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Sample records for muscle volume comparison

  1. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  2. Comparison between standard and reduced volume radiotherapy in bladder preservation trimodality protocol for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, Waleed; Darwish, Azza; Naoum, George E; Sameh, Wael; Husseiny, Gamal El; Abd-El-Gawad, Fathy; Samir, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to compare the toxicity, pelvic nodal relapse, and overall survival of whole bladder irradiation only to the standard technique of whole pelvis irradiation followed by bladder boost in patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma undergoing bladder preservation protocol. Material and method A total of 60 patients with transitional cell carcinoma, stage T2-3, N0, M0 bladder cancer were subjected to maximal transurethral resection bladder tumour (TURB). Then, the patients were randomised into two groups: group I (30 patients) to receive whole pelvis radiotherapy 44 Gy followed by 20 Gy bladder boost. While group II (30 patients) were randomised to receive whole bladder radiotherapy alone for a total dose of 64 Gy. In both groups, concomitant cisplatin and paclitaxel were given weekly throughout the whole course of radiotherapy where conventional 2 Gy/fraction were used. Additionally, four cycles of adjuvant cisplatin and paclitaxel were given after the end of the chemoradiotherapy induction course. Results The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that complete response was achieved in 73.3% of patients in group I and 76.7% of the patients in group II. After a median follow-up of 2 years, regional relapse occurred in 7.1% of patients in group I and 10.3% in group II. (p = 1). Distant metastases were detected in 17.9% of patient in group I and 13.8% in group II (p = 0.73). The 2-year disease-free survival was 60% in group I and 63.3% in group II (p = 0.79). The whole 2-year overall survival was 75% in group I and 79.3% in group II (p = 0.689). Radiation gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity was higher in group I than in group II (p = 0.001), while late GI radiation toxicity was comparable in both groups. Conclusion Treating the bladder only, without elective pelvic nodal irradiation, did not compromise pelvic control rate, but significantly decreased the acute radiation toxicity. PMID:27899955

  3. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  4. In vitro measurement of muscle volume with 3-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Walker, F; Caress, J; Hunt, C; Tegeler, C

    1999-05-01

    The aim was to test the accuracy of muscle volume measurements with a new 3-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system, which allows a freehand scanning of the transducer with an improved quality of the ultrasound images and therefore the outlines of the muscles. Five resected cadaveric hand muscles were insonated and the muscle volumes calculated by 3-D reconstructions of the acquired 2-D ultrasound sections. Intra-reader, inter-reader and follow-up variability were calculated, as well as the volume of the muscle tissue measured by water displacement. In the results, 3-D ultrasound and water displacement measurements showed an average deviation of 10.1%; Data of 3-D ultrasound measurements were: intra-reader variability 2.8%; inter-reader variability 2.4% and follow-up variability 2.3%. 3-D measurements of muscle volume are valid and reliable. Serial sonographic measurements of muscle may be able to quantitate changes in muscle volume that occur in disease and recovery.

  5. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power. PMID:27315060

  6. Skeletal muscle volume following dehydration induced by exercise in heat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracellular skeletal muscle water is redistributed into the extracellular compartment during periods of dehydration, suggesting an associated decline in muscle volume. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal muscle volume in active (knee extensors (KE)) and less active (biceps/triceps brachii, deltoid) musculature following dehydration induced by exercise in heat. Methods Twelve participants (seven men, five women) cycled in the heat under two conditions: (1) dehydration (DHYD) resulting in 3% and 5% losses of estimated total body water (ETBW), which was assessed by changes in body mass, and (2) fluid replacement (FR) where 3% and 5% losses of ETBW were counteracted by intermittent (20 to 30 min) fluid ingestion via a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. During both conditions, serum osmolality and skeletal muscle volume (assessed by magnetic resonance imaging) were measured at baseline and at the 3% and 5% ETBW loss measurement points. Results In DHYD, serum osmolality increased at 3% (p = 0.005) and 5% (p < 0.001) ETBW losses, while FR decreased serum osmolality at the 5% loss of ETBW time point (p = 0.009). In DHYD, KE muscle volume declined from 1,464 ± 446 ml to 1,406 ± 425 ml (3.9%, p < 0.001) at 3% ETBW loss and to 1,378 ± 421 ml (5.9%, p < 0.001) at 5% ETBW loss. The largest decline in KE volume in DYHD occurred in the mid-belly (31 ml, p = 0.001) and proximal (24 ml, p = 0.001) regions of the grouped vasti muscles. There were no changes in volume for the biceps/triceps (p = 0.35) or deltoid (p = 0.92) during DHYD. FR prevented the loss of KE muscle volume at 3% (1,430 ± 435 ml, p = 0.074) and 5% (1,431 ± 439 ml, p = 0.156) ETBW loss time points compared to baseline (1,445 ± 436 ml). Conclusions Following exercise in the heat, the actively contracting muscles lost volume, while replacing lost fluids intermittently during exercise in heat prevented this decline

  7. Pressure-volume behaviour of the rat upper airway: effects of tongue muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, E Fiona; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2003-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that the simultaneous activation of tongue protrudor and retractor muscles (co-activation) would constrict and stiffen the pharyngeal airway more than the independent activation of tongue protrudor muscles. Upper airway stiffness was determined by injecting known volumes of air into the sealed pharyngeal airway of the anaesthetized rat while measuring nasal pressure under control (no-stimulus) and stimulus conditions (volume paired with hypoglossal (XII) nerve stimulation). Stimulation of the whole XII nerves (co-activation) or the medial XII branches (protrudor activation) effected similar increases in total pharyngeal airway stiffness. Importantly, co-activation produced volume compression (airway narrowing) at large airway volumes (P < 0.05), but had no effect on airway dimension at low airway volumes. In comparison, protrudor activation resulted in significant volume expansion (airway dilatation) at low airway volumes and airway narrowing at high airway volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, both co-activation and independent protrudor muscle activation increase airway stiffness. However, their effects on airway size are complex and depend on the condition of the airway at the time of activation. PMID:12640023

  8. The determinants of transverse tubular volume in resting skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jingwei; Fraser, James A

    2014-01-01

    The transverse tubular (t)-system of skeletal muscle couples sarcolemmal electrical excitation with contraction deep within the fibre. Exercise, pathology and the composition of the extracellular fluid (ECF) can alter t-system volume (t-volume). T-volume changes are thought to contribute to fatigue, rhabdomyolysis and disruption of excitation–contraction coupling. However, mechanisms that underlie t-volume changes are poorly understood. A multicompartment, history-independent computer model of rat skeletal muscle was developed to define the minimum conditions for t-volume stability. It was found that the t-system tends to swell due to net ionic fluxes from the ECF across the access resistance. However, a stable t-volume is possible when this is offset by a net efflux from the t-system to the cell and thence to the ECF, forming a net ion cycle ECF→t-system→sarcoplasm→ECF that ultimately depends on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Membrane properties that maximize this circuit flux decrease t-volume, including PNa(t) > PNa(s), PK(t) < PK(s) and N(t) < N(s) [P, permeability; N, Na+/K+-ATPase density; (t), t-system membrane; (s), sarcolemma]. Hydrostatic pressures, fixed charges and/or osmoles in the t-system can influence the magnitude of t-volume changes that result from alterations in this circuit flux. Using a parameter set derived from literature values where possible, this novel theory of t-volume was tested against data from previous experiments where t-volume was measured during manipulations of ECF composition. Predicted t-volume changes correlated satisfactorily. The present work provides a robust, unifying theoretical framework for understanding the determinants of t-volume. PMID:25384782

  9. Muscle-like actuators? A comparison between three electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Kenneth; Rosenthal, Marc S.; Full, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    Muscles fulfill several functions within an animal's body. During locomotion they propel and control the limbs in unstructured environments. Therefore, the functional workspace of muscle needs to be represented by variables describing energy management (i.e. power output, efficiency) as well as control aspects (i.e. stiffness, damping). Muscles in the animal kingdom vary greatly with respect to those variables. To study if ElectroActive Polymer's (EAP) can be considered as artificial muscles we are making a direct comparison between the contractile properties of EAP's and biological muscle. We have measured the functional workspace of EAP actuators using the same setup and techniques that we use to test biological muscle. We evaluated the properties of three different EAP materials; the acrylic and silicone dielectric elastomers developed at SRI International and the high-energy electron-irradiated co-polymers (p(VDF-TrFE)) developed at the MRL laboratory at Penn State University. Initial results indicate that the EAP materials partly capture the functional workspace of natural muscle and sometimes even exceed the capabilities of muscle. Based on the data we have collected it seems that both EAP technologies have characteristics that could qualify them as artificial muscles.

  10. Experimental comparisons between McKibben type artificial muscles and straight fibers type artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Taro

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes experimental comparison between a conventional McKibben type artificial muscle and a straight fibers type artificial muscle developed by the authors. A wearable device and a rehabilitation robot which assists a human muscle should have characteristics similar to those of human muscle. In addition, because the wearable device and the rehabilitation robot should be light, an actuator with a high power/weight ratio is needed. At present, the McKibben type is widely used as an artificial muscle, but in fact its physical model is highly nonlinear. Further, the heat and mechanical loss of this actuator are large because of the friction caused by the expansion and contraction of the sleeve. Therefore, the authors have developed an artificial muscle tube in which high strength glass fibers have been built into the tube made from natural latex rubber. As results, experimental results demonstrated that the developed artificial muscle is more effective regarding its fundamental characteristics than that of the McKibben type; the straight fibers types of artificial muscle have more contraction ratio and power, longer lifetime than the McKibben types. And it has almost same characteristics of human muscle for isotonic and isometric that evaluate it dynamically.

  11. Automatic quantification of muscle volumes in magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd; Nambi, Vijay; Yang, Eric; Kumar, Anirudh; Virani, Salim S; Kougias, Panagiotis; Shah, Dipan; Lumsden, Alan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Morrisett, Joel D

    2011-10-01

    Muscle volume measurements are essential for an array of diseases ranging from peripheral arterial disease, muscular dystrophies, neurological conditions to sport injuries and aging. In the clinical setting, muscle volume is not routinely measured due to the lack of standardized ways for its repeatable quantification. In this paper, we present magnetic resonance muscle quantification (MRMQ), a method for the automatic quantification of thigh muscle volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. MRMQ integrates a thigh segmentation and nonuniform image gradient correction step, followed by feature extraction and classification. The classification step leverages prior probabilities, introducing prior knowledge to a maximum a posteriori classifier. MRMQ was validated on 344 slices taken from 60 MRI scans. Experiments for the fully automatic detection of muscle volume in MRI scans demonstrated an averaged accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for leave-one-out cross-validation of 88.3%, 93.6% and 87.2%, respectively.

  12. In vivo pediatric shoulder muscle volumes and their relationship to 3D strength.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyun Soo; Alter, Katharine E; Brochard, Sylvain; Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T

    2014-08-22

    In the pediatric shoulder, injury and pathology can disrupt the muscle force balance, resulting in severe functional losses. As little data exists pertaining to in vivo pediatric shoulder muscle function, musculoskeletal data are crucially needed to advance the treatment of pediatric shoulder pathology/injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a pediatric database of in vivo volumes for the major shoulder muscles and correlate these volumes with maximum isometric flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and abduction/adduction joint moments. A methodology was developed to derive 3D shoulder muscle volumes and to divide the deltoid into sub-units with unique torque producing capabilities, based on segmentation of three-dimensional magnetic resonance images. Eleven typically developing children/adolescents (4F/7M, 12.0 ± 3.2 years, 150.8 ± 16.7 cm, 49.2 ± 16.4 kg) participated. Correlation and regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between volume and maximum, voluntary, isometric joint torques. The deltoid demonstrated the largest (30.4 ± 1.2%) and the supraspinatus the smallest (4.8 ± 0.5%) percent of the total summed volume of all six muscles evaluated. The anterior and posterior deltoid sections were 43.4 ± 3.9% and 56.6 ± 3.9% of the total deltoid volume. The percent volumes were highly consistent across subjects. Individual muscle volumes demonstrated moderate-high correlations with torque values (0.70-0.94, p<0.001). This study presents a comprehensive database documenting normative pediatric shoulder muscle volume. Using these data a clear relationship between shoulder volume and the torques they produce was established in all three rotational degrees-of-freedom. This study furthers the understanding of shoulder muscle function and serves as a foundation for evaluating shoulder injury/pathology in the pediatric/adolescent population.

  13. Three-dimensional lateral pterygoid muscle volume: MRI analyses with insertion patterns correlation.

    PubMed

    Melke, Gabriela Sobral de Figueiredo; Costa, André Luiz Ferreira; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro; Fuziy, Acacio; Ferreira-Santos, Rívea Inês

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated lateral pterygoid muscle volume in closed and open mouth positions in association with anterior disc displacement, effusion and abnormal articular disc shape from three-dimensional reformations of MRI. A total of 24 MRI of a sample (15 females, 9 males) aged 19-64 years (37.2 years±11.4) were assessed. Segmentation and volumetric assessment of the total, upper and lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle were performed using free software. The upper head of the lateral pterygoid muscle had a smaller volume than the lower head at both sides, in the closed- and open-mouth positions. In the open-mouth position, individuals with a subdivided upper head, where one component was inserted in the articular disc and another in the mandibular head, displayed a significantly larger volume of the upper head compared to individuals who had a single attachment to the articular disc (p=0.0130). The lateral pterygoid muscle has different volumes in the closed- and open-mouth positions. Gender affected muscle volume, specifically the upper head component. Insertion type in the upper head also seemed to affect muscle volume.

  14. Plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume predict torque-generating capacity in young men.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Josh R; Piazza, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Muscle volume is known to correlate with maximal joint torque in humans, but the role of muscle moment arm in determining maximal torque is less clear. Moderate correlations have been reported between maximal isometric knee extensor torque and knee extensor moment arm, but no such observations have been made for the ankle joint. It has been suggested that smaller muscle moment arms may enhance force generation at high rates of joint rotation, but this has not yet been observed for ankle muscles in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to correlate plantar flexor moment arm and plantar flexor muscle volume with maximal plantar flexor torque measured at different rates of plantar flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume of the posterior compartment in 20 healthy young men. Maximal plantar flexor torque was measured isometrically and at three plantar flexion speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer. Plantar flexor torque was significantly correlated with muscle volume (0.222 < R(2) < 0.322) and with muscle moment arm at each speed (0.323 < R(2) < 0.494). While muscle volume was strongly correlated with body mass and stature, moment arm was not. The slope of the torque-moment arm regression line decreased as the rate of joint rotation increased, indicating that subjects with small moment arms experienced smaller reductions in torque at high speeds. The findings of this study suggest that plantar flexor moment arm is a determinant of joint strength that is at least as important as muscle size.

  15. Inward flux of lactate⁻ through monocarboxylate transporters contributes to regulatory volume increase in mouse muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew J; Hawke, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Mouse and rat skeletal muscles are capable of a regulatory volume increase (RVI) after they shrink (volume loss resultant from exposure to solutions of increased osmolarity) and that this RVI occurs mainly by a Na-K-Cl-Cotransporter (NKCC)-dependent mechanism. With high-intensity exercise, increased extracellular osmolarity is accompanied by large increases in extracellular [lactate⁻]. We hypothesized that large increases in [lactate⁻] and osmolarity augment the NKCC-dependent RVI response observed with a NaCl (or sucrose)-induced increase in osmolarity alone; a response that is dependent on lactate⁻ influx through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Single mouse muscle fibres were isolated and visualized under light microscopy under varying osmolar conditions. When solution osmolarity was increased by adding NaLac by 30 or 60 mM, fibres lost significantly less volume and regained volume sooner compared to when NaCl was used. Phloretin (MCT1 inhibitor) accentuated the volume loss compared to both NaLac controls, supporting a role for MCT1 in the RVI response in the presence of elevated [lactate⁻]. Inhibition of MCT4 (with pCMBS) resulted in a volume loss, intermediate to that seen with phloretin and NaLac controls. Bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor), in combination with pCMBS, reduced the magnitude of volume loss, but volume recovery was complete. While combined phloretin-bumetanide also reduced the magnitude of the volume loss, it also largely abolished the cell volume recovery. In conclusion, RVI in skeletal muscle exposed to raised tonicity and [lactate⁻] is facilitated by inward flux of solute by NKCC- and MCT1-dependent mechanisms. This work demonstrates evidence of a RVI response in skeletal muscle that is facilitated by inward flux of solute by MCT-dependent mechanisms. These findings further expand our understanding of the capacities for skeletal muscle to volume regulate, particularly in instances of raised tonicity and lactate⁻ concentrations, as

  16. Influences of swallowing volume and viscosity on regulation of levator veli palatini muscle activity during swallowing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, K; Tachimura, T; Sakai, T

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the aspect of the regulation of velum movement in the transition from the oral to pharyngeal phases of swallowing in relation to changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity by means of measurment of levator veli palatini muscle activity. The subjects were nine normal adults, ranging in age from 24 to 30 years. The swallowing volume was set at 1/4, 1/2 and 1 volume of the optimum volume of green tea for swallowing determined in each subject, and the viscosity was adjusted to 0, 2·0 and 4·6 Pa·s by mixing with thickener. Nine test foods were prepared in total. The electromyographic activity of the levator veli palatini muscle was monitored using bipolar hooked wire electrodes. The levator veli palatini muscle activity was defined as the integrated electromyographic wave. The mean in swallowing each test food was determined in each subject. The levator veli palatini muscle activity increased with the swallowing volume for all subjects (P < 0·05) and decreased inversely with the viscosity for six subjects (P < 0·05), but no change with the increase in the viscosity was noted for three subjects. This study clarified the aspect of the regulation of velar movement with regard to the involvement of the levator veli palatini muscle in swallowing activity with changes in the swallowing volume and viscosity.

  17. NMR imaging estimates of muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in the thigh: variations with muscle, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Barnouin, Yoann; Azzabou, Noura; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Moraux, Amélie; Leroux, Gaëlle; Behin, Anthony; McPhee, Jamie S; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-06-01

    Muscle mass is particularly relevant to follow during aging, owing to its link with physical performance and autonomy. The objectives of this work were to assess muscle volume (MV) and intramuscular fat (IMF) for all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy individuals using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the effect of gender and age on MV and IMF and to determine the best representative slice for the estimation of MV and IMF. The study enrolled 105 healthy young (range 20-30 years) and older (range 70-80 years) subjects. MRI scans were acquired along the femur length using a three-dimension three-point Dixon proton density-weighted gradient echo sequence. MV and IMF were estimated from all the slices. The effects of age and gender on MV and IMF were assessed. Predictive equations for MV and IMF were established using a single slice at various femur levels for each muscle in order to reduce the analysis process. MV was decreased with aging in both genders, particularly in the quadriceps femoris. IMF was largely increased with aging in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. Percentages of MV decrease and IMF increase with aging varied according to the muscle. Predictive equations to predict MV and IMF from single slices are provided and were validated. This study is the first one to provide muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy subjects.

  18. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  19. Effect of extracellular osmolality on cell volume and resting metabolism in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Antolic, AnaMaria; Harrison, Rosemarie; Farlinger, Chris; Cermak, Naomi M; Peters, Sandra J; LeBlanc, Paul; Roy, Brian D

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to establish an in vitro mammalian skeletal muscle model to study acute alterations in resting skeletal muscle cell volume. Isolated, whole muscles [soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] were dissected from Long-Evans rats and incubated for 60 min in Sigma medium 199 (1 g of resting tension, bubbled with 95% O(2)-5% O(2), 30 +/- 2 degrees C, and pH 7.4). Medium osmolality was altered to simulate hyposmotic (190 +/- 10 mmol/kg) or hyperosmotic conditions (400 +/- 10 mmol/kg), whereas an isosmotic condition (290 +/- 10 mmol/kg) served as a control. After incubation, relative water content of the muscle decreased with hyperosmotic and increased with hyposmotic condition in both muscle types (P < 0.05). The cross-sectional area of soleus type I and type II fibers increased (P < 0.05) in hyposmotic, whereas hyperosmotic exposure led to no detectable changes. The EDL type II fiber area decreased in the hyperosmotic condition and increased after hyposmotic exposure, whereas no change was observed in EDL type I fibers. Furthermore, exposure to the hyperosmotic condition in both muscle types resulted in decreased muscle ATP and phosphocreatine (P < 0.05) contents and increased creatine and lactate contents (P < 0.05) compared with control and hyposmotic conditions. This isolated skeletal muscle model proved viable and demonstrated that altering extracellular osmolality could cause acute alterations in muscle water content and resting muscle metabolism.

  20. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  1. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  2. Diaphragm curvature modulates the relationship between muscle shortening and volume displacement.

    PubMed

    Greybeck, Brad J; Wettergreen, Matthew; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Boriek, Aladin M

    2011-07-01

    During physiological spontaneous breathing maneuvers, the diaphragm displaces volume while maintaining curvature. However, with maximal diaphragm activation, curvature decreases sharply. We tested the hypotheses that the relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and volume displacement (VD) is nonlinear and that curvature is a determinant of such a relationship. Radiopaque markers were surgically placed on three neighboring muscle fibers in the midcostal region of the diaphragm in six dogs. The three-dimensional locations were determined using biplanar fluoroscopy and diaphragm VD, curvature, and muscle shortening were computed in the prone and supine postures during spontaneous breathing (SB), spontaneous inspiration efforts after airway occlusion at lung volumes ranging from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity, and during bilateral maximal phrenic nerve stimulation at those same lung volumes. In supine dogs, diaphragm VD was approximately two- to three-fold greater during maximal phrenic nerve stimulation than during SB. The contribution of muscle shortening to VD nonlinearly increases with level of diaphragm activation independent of posture. During submaximal diaphragm activation, the contribution is essentially linear due to constancy of diaphragm curvature in both the prone and supine posture. However, the sudden loss of curvature during maximal bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation at muscle shortening values greater than 40% (ΔL/L(FRC)) causes a nonlinear increase in the contribution of muscle shortening to diaphragm VD, which is concomitant with a nonlinear change in diaphragm curvature. We conclude that the nonlinear relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and its VD is, in part, due to a loss of its curvature at extreme muscle shortening.

  3. Collision and containment detection between biomechanically based eye muscle volumes.

    PubMed

    Santana Sosa, Graciela; Kaltofen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Collision and containment detection between three-dimensional objects is a common requirement in simulation systems. However, few solutions exist when exclusively working with deformable bodies. In our ophthalmologic diagnostic software system, the extraocular eye muscles are represented by surface models, which have been reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. Those models are projected onto the muscle paths calculated by the system's biomechanical model. Due to this projection collisions occur. For their detection, three approaches have been implemented, which we present in this paper: one based on image-space techniques using OpenGL, one based on the Bullet physics library and one using an optimized space-array data structure together with software rendering. Finally, an outlook on a possible response to the detected collisions is given.

  4. Comparison of the protein-synthesizing machinery in the skeletal muscle of normal and dystrophic Bar Harbor mice.

    PubMed

    Watts, D C; Reid, J D

    1969-11-01

    1. Although the total weight of leg muscle increased with the age of a normal mouse the DNA and RNA content per leg did not change significantly. 2. The weight of leg muscle from a dystrophic mouse was only about 45% of that from a normal mouse but the DNA and RNA contents were the same and hence similar DNA/RNA ratios were obtained. 3. The total ribosome contents of normal and dystrophic mice were the same on a whole-leg basis, and for both the free ribosomes were about 60% of the total. However, comparison with similar data from liver suggested that some loss of ribosomes occurred during the isolation procedure. 4. The polyribosome patterns obtained by density-gradient centrifugation were the same for normal and dystrophic muscle, and comparable polyribosome fractions of different sizes obtained from such gradients had similar capacities for the incorporation of radioactive amino acids in a standard protein-synthesizing system. 5. By using a standard protein-synthesizing system with normal polyribosomes similar extents of incorporation were found with normal- or dystrophic-muscle pH5 fraction or partially purified transfer RNA preparation. 6. It is concluded that there is no absolute difference between the protein-synthesizing systems of normal and dystrophic mouse muscle and that the observed apparent differences result from concentration differences caused by changes in muscle volume. 7. A possible cause of the failure of dystrophic muscle to resynthesize myofibrils is also suggested.

  5. Comparison of peak muscle power between Brazilian and French girls.

    PubMed

    Nanci Maria, França; Eric, Doré; Mario, Bedu; Emmanuel, Van Praagh

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the muscle power of Brazilian circumpubertal girls and extended the analysis to a cross-cultural dimension. A total of 462 children, 123 Brazilian girls and 339 French girls, 9-18 years, participated in this investigation. Anthropometric data included body mass (BM), height, skinfold thicknesses, and estimated lean leg volume (LLV). All subjects completed a physical activity questionnaire. Cycling peak power was measured including the flywheel inertia of the device (CPPi). Brazilian girls self-assessed their maturation using pubic hair development. CPPi and optimal velocity (v(opt) = velocity at CPPi) increased with stages of puberty. A multiple stepwise regression with anthropometric variables as explanatory factors showed only LLV and age explaining the variance of CPPi (R2 = 0.40, P < 0.001). Therefore, 60% of the variance of CPPi in Brazilian girls was related to undetermined qualitative individual factors, which may be related to cycling skill. Even when normalized for anthropometric variables, the anaerobic performance (CPPi and v(opt)) of Brazilian girls was significantly lower than a cohort of French girls. The latter demonstrated a high participation in sport and training activities, while 50% of the Brazilian girls had only physical education classes in the form of regular physical activity. Moreover, most of the Brazilian girls demonstrated an ineffective sprint cycling skill. The data suggest that motor learning is an important issue in muscle power assessment and might, therefore, partially explain peak power differences in Brazilian compared with French girls.

  6. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  7. Comparison of coil designs for peripheral magnetic muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, S. M.; Herzog, H.-G.; Gattinger, N.; Gleich, B.

    2011-10-01

    The recent application of magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation is often said to solve key drawbacks of the established electrical method. Magnetic fields cause less pain, allow principally a better penetration of inhomogeneous biologic tissue and do not require skin contact. However, in most studies the evoked muscle force has been disappointing. In this paper, a comparison of a classical round circular geometry, a commercial muscle-stimulation coil and a novel design is presented, with special emphasis on the physical field properties. These systems show markedly different force responses for the same magnetic energy and highlight the enormous potential of different coil geometries. The new design resulted in a slope of the force recruiting curve being more than two and a half times higher than the other coils. The data were analyzed with respect to the underlying physical causes and field conditions. After a parameter-extraction approach, the results for the three coils span a two-dimensional space with clearly distinguishable degrees of freedom, which can be manipulated nearly separately and reflect the two main features of a field; the peak amplitude and its decay with the distance.

  8. Ground and Space Radar Volume Matching and Comparison Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth; Schwaller, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    This software enables easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. The software was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground based Sand C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite s Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The software is also applicable to other ground-based and space-based radars. The ground and space radar volume matching and comparison software was developed in response to requirements defined by the Ground Validation System (GVS) of Goddard s Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) project. This software innovation is specifically concerned with simplifying the comparison of ground- and spacebased radar measurements for the purpose of GPM algorithm and data product validation. This software is unique in that it provides an operational environment to routinely create comparison products, and uses a direct geometric approach to derive common volumes of space- and ground-based radar data. In this approach, spatially coincident volumes are defined by the intersection of individual space-based Precipitation Radar rays with the each of the conical elevation sweeps of the ground radar. Thus, the resampled volume elements of the space and ground radar reflectivity can be directly compared to one another.

  9. Coupling of albumin flux to volume flow in skin and muscles of anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Renkin, E.M.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Sibley, L.

    1988-09-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I or /sup 125/I was injected intravenously in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats, and tracer clearances into leg skin and muscles were measured over 30, 60, and 120 min. BSA labeled with the alternate tracer was used as vascular volume reference. Two minutes before injection of the tracer, a ligature was tied around one femoral vein to occlude outflow partially and raise capillary pressure in that leg. The unoccluded leg served as control. Skin and muscles of the occluded leg had variably and substantially higher water contents (delta W) than paired control tissues and slightly but consistently increased albumin clearances (CA). The delta CA/delta W, equivalent to the albumin concentration of capillary filtrate relative to plasma determined by linear regression, were as follows: leg skin 0.004 (95% confidence limits -0.001 to +0.009), muscle biceps femoris 0.005 (0.001-0.010), muscle gastrocnemius 0.011 (0.004-0.019), muscle tibialis anterior 0.016 (0.012-0.021). All these values are significantly less than 0.10, which corresponds to a reflection coefficient for serum albumin (sigma A) of 0.90. Convective coupling of albumin flux to volume flux in skin and muscles of intact, anesthetized rats is low, with sigma AS in the range 0.98 to greater than 0.99.

  10. Effects of changes in cell volume on the rates of glutamine and alanine release from rat skeletal muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Parry-Billings, M; Bevan, S J; Opara, E; Newsholme, E A

    1991-06-01

    The effect of changes in cell volume on the rates of release of glutamine and alanine from muscle and on the concentrations of these amino acids in muscle were investigated by using an isolated preparation of rat skeletal muscle incubated in the presence of hypo- and hyper-osmotic media. Changes in cell volume were associated with changes in the rates of release of glutamine and alanine from muscle: incubation in hypo-osmotic medium decreased the rates of release of glutamine and alanine, and incubation in hyperosmotic medium increased these rates. These changes were rapidly reversed by a change in osmoticity of the medium. Despite marked changes in cell volume, the concentrations of these amino acids in muscle were maintained. It is suggested that cell volume may play a role in the regulation of amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  11. Volume-pressure relationship (compliance) of interstitium in dog skin and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Wiig, H.; Reed, R.K. )

    1987-08-01

    The relationship between changes in interstitial fluid volume (IFV) and pressure (IFP) during over- and dehydration was estimated in hindlimb skin and skeletal muscle of 17 dogs. IFV was measured as the extravascular distribution volume of {sup 51}Cr-EDTA after nephrectomy and IFP with micropipettes, wick-in-needle technique (WIN), and perforated capsules. Control IFP (micropipettes) averaged {minus}1.7 {plus minus} 0.5 and 0.0 {plus minus} 1.0 mmHg in skin and muscle, respectively, not different from corresponding WIN and capsule pressures in subcutis. Control IFV was 0.93 {plus minus} 0.34 and 0.42 {plus minus} 0.11 ml/g dry wt in skin and muscle, respectively. Peritoneal dialysis with 20% glucose reduced IFV by 27% in skin and by 44% in muscle, whereas micropipette IFP fell gradually by {approximately} 4 mmHg in skin and muscle. Compliance during dehydration was 7.6 and 12.5% change in IFV per millimeter Hg fall in IFP (micropipettes) in skin and muscle, respectively, whereas compliance in subcutis based on perforated capsule pressure was 2.0% change in IFV per millimeter Hg. The maximal increase in IFP during overhydration was {approximately}2 mmHg in both skin and muscle. Skin and muscle compliance in dogs did not differ significantly from that of rats and cats. The authors conclude that the difference in compliance among previous studies mainly results from different methods for IFP measurement but is probably also influenced by the state of hydration before altering IFV.

  12. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, p<0.05) after training. Muscle desaturation was not enhanced by low volume aerobic training in this study, possibly because the training volume was too low. However, our findings suggest that aerobic training may potentially enhance muscle desaturation at peak exercise in elderly subjects.

  13. Comparison of methods to quantify volume during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    McBride, Jeffrey M; McCaulley, Grant O; Cormie, Prue; Nuzzo, James L; Cavill, Michael J; Triplett, N Travis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare 4 different methods of calculating volume when comparing resistance exercise protocols of varying intensities. Ten Appalachian State University students experienced in resistance exercise completed 3 different resistance exercise protocols on different days using a randomized, crossover design, with 1 week of rest between each protocol. The protocols included 1) hypertrophy: 4 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat at 75% of a 1-repetition maximum (1RM) (90-second rest periods); 2) strength: 11 sets of 3 repetitions at 90% 1RM (5-minute rest periods); and 3) power: 8 sets of 6 repetitions of jump squats at 0% 1RM (3-minute rest periods). The volume of resistance exercise completed during each protocol was determined with 4 different methods: 1) volume load (VL) (repetitions [no.] x external load [kg]); 2) maximum dynamic strength volume load (MDSVL) (repetitions [no.] x [body mass--shank mass (kg) + external load (kg)]); 3) time under tension (TUT) (eccentric time +milliseconds] + concentric time +milliseconds]); and 4) total work (TW) (force [N] x displacement [m]). The volumes differed significantly (p , 0.05) between hypertrophy and strength in comparison with the power protocol when VL and MDSVL were used to determine the volume of resistance exercise completed. Furthermore, significant differences in TUT existed between all 3 resistance exercise protocols. The TW calculated was not significantly different between the 3 protocols. These data imply that each method examined results in substantially different values when comparing various resistance exercise protocols involving different levels of intensity.

  14. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  15. Determination of equine deep digital flexor muscle volume based on distances between anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Lamers, A A H; van der Kolk, J H; Back, W; Wijnberg, I D

    2014-10-01

    In equine medicine the use of Botox® is experimental. Dosages are determined from human treatment-protocols and limited numbers of equine studies. Determination of target-muscle volume can be helpful to extrapolate human dosages. The aim of the study was to calculate a formula enabling the estimation of the deep digital flexor muscle (DDFM) volume based on distances between anatomical landmarks. Nineteen cadaveric limbs were collected and distance A (top of olecranon to Os carpi accessorium) and B (circumference of limb) were measured. Converting mathematical formulas, C was calculated: π × (((0.5B)/π)(2)) × A. DDFM volume was determined by water displacement. Linear Regression Analysis was used to analyse data. The line best fitting the observed points was: Ln(volume[ml]) = -1.89 + 0.98 × Ln(value C[cm(3)]). Correlation was highest when natural logarithm was applied to both variables and was 0.97. The calculated formula enables estimating DDFM volume of a living horse. This estimated volume can be useful to apply human Botox® treatment-protocols.

  16. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  17. The Development of a Flexible Measuring System for Muscle Volume Using Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Kiyotaka; Fukuda, Osamu; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Muraki, Satoshi

    Quantification of muscle volume can be used as a means for the estimation of muscle strength. Its measuring process does not need the subject's muscular contractions so it is completely safe and particularly suited for elderly people. Therefore, we have developed a flexible measuring system for muscle volume using ultrasonography. In this system, an ultrasound probe is installed on a link mechanism which continuously scans fragmental images along the human body surface. These images are then measured and composed into a wide area cross-sectional image based on the spatial compounding method. The flexibility of the link mechanism enables the operator to measure the images under any body postures and body site. The spatial compounding method significantly reduces speckle and artifact noises from the composed cross-sectional image so that the operator can observe the individual muscles, such as Rectus femoris, Vastus intermedius, and so on, in detail. We conducted the experiments in order to examine the advantages of this system we have developed. The experimental results showed a high accuracy of the measuring position which was calculated using the link mechanism and presented the noise reduction effect based on the spatial compounding method. Finally, we confirmed high correlations between the MRI images and the ones of the developed system to verify the validity of the system.

  18. Increases in muscle volume after plantarflexor strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    McNee, Anne E; Gough, Martin; Morrissey, Matt C; Shortland, Adam P

    2009-06-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) have small, weak muscles. However, change in muscle size due to resistance training in this group is unknown. We investigated the effect of plantarflexor strengthening on muscle volume, gait, and function in 13 ambulant children with spastic CP (seven males, six females; mean age 10 y 11 mo, SD 3 y 0 mo, range 6 y 11 mo-16 y 11 mo; eight with diplegia, five with hemiplegia; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, six; level II, five; level III, two). Assessments were performed before training, 5 and 10 weeks into training, and at a 3-month follow-up. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes were computed from three-dimensional ultrasound images. The number of unilateral heel raises able to be achieved on each side was assessed. Function was measured using three-dimensional gait analysis, the 'timed up and go' test, the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, and the Functional Mobility Scale. Training involved heel raises or Thera-Band resistance, 4 times a week for 10 weeks. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes increased by 17 and 14% at week 5 (p=0.03, p=0.028). This increase was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (medial gastrocnemius p=0.001, p<0.001; lateral gastrocnemius p=0.006, p=0.007). Heel raises (mean number) increased by week 5 (p=0.002). This was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (p<0.001; p<0.001). No significant change in measured function was observed. Muscle volume increased in response to training in children with spastic CP. The role of progressive strength training in maintaining long-term function is discussed.

  19. Volume regulation in mammalian skeletal muscle: the role of sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporters during exposure to hypertonic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew; Trajcevski, Karin E; Hawke, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether mammalian skeletal muscle is capable of volume regulation in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity despite evidence that muscle fibres have the required ion transport mechanisms to transport solute and water in situ. We addressed this issue by studying the ability of skeletal muscle to regulate volume during periods of induced hyperosmotic stress using single, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres and intact muscle (soleus and EDL). Fibres and intact muscles were loaded with the fluorophore, calcein, and the change in muscle fluorescence and width (single fibres only) used as a metric of volume change. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle exposed to increased extracellular osmolarity would elicit initial cellular shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI) with the RVI dependent on the sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter (NKCC). We found that single fibres exposed to a 35% increase in extracellular osmolarity demonstrated a rapid, initial 27–32% decrease in cell volume followed by a RVI which took 10–20 min and returned cell volume to 90–110% of pre-stimulus values. Within intact muscle, exposure to increased extracellular osmolarity of varying degrees also induced a rapid, initial shrinkage followed by a gradual RVI, with a greater rate of initial cell shrinkage and a longer time for RVI to occur with increasing extracellular tonicities. Furthermore, RVI was significantly faster in slow-twitch soleus than fast-twitch EDL. Pre-treatment of muscle with bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor) or ouabain (Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor), increased the initial volume loss and impaired the RVI response to increased extracellular osmolarity indicating that the NKCC is a primary contributor to volume regulation in skeletal muscle. It is concluded that mouse skeletal muscle initially loses volume then exhibits a RVI when exposed to increases in extracellular osmolarity. The rate of RVI is dependent

  20. Volume regulation in mammalian skeletal muscle: the role of sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporters during exposure to hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew; Trajcevski, Karin E; Hawke, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    Controversy exists as to whether mammalian skeletal muscle is capable of volume regulation in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity despite evidence that muscle fibres have the required ion transport mechanisms to transport solute and water in situ. We addressed this issue by studying the ability of skeletal muscle to regulate volume during periods of induced hyperosmotic stress using single, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres and intact muscle (soleus and EDL). Fibres and intact muscles were loaded with the fluorophore, calcein, and the change in muscle fluorescence and width (single fibres only) used as a metric of volume change. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle exposed to increased extracellular osmolarity would elicit initial cellular shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI) with the RVI dependent on the sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter (NKCC). We found that single fibres exposed to a 35% increase in extracellular osmolarity demonstrated a rapid, initial 27–32% decrease in cell volume followed by a RVI which took 10-20 min and returned cell volume to 90–110% of pre-stimulus values. Within intact muscle, exposure to increased extracellular osmolarity of varying degrees also induced a rapid, initial shrinkage followed by a gradual RVI, with a greater rate of initial cell shrinkage and a longer time for RVI to occur with increasing extracellular tonicities. Furthermore, RVI was significantly faster in slow-twitch soleus than fast-twitch EDL. Pre-treatment of muscle with bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor) or ouabain (Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor), increased the initial volume loss and impaired the RVI response to increased extracellular osmolarity indicating that the NKCC is a primary contributor to volume regulation in skeletal muscle. It is concluded that mouse skeletal muscle initially loses volume then exhibits a RVI when exposed to increases in extracellular osmolarity. The rate of RVI is dependent on the

  1. Editorial Commentary: Single-Image Slice Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments Do Not Predict 3-Dimensional Muscle Volume.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-01-01

    No single-image magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment-Goutallier classification, Fuchs classification, or cross-sectional area-is predictive of whole-muscle volume or fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus. Rather, 3-dimensional MRI measurement of whole-muscle volume and fat-free muscle volume is required and is associated with shoulder strength, which is clinically relevant. Three-dimensional MRI may represent a new gold standard for assessment of the rotator cuff musculature using imaging and may help to predict the feasibility of repair of a rotator cuff tear as well as the postoperative outcome. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional MRI assessment of muscle volume is labor intensive and is not widely available for clinical use.

  2. Comparison between muscle activation measured by electromyography and muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography for effective muscle assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Ji-Whan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the intrarater reliability and validity of muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography (US) and muscle activity via electromyography (EMG) during manual muscle testing (MMT) of the external oblique (EO) and lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles. The study subjects were 30 healthy individuals who underwent MMT at different grades. EMG was used to measure the muscle activity in terms of ratio to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and root mean square (RMS) metrics. US was used to measure the raw muscle thickness, the ratio of muscle thickness at MVC, and the ratio of muscle thickness at rest. One examiner performed measurements on each subject in 3 trials. The intrarater reliabilities of the % MVC RMS and raw RMS metrics for EMG and the % MVC thickness metrics for US were excellent (ICC=0.81-0.98). There was a significant difference between all the grades measured using the % MVC thickness metric (p<0.01). Further, this % MVC thickness metric of US showed a significantly higher correlation with the EMG measurement methods than with the others (r=0.51-0.61). Our findings suggest that the % MVC thickness determined by US was the most sensitive of all methods for assessing the MMT grade.

  3. Systematic Test of Neurotoxin Dose and Volume on Muscle Function in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hulst, Jonah B.; Minamoto, Viviane B.; Lim, Michael B.; Bremner, Shannon N.; Ward, Samuel R.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Botulinum toxin serotype A (BT-A) is used for a variety of motor and sensory disorders related to abnormal muscle activity. Methods We developed a high-resolution rodent model to allow precise determination of the effect of BT-A dose (measured in units) and injectate volume (measured in μL) on the efficacy of the injection and systemic side effects. Dorsiflexion is the best indicator of injected and contralateral muscle function. Results One month after injection, dorsiflexion torque of BT-A-injected limbs was decreased significantly in all experimental groups compared with saline controls (P<0.05). Torque was also compared among the BT-A groups, which demonstrated a significant effect of dose (P<0.001), but no effect of volume (P>0.2) and no dose x volume interaction (P>0.3). Similar results were observed for other parameters measured. Discussion These data demonstrate that injection dose and not volume or concentration is the primary determinant of neurotoxin efficacy in a rodent model. PMID:23929710

  4. Trunk Muscle Activities During Abdominal Bracing: Comparison Among Muscles and Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Takahashi, Takumi; Takai, Yohei; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bracing is often adopted in fitness and sports conditioning programs. However, there is little information on how muscular activities during the task differ among the muscle groups located in the trunk and from those during other trunk exercises. The present study aimed to quantify muscular activity levels during abdominal bracing with respect to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Ten healthy young adult men performed five static (abdominal bracing, abdominal hollowing, prone, side, and supine plank) and five dynamic (V- sits, curl-ups, sit-ups, and back extensions on the floor and on a bench) exercises. Surface electromyogram (EMG) activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles were recorded in each of the exercises. The EMG data were normalized to those obtained during maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle (% EMGmax). The % EMGmax value during abdominal bracing was significantly higher in IO (60%) than in the other muscles (RA: 18%, EO: 27%, ES: 19%). The % EMGmax values for RA, EO, and ES were significantly lower in the abdominal bracing than in some of the other exercises such as V-sits and sit-ups for RA and EO and back extensions for ES muscle. However, the % EMGmax value for IO during the abdominal bracing was significantly higher than those in most of the other exercises including dynamic ones such as curl-ups and sit-ups. These results suggest that abdominal bracing is one of the most effective techniques for inducing a higher activation in deep abdominal muscles, such as IO muscle, even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Key Points Trunk muscle activities during abdominal bracing was examined with regard to muscle- and exercise-related differences. Abdominal bracing preferentially activates internal oblique muscles even compared to dynamic exercises involving trunk flexion/extension movements. Abdominal bracing should be

  5. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up.

    PubMed

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power.

  6. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power. PMID:26157247

  7. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  8. Comparison in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage among four limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Lin, Kun-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Lin, Ming-Ju; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following maximal eccentric exercise would be smaller for the knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) compared with the elbow flexors (EF) and extensors (EE). A total of 17 sedentary men performed five sets of six maximal isokinetic (90° s(-1)) eccentric contractions of EF (range of motion, ROM: 90°-0°, 0 = full extension), EE (55°-145°), KF (90°-0°), and KE (30°-120°) using a different limb with a 4-5-week interval in a counterbalanced order. Changes in maximal isometric and concentric isokinetic strength, optimum angle, limb circumference, ROM, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration, muscle soreness, and echo-intensity of B-mode ultrasound images before and for 5 days following exercise were compared amongst the four exercises using two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. All variables changed significantly following EF, EE, and KF exercises, but KE exercise did not change the optimum angle, limb circumference, and echo-intensity. Compared with KF and KE, EF and EE showed significantly greater changes in all variables, without significant differences between EF and EE. Changes in all variables were significantly greater for KF than KE. For the same subjects, the magnitude of change in the dependent variables following exercise varied among the exercises. These results suggest that the two arm muscles are equally more susceptible to muscle damage than leg muscles, but KF is more susceptible to muscle damage than KE. The difference in the susceptibility to muscle damage seems to be associated with the use of muscles in daily activities.

  9. Comparison of gait before and after superficial trunk muscle exercise and deep trunk muscle exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwanhee; Shim, Jemyung; Baek, Minho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of superficial trunk muscle and deep trunk muscle exercise on gait. [Subjects] The subjects were 45 young adults who voluntarily consented to participate. The subjects were divided into a control group, a superficial muscle exercise group, and a deep muscle exercise group with 15 participants in each group. [Methods] Each group performed the exercises 5 times a week for 4 weeks. A Gait Analyzer was used to measure the subjects’ gait. A one-way ANOVA was conducted for analysis between each group. [Results] After 4 weeks, the values from right heel contact to foot flat, left foot flat to heel off, right foot flat to heel off, and left heel off to toe off significantly differed among the groups. [Conclusion] The superficial trunk muscle exercise improved stability, such as the period of mid stance during gait. The deep trunk muscle exercise improved mobility, such as heel contact to foot flat and heel off to toe off during gait. PMID:26696717

  10. Leg muscle volume during 30-day 6-degree head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Lee, P. L.; Ellis, S.; Selzer, R. H.; Ortendahl, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to compare the effect of two modes of lower-extremity exercise training on the mass (volume) of posterior leg group (PLG) muscles (soleus, flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and flexor digitorum longus) on 19 men (ages 32-42 years) subjected to intense dynamic-isotonic (ITE, cycle ergometer, number of subjects (N) = 7), isokinetic (IKE, torque egrometer, N = 7), and no exercise (NOE, N = 5) training for 60 min/day during head-down bed rest (HDBR). Total volume of the PLG muscles decreased (p less than 0.05) similarly: ITE = 4.3 +/- SE 1.6%, IKE = 7.7 +/- 1.6%, and NOE = 6.3 +/- 0.8%; combined volume (N = 19) loss was 6.1 +/- 0.9%. Ranges of volume changes were 2.6% to -9.0% (ITE), -2.1% to -14.9% (IKE), and -3.4% to -8/1% (NOE). Correlation coefficients (r) of muscle volume versus thickness measured with ultrasonography were: ITE r + 0.79 (p less than 0.05), IKE r = 0.27 (not significant (NS)), and NOE r = 0.63 (NS). Leg-muscle volume and thickness were highly correlated (r = 0.79) when plasma volume was maintained during HDBR with ITE. Thus, neither intensive lower extremity ITE nor IKE training influence the normal non-exercised posterior leg muscle atrophy during HDBR. The relationship of muscle volume and thickness may depend on the mode of exercise training associated with the maintenance of plasma volume.

  11. Effect of isosmotic removal of extracellular Na+ on cell volume and membrane potential in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rasgado, C; Summers, J C; McGruder, K D; DeSantiago, J; Rasgado-Flores, H

    1994-09-01

    Isosmotic removal of extracellular Na+ (Nao) is a frequently performed manipulation. With the use of isolated voltage-clamped barnacle muscle cells, the effect of this manipulation on isosmotic cell volume was studied. Replacement of Nao by tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane produced membrane depolarization (approximately 20 mV) and cell volume loss (approximately 14%). The membrane depolarization was verapamil insensitive but depended on extracellular Ca2+ (Cao) and was probably due to activation of intracellular Ca2+ (Cai)-dependent nonselective cation channels. The cell volume loss did not require membrane depolarization but depended on Cao. This was probably due to an increase in Cai, mediated by activation of Ca2+ influx via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Nao replacement by Li+ also promoted membrane depolarization (approximately 20 mV) and cell volume loss (20%). Both effects were reduced (approximately 73%) but were not abolished by Cao removal. Under this condition, the remaining membrane depolarization was probably due to a higher membrane permeability of Li+ over Na+. The remaining cell volume loss was due to membrane depolarization, which probably induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  12. Calcium and magnesium contents and volume of the terminal cisternae in caffeine-treated skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    (a) The effects of caffeine on the composition and volume of the terminal cisternae (TC) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in frog skeletal muscle were determined with rapid freezing, electron microscopy, and electron probe analysis. (b) Caffeine (5 mM) released approximately 65% of the Ca content of the TC in 1 min and 84% after 3 min. The release of Ca from the TC was associated with a highly significant increase in its Mg content. This increase in Mg was not reduced by valinomycin. There was also a small increase in the K content of the TC at 1 min, although not after 3 min of caffeine contracture. (c) On the basis of the increase in Mg content during caffeine contracture and during tetanus (Somlyo, A. V., H. Gonzalez- Serratos, H. Shuman, G. McClellan, and A. P. Somlyo, 1981, J. Cell Biol., 90:577-594), we suggest that both mechanisms of Ca release are associated with an increase in the Ca and Mg permeability of the SR membranes, the two ions possibly moving through a common channel. (d) There was a significant increase in the P content of the TC during caffeine contracture, while in tetanized muscle (see reference above) there was no increase in the P content of the TC. (e) Mitochondrial Ca content was significantly increased (at 1 and at 3 min) during caffeine contracture. Valinomycin (5 microM) blocked this mitochondrial Ca uptake. (f) The sustained Ca release caused by caffeine in situ contrasts with the transient Ca release observed in studies of fragmented SR preparations, and could be explained by mediation of the caffeine-induced Ca release by a second messenger produced more readily in intact muscle than in isolated SR. (g) The TC were not swollen in rapidly frozen, caffeine-treated muscles, in contrast to the swelling of the TC observed in conventionally fixed, caffeine-treated preparation, the latter finding being in agreement with previous studies. (h) The fractional volume of the TC in rapidly frozen control (resting) frog semitendinosus muscles

  13. Some properties of different skeletal muscle fiber types: comparison of reference bases.

    PubMed

    Kelso, T B; Hodgson, D R; Visscher, A R; Gollnick, P D

    1987-04-01

    Several biochemical components of the white portion of the gastrocnemius (WGM), plantaris (PM), and soleus (SM) muscles of the rat and middle gluteal (MGM) muscle of the horse were compared based on wet and dry weight, protein, and total creatine concentrations ([TCr]). The water content was similar for the rat hindlimb muscles, however, the concentrations of protein, ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr), creatine, and glycogen ranked as SM less than PM less than WGM for all reference bases except total creatine. In contrast, concentrations of ATP, creatine, and PCr were similar in all muscles studied when expressed as ratios of [TCr]. Horse MGM had the lowest percent of water and protein per gram wet or dry weight but highest glycogen concentration of the muscles studied, irrespective of the reference base used to express concentrations. Coefficients of variation were lowest when muscle constituents were related to [TCr]. It is concluded that expressing muscle constituents relative to total creatine results in the smallest variation and is a good method for making comparisons between muscles of similar fiber composition. However, essential information concerning different types of muscle may be lost when this reference base is used.

  14. Comparisons of different muscle metabolic enzymes and muscle fiber types in Jinhua and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Shan, T; Wu, T; Zhu, L N; Ren, Y; An, S; Wang, Y

    2011-01-01

    Western and indigenous Chinese pig breeds show obvious differences in muscle growth and meat quality, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the breed-specific mechanisms controlling meat quality and postmortem muscle metabolism. The specific purpose was to investigate the variations in meat quality, muscle fiber type, and enzyme activity between local Jinhua and exotic Landrace pigs at the same age (180 d of age), as well as the same BW of 64 kg, respectively. We compared differentially expressed muscle fiber types such as types I and IIa (oxidative), type IIb (glycolytic), as well as type IIx (intermediate) fibers in LM and soleus muscles of Jinhua and Landrace pigs using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Furthermore, the metabolic enzyme activities of lactate dehydrogenase, as well as succinic dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, were used as markers of glycolytic and oxidative capacities, respectively. Results showed that Jinhua pigs exhibited greater intramuscular fat content and less drip loss compared with the Landrace (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, the mRNA abundance of oxidative and intermediate fibers was increased in Jinhua pigs, whereas the glycolytic fibers were more highly expressed in the Landrace (P < 0.01). In addition, Jinhua pigs possessed greater oxidative capacity than that of the Landrace (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the increased expression of the oxidative and intermediate fibers and greater activities of oxidative enzymes in Jinhua pigs were related to meat quality as indicated by a greater intramuscular fat and reduced drip loss. Based on these results, we conclude that muscle fiber composition and postmortem muscle metabolism can explain, in part, the variation of meat quality in Jinhua and Landrace pigs. These results may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for breed specific differences in growth performance

  15. Effect of pattern and severity of respiratory muscle weakness on carbon monoxide gas transfer and lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Hart, N; Cramer, D; Ward, S P; Nickol, A H; Moxham, J; Polkey, M I; Pride, N B

    2002-10-01

    In clinical practice, an elevated carbon monoxide (CO) transfer coefficient (KCO) and restrictive ventilatory defect are taken as features of respiratory muscle weakness (RMW). However, the authors hypothesised that both pattern and severity of RMW effect gas transfer and lung volumes. Measurements of CO transfer and lung volumes were performed in patients with isolated diaphragm weakness (n=10), inspiratory muscle weakness (n=12), combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle weakness (n=5) and healthy controls (n=6). Patients with diaphragm weakness and inspiratory muscle weakness had reduced total lung capacity (TLC) (83.6% predicted and 68.9% pred, respectively), functional residual capacity (FRC) (83.9% pred and 83.6% pred) and transfer factor of the lung for CO (TL,CO) (86.2% pred and 66.2% pred) with increased KCO (114.1% pred and 130.2% pred). Patients with combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle weakness had reduced TLC (80.9% pred) but increased FRC (109.9% pred) and RV (157.4% pred) with decreased TL,CO (58.0% pred) and KCO (85.5% pred). In patients with diaphragm weakness, the increase in carbon monoxide transfer coefficient was similar to that of normal subjects when alveolar volume was reduced. However, the increase in carbon monoxide transfer coefficient in inspiratory muscle weakness was often less than expected, while in combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle weakness, the carbon monoxide transfer coefficient was normal/reduced despite further reductions in alveolar volume, which may indicate subtle abnormalities of the lung parenchyma or pulmonary vasculature. Thus, this study demonstrates the limitations of using carbon monoxide transfer coefficient in the diagnosis of respiratory muscle weakness, particularly if no account is taken of the alveolar volume at which the carbon monoxide transfer coefficient is made.

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction of active muscle cell segment volume from two-dimensional optical sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, David S.; Griffiths, P. J.; Cecchi, G.; Taylor, Stuart R.

    1999-06-01

    An ultramicroscope coupled to a square-aspect-ratio sensor was used to image the dynamic geometry of live muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells, dissected from frogs, were suspended in the optical axis and illuminated from one side by a focused slit of white light. The sensor detected light scattered at 90 degrees to the incident beam. Serial cross-sections were acquired as a motorized stage moved the cell through the slit of light. The axial force at right angles to the cross- sections was recorded simultaneously. Cross-sections were aligned by a least-squares fit of their centroids to a straight line, to correct for misalignments between the axes of the microscope, the stage, and the sensor. Three- dimensional volumes were reconstructed from each series and viewed from all directions to locate regions that remained at matching axial positions. The angle of the principal axis and the cross-sectional area were calculated and associated with force recorded concurrently. The cells adjusted their profile and volume to remain stable against turning as contractile force rose and fell, as predicted by the law of conservation of angular momentum.

  17. Responses of glutamine transport in cultured rat skeletal muscle to osmotically induced changes in cell volume.

    PubMed Central

    Low, S Y; Taylor, P M; Rennie, M J

    1996-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the relationship between cellular hydration state and the rate of glutamine transport, tracer glutamine uptake into primary rat myotubes was studied at external osmolalities of 170, 320 or 430 mosmol kg-1. 2. Incubation of myotubes with glutamine (2 mM; 30 min) at 320 mosmol kg-1 increased cell volume and glutamine transport (by 35 and 36%, respectively); insulin (66 nM; 30 min) also increased cell volume and glutamine transport (by 22 and 40%, respectively) and the effects of insulin and glutamine combined were additive. The increase in glutamine uptake following glutamine pre-incubation represented an increase in Vmax of Na(+)-dependent glutamine transport. 3. There was an inverse relationship between myotube glutamine transport and external osmolality after 30 min exposure. 4. During hyposmotic (170 mosmol kg-1) exposure there were large, rapid increases of cell volume and glutamine transport; the latter increased transiently (during the cell swelling phase) by a maximum of approximately 80% at 2 min, (due to an increased Vmax for Na(+)-dependent glutamine transport) then decayed to a new elevated steady state after 30 min exposure. 5. During hyperosmotic (430 mosmol kg-1) exposure there were rapid decreases in glutamine transport and myotube cell volume (both by approximately 30%) to values which were maintained for at least 15 min. 6. The volume-sensitive glutamine transport process features characteristics of the insulin-sensitive system Nm transporter. 7. Modulation of Na(+)-dependent glutamine transport by insulin and cell volume changes may contribute towards regulation of muscle metabolism. PMID:8734997

  18. Comparison of a space shuttle flight (STS-78) and bed rest on human muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Lee, G. A.; Widrick, J. J.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess muscle fiber size, composition, and in vivo contractile characteristics of the calf muscle of four male crew members during a 17-day spaceflight (SF; Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission) and eight men during a 17-day bed rest (BR). The protocols and timelines of these two investigations were identical, therefore allowing for direct comparisons between SF and the BR. The subjects' age, height, and weight were 43 +/- 2 yr, 183 +/- 4 cm, and 86 +/- 3 kg for SF and 43 +/- 2 yr, 182 +/- 3 cm, and 82 +/- 4 kg for BR, respectively. Calf muscle strength was examined before SF and BR; on days 2, 8, and 12 during SF and BR; and on days 2 and 8 of recovery. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and within 3 h after SF (gastrocnemius and soleus) and BR (soleus) before reloading. Maximal isometric calf strength and the force-velocity characteristics were unchanged with SF or BR. Additionally, neither SF nor BR had any effect on fiber composition or fiber size of the calf muscles studied. In summary, no changes in calf muscle strength and morphology were observed after the 17-day SF and BR. Because muscle strength is lost during unloading, both during spaceflight and on the ground, these data suggest that the testing sequence employed during the SF and BR may have served as a resistance training countermeasure to attenuate whole muscle strength loss.

  19. Lateral pterygoid muscle volume and migraine in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro; Costa, André Luiz Ferreira; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Min, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) plays an important role in jaw movement and has been implicated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Migraine has been described as a common symptom in patients with TMDs and may be related to muscle hyperactivity. This study aimed to compare LPM volume in individuals with and without migraine, using segmentation of the LPM in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the TMJ. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with migraine and 20 volunteers without migraine underwent a clinical examination of the TMJ, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs. MR imaging was performed and the LPM was segmented using the ITK-SNAP 1.4.1 software, which calculates the volume of each segmented structure in voxels per cubic millimeter. The chi-squared test and the Fisher's exact test were used to relate the TMD variables obtained from the MR images and clinical examinations to the presence of migraine. Logistic binary regression was used to determine the importance of each factor for predicting the presence of a migraine headache. Results Patients with TMDs and migraine tended to have hypertrophy of the LPM (58.7%). In addition, abnormal mandibular movements (61.2%) and disc displacement (70.0%) were found to be the most common signs in patients with TMDs and migraine. Conclusion In patients with TMDs and simultaneous migraine, the LPM tends to be hypertrophic. LPM segmentation on MR imaging may be an alternative method to study this muscle in such patients because the hypertrophic LPM is not always palpable. PMID:25793177

  20. The influence of intracellular lactate and H+ on cell volume in amphibian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Fraser, James A; Bailey, Peter S J; Griffin, Julian L; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of intracellular lactate and proton accumulation on cell volume, Vc, were investigated in resting Rana temporaria striated muscle fibres. Intracellular lactate and H+ concentrations were simultaneously increased by exposing resting muscle fibres to extracellular solutions that contained 20–80 mm sodium lactate. Cellular H+ and lactate entry was confirmed using pH-sensitive electrodes and 1H-NMR, respectively, and effects on Vc were measured using confocal microscope xz-scanning. Exposure to extracellular lactate up to 80 mm produced significant changes in pH and intracellular lactate (from a pH of 7.24 ± 0.03, n = 8, and 4.65 ± 1.07 mm, n = 6, respectively, in control fibres, to 6.59 ± 0.03, n = 4, and 26.41 ± 0.92 mm, n = 3, respectively) that were comparable to those observed following fatiguing stimulation (6.30–6.70 and 18.04 ± 1.78 mm, n = 6, respectively). Yet, the increase in intracellular osmolarity expected from such an increase in intracellular lactate did not significantly alter Vc. Simulation of these experimental results, modified from the charge difference model of Fraser & Huang, demonstrated that such experimental manoeuvres produced changes in intracellular [H+] and [lactate] comparable to those observed during muscle fatigue, and accounted for this paradoxical conservation of Vc through balancing negative osmotic effects resulting from the net cation efflux that would follow a titration of intracellular membrane-impermeant anions by the intracellular accumulation of protons. It demonstrated that with established physiological values for intracellular buffering capacity and the permeability ratio of lactic acid and anionic lactate, PLacH: PLac−, this would provide a mechanism that precisely balanced any effect on cell volume resulting from lactate accumulation during exercise. PMID:16613877

  1. Static optimization of muscle forces during gait in comparison to EMG-to-force processing approach.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Sofia; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2007-07-01

    Individual muscle forces evaluated from experimental motion analysis may be useful in mathematical simulation, but require additional musculoskeletal and mathematical modelling. A numerical method of static optimization was used in this study to evaluate muscular forces during gait. The numerical algorithm used was built on the basis of traditional optimization techniques, i.e., constrained minimization technique using the Lagrange multiplier method to solve for constraints. Measuring exact muscle forces during gait analysis is not currently possible. The developed optimization method calculates optimal forces during gait, given a specific performance criterion, using kinematics and kinetics from gait analysis together with muscle architectural data. Experimental methods to validate mathematical methods to calculate forces are limited. Electromyography (EMG) is frequently used as a tool to determine muscle activation in experimental studies on human motion. A method of estimating force from the EMG signal, the EMG-to-force approach, was recently developed by Bogey et al. [Bogey RA, Perry J, Gitter AJ. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forcs during normal human gait. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 2005;13:302-10] and is based on normalization of activation during a maximum voluntary contraction to documented maximal muscle strength. This method was adapted in this study as a tool with which to compare static optimization during a gait cycle. Muscle forces from static optimization and from EMG-to-force muscle forces show reasonably good correlation in the plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, but less correlation in the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Additional comparison of the mathematical muscle forces from static optimization to documented averaged EMG data reveals good overall correlation to patterns of evaluated muscular activation. This indicates that on an individual level, muscular force patterns from mathematical

  2. Tubular system volume changes in twitch fibres from toad and rat skeletal muscle assessed by confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George

    2002-01-01

    The volume of the extracellular compartment (tubular system) within intact muscle fibres from cane toad and rat was measured under various conditions using confocal microscopy. Under physiological conditions at rest, the fractional volume of the tubular system (t-sysVol) was 1.38 ± 0.09 % (n = 17), 1.41 ± 0.09 % (n = 12) and 0.83 ± 0.07 % (n = 12) of the total fibre volume in the twitch fibres from toad iliofibularis muscle, rat extensor digitorum longus muscle and rat soleus muscle, respectively. In toad muscle fibres, the t-sysVol decreased by 30 % when the tubular system was fully depolarized and decreased by 15 % when membrane cholesterol was depleted from the tubular system with methyl-β-cyclodextrin but did not change as the sarcomere length was changed from 1.93 to 3.30 μm. There was also an increase by 30 % and a decrease by 25 % in t-sysVol when toad fibres were equilibrated in solutions that were 2.5-fold hypertonic and 50 % hypotonic, respectively. When the changes in total fibre volume were taken into consideration, the t-sysVol expressed as a percentage of the isotonic fibre volume did actually decrease as tonicity increased, revealing that the tubular system in intact fibres cannot be compressed below 0.9 % of the isotonic fibre volume. The results can be explained in terms of forces acting at the level of the tubular wall. These observations have important physiological implications showing that the tubular system is a dynamic membrane structure capable of changing its volume in response to the membrane potential, cholesterol depletion and osmotic stress but not when the sarcomere length is changed in resting muscle. PMID:11790823

  3. Tubular system volume changes in twitch fibres from toad and rat skeletal muscle assessed by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George

    2002-01-15

    The volume of the extracellular compartment (tubular system) within intact muscle fibres from cane toad and rat was measured under various conditions using confocal microscopy. Under physiological conditions at rest, the fractional volume of the tubular system (t-sys(Vol)) was 1.38 +/- 0.09 % (n = 17), 1.41 +/- 0.09 % (n = 12) and 0.83 +/- 0.07 % (n = 12) of the total fibre volume in the twitch fibres from toad iliofibularis muscle, rat extensor digitorum longus muscle and rat soleus muscle, respectively. In toad muscle fibres, the t-sys(Vol) decreased by 30 % when the tubular system was fully depolarized and decreased by 15 % when membrane cholesterol was depleted from the tubular system with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin but did not change as the sarcomere length was changed from 1.93 to 3.30 microm. There was also an increase by 30 % and a decrease by 25 % in t-sys(Vol) when toad fibres were equilibrated in solutions that were 2.5-fold hypertonic and 50 % hypotonic, respectively. When the changes in total fibre volume were taken into consideration, the t-sys(Vol) expressed as a percentage of the isotonic fibre volume did actually decrease as tonicity increased, revealing that the tubular system in intact fibres cannot be compressed below 0.9 % of the isotonic fibre volume. The results can be explained in terms of forces acting at the level of the tubular wall. These observations have important physiological implications showing that the tubular system is a dynamic membrane structure capable of changing its volume in response to the membrane potential, cholesterol depletion and osmotic stress but not when the sarcomere length is changed in resting muscle.

  4. Time course of low- and high-volume strength training on neuromuscular adaptations and muscle quality in older women.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Regis; Botton, Cíntia E; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Bottaro, Martim; Brown, Lee E; Lacerda, Fabiano; Gaya, Anelise; Moraes, Kelly; Peruzzolo, Amanda; Pinto, Ronei S

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of low- and high-volume strength trainings on neuromuscular adaptations of lower- and upper-body muscles in older women after 6 weeks (6WE), 13 weeks (13WE), and 20 weeks (20WE) of training. Healthy older women were assigned to low-volume (LV) or high-volume (HV) training groups. The LV group performed one set of each exercise, while the HV group performed three sets, 2 days/week. Knee extension and elbow flexion one-repetition maximum (1-RM), maximal isometric strength, maximal muscle activation, and muscle thickness (MT) of the lower- and upper-body muscles, as well as lower-body muscle quality (MQ) obtained by ultrasonography, were evaluated. Knee extension and elbow flexion 1-RM improved at all time points for both groups; however, knee extension 1-RM gains were greater for the HV group after 20WE. Maximal isometric strength of the lower body for both groups increased only at 20WE, while upper-body maximal isometric strength increased after 13WE and 20WE. Maximal activation of the lower and upper body for both groups increased only after 20WE. Both groups showed significant increases in MT of their lower and upper body, with greater gains in lower-body MT for the HV group at 20WE. MQ improved in both groups after 13WE and 20WE, whereas the HV group improved more than the LV group at 20WE. These results showed that low- and high-volume trainings have a similar adaptation time course in the muscular function of upper-body muscles. However, high-volume training appears to be more efficient for lower-body muscles after 20 weeks of training.

  5. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  6. Effects of respiratory muscle unloading on leg muscle oxygenation and blood volume during high-intensity exercise in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Carrascosa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Cristino Carneiro; Barroco, Adriano C; Berton, Danilo C; Vilaça, Debora; Lira-Filho, Edgar B; Ribeiro, Dirceu; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Neder, J Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Blood flow requirements of the respiratory muscles (RM) increase markedly during exercise in chronic heart failure (CHF). We reasoned that if the RM could subtract a fraction of the limited cardiac output (QT) from the peripheral muscles, RM unloading would improve locomotor muscle perfusion. Nine patients with CHF (left ventricle ejection fraction = 26 +/- 7%) undertook constant-work rate tests (70-80% peak) receiving proportional assisted ventilation (PAV) or sham ventilation. Relative changes (Delta%) in deoxy-hemoglobyn, oxi-Hb ([O2Hb]), tissue oxygenation index, and total Hb ([HbTOT], an index of local blood volume) in the vastus lateralis were measured by near infrared spectroscopy. In addition, QT was monitored by impedance cardiography and arterial O2 saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2). There were significant improvements in exercise tolerance (Tlim) with PAV. Blood lactate, leg effort/Tlim and dyspnea/Tlim were lower with PAV compared with sham ventilation (P < 0.05). There were no significant effects of RM unloading on systemic O2 delivery as QT and SpO2 at submaximal exercise and at Tlim did not differ between PAV and sham ventilation (P > 0.05). Unloaded breathing, however, was related to enhanced leg muscle oxygenation and local blood volume compared with sham, i.e., higher Delta[O2Hb]% and Delta[HbTOT]%, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that RM unloading had beneficial effects on the oxygenation status and blood volume of the exercising muscles at similar systemic O2 delivery in patients with advanced CHF. These data suggest that blood flow was redistributed from respiratory to locomotor muscles during unloaded breathing.

  7. Osmolytes responsible for volume reduction under isosmotic or hypoosmotic conditions in Barnacle muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rasgado, C; Pierce, S K; Rasgado-Flores, H

    2001-07-01

    In numerous animal cells, experimental manipulations that increase the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration induce cell volume reduction. This may occur under isosmotic conditions, e.g. when external Ca2+ (Ca(o)) is replaced by Mg2+ (42) or during exposure to hypoosmotic conditions (i.e. regulatory volume decrease, RVD) in the presence of Ca(o). We determined the osmolytes responsible for volume reduction under isosmotic and hypoosmotic conditions in barnacle muscle cells. Organic osmolytes (i.e. free amino acids and methylamines) and inorganic ions accounted for approximately 78% and 22% of the intracellular isosmotic activity, respectively. Isosmotic Ca(o) removal induced a net loss of KCI (with a ratio of 1K:1Cl) and free amino acids (FAA, mainly glycine and taurine). During RVD. the same ions (but in a proportion of 2K:1Cl) and FAA were lost. Since RVD was accompanied by extracellular alkalinization, the 2K:1Cl loss may be explained by the presence of a K+/H+ exchanger (or K+-OH- co-transporter) or Cl-/OH- exchanger. The lack of RVD in the absence of Ca(o) cannot be attributed to the loss of intracellular osmolytes during isosmotic Ca(o) removal because addition of Ca(o) during cell swelling promoted RVD.

  8. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids mediate insulin-mediated augmentation in skeletal muscle perfusion and blood volume

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Sajeevani; Chadderdon, Scott; Wu, Melinda; Qi, Yue; Xie, Aris; Alkayed, Nabil J.; Davidson, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF) increases in response to physiological hyperinsulinemia. This vascular action of insulin may facilitate glucose uptake. We hypothesized that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), a family of arachadonic, acid-derived, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, are mediators of insulin's microvascular effects. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) was performed to quantify skeletal muscle capillary blood volume (CBV) and MBF in wild-type and obese insulin-resistant (db/db) mice after administration of vehicle or trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid (t-AUCB), an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase that converts EETs to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Similar studies were performed in rats pretreated with l-NAME. CEU was also performed in rats undergoing a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, half of which were pretreated with the epoxygenase inhibitor MS-PPOH to inhibit EET synthesis. In both wild-type and db/db mice, intravenous t-AUCB produced an increase in CBV (65–100% increase at 30 min, P < 0.05) and in MBF. In db/db mice, t-AUCB also reduced plasma glucose by ∼15%. In rats pretreated with l-NAME, t-AUCB after produced a significant ≈20% increase in CBV, indicating a component of vascular response independent of nitric oxide (NO) production. Hyperinsulinemic clamp produced a time-dependent increase in MBF (19 ± 36 and 76 ± 49% at 90 min, P = 0.026) that was mediated in part by an increase in CBV. Insulin-mediated changes in both CBV and MBF during the clamp were blocked entirely by MS-PPOH. We conclude that EETs are a mediator of insulin-mediated augmentation in skeletal muscle perfusion and are involved in regulating changes in CBV during hyperinsulinemia. PMID:25336524

  9. Vascular smooth muscle contraction evoked by cell volume modulation: role of the cytoskeleton network.

    PubMed

    Koltsova, Svetlana V; Gusakova, Svetlana V; Anfinogenova, Yana J; Baskakov, Mikhail B; Orlov, Sergei N

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we reported that hyposmotic swelling evoked transient vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that was completely abolished by L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers. In contrast, sustained contraction revealed in hyper- and isoosmotically-shrunken SMCs was insensitive to L-type channel blockers and was diminished in Ca(2+)-free medium by only 30-50%. Several research groups reported cell volume-dependent cytoskeleton network rearrangements. This study examines the role of cytoskeleton proteins in cell volume-dependent contraction of endothelium-denuded vascular smooth muscle rings (VSMR) from the rat thoracic aorta. Hyperosmotic shrinkage and hyposmotic swelling were triggered by modulation of medium osmolality; isosmotic shrinkage was induced by VSMR transfer from hypo- to isosmotic medium. The relative content of globular (G) and fibrillar (F) actin was estimated by fluorescence microscopy. Hyperosmotic shrinkage and hyposmotic swelling led to elevation of the F-actin/G-actin ratio by 2.5- and 1.8-fold respectively. Contraction of shrunken and swollen VSMR was insensitive to modulators of microtubules such as vinblastine, colchicine and docetaxel. Microfilament disassembly by cytochalasin B resulted in dramatic attenuation of the maximal amplitude of contraction of hyperosmotically-shrunken and hyposmotically-swollen VSMR, and almost completely abolished the contraction triggered by isosmotic shrinkage. These data suggest that both L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of swollen vascular SMC and Ca(2+)(o)-insensitive contractions of shrunken cells are triggered by reorganization of the microfilament network caused by elevation of the F-actin/G-actin ratio.

  10. Muscle torque in total knee arthroplasty: comparison of subvastus and midvastus approaches.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Yang, Rong-Sen; Chen, Kuang-Ho; Liu, Tang-Kue; Chen, Wen-Chih; Ho, Yi-Ching; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2010-07-01

    The subvastus and midvastus approaches are two of the most commonly performed quadriceps preserving approaches for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), which can hasten functional recovery and rehabilitation. However, there has not been sufficient investigation with respect to a quantitative comparison between the two approaches in terms of muscle strength. To compare outcomes with respect to muscle strength between these two approaches, quadriceps and hamstring muscle torques of 20 patients who underwent primary TKA with the subvastus (SV) approach and 10 patients who received the midvastus (MV) approach were measured after surgery. The median age of patients in the SV group (68 years, range 53-77 years) was significantly different that the median age of patients in the MV group (61 years, range 50-73 years) (P = 0.0141). There was no significant difference in patient weight, height, or postoperative duration before muscle testing between the SV and MV groups. There were no significant differences in peak muscle torque or hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) ratio between the groups. We thus conclude peak muscle torque and H/Q ratios were not statistically different with the SV or MV approach, therefore functional outcome is comparable.

  11. Effects of swim training on lung volumes and inspiratory muscle conditioning.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Dixon, G F; Drake, J; Gadek, J E

    1987-01-01

    Lung volumes and inspiratory muscle (IM) function tests were measured in 16 competitive female swimmers (age 19 +/- 1 yr) before and after 12 wk of swim training. Eight underwent additional IM training; the remaining eight were controls. Vital capacity (VC) increased 0.25 +/- 0.25 liters (P less than 0.01), functional residual capacity (FRC) increased 0.39 +/- 0.29 liters (P less than 0.001), and total lung capacity (TLC) increased 0.35 +/- 0.47 (P less than 0.025) in swimmers, irrespective of IM training. Residual volume (RV) did not change. Maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) measured at FRC changed -43 +/- 18 cmH2O (P less than 0.005) in swimmers undergoing IM conditioning and -29 +/- 25 (P less than 0.05) in controls. The time that 65% of prestudy PImax could be endured increased in IM trainers (P less than 0.001) and controls (P less than 0.05). All results were compared with similar IM training in normal females (age 21.1 +/- 0.8 yr) in which significant increases in PImax and endurance were observed in IM trainers only with no changes in VC, FRC, or TLC (Clanton et al., Chest 87: 62-66, 1985). We conclude that 1) swim training in mature females increases VC, TLC, and FRC with no effect on RV, and 2) swim training increases IM strength and endurance measured near FRC.

  12. Strong relationships exist between muscle volume, joint power and whole-body external mechanical power in adults and children.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Jones, David A; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2009-06-01

    The present study investigated whether differences between adults and children in mechanical power during single-joint knee extension tasks and the complex multijoint task of jumping could be explained by differences in the quadriceps femoris muscle volume. Peak power was calculated during squat jumps, from the integral of the vertical force measured by a force plate, and during concentric knee extensions at 30, 90, 120, 180 and 240 deg s(-1), and muscle volume was measured from magnetic resonance images for 10 men, 10 women, 10 prepubertal boys and 10 prepubertal girls. Peak power during jumping and isokinetic knee extension was significantly higher in men than in women, and in both adult groups compared with children (P < 0.01), although there were no differences between boys and girls. When power was normalized to muscle volume, the intergroup differences ceased to exist for both tasks. Peak power correlated significantly with quadriceps volume (P < 0.01), with r(2) values of 0.8, 0.86, 0.81, 0.78 and 0.81 from isokinetic knee extension at angular velocities of 30, 90, 120, 180 and 240 deg s(-1), respectively, and with an r(2) value of 0.9 from squat jumps. These results indicate that the quadriceps femoris muscle volume accounts largely for the increase in power that occurs with maturation in the two genders not only in kinematically constrained knee extensions but also in multijoint tasks. Future studies should examine the role of other factors relating to the generation and transmission of contractile power, such as muscle architecture, tendon stiffness and external mechanical leverage.

  13. Comparison of height-accumulation and volume-equation methods for estimating tree and stand volumes. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R.B.; Baldwin, V.C.

    1995-09-01

    Estimating tree and stand volume in mature plantations is time consuming, involving much manpower and equipment; however, several sampling and volume-prediction techniques are available. This study showed that a well-constructed, volume-equation method yields estimates comparable to those of the often more time-consuming, hight-accumulation method, even though the latter should be more accurate for any individual tree. Plot volumes were estimated by both methods in a remeasurement of trees in a 40-plot, planted slash pine thinning study. The mean percent age difference in total volume, inside bark, between the two methods ranged from 1 to 2.5 percent across all the plots; differences outside bark ranged from 7 to 10 percent. The results were similar when the effecs of site, plot mean values, or tree-by-tree comparisons were incorporated.

  14. Upper extremity muscle tone and response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Yokoi, Yuka; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine, in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation, if the response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing is dependent upon both upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of manually assisted breathing. [Subjects] We recruited 13 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and assessed their upper extremity muscle tone using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS). The subjects were assigned to either the low MAS group (MAS≤2, n=7) or the high MAS group (MAS≥3, n=6). [Methods] The manually assisted breathing technique was applied at a pressure of 2 kgf and 4 kgf. A split-plot ANOVA was performed to compare the tidal volume of each pressure during manually assisted breathing between the low and the high MAS groups. [Results] Statistical analysis showed there were main effects of the upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of the manually assisted breathing technique. There was no interaction between these factors. [Conclusion] Our findings reveal that the tidal volume during the manually assisted breathing technique for patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation depends upon the patient’s upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity. PMID:26357431

  15. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James; Hays, David; Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  16. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Hannan, Liam M.; Dominelli, Paolo B.; Peters, Carli M.; Fougere, Renee J.; McKim, Douglas A.; Sheel, A. William

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR) acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs) in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW). Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12) and healthy controls (n=12) underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p<0.001). Immediately after LVR, Crs increased by 39.5±9.8% to 50±7 mL·cmH2O−1 in individuals with RMW (p<0.05), while no significant change occurred in controls (p=0.23). At 1 h and 2 h post-treatment, there were no within-group differences in Crs compared to baseline (all p>0.05). LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05). During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05). LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique. PMID:28326313

  17. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  18. Comparison of kinetic variables and muscle activity during a squat vs. a box squat.

    PubMed

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Skinner, Jared W; Schafer, Patrick C; Haines, Tracie L; Kirby, Tyler J

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there was a difference in kinetic variables and muscle activity when comparing a squat to a box squat. A box squat removes the stretch-shortening cycle component from the squat, and thus, the possible influence of the box squat on concentric phase performance is of interest. Eight resistance trained men (Height: 179.61 ± 13.43 cm; Body Mass: 107.65 ± 29.79 kg; Age: 24.77 ± 3.22 years; 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 200.11 ± 58.91 kg) performed 1 repetition of squats and box squats using 60, 70, and 80% of their 1RM in a randomized fashion. Subjects completed the movement while standing on a force plate and with 2 linear position transducers attached to the bar. Force and velocity were used to calculate power. Peak force and peak power were determined from the force-time and power-time curves during the concentric phase of the lift. Muscle activity (electromyography) was recorded from the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, and longissimus. Results indicate that peak force and peak power are similar between the squat and box squat. However, during the 70% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in a significantly lower peak force in comparison to the box squat (squat = 3,269 ± 573 N, box squat = 3,364 ± 575 N). In addition, during the 80% of 1RM trials, the squat resulted in significantly lower peak power in comparison to the box squat (squat = 2,050 ± 486 W, box squat = 2,197 ± 544 W). Muscle activity was generally higher during the squat in comparison to the box squat. In conclusion, minimal differences were observed in kinetic variables and muscle activity between the squat and box squat. Removing the stretch-shortening cycle during the squat (using a box) appears to have limited negative consequences on performance.

  19. Comparison of volume estimation methods for pancreatic islet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, JiřÃ.­; Å vihlík, Jan; Habart, David; Kybic, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution we study different methods of automatic volume estimation for pancreatic islets which can be used in the quality control step prior to the islet transplantation. The total islet volume is an important criterion in the quality control. Also, the individual islet volume distribution is interesting -- it has been indicated that smaller islets can be more effective. A 2D image of a microscopy slice containing the islets is acquired. The input of the volume estimation methods are segmented images of individual islets. The segmentation step is not discussed here. We consider simple methods of volume estimation assuming that the islets have spherical or ellipsoidal shape. We also consider a local stereological method, namely the nucleator. The nucleator does not rely on any shape assumptions and provides unbiased estimates if isotropic sections through the islets are observed. We present a simulation study comparing the performance of the volume estimation methods in different scenarios and an experimental study comparing the methods on a real dataset.

  20. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  1. Strength training at high versus low external resistance in older adults: effects on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics.

    PubMed

    Van Roie, Evelien; Delecluse, Christophe; Coudyzer, Walter; Boonen, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Muscle adaptations can be induced by high-resistance exercise. Despite being potentially more suitable for older adults, low-resistance exercise protocols have been less investigated. We compared the effects of high- and low-resistance training on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics. Fifty-six older adults were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of leg press and leg extension training at either HIGH (2×10-15 repetitions at 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM)), LOW (1×80-100 repetitions at 20% of 1RM), or LOW+ (1×60 repetitions at 20% of 1RM, followed by 1×10-20 repetitions at 40% of 1RM). All protocols ended with muscle failure. Leg press and leg extension of 1RM were measured at baseline and post intervention and before the first training session in weeks 5 and 9. At baseline and post intervention, muscle volume (MV) was measured by CT-scan. A Biodex dynamometer evaluated knee extensor static peak torque in different knee angles (PT(stat90°), PT(stat120°), PT(stat150°)), dynamic peak torque at different speeds (PT(dyn60°s)(-1), PT(dyn180°s)(-1), PT(dyn240°s)(-1)), and speed of movement at 20% (S20), 40% (S40), and 60% (S60) of PTstat90°. HIGH and LOW+ resulted in greater improvements in 1RM strength than LOW (p<0.05). These differences were already apparent after week 5. Similar gains were found between groups in MV, PT(stat), PT(dyn60°s)(-1), and PT(dyn180°s)(-1). No changes were reported in speed of movement. HIGH tended to improve PT(dyn240°s)(-1) more than LOW or LOW+ (p=0.064). In conclusion, high- and low-resistance exercises ending with muscle failure may be similarly effective for hypertrophy. High-resistance training led to a higher increase in 1RM strength than low-resistance training (20% of 1RM), but this difference disappeared when using a mixed low-resistance protocol in which the resistance was intensified within a single exercise set (40% of 1RM). Our findings support the need for more research on low

  2. In vivo MRI quantification of individual muscle and organ volumes for assessment of anabolic steroid growth effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ed X; Tang, Haiying; Tong, Christopher; Heymsfield, Steve B; Vasselli, Joseph R

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to develop a quantitative and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to investigate the muscle growth effects of anabolic steroids. A protocol of MRI acquisition on a standard clinical 1.5 T scanner and quantitative image analysis was established and employed to measure the individual muscle and organ volumes in the intact and castrated guinea pigs undergoing a 16-week treatment protocol by two well-documented anabolic steroids, testosterone and nandrolone, via implanted silastic capsules. High correlations between the in vivo MRI and postmortem dissection measurements were observed for shoulder muscle complex (R=0.86), masseter (R=0.79), temporalis (R=0.95), neck muscle complex (R=0.58), prostate gland and seminal vesicles (R=0.98), and testis (R=0.96). Furthermore, the longitudinal MRI measurements yielded adequate sensitivity to detect the restoration of growth to or towards normal in castrated guinea pigs by replacing circulating steroid levels to physiological or slightly higher levels, as expected. These results demonstrated that quantitative MRI using a standard clinical scanner provides accurate and sensitive measurement of individual muscles and organs, and this in vivo MRI protocol in conjunction with the castrated guinea pig model constitutes an effective platform to investigate the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth effects of other potential anabolic steroids. The quantitative MRI protocol developed can also be readily adapted for human studies on most clinical MRI scanner to investigate the anabolic steroid growth effects, or monitor the changes in individual muscle and organ volume and geometry following injury, strength training, neuromuscular disorders, and pharmacological or surgical interventions.

  3. Comparison of magnetic field and electric potential produced by frog heart muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, Deborah; Cohen, David

    1985-04-01

    A comparison is made here between the magnetic field and electric potential produced by a thin strip of frog heart muscle. An experimental test is made of the theory which states that the wave front of a single fiber (or parallel bundle of fibers as in this strip) can be represented, for both the magnetic field and electric potential, by the same single-current dipole. First, an experimental measurement is made of the ratio of magnetic field/electric potential produced by an actual current dipole in an electrolytic tank. Then the dipole is replaced by the muscle strip and a measurement is again made of the ratio; this is done for three muscle strips at eight different source-to-detector distances ranging from 1 to 5 cm. It is found, in all cases, that the muscle ratios are equal to those of the actual dipole to within the experimental uncertainty of ±10%. Therefore, to this extent the theory is verified for this case of a thin strip of frog heart tissue.

  4. Protein synthesis assessed by ribosome analysis in human papillary muscle in relation to oxidative capacity: a comparison with skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wernerman, J; Sylvén, C; von der Decken, A; Jansson, E; Böök, K; Vinnars, E

    1988-08-01

    Protein synthesis as assessed by the concentration and size distribution of ribosomes was determined together with citrate synthase activity in papillary muscles obtained at open heart surgery from patients with mitral valve disease. The results were compared with corresponding data from the quadriceps femoris muscle of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Citrate synthase activity was six times higher in papillary muscle than in skeletal muscle. The total ribosome concentration per mg DNA was similar in the two types of muscle. Compared with skeletal muscle, in papillary muscle polyribosomes constituted a higher proportion of the ribosomes (p less than 0.001), and there was a tendency towards larger polyribosome aggregates. It is proposed that the high concentration of polyribosomes in papillary muscle is related to the high oxidative capacity of that tissue.

  5. Comparison of incremental and constant load tests of inspiratory muscle endurance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Jenkins, S C; Philippe, D L; Shepherd, K L; Hillman, D R; Eastwood, P R

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relative value of incremental and constant load tests in detecting changes in inspiratory muscle endurance following high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (H-IMT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In total, 16 subjects (11 males; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 37.4+/-12.5%) underwent H-IMT. In addition, 17 subjects (11 males; FEV(1) 36.5+/-11.5%) underwent sham inspiratory muscle training (S-IMT). Training took place three times a week for 8 weeks. Baseline and post-training measurements were obtained of maximum threshold pressure sustained during an incremental load test (P(th,max)) and time breathing against a constant load (t(lim)). Breathing pattern was unconstrained. H-IMT increased P(th,max) and t(lim) relative to baseline and to any change seen following S-IMT. The effect size for P(th,max) was greater than for t(lim). Post-training tests were accompanied by changes in breathing pattern, including decreased duty cycle, which may have served to decrease inspiratory work and thereby contribute to the increase in P(th,max) and t(lim) in both groups. When assessing inspiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via tests in which the pattern of breathing is unconstrained, the current authors recommend incremental load tests be used in preference to constant load tests. However, to attribute changes in these tests to improvements in inspiratory muscle endurance, breathing pattern should be controlled.

  6. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    PubMed

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  7. Effect of isosmotic removal of extracellular Ca2+ and of membrane potential on cell volume in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rasgado, C; McGruder, K D; Summers, J C; Rasgado-Flores, H

    1994-09-01

    Isosmotic removal of extracellular Ca2+ (Cao) and changes in membrane potential (Vm) are frequently performed manipulations. Using isolated voltage-clamped barnacle muscle cells, we studied the effect of these manipulations on isosmotic cell volume. Replacing Cao by Mg2+ induced 1) verapamil-sensitive extracellular Na(+)-dependent membrane depolarization, 2) membrane depolarization-dependent cell volume reduction in cells whose sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was presumably loaded with Ca2+ [intracellular Ca2+ (Cai)-loaded cells], and 3) cell volume increase in cells whose SR was presumably depleted of Ca2+ (Cai-depleted cells) or in Cai-loaded cells whose Vm was held constant. Membrane depolarization induced 1) volume reduction in Cai-loaded cells or 2) verapamil-sensitive volume increase in Cai-depleted cells. This suggests tha, in Cai-loaded cells, membrane depolarization induces SR Ca2+ release, which in turn promotes volume reduction. Conversely, in Cai-depleted cells, the depolarization activates Na+ influx through a verapamil-sensitive pathway leading to the volume increase. This pathway is also revealed when Cao is removed in either Cai-depleted cells or in cells whose Vm is held constant.

  8. Change in Psoas Muscle Volume as a Predictor of Outcomes in Patients Treated with Chemotherapy and Radical Cystectomy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Homayoun; Almassi, Nima; Kovac, Evan; Ercole, Cesar; Remer, Erick; Rini, Brian; Stephenson, Andrew; Garcia, Jorge A.; Grivas, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sarcopenia, or the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, has been investigated as a potential marker of adverse outcomes among surgical patients. Our aim was to assess for changes in psoas muscle volume (PMV) following administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with bladder cancer and to examine whether changes in PMV following NAC are predictive of perioperative complications, pathologic response or survival. Methods: During the period of 2009–2013, patients undergoing NAC and radical cystectomy (RC) at our institution with pre and post NAC cross sectional images available were included. Bilateral total psoas muscle volume (PMV) was obtained from pre- and post- NAC images and the proportion of PMV change was calculated by dividing the change PMV by pre-NAC PMV. Analyses for the assessment of factors predicting PMV loss, partial/complete pathologic response (pPR/pCR), complications, readmission, cancer specific (CSS), recurrence-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were performed. Results: Total of 60 patients had complete radiological data available. Post-NAC PMV and BMI declines were statistically significant, 4.9% and 0.05%, respectively. NAC dose reduction/delay was a significant predictor of PMV loss (coefficient B 4.6; 95% CI 0.05–9.2; p = 0.047). The proportion of PMV decline during NAC was not a predictor of pPR, pCR, complications, readmission, CSS, RFS, or OS. Conclusions: We observed an interval decline in PMV during the period of NAC administration and this decline was more than it could be appreciated with changes in BMI during the same period. PMV decline was associated with the need for dose reduction/dose delay during NAC. In our series, PMV changes occurring during NAC administration were not predictive of pathologic response to chemotherapy, postoperative complications or survival. PMID:28149936

  9. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  10. KEY COMPARISON: EURAMET regional key comparison EURAMET.M.FF-K4.b: Volume intercomparison at 20 L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Elsa; Lau, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the sequence of CIPM key comparisons concerning volume calibrations an interregional comparison CCM.FF-K4 was performed between December 2003 and March 2005 for volume standards of 20 L and 100 mL. The corresponding regional part of this comparison within Europe was performed in 2006 for a 100 mL Gay-Lussac Pycnometer—EUROMET.M.FF-K4 (EUROMET project number 692). It was decided during the EUROMET meeting in Istanbul 2007 to also perform the regional part of this key comparison at 20 L, as EURAMET.M.FF-K4.b (EURAMET project number 1008). This comparison was guided by IPQ (Portugal) with SP (Sweden) acting has the pilot laboratory having taken part in the interregional exercise. Fourteen countries decided to participate in this comparison. One of three 20 L pipettes, 710-04FyV used in the CCM.FF K4, was readjusted by CENAM (Mexico), which initiated this key comparison and produced the transfer standard. The main purpose of this project was to compare the experimental results and uncertainty calculations in calibrating this 20 L pipette and linking the intra-regional European results with the results obtained in the previous inter-regional CIPM key comparison. The results of all laboratories participating in EURAMET project 1008 are presented in this report as well as their equivalence with the reference value of the key comparison CCM.FF-K4. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Deltoid muscle volume affects clinical outcome of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Seo, Anna; Kim, Jeong Jun; Lee, Chang-Hwa; Baek, Seung-Hun; Kim, Shin Yoon; Jeong, Eun Taek; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the interrelation between preoperative deltoid muscle status by measuring the 3-dimensional deltoid muscle volume and postoperative functional outcomes after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty(RTSA). Thirty-five patients who underwent RTSA participated in this study. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) as well as pre- and postoperative radiography and various functional outcome evaluations at least 1 year. The primary outcome parameter was set as age- and sex-matched Constant scores. The 3-dimensional deltoid muscle model was generated using a medical image processing software and in-house code, and the deltoid muscle volume was calculated automatically. Various clinical and radiographic factors comprising the deltoid muscle volume adjusted for body mass index(BMI) were analyzed, and their interrelation with the outcome parameters was appraised using a multivariate analysis. As a result, all practical consequences considerably improved following surgery(all p<0.01). Overall, 20 and 15 indicated a higher and a lower practical consequence than the average, respectively, which was assessed by the matched Constant scores. The deltoid muscle volume adjusted for BMI(p = 0.009), absence of a subscapularis complete tear (p = 0.040), and greater change in acromion-deltoid tuberosity distance(p = 0.013) were associated with higher matched Constant scores. Multivariate analysis indicated that the deltoid muscle volume was the single independent prognostic factor for practical consequences(p = 0.011). In conclusion, the preoperative deltoid muscle volume significantly affected the functional outcome following RTSA in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears. Therefore, more attention should be paid to patients with severe atrophied deltoid muscle who are at a high risk for poor practical consequences subsequent to RTSA. PMID:28355234

  12. Effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Yunoki, T; Matsuura, R; Arimitsu, T; Kimura, T

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during moderate exercise and heavy exercise for 30 min. Total hemoglobin concentration (Total Hb) in the vastus lateralis muscle plus its skin was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. Total Hb significantly increased and remained stable from 20 min in moderate exercise and from 10 min in heavy exercise. Heart rate (HR) rapidly increased until 3 min and showed a steady state in moderate exercise. HR at 30 min was significantly higher than that at 3 min in moderate exercise. HR rapidly increased until 3 min and then gradually but significantly increased in heavy exercise. Increase in total Hb was not significantly related with HR after 3 min of exercise when HR was around 120 beats per min in moderate exercise. Increase in total Hb was significantly related with HR from 3 min to 10 min in the heavy exercise (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.959 to 0.702). It is concluded that an increase in the blood volume in skin plus active muscle is not simply associated with HR drift.

  13. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K81: Chloramphenicol in pig muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzer, Joachim; Henrion, Andre; Gowik, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM) a key comparison, CCQM-K81 'Chloramphenicol in pig muscle', was coordinated by BVL and PTB in 2009/2010. Six NMIs/DIs participated in this comparison. Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an effective broad-spectrum antibiotic which can in principle be used for the treatment of humans and animals. Its use for the treatment of food-producing animals is, however, forbidden worldwide in many countries due to potential severe side effects. The key comparison was the follow-up to the successful pilot study 'CCQM-P90: chloramphenicol in milk'. With this key comparison it was intended to demonstrate the capability of NMIs/DIs to analyse traces of CAP in food at concentration levels resulting from legal requirements for food control. Additionally, the quality of this kind of analysis with respect to compliance with legal requirements for food control methods and the international comparability of measurements should be evaluated in general. The study was classified as a 'track C' study (studies in emerging areas of global interest). For the study incurred lyophilised pig muscle material containing CAP (at a mass-fraction level around the maximum allowable level for import for a number of countries) has been produced as a candidate reference material by BVL and IRMM (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC of the European Commission). Animal treatment and slaughtering of the animal to gain incurred muscle material as well as pre-testing of the CAP content was done at the BVL. The IRMM did further processing of the material and testing of homogeneity and stability. Participants were invited to assign the mass fraction of free CAP in the comparison sample. CCQM-K81 demonstrated successfully the capability of the participating laboratories to assign chloramphenicol values in tissue down to residue levels of around 0.3 ng/g (referring to the

  14. Comparison of Muscle BOLD Responses to Arterial Occlusion at 3T and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Towse, Theodore F.; Childs, Benjamin T.; Sabin, Shea A.; Bush, Emily C.; Elder, Christopher P.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of muscle BOLD (mBOLD) imaging at 7T by comparing the changes in R2* of muscle at 3 and 7T in response to a brief period of tourniquet-induced ischemia. Methods Eight subjects (3 male), aged 29.5 ± 6.1 years (mean ± standard deviation, SD), 167.0 ± 10.6 cm tall with a body mass of 62.0 ± 18.0 kg, participated in the study. Subjects reported to the lab on four separate occasions including a habituation session, two MRI scans, and in a subset of subjects, a session during which changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation were quantified using Doppler ultrasound (U/S) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) respectively. For statistical comparisons between 3T and 7T, R2* rate constants were calculated as R2* = 1/T2*. Results The mean pre-occlusion R2* value was greater at 7T than at 3T (60.16 ± 2.95 vs 35.17 ± 0.35 s−1 respectively, p <0.001). Also, the mean ΔR2*END and ΔR2*POST values were greater for 7T than for 3T (−2.36 ± 0.25 vs. −1.24 ± 0.39 s−1, respectively, Table 1). Conclusion Muscle BOLD contrast at 7T is as much as six-fold greater than at 3T. In addition to providing greater SNR and CNR, 7T mBOLD studies may offer further advantages in the form of greater sensitivity to pathological changes in the muscle microcirculation. PMID:25884888

  15. Postmaximal contraction blood volume responses are blunted in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects in a muscle-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Otto A; Copenhaver, Elizabeth A; Chance, Marti A; Fowler, Michael J; Towse, Theodore F; Kent-Braun, Jane A; Damon, Bruce M

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in postisometric contraction blood volume and oxygenation responses among groups of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obese, and lean individuals detectable using MRI. Eight T2DM patients were individually matched by age, sex, and race to non-T2DM individuals with similar body mass index (obese) and lean subjects. Functional MRI was performed using a dual-gradient-recalled echo, echo-planar imaging sequence with a repetition time of 1 s and at two echo times (TE = 6 and 46 ms). Data were acquired before, during, and after 10-s isometric dorsiflexion contractions performed at 50 and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force. MRI signal intensity (SI) changes from the tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles were plotted as functions of time for each TE. From each time course, the difference between the minimum and the maximum postcontraction SI (ΔSI) were determined for TE = 6 ms (ΔSI(6)) and TE = 46 ms (ΔSI(46)), reflecting variations in blood volume and oxyhemoglobin saturation, respectively. Following 50% MVC contractions, the mean postcontraction ΔSI(6) values were similar in the three groups. Following MVC only, and in the EDL muscle only, T2DM and obese participants had ∼56% lower ΔSI(6) than the lean individuals. Also following MVC only, the ΔSI(46) response in the EDL was lower in T2DM subjects than in lean individuals. These data suggest that skeletal muscle small vessel impairment occurs in T2DM and body mass index-matched subjects, in muscle-specific and contraction intensity-dependent manners.

  16. Postmaximal contraction blood volume responses are blunted in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects in a muscle-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Otto A.; Copenhaver, Elizabeth A.; Chance, Marti A.; Fowler, Michael J.; Towse, Theodore F.; Kent-Braun, Jane A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in postisometric contraction blood volume and oxygenation responses among groups of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obese, and lean individuals detectable using MRI. Eight T2DM patients were individually matched by age, sex, and race to non-T2DM individuals with similar body mass index (obese) and lean subjects. Functional MRI was performed using a dual-gradient-recalled echo, echo-planar imaging sequence with a repetition time of 1 s and at two echo times (TE = 6 and 46 ms). Data were acquired before, during, and after 10-s isometric dorsiflexion contractions performed at 50 and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force. MRI signal intensity (SI) changes from the tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles were plotted as functions of time for each TE. From each time course, the difference between the minimum and the maximum postcontraction SI (ΔSI) were determined for TE = 6 ms (ΔSI6) and TE = 46 ms (ΔSI46), reflecting variations in blood volume and oxyhemoglobin saturation, respectively. Following 50% MVC contractions, the mean postcontraction ΔSI6 values were similar in the three groups. Following MVC only, and in the EDL muscle only, T2DM and obese participants had ∼56% lower ΔSI6 than the lean individuals. Also following MVC only, the ΔSI46 response in the EDL was lower in T2DM subjects than in lean individuals. These data suggest that skeletal muscle small vessel impairment occurs in T2DM and body mass index-matched subjects, in muscle-specific and contraction intensity-dependent manners. PMID:21572006

  17. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  18. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis.

  19. Comparison of Cerebral Blood Volume and Plasma Volume in Untreated Intracranial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Joana; Eldeniz, Cihat; An, Hongyu; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plasma volume and blood volume are imaging-derived parameters that are often used to evaluation intracranial tumors. Physiologically, these parameters are directly related, but their two different methods of measurements, T1-dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)- and T2-dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MR utilize different model assumptions and approaches. This poses the question of whether the interchangeable use of T1-DCE-MRI derived fractionated plasma volume (vp) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) assessed using DSC-MRI, particularly in glioblastoma, is reliable, and if this relationship can be generalized to other types of brain tumors. Our goal was to examine the hypothetical correlation between these parameters in three most common intracranial tumor types. Methods Twenty-four newly diagnosed, treatment naïve brain tumor patients, who had undergone DCE- and DSC-MRI, were classified in three histologically proven groups: glioblastoma (n = 7), meningioma (n = 9), and intraparenchymal metastases (n = 8). The rCBV was obtained from DSC after normalization with the normal-appearing anatomically symmetrical contralateral white matter. Correlations between these parameters were evaluated using Pearson (r), Spearman's (ρ) and Kendall’s tau-b (τB) rank correlation coefficient. Results The Pearson, Spearman and Kendall’s correlation between vp with rCBV were r = 0.193, ρ = 0.253 and τB = 0.33 (p-Pearson = 0.326, p-Spearman = 0.814 and p-Kendall = 0.823) in glioblastoma, r = -0.007, ρ = 0.051 and τB = 0.135 (p-Pearson = 0.970, p-Spearman = 0.765 and p-Kendall = 0.358) in meningiomas, and r = 0.289, ρ = 0.228 and τB = 0.239 (p-Pearson = 0.109, p-Spearman = 0.210 and p-Kendall = 0.095) in metastasis. Conclusion Results indicate that no correlation exists between vp with rCBV in glioblastomas, meningiomas and intraparenchymal metastatic lesions. Consequently, these parameters, as calculated in this study, should not be used interchangeably in

  20. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF A REDUCED VOLUME MARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TEST METHOD USING AMPHIPOD AMPELISCA ABDITA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has standardized methods for performing acute marine amphipod sediment toxicity tests. A test design reducing sediment volume from 200 to 50 ml and overlying water from 600 to 150 ml was recently proposed. An interlaboratory comparison wa...

  1. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  2. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  3. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  4. Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training volume and increases in muscle mass: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ogborn, Dan; Krieger, James W

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the current literature and elucidate the effects of total weekly resistance training (RT) volume on changes in measures of muscle mass via meta-regression. The final analysis comprised 34 treatment groups from 15 studies. Outcomes for weekly sets as a continuous variable showed a significant effect of volume on changes in muscle size (P = 0.002). Each additional set was associated with an increase in effect size (ES) of 0.023 corresponding to an increase in the percentage gain by 0.37%. Outcomes for weekly sets categorised as lower or higher within each study showed a significant effect of volume on changes in muscle size (P = 0.03); the ES difference between higher and lower volumes was 0.241, which equated to a percentage gain difference of 3.9%. Outcomes for weekly sets as a three-level categorical variable (<5, 5-9 and 10+ per muscle) showed a trend for an effect of weekly sets (P = 0.074). The findings indicate a graded dose-response relationship whereby increases in RT volume produce greater gains in muscle hypertrophy.

  5. Development of congenital clubfoot during growth: a long-term study on the basis of pedobarography, biomechanics, and magnetic resonance imaging measurements of muscle volumes.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Renée; Mitternacht, Jürgen; von Pfister, Lorenz; Turova, Varvara; Blumenstein, Tobias; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the degree to which the operated congenital asymptomatic clubfoot still shows malpositions or whether it approaches a physiological development with increasing age. Clubfeet of 12 children were examined repeatedly over up to 10 years using pedobarography. The muscle volumes of the lower legs were investigated with MRI and compared with those of a healthy control group. Although some characteristics of clubfoot remained in the plantar pressure distribution, a gradual decrease in the heel and metatarsus load accompanied by an increase in the forefoot load could be registered as is typical for a developing healthy child's foot. The MRI showed a reduced volume of all muscles of the affected lower leg. A correlation was detected between the measured moments in the upper and lower ankle joints and the volumes of the muscles that move these joints. Even though a functional and anatomical separation between the two groups existed, the general developmental changes during growth were similar. The combination of pedobarographic data and derived joint moments with MRI-measured muscle volumes indicated that higher ankle joint moments in clubfoot were associated with smaller muscle volume and were therefore generated by higher joint rigidity.

  6. [Comparison of volume preset and pressure preset ventilators during daytime nasal ventilation in chronic respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Wolter, P; Berthier, F; Tamisier, R; Jullien, V; Lemoigne, F; Blaive, B

    2001-02-01

    Both volume preset and pressure preset ventilators are available for domiciliary nasal ventilation. Owing to their technical characteristics, it has been suggested that impaired ventilatory mechanics might cause a drop in the tidal volume (Vt) delivered by pressure preset devices, thereby placing mechanical ventilation at risk of inefficacy. We have assessed two ventilator systems (one pressure preset and one volume preset) with regard to the tidal volume and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PetCO(2)) changes that may be achieved in a group of awake patients with stable chronic respiratory failure (CRF). Eleven patients with stable CRF were ventilated in the assist/control mode for two consecutive one-hour periods. One ventilator was tested each hour, in random order. The VIGIL'AIR(R) system was used to record Vt, Respiratory Rate (RR), and Inspiratory/Expiratory ratio (I/E). The deviation E (E=preset value - measured value) was calculated for each measurement. Changes in PetCO(2) and arterial oxygen saturation were determined respectively by a capnometer and a pulse oximeter. Comparison of the mean deviation of Vt calculated for the two ventilators revealed a difference in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The deviation was greatest with the pressure preset ventilator (PPV), which gave mean measured values higher than the mean preset values. The same comparison failed to reveal any difference in restrictive CRF. Comparison of the volume preset and pressure preset ventilators for RR, I/E and PetCO(2) did not reveal any difference. Compared to the volume preset ventilator, the efficacy of PPV to ventilate is not affected by the restrictive or obstructive nature of CRF. Our results show that pressure-preset ventilator is an adequate alternative to the volume-preset device for daytime non invasive ventilation in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

  7. Comparison of total protein concentration in skeletal muscle as measured by the Bradford and Lowry assays.

    PubMed

    Seevaratnam, Rajini; Patel, Barkha P; Hamadeh, Mazen J

    2009-06-01

    The Lowry and Bradford assays are the most commonly used methods of total protein quantification, yet vary in several aspects. To date, no comparisons have been made in skeletal muscle. We compared total protein concentrations of mouse red and white gastrocnemius, reagent stability, protein stability and range of linearity using both assays. The Lowry averaged protein concentrations 15% higher than the Bradford with a moderate correlation (r = 0.36, P = 0.01). However, Bland-Altman analysis revealed considerable bias (15.8 +/- 29.7%). Both Lowry reagents and its protein-reagent interactions were less stable over time than the Bradford. The linear range of concentration was smaller for the Lowry (0.05-0.50 mg/ml) than the Bradford (0-2.0 mg/ml). We conclude that the Bradford and Lowry measures of total protein concentration in skeletal muscle are not interchangeable. The Bradford and Lowry assays have various strengths and weaknesses in terms of substance interference and protein size. However, the Bradford provides greater reagent stability, protein-reagent stability and range of linearity, and requires less time to analyse compared to the Lowry assay.

  8. Triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise improves session volume load and reduces muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen P; Mabon, Tom; Pryde, Mitchell; Feebrey, Sarah; Cannon, Jack

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise would enhance muscular performance, produce a more favorable anabolic profile, and reduce biochemical markers of muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. Fifteen male strength-trained athletes completed two acute lower-body resistance exercise sessions to fatigue 7 days apart. After a 4-hour fast, participants consumed either a multinutrient supplement (Musashi 1-2-3 Step System, Notting Hill, Australia) (SUPP) or placebo (PLA) beverage preexercise (PRE), during (DUR), and immediately postexercise (IP). Session volume loads were calculated as kilograms × repetitions. Lower-body peak power was measured using unloaded repeated countermovement jumps, and blood samples were collected to assess biochemistry, serum hormones, and muscle damage markers at PRE, DUR, IP, 30 minutes postexercise (P30), and 24 hours postexercise (P24h). The SUPP demonstrated increased glucose concentrations at DUR and IP compared with at PRE (P < .01), whereas PLA demonstrated higher glucose at P30 compared with at PRE (P < .001). Session volume load was higher for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). Cortisol increased at DUR, IP, and P30 compared with at PRE in both treatments (P < .05); however, SUPP also displayed lower cortisol at P24h compared with at PRE and PLA (P < .01). The total testosterone response to exercise was higher for PLA compared with SUPP (P < .01); however, total creatine kinase and C-reactive protein responses to exercise were lower for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). These data indicate that although triphasic multinutrient supplementation did not produce a more favorable anabolic profile, it improved acute resistance exercise performance while attenuating muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

  9. Intensive training and reduced volume increases muscle FXYD1 expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise in athletes.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Martin; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Christensen, Peter M; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the effect of intensive training in combination with marked reduction in training volume on phospholemman (FXYD1) expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (10-12 × ∼30-s sprints) two or three times per week and aerobic high-intensity training (4-5 × 3-4 min at 90-95% of peak aerobic power output) 1-2 times per week for 7 wk and reduced the training volume by 70%. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and during a repeated high-intensity exercise protocol, and protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Expression of FXYD1 (30%), actin (40%), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (12%), phospholamban (PLN) (16%), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) γ/δ (25%) was higher (P < 0.05) than before the training intervention. In addition, after the intervention, nonspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation was higher (P < 0.05) at rest and during exercise, mainly achieved by an increased FXYD1 Ser-68 phosphorylation, compared with before the intervention. CaMKII, Thr-287, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 Thr-56 phosphorylation at rest and during exercise, overall PKCα/β, Thr-638/641, and mTOR Ser-2448 phosphorylation during repeated intense exercise as well as resting PLN Thr-17 phosphorylation were also higher (P < 0.05) compared with before the intervention period. Thus, a period of high-intensity training with reduced training volume increases expression and phosphorylation levels of FXYD1, which may affect Na(+)/K(+) pump activity and muscle K(+) homeostasis during intense exercise. Furthermore, higher expression of CaMKII and PLN, as well as increased phosphorylation of CaMKII Thr-287 may have improved intracellular Ca(2+) handling.

  10. Amygdalar and hippocampal volume: A comparison between manual segmentation, Freesurfer and VBM.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Oliver; Pohlack, Sebastian; Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Winkelmann, Tobias; Plichta, Michael M; Demirakca, Traute; Flor, Herta

    2015-09-30

    Automated segmentation of the amygdala and the hippocampus is of interest for research looking at large datasets where manual segmentation of T1-weighted magnetic resonance tomography images is less feasible for morphometric analysis. Manual segmentation still remains the gold standard for subcortical structures like the hippocampus and the amygdala. A direct comparison of VBM8 and Freesurfer is rarely done, because VBM8 results are most often used for voxel-based analysis. We used the same region-of-interest (ROI) for Freesurfer and VBM8 to relate automated and manually derived volumes of the amygdala and the hippocampus. We processed a large manually segmented dataset of n=92 independent samples with an automated segmentation strategy (VBM8 vs. Freesurfer Version 5.0). For statistical analysis, we only calculated Pearsons's correlation coefficients, but used methods developed for comparison such as Lin's concordance coefficient. The correlation between automatic and manual segmentation was high for the hippocampus [0.58-0.76] and lower for the amygdala [0.45-0.59]. However, concordance coefficients point to higher concordance for the amygdala [0.46-0.62] instead of the hippocampus [0.06-0.12]. VBM8 and Freesurfer segmentation performed on a comparable level in comparison to manual segmentation. We conclude (1) that correlation alone does not capture systematic differences (e.g. of hippocampal volumes), (2) calculation of ROI volumes with VBM8 gives measurements comparable to Freesurfer V5.0 when using the same ROI and (3) systematic and proportional differences are caused mainly by different definitions of anatomic boundaries and only to a lesser part by different segmentation strategies. This work underscores the importance of using method comparison techniques and demonstrates that even with high correlation coefficients, there can be still large differences in absolute volume.

  11. A comparison of the spindles in two different muscles of the frog.

    PubMed

    Brown, M C

    1971-08-01

    1. The responses of spindles in the iliofibularis muscle of frogs to stretch during either small motor nerve fibre stimulation or the application of suxamethonium were compared.2. All spindles which were excited by small motor nerve fibre stimulation were also excited by suxamethonium, and their responses to these two methods of excitation were very similar. The drug dose was usually 5-10 mug/ml. but smaller and larger doses were effective. Large doses (> 100 mug/ml.) could sometimes lead to a reversible partial block of the spindle response to stretch.3. Suxamethonium also caused a prolonged contraction in extrafusal slow muscle fibres. This contraction was not responsible for the effect on the spindle, because the time course of its action on the muscle tension and on the spindle afferent was different.4. It was concluded that suxamethonium stimulated prolonged contraction in the small intrafusal muscle fibres, which are known to be innervated by the small motor nerve fibres.5. Only about half of the spindles in the iliofibularis muscle were excited by suxamethonium.6. In the sartorius muscle which has no slow extrafusal muscle fibres, no spindles were found to be excited by suxamethonium in the way characteristic of that due to small intrafusal muscle fibre contraction.7. It is concluded that, in frog muscles which have no slow extrafusal fibres, the muscle spindles do not have small intrafusal muscle fibres of the kind found in the iliofibularis muscle.

  12. Noninvasive, low-noise, fast imaging of blood volume and deoxygenation changes in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous-wave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanqing; Lech, Gwen; Nioka, Shoko; Intes, Xavier; Chance, Britton

    2002-08-01

    This article focuses on optimizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a three-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) near-infrared continuous-wave (cw) imager and its application to in vivo muscle metabolism measurement. The shot-noise limited SNR is derived and calculated to be 2 x104 for the physiological blood concentrations of muscle. Aiming at shot-noise limited SNR performance and fast imaging, we utilize sample and hold circuits to reduce high-frequency noise. These circuits have also been designed to be parallel integrating, through which SNR of 2 x103 and 2 Hz imaging acquisition rate have been achieved when the probe is placed on a muscle model. The noise corresponds to 2 x10-4 optical density error, which suggests an in vitro resolution of 15. 4 nM blood volume and 46.8 nM deoxygenation changes. A 48 dB digital gain control circuit with 256 steps is employed to enlarge the dynamic range of the imager. We utilize cuff ischemia as a living model demonstration and its results are reported. The instrument is applied during exercise to measure the changes of blood volume and deoxygenation, which provides important information about muscle metabolism. We find that the primary source of noise encountered during exercise experiment is from the random motion of muscle. The results demonstrate that the LED cw imager is ideal for the noninvasive study of muscle metabolism.

  13. Comparison of gray matter volume and thickness for analysis of cortical changes in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kunchen; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2011-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two indices of concern in brain structure magnetic resonance imaging research. Gray matter volume reflects mixed-measurement information of cerebral cortex, while cortical thickness reflects only the information of distance between inner surface and outer surface of cerebral cortex. Using Scaled Subprofile Modeling based on Principal Component Analysis (SSM_PCA) and Pearson's Correlation Analysis, this study further provided quantitative comparisons and depicted both global relevance and local relevance to comprehensively investigate morphometrical abnormalities in cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and thirteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that factor scores from the first 8 principal components accounted for ~53.38% of the total variance for gray matter volume, and ~50.18% for cortical thickness. Factor scores from the fifth principal component showed significant correlation. In addition, gray matter voxel-based volume was closely related to cortical thickness alterations in most cortical cortex, especially, in some typical abnormal brain regions such as insula and the parahippocampal gyrus in AD. These findings suggest that these two measurements are effective indices for understanding the neuropathology in AD. Studies using both gray matter volume and cortical thickness can separate the causes of the discrepancy, provide complementary information and carry out a comprehensive description of the morphological changes of brain structure.

  14. Muscle plasticity: comparison of a 30-Hz burst with 10-Hz continuous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A S; Stone, H E; Roessmann, U; Burke, M; Tisdale, E; Mortimer, J T

    1989-03-01

    The changes in the contractile properties induced by a 30-Hz phasic stimulation paradigm were measured and compared with the changes induced by a 10-Hz continuous stimulation paradigm. The study was performed on the tibialis anterior muscles of cats with one paradigm applied to one hindlimb muscle and the other to the contralateral limb. Both hindlimb muscles received the same number of stimuli in a day, making the average stimulation frequency 10 Hz. Two periods of daily stimulation were studied, 8 and 24 h/day. Muscles stimulated at 30 Hz produced greater overall tetanic tension and, during a prolonged stimulation test, exerted a greater mean tension than muscles stimulated at 10 Hz (50 and 32% increase for animals stimulated for 8 and 24 h/day, respectively). Muscle mass was least reduced and fewer pathological abnormalities were observed in the muscles stimulated at 30 Hz. There were no apparent differences in the histochemistry or biochemistry between muscles stimulated at 10 and 30 Hz, which could account for these differences in muscle properties. These results indicate the 30-Hz paradigm may be better suited than 10 Hz continuous stimulation for applications requiring sustained muscle tension such as correction of scoliosis or muscle conditioning for motor prostheses.

  15. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  16. Comparison of /sup 45/Ca binding and mobilization in cartilage and smooth muscle of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, F.R.; Weiss, G.B.; Sturm, B.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea pig trachea, separation of smooth muscle from cartilage permits measurement of /sup 45/Ca fluxes in more homogeneous preparations. The role of cartilage Ca/sup + +/ as a source for smooth muscle Ca/sup + +/ mobilization can be assessed by similar experiments with the two dissociated preparations. Equilibration of /sup 45/Ca into cartilage occurred over 2 hr; plotting of /sup 45/Ca uptake on Scatchard coordinates yields high and low affinity Ca/sup + +/ uptake components similar to those in tracheal and other smooth muscles. Washout of /sup 45/Ca from cartilage demonstrated two components with the more rapid including the extracellular (/sup 14/C-sucrose) compartment. Washout of higher affinity /sup 45/Ca (after incubation in 0.03 mM Ca/sup + +/) was increased in cartilage by Sr/sup + +/, added Ca/sup + +/, La/sup + + +/ and EGTA. Comparison with tracheal smooth muscle /sup 45/Ca washouts indicates that those Ca/sup + +/ components previously identified as of intracellular origin were not present in cartilage. Exposure to 60 mM (added) K/sup +/ during /sup 45/Ca washout increased /sup 45/Ca efflux in cartilage but not in smooth muscle. This release of /sup 45/Ca by K/sup +/ may indicate that Ca/sup + +/ can be mobilized from cartilage sites by K/sup +/ to support smooth muscle contractile responses. Thus, cartilage Ca/sup + +/ could be an important source of Ca/sup + +/ for excitation-contraction coupling in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

  17. Capillary ultrastructure and mitochondrial volume density in skeletal muscle in relation to reduced exercise capacity of patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Baum, Oliver; Torchetti, Eleonora; Malik, Corinna; Hoier, Birgitte; Walker, Meegan; Walker, Philip J; Odriozola, Adolfo; Graber, Franziska; Tschanz, Stefan A; Bangsbo, Jens; Hoppeler, Hans; Askew, Christopher D; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-05-15

    Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most commonly reported symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Impaired limb blood flow is a major casual factor of lower exercise tolerance in PAD but cannot entirely explain it. We hypothesized that IC is associated with structural changes of the capillary-mitochondria interface that could contribute to the reduction of exercise tolerance in IC patients. Capillary and mitochondrial morphometry were performed after light and transmission electron microscopy using vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 14 IC patients and 10 age-matched controls, and peak power output (PPO) was determined for all participants using an incremental single-leg knee-extension protocol. Capillary density was lower (411 ± 90 mm(-2) vs. 506 ± 95 mm(-2); P ≤ 0.05) in the biopsies of the IC patients than in those of the controls. The basement membrane (BM) around capillaries was thicker (543 ± 82 nm vs. 423 ± 97 nm; P ≤ 0.01) and the volume density of mitochondria was lower (3.51 ± 0.56% vs. 4.60 ± 0.74%; P ≤ 0.01) in the IC patients than the controls. In the IC patients, a higher proportion of capillaries appeared with collapsed slit-like lumen and/or swollen endothelium. PPO was lower (18.5 ± 9.9 W vs. 33.5 ± 9.4 W; P ≤ 0.01) in the IC patients than the controls. We suggest that several structural alterations in skeletal muscle, either collectively or separately, contribute to the reduction of exercise tolerance in IC patients.

  18. A comparison of bone regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells and muscle-derived stem cells and the critical role of BMP.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Tang, Ying; Lu, Aiping; Tan, Jian; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Kozemchak, Adam M; Wang, Bing; Cummins, James H; Tuan, Rocky S; Huard, Johnny

    2014-08-01

    Adult multipotent stem cells have been isolated from a variety of human tissues including human skeletal muscle, which represent an easily accessible source of stem cells. It has been shown that human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (hMDSCs) are muscle-derived mesenchymal stem cells capable of multipotent differentiation. Although hMDSCs can undergo osteogenic differentiation and form bone when genetically modified to express BMP2; it is still unclear whether hMDSCs are as efficient as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) for bone regeneration. The current study aimed to address this question by performing a parallel comparison between hMDSCs and hBMMSCs to evaluate their osteogenic and bone regeneration capacities. Our results demonstrated that hMDSCs and hBMMSCs had similar osteogenic-related gene expression profiles and had similar osteogenic differentiation capacities in vitro when transduced to express BMP2. Both the untransduced hMDSCs and hBMMSCs formed very negligible amounts of bone in the critical sized bone defect model when using a fibrin sealant scaffold; however, when genetically modified with lenti-BMP2, both populations successfully regenerated bone in the defect area. No significant differences were found in the newly formed bone volumes and bone defect coverage between the hMDSC and hBMMSC groups. Although both cell types formed mature bone tissue by 6 weeks post-implantation, the newly formed bone in the hMDSCs group underwent quicker remodelling than the hBMMSCs group. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that hMDSCs are as efficient as hBMMSCs in terms of their bone regeneration capacity; however, both cell types required genetic modification with BMP in order to regenerate bone in vivo.

  19. A comparison of optimisation methods and knee joint degrees of freedom on muscle force predictions during single-leg hop landings.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Perraton, Luke; Fok, Laurence; Muñoz, Mario A; Clark, Ross; Pivonka, Peter; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of different optimisation methods and different knee joint degrees of freedom (DOF) on muscle force predictions during a single legged hop. Nineteen subjects performed single-legged hopping manoeuvres and subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed to predict muscle forces during the movement. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC) methods using either 1 or 3 DOF knee joint models. All sagittal and transverse plane joint angles calculated using inverse kinematics or CMC in a 1 DOF or 3 DOF knee were well-matched (RMS error<3°). Biarticular muscles (hamstrings, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) showed more differences in muscle force profiles when comparing between the different muscle prediction approaches where these muscles showed larger time delays for many of the comparisons. The muscle force magnitudes of vasti, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were not greatly influenced by the choice of muscle force prediction method with low normalised root mean squared errors (<48%) observed in most comparisons. We conclude that SO and CMC can be used to predict lower-limb muscle co-contraction during hopping movements. However, care must be taken in interpreting the magnitude of force predicted in the biarticular muscles and the soleus, especially when using a 1 DOF knee. Despite this limitation, given that SO is a more robust and computationally efficient method for predicting muscle forces than CMC, we suggest that SO can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal models that have a 1 or 3 DOF knee joint to study the relative differences and the role of muscles during hopping activities in future studies.

  20. Comparison of contraction times of a muscle and its motor units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, E.; Smith, L.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The twitch contraction time (CT) for each of 13 soleus (SOL) and 13 medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles was compared with the mean CT from a sample of its motor units (MUs; 356 total) to see if the CT of a whole muscle when tested at its optimal length (Lo) differed systematically from that of its MUs tested at their individual Lo's. The CTs of the whole muscle were significantly longer in the ratio of 1.13. This is consistent with a hypothesis that electrical-field effects result in a more protracted contraction of the individual muscle fiber.

  1. Comparison of muscle synergies for running between different foot strike patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Koji; Hagio, Shota; Kibushi, Benio; Moritani, Toshio; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that humans run with a fore-foot strike (FFS), a mid-foot strike (MFS) or a rear-foot strike (RFS). A modular neural control mechanism of human walking and running has been discussed in terms of muscle synergies. However, the neural control mechanisms for different foot strike patterns during running have been overlooked even though kinetic and kinematic differences between different foot strike patterns have been reported. Thus, we examined the differences in the neural control mechanisms of human running between FFS and RFS by comparing the muscle synergies extracted from each foot strike pattern during running. Muscle synergies were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization with electromyogram activity recorded bilaterally from 12 limb and trunk muscles in ten male subjects during FFS and RFS running at different speeds (5–15 km/h). Six muscle synergies were extracted from all conditions, and each synergy had a specific function and a single main peak of activity in a cycle. The six muscle synergies were similar between FFS and RFS as well as across subjects and speeds. However, some muscle weightings showed significant differences between FFS and RFS, especially the weightings of the tibialis anterior of the landing leg in synergies activated just before touchdown. The activation patterns of the synergies were also different for each foot strike pattern in terms of the timing, duration, and magnitude of the main peak of activity. These results suggest that the central nervous system controls running by sending a sequence of signals to six muscle synergies. Furthermore, a change in the foot strike pattern is accomplished by modulating the timing, duration and magnitude of the muscle synergy activity and by selectively activating other muscle synergies or subsets of the muscle synergies. PMID:28158258

  2. Extraocular Muscle Compartments in Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Clark, Robert A.; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate changes in volumes of extraocular muscle (EOM) compartments in unilateral superior oblique (SO) palsy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods High-resolution, surface-coil MRI was obtained in 19 patients with unilateral SO palsy and 19 age-matched orthotropic control subjects. Rectus EOMs and the SO were divided into two anatomic compartments for volume analysis in patients with unilateral SO palsy, allowing comparison of total compartmental volumes versus controls. Medial and lateral compartmental volumes of the SO muscle were compared in patients with isotropic (round shape) versus anisotropic (elongated shape) SO atrophy. Results The medial and lateral compartments of the ipsilesional SO muscles were equally atrophic in isotropic SO palsy, whereas the lateral compartment was significantly smaller than the medial in anisotropic SO palsy (P = 0.01). In contrast to the SO, there were no differential compartmental volume changes in rectus EOMs; however, there was significant total muscle hypertrophy in the ipsilesional inferior rectus (IR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles and contralesional superior rectus (SR) muscles. Medial rectus (MR) volume was normal both ipsi- and contralesionally. Conclusions A subset of patients with SO palsy exhibit selective atrophy of the lateral, predominantly vertically acting SO compartment. Superior oblique atrophy is associated with whole-muscle volume changes in the ipsilesional IR, ipsilesional LR, and contralesional SR; however, SO muscle atrophy is not associated with compartmentally selective volume changes in the rectus EOMs. Selective compartmental SO pathology may provide an anatomic mechanism that explains some of the variability in clinical presentations of SO palsy. PMID:27768791

  3. A comparison of peripheral imaging technologies for bone and muscle quantification: a technical review of image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K

    2016-12-14

    The choice of an appropriate imaging technique to quantify bone, muscle, or muscle adiposity needs to be guided by a thorough understanding of its competitive advantages over other modalities balanced by its limitations. This review details the technical machinery and methods behind peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), high-resolution (HR)-pQCT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that drive successful depiction of bone and muscle morphometry, densitometry, and structure. It discusses a number of image acquisition settings, the challenges associated with using one versus another, and compares the risk-benefits across the different modalities. Issues related to all modalities including partial volume artifact, beam hardening, calibration, and motion assessment are also detailed. The review further provides data and images to illustrate differences between methods to better guide the reader in selecting an imaging method strategically. Overall, investigators should be cautious of the impact of imaging parameters on image signal or contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the need to report these settings in future publications. The effect of motion should be assessed on images and a decision made to exclude prior to segmentation. A more standardized approach to imaging bone and muscle on pQCT and MRI could enhance comparability across studies and could improve the quality of meta-analyses.

  4. A comparison of peripheral imaging technologies for bone and muscle quantification: a technical review of image acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A.K.O.

    2016-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate imaging technique to quantify bone, muscle, or muscle adiposity needs to be guided by a thorough understanding of its competitive advantages over other modalities balanced by its limitations. This review details the technical machinery and methods behind peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), high-resolution (HR)-pQCT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that drive successful depiction of bone and muscle morphometry, densitometry, and structure. It discusses a number of image acquisition settings, the challenges associated with using one versus another, and compares the risk-benefits across the different modalities. Issues related to all modalities including partial volume artifact, beam hardening, calibration, and motion assessment are also detailed. The review further provides data and images to illustrate differences between methods to better guide the reader in selecting an imaging method strategically. Overall, investigators should be cautious of the impact of imaging parameters on image signal or contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the need to report these settings in future publications. The effect of motion should be assessed on images and a decision made to exclude prior to segmentation. A more standardized approach to imaging bone and muscle on pQCT and MRI could enhance comparability across studies and could improve the quality of meta-analyses. PMID:27973379

  5. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Frechette, Danielle M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture.

  6. Lung volume assessment for a cross-comparison of two breathing-adapted techniques in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Luc . E-mail: luc.simon@curie.net; Giraud, Philippe; Servois, Vincent; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the validity of gated radiotherapy of lung by using a cross-check methodology based on four-dimensional (4D)-computed tomography (CT) exams. Variations of volume of a breathing phantom was used as an indicator. Methods and Materials: A balloon was periodically inflated and deflated by a medical ventilator. The volume variation ({delta}V) of the balloon was measured simultaneously by a spirometer, taken as reference, and by contouring 4D-CT series (10 phases) acquired by the real-time position management system (RPM). Similar cross-comparison was performed for 2 lung patients, 1 with free breathing (FB), the other with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. Results: During FB, {delta}V measured by the spirometer and from 4D-CT were in good agreement: the mean differences for all phases were 8.1 mL for the balloon and 10.5 mL for a patient-test. End-inspiration lung volume has been shown to be slightly underestimated by the 4D-CT. The discrepancy for {delta}V between DIBH and end-expiration, measured from CT and from spirometer, respectively, was less than 3%. Conclusions: Provided that each slice series is correctly associated with the proper breathing phase, 4D-CT allows an accurate assessment of lung volume during the whole breathing cycle ({delta}V error <3% compared with the spirometer signal). Taking the lung volume variation into account is a central issue in the evaluation and control of the toxicity for lung radiation treatments.

  7. Comparison of rotator cuff muscle architecture between humans and other selected vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Kwan, Alan; Eng, Carolyn M; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-01-15

    In this study, we compare rotator cuff muscle architecture of typically used animal models with that of humans and quantify the scaling relationships of these muscles across mammals. The four muscles that correspond to the human rotator cuff - supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor - of 10 commonly studied animals were excised and subjected to a series of comparative measurements. When body mass among animals was regressed against physiological cross-sectional area, muscle mass and normalized fiber length, the confidence intervals suggested geometric scaling but did not exclude other scaling relationships. Based on the architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of fiber length-to-moment arm ratio, fiber length-to-muscle length ratio and the fraction of the total rotator cuff physiological cross-sectional area contributed by each muscle, chimpanzees were found to be the most similar to humans (ADI=2.15), followed closely by capuchins (ADI=2.16). Interestingly, of the eight non-primates studied, smaller mammals such as mice, rats and dogs were more similar to humans in architectural parameters compared with larger mammals such as sheep, pigs or cows. The force production versus velocity trade-off (indicated by fiber length-to-moment arm ratio) and the excursion ability (indicated by fiber length-to-muscle length ratio) of humans were also most similar to those of primates, followed by the small mammals. Overall, primates provide the best architectural representation of human muscle architecture. However, based on the muscle architectural parameters of non-primates, smaller rather than larger mammals may be better models for studying muscles related to the human rotator cuff.

  8. Sarcomere-length dependence of lattice volume and radial mass transfer of myosin cross-bridges in rat papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Naoto; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Toyota, Hiroko; Araki, Junichi; Shimizu, Juichiro; Iribe, Gentaro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Mohri, Satoshi; Tsujioka, Katsuhiko; Suga, Hiroyuki; Kajiya, Fumihiko

    2004-05-01

    We examined the sarcomere length-dependence of the spacing of the hexagonal lattice of the myofilaments and the mass transfer of myosin cross-bridges during contraction of right ventricular papillary muscle of the rat. The lattice spacing and mass transfer were measured by using X-ray diffraction, and the sarcomere length was monitored by laser diffraction at the same time. Although the lattice spacing and the sarcomere length were inversely related, their relationship was not exactly isovolumic. The cell volume decreased by about 15% when the sarcomere length was shortened from 2.3 micro m to 1.8 micro m. Twitch tension increased with sarcomere length (the Frank-Starling law). At the peak tension, the ratio of the intensity of the (1,0) equatorial reflection to that of the (1,1) reflection was smaller when the tension was greater, showing that the larger tension at a longer sarcomere length accompanies a larger amount of mass transfer of cross-bridges from the thick to the thin filament. The result suggests that the Frank-Starling law is due to an increase in the number of myosin heads attached to actin, not in the average force produced by each head.

  9. Comparison of immediate complete denture, tooth and implant-supported overdenture on vertical dimension and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Farhan Khalid; Gebreel, Ashraf; Elshokouki, Ali hamed; Habib, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the changes in the occlusal vertical dimension, activity of masseter muscles and biting force after insertion of immediate denture constructed with conventional, tooth-supported and Implant-supported immediate mandibular complete denture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were selected and treatment was carried out with all the three different concepts i.e, immediate denture constructed with conventional (Group A), tooth-supported (Group B) and Implant-supported (Group C) immediate mandibular complete dentures. Parameters of evaluation and comparison were occlusal vertical dimension measured by radiograph (at three different time intervals), Masseter muscle electromyographic (EMG) measurement by EMG analysis (at three different positions of jaws) and bite force measured by force transducer (at two different time intervals). The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA-F test at 5% level of significance. If the F test was significant, Least Significant Difference test was performed to test further significant differences between variables. RESULTS Comparison between mean differences in occlusal vertical dimension for tested groups showed that it was only statistically significant at 1 year after immediate dentures insertion. Comparison between mean differences in wavelet packet coefficients of the electromyographic signals of masseter muscles for tested groups was not significant at rest position, but significant at initial contact position and maximum voluntary clench position. Comparison between mean differences in maximum biting force for tested groups was not statistically significant at 5% level of significance. CONCLUSION Immediate complete overdentures whether tooth or implant supported prosthesis is recommended than totally mucosal supported prosthesis. PMID:22737309

  10. Effects of Low-Intensity Cycle Training with Restricted Leg Blood Flow on Thigh Muscle Volume and VO2MAX in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Sakamaki, Mikako; Ozaki, Hayao; Ogasawara, Riki; Sugaya, Masato; Kudo, Maiko; Kurano, Miwa; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Sato, Yoshiaki; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishii, Naokata

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent improvements in aerobic capacity and muscle hypertrophy in response to a single mode of training have not been reported. We examined the effects of low-intensity cycle exercise training with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle size and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). A group of 19 young men (mean age ± SD: 23.0 ± 1.7 years) were allocated randomly into either a BFR-training group (n=9, BFR-training) or a non-BFR control training group (n=10, CON-training), both of which trained 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Training intensity and duration were 40% of VO2max and 15 min for the BFR-training group and 40% of VO2max and 45 min for the CON-training group. MRI-measured thigh and quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume increased by 3.4-5.1% (P < 0.01) and isometric knee extension strength tended to increase by 7.7% (p < 0.10) in the BFR-training group. There was no change in muscle size (~0.6%) and strength (~1.4%) in the CON-training group. Significant improvements in VO2max (6.4%) and exercise time until exhaustion (15.4%) were observed in the BFR-training group (p < 0.05) but not in the CON-training group (-0.1 and 3. 9%, respectively). The results suggest that low-intensity, short-duration cycling exercise combined with BFR improves both muscle hypertrophy and aerobic capacity concurrently in young men. Key pointsConcurrent improvements in aerobic capacity and muscle hypertrophy in response to a single mode of training have not been reported.In the present study, low-intensity (40% of VO2max) cycle training with BFR can elicit concurrent improvement in muscle hypertrophy and aerobic capacity.

  11. Comparison and analysis of Wuding and avian chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, H Q; Jiang, Z Q; Dou, T F; Li, Q H; Xu, Z Q; Liu, L X; Gu, D H; Rong, H; Huang, Y; Chen, X B; Jois, M; Te Pas, M F W; Ge, C R; Jia, J J

    2016-10-05

    Chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells are located between the basement membrane and the sarcolemma of mature muscle fibers. Avian broilers have been genetically selected based on their high growth velocity and large muscle mass. The Wuding chicken is a famous local chicken in Yunnan Province that undergoes non-selection breeding and is slow growing. In this study, we aimed to explore differences in the proliferation and differentiation properties of satellite cells isolated from the two chicken breeds. Using immunofluorescence, hematoxylin-eosin staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, we analyzed the in vitro characteristics of proliferating and differentiating satellite cells isolated from the two chicken breeds. The growth curve of satellite cells was S-shaped, and cells from Wuding chickens entered the logarithmic phase and plateau phase 1 day later than those from Avian chicken. The results also showed that the two skeletal muscle satellite cell lines were positive for Pax7, MyoD and IGF-1. The expression of Pax7 followed a downward trend, whereas that of MyoD and IGF-1 first increased and subsequently decreased in cells isolated from the two chickens. These data indicated that the skeletal muscle satellite cells of Avian chicken grow and differentiate faster than did those of Wuding chickens. We suggest that the methods of breeding selection applied to these breeds regulate the characteristics of skeletal muscle satellite cells to influence muscle growth.

  12. Exploring Muscle Activation during Nordic Walking: A Comparison between Conventional and Uphill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Bacchi, Elisabetta; Figard-Fabre, Hélène; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) owes much of its popularity to the benefits of greater energy expenditure and upper body engagement than found in conventional walking (W). Muscle activation during NW is still understudied, however. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in muscle activation and physiological responses between NW and W in level and uphill walking conditions. Nine expert Nordic Walkers (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; BMI 24.2±1.8 kg/m2) performed 5-minute treadmill trials of W and NW at 4 km/h on inclines of 0% and 15%. The electromyographic activity of seven upper body and five leg muscles and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded and pole force during NW was measured. VO2 during NW was 22.3% higher at 0% and only 6.9% higher at 15% than during W, while upper body muscle activation was 2- to 15-fold higher under both conditions. Lower body muscle activation was similarly increased during NW and W in the uphill condition, whereas the increase in erector spinae muscle activity was lower during NW than W. The lack of a significant increase in pole force during uphill walking may explain the lower extra energy expenditure of NW, indicating less upper body muscle activation to lift the body against gravity. NW seemed to reduce lower back muscle contraction in the uphill condition, suggesting that walking with poles may reduce effort to control trunk oscillations and could contribute to work production during NW. Although the difference in extra energy expenditure between NW and W was smaller in the uphill walking condition, the increased upper body muscle involvement during exercising with NW may confer additional benefit compared to conventional walking also on uphill terrains. Furthermore, people with low back pain may gain benefit from pole use when walking uphill. PMID:26418339

  13. Muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming: Comparison between elite swimmers and beginners.

    PubMed

    Vaz, João R; Olstad, Bjørn Harald; Cabri, Jan; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Hug, François

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to compare muscle coordination strategies of the upper and lower limb muscles between beginners and elite breaststroke swimmers. Surface electromyography (EMG) of eight muscles was recorded in 16 swimmers (8 elite, 8 beginners) during a 25 m swimming breaststroke at 100% of maximal effort. A decomposition algorithm was used to identify the muscle synergies that represent the temporal and spatial organisation of muscle coordination. Between-groups indices of similarity and lag times were calculated. Individual muscle patterns were moderately to highly similar between groups (between-group indices range: 0.61 to 0.84). Significant differences were found in terms of lag time for pectoralis major (P < 0.05), biceps brachii, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior (P < 0.01), indicating an earlier activation for these muscles in beginners compared to elites (range: -13.2 to -3.8% of the swimming cycle). Three muscle synergies were identified for both beginners and elites. Although their composition was similar between populations, the third synergy exhibited a high within-group variability. Moderate to high indices of similarity were found for the shape of synergy activation coefficients (range: 0.63 to 0.88) but there was a significant backward shift (-8.4% of the swimming cycle) in synergy #2 for beginners compared to elites. This time shift suggested differences in the global arm-to-leg coordination. These results indicate that the synergistic organisation of muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming is not profoundly affected by expertise. However, specific timing adjustments were observed between lower and upper limbs.

  14. Comparison between the changes in muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration in finswimmers during incremental exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bangde; Tian, Qingping; Zhang, Zhongxing; Gong, Hui

    2009-08-01

    For the purpose of comparing the response in local skeletal muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration during incremental exercise, 8 female finswimmers were recruited to take an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer. Muscle oxygenation in right vastus lateralis (VL) were monitored by continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CW NIRS), respiratory gas exchange and blood lactate concentration ([La]b) were simultaneously measured by a metabolic system and a portable blood lactate analyzer respectively. NIRS measurements showed a muscle oxygenation index inflection point (OIip), from which the muscle oxygenation started to decrease dramatically. Significant correlations have been found between OIip and blood lactate threshold identified at the lowest [La]b value which was >0.5 mmol/L lower than that obtained at the following workload. These results might suggest that the CW NIRS measurement could be applied to monitor lactate threshold noninvasively.

  15. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects.

    PubMed

    Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Ikhsanov, Renat S; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; O'Reilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-05-07

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles--surface and volume ones--and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to a substantial (by ∼5 times) increase of the internal photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle compared to the case when such a discontinuity is absent. For a plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of the two photoeffect mechanisms was undertaken for the first time which showed that the surface photoeffect can in the general case be larger than the volume one, which agrees with the results obtained for a flat metal surface first formulated by Tamm and Schubin in their pioneering development of a quantum-mechanical theory of photoeffect in 1931. In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism through the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary. The latter is stronger at relatively lower photon energies and correspondingly is more substantial for internal photoemission than for an external one. We show that in the general case, it is essential to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna.

  16. Computational tools for calculating alternative muscle force patterns during motion: a comparison of possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Saulo; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki; Viceconti, Marco; Taddei, Fulvia

    2013-08-09

    Comparing the available electromyography (EMG) and the related uncertainties with the space of muscle forces potentially driving the same motion can provide insights into understanding human motion in healthy and pathological neuromotor conditions. However, it is not clear how effective the available computational tools are in completely sample the possible muscle forces. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of Metabolica and the Null-Space algorithm at generating a comprehensive spectrum of possible muscle forces for a representative motion frame. The hip force peak during a selected walking trial was identified using a lower-limb musculoskeletal model. The joint moments, the muscle lever arms, and the muscle force constraints extracted from the model constituted the indeterminate equilibrium equation at the joints. Two spectra, each containing 200,000 muscle force samples, were calculated using Metabolica and the Null-Space algorithm. The full hip force range was calculated using optimization and compared with the hip force ranges derived from the Metabolica and the Null-Space spectra. The Metabolica spectrum spanned a much larger force range than the NS spectrum, reaching 811N difference for the gluteus maximus intermediate bundle. The Metabolica hip force range exhibited a 0.3-0.4 BW error on the upper and lower boundaries of the full hip force range (3.4-11.3 BW), whereas the full range was imposed in the NS spectrum. The results suggest that Metabolica is well suited for exhaustively sample the spectrum of possible muscle recruitment strategy. Future studies will investigate the muscle force range in healthy and pathological neuromotor conditions.

  17. Serial temperature monitoring and comparison of rectal and muscle temperatures in immobilized free-ranging black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis).

    PubMed

    vdB Morkel, Peter; Miller, Michele; Jago, Mark; Radcliffe, Robin W; du Preez, Pierre; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Sefton, Jennifer; Taft, Arthur; Nydam, Daryl; Gleed, Robin D

    2012-03-01

    Control of body temperature is critical to a successful anesthetic outcome, particularly during field immobilization of wild animals. Hyperthermia associated with exertion can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening complications such as organ damage (including myopathy) and death. Methods for monitoring core body temperature must accurately reflect the physiologic status of the animal in order for interventions to be effective. The goal of this preliminary study was to compare serial rectal and muscle temperatures in field-immobilized black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) and evaluate a possible association. Twenty-four free-ranging black rhinoceros were immobilized between February and March of 2010 in Ethosha National Park, Namibia. Pairwise comparisons showed a correlation of 0.73 (95% CI; 0.70-0.75) between rectal and muscle temperature measurements. Results from a multivariable model indicate that muscle temperature readings were, on average, 0.46 degrees C (95% CI; 0.36-0.57 degrees C) higher than rectal temperatures while adjusting for repeated measurements on the same rhinoceros, effect of duration of immobilization, and effect of ambient temperature on rhinoceroses' temperature readings. As immobilization time increased, muscle and rectal temperature values within an individual rhinoceros tended to equilibrate. The overall temperatures decreased by an average of 0.00059 degrees C/min (95% CI; -0.0047 to -0.0035 degrees C/min; P = 0.779). As the ambient temperature at time of immobilization increased by 1 degree C, the average rhinoceros temperature increased by 0.09 degrees C (95% CI; 0.06-0.11 degrees C, P < 0.0001). Higher body temperature creates a potential for cellular damage leading to complications that include myopathy. Methods for monitoring rectal, muscle, and ambient temperatures should be incorporated into anesthetic monitoring protocols for large ungulates, particularly under field conditions.

  18. Determination of skeletal muscle perfusion using arterial spin labeling NMRI: validation by comparison with venous occlusion plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J S; Duteil, S; Vaughan, J T; Hennel, F; Wary, C; Leroy-Willig, A; Carlier, P G

    2001-08-01

    T(1)-based determination of perfusion was performed with the high temporal and spatial resolution that monitoring of exercise physiology requires. As no data were available on the validation of this approach in human muscles, T(1)-based NMRI of perfusion was compared to standard strain-gauge venous occlusion plethysmography performed simultaneously within a 4 T magnet. Two different situations were investigated in 21 healthy young volunteers: 1) a 5-min ischemia of the leg, or 2) a 2-3 min ischemic exercise consisting of a plantar flexion on an amagnetic ergometer. Leg perfusion was monitored over 5-15 min of the recovery phase, after the air-cuff arterial occlusion had been released. The interesting features of the sequence were the use of a saturation-recovery module for the introduction of a T(1) modulation and of single-shot spin echo for imaging. Spatial resolution was 1.7 x 2.0 mm and temporal resolution was 2 s. For data analysis, ROIs were traced on different muscles and perfusion was calculated from the differences in muscle signal intensity in successive images. To allow comparison with the global measurement of perfusion by plethysmography, the T(1)-based NMR measurements in exercising muscles were rescaled to the leg cross-section. The perfusion measurements obtained by plethysmography and NMRI were in close agreement with a correlation coefficient between 0.87 and 0.92. This indicates that pulsed arterial techniques provide determination of muscle perfusion not only with superior spatial and temporal resolution but also with exactitude.

  19. Direct comparison of progenitor cells derived from adipose, muscle, and bone marrow from wild-type or craniosynostotic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    GM, Cooper; EL, Lensie; JJ, Cray; MR, Bykowski; GE, DeCesare; MA, Smalley; MP, Mooney; PG, Campbell; JE, Losee

    2010-01-01

    Background Reports have identified cells capable of osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow, muscle, and adipose tissues, but there are few direct comparisons of these different cell-types. Also, few have investigated the potential connection between a tissue-specific pathology and cells derived from seemingly unrelated tissues. Here, we compare cells isolated from wild-type rabbits or rabbits with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. Methods Cells were derived from bone marrow, adipose, and muscle of 10 day-old wild-type rabbits (WT; n=17) or from age-matched rabbits with familial nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (CS; n=18). Cells were stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and alkaline phosphatase expression and cell proliferation were assessed. Results In WT rabbits, cells derived from muscle had more alkaline phosphatase activity than cells derived from either adipose or bone marrow. The cells derived from CS rabbit bone marrow and muscle were significantly more osteogenic than WT. Adipose-derived cells demonstrated no significant differences. While muscle-derived cells were most osteogenic in WT rabbits, bone marrow-derived cells were most osteogenic in CS rabbits. Conclusions Results suggest that cells from different tissues have different potentials for differentiation. Furthermore, cells derived from rabbits with craniosynostosis were different from wild-type derived cells. Interestingly, cells derived from the craniosynostotic rabbits were not uniformly more responsive compared with wild-type cells, suggesting that specific tissue-derived cells may react differently in individuals with craniosynostosis. PMID:20871482

  20. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohee

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander.

  1. Pubovisceralis Muscle Fiber Architecture Determination: Comparison Between Biomechanical Modeling and Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sofia; Parente, Marco; Silva, Elisabete; Da Roza, Thuane; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Leitão, João; Cunha, João; Natal Jorge, Renato; Nunes, Rita Gouveia

    2017-01-17

    Biomechanical analysis of pelvic floor dysfunction requires knowledge of certain biomechanical parameters, such as muscle fiber direction, in order to adequately model function. Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides an estimate of overall muscle fiber directionality based on the mathematical description of water diffusivity. This work aimed at evaluating the concurrence between pubovisceralis muscle fiber representations obtained from DTI, and the maximum principal stress lines obtained through the finite element method. Seven datasets from axial T2-weighted images were used to build numerical models, and muscle fiber orientation estimated from the DT images. The in-plane projections of the first eigenvector of both vector fields describing muscle fiber orientation were extracted and compared. The directional consistency was evaluated by calculating the angle between the normalized vectors for the entire muscle and also for the right and left insertions, middle portions, and anorectal area. The values varied between 28° ± 6 (right middle portion) and 34° ± 9 (anorectal area), and were higher than the angular precision of the DT estimates, evaluated using wild bootstrapping analysis. Angular dispersion ranged from 17° ± 4 (left middle portion) to 23° ± 5 (anorectal area). Further studies are needed to examine acceptability of these differences when integrating the vectors estimated from DTI in the numerical analysis.

  2. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander. PMID:24409013

  3. Effect of short-term equal-volume resistance training with different workout frequency on muscle mass and strength in untrained men and women.

    PubMed

    Candow, Darren G; Burke, Darren G

    2007-02-01

    Changes in muscle mass and strength will vary, depending on the volume and frequency of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of short-term equal-volume resistance training with different workout frequency on lean tissue mass and muscle strength. Twenty-nine untrained volunteers (27-58 years; 23 women, 6 men) were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups: group 1 (n = 15; 12 women, 3 men) trained 2 times per week and performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises, group 2 (n = 14; 11 women, 3 men) trained 3 times per week and performed 2 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises. Prior to and following training, whole-body lean tissue mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) and strength (1 repetition maximum squat and bench press) were measured. Both groups increased lean tissue mass (2.2%), squat strength (28%), and bench press strength (22-30%) with training (p < 0.05), with no other differences. These results suggest that the volume of resistance training may be more important than frequency in developing muscle mass and strength in men and women initiating a resistance training program.

  4. Volume quantification by contrast-enhanced ultrasound: an in-vitro comparison with true volumes and thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has recently been proposed as a minimally- invasive, alternative method for blood volume measurement. This study aims at comparing the accuracy of CEUS and the classical thermodilution techniques for volume assessment in an in-vitro set-up. Methods The in-vitro set-up consisted of a variable network between an inflow and outflow tube and a roller pump. The inflow and outflow tubes were insonified with an ultrasound array transducer and a thermistor was placed in each tube. Indicator dilution curves were made by injecting indicator which consisted of an ultrasound-contrast-agent diluted in ice-cold saline. Both acoustic intensity- and thermo-dilution curves were used to calculate the indicator mean transit time between the inflow and outflow tube. The volumes were derived by multiplying the estimated mean transit time by the flow rate. We compared the volumes measured by CEUS with the true volumes of the variable network and those measured by thermodilution by Bland-Altman and intraclass-correlation analysis. Results The measurements by CEUS and thermodilution showed a very strong correlation (rs = 0.94) with a modest volume underestimation by CEUS of −40 ± 28 mL and an overestimation of 84 ± 62 mL by thermodilution compared with the true volumes. Both CEUS and thermodilution showed a high statistically significant correlation with the true volume (rs = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95 - 0.98; P<0.0001) and rs = 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94 - 0.98; P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions CEUS volume estimation provides a strong correlation with both the true volumes in-vitro and volume estimation by thermodilution. It may therefore represent an interesting alternative to the standard, invasive thermodilution technique. PMID:24134671

  5. Comparison Between Pre-Exhaustion and Traditional Exercise Order on Muscle Activation and Performance in Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Enrico Gori; Brown, Lee E.; Gomes, Willy Andrade; Corrêa, Daniel Alves; Serpa, Érica Paes; da Silva, Josinaldo Jarbas; Junior, Guanis de Barros Vilela; Fioravanti, Gustavo zorzi; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the acute effects of pre-exhaustion vs. traditional exercise order on neuromuscular performance and sEMG in trained men. Fourteen young, healthy, resistance trained men (age: 25.5 ± 4.0 years, height: 174.9 ± 4.1 cm, and total body mass: 80.0 ± 11.1 kg) took part of this study. All tests were randomized and counterbalanced for all subjects and experimental conditions. Volunteers attended one session in the laboratory. First, they performed ten repetition maximum (10RM) tests for each exercise (bench press and triceps pushdown) separately. Secondly, they performed all three conditions at 10RM: pre-test (bench press and triceps pushdown, separately), pre-exhaustion (triceps pushdown+bench press, PE) and traditional (bench press+triceps pushdown, TR), and rested 30 minutes between conditions. Results showed that pre-test was significantly greater than PE (p = 0.031) but not different than TR, for total volume load lifted. There was a significant difference between the pre-test and the time-course of lactate measures (p = 0.07). For bench press muscle activity of the pectoralis major, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005). Also, for muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.001, PE: p = 0.005, and TR: p = 0.006). For triceps pushdown, muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005). For RPE, there were no significant differences between PE and TR (p = 0.15). Our results suggest that exercise order decreases repetitions performed, however, neuromuscular fatigue, lactate, and RPE are not impacted. The lack of difference in total volume load lifted between PE and TR might explain, at least in part, the similar metabolic and perceptual

  6. Sex Assessment from the Volume of the First Metatarsal Bone: A Comparison of Linear and Volume Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, Daniele; Poppa, Pasquale; Cummaudo, Marco; Mattia, Mirko; Cappella, Annalisa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Zago, Matteo; Sforza, Chiarella; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-02-23

    Sexual dimorphism is a crucial characteristic of skeleton. In the last years, volumetric and surface 3D acquisition systems have enabled anthropologists to assess surfaces and volumes, whose potential still needs to be verified. This article aimed at assessing volume and linear parameters of the first metatarsal bone through 3D acquisition by laser scanning. Sixty-eight skeletons underwent 3D scan through laser scanner: Seven linear measurements and volume from each bone were assessed. A cutoff value of 13,370 mm(3) was found, with an accuracy of 80.8%. Linear measurements outperformed volume: metatarsal length and mediolateral width of base showed higher cross-validated accuracies (respectively, 82.1% and 79.1%, raising at 83.6% when both of them were included). Further studies are needed to verify the real advantage for sex assessment provided by volume measurements.

  7. A comparison of muscle activity in concentric and counter movement maximum bench press.

    PubMed

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematics and muscle activation patterns of regular free-weight bench press (counter movement) with pure concentric lifts in the ascending phase of a successful one repetition maximum (1-RM) attempt in the bench press. Our aim was to evaluate if diminishing potentiation could be the cause of the sticking region. Since diminishing potentiation cannot occur in pure concentric lifts, the occurrence of a sticking region in this type of muscle actions would support the hypothesis that the sticking region is due to a poor mechanical position. Eleven male participants (age 21.9 ± 1.7 yrs, body mass 80.7 ± 10.9 kg, body height 1.79 ± 0.07 m) conducted 1-RM lifts in counter movement and in pure concentric bench presses in which kinematics and EMG activity were measured. In both conditions, a sticking region occurred. However, the start of the sticking region was different between the two bench presses. In addition, in four of six muscles, the muscle activity was higher in the counter movement bench press compared to the concentric one. Considering the findings of the muscle activity of six muscles during the maximal lifts it was concluded that the diminishing effect of force potentiation, which occurs in the counter movement bench press, in combination with a delayed muscle activation unlikely explains the existence of the sticking region in a 1-RM bench press. Most likely, the sticking region is the result of a poor mechanical force position.

  8. Comparison of soleus muscles from rats exposed to microgravity for 10 versus 14 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staron, R. S.; Kraemer, W. J.; Hikida, R. S.; Reed, D. W.; Murray, J. D.; Campos, G. E.; Gordon, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of two different duration space-flights on the extent of atrophy, fiber type composition, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) content of rat soleus muscles were compared. Adult male Fisher rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-57 and exposed to 10 days of microgravity and adult ovariectomized female Spraque-Dawley rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-62 for 14 days. Soleus muscles were bilaterally removed from the flight and control animals and frozen for subsequent analyses. Muscle wet weights, fiber types (I, IC, IIC, and IIA), cross-sectional area, and MHC content were determined. Although a significant difference was found between the soleus wet weights of the two ground-based control groups, they were similar with regard to MHC content (ca 90% MHCI and ca 10% MHCIIa) and fiber type composition. Unloading of the muscles caused slow-to-fast transformations which included a decrease in the percentage of type I fibers and MHCI, an increase in fibers classified as type IC, and the expression of two fast myosin heavy chains not found in the control rat soleus muscles (MHCIId and MHCIIb). Although the amount of atrophy (ca 26%) and the extent of slow-to-fast transformation (decrease in the percentage of MHCI from 90% to 82.5%) in the soleus muscles were similar between the two spaceflights, the percentages of the fast MHCs differed. After 14 days of spaceflight, the percentage of MHCIIa was significantly lower and the percentages of MHCIId and MHCIIb were significantly higher than the corresponding MHC content of the soleus muscles from the 10-day animals. Indeed, MHCIId became the predominant fast MHC after 14 days in space. These data suggest fast-to-faster transformations continued during the longer spaceflight.

  9. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  10. Comparison of muscle activation using various hand positions during the push-up exercise.

    PubMed

    Cogley, Robert M; Archambault, Teasha A; Fibeger, Jon F; Koverman, Mandy M; Youdas, James W; Hollman, John H

    2005-08-01

    Popular fitness literature suggests that varied hand placements during push-ups may isolate different muscles. Scientific literature, however, offers scant evidence that varied hand placements elicit different muscle responses. This study examined whether different levels of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the pectoralis major and triceps brachii muscles are required to perform push-ups from each of 3 different hand positions: shoulder width base, wide base, and narrow base hand placements. Forty subjects, 11 men and 29 women, performed 1 repetition of each push-up. The EMG activity for subjects' dominant arm pectoralis major and triceps brachii was recorded using surface electrodes. The EMG activity was greater in both muscle groups during push-ups performed from the narrow base hand position compared with the wide base position (p < 0.05). This study suggests that, if a goal is to induce greater muscle activation during exercise, then push-ups should be performed with hands in a narrow base position compared with a wide base position.

  11. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  12. Comparison of sensory modes of biofeedback in relaxation training of frontalis muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, W

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of various sensory modes of EMG biofeedback to relaxation training of the frontalis muscle. 19 male and 29 female subjects were randomly selected from a pool of college volunteers. They were then randomly assigned 12 each to audiofeedback, visual feedback, audiovisual feedback, and no feedback groups. There were 11 20-min. sessions per subject. Subjects in the biofeedback groups were trained to reduce muscle tension voluntarily by utilizing Cyborg J33 EMG portable trainers. The subjects in the three feedback groups exhibited significantly lower muscle tension than did the subjects in the no-feedback control group. There were no significant differences in relaxation among the three feedback groups.

  13. Comparison of Lower Limb Muscle Activity during Eccentric and Concentric Exercises in Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify changes in muscle activation by comparing muscle activities of the affected side (AS) and non-affected side (NAS) during eccentric and concentric exercises in runners with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. [Subjects] The study included 18 participants consisting of men and women with chronic Achilles tendinopathy in a single leg who had more than 1 year of running experience. [Methods] All subjects performed concentric and eccentric exercise with the Achilles tendon moving from full plantar flexion to full dorsiflexion for 8 seconds, and electromyography data was obtained. [Results] All muscles examined showed a significant increase in %maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with concentric exercise compared with eccentric exercise. Compared with the NAS, the AS showed significant increases in %MVC of the rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and lateral gastrocnemius. All interaction effects of exercise methods and injuries showed statistically significant changes. [Conclusion] Runners with Achilles tendinopathy show increases in medial gastrocnemius activity when performing eccentric exercise. PMID:25276014

  14. Performance and muscle architecture comparisons between starters and nonstarters in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's soccer.

    PubMed

    Jajtner, Adam R; Hoffman, Jay R; Scanlon, Tyler C; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Mangine, Gerald T; McCormack, William P; Bohner, Jonathan D; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffery R

    2013-09-01

    This study compared performance and muscle architecture (MA) changes in starters (S) and nonstarters (NS) during a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's soccer season. Twenty-eight women (19.9 ± 1.1 years; 1.71 ± 0.08 m; 64.7 ± 6.4 kg) were monitored for vertical jump power (VJP), repeated line drills (LDs), 3-dimensional multiple object tracking (3D-MOT), and reaction time (RT) at preseason, midseason, and postseason. Muscle architecture changes using ultrasonography were assessed at preseason and postseason. Comparisons between S (n = 11; 70.0 ± 14.6 min per game) and NS (n = 17; 8.4 ± 8.0 min per game) were performed to make magnitude-based inferences. No differences were seen in VJP during the season in either group. Starters were more likely (81.1%) to decrease LD time than NS, with no differences in fatigue rate. Starters and NS improved 3D-MOT (1.14 ± 0.41 to 1.55 ± 0.43) and RT (0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.34 ± 0.33 seconds), with no differences between groups. Rectus femoris (RF) echo intensity improved (65.57 ± 1.50 to 61.26 ± 1.59) in both groups, with no interactions observed. Cross-sectional area (20.84 ± 3.58 to 21.46 ± 3.66 cm) increased and pennation angle (PANG) (12.58 ± 2.56 to 11.78 ± 2.03°) decreased for both groups in the vastus lateralis (VL). Muscle architecture comparisons between groups revealed S likely decreased VL muscle thickness (MT) and PANG (81.6 and 79.4%, respectively) and possibly decreased RF MT and PANG (65.7 and 59.4%, respectively) when compared with NS. Results indicate that VJP and LD fatigue rate are not changed during a competitive season, but S become faster than NS. Three-dimensional multiple object tracking and RT improve regardless of playing time. Changes in MA indicate that practices alone provide sufficient stimulus for improving muscle quality during the competitive season.

  15. Comparison of swim recovery and muscle stimulation on lactate removal after sprint swimming.

    PubMed

    Neric, Francis B; Beam, William C; Brown, Lee E; Wiersma, Lenny D

    2009-12-01

    Competitive swimming requires multiple bouts of high-intensity exercise, leading to elevated blood lactate. Active exercise recovery has been shown to lower lactate faster than passive resting recovery but may not always be practical. An alternative treatment, electrical muscle stimulation, may have benefits similar to active recovery in lowering blood lactate but to date is unstudied. Therefore, this study compared submaximal swimming and electrical muscle stimulation in reducing blood lactate after sprint swimming. Thirty competitive swimmers (19 men and 11 women) participated in the study. Each subject completed 3 testing sessions consisting of a warm-up swim, a 200-yard maximal frontcrawl sprint, and 1 of 3 20-minute recovery treatments administered in random order. The recovery treatments consisted of a passive resting recovery, a submaximal swimming recovery, or electrical muscle stimulation. Blood lactate was tested at baseline, after the 200-yard sprint, and after 10 and 20 minutes of recovery. A significant interaction (p < 0.05) between recovery treatment and recovery time was observed. Blood lactate levels for the swimming recovery were significantly lower at 10 minutes (3.50 +/- 1.57 mmol.L-1) and 20 minutes (1.60 +/- 0.57 mmol.L-1) of recovery than either of the other 2 treatments. Electrical muscle stimulation led to a lower mean blood lactate (3.12 +/- 1.41 mmol.L-1) after 20 minutes of recovery compared with passive rest (4.11 +/- 1.35 mmol.L-1). Submaximal swimming proved to be most effective at lowering blood lactate, but electrical muscle stimulation also reduced blood lactate 20 minutes postexercise significantly better than resting passive recovery. Electrical muscle stimulation shows promise as an alternate recovery treatment for the purpose of lowering blood lactate.

  16. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Sousa, Vanessa Oliveira; Gameiro, Luiz Felipe; Muchailh, Rosana Carneiro; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Amaro, João Luiz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1) (n = 50) included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2) (n = 50) included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m2 in G1 and 25.0 kg/m2 in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004). In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006) and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001) compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21915489

  17. Age-associated differences in triceps surae muscle composition and strength – an MRI-based cross-sectional comparison of contractile, adipose and connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In human skeletal muscles, the aging process causes a decrease of contractile and a concomitant increase of intramuscular adipose (IMAT) and connective (IMCT) tissues. The accumulation of non-contractile tissues may contribute to the significant loss of intrinsic muscle strength typically observed at older age but their in vivo quantification is challenging. The purpose of this study was to establish MR imaging-based methods to quantify the relative amounts of IMCT, IMAT and contractile tissues in young and older human cohorts, and investigate their roles in determining age-associated changes in skeletal muscle strength. Methods Five young (31.6 ± 7.0 yrs) and five older (83.4 ± 3.2 yrs) Japanese women were subject to a detailed MR imaging protocol, including Fast Gradient Echo, Quantitative Fat/Water (IDEAL) and Ultra-short Echo Time (UTE) sequences, to determine contractile muscle tissue and IMAT within the entire Triceps Surae complex, and IMCT within both heads of the Gastrocnemius muscle. Specific force was calculated as the ratio of isometric plantarflexor force and the physiological cross-sectional area of the Triceps Surae complex. Results In the older cohort, total Triceps Surae volume was smaller by 17.5%, while the relative amounts of Triceps Surae IMAT and Gastrocnemius IMCT were larger by 55.1% and 48.9%, respectively. Differences of 38.6% and 42.1% in plantarflexor force and specific force were observed. After subtraction of IMAT and IMCT from total muscle volume, differences in intrinsic strength decreased to 29.6%. Conclusions Our data establishes that aging causes significant changes in skeletal muscle composition, with marked increases in non-contractile tissues. Such quantification of the remodeling process is likely to be of functional and clinical importance in elucidating the causes of the disproportionate age-associated decrease of force compared to that of muscle volume. PMID:24939372

  18. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  19. Comparison of palatability characteristics of beef gluteus medius and triceps brachii muscles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate triceps brachii steaks as a substitute for gluteus medius steaks in foodservice and retail applications, including the impact of aging time and USDA quality grade on the palatability of both muscles. Top sirloin butts (n = 600) and shoulder clod arm ...

  20. [Muscle relaxants in Germany 2005: a comparison of application customs in hospitals and private practices].

    PubMed

    Fink, H; Geldner, G; Fuchs-Buder, T; Hofmockel, R; Ulm, K; Wallek, B; Blobner, M

    2006-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate application customs of muscles relaxants in hospitals compared to their use in private practice. Of the 3,260 questionnaires sent-out, 66.9% could be analyzed. Of these 54% were from anesthetists in private practice, 41% from heads of hospital anesthesia departments and 5% from heads of level one hospital anesthesia departments. The first difference between private practices and hospitals was the number of available muscle relaxants: 87% of private practices use 1-3 relaxants, whereas 79% of hospitals use 3-5. Another apparent difference was the relationship between general anesthesia and the number of intubations: 60% of private practices have over 80% of general anesthesia cases, but only 50% of these patients are intubated. On the contrary, two thirds of the hospitals have 50-80% general anesthesia cases and 60-70% of patients are intubated. The main wish for an ideal muscle relaxant was independent of private practice or hospital, short onset time, followed by fast recovery. In accordance 74% of anesthetists in hospitals and 72% of anesthetists in private practice voiced the wish for a non-depolarizing succinylcholine substitute. The results of this nationwide survey suggest that time pressure in combination with an increased specialization of anesthetists in private practice are the main factors for availability and use of muscle relaxants in routine anesthesia.

  1. The relationship of leg volume (muscle plus bone) to maximal aerobic power output on a bicycle ergometer: the effects of anaemia, malnutrition and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Davies, C T

    1974-01-01

    The relationship of maximal power output (VO2 max) to leg muscle plus bone) volume (LV) has been analysed in African children suffering from malnutrition and severe anaemia and in a group of rural adult Africans engaged in prolonged, active daily work. The results are examined in relation to 'normal' healthy active (but not in training) African ? s and ? s aged 7-35 years. The analysis clearly demonstrates that the association between VO2 max and LV is not causal; the effects of increased habitual activity and anaemia show that the two parameters can be varied independently. The effect of habitual activity on the VO2 max : LV relationship is essentially additive, whereas the effect of anaemia is multiplicative. However in malnutrition, the relationship remains unchanged; VO2 max decreases paripassu with the reduced leg (muscle plus bone) volume. Iron therapy produces an increase in VO2 max) towards normal values without a concomitant change in LV. The results give a clearer understanding of the relationship between 'active' muscle mass and aerobic power output on the bicycle ergometer and could be used as a basis for clinical diagnosis in the industrial and medical fields, particularly for cases of debilitating disease which have an effect on physiological performance and effort intolerance. The data at present cannot be applied to men and women over 35 years of age.

  2. Comparison and reproducibility of sEMG during manual muscle testing on land and in water.

    PubMed

    Silvers, W Matthew; Dolny, Dennis G

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) compare the sEMG recordings from maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), and (2) examine the reproducibility of sEMG recordings from MVCs for selected lower extremity muscles derived from manual muscle testing (MMT) on dry land, and in water prior to and following aquatic treadmill running. Twelve healthy recreational male runners participated. The selected muscles were: M. quadriceps-vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF), M. biceps femoris (BF), M. tibialis anterior (TA) and the M. gastrocnemius caput mediale (GAS) of the right leg. The MVC testing conditions were: dry land, underwater prior to (Water 1) and following an aquatic exercise trial (Water 2). For each muscle, a one-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to compare MVC scores between testing conditions, and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error (CV%) were calculated to determine the reproducibility and precision of MVC scores, respectively, between conditions. For all muscles, no significant differences were observed between land and water MVC scores (p=0.88-0.97), and high reliability (ICC=0.96-0.98) and precision (CV%=7.4-12.6%) were observed between MVC conditions. Under MMT conditions it appears that comparable MVC sEMG values were achieved on land and in water and the integrity of the EMG recordings were maintained during water immersion. Future studies using sEMG waterproofing procedures should conduct MVC testing in water for data normalization and perform post-exercise verification of sEMG signal integrity.

  3. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  4. Changes in volume, muscle compartment, and compliance of the lower extremities in man following 30 days of exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Buchanan, Paul; Mathes, Karen L.; Stein, Steward L.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between leg compliance and a reduction in the size of the leg muscle compartment due to long-duration exposure to microgravity, eight men were exposed for 30 d of continuous 6-deg headdown tilt, and changes in vascular compliance (vol pct/mm Hg x 100) of the calf and serial circumferences of the thigh and the calf were measured before, during, and after the tilt. It was found that the tilt exposure led to calculated leg volume decreases of 9.9 percent in the calf and of 4.5 in the thigh. Leg compliance was found to increase from 3.9 to about 4.9. Calf compliance measured before and after bedrest was found to be inversely related to calf-muscle compartment cross-sectional area (CSA).

  5. Role of heart rate and stroke volume during muscle metaboreflex-induced cardiac output increase: differences between activation during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Filippi, Michele; Piredda, Carlo; Chiappori, Paolo; Melis, Franco; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the role of stroke volume (SV) in the metaboreflex-induced cardiac output (CO) increase was blunted when the metaboreflex was stimulated by exercise muscle ischemia (EMI) compared with post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI), because during EMI heart rate (HR) increases and limits diastolic filling. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited and their hemodynamic responses to the metaboreflex evoked by EMI, PEMI, and by a control dynamic exercise were assessed. The main finding was that the blood pressure increment was very similar in the EMI and PEMI settings. In both conditions the main mechanism used to raise blood pressure was a CO elevation. However, during the EMI test CO was increased as a result of HR elevation whereas during the PEMI test CO was increased as a result of an increase in SV. These results were explainable on the basis of the different HR behavior between the two settings, which in turn led to different diastolic time and myocardial performance.

  6. [Comparison of force and shortening velocity in fast and slow rabbit muscle fibers at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Kochubeĭ, P V; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of force, maximal shortening velocity and power of maximally activated single permeabilized fibers from fast and slow muscles of the rabbit were recorded in a temperature range from 10 to 35 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It was found that temperature dependence of force of both types of fibers is identical. Averaged maximal shortening velocity in the slow fibers, unlike the fast fibers, had no statistically significant temperature dependence that is not in agreement with the data obtained on intact rat muscle fibers and in an in vitro motility assay. However maximal shortening velocity in each individual slow fiber did depend on temperature. The temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was lower than that of the fast ones. Because of large data scattering the average temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was significantly lower than that in individual slow fibers.

  7. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on regional key comparison SIM.M.FF-K4: Volume of liquids at 20 L and 100 mL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Roberto; Maldonado, Manuel; Wright, John; Wallace, Tanisha; Rodríguez, Sandra; Pinzón, Orlando; Morales, Abed; Vega, Maria; Santo, Claudia; Kornblit, Fernando; Malta, Dalni

    2010-01-01

    At its meeting in October 2006 in Querétaro, Mexico, the Interamerican Metrology System (SIM) Technical Committee for Fluid Flow (TCFF) approved a Regional Key Comparison for Volume of Liquids at 20 L and 100 mL, to be piloted by the national metrology institute of Mexico (CENAM). The objective of this comparison was to demonstrate the degree of equivalence of the volume measurement standards held at national measurement institutes (NMIs) and to provide supporting evidence for the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) claimed by the participating laboratories in the Americas. During the comparison, one of the pycnometers suffered irreversible damage, and degrees of equivalence for volume at 100 mL were calculated using the results obtained with one single pycnometer (TS 03.04.04). Conclusions are as follows: The transfer standards for SIM.M.FF-K4 exhibited global good performance all the way along, both in terms of stability and repeatability. Degrees of equivalence have been produced for volumes at 20 L and at 100 mL. The best estimation of the measurands, as reported by the participants, shows a general agreement better than +/-0.0070% for volume of liquids at 100 mL and 20 L. It is advisable to review the uncertainty analysis of some participants. New CMC entries for some NMIs should take into account the information presented in this Report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  8. Comparison of human bronchiolar smooth muscle responsiveness in vitro with histological signs of inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, J C; Mons, H; Van Strik, R; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that chronic inflammation is associated with increased sensitivity or contractility of human airway smooth muscle. Bronchiolar strips from 30 patients, 12 of whom had chronic bronchitis, were examined in the organ bath for their responses to histamine, methacholine, and leukotriene (LT) C4. The same airways were also studied histologically and small airway disease was quantified by subjective grading of the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia. The degree of small airway disease varied widely among patients both with and without chronic bronchitis. Multiple regression analysis failed to show increased sensitivity (-log EC50) to histamine, methacholine, or LTC4 in relation to small airway disease. In contrast, the only significant correlations found were between a decreased -log EC50 to histamine and methacholine and an increased small airway disease score. Contractile responses (Tmax) to histamine and methacholine in peripheral airways tended to be higher in patients with chronic bronchitis than in those without. Tmax was not related to small airway disease scores. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation does not cause in vitro hyperresponsiveness of human small airway smooth muscle. Images PMID:3321543

  9. KEY COMPARISON: Results of the key comparison CCM.FF-K4 for volume of liquids at 20 L and 100 mL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Roberto; Maldonado, Manuel; Wright, John; Jacques, Claude; Lachance, Christian; Lau, Peter; Többen, Helmut; Cignolo, Giorgio; Lorefice, Salvatore; Man, John; Aibe, Valter Y.

    2006-01-01

    A key comparison was performed in order to compare national measurement systems to determine volume of liquids, particularly at fixed volumes of 20 L and 100 mL. The participants were CENAM (Mexico), NIST (United States of America), NRC/MC (Canada), SP (Sweden), PTB (Germany), INRIM (former IMGC, Italy), NMIA (Australia) and INMETRO (Brazil). CENAM acted as pilot laboratory. The measurements were carried out from December 2003 to March 2005. The chosen values of volume (20 L and 100 mL) are both representatives of the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) declared by most of the participating national metrology institutes. The transfer standards (TSs) were three stainless steel pipettes for volume at 20 L and six commercially available glass pycnometers for volume at 100 mL. Prior to the beginning of the key comparison, the 20 L TSs were tested by CENAM, SP and NMIA The results of the test phase showed excellent values for both repeatability and reproducibility. During the CCM.FF-K4, the results of most of the laboratories showed good agreement with the reference values. The best estimation of the measurands, as reported by the participants showed a general agreement better than ±0.0025% for volume of liquids at 100 mL and 20 L. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  10. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  11. Comparison of reduction of edema after rest and after muscle exercises in treatment of chronic venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Quilici, Belczak Cleusa Ema; Gildo, Cavalheri; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira; Quilici, Belczak Sergio; Augusto, Caffaro Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work was to compare the reduction in edema obtained in the conservative treatment of phlebopathies after resting and after performing a muscle exercise program in the Trendelenburg position. Methods Twenty-eight limbs of 24 patients with venous edema of distinct etiologies and classified as between C3 and C5 using CEAP classification. Volumetric evaluation by water displacement was carried out before and after resting in the Trendelenburg position and after performing programmed muscle exercises 24 hours later under identical conditions of time, position and temperature. For the statistical analysis the paired t-test was used with an alpha error of 5% being considered acceptable. Results The average total volume of the lower limbs was 3,967.46 mL. The mean reduction in edema obtained after resting was 92.9 mL, and after exercises it was 135.4 mL, giving a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.0007). Conclusion In conclusion, exercises are more efficient to reduce the edema of lower limbs than resting in the Trendelenburg position. PMID:19602249

  12. A practical model of low-volume high-intensity interval training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Little, Jonathan P; Safdar, Adeel; Wilkin, Geoffrey P; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J

    2010-03-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIT) induces skeletal muscle metabolic and performance adaptations that resemble traditional endurance training despite a low total exercise volume. Most HIT studies have employed 'all out', variable-load exercise interventions (e.g. repeated Wingate tests) that may not be safe, practical and/or well tolerated by certain individuals. Our purpose was to determine the performance, metabolic and molecular adaptations to a more practical model of low-volume HIT. Seven men (21 + or - 0.4 years, V(O2peak) = 46 + or - 2 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) performed six training sessions over 2 weeks. Each session consisted of 8-12 x 60 s intervals at approximately 100% of peak power output elicited during a ramp V(O2) peak test (355 + or - 10 W) separated by 75 s of recovery. Training increased exercise capacity, as assessed by significant improvements on both 50 kJ and 750 kJ cycling time trials (P < 0.05 for both). Skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsy samples obtained before and after training revealed increased maximal activity of citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as well as total protein content of CS, COX subunits II and IV, and the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) (P < 0.05 for all). Nuclear abundance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) was approximately 25% higher after training (P < 0.05), but total PGC-1alpha protein content remained unchanged. Total SIRT1 content, a proposed activator of PGC-1alpha and mitochondrial biogenesis, was increased by approximately 56% following training (P < 0.05). Training also increased resting muscle glycogen and total GLUT4 protein content (both P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that a practical model of low volume HIT is a potent stimulus for increasing skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity and improving exercise performance. The results also suggest that increases in SIRT1, nuclear PGC-1alpha, and Tfam may be involved in

  13. Relationships of peak leg power, 1 maximal repetition half back squat, and leg muscle volume to 5-m sprint performance of junior soccer players.

    PubMed

    Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Chérif, Najet; Amar, Mohamed Ben; Hermassi, Souhail; Fathloun, Mourad; Bouhlel, Ezdine; Tabka, Zouhair; Shephard, Roy J

    2010-01-01

    Performance over very short distances (1-5 m) is important in soccer. We investigated this in 23 male regional-level soccer players aged 17.2 +/- 0.7 years, filming body markers to determine the average velocity and acceleration over the first step (V(S) and A(S)) and the first 5 m (V(5), A(5)). Data were related to scores on a force-velocity test, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 1 maximal repetition (1 RM) half back squat. Leg and thigh muscle volumes were also assessed anthropometrically. V(5) was positively correlated with leg and thigh muscle volumes (r = 0.61, p < 0.05; r = 0.43, p < 0.05, respectively), SJ power (absolute and relative to body mass, r = 0.45, p < 0.05; r = 0.43, p < 0.05, respectively), absolute force-velocity leg power (r = 0.49, p < 0.05), and 1 RM half back squat (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). The use of dimensional exponents did not change coefficients materially. V(S) was also correlated with leg muscle volume and 1 RM back half squat (r = 0.56, p < 0.01; r = 0.58, p < 0.01, respectively) and more weakly with force-velocity leg power and SJ force (r = 0.49, p < 0.05; r = 0.46, p < 0.5, respectively). However, the CMJ was unrelated to velocity or acceleration. Sprinting ability is correlated with measures of power and force such as the force-velocity test, SJ, and 1 RM half back squat; such measures thus offer useful guidance to soccer coaches who wish to improve the short-distance velocity of their players.

  14. Comparison of loess and purple rill erosions measured with volume replacement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-yan; Huang, Yu-han; Zhao, Yu; Mo, Bin; Mi, Hong-xing

    2015-11-01

    Rills are commonly found on sloping farm fields in both the loess and the purple soil regions of China. A comparative study on rill erosion between the two soils is important to increase research knowledge and exchange application experiences. Rill erosion processes of loess and purple soils were determined through laboratory experiments with the volume replacement method. Water was used to refill the eroded rill segments to compute eroded volume before sediment concentration distribution along the rill was computed using the soil bulk density, flow rate, and water flow duration. The experimental loess soil materials were from the Loess Plateau and purple soil from the southwestern part of China, Chongqing City. A laboratory experimental platform was used to construct flumes to simulate rills with 12.0 m length, 0.1 m width, and 0.3 m depth. Soil materials were filled into the flumes at a bulk density of 1.2 g cm-3 to a depth of 20 cm to form rills for experiments on five slope gradients (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°) and three flow rates (2, 4, and 8 L/min). After each experimental run under the given slope gradient and flow rate, the rill segments from the upper slope between 0-0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-3, …, 7-8, 8-10, and 10-12 m were lined with plastic sheets before be re-filled with water to determine sediment concentration after the eroded volumes was measured. Rill erosion differed between the two soils. As purple soil started to erode at a higher erosive force than loess soil, it possibly exhibits higher resistance to water erosion. The subsequent erosion process in the eroding purple rill was similar to that in the loess rill. However, the total erosion in the eroding loess rill was more than that in the eroding purple rill. The maximum sediment concentration transported by the eroding purple rills was significantly lower, approximately 55% of those transported by the loess rills under the same flow rate and slope gradient. Hence, less purple sediments can

  15. The head and neck muscles of the Philippine colugo (Dermoptera: Cynocephalus volans), with a comparison to tree-shrews, primates, and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui

    2009-01-01

    The colugos, or flying lemurs (Dermoptera), are arboreal gliding mammals that are commonly grouped with tree-shrews (Scandentia) and Primates in the superorder Euarchonta. However, little is known about the head and neck muscles of these gliding mammals. This raises difficulties for the discussion of not only the functional morphology and evolution of colugos, but also the origin, evolution, functional morphology, and phylogenetic relationships of the Euarchonta as a whole, and thus also of our own clade, the Primates. In this work, I describe the head and neck muscles of the colugo Cynocephalus volans, and compare these muscles with those of other mammals, either dissected by me or described in the literature. My observations and comparisons indicate that, with respect to the number of muscles, the plesiomorphic condition for euarchontans as well as for primates is more similar to that found in extant tree-shrews than in extant colugos. This is because various muscles that were probably plesiomorphically present in the euarchontan and primate clades, as, e.g., the stylohyoideus, mandibulo-auricularis, cleido-occipitalis, omohyoideus, and sternohyoideus, are not present as independent elements in extant colugos. These observations and comparisons also indicate that various laryngeal and facial muscles that are present in modern humans were absent in the last common ancestor of extant primates.

  16. Comparison of immunohistochemical and functional reinnervation of skin and muscle after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Verdu, E; Navarro, X

    1997-07-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of immunohistochemical detection of regenerating axons as a correlate of functional recovery, reinnervation of mouse foot pads, hairy skin, and muscle were studied at several intervals along 3 months after sciatic nerve crush using immunohistochemical markers PGP 9.5 and CGRP. These histological results were compared with functional recovery of sweat glands (SGs), plantar muscles, and pain sensibility. One week after nerve injury all neural functions were abolished in the operated hindpaw of all mice, no CGRP-immunoreactive (-ir) fibers were seen in the samples studied, while PGP 9.5 immunofluorescence remained at dim levels within nerve trunks, but disappeared from terminal innervation. The first PGP 9.5- and CGRP-ir regenerating fibers were seen at 15-16 days postoperation (dpo) in dermal nerve trunks of dorsal hairy skin and some days later in dermal trunks of foot pads. Regenerating nerve fibers progressed along the periphery of the dermis reinnervating the different dermal appendages. At 25 dpo all target organs were reinnervated. The first SGs activated by pilocarpine reappeared by 16 dpo and increased in number to 88% of control counts. Nociceptive responses reappeared at 17 dpo and reached 100% of control values. The first PGP immunofluorescence in neuromuscular junctions was seen at 16 dpo, while the first muscle action potentials were recorded at 19 dpo, and the potentials amplitude increased to 66% of controls. Good correlations were found between morphological and functional results of reinnervation. However, the density and distribution of nerve profiles in the tissues studied did not reach normal levels, while neural functions conveyed by small fibers reached levels similar to controls.

  17. A comparison of inspiratory muscle fatigue following maximal exercise in moderately trained males and females.

    PubMed

    Ozkaplan, Atila; Rhodes, Edward C; Sheel, A William; Taunton, Jack E

    2005-09-01

    Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been reported in males but there are few reports of IMF in females. It is not known if a gender difference exists for inspiratory muscle strength following heavy exercise, as is reported in locomotor muscles. Therefore, the relationship between fatigue and subsequent recovery of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) following exercise to maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was examined in a group of moderately trained males and females. Eighteen males (23+/-3 years; mean +/- SD) and 16 females (23+/-2 years) completed ten MIP and ten maximal handgrip (HG) strength maneuvers to establish baseline. Post-exercise MIP and HG were assessed successively immediately following a progressive intensity VO2max test on a cycle ergometer and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 15 min. VO2max, relative to fat-free mass was not statistically different between males (62+/-7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and females (60+/-8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). Males had higher absolute MIP values than females at all time intervals (P<0.05). Immediately following exercise, MIP was significantly reduced in both genders (M=83+/-16%; F=78+/-15% of baseline) but HG values were not different than resting values. MIP values remained depressed for both males and females throughout the 15 min (P<0.05). Differences for MIP between males and females were not statistically significant at any measurement time (P>0.05). The findings in this study conclude that IMF, observed immediately following maximal exercise, demonstrated the same pattern of recovery for both genders.

  18. Hindlimb muscle architecture in non-human great apes and a comparison of methods for analysing inter-species variation

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Julia P; Crompton, Robin H; Thorpe, Susannah K S

    2011-01-01

    By relating an animal's morphology to its functional role and the behaviours performed, we can further develop our understanding of the selective factors and constraints acting on the adaptations of great apes. Comparison of muscle architecture between different ape species, however, is difficult because only small sample sizes are ever available. Further, such samples are often comprised of different age–sex classes, so studies have to rely on scaling techniques to remove body mass differences. However, the reliability of such scaling techniques has been questioned. As datasets increase in size, more reliable statistical analysis may eventually become possible. Here we employ geometric and allometric scaling techniques, and ancovas (a form of general linear model, GLM) to highlight and explore the different methods available for comparing functional morphology in the non-human great apes. Our results underline the importance of regressing data against a suitable body size variable to ascertain the relationship (geometric or allometric) and of choosing appropriate exponents by which to scale data. ancova models, while likely to be more robust than scaling for species comparisons when sample sizes are high, suffer from reduced power when sample sizes are low. Therefore, until sample sizes are radically increased it is preferable to include scaling analyses along with ancovas in data exploration. Overall, the results obtained from the different methods show little significant variation, whether in muscle belly mass, fascicle length or physiological cross-sectional area between the different species. This may reflect relatively close evolutionary relationships of the non-human great apes; a universal influence on morphology of generalised orthograde locomotor behaviours or, quite likely, both. PMID:21507000

  19. Comparison of the effects of atenolol, sotalol and labetalol on muscle blood flow in man.

    PubMed Central

    Raman, G. V.; Mwongera, F. M.; Warren, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A double-blind study of the effect of three beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs (beta-blockers) on exercise muscle blood flow (MBF) in 14 normotensive volunteers was carried out. MBF was measured by the xenon-133 clearance technique. MBF was not altered by placebo, sotalol or labetalol. Atenolol significantly reduced MBF compared with placebo, sotalol and labetalol. We conclude that sotalol and labetalol may be more useful than conventional beta-blockers for treatment of hypertension or angina in association with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:2880341

  20. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  1. Intraexaminer comparison of applied kinesiology manual muscle testing of varying durations: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Conable, Katharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the difference in results (strong/facilitated vs weak/functionally inhibited) between short (1 second) and long (3 seconds) manual muscle tests (MMTs) on the same subject and to pilot the use of thin-film force transducers for characterizing the parameters of MMT and for measuring maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Method Forty-four healthy chiropractic students were tested. A thin-film force transducer recorded force over time during MVIC of the middle deltoid and 1- and 3-second MMTs of the same subjects. The MMTs were graded as strong (able to resist the testing pressure) or weak (unable to resist testing pressure, breaking away). Results Forty-two short tests were strong, and 2 were weak. Thirty-nine long tests were strong, and 5 were weak. κ (0.54) showed fair agreement for results between short and long tests. Peak force in both short and long weak tests was higher than that in strong tests when expressed as a proportion of maximum contraction. All manual tests used less force than MVICs. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a study of this nature is feasible. Longer test durations demonstrate some muscle weaknesses that are not evident on 1-second MMTs. Thin-film transducers show promise for recording MMT parameters for research purposes. PMID:21572637

  2. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  3. Comparison of tissue effects in rabbit muscle of surgical dissection devices.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Burns, Greg; Salzman, Karen L; McGill, Lawrence D; Macdonald, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    While some energy-based surgical dissection and coagulation modalities may offer excellent cutting and coagulation abilities, the impact on healing may differ among devices. We compared the tissue effects of three of these modalities with those of the standard surgical scalpel in rabbit muscle at 24 h and 14 days after surgery by evaluating radiographic and histological data. Linear incisions were made with each device in the dorsal lumbar musculature of rabbits using monopolar electrocautery in cut mode (MPE-Cut) and coagulation mode (MPE-Coag), a ferromagnetic induction loop (FMI), and a traditional scalpel. Magnetic resonance imaging scans and histological sampling were done at 24 h and 14 days. Subjective cutting and coagulation characteristics for each device were also recorded during surgery. The scalpel and FMI appeared to cause the least tissue damage adjacent to the incisions in rabbit dorsal lumbar musculature. The scalpel showed the best healing, while the FMI and MPE-Cut demonstrated good healing. The MPE-Coag showed the worst tissue healing. The scalpel, FMI, and MPE-Cut all exhibited favorable subjective characteristics during surgery. It appears that the FMI may be a better choice for surgical dissection and coagulation in muscle tissue than the MPE coagulation mode because it shows less tissue damage and offers better tissue healing.

  4. Men, muscles, and body image: comparisons of competitive bodybuilders, weight trainers, and athletically active controls

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, T; Lewis, R; Cash, T; Pope, H

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate body image and psychosocial adjustment among competitive bodybuilders, non-competitive weight trainers, and athletically active men. Methods: Participants were 40 men in each of the three groups who were assessed on body composition and multiple facets of body image evaluation, investment and anxiety, eating attitudes, and social self esteem. Results: Relative to the other two groups, competitive bodybuilders had greater body mass due to fat-free body mass. Although groups did not differ in their situational body image discomfort, competitive bodybuilders and weight trainers had a more positive global appearance evaluation and were more psychologically invested in their physical appearance. Compared with active controls, men in both weightlifting groups were more satisfied with their upper torso and muscle tone. Competitive bodybuilders reported more mid torso satisfaction than the other two groups. Competitive bodybuilders also wished to be significantly heavier than controls did and reported higher social self esteem but greater eating disturbance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that competitive bodybuilders as a group are not more "muscle dysmorphic" than either non-competitive weight trainers or physically active men who do not train with weights. PMID:15793091

  5. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  6. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  7. High muscle mitochondrial volume and aerobic capacity in a small marsupial (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) reveals flexible links between energy-use levels in mammals.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Webster, Koa N; Lee, Enhua; Buttemer, William A

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the muscle structure-function relationships that underlie the aerobic capacity of an insectivorous, small (~15 g) marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata (Family: Dasyuridae), to obtain further insight into energy use patterns in marsupials relative to those in placentals, their sister clade within the Theria (advanced mammals). Disparate hopping marsupials (Suborder Macropodiformes), a kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a rat-kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata), show aerobic capabilities as high as those of 'athletic' placentals. Equivalent muscle mitochondrial volumes and cardiovascular features support these capabilities. We examined S. crassicaudata to determine whether highly developed aerobic capabilities occur elsewhere in marsupials, rather than being restricted to the more recently evolved Macropodiformes. This was the case. Treadmill-trained S. crassicaudata attained a maximal aerobic metabolic rate ( or MMR) of 272 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1) (N=8), similar to that reported for a small (~20 g), 'athletic' placental, Apodemus sylvaticus, 264 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1). Hopping marsupials have comparable aerobic levels when body mass variation is considered. Sminthopsis crassicaudata has a basal metabolic rate (BMR) about 75% of placental values but it has a notably large factorial aerobic scope (fAS) of 13; elevated fAS also features in hopping marsupials. The of S. crassicaudata was supported by an elevated total muscle mitochondrial volume, which was largely achieved through high muscle mitochondrial volume densities, Vv(mt,f), the mean value being 14.0±1.33%. These data were considered in relation to energy use levels in mammals, particularly field metabolic rate (FMR). BMR is consistently lower in marsupials, but this is balanced by a high fAS, such that marsupial MMR matches that of placentals. However, FMR shows different mass relationships in the two clades, with the FMR of small (<125 g) marsupials, such as S. crassicaudata, being higher than that in

  8. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J B; Ramos, Isalira P; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F; Santos, Raquel S; de Oliveira, Milena V; Souza, Sergio A; Goldenberg, Regina C; Luiz, Ronir R; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  9. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A.; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J. B.; Ramos, Isalira P.; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F.; Santos, Raquel S.; de Oliveira, Milena V.; Souza, Sergio A.; Goldenberg, Regina C.; Luiz, Ronir R.; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G.; Silva, Pedro L.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  10. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the ‘cost of muscle force’ approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds – adult humans – accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds – children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  11. A Comparison of Cough Assistance Techniques in Patients with Respiratory Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Won Ah; Won, Yu Hui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of a mechanical in-exsufflator (MI-E), either alone or in combination with manual thrust, to augment cough in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) and respiratory muscle dysfunction. Materials and Methods For this randomized crossover single-center controlled trial, patients with noninvasive ventilator-dependent NMD were recruited. The primary outcome was peak cough flow (PCF), which was measured in each patient after a cough that was unassisted, manually assisted following a maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) maneuver, assisted by MI-E, or assisted by manual thrust plus MI-E. The cough augmentation techniques were provided in random order. PCF was measured using a new device, the Cough Aid. Results All 40 enrolled participants (37 males, three females; average age, 20.9±7.2 years) completed the study. The mean (standard deviation) PCFs in the unassisted, manually assisted following an MIC maneuver, MI-E-assisted, and manual thrust plus MI-E-assisted conditions were 95.7 (40.5), 155.9 (53.1), 177.2 (33.9), and 202.4 (46.6) L/min, respectively. All three interventions significantly improved PCF. However, manual assistance following an MIC maneuver was significantly less effective than MI-E alone. Manual thrust plus MI-E was significantly more effective than both of these interventions. Conclusion In patients with NMD and respiratory muscle dysfunction, MI-E alone was more effective than manual assistance following an MIC maneuver. However, MI-E used in conjunction with manual thrust improved PCF even further. PMID:27593879

  12. Effect of Microcurrent Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: A Double-Blind Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Perrin, David H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) treatment on pain and loss of range of motion (ROM) associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: We assigned subjects to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received treatment with microcurrent stimulation (200 μA, 30 Hz, for 10 minutes, then 100 μA, 0.3 Hz, for 10 minutes) 24, 48, and 72 hours after DOMS induction. Group 2 served as a sham group and was treated using a machine altered by the manufacturer so that no current could flow through the electrodes. Subjects: DOMS was induced in the biceps brachii of the nondominant arm of 18 subjects (3 males, 15 females: age = 20.33 ± 2.3 years, ht = 170.81 ± 7.3 cm, wt = 69.61 ± 13.1 kg). Dominance was defined as the arm used by the subject to throw a ball. Measurements: Subjective pain and active elbow extension ROM were evaluated before and after treatment each day. Two methods were used to assess pain: constant pressure using a weighted Orthoplast sphere and full elbow extension to the limit of pain tolerance. Subjective pain was measured with a graphic rating scale and active elbow extension ROM using a standard, plastic, double-armed goniometer. Three repeated-measures ANOVAs (between-subjects variable was group, within- subjects variables were day and test) were used to assess ROM and pain scores for the 2 groups. Results: We found no significant difference in the measurement of subjective pain scores or elbow extension ROM when the MENS group was compared with the sham group. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the MENS treatment, within the parameters used for this experiment, was not effective in reducing the pain or loss of ROM associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness. PMID:16558582

  13. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  14. Excluded Volume Effects in Polymer Solutions: II. Comparison of Experimental Results with Numerical Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Graessley, W.W.; Grest, G.S.; Hayward, R.C.

    1999-03-23

    The effect of excluded volume on the coil size of dilute linear polymers was investigated by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The radius of gyration R{sub g} was evaluated for a wide range of chain lengths at several temperatures and at the athermal condition. The theta temperature and the corresponding theta chain dimensions were established for the system, and the dependence of the size expansion factor, a{sub s} = R{sub g} /(R{sub g}){sub {theta}}, on chain length N and temperature T was examined. For long chains and at high temperatures, a{sub s} is a function of N/N{sub s}{sup 2} alone, where the length scale N{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on T. The form of this simulations-based master function compares favorably with {alpha}{sub s}(M/M{sub s}{sup 2}), an experimental master curve for linear polymers in good solvents, where M{sub s}{sup 2} depends only on polymer-solvent system. Comparisons when N{sub s}{sup 2}(T) and M{sub s}{sup 2}(system) are reduced to common units, numbers of Kuhn steps, strongly indicate that coil expansion in even the best of good solvents is small relative to that expected for truly athermal solutions. An explanation for this behavior is proposed, based on what would appear to be an inherent difference in the equation of state properties for polymeric and monomeric liquids.

  15. Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes after Postisometric Muscle Relaxation or Kinesio Taping Application for Normalization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle Tone and the Pain Relief: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Slupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Kołcz-Trzęsicka, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Kamil; Halska, Urszula; Przestrzelska, Monika; Mucha, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the resting bioelectrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (the UT muscle) before and after one of the two interventions: postisometric muscle relaxation (PIR) and Kinesio Taping (KT). Moreover a comparison between group results was conducted. From the initial 61 volunteers, 52 were selected after exclusion criteria and were allocated randomly to 2 groups: PIR group and KT group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was change in bioelectrical activity of UT muscle evaluated by surface electromyography (sEMG). Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Significant differences were found only in KT group: the average resting bioelectrical activity decreased by 0.8 μV (p = 0.0237) and the average VAS result reduced by 2.0 points (p = 0.0001). Greater decrease of VAS results was recorded in KT group compared to PIR group (p = 0.0010). Both PIR and KT intervention did not influence significantly the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle. KT application was better for pain relief in the studied sample compared with PIR intervention. PMID:26347792

  16. Final report on BIPM/CIPM key comparison CCM.FF-K4.2.2011: Volume comparison at 100 µL—Calibration of micropipettes (piston pipettes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Elsa; Arias, Roberto; Jintao, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Five fixed micropipettes of 100 µl were tested by eight different National Metrology Institutes from different Regional Metrology Organizations between July 2011 and June 2012. The micropipettes had a stable volume, during the whole comparison, with a maximum standard deviation of 0.06 µl. After a careful analysis of the original results it was decided to make corrections to the standard atmospheric pressure in order to compare results under the same calibration conditions. These corrections led to a decrease of variability within the laboratories. It was also decided to include the stability of the standard and the method variability, determined by the pilot laboratory, in the uncertainty budget of each laboratory. The corrected results (volume and uncertainty) are consistent and overlap with the key comparison reference values for the micropipettes 354828Z, 354853Z and 354864Z. For the other two micropipettes only one result is not consistent with the reference value. Most results also overlap with those of the other laboratories di,j < U(di,j). An important outcome of this comparison is that in order to have comparable results, corrections for the working conditions must be applied to the laboratory results. Laboratories must always correct their reported volume results to a reference pressure condition and temperature (for example 101.325 kPa and 20 ºC) and this information should be stated in the calibration certificate of the micropipette. Also the standard uncertainty of the method variability and reproducibility values should always be included in the uncertainty budget (around 0.1%) to lead to more realistic uncertainty values. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement

  17. Fish muscle: the exceptional case of Notothenioids.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Daniel A; Calvo, Jorge

    2009-03-01

    Fish skeletal muscle is an excellent model for studying muscle structure and function, since it has a very well-structured arrangement with different fiber types segregated in the axial and pectoral fin muscles. The morphological and physiological characteristics of the different muscle fiber types have been studied in several teleost species. In fish muscle, fiber number and size varies with the species considered, limiting fish maximum final length due to constraints in metabolites and oxygen diffusion. In this work, we analyze some special characteristics of the skeletal muscle of the suborder Notothenioidei. They experienced an impressive radiation inside Antarctic waters, a stable and cold environment that could account for some of their special characteristics. The number of muscle fibers is very low, 12,700-164,000, in comparison to 550,000-1,200,000 in Salmo salar of similar sizes. The size of the fibers is very large, reaching 600 microm in diameter, while for example Salmo salar of similar sizes have fibers of 220 microm maximum diameter. Evolutionary adjustment in cell cycle length for working at low temperature has been shown in Harpagifer antarcticus (111 h at 0 degrees C), when compared to the closely related sub-Antarctic species Harpagifer bispinis (150 h at 5 degrees C). Maximum muscle fiber number decreases towards the more derived notothenioids, a trend that is more related to phylogeny than to geographical distribution (and hence water temperature), with values as low as 3,600 in Harpagifer bispinis. Mitochondria volume density in slow muscles of notothenioids is very high (reaching 0.56) and since maximal rates of substrate oxidation by mitochondria is not enhanced, at least in demersal notothenioids, volume density is the only means of overcoming thermal constraints on oxidative capacity. In brief, some characteristics of the muscles of notothenioids have an apparent phylogenetic component while others seem to be adaptations to low temperature.

  18. Comparative anatomy, evolution, and homologies of tetrapod hindlimb muscles, comparison with forelimb muscles, and deconstruction of the forelimb-hindlimb serial homology hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Molnar, Julia

    2014-06-01

    For more than two centuries, the idea that the forelimb and hindlimb are serially homologous structures has been accepted without serious question. This study presents the first detailed analysis of the evolution and homologies of all hindlimb muscles in representatives of each major tetrapod group and proposes a unifying nomenclature for these muscles. These data are compared with information obtained previously about the forelimb muscles of tetrapods and the muscles of other gnathostomes in order to address one of the most central and enigmatic questions in evolutionary and comparative anatomy: why are the pelvic and pectoral appendages of gnathostomes generally so similar to each other? An integrative analysis of the new myological data, combined with a review of recent paleontological, developmental, and genetic works and of older studies, does not support serial homology between the structures of these appendages. For instance, many of the strikingly similar forelimb and hindlimb muscles found in each major extant tetrapod taxon were acquired at different geological times and/or have different embryonic origins. These similar muscles are not serial homologues, but the result of evolutionary parallelism/convergence due to a complex interplay of ontogenetic, functional, topological, and phylogenetic constraints/factors.

  19. Comparison of two sample preparation methods for analysis of organochlorine pesticides residues in fish muscle.

    PubMed

    Witczak, Agata; Patrzykąt, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare recoveries of organochlorine pesticides (heptachlor, α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, op'-DDD, pp'-DDD, pp'-DDE, op'-DDT, pp'-DDT) from fish muscle dried by two alternative methods: (i) grinding with anhydrous sodium sulphate and (ii) freeze drying. Pesticide residues content was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) method. For four pesticides (γ-HCH, α-HCH, heptachlor and pp;-DDD) in four of five fish species, higher recoveries were obtained from the freeze-dried samples. For five remaining pesticides, correlations between fish species and drying method were not found. The results of this study do not clearly indicate which drying method caused lower losses of analytes. Recoveries from the freeze-dried samples ranged from 69.9 to 117.6 %, while recoveries from the samples ground with sodium sulphate varied from 64.4 to 126.7 %. Either of the methods gave satisfactory recoveries and they both can be used interchangeably.

  20. Muscle metabolite accumulation following maximal exercise. A comparison between short-term and prolonged kayak performance.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Karlsson, J

    1984-01-01

    Five elite flatwater kayak paddlers were studied during indoor simulated 500 and 10,000-m races, with performance times of 2 and 45 min, respectively. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the midportion of m. deltoideus immediately pre and post exercise. Concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), glucose, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), glycogen, and lactate were subsequently determined. Short term exercise resulted in statistically significant increases in glucose (P less than 0.001), G-6-P (P less than 0.05) and lactate (P less than 0.01) concentration concomitant with decreased CP (P less than 0.05) and glycogen (P less than 0.01). Following prolonged exercise, a non-significant elevation in glucose and a reduction (P less than 0.01) in glycogen were demonstrated. Evidently the metabolic demands for kayak competitions at 500 and 10,000 m are different. Thus, the energy contribution from glycolytic precursors and the anaerobic component is of greater relative importance in short distances than in exercise of long duration. A generalization of the findings to other athletic events of varying distances is proposed. The present data on arm-exercise is consistent with previous findings obtained in connection with leg exercises.

  1. Hand volume estimates based on a geometric algorithm in comparison to water displacement.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N; Sims, N; Hill, C J; Hernandez, T; Greenshner, A; Diep, H

    2006-06-01

    Assessing changes in upper extremity limb volume during lymphedema therapy is important for determining treatment efficacy and documenting outcomes. Although arm volumes may be determined by tape measure, the suitability of circumference measurements to estimate hand volumes is questionable because of the deviation in circularity of hand shape. Our aim was to develop an alternative measurement procedure and algorithm for routine use to estimate hand volumes. A caliper was used to measure hand width and depth in 33 subjects (66 hands) and volumes (VE) were calculated using an elliptical frustum model. Using regression analysis and limits of agreement (LOA), VE was compared to volumes determined by water displacement (VW), to volumes calculated from tape-measure determined circumferences (VC), and to a trapezoidal model (VT). VW and VE (mean +/- SD) were similar (363 +/- 98 vs. 362 +/-100 ml) and highly correlated; VE = 1.01VW -3.1 ml, r=0.986, p<0.001, with LOA of +/- 33.5 ml and +/- 9.9 %. In contrast, VC (480 +/- 138 ml) and VT (432 +/- 122 ml) significantly overestimated volume (p<0.0001). These results indicate that the elliptical algorithm can be a useful alternative to water displacement when hand volumes are needed and the water displacement method is contra-indicated, impractical to implement, too time consuming or not available.

  2. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes.

  3. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  4. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  5. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  6. A comparison of two stretching programs for hamstring muscles: A randomized controlled assessor-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, Christophe; Wolfs, Sébastien; Chevalier, Madeline; Granado, Caroline; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Depas, Yannick; Roussel, Nathalie; Hage, Renaud; Vanderthommen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most parameters regarding hamstring flexibility training programs have been investigated; however, the joint (i.e. hip or knee) on which the stretching should preferentially be focused needs to be further explored. This randomized controlled assessor-blinded study aimed to investigate the influence of this parameter. We randomly assigned 111 asymptomatic participants with tight hamstring muscles in three groups: a control group and two groups following a different home-based 8-week (five 10-minute sessions per week) hamstring stretching program (i.e. stretching performed by flexing the hip while keeping the knee extended [SH] or by first flexing the hip with a flexed knee and then extending the knee [SK]). Range of motion (ROM) of hip flexion and knee extension were measured before and after the stretching program by means of the straight leg raising test and the passive knee extension angle test, respectively. Eighty-nine participants completed the study. A significant increase in ROM was observed at post-test. Analyses showed significant group-by-time interactions for changes regarding all outcomes. Whereas the increase in hip flexion and knee extension ROM was higher in the stretching groups than in the CG (especially for the SH group p < 0.05), no differences between the two stretching groups were observed (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the fact that both stretching programs resulted in similar results suggests no influence of the joint at which the stretching is focused upon, as assessed by the straight leg raising and knee extension angle tests.

  7. Comparison of energy output during ramp and staircase shortening in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, M; Woledge, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We compared the rates of work and heat production during ramp shortening with those during staircase shortening (sequence of step releases of the same amplitude, separated by regular time intervals). Ramp or staircase shortening was applied to isolated muscle fibres (sarcomere length, 2.2 microns; temperature, approximately 1 degree C) at the plateau of an isometric tetanus. The total amount of shortening was no greater than 6% of the fibre length. 2. During ramp shortening the power output showed a maximum at about 0.8 fibre lengths per second (Lo s-1), which corresponds to 1/3 the maximum shortening velocity (Vo). For the same average shortening velocity during staircase shortening (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) the power output was 40-60% lower. The rate of heat production for the same average shortening velocity was approximately 45% higher during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. 3. The relation between rate of total energy output and shortening velocity was well described by a second order regression line in the range of velocities used (0.1-2.3 Lo s-1). For any shortening velocity the rate of total energy output (power plus heat rate) was not statistically different for staircase (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) and ramp shortening. 4. The mechanical efficiency (the ratio of the power over the total energy rate) during ramp shortening had a maximum value of 0.36 at 1/5 Vo; during staircase shortening, for any given shortening velocity, the mechanical efficiency was reduced compared with ramp shortening: with a staircase step of about 0.5% Lo at 1/5 Vo the efficiency was approximately 0.2. 5. The results indicate that a cross-bridge is able to convert different quantities of energy into work depending on the different shortening protocol used. The fraction of energy dissipated as heat is larger during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. PMID:8544132

  8. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and complexity are studied for four nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme and three cell-centered schemes - a node-averaging scheme and two schemes with nearest-neighbor and adaptive compact stencils for least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Tests from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The tests of the second class are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes may degenerate on mixed grids, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to that of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly anisotropic

  9. Glacier volume estimation of Cascade Volcanoes—an analysis and comparison with other methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Kennard, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, the occurrence of floods and mudflows made apparent a need to assess mudflow hazards on other Cascade volcanoes. A basic requirement for such analysis is information about the volume and distribution of snow and ice on these volcanoes. An analysis was made of the volume-estimation methods developed by previous authors and a volume estimation method was developed for use in the Cascade Range. A radio echo-sounder, carried in a backpack, was used to make point measurements of ice thickness on major glaciers of four Cascade volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Washington; Mount Hood and the Three Sisters, Oregon; and Mount Shasta, California). These data were used to generate ice-thickness maps and bedrock topographic maps for developing and testing volume-estimation methods. Subsequently, the methods were applied to the unmeasured glaciers on those mountains and, as a test of the geographical extent of applicability, to glaciers beyond the Cascades having measured volumes. Two empirical relationships were required in order to predict volumes for all the glaciers. Generally, for glaciers less than 2.6 km in length, volume was found to be estimated best by using glacier area, raised to a power. For longer glaciers, volume was found to be estimated best by using a power law relationship, including slope and shear stress. The necessary variables can be estimated from topographic maps and aerial photographs.

  10. A comparison of low volume 'high-intensity-training' and high volume traditional resistance training methods on muscular performance, body composition, and subjective assessments of training

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, J; Eichmann, B; Fisher, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of resistance training (RT) examine methods that do not resemble typical training practices of persons participating in RT. Ecologically valid RT programs more representative of such practices are seldom compared. This study compared two such approaches to RT. Thirty participants (males, n = 13; females, n = 17) were randomised to either a group performing low volume 'High Intensity Training' (HIT; n = 16) or high volume 'Body-building' (3ST; n = 14) RT methods 2x/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included muscular performance, body composition, and participant's subjective assessments. Both HIT and 3ST groups improved muscular performance significantly (as indicated by 95% confidence intervals) with large effect sizes (ES; 0.97 to 1.73 and 0.88 to 1.77 respectively). HIT had significantly greater muscular performance gains for 3 of 9 tested exercises compared with 3ST (p < 0.05) and larger effect sizes for 8 of 9 exercises. Body composition did not significantly change in either group. However, effect sizes for whole body muscle mass changes were slightly more favourable in the HIT group compared with the 3ST group (0.27 and -0.34 respectively) in addition to whole body fat mass (0.03 and 0.43 respectively) and whole body fat percentage (-0.10 and -0.44 respectively). Significant muscular performance gains can be produced using either HIT or 3ST. However, muscular performance gains may be greater when using HIT. Future research should look to identify which components of ecologically valid RT programs are primarily responsible for these differences in outcome. PMID:27601778

  11. Human-computer interaction in radiotherapy target volume delineation: a prospective, multi-institutional comparison of user input devices.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the prospective comparison of objective and subjective effects of target volume region of interest (ROI) delineation using mouse-keyboard and pen-tablet user input devices (UIDs). The study was designed as a prospective test/retest sequence, with Wilcoxon signed rank test for matched-pair comparison. Twenty-one physician-observers contoured target volume ROIs on four standardized cases (representative of brain, prostate, lung, and head and neck malignancies) twice: once using QWERTY keyboard/scroll-wheel mouse UID and once with pen-tablet UID (DTX2100, Wacom Technology Corporation, Vancouver, WA, USA). Active task time, ROI manipulation task data, and subjective survey data were collected. One hundred twenty-nine target volume ROI sets were collected, with 62 paired pen-tablet/mouse-keyboard sessions. Active contouring time was reduced using the pen-tablet UID, with mean ± SD active contouring time of 26 ± 23 min, compared with 32 ± 25 with the mouse (p ≤ 0.01). Subjective estimation of time spent was also reduced from 31 ± 26 with mouse to 27 ± 22 min with the pen (p = 0.02). Task analysis showed ROI correction task reduction (p = 0.045) and decreased panning and scrolling tasks (p < 0.01) with the pen-tablet; drawing, window/level changes, and zoom commands were unchanged (p = n.s.) Volumetric analysis demonstrated no detectable differences in ROI volume nor intra- or inter-observer volumetric coverage. Fifty-two of 62 (84%) users preferred the tablet for each contouring task; 5 of 62 (8%) denoted no preference, and 5 of 62 (8%) chose the mouse interface. The pen-tablet UID reduced active contouring time and reduced correction of ROIs, without substantially altering ROI volume/coverage.

  12. Botox induced muscle paralysis rapidly degrades bone

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Sarah E.; Sanford, David A.; Becker, Blair A.; Bain, Steven D.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2006-01-01

    The means by which muscle function modulates bone homeostasis is poorly understood. To begin to address this issue, we have developed a novel murine model of unilateral transient hindlimb muscle paralysis using botulinum toxin A (Botox). Female C57BL/6 mice (16 weeks) received IM injections of either saline or Botox (n = 10 each) in both the quadriceps and calf muscles of the right hindleg. Gait dysfunction was assessed by multi-observer inventory, muscle alterations were determined by wet mass, and bone alterations were assessed by micro-CT imaging at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and tibia mid-diaphysis. Profound degradation of both muscle and bone was observed within 21 days despite significant restoration of weight bearing function by 14 days. The muscle mass of the injected quadriceps and calf muscles was diminished −47.3% and −59.7%, respectively, vs. saline mice (both P < 0.001). The ratio of bone volume to tissue volume (BV/TV) within the distal femoral epiphysis and proximal tibial metaphysis of Botox injected limbs was reduced −43.2% and −54.3%, respectively, while tibia cortical bone volume was reduced −14.6% (all P < 0.001). Comparison of the contralateral non-injected limbs indicated the presence of moderate systemic effects in the model that were most probably associated with diminished activity following muscle paralysis. Taken as a whole, the micro-CT data implied that trabecular and cortical bone loss was primarily achieved by bone resorption. These data confirm the decisive role of neuromuscular function in mediating bone homeostasis and establish a model with unique potential to explore the mechanisms underlying this relation. Given the rapidly expanding use of neuromuscular inhibitors for indications such as pain reduction, these data also raise the critical need to monitor bone loss in these patients. PMID:16185943

  13. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, [Formula: see text], where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians

  14. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, π(d2)2, where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians (interquartile range

  15. Reduced volume and increased training intensity elevate muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha2-subunit expression as well as short- and long-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Wendell, Jesper; Nybo, Lars; Thomassen, Martin

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners as a result of a reduced amount of training combined with speed endurance training. For a 6- to 9-wk period, 17 runners were assigned to either a speed endurance group with a 25% reduction in the amount of training but including speed endurance training consisting of six to twelve 30-s sprint runs 3-4 times/wk (SET group n = 12) or a control group (n = 5), which continued the endurance training ( approximately 55 km/wk). For the SET group, the expression of the muscle Na(+)-K(+) pump alpha(2)-subunit was 68% higher (P < 0.05) and the plasma K(+) level was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running after 9 wk. Performance in a 30-s sprint test and the first of the supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7% and 36%, respectively, after the speed endurance training period. In the SET group, maximal O(2) uptake was unaltered, but the 3-km (3,000-m) time was reduced (P < 0.05) from 10.4 +/- 0.1 to 10.1 +/- 0.1 min and the 10-km (10,000-m) time was improved from 37.3 +/- 0.4 to 36.3 +/- 0.4 min (means +/- SE). Muscle protein expression and performance remained unaltered in the control group. The present data suggest that both short- and long-term exercise performances can be improved with a reduction in training volume if speed endurance training is performed and that the Na(+)-K(+) pump plays a role in the control of K(+) homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise.

  16. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of pineal gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Acer, Niyazi; Ilıca, Ahmet Turan; Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Yıldırım, Birdal; Turgut, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI) on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males) who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55 ± 51.34, 102.69 ± 40.39, and 104.33 ± 40.45 mm(3), respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P > 0.05). From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  17. [Volume of the irradiated small intestine during pelvic radiotherapy. Comparison of various calculation methods].

    PubMed

    Bonetta, A; Capirci, C; Lambertini, D; Zingoni, A; Fantuzzi, E

    1996-09-01

    In pelvic irradiation, the small bowel portion included in the planning treatment volume is one of the major factors of acute enteropathy. Three different methods are used to calculate the bowel volume: Gallagher's grid method and two systems based on specific algorithms using CT data. We compared the results of these different methods in a series of nine patients submitted to treatment volume planning simulation for pelvic irradiation, after oral barium administration. The small bowel volumes were calculated with the grid method on orthogonal radiographs. About one hour later, the patients were submitted to CT for radiotherapy planning. The small bowel regions to be irradiated were drawn manually on all CT slices on a Varian Cadplan 2.62 console. Two different algorithms were used to calculate the small bowel volumes: one of them based on polyhedral and the other on cylindric approximation. The average volumes, the variance and the determination coefficient with linear and polynomial regression were in substantial statistical agreement in the three series; the correlation index between the grid and the CT methods ranged 0.84-0.87. Therefore, the authors believe that enteric side-effects can be correlated with the irradiated small bowel volume, independent of the calculation method.

  18. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa.

  19. [THE ROLE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE IN VOLUME-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS OF REGULATION OF VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS CONTRACTILE ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Smagliy, L V; Gusakova, S V; Birulina, Yu G; Kovalev, I V; Orlov, S N

    2015-04-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H2S) influence on the contractile activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) was studied on endothelium-denuded aortic ring segments of male Wistar rats with method of mechanography. Contractions of SMS were induced by incubation in high potassium solution as well as in hyper-, hypo- and isosmotic solutions. 5-100 LM of H2S donor--sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) increased mechanical tension of SMC precontracted with high potassium solution that was abolished by bumetanide--the inhibitor of Na+, K+, 2Cl(-) -cotransporter (NKCC), but 100-1000 microM of NaHS relaxed SMS. NaHS (10 microM) increased the amplitude of hyper- and isosmotic contraction, but not of hyposmotic contraction. NaHS (ImM) decreased the amplitude of hyper-, iso-, and hyposmotic contractions. The direct measurements of NKCC activity with radionuclide method showed an increase in NKCC activity under the action of 5-100 microM of NaHS. These findings suggest that low concentrations of H2S participate in the NKCC activation. This mechanism underlines constrictive action of H2S on smooth muscle cells.

  20. Comparison of water immersion and saline infusion as a means of inducing volume expansion in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Pins, D. S.; Arrington, R.; Denunzio, A. G.; Engstrom, R.

    1975-01-01

    The study compares the natriuresis induced by head-out water immersion to that of a standard saline infusion and assesses the relative effectiveness of these two techniques as volume determinants of renal sodium and water handling in humans in a seated posture. The data obtained show that the volume stimulus of immersion is identical to that of standard saline-induced extracellular fluid volume expansion (ECVE) in normal seated subjects. The ability of head-out water immersion to induce a natriuresis without a concomitant increase in total blood volume and with a decrease in body weight suggests that water immersion may be preferred as an investigative tool for assessing the effects of ECVE in man.

  1. Comparison of slow inactivation in human heart and rat skeletal muscle Na+ channel chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, John P; Wang, Sho-Ya; Kallen, Roland G; Wang, Ging Kuo

    1999-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels undergo two types of inactivation in response to depolarization. One type, fast inactivation, occurs with a time scale of milliseconds. The other, slow inactivation, occurs over seconds to minutes. In addition, these two processes appear to be distinct at the molecular level. However, the molecular mechanism of Na+ channel slow inactivation is unknown. We used patch clamp techniques to study slow inactivation, activation and fast inactivation in α-subunit cDNA clones for wild-type human heart Na+ channels (hH1) and rat skeletal muscle Na+ channels (μ1) transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Our experiments showed that the Na+ channel slow inactivation phenotype (development, steady state and recovery) differed dramatically between hH1 and μ1. Slow inactivation in μ1 had a faster onset, a steeper voltage dependence, and was more complete compared with hH1. In addition, recovery from slow inactivation was much slower for μ1 than for hH1. Activation and fast inactivation kinetics were also different in hH1 and μ1. In hH1, fast inactivation was slower and V½ values of activation and steady-state fast inactivation (h∞) were more negative than in μ1. To better understand the molecular basis of Na+ channel slow inactivation, Na+ channel chimaeras were constructed with domains from hH1 and μ1. The slow inactivation phenotype in the chimaeras (domains denoted by subscripts) μ1(1)hH1(2,3,4), μ1(1,2)hH1(3,4) and μ1(1,2,3)hH1(4) was intermediate compared with that of wild-type. However, the chimaera μ1(1)hH1(2,3,4) was more like wild-type hH1, while the chimaeras μ1(1,2)hH1(3,4) and μ1(1,2,3)hH1(4) were more similar to wild-type μ1. In the chimaeras, activation resembled that of μ1, fast inactivation resembled that of hH1, and steady-state fast inactivation fell between that of hH1 and μ1. The data demonstrate that all four domains can modulate the Na+ channel slow inactivation phenotype. However, domains D1

  2. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  3. A comparison of the moment arms of pelvic limb muscles in horses bred for acceleration (Quarter Horse) and endurance (Arab).

    PubMed

    Crook, T C; Cruickshank, S E; McGowan, C M; Stubbs, N; Wilson, A M; Hodson-Tole, E; Payne, R C

    2010-07-01

    Selective breeding for performance has resulted in distinct breeds of horse, such as the Quarter Horse (bred for acceleration) and the Arab (bred for endurance). Rapid acceleration, seen during Quarter Horse racing, requires fast powerful muscular contraction and the generation of large joint torques, particularly by the hind limb muscles. This study compared hind limb moment arm lengths in the Quarter Horse and Arab. We hypothesized that Quarter Horse hind limb extensor muscles would have longer moment arms when compared to the Arab, conferring a greater potential for torque generation at the hip, stifle and tarsus during limb extension. Six Quarter Horse and six Arab hind limbs were dissected to determine muscle moment arm lengths for the following muscles: gluteus medius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius (medialis and lateralis) and tibialis cranialis. The moment arms of biceps femoris (acting at the hip) and gastrocnemius lateralis (acting at the stifle) were significantly longer in the Quarter Horse, although the length of the remaining muscle moment arms were similar in both breeds of horse. All the Quarter Horse muscles were capable of generating greater muscle moments owing to their greater physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and therefore greater isometric force potential, which suggests that PCSA is a better determinant of muscle torque than moment arm length in these two breeds of horse. With the exception of gastrocnemius and tibialis cranialis, the observed muscle fascicle length to moment arm ratio (MFL : MA ratio) was greater for the Arab horse muscles. It appears that the Arab muscles have the potential to operate at slower velocities of contraction and hence generate greater force outputs when compared to the Quarter Horse muscles working over a similar range of joint motion; this would indicate that Arab hind limb muscles are optimized to function at maximum economy rather than maximum power output.

  4. Comparison of an accelerometer and a condenser microphone for mechanomyographic signals during measurement of agonist and antagonist muscles in sustained isometric muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kwang; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Iwanaga, Koichi; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the force tremor (FT) on mechanomyographic (MMG) signals recorded by a condenser microphone (MIC) and an accelerometer (ACC) during measurement of agonist and antagonist muscles in sustained isometric contractions. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals and MMG signals by MIC (MMG-MIC) and ACC (MMG-ACC) were recorded simultaneously on biceps brachii (BB) and triceps brachii (TB). Following determination of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), 10 male subjects were asked to perform sustained elbow flexion and extension contractions at 30% MVC until exhaustion. We analyzed the root mean square (RMS) for all signals and compared the sum of the power spectrum (SPA) for 3-6 Hz and 8-12 Hz and the ratio of the sum of SPA for 3-6 Hz and 8-12 Hz in SPA for 3-100 Hz (SPA-FT/SPA-(3-100 Hz)) between MMG-MIC and MMG-ACC. During all sustained muscle contractions, the RMS of EMG and MMG-(MIC) was significantly (p<0.05) increased in antagonistic muscle pairs, while the increase was more noticeable for the agonist than for the antagonist. In addition, the antagonist had a significantly (p<0.05) smaller amplitude than the agonist muscle. The RMS of MMG-ACC, however, showed no significant (p>0.05) difference in RMS amplitude and slope between agonist and antagonist muscles during flexion. In extension, the MMG-ACC-RMS amplitude showed a tendency to be higher in the antagonist than in the agonist, while their slopes showed no significant (p>0.05) difference. The SPA for 3-6 Hz and 8-12 Hz in MMG-(MIC) showed a tendency to be higher in the agonist than the antagonist, and the slopes of the agonist were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those of the antagonist in all contractions. In MMG-ACC, SPA and slopes for 3-6 Hz and 8-12 Hz tended not to differ between agonist and antagonist. The SPA-FT/SPA-(3-100 Hz) in MMG-ACC showed that the antagonist was higher than that of the agonist in all contractions. The MMG

  5. Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound to assess semitendinosus muscle morphology.

    PubMed

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Maas, Huub; Harlaar, Jaap; Becher, Jules G; Buizer, Annemieke I; Jaspers, Richard T

    2016-10-01

    In several neurological disorders and muscle injuries, morphological changes of the m. semitendinosus (ST) are presumed to contribute to movement limitations around the knee. Freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), using position tracking of two-dimensional US images to reconstruct a 3D voxel array, can be used to assess muscle morphology in vivo. The aims of this study were: (i) to introduce a newly developed 3D US protocol for ST; and (ii) provide a first comparison of morphological characteristics determined by 3D US with those measured on dissected cadaveric muscles. Morphological characteristics of ST (e.g. muscle belly length, tendon length, fascicle length and whole muscle volume, and volumes of both compartments) were assessed in six cadavers using a 3D US protocol. Subsequently, ST muscles were removed from the body to measure the same morphological characteristics. Mean differences between morphological characteristics measured by 3D US and after dissection were smaller than 10%. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were higher than 0.75 for all variables except for the lengths of proximal fascicles (ICC = 0.58). Measurement of the volume of proximal compartment by 3D US was not feasible, due to low US image quality proximally. We conclude that the presented 3D US protocol allows for reasonably accurate measurements of key morphological characteristics of ST muscle.

  6. Cell-volume-dependent vascular smooth muscle contraction: role of Na+, K+, 2Cl- cotransport, intracellular Cl- and L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Anfinogenova, Yana J; Baskakov, Mikhail B; Kovalev, Igor V; Kilin, Alexander A; Dulin, Nickolai O; Orlov, Sergei N

    2004-10-01

    This study elucidates the role of cell volume in contractions of endothelium-denuded vascular smooth muscle rings (VSMR) from the rat aorta. We observed that hyposmotic swelling as well as hyper- and isosmotic shrinkage led to VSMR contractions. Swelling-induced contractions were accompanied by activation of Ca2+ influx and were abolished by nifedipine and verapamil. In contrast, contractions of shrunken cells were insensitive to the presence of L-type channel inhibitors and occurred in the absence of Ca2+ o. Thirty minutes preincubation with bumetanide, a potent Na+, K+, CI- cotransport (NKCC) inhibitor, decreased Cl(-)i content, nifedipine-sensitive 45Ca uptake and contractions triggered by modest depolarization ([K+]o = 36 mM). Elevation of [K+]o to 66 mM completely abolished the effect of bumetanide on these parameters. Bumetanide almost completely abrogated phenylephrine-induced contraction, partially suppressed contractions triggered by hyperosmotic shrinkage, but potentiated contractions of isosmotically shrunken VSMR. Our results suggest that bumetanide suppresses contraction of modestly depolarized cells via NKCC inhibition and Cl(-)i-mediated membrane hyperpolarization, whereas augmented contraction of isosmotically shrunken VSMR by bumetanide is a consequence of suppression of NKCC-mediated regulatory volume increase. The mechanism of bumetanide inhibition of contraction of phenylephrine-treated and hyperosmotically shrunken VSMR should be examined further.

  7. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-18

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy.

  8. Comparison of the T10 and L4 paraspinal muscle activities over time during continuous computer work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the T10 and L4 paraspinal muscle activities over time during continuous computer work. [Subjects] Ten male workers participated in this study. [Methods] The T10 and L4 paraspinal muscle activities were measured using a surface EMG system after 0, 20, 40, and 80 minutes of continuous computer work. [Results] The T10 and L4 paraspinal muscle activities after 20 and 40 minutes were increased significantly compared with the initial values, while they were decreased significantly after 80 minutes compared with the initial readings. [Conclusion] This study suggests that workers using computers for short periods would benefit from back muscle stretching exercises due to increased tension in these muscles. For longer computer work, strengthening exercises would be more effective than stretching due to decreased back muscle activation. PMID:26357446

  9. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles A A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  10. Comparison of Characteristics of Myosin Heavy Chain-based Fiber and Meat Quality among Four Bovine Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gap-Don; Yang, Han-Sul; Jeong, Jin-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber characteristics account for meat quality and muscle fibers are mainly classified into three or more types according to their contractile and metabolic properties. However, the majority of previous studies on bovine skeletal muscle are based on myosin ATPase activity. In the present study, the differences in the characteristics of muscle fibers classified by the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) among four bovine skeletal muscles such as longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM), semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST) and their relationships to beef quality were investigated. MHCs 2x, 2a and slow were identified by LC-MS/MS and IIX, IIA and I fiber types were classified. PM, which had the smallest size and highest density of fibers regardless of type, showed the highest myoglobin content, CIE L*, a*, b* and sarcomere length (p<0.05), whereas ST with the highest composition of IIX, showed high shear force and low sarcomere length (p<0.05). The correlation coefficients between muscle fiber characteristics and meat quality showed that type IIX is closely related to poor beef quality and that a high density of small-sized fibers is related to redness and tenderness. Therefore, the differences in meat quality between muscles can be explained by the differences in muscle fiber characteristics, and especially, the muscles with good quality are composed of more small-sized fibers regardless of fiber type. PMID:28115894

  11. Final report on regional supplementary comparison SIM.M.FF-S5: Volume of liquids at 50 mL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Abed; Malta, Dalni; Kornblit, Fernando; Ramírez, Ruben R.; Arias, Roberto; Trujillo, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    A regional supplementary comparison for the volume of liquid at 50 mL was conducted during October 2009 to June 2010 between the SIM members CENAM, INTI, INMETRO, INDECOPI and INTN. The transfer standard consisted of two 50 mL glass pycnometers, of the Gay Lussac type. CENAM acted as the pilot, collected the measurement results, analyzed the data and produced the comparison report. The median of all participants' results was used to calculate the regional comparison reference value because the result for one of the two pycnometers in one laboratory failed the chi-squared test at the 0.05 probability level. The measurements reported by the participants show an excellent overlap in four out of the five NMIs (-34×10-6 < Di < 29×10-6). The degree of equivalence obtained herein will be taken into account for the preparation of calibration and measurement capabilities claims from the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the SIM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Comparison of supervised MRI segmentation methods for tumor volume determination during therapy.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, M; Clarke, L P; Velthuizen, R P; Phuphanich, S; Bensaid, A M; Hall, L O; Bezdek, J C; Greenberg, H; Trotti, A; Silbiger, M

    1995-01-01

    Two different multispectral pattern recognition methods are used to segment magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain for quantitative estimation of tumor volume and volume changes with therapy. A supervised k-nearest neighbor (kNN) rule and a semi-supervised fuzzy c-means (SFCM) method are used to segment MRI slice data. Tumor volumes as determined by the kNN and SFCM segmentation methods are compared with two reference methods, based on image grey scale, as a basis for an estimation of ground truth, namely: (a) a commonly used seed growing method that is applied to the contrast enhanced T1-weighted image, and (b) a manual segmentation method using a custom-designed graphical user interface applied to the same raw image (T1-weighted) dataset. Emphasis is placed on measurement of intra and inter observer reproducibility using the proposed methods. Intra- and interobserver variation for the kNN method was 9% and 5%, respectively. The results for the SFCM method was a little better at 6% and 4%, respectively. For the seed growing method, the intra-observer variation was 6% and the interobserver variation was 17%, significantly larger when compared with the multispectral methods. The absolute tumor volume determined by the multispectral segmentation methods was consistently smaller than that observed for the reference methods. The results of this study are found to be very patient case-dependent. The results for SFCM suggest that it should be useful for relative measurements of tumor volume during therapy, but further studies are required. This work demonstrates the need for minimally supervised or unsupervised methods for tumor volume measurements.

  13. Functional activity of the two promoters of the myosin alkali light chain gene in primary muscle cell cultures: comparison with other muscle gene promoters and other culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Daubas, P; Klarsfeld, A; Garner, I; Pinset, C; Cox, R; Buckingham, M

    1988-01-01

    Proximal upstream flanking sequences of the mouse myosin alkali light chain gene encoding MLC1F and MLC3F, the mouse alpha-cardiac actin gene and the chicken gene for the alpha-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor were linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and transfected into primary cultures derived from mouse skeletal muscle or into myogenic cell lines. We demonstrate that the mouse MLC1F/MLC3F gene has two functional promoters. In primary muscle cultures, a 1200 bp sequence flanking exon 1 (MLC1F) and a 438 bp sequence flanking exon 2 (MLC3F) direct CAT activity in myotubes, but not in myoblasts or in non myogenic 3T6 and CV1 cells. Developmentally regulated expression is also seen with the alpha-cardiac actin (320 bp) and acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit (850 bp) upstream sequences in the primary culture system. Transfection experiments with myogenic cell lines show different results with a given promoter construct, reflecting possible differences in the levels of regulatory factors between lines. Different muscle gene promoters behave differently in a given cell line, suggesting different regulatory factor requirements between these promoters. Images PMID:2894633

  14. Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David, Ed.

    The papers which make up this volume were for the most part presented at a program of seminars given in Oxford, England, in the autumn of 1990. The seminars represented the first activity of the new Centre for Comparative Studies in Education installed at the Department of Educational Studies of the University of Oxford in January 1990. The…

  15. A comparison of 3 different rest intervals on the exercise volume completed during a workout.

    PubMed

    Willardson, Jeffrey M; Burkett, Lee N

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare differences between 3 different rest intervals on the squat and bench press volume completed during a workout. Fifteen college-aged men volunteered to participate in this study (age 20.73 +/- 2.60 years; body mass 80.73 +/- 10.80 kg). All subjects performed 3 testing sessions, during which 4 sets of the squat and bench press were performed with an 8 repetition maximum (8RM) load. During each testing session, the squat and bench press were performed with a 1, 2, or 5-minute rest interval between sets. Volume was defined as the total number of repetitions completed over 4 sets for each rest condition. Statistical analysis was conducted separately for the squat and bench press. One-way repeated analyses of variance with Bonferroni post hocs demonstrated significant differences between each rest condition for both exercises tested (p < 0.05). The 5-minute rest condition resulted in the highest volume completed, followed in descending order by the 2- and 1-minute rest conditions. The ability to perform a higher volume of training with a given load may stimulate greater strength adaptations.

  16. A Comparison of Gender and Socioeconomic Bracket in Fourth Grade Students when Measuring Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Kelly A.

    The goal of this study was to assess students' abilities when measuring volume as well as providing a hands-on method for designing a water-filtration process. I studied the trends among gender, time, and ability to measure water in two different groups of fourth grade students. Fourth grade students from both higher income and lower income school districts visited a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Studio in order to participate in hands-on, problem-based learning. The students in this study attempted to solve the "Dirty Water Problem" by measuring 281ml of dirty water solution, and using household tools to filter and clean the dirty water. This study showed that 68% of students from a high-income socioeconomic bracket were able to measure a determined volume of water independently. Meanwhile, only 18% of students from a low-income socioeconomic bracket were able to complete the same task independently. In the low-income bracket, 78% of students required assistance measuring a volume of water, indicating that the majority of these students performed below grade level. Where time spent at the station was concerned, the difference between high-income and low-income socioeconomic brackets was insignificant. Key Words: STEM, measurement, volume, design, Dirty Water Problem, socioeconomic bracket.

  17. COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION/LARGE VOLUME INJECTION PROCEDURES FOR METHOD 8270

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two solid phase (SPE) and one traditional continuous liquid-liquid extraction method are compared for analysis of Method 8270 SVOCs. Productivity parameters include data quality, sample volume, analysis time and solvent waste.

    One SPE system, unique in the U.S., uses aut...

  18. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  19. Hippocampal volumes among older Indian adults: Comparison with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dhikav, Vikas; Duraisamy, Sharmila; Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hippocampal volume data from India have recently been reported in younger adults. Data in older adults are unknown. The present paper describes hippocampal volume from India among older adults and compares the same with patients having Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Materials and Methods: A total of 32 cognitively normal subjects, 20 patients with AD, and 13 patients with MCI were enrolled. Patients were evaluated for the diagnosis of AD/MCI using the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Related Disorders Association criteria and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale (score = 0.5), respectively. Hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine by manual segmentation (Megnatom Symphony 1.5T scanner) three-dimensional (3D) sequences. Results: Age and duration of illness in the MCI group were 70.6 ± 8.6 years and 1.9 ± 0.9 years, respectively. In the AD group, age and duration of illness were 72 ± 8.1 years and 3.1 ± 2.2 years, respectively. In cognitively normal subjects, the age range was 45-88 years (66.9 ± 10.32) years. Mean mini–mental status examination (MMSE) score of healthy subjects was 28.28 ± 1.33. In the MCI group, MMSE was 27.05 ± 1.79. In the AD group, MMSE was 13.32 ± 5.6. In the healthy group, the hippocampal volume was 2.73 ± 0.53 cm3 on the left side and 2.77 ± 0.6 cm3 on the right side. Likewise, in MCI, the volume on the left side was 2.35 ± 0.42 cm3 and the volume on the right side was 2.36 ± 0.38 cm3. Similarly, in the AD group, the volume on the right side was 1.64 ± 0.55 cm3 and on the left side it was 1.59 ± 0.55 cm3. Post hoc analysis using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) showed, using analysis of variance (ANOVA) that there was a statistically significant difference between healthy and AD (P ≤ 0.01), and between healthy and MCI (P ≤ 0.01) subjects. There was a correlation between MMSE

  20. Quantitative Comparison of Volume Maintenance between Inlay and Onlay Bone Grafts in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Rosenthal, Andrew H.; Ozaki, Wayne; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonvascularized autologous bone grafts are the criterion standard in craniofacial reconstruction for bony defects involving the craniofacial skeleton. The authors have previously demonstrated that graft microarchitecture is the major determinant of volume maintenance for both inlay and onlay bone grafts following transplantation. This study performs a head-to-head quantitative analysis of volume maintenance between inlay and onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton using a rabbit model to comparatively determine their resorptive kinetics over time. Methods Fifty rabbits were divided randomly into six experimental groups: 3-week inlay, 3-week onlay, 8-week inlay, 8-week onlay, 16-week inlay, and 16-week onlay. Cortical bone from the lateral mandible and both cortical and cancellous bone from the ilium were harvested from each animal and placed either in or on the cranium. All bone grafts underwent micro–computed tomographic analysis at 3, 8, and 16 weeks. Results All bone graft types in the inlay position increased their volume over time, with the greatest increase in endochondral cancellous bone. All bone graft types in the onlay position decreased their volume over time, with the greatest decrease in endochondral cancellous bone. Inlay bone grafts demonstrated increased volume compared with onlay bone grafts of identical embryologic origin and microarchitecture at all time points (p < 0.05). Conclusions Inlay bone grafts, irrespective of their embryologic origin, consistently display less resorption over time compared with onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton. Both inlay and onlay bone grafts are driven by the local mechanical environment to recapitulate the recipient bed. PMID:23629083

  1. Deoxygenation and the blood volume signals in the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles obtained during the execution of the Mirallas's test of judo athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Mirallas, Jaume A.

    1996-12-01

    The technique of execution of any movement in Judo is extremely important. The coaches want tests and tools easy to use and cheaper, to evaluate the progress of a judoist in the tatame. In this paper we present a test developed by Mirallas, which has his name 'Test of Mirallas' to evaluate the maximal power capacity of the judoist. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals were obtained to have a measurement of the metabolic work of the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles, during the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement, allowing this measurement to assess by NIRS the maximal oxygen uptake. Also obtained were tympanic, skin forehead, and biceps brachii temperatures during the test time and recovery phase to study the effects of ambient conditions and the post-exercise oxygen consumption. The deoxygenation and blood volume signals obtained gave different results, demonstrating the hypothesis of the coaches that some judoist do the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement correctly and the rest didn't. The heart rate frequency obtained in the group of judoist was between 190-207 bpm, and in the minute five of post-exercise was 114-137 bpm; the time employed in the MIrallas's test were from 7 feet 14 inches to 13 feet 49 inches, and the total of movements were from 199 to 409. The data obtained in the skin forehead, and skin biceps brachii confirms previous works that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied. According to the results, the test developed by Mirallas is a good tool to evaluate the performance of judoist any time, giving better results compared with standard tests.

  2. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Fryer, Amber; Mahajan, Chaitali; Indelicato, Daniel; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig C.; Lawlor, Paula C.; Henderson, Randal; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The contrast in dose distribution between proton radiotherapy (RT) and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is unclear, particularly in regard to critical structures such as the rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Between August and November 2006, the first 10 consecutive patients treated in our Phase II low-risk prostate proton protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute protocol 0001) were reviewed. The double-scatter proton beam plans used in treatment were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. For all plans, each beam dose distribution, angle, smearing, and aperture margin were optimized. IMRT plans were created for all patients and simultaneously analyzed. The IMRT plans were optimized through multiple volume objectives, beam weighting, and individual leaf movement. The patients were treated to 78 Gray-equivalents (GE) in 2-GE fractions with a biologically equivalent dose of 1.1. Results: All rectal and rectal wall volumes treated to 10-80 GE (percentage of volume receiving 10-80 GE [V{sub 10}-V{sub 80}]) were significantly lower with proton therapy (p < 0.05). The rectal V{sub 50} was reduced from 31.3% {+-} 4.1% with IMRT to 14.6% {+-} 3.0% with proton therapy for a relative improvement of 53.4% and an absolute benefit of 16.7% (p < 0.001). The mean rectal dose decreased 59% with proton therapy (p < 0.001). For the bladder and bladder wall, proton therapy produced significantly smaller volumes treated to doses of 10-35 GE (p < 0.05) with a nonsignificant advantage demonstrated for the volume receiving {<=}60 GE. The bladder V{sub 30} was reduced with proton therapy for a relative improvement of 35.3% and an absolute benefit of 15.1% (p = 0.02). The mean bladder dose decreased 35% with proton therapy (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Compared with IMRT, proton therapy reduced the dose to the dose-limiting normal structures while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage.

  3. Evolution of a Novel Muscle Design in Sea Urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Alexander; Schröder, Leif; Ogurreck, Malte; Faber, Cornelius; Stach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sea urchin (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) masticatory apparatus, or Aristotle's lantern, is a complex structure composed of numerous hard and soft components. The lantern is powered by various paired and unpaired muscle groups. We describe how one set of these muscles, the lantern protractor muscles, has evolved a specialized morphology. This morphology is characterized by the formation of adaxially-facing lobes perpendicular to the main orientation of the muscle, giving the protractor a frilled aspect in horizontal section. Histological and ultrastructural analyses show that the microstructure of frilled muscles is largely identical to that of conventional, flat muscles. Measurements of muscle dimensions in equally-sized specimens demonstrate that the frilled muscle design, in comparison to that of the flat muscle type, considerably increases muscle volume as well as the muscle's surface directed towards the interradial cavity, a compartment of the peripharyngeal coelom. Scanning electron microscopical observations reveal that the insertions of frilled and flat protractor muscles result in characteristic muscle scars on the stereom, reflecting the shapes of individual muscles. Our comparative study of 49 derived “regular” echinoid species using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows that frilled protractor muscles are found only in taxa belonging to the families Toxopneustidae, Echinometridae, and Strongylocentrotidae. The onset of lobe formation during ontogenesis varies between species of these three families. Because frilled protractor muscles are best observed in situ, the application of a non-invasive imaging technique was crucial for the unequivocal identification of this morphological character on a large scale. Although it is currently possible only to speculate on the functional advantages which the frilled muscle morphology might confer, our study forms the anatomical and evolutionary framework for future analyses of this unusual muscle design among

  4. Evolution of a novel muscle design in sea urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Alexander; Schröder, Leif; Ogurreck, Malte; Faber, Cornelius; Stach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sea urchin (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) masticatory apparatus, or Aristotle's lantern, is a complex structure composed of numerous hard and soft components. The lantern is powered by various paired and unpaired muscle groups. We describe how one set of these muscles, the lantern protractor muscles, has evolved a specialized morphology. This morphology is characterized by the formation of adaxially-facing lobes perpendicular to the main orientation of the muscle, giving the protractor a frilled aspect in horizontal section. Histological and ultrastructural analyses show that the microstructure of frilled muscles is largely identical to that of conventional, flat muscles. Measurements of muscle dimensions in equally-sized specimens demonstrate that the frilled muscle design, in comparison to that of the flat muscle type, considerably increases muscle volume as well as the muscle's surface directed towards the interradial cavity, a compartment of the peripharyngeal coelom. Scanning electron microscopical observations reveal that the insertions of frilled and flat protractor muscles result in characteristic muscle scars on the stereom, reflecting the shapes of individual muscles. Our comparative study of 49 derived "regular" echinoid species using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows that frilled protractor muscles are found only in taxa belonging to the families Toxopneustidae, Echinometridae, and Strongylocentrotidae. The onset of lobe formation during ontogenesis varies between species of these three families. Because frilled protractor muscles are best observed in situ, the application of a non-invasive imaging technique was crucial for the unequivocal identification of this morphological character on a large scale. Although it is currently possible only to speculate on the functional advantages which the frilled muscle morphology might confer, our study forms the anatomical and evolutionary framework for future analyses of this unusual muscle design among sea

  5. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  6. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-01-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness. PMID:26171383

  7. Comparison of EMG during passive stretching and shortening phases of each muscle for the investigation of parkinsonian rigidity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Ji-Sun; Koh, Seong-Beom; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis in the literature that torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity is the difference between the independent contributions of stretched and shortened muscles. The hypothesis was tested using muscle-specific stretch-shortening (MSSS) EMG ratio in this study. Nineteen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18 healthy subjects (the mean age comparable to that of patients) participated in this study. The EMG activity was measured in the four muscles involved in wrist joint movement, i.e. flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis and extensor carpi ulnaris. The passive flexion-extension movement with a range of ±30∘ was applied at wrist joint. Root mean squared (RMS) mean was calculated from the envelope of the EMG for each of stretching and shortening phases. MSSS EMG ratio was defined as the ratio of RMS EMG of stretching phase and RMS EMG of shortening phase of a single muscle, and it was calculated for each muscle. MSSS EMG ratios were smaller than one in all muscles. These results indicate that all wrist muscles generate greater mean EMG during shortening than during stretching. Therefore, the torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity cannot be explained as the simple summation of independent antagonistic torque pair.

  8. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  9. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness.

  10. Comparison of three image segmentation techniques for target volume delineation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Drever, Laura A; Roa, Wilson; McEwan, Alexander; Robinson, Don

    2007-03-09

    Incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) data into radiotherapy planning is currently under investigation for numerous sites including lung, brain, head and neck, breast, and prostate. Accurate tumor-volume quantification is essential to the proper utilization of the unique information provided by PET. Unfortunately,target delineation within PET currently remains a largely unaddressed problem. We therefore examined the ability of three segmentation methods-thresholding, Sobel edge detection, and the watershed approach-to yield accurate delineation of PET target cross-sections. A phantom study employing well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes and activity distributions provided an opportunity to assess the relative efficacy with which the three approaches could yield accurate target delineation in PET. Results revealed that threshold segmentation can accurately delineate target cross-sections, but that the Sobel and watershed techniques both consistently fail to correctly identify the size of experimental volumes. The usefulness of threshold-based segmentation is limited, however, by the dependence of the correct threshold (that which returns the correct area at each image slice) on target size.

  11. Volume-of-fluid algorithm with different modified dynamic material ordering methods and their comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2010-05-01

    Volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface reconstruction methods are used to define material interfaces to separate different materials in a mixed cell. These material interfaces are then used to evaluate transport flux at each cell edges in multi-material hydrodynamic calculations. Most of the VOF interface reconstruction methods and volume transport schemes rely on an accurate material order unique to each computational cell. Similarly, to achieve overshoot-free volume fractions, a non-intersecting interface reconstruction procedure has to be performed with the help of a 'material-order list' determined prior to interface reconstruction. It is, however, the least explored area of VOF technique especially for 'onion-skin' or 'layered' model. Also, important technical details how to prevent intersection among different material interfaces are missing in many literature. Here, we present an efficient VOF interface tracking algorithm along with modified 'material order' methods and different interface reconstruction methods. The relative accuracy of different methods are evaluated for sample problems. Finally, a convergence study with respect to mesh-size is performed.

  12. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  13. Comparison of an EMG-based and a stress-based method to predict shoulder muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Malfroy Camine, Valérie; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of muscle forces in musculoskeletal shoulder models is still controversial. Two different methods are widely used to solve the indeterminacy of the system: electromyography (EMG)-based methods and stress-based methods. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of these two methods on the prediction of muscle forces, glenohumeral load and joint stability after total shoulder arthroplasty. An EMG-based and a stress-based method were implemented into the same musculoskeletal shoulder model. The model replicated the glenohumeral joint after total shoulder arthroplasty. It contained the scapula, the humerus, the joint prosthesis, the rotator cuff muscles supraspinatus, subscapularis and infraspinatus and the middle, anterior and posterior deltoid muscles. A movement of abduction was simulated in the plane of the scapula. The EMG-based method replicated muscular activity of experimentally measured EMG. The stress-based method minimised a cost function based on muscle stresses. We compared muscle forces, joint reaction force, articular contact pressure and translation of the humeral head. The stress-based method predicted a lower force of the rotator cuff muscles. This was partly counter-balanced by a higher force of the middle part of the deltoid muscle. As a consequence, the stress-based method predicted a lower joint load (16% reduced) and a higher superior-inferior translation of the humeral head (increased by 1.2 mm). The EMG-based method has the advantage of replicating the observed cocontraction of stabilising muscles of the rotator cuff. This method is, however, limited to available EMG measurements. The stress-based method has thus an advantage of flexibility, but may overestimate glenohumeral subluxation.

  14. Comparison of high-capacity and first-generation adenoviral vector gene delivery to murine muscle in utero.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Wu, E; Zheng, H; Biermann, V; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2005-01-01

    In utero gene delivery could offer the advantage of treatment at an early stage for genetic disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in which the inevitable process of muscle degeneration is already initiated at birth. Furthermore, treatment of fetal muscle with adenoviral (Ad) vectors is attractive because of a high density of Ad receptors, easy vector accessibility due to immaturity of the basal lamina and the possibility of treating stem cells. Previously, we demonstrated the efficient transduction of fetal muscle by high-capacity Ad (HC-Ad) vectors. In this study, we compared HC-Ad and first-generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors for longevity of lacZ transgene expression, toxicity and induction of immunity after direct vector-mediated in utero gene delivery to fetal C57BL/6 mice muscle 16 days after conception (E-16). The total amount of beta-galactosidase (betagal) expressed from the HC-Ad vector remained stable for the 5 months of the study, although the concentration of betagal decreased due to muscle growth. Higher survival rates that reflect lower levels of toxicity were observed in those mice transduced with an HC-Ad vector as compared to an FG-Ad vector. The toxicity induced by FG-Ad vector gene delivery was dependent on mouse strain and vector dose. Animals treated with either HC-Ad and FG-Ad vectors developed non-neutralizing antibodies against Ad capsid and antibodies against betagal, but these antibodies did not cause loss of vector genomes from transduced muscle. In a mouse model of DMD, dystrophin gene transfer to muscle in utero using an HC-Ad vector restored the dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that long-term transgene expression can be achieved by HC-Ad vector-mediated gene delivery to fetal muscle, although strategies of vector integration may need to be considered to accommodate muscle growth.

  15. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  16. COMPARISON OF TRUNK AND LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLE ACTIVITY AMONG FOUR STATIONARY EQUIPMENT DEVICES: UPRIGHT BIKE, RECUMBENT BIKE, TREADMILL, AND ELLIPTIGO®

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan; Gibson, Chris; Kearney, Andrew; Busemeyer, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    Background Stationary equipment devices are often used to improve fitness. The ElliptiGO® was recently developed that blends the elements of an elliptical trainer and bicycle, allowing reciprocal lower limb pedaling in an upright position. However, it is unknown whether the muscle activity used for the ElliptiGO® is similar to walking or cycling. To date, there is no information comparing muscle activity for exercise on the treadmill, stationary upright and recumbent bikes, and the ElliptiGO®. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to assess trunk and lower extremity muscle activity among treadmill walking, cycling (recumbent and upright) and the ElliptiGO® cycling. It was hypothesized that the ElliptiGO® and treadmill would elicit similar electromyographic muscle activity responses compared to the stationary bike and recumbent bike during an exercise session. Study Design Cohort, repeated measures Methods Twelve recreationally active volunteers participated in the study and were assigned a random order of exercise for each of the four devices (ElliptiGO®, stationary upright cycle ergometer, recumbent ergometer, and a treadmill). Two-dimensional video was used to monitor the start and stop of exercise and surface electromyography (SEMG) were used to assess muscle activity during two minutes of cycling or treadmill walking at 40-50% heart rate reserve (HRR). Eight muscles on the dominant limb were used for analysis: gluteus maximus (Gmax), gluteus medius (Gmed), biceps femoris (BF), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG), tibialis anterior (TA), rectus femoris (RF). Two trunk muscles were assessed on the same side; lumbar erector spinae at L3-4 level (LES) and rectus abdominus (RA). Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were determined for each muscle and SEMG data were expressed as %MVIC in order to normalize outputs. Results The %MVIC for RF during ElliptiGO® cycling was higher than recumbent cycling. The LG muscle activity was highest

  17. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise).

  18. Quantitative determination of biological activity of botulinum toxins utilizing compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and comparison of neuromuscular transmission blockage and muscle flaccidity among toxins.

    PubMed

    Torii, Yasushi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Motohide; Ishida, Setsuji; Harakawa, Tetsuhiro; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kaji, Ryuji; Kozaki, Shunji; Ginnaga, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    The biological activity of various types of botulinum toxin has been evaluated using the mouse intraperitoneal LD(50) test (ip LD(50)). This method requires a large number of mice to precisely determine toxin activity, and so has posed a problem with regard to animal welfare. We have used a direct measure of neuromuscular transmission, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP), to evaluate the effect of different types of botulinum neurotoxin (NTX), and we compared the effects of these toxins to evaluate muscle relaxation by employing the digit abduction scoring (DAS) assay. This method can be used to measure a broad range of toxin activities the day after administration. Types A, C, C/D, and E NTX reduced the CMAP amplitude one day after administration at below 1 ip LD(50), an effect that cannot be detected using the mouse ip LD(50) assay. The method is useful not only for measuring toxin activity, but also for evaluating the characteristics of different types of NTX. The rat CMAP test is straightforward, highly reproducible, and can directly determine the efficacy of toxin preparations through their inhibition of neuromuscular transmission. Thus, this method may be suitable for pharmacology studies and the quality control of toxin preparations.

  19. A Comparison of Increases in Volume Load Over 8 Weeks of Low-Versus High-Load Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Ogborn, Dan; Contreras, Bret; Cappaert, Tom; Silva Ribeiro, Alex; Alvar, Brent A.; Vigotsky, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that the ability to increase volume load (VL) via a progressive increase in the magnitude of load for a given exercise within a given repetition range could enhance the adaptive response to resistance training. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare changes in volume load (VL) over eight weeks of resistance training (RT) in high-versus low-load protocols. Materials and Methods Eighteen well-trained men were matched according to baseline strength were randomly assigned to either a low-load RT (LOW, n = 9) where 25 - 35 repetitions were performed per exercise, or a high-load RT (HIGH, n = 9) where 8 - 12 repetitions were performed per exercise. Both groups performed three sets of seven exercises for all major muscles three times per week on non-consecutive days. Results After adjusting for the pre-test scores, there was a significant difference between the two intervention groups on post-intervention total VL with a very large effect size (F (1, 15) = 16.598, P = .001, ηp2 = .525). There was a significant relationship between pre-intervention and post-intervention total VL (F (1, 15) = 32.048, P < .0001, ηp2 = .681) in which the pre-test scores explained 68% of the variance in the post-test scores. Conclusions This study indicates that low-load RT results in greater accumulations in VL compared to high-load RT over the course of 8 weeks of training. PMID:27625750

  20. Factors contributing to thixotropy of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Izumizaki, Masahiko; Shibata, Masahiko; Homma, Ikuo

    2004-06-25

    Thixotropy is a passive property of the skeletal muscle dependent on the muscle's immediate history of contraction and length change. Thixotropic properties of inspiratory muscles, introduced by forceful muscle contraction at an inflated lung volume, cause an increased end-expiratory position (EEP) of the rib cage. We searched for factors contributing to the development of inspiratory muscle thixotropy in nine healthy subjects. Using induction plethysmography, we examined aftereffects on EEP of the duration of inspiratory muscle contraction and subsequent muscle relaxation. We also studied effects of inspiratory effort intensity measured by mouth pressure at different lung volumes. EEP elevation was noted subsequent to 5-s contraction followed by 2-s relaxation and was enhanced when conditioned at higher lung volumes with a strong inspiratory effort. Our results suggest four factors that influence inspiratory muscle thixotropy: (1) intensity of muscle contraction, (2) lung volume when contraction occurs, (3) duration of contraction, and (4) muscle relaxation.

  1. The volume of the T-system and its association with the sarcoplasmic reticulum in slow muscle fibres of the frog

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the T-system and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in slow muscle fibres of the frog, Rana temporaria. 2. The size of the T-system was measured by an autoradiographic method, using tritium-labelled albumin as a marker. Its volume, expressed as a fraction of that of the fibre, was found to be 1·8 × 10-3, as compared with a figure of 3·9 × 10-3 for the T-system in a twitch fibre. 3. The spatial distribution of the T-tubules, and their association with the SR, was studied with the electron microscope, employing ferritin and the enzyme peroxidase as markers. The observations show (a) the tubules form a three dimensional, rather than transverse, network and (b) the area of triadic (and diadic) contact with the SR is 5-10 × smaller than in a twitch fibre. 4. The possibility that the T-system and SR of the slow fibre participate in linking membrane excitation with contraction is discussed in the light of these findings. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Plate 2Figs. 1 and 2Plate 4 PMID:5571928

  2. Development of an equation to predict muscle volume of elbow flexors for men and women with a wide range of age.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Takai, Yohei; Kato, Emika; Wakahara, Taku; Ohta, Megumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2010-03-01

    The present study examined the age-related changes in muscle thickness (MT) and volume (MV) of elbow flexors and developed a prediction equation of the MV based on the MT applicable to men and women with a wide range of age. The MT and MV were determined from a single ultrasonographic image and multiple magnetic resonance imaging scans, respectively, in 72 men and 75 women aged 19-77 year. As a result of examining the age-MT and age-MV relationships by calculation of partial correlation coefficients with the control variable of gender, MV was decreased with aging whereas the corresponding decline in MT was not significant. The subjects were randomly separated into either a validation (38 men and 42 women) or a cross-validation (34 men and 33 women) group, and a multiple regression equation to estimate MV using not only MT but also upper arm length (L), age and gender as independent variables [MV (cm(3)) = 60.8 x MT (cm) + 6.48 x L (cm) - 0.709 x age (year) + 51.4 x gender (0 women, 1 men) - 187.4] was validated and cross-validated. Thus, the prediction equation for MV of elbow flexors newly developed was shown to be applicable to men and women with a wide range of age.

  3. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  4. Food control by applied biochemistry of marine organisms: Comparison of proteins and metabolites from fish and invertebrate muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, H.

    1995-03-01

    Most fishery products consist of muscle tissue from fish and invertebrates. Differences in the molecular structure and in metabolism of muscles can be utilized to characterize and identify various seafood. Creatine and arginine were found to be useful for the differentiation between imitation crab/shrimp meat and real crustacean meat. Octopine served as an indicator for the meat of cephalopods and mussels. In order to identify the animal species of a fishery product, several electrophoretic methods were used. It depended on the type of product, whether sarcoplasmic or myofibrillar proteins were better suited. Raw products were best analysed by isoelectric focusing of sarcoplasmic proteins. Two types of sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumins of fish and soluble calcium-binding proteins of invertebrates, were especially useful for species identification. Due to their thermal stability, these proteins gave species-specific patterns for cooked products, too. Two other techniques were also investigated: urea gel isoelectric focusing, and sodium dodecyl sulphate — polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These methods were applied in the analysis of products where the sarcoplasmic proteins had been removed by washing steps, i.e. imitation crab meat made from surimi, and of other raw and cooked products. The myosin light chains gave protein patterns that were characteristic for many species. Paramyosin, which is absent from vertebrate muscle, indicated the presence of mollusc muscle. It was shown that the determination, of arginine kinase activity enabled differentiation between raw fish muscle and invertebrate muscles.

  5. Comparison of trunk muscle reflex activation patterns between active and passive trunk flexion-extension loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of trunk flexion-extension loading on the neuromuscular reflexive latencies and amplitude responses of the trunk musculature. Eighteen male and female subjects (18-27yrs) participated in active and passive trunk flexion extension, performed ∼7days apart. Subjects performed 60 trunk flexion-extension repetitions. Surface electromyography (EMG) was collected bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal muscles. In the active condition, subjects volitionally moved their trunks, while in the passive condition the dynamometer controlled the movements. The trunk was perturbed before and immediately after 30 repetitions. Latency of muscle onset, latency of first peak, latency of maximum peak, and peak EMG amplitude were evaluated. No differences between conditions, sides, or perturbation session were apparent. Overall latencies were shorter in females (p<.05) and abdominal muscles compared to paraspinals (p<.05). Thoracic paraspinal muscle amplitudes were greater than all other muscles (p<.05). Based upon the present results, the neuromuscular system engages trunk flexor muscles prior to the paraspinals in order to provide possible stabilization of the trunk when flexor moments are generated. Overall, the results indicate no difference in response of the neuromuscular system to active or passive repetitive loading.

  6. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Seamon, Bryant A.; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R2). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97–.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54–1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  7. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Seamon, Bryant A; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R (2)). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97-.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54-1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  8. Brain structure volumes in the mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi (Spalacidae, Rodentia) in comparison to the rat and subterrestrial insectivores.

    PubMed

    Frahm, H D; Rehkämper, G; Nevo, E

    1997-01-01

    Natural blindness and a subterranean, digging mode of life demand peculiar adaptations of the central nervous system in the mole rat Spalax ehrenbergi, which are the focus of this quantitative investigation. Volumes of 25 brain structures in Spalax were evaluated allometrically, using the least encephalized mammalian species, the Madagassian hedgehog-like tenrecs (Tenrecinae) as a reference base, and their sizes compared with those of the rat (as a more generalized representative of rodents) and of some subterranean Insectivora. The allometric approach reveals that Spalax has a larger brain than tenrecs and the rat. Within the brain, the neocortex and diencephalon are well developed, an observation also made in other mammalian species with a relatively high encephalization. An unique feature in Spalax is the enlargement of motor structures of the brain, such as the cerebellum (and cerebellar nuclei), and the striatum. Most conspicuous is the large size of the nucleus motorius nervi trigemini, reflecting the importance of masticatory muscles for the special digging technique, which demand an intense use of the teeth for loosening the soil.

  9. Comparison of changes in hemodynamics between unilateral and bilateral lung volume reduction for pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, K; Haraguchi, S; Akiyama, H; Hirata, T; Hirai, K; Mikami, I; Tanaka, S

    2001-10-01

    This study was aimed to compare changes in hemodynamics between unilateral (UL) or simultaneous bilateral (BL) lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) for chronic obstructive lung disease. Sixteen patients underwent LVRS by stapler resection with neodymium: yttrium-alminum-garnet (Nd: YAG) laser ablation; five underwent BL-LVRS (four by median sternotomy and one by thoracoscopy) and 11 underwent UL-LVRS by thoracoscopy. Four patients had multiple bullae within pulmonary emphysema. At preoperation and 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, hemodynamics and right ventricular performance were evaluated. UL- and BL-LVRS reduced afterload of the right and left ventricle postoperatively. Although the pulmonary arterial resistance increased after surgery, the total pulmonary resistance decreased (p=0.001) in association with the reduced systemic vascular resistance (p=0.001). These reductions improved cardiopulmonary circulation, resulting in increased stroke volume and cardiac output (p=0.003). The right ventricular ejection fraction showed minimal change 48 hours postoperation. Two patients died of pneumonia caused by persistent air leakage. In conclusion, both the UL- and BL-LVRS showed similar effectiveness in terms of improvement in the systemic and cardiopulmonary circulation after LVRS, if there were no postoperative complications. We concluded that we had to reduce and repair the persistent air leakage after LVRS.

  10. Comparison of two bioimpedance spectroscopy techniques in the assessment of body fluid volumes.

    PubMed

    Neves, E B; Pino, A V; Souza, M N

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the estimates of body liquid volumes performed by two bioimpedance spectrometry techniques. One based on a step response technique (BIS-PEB) and second one based on multifrequency Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment (Xitron Technologies, San Diego, CA, USA). The convenience sample was initially composed of 422 students from a military parachuting course of the Brazilian Army. From such sample 42 male students were randomly selected to be evaluated during three weeks. The anthropometrical characteristics of the sample can be summarized as: 25.18 +/- 4.10 years old; weight equals of 76.77 +/- 7.84 kg; height equals to 174.96 +/- 5.67 cm; body mass index (BMI) equal to 25.05 +/- 2.11 kg m(-2). Bland-Altman graphics were used to compare the two methods in what concerns to estimate of extracellular fluid (ECF), intracellular fluid (ICF), and total body water (TBW). One can observe that the estimates of the two techniques present a good correlation, especially in the case of ECF (r = 0.975). The present study indicates that BIS-PEB technique associated with De Lorenzo equation can supply noninvasive estimates of body fluid volumes comparable to Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment.

  11. A Performance Comparison Between a Level Set Method and an Unsplit Volume of Fluid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Olivier; Chiodi, Robert; Owkes, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of high density ratio liquid-gas flows presents many numerical difficulties due to the necessity to track the interface and the discontinuities in physical properties associated with the interface. Two main categories of methods used to track the interface are level set methods and volume of fluid (VOF) methods. In particular, conservative level set methods track and transport the interface using a scalar field, with the interface profile represented by a hyperbolic tangent function of a finite thickness. Volume of fluid methods, on the other hand, store the percentage of each fluid in the computational cells. Both methods offer distinct advantages, however, the strengths and weaknesses of each method relative to each other have yet to be thoroughly investigated. This work compares the accuracy and computational efficiency for an accurate conservative level set method and an unsplit VOF method using canonical test cases, such as Zalesak's disk, the deformation of a circle, and the deformation of a sphere. The mass conservation and ability to correctly predict instability for a more complex case of an air-blast atomization of a planar liquid layer will also be presented.

  12. A comparison of finite volume flux vector splittings for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. K.; Thomas, J. L.; Van Leer, B.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is made between the computational results of the Steger-Warming (1981) and van Leer (1982) flux splitting methods, which have been applied in generalized coordinates to quasi-one-dimensional transonic flow in a nozzle and two-dimensional subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow over airfoils. The latter splitting method leads to higher convergence rates and a sharper representation of shocks in the transition region. The second-order accurate, one-sided-difference model is extended to a third-order, upwind-biased model with only small additional computational effort.

  13. Comparison of growth characteristics between skeletal muscle satellite cell lines from diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-hao; Tan, Xungang; Jiao, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. According to myosatellite cell lines (MSCs) established in vitro from diploid and triploid flounder, we compared the characters of growth and differentiation of their MSCs. The results would be useful for learning the muscle development mechanism in teleosts. Materials and Methods. The skeletal muscle cells from the diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were isolated and cultured in vitro, respectively, and the cells were characterized at the morphology and molecular level; meanwhile, the performance of these cells’ proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Results. Two new skeletal muscle cell lines (POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n)) from diploid and triploid flounder have been respectively subcultured for 67 times and 66 times. The cultured cells were mostly spindle-like mononuclear cells. They have normal flounder diploid karyotype (2n=48t) and triploid karyotype (3n=72t), respectively. Muscle satellite cell gene marker (pax7b) and myogenic cell protein marker (Desmin) were all expressed in cells of two cell lines. Both of the cells could differentiate into the large polynucleated muscle fibre cells, and immunofluorescence reactions of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were positive. There were more cells of POMSCS(3n) to differentiate into the muscle fibre cells than that of POMSCS(2n). However, POMSCS(2n) cells proliferated more rapidly than those of POMSCS(3n) (P < 0.05). The significant fluorescent signals were observed in both POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n) cells after transfected with pEGFP-N3 reporter plasmid. Conclusions. The two cell lines have been established and characterized as MSCs. We suppose that it might be the differentiation capacity, rather than the proliferation activity of MSCs to play a key role in the better growth of triploid ones than diploid. Both cell lines will become the ideal tools to learn the mechanism of fish MSCs proliferation, differentiation and regeneration during muscle development in the future. PMID

  14. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  15. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  16. Comparison of 2-D and 3-D estimates of placental volume in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aye, Christina Y L; Stevenson, Gordon N; Impey, Lawrence; Collins, Sally L

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound estimation of placental volume (PlaV) between 11 and 13 wk has been proposed as part of a screening test for small-for-gestational-age babies. A semi-automated 3-D technique, validated against the gold standard of manual delineation, has been found at this stage of gestation to predict small-for-gestational-age at term. Recently, when used in the third trimester, an estimate obtained using a 2-D technique was found to correlate with placental weight at delivery. Given its greater simplicity, the 2-D technique might be more useful as part of an early screening test. We investigated if the two techniques produced similar results when used in the first trimester. The correlation between PlaV values calculated by the two different techniques was assessed in 139 first-trimester placentas. The agreement on PlaV and derived "standardized placental volume," a dimensionless index correcting for gestational age, was explored with the Mann-Whitney test and Bland-Altman plots. Placentas were categorized into five different shape subtypes, and a subgroup analysis was performed. Agreement was poor for both PlaV and standardized PlaV (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001), with the 2-D technique yielding larger estimates for both indices compared with the 3-D method. The mean difference in standardized PlaV values between the two methods was 0.007 (95% confidence interval: 0.006-0.009). The best agreement was found for regular rectangle-shaped placentas (p = 0.438 and p = 0.408). The poor correlation between the 2-D and 3-D techniques may result from the heterogeneity of placental morphology at this stage of gestation. In early gestation, the simpler 2-D estimates of PlaV do not correlate strongly with those obtained with the validated 3-D technique.

  17. S-2 stage 1/25 scale model base region thermal environment test. Volume 1: Test results, comparison with theory and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadunas, J. A.; French, E. P.; Sexton, H.

    1973-01-01

    A 1/25 scale model S-2 stage base region thermal environment test is presented. Analytical results are included which reflect the effect of engine operating conditions, model scale, turbo-pump exhaust gas injection on base region thermal environment. Comparisons are made between full scale flight data, model test data, and analytical results. The report is prepared in two volumes. The description of analytical predictions and comparisons with flight data are presented. Tabulation of the test data is provided.

  18. Comparison of regulated passive membrane conductance in action potential-firing fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Macdonald, William Alexander; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; de Paoli, Frank Vinzenco; Gurung, Iman Singh; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2009-10-01

    In several pathological and experimental conditions, the passive membrane conductance of muscle fibers (G(m)) and their excitability are inversely related. Despite this capacity of G(m) to determine muscle excitability, its regulation in active muscle fibers is largely unexplored. In this issue, our previous study (Pedersen et al. 2009. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910291) established a technique with which biphasic regulation of G(m) in action potential (AP)-firing fast-twitch fibers of rat extensor digitorum longus muscles was identified and characterized with temporal resolution of seconds. This showed that AP firing initially reduced G(m) via ClC-1 channel inhibition but after approximately 1,800 APs, G(m) rose substantially, causing AP excitation failure. This late increase of G(m) reflected activation of ClC-1 and K(ATP) channels. The present study has explored regulation of G(m) in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers of soleus muscle and compared it to G(m) dynamics in fast-twitch fibers. It further explored aspects of the cellular signaling that conveyed regulation of G(m) in AP-firing fibers. Thus, in both fiber types, AP firing first triggered protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ClC-1 channel inhibition that reduced G(m) by approximately 50%. Experiments with dantrolene showed that AP-triggered SR Ca(2+) release activated this PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition that was associated with reduced rheobase current and improved function of depolarized muscles, indicating that the reduced G(m) enhanced muscle fiber excitability. In fast-twitch fibers, the late rise in G(m) was accelerated by glucose-free conditions, whereas it was postponed when intermittent resting periods were introduced during AP firing. Remarkably, elevation of G(m) was never encountered in AP-firing slow-twitch fibers, even after 15,000 APs. These observations implicate metabolic depression in the elevation of G(m) in AP-firing fast-twitch fibers. It is concluded that regulation of G(m) is

  19. Comparison of acute and chronic traumatic brain injury using semi-automatic multimodal segmentation of MR volumes.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Alger, Jeffry R; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D

    2011-11-01

    Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options.

  20. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (p<0.05). Bilateral IO, EO, and left RA muscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (p<0.05). These findings suggest that additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise could be a useful method to enhance abdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction.

  1. Comparison of histopathologic criteria and skeletal muscle fixation techniques for the diagnosis of polysaccharide storage myopathy in horses.

    PubMed

    Firshman, A M; Valberg, S J; Bender, J B; Annandale, E J; Hayden, D W

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to determine the effect of three methods of fixation of skeletal muscle biopsy specimens on the histopathologic appearance of muscle sections and to determine criteria that were most consistently associated with a diagnosis of polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in horses. Surgically excised semimembranosus muscle biopsy specimens were obtained from nine horses previously diagnosed with PSSM and from 15 control horses. Portions of each specimen were fixed in formalin, frozen immediately, and chilled for 24 hours prior to freezing. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), and amylase-PAS were scored for histopathologic criteria by three investigators blinded to the sample origin. The presence of amylase-resistant, abnormal polysaccharide was found to be the most sensitive and specific diagnostic indicator for PSSM, and was readily detected regardless of the fixation technique or investigator. Other less-specific features associated with PSSM included atrophy and cytoplasmic and subsarcolemmal vacuoles; however, their histologic scores varied among fixation technique and investigators. Scores for subsarcolemmal and cytoplasmic amylase-sensitive glycogen in horses with PSSM were similar to those for control horses and varied among fixation techniques. In conclusion, PSSM is most accurately diagnosed in muscle biopsy specimens on the basis of appearance of amylase-resistant, abnormal polysaccharide, not amylase-sensitive glycogen, regardless of fixation technique. In general, frozen sections appeared to be better suited for studying myopathies because many histopathologic features of skeletal muscle were obscured by formalin fixation.

  2. Disaster warning system: Satellite feasibility and comparison with terrestrial systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spoor, J. H.; Hodge, W. H.; Fluk, M. J.; Bamford, T. F.

    1974-01-01

    The Disaster Warning System (DWS) is a conceptual system which will provide the National Weather Service (NWS) with communication services in the 1980s to help minimize losses caused by natural disasters. The object of this study is a comparative analysis between a terrestrial DWS and a satellite DWS. Baseline systems satisfying the NOAA requirements were synthesized in sufficient detail so that a comparison could be made in terms of performance and cost. The cost of both baseline systems is dominated by the disaster warning and spotter reporting functions. An effort was undertaken to reduce system cost through lower-capacity alternative systems generated by modifying the baseline systems. By reducing the number of required channels and modifying the spotter reporting techniques, alternative satellite systems were synthesized. A terrestrial alternative with the coverage reduced to an estimated 95 percent of the population was considered.

  3. Comparison Between Neck and Shoulder Stiffness Determined by Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography and a Muscle Hardness Meter.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Kusama, Saki

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this study were to compare neck and shoulder stiffness values determined by shear wave ultrasound elastography with those obtained with a muscle hardness meter and to verify the correspondence between objective and subjective stiffness in the neck and shoulder. Twenty-four young men and women participated in the study. Their neck and shoulder stiffness was determined at six sites. Before the start of the measurements, patients rated their present subjective symptoms of neck and shoulder stiffness on a 6-point verbal scale. At all measurement sites, the correlation coefficients between the values of muscle hardness indices determined by the muscle hardness meter and shear wave ultrasound elastography were not significant. Furthermore, individuals' subjective neck and shoulder stiffness did not correspond to their objective symptoms. These results suggest that the use of shear wave ultrasound elastography is essential to more precisely assess neck and shoulder stiffness.

  4. Comparison of EMG activity between maximal manual muscle testing and cybex maximal isometric testing of the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Chang, Jia-Hao; Chien, Chi-Sheng; Chang, Guan-Liang

    2008-02-01

    Two methods have been used to produce a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles for normalization of electromyographic (EMG) data. The purposes of this study were to compare the myoelectic activity of MVIC of manual muscle testing (MMT) versus Cybex maximal isometric testing. Eighteen normal subjects were recruited. MMT and Cybex testing for MVIC of the dominant leg were performed. EMG activities of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were recorded during MMT and Cybex trials. EMG amplitude and median frequency obtained from the two methods (MMT and Cybex testing) were used for statistical analysis of these three muscles. Statistically, the difference in the mean of the EMG signal amplitude and median frequency between MMT and Cybex testing were not significant. Considering cost and time, MMT for MVIC technique appears to be reliable and highly valuable.

  5. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  6. A comparison of chronic AICAR treatment-induced metabolic adaptations in red and white muscles of rats.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masataka; Nakano, Hiroshi; Radak, Zsolt; Kumagai, Shuzo

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase plays a pivotal role in metabolic adaptations. Treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofranoside (AICAR) promotes the expression of metabolic regulators and components involved in glucose uptake, mitochondrial biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle cells. Our aim was to determine whether AICAR-induced changes in metabolic regulators and components were more prominent in white or red muscle. Rats were treated with AICAR (1 mg/g body weight/day) for 14 days, resulting in increased expression levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), glucose transporter 4 proteins, and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. These changes were more prominent in white rather than red gastrocnemius muscle or were only observed in the white gastrocnemius. Our results suggest that AICAR induces the expression of metabolic regulators and components, especially in type II (B) fibers.

  7. Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. II. Detection in simulations and comparison with theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-02-01

    Measuring the volume weighted velocity power spectrum suffers from a severe systematic error due to imperfect sampling of the velocity field from the inhomogeneous distribution of dark matter particles/halos in simulations or galaxies with velocity measurement. This "sampling artifact" depends on both the mean particle number density n¯P and the intrinsic large scale structure (LSS) fluctuation in the particle distribution. (1) We report robust detection of this sampling artifact in N -body simulations. It causes ˜12 % underestimation of the velocity power spectrum at k =0.1 h /Mpc for samples with n¯ P=6 ×10-3 (Mpc /h )-3 . This systematic underestimation increases with decreasing n¯P and increasing k . Its dependence on the intrinsic LSS fluctuations is also robustly detected. (2) All of these findings are expected based upon our theoretical modeling in paper I [P. Zhang, Y. Zheng, and Y. Jing, Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. I. Theoretical modeling, arXiv:1405.7125.]. In particular, the leading order theoretical approximation agrees quantitatively well with the simulation result for n¯ P≳6 ×10-4 (Mpc /h )-3 . Furthermore, we provide an ansatz to take high order terms into account. It improves the model accuracy to ≲1 % at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc over 3 orders of magnitude in n¯P and over typical LSS clustering from z =0 to z =2 . (3) The sampling artifact is determined by the deflection D field, which is straightforwardly available in both simulations and data of galaxy velocity. Hence the sampling artifact in the velocity power spectrum measurement can be self-calibrated within our framework. By applying such self-calibration in simulations, it is promising to determine the real large scale velocity bias of 1013M⊙ halos with ˜1 % accuracy, and that of lower mass halos with better accuracy. (4) In contrast to suppressing the velocity power spectrum at large scale, the sampling artifact causes an overestimation of the velocity

  8. Comparison of Orientation and Rotational Motion of Skeletal Muscle Cross-bridges Containing Phosphorylated and Dephosphorylated Myosin Regulatory Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna; Rich, Ryan; Marandos, Peter; Fudala, Rafal; Li, Amy; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Calcium binding to thin filaments is a major element controlling active force generation in striated muscles. Recent evidence suggests that processes other than Ca2+ binding, such as phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) also controls contraction of vertebrate striated muscle (Cooke, R. (2011) Biophys. Rev. 3, 33–45). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies using nucleotide analog spin label probes showed that dephosphorylated myosin heads are highly ordered in the relaxed fibers and have very low ATPase activity. This ordered structure of myosin cross-bridges disappears with the phosphorylation of RLC (Stewart, M. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 430–435). The slower ATPase activity in the dephosporylated moiety has been defined as a new super-relaxed state (SRX). It can be observed in both skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers (Hooijman, P., Stewart, M. A., and Cooke, R. (2011) Biophys. J. 100, 1969–1976). Given the importance of the finding that suggests a novel pathway of regulation of skeletal muscle, we aim to examine the effects of phosphorylation on cross-bridge orientation and rotational motion. We find that: (i) relaxed cross-bridges, but not active ones, are statistically better ordered in muscle where the RLC is dephosporylated compared with phosphorylated RLC; (ii) relaxed phosphorylated and dephosphorylated cross-bridges rotate equally slowly; and (iii) active phosphorylated cross-bridges rotate considerably faster than dephosphorylated ones during isometric contraction but the duty cycle remained the same, suggesting that both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated muscles develop the same isometric tension at full Ca2+ saturation. A simple theory was developed to account for this fact. PMID:23319584

  9. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    PubMed Central

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  10. Comparison of muscle-activation patterns during the conventional push-up and perfect· pushup™ exercises.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Budach, Brian D; Ellerbusch, Jay V; Stucky, Craig M; Wait, Kevin R; Hollman, John H

    2010-12-01

    Manufacturers of Perfect·Pushup™ handgrips claim enhanced muscular recruitment when compared with the conventional hand-on-floor push-up exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded using surface electrodes from the right-sided triceps brachii, pectoralis major, serratus anterior (SA), and posterior deltoid muscles during push-ups performed from 3 different hand positions: (a) shoulder width, (b) wide base, and (c) narrow base (NB). Push-ups were performed under 2 conditions: (a) standard push-up and (b) Perfect·Pushup™ handgrips. We recruited 20 healthy subjects, 11 men (24.9 ± 2.6 years) and 9 women (23.8 ± 1 years). Subjects completed 3 consecutive push-ups for each hand position under both conditions. Push-up speed was controlled using a metronome, and testing order was randomized. We recorded peak EMG activity for each muscle during each of the push-ups and normalized EMG values by maximum muscle contractions (% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]). Electromyographic data were analyzed with 3 (hand position) × 2 (condition) repeated-measures analysis of variance with a post hoc Bonferroni-adjusted simple effects test to detect significant position effects for position by condition interactions (α = 0.05). A push-up required considerable muscle activation of the triceps brachii (73-109% MVIC), pectoralis major (95-105% MVIC), SA (67-87% MVIC), and posterior deltoid (11-21% MVIC) whether performed using the conventional hand-on-floor position or the Perfect·Pushup™ handgrips. The NB hand position was most effective for preferentially activating the triceps brachii and posterior deltoid muscles. Based upon EMG activation from 4 muscles, the Perfect·Pushup™ handgrips do not appear to preferentially enhance muscular recruitment when compared with the conventional push-up method.

  11. Mushroom body volumes and visual interneurons in ants: comparison between sexes and castes.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Birgit; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2004-02-02

    The mushroom bodies are brain centers involved in complex behaviors such as learning and orientation. Here we examine the organization of mushroom bodies in ants, focusing on visual input. We describe the structure of visual neurons and compare the volume of brain structures involved in visual processing, especially the optic lobes and parts of the mushroom bodies receiving visual input in males, winged females, and workers of carpenter ants (Camponotus). A relatively small number of neurons connect the medulla with the mushroom bodies, and these neurons have relatively large dendritic fields in the medulla, suggesting low spatial resolution in ants. These neurons terminate in different yet overlapping strata in the mushroom bodies' collar region. While males have larger optic lobes than workers, their collar region is smaller than in females. Male ants have an additional type of medulla-mushroom body neuron with dendrites probing the distal medulla. These neurons are absent in female and worker ants. Most mushroom body Kenyon cells that are postsynaptic to visual input neurons appear to integrate visual as well as antennal input. This is in contrast to honey bees, where visual input to the mushroom bodies is more prominent and where Kenyon cells are not known to combine visual and antennal input.

  12. Comparisons and Limitations of Gradient Augmented Level Set and Algebraic Volume of Fluid Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumolu, Lakshman; Ryddner, Douglas; Trujillo, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Recent numerical methods for implicit interface transport are generally presented as enjoying higher order of spatial-temporal convergence when compared to classical methods or less sophisticated approaches. However, when applied to test cases, which are designed to simulate practical industrial conditions, significant reduction in convergence is observed in higher-order methods, whereas for the less sophisticated approaches same convergence is achieved but a growth in the error norms occurs. This provides an opportunity to understand the underlying issues which causes this decrease in accuracy in both types of methods. As an example we consider the Gradient Augmented Level Set method (GALS) and a variant of the Volume of Fluid (VoF) method in our study. Results show that while both methods do suffer from a loss of accuracy, it is the higher order method that suffers more. The implication is a significant reduction in the performance advantage of the GALS method over the VoF scheme. Reasons for this lie in the behavior of the higher order derivatives, particular in situations where the level set field is highly distorted. For the VoF approach, serious spurious deformations of the interface are observed, albeit with a deceptive zero loss of mass.

  13. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  14. 3D volume MR temperature mapping for HIFU heating trajectory comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Nick; Vyas, Urvi; de Bever, Josh; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2012-10-01

    Many areas of MR-guided thermal therapy research would benefit from temperature maps with high spatial and temporal resolution that cover a large 3-D volume. This paper describes an approach to achieve these goals that is suitable for research applications where retrospective reconstruction of the temperature maps is acceptable. The method acquires undersampled data from a modified 3-D segmented EPI sequence and creates images using a temporally constrained reconstruction algorithm. The 3-D images can be zero-filled to arbitrarily small voxel spacing in all directions and then converted into temperature maps using the standard proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift technique. During HIFU heating experiments, the proposed method was used to obtain temperature maps with 1.5×1.5×3.0 mm resolution, 288×162×78 mm field of view, and 1.7 second temporal resolution. The approach is validated to demonstrate that it can accurately capture the spatial characteristics and time dynamics of rapidly changing HIFU-induced temperature distributions. An example application is presented where the method is used to analyze and compare different HIFU volumetric heating trajectories.

  15. Plasma cytokine and exertional responses in relation to exercise intensity and volume of exercising muscle mass during arm-crank ergometry.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Thomas A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2015-08-01

    This original study investigated the effect of submaximal exercise intensity and volume of contracting muscle mass on plasma inflammation-mediating cytokine and perceived exertional responses to acute arm-crank ergometry (ACE). Twelve recreationally active but upper limb untrained males performed 30 min of (i) low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) ACE (LOW); (ii) moderate-intensity (60% peak oxygen uptake) ACE (MOD); and (iii) concurrent low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) ACE plus lower limb cycle ergometry to match total power output in MOD (HYB). Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1ra, adrenaline, and cortisol were determined at rest, immediately postexercise, and 1 h and 2 h postexercise. Heart rate (HR) and differentiated ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were also recorded. Plasma IL-6 concentrations were elevated (p < 0.05) immediately postexercise and 1 h postexercise (∼ 2.5-fold) in all trials and 2 h postexercise in MOD (3-fold). Plasma IL-1ra concentrations were elevated (p < 0.05) 2 h postexercise in MOD only (2-fold). No plasma IL-10, cortisol, and adrenaline responses were observed. HR and differentiated RPE were significantly higher during MOD than HYB and LOW. Peripheral RPE were significantly higher than central and overall RPE in each trial. Thirty minutes of moderate intensity ACE initiated a plasma cytokine response associated with the protective effect of regular exercise against cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk. Further work is required to establish an optimal intensity and duration of upper limb exercise to maximise the anti-inflammatory potential whilst managing the risk of over-use injury.

  16. Comparison of electromyographic signals from monopolar current and potential amplifiers derived from a penniform muscle, the gastrocnemius medialis.

    PubMed

    von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Maurer, Christian; Ruf, Florian; Nigg, Benno M

    2013-10-01

    Electromyograms (EMGs) are measured by bipolar surface electrodes that quantify potential differences. Bipolar potentials over penniform muscles may be associated with errors. Our assumption was that muscle activity can be quantified more reliably and with a higher spatial resolution using current measurements. The purpose of this work is: (a) to introduce the concept of current measurements to detect muscle activity, (b) to show the coherences observed over a segment of a typical penniform muscle, the gastrocnemius medialis where one would expect a synchronicity of the activation, and (c) to show the amount of mixing that is caused by the finite inter electrode resistance. A current amplifier was developed. EMGs were recorded at 40% of maximum voluntary contraction during isometric contractions of the gastrocnemius medialis. EMGs of twelve persons were recorded with an array of four peripheral and one central electrode. Monopolar EMGs were recorded for "all-potential", "center at current" and "all-current" conditions. Coherence revealed the similarity of signals recorded from neighboring electrodes. Coherence was high for the "all-potential", significant for the "current at center" condition and disappeared in the "all-current" condition. It was concluded that EMG array recordings strongly depends on the measurement configuration. The proposed current amplifier significantly improves spatial resolution of EMG array recordings because the inter-electrode cross talk is reduced.

  17. Comparison of Lower Extremity Strength, Power and Muscle Area between Healthy Subjects and Mobility-Limited Elders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared muscle strength, power and cross sectional area (CSA) in healthy middle-aged adults (mean age: 47.3 +/- 5 yrs, n = 26), healthy older adults (73.8 +/- 4 yrs, n = 21), and older adults with mobility impairments (77.1 +/- 5 yrs, n = 21). One repetition maximum strength (1RM) and pe...

  18. Adaptations for rapid and forceful contraction in wing muscles of the male golden-collared manakin: sex and species comparisons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J D; Hertel, F; Bauch, M; Schlinger, B A

    2001-11-01

    The courtship display of the male golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus) of Panamanian rainforests is noteworthy for several types of whip-crack-like sounds created by a rapid overhead flip of the wings. We have hypothesized that this courtship behavior. which is not performed by females, is associated with steroid-sensitive and sexually dimorphic neuromuscular systems. Presumably, muscles creating the motion of the wingsnap in males are specialized for greater force generation and speed of contraction. We tested this hypothesis by examining mass, fiber diameter, metabolic enzyme activity, and myosin isoform expression in several muscles of male and female manakins and in both sexes of a non-wingsnapping bird, the zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata). We have identified three wing muscles, the scapulohumeralis caudalis, the supracoracoideus, and the pectoralis major, that differ in one or more of these characteristics across sex and species, suggesting they are specialized for faster contraction and greater force production in male manakins. These muscles normally function to raise and lower the wings during flight. As this movement is the principal motion of the wingsnap, these adaptations presumably underlie the performance of the wingsnap display.

  19. Muscle activity during stance phase of walking: comparison of males with transfemoral amputation with osseointegrated fixations to nondisabled male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pantall, Annette; Ewins, David

    2013-01-01

    A recent development in prosthetics is the osseointegrated fixation (OF), with improvements in comfort, fatigue, hip movement, and ease of prosthetic attachment reported. However, little information is available regarding muscle function. This study reports on selected gait parameters of the residual limb during the stance phase of level overground walking, focusing on muscle activity. Five males with transfemoral amputation (TFA) with OFs were recruited. Ground reaction force (GRF), lower-limb kinematics, and surface electromyography (sEMG) from residual-limb muscles were recorded. sEMG data were also collected from a group of 10 nondisabled male subjects. Interstance variability of gait parameters was assessed by coefficient of multiple correlations. Repeatability of GRF and hip kinematics was high, whereas repeatability of the sEMG was low for four of the five individuals with TFA. Interstance variability of the sEMG for gluteus medius (GMED) was significantly greater in the group with TFA. The main difference in sEMG between the groups was the phase, with GMED and adductor magnus displaying greater differences than their counterparts in the nondisabled group. Results demonstrate that muscles in the residual limb retain aspects of their previous functional pattern.

  20. In vitro neurotoxic effects of Pseudechis spp. venoms: A comparison of avian and murine skeletal muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Andrew J; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2013-03-01

    Two common in vitro skeletal muscle preparations used for the study of venom neurotoxicity are the indirectly stimulated chick isolated biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation and the rat isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation. The aim of the current study was to compare the in vitro neurotoxicity of six Pseudechis spp. (Black snakes) venoms in both avian (chicken) and mammalian (rat) skeletal muscle preparations to determine differences in sensitivity. All Pseudechis spp. venoms significantly inhibited indirect twitches, in both preparations, indicating the presence of post synaptic neurotoxins. The inhibitory effects of all venoms were more rapid in the avian preparation, except for Pseudechis colletti venom where no significant difference was seen between the murine and avian muscles. Time taken to produce 50% reduction in stimulated twitches (i.e. t(50)) was markedly shorter in the avian preparation. We have shown that the avian in vitro preparation is more sensitive to the neurotoxic activity of Pseudechis spp. than the murine preparation. This difference is likely to be due to species differences in the interaction between the neurotoxins and the nicotinic receptor binding sites as well as differences in the 'safety factor' between the preparations.

  1. Comparison of mercury concentrations in liver, muscle, whole bodies, and composites of fish from the Red River of the North

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Brigham, Mark E.; Stauffer, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    Carp (Cyprinus carpio) from four sites and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from one site in the Red River of the North in 1994 were analyzed for total mercury content. In carp, mercury concentrations differed among liver, muscle, and whole bodies (0.11, 0.31, and 0.18 µg/g wet weight, respectively), between large and small size groups, but not location. Mercury distribution in channel catfish tissues differed from that in carp. Liver and muscle tissue had similar mean concentrations; each was higher than whole-body concentrations (0.16, 0.18, and 0.11 µg/g, respectively). Mercury concentrations were not significantly different between the two size groups of channel catfish. Weighted-mean mercury concentrations from seven individual fish agreed closely (usually within 10%) with concentrations determined on physical composites of the same fish. The ratio of mercury in whole bodies to mercury in muscle was similar for both carp and channel catfish. Historical data indicate that this ratio may be applicable to other species and locations. The ratio of mercury in livers to whole bodies and muscle differed between carp and channel catfish, which may reflect physiological differences between different trophic groups.

  2. Comparison of electromyographic activities of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during stabilization exercises in prone, quadruped, and sitting positions

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Marie; Jacobs, Dee; Wooten, Mary E.; Edeer, Ayse Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were: 1) describe a hierarchy of electromyographic activity production, using percentage maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during prone, quadruped and sitting exercises; and 2) identify optimal recruitment exercises for both lumbar iliocostalis as a global multi-segmental stabilizer and lumbar multifidus as a segmental stabilizer. [Subjects] Twelve healthy volunteers (six male and six female) aged 24 to 45 participated. [Methods] Surface electromyographic activity data were collected bilaterally from lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during exercises. [Results] Two-way ANOVA showed that prone extension, and prone alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce a statistically significant difference in percent maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus bilaterally compared to other exercises. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce greater activity in lumbar multifidus muscle than sitting exercises [Conclusion] Prone exercises generate the greatest electromyographic activity and may be the most effective exercises for strengthening both lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting produces electromyographic activity at the recommended percent maximum voluntary contraction for training the lumbar multifidus in its role as a segmental stabilizer and is an effective training exercise for this goal. PMID:27821968

  3. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Inviscid Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-centered and node-centered approaches have been compared for unstructured finite-volume discretization of inviscid fluxes. The grids range from regular grids to irregular grids, including mixed-element grids and grids with random perturbations of nodes. Accuracy, complexity, and convergence rates of defect-correction iterations are studied for eight nominally second-order accurate schemes: two node-centered schemes with weighted and unweighted least-squares (LSQ) methods for gradient reconstruction and six cell-centered schemes two node-averaging with and without clipping and four schemes that employ different stencils for LSQ gradient reconstruction. The cell-centered nearest-neighbor (CC-NN) scheme has the lowest complexity; a version of the scheme that involves smart augmentation of the LSQ stencil (CC-SA) has only marginal complexity increase. All other schemes have larger complexity; complexity of node-centered (NC) schemes are somewhat lower than complexity of cell-centered node-averaging (CC-NA) and full-augmentation (CC-FA) schemes. On highly anisotropic grids typical of those encountered in grid adaptation, discretization errors of five of the six cell-centered schemes converge with second order on all tested grids; the CC-NA scheme with clipping degrades solution accuracy to first order. The NC schemes converge with second order on regular and/or triangular grids and with first order on perturbed quadrilaterals and mixed-element grids. All schemes may produce large relative errors in gradient reconstruction on grids with perturbed nodes. Defect-correction iterations for schemes employing weighted least-square gradient reconstruction diverge on perturbed stretched grids. Overall, the CC-NN and CC-SA schemes offer the best options of the lowest complexity and secondorder discretization errors. On anisotropic grids over a curved body typical of turbulent flow simulations, the discretization errors converge with second order and are small for the CC

  4. Comparison of Two Methods for Noninvasive Determination of Stroke Volume During Orthostatic Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, Donald F.; Ratliff, Duane A.; Sithole, Joseph; Convertino, Victor A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The real time, beat-by-beat, non-invasive determination of stroke volume (SV) is an important parameter in many aerospace related physiologic protocols. In this study, we compared simultaneous estimates of SV calculated from peripheral pulse waveforms with a more conventional non-invasive technique. Methods: Using a prospective, randomized blinded protocol, ten males and nine females completed 12-mm tilt table protocols. The relative change (%(Delta)) in beat-to-beat SV was estimated non-invasively from changes in pulse waveforms measured by application of infrared finger photoplethysmography (IFP) with a Portapres(Registered TradeMark) blood pressure monitoring device and by thoracic impedance cardiography (TIC). The %(Delta) SV values were calculated from continuous SV measurements in the supine posture and over the first 10 s (T1), second 10 s (T2), and 3.5 minutes (T3) of 80deg head-up tilt (HUT). Results: The average %(Delta) SV measured by IFP at T1 (-11.7 +/- 3.7 %) was statistically less (P <0.02) than the average %(Delta) SV measured by TIC at T1 (-21.7 +/- 3.1 %), while the average %(Delta) SV measured by 1FF at T2 (-16.2 +/- 3.9 %) and T3 (-19.1 +/- 3.8 %) were not statistically distinguishable (P > or = 0.322) than the average %(Delta) SV measured by TIC at T2 (-21.8 +/- 2.5 %), and T3 (-22.6 +/- 2.9 %). Correlation coefficients (r(sup 2)) between IFP and TIC were 0.117 (T1), 0.387 (T2), and 0.7 18 (T3). Conclusion: IFP provides beat-to-beat (real time) assessment of %(Delta) SV after 20 sec of transition to an orthostatic challenge that is comparable to the commonly accepted TIC. Our data support the notion that IFP technology which has flown during space missions can be used to accurately assess physiological status and countermeasure effectiveness for orth static problems that may arise in astronauts after space flight. While the peripherally measured IFP response is slightly delayed, the ease of implementing this monitor in the field is

  5. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  6. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  7. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  8. Laboratory experiments for inter-comparison of three volume scattering meters to measure angular scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Harmel, T; Hieronymi, M; Slade, W; Röttgers, R; Roullier, F; Chami, M

    2016-01-25

    Measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) of hydrosols is of primary importance to investigate the interaction of light with hydrosols and to further interpret in situ and remote sensing data of ocean color. In this paper, a laboratory inter-comparison experiment of three recently developed VSF meters that are able to measure the scattered light for a wide range of scattering angle at 515 nm wavelength is performed using phytoplankton cultures and mineral-like hydrosols. A rigorous measurement protocol was employed to ensure good quality data. In particular, the protocol enabled removing the influence of bacteria on the hydrosols within the sample. The differences in the VSF measurements between the instruments vary from 10 to 25% depending on the composition of the hydrosols. The analysis of the angular features of the VSF revealed a sharp increase of the VSF beyond the scattering angle of 150° for some phytoplankton species. Such behavior is observed for two of the three VSF meters, thus suggesting that it is not due to instrumental artifacts but more likely to phytoplankton optical properties themselves. Moreover, comparisons with currently used theoretical phase functions show that the models are not able to reproduce satisfactorily the directional patterns in the backscattering region. This study suggests that a better modelling of the VSF shape of phytoplankton at high scattering angles is required to correctly represent the angular shape of the VSF in the backscattering hemisphere. Tabulated values of the measured phase functions are provided for scattering angles from 0.1 to 175°.

  9. Scapulothoracic Muscle Activity during Use of a Wall Slide Device (WSD), a Comparison with the General Wall Push up Plus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se-yeon; Ahn, Tae-kyung; Eom, Ji-hwan; Youn, Hyun-ji; Kim, In-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the wall slide device on activation of the scapulothoracic musculature. [Subjects] We recruited 15 healthy male subjects. [Methods] The subjects performed the general wall push-up plus (WPUP) and the wall slide with device (WSD) exercises. During the exercises, the muscle activities of the upper and lower trapezius (UT, LT), middle and lower serratus anterior (MSA, LSA), and pectoralis major (PM) were measured. [Results] The normalized muscle activity data of the WSD were significantly higher in UT, MSA and LSA than the WPUP. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that exercise using the WSD can more effectively activate the scapulothoracic musculature than the general WPUP. PMID:25013271

  10. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function: A comparison between ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, P; Herzog, W

    2015-06-01

    Due to a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury in alpine ski racers, this study aims to assess functional asymmetry in the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and leg muscle mass in elite ski racers with and without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs) for kinetic impulse (CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI). Dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning was used to assess asymmetry in lower body muscle mass. Compared with controls, ACL-R skiers had increased AI in muscle mass (P < 0.001), kinetic impulse AI in the CMJ concentric phase (P < 0.05), and the final phase of the SJ (P < 0.05). Positive associations were observed between muscle mass and AI in the CMJ concentric phase (r = 0.57, P < 0.01) as well as in the late SJ phase (r = 0.66, P < 0.01). Future research is required to assess the role of the CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI as a part of a multifaceted approach for improving outcome following ACL-R in elite ski racers.

  11. Comparison of three computer office workstations offering forearm support: impact on upper limb posture and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Alain; Larivière, Christian; Plamondon, André; Imbeau, Daniel

    2006-02-10

    The aims of the study were: 1) to determine whether resting the forearms on the work surface, as compared to chair armrests, reduces muscular activation; 2) to compare the sensitivity of different electromyographic (EMG) summary parameters. Eighteen healthy subjects performed computer work (with keyboard and mouse alternately) for 20 min while resting their forearms on a work surface adjustable in height (Workstation A), on the chair's armrests with an adjustable workstation (Workstation B) or on their chair's armrests with a non-adjustable workstation (Workstation C). The EMG amplitude of the trapezius and deltoid muscles was little influenced by the workstations, whereas their EMG variability increased with Workstation A, which was interpreted as a positive effect. However, the EMG amplitude of the mouse-side extensor digitorum muscle was higher with Workstation A. Alternating between resting the forearms on the work surface and on the chairs' armrests could solicit different muscles during computer work, and could be considered as a strategy for preventing musculoskeletal disorders. The new exposure variation analysis summary parameters used were sensitive to small workstation changes, thus supporting their use in future studies.

  12. Comparison of Balance, Proprioception and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Total Hip Replacement Patients With and Without Fracture: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there was a difference in balance, proprioception, and skeletal muscle mass among patients who undergo hip fracture surgery relative to and elective total hip replacement (THR). Methods Thirty-one THR patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups: fracture group (n=15) and non-fracture group (n=16). Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to balance the proprioception of the hip joint while a joint position sense (JPS) test was used to evaluate it. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed using a 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). All tests were assessed at 3 months after the surgery. An independent t-test was used to compare the fracture group and non-fracture group. Spearman correlation was used to identify the correlation of each variable. Results In an independent t-test, the BBS score of patients undergoing elective surgery was higher than the BBS score of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was a significant correlation between the BBS and JPS score after a THR. SMI also correlated with the score of BBS. Conclusion It seems that THR patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture might have more trouble balancing than elective THR patients. Therefore THR patients undergoing hip fracture surgery might need more care during rehabilitation. PMID:28119837

  13. Transcript profiles in longissimus dorsi muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue: a comparison of pigs with different postweaning growth rates.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, C M; Jones, C K; Schroyen, M; Severin, A J; Patience, J F; Tuggle, C K; Koltes, J E

    2015-05-01

    Although most pigs recover rapidly from stresses associated with the transition of weaning, a portion of the population lags behind their contemporaries in growth performance. The underlying biological and molecular mechanisms involved in postweaning differences in growth performance are poorly understood. The objective of this experiment was to use transcriptional profiling of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue to develop a better understanding of the metabolic basis for poor weaned-pig transition. A total of 1,054 pigs was reared in commercial conditions and weighed at birth, weaning, and 3 wk postweaning. Transition ADG (tADG) was calculated as the ADG for the 3-wk period postweaning. Nine pigs from both the lowest 10th percentile (low tADG) and the 60th to 70th percentile (high tADG) were harvested at 3 wk postweaning. Differential expression analysis was conducted in longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) and subcutaneous adipose tissue using RNA-Seq methodology. In LM, 768 transcripts were differentially expressed (DE), 327 with higher expression in low tADG and 441 with higher expression in high tADG pigs (q < 0.10). Expression patterns measured in LM by RNA-Seq were verified in 30 of 32 transcripts using quantitative PCR. No DE transcripts were identified in adipose tissue. To identify biological functions potentially underlying the effects of tADG on skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology, functional annotation analysis of the DE transcripts was conducted using DAVID and Pathway Studio analytic tools. The group of DE genes with lower expression in LM of low tADG pigs was enriched in genes with functions related to muscle contraction, glucose metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, muscle development, and response to hormone stimulus (enrichment score > 1.3). The list of DE genes with higher expression in low tADG LM was enriched in genes with functions related to protein catabolism (enrichment score > 1.3). Analysis of known gene-gene interactions identified

  14. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  15. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  16. Comparison of PCR assays targeting the multi-copy targets B1 gene and 529 bp repetitive element for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in swine muscle.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Santoro, Azzurra; Milardi, Giovanni Luigi; Diaferia, Manuela; Branciari, Raffaella; Miraglia, Dino; Cioffi, Attilia; Gabrielli, Simona; Ranucci, David

    2017-05-01

    The comparison of the sensitivities of two molecular assays designed to target the multi-copy sequences of the Toxoplasma gondii genomic B1 region and 529 bp-RE respectively, in detecting T. gondii in swine muscle was assessed. Diaphragm pillars were obtained from 498 slaughtered pigs managed in intensive farms in Central Italy. Genomic DNA was extracted from the tissues and T. gondii-B1 and 529 bp-RE sequences were amplified by specific PCR protocols. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in 165 samples (33.13%). There was a good correlation (κ = 0.77) between the results obtained targeting the two different genetic markers, however the 529 bp RE-PCR assay overall detected a significantly higher (P < 0.05) number of T. gondii-positive samples (150 samples) than the B1-PCR protocol (134). Our results show that: i) standardized B1 and 529 bp-RE PCRs applied to muscle tissues can detect a high rate of T. gondii-infection; ii) a multi-target PCR approach is recommended for the accurate diagnosis of infection in swine and can also be used in food testing.

  17. Comparison of total lipids and fatty acids from liver, heart and abdominal muscle of scalloped (Sphyrna lewini) and smooth (Sphyrna zygaena) hammerhead sharks.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bruce Clement; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Namdarizandi, Vahid; Vizarra, Scott; Cliff, Geremy

    2014-01-01

    Liver, heart and abdominal muscle samples from scalloped (Sphyrna lewini) and smooth (Sphyrna zygaena) hammerhead sharks were analysed to characterise their lipid and fatty acid profiles. Samples were compared both between and within species, but there were no significant differences in total lipids for either comparison, although much greater total amounts were found in the liver samples. Within the individual fatty acids, the only significant differences were greater amounts of 22:6n-3, total n-3 polyunsaturates and total polyunsaturates in smooth, when compared to scalloped, hammerhead liver. This may reflect the more wide spread distribution of this species into cooler waters. Within both species the liver levels of the same fatty acid fractions decreased from spring to summer, which may correlate with changes in fatty acid profile to adapt to any differences in amount or species of prey consumed, or other considerations, eg. buoyancy, however there was no data to clarify this.

  18. Peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD: lower limbs versus upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Malaguti, Carla; Corso, Simone Dal

    2011-01-01

    In patients with COPD, the degree of functional impairment appears to differ between the upper and lower limbs. Significant dyspnea and fatigue have been reported by these patients when performing tasks with unsupported upper limbs and two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this fact: neuromechanical dysfunction of respiratory muscles; and changes in lung volume during such activities. The neuromechanical dysfunction seen in COPD patients during this type of exercise is related to changes in the breathing pattern, as well as to the simultaneity of afferent and efferent muscle stimuli, resulting in respiratory muscle asynchrony. In addition, the increased ventilation during upper limb exercise in patients with COPD leads to dynamic hyperinflation at different workloads. During lower limb exercises, the strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle is lower in COPD patients than in healthy subjects. This could by explained by abnormal muscle metabolism (decreased aerobic capacity), dependence on glycolytic metabolism, and rapid accumulation of lactate during exercise. In comparison with lower limb exercises, upper limb exercises result in higher metabolic and ventilatory demands, as well as in a more intense sensation of dyspnea and greater fatigue. Because there are differences between the upper and lower limb muscles in terms of the morphological and functional adaptations in COPD patients, specific protocols for strength training and endurance should be developed and tested for the corresponding muscle groups.

  19. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    PubMed

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates.

  20. Measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J M; Roberts, N; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method for measurement of the cross sectional area and volume of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with stereology, and to compare the results of measurements obtained by the MRI method with those obtained by the conventional method of static B-mode ultrasound in order to evaluate whether MRI is a reliable alternative to ultrasound. METHODS: A preliminary MRI study was undertaken on a single female volunteer in order to optimise the scanning technique and sampling design for estimating the muscle volume using the Cavalieri method. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the method comparison study. Each volunteer underwent static B-mode ultrasonography, immediately followed by MRI. The cross sectional area of the quadriceps femoris was estimated at the junction of the proximal one third and distal two thirds of the thigh, and seven systematic sections of the thigh were obtained in order to estimate muscle volume by both modalities. RESULTS: Seven sections through the muscle are required to achieve a coefficient of error of 4-5%. There was no significant difference in the cross sectional area estimates or volume estimates when ultrasound and MRI were compared. CONCLUSION: Muscle cross sectional area and volume can be measured without bias by MRI in conjunction with stereological methods and the method is a reliable alternative to static B-mode ultrasound for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9132215

  1. Comparison of four specific dynamic office chairs with a conventional office chair: impact upon muscle activation, physical activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, Rolf P; Kraft, Kathrin; Groenesteijn, Liesbeth; Krause, Frank; Berger, Helmut; Vink, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged and static sitting postures provoke physical inactivity at VDU workplaces and are therefore discussed as risk factors for the musculoskeletal system. Manufacturers have designed specific dynamic office chairs featuring structural elements which promote dynamic sitting and therefore physical activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of four specific dynamic chairs on erector spinae and trapezius EMG, postures/joint angles and physical activity intensity (PAI) compared to those of a conventional standard office chair. All chairs were fitted with sensors for measurement of the chair parameters (backrest inclination, forward and sideward seat pan inclination), and tested in the laboratory by 10 subjects performing 7 standardized office tasks and by another 12 subjects in the field during their normal office work. Muscle activation revealed no significant differences between the specific dynamic chairs and the reference chair. Analysis of postures/joint angles and PAI revealed only a few differences between the chairs, whereas the tasks performed strongly affected the measured muscle activation, postures and kinematics. The characteristic dynamic elements of each specific chair yielded significant differences in the measured chair parameters, but these characteristics did not appear to affect the sitting dynamics of the subjects performing their office tasks.

  2. A comparison of muscle stiffness and musculoarticular stiffness of the knee joint in young athletic males and females.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; De Vito, Giuseppe; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Fong, Daniel T P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the gender-specific differences in peak torque (PT), muscle stiffness (MS) and musculoarticular stiffness (MAS) of the knee joints in a young active population. Twenty-two male and twenty-two female recreational athletes participated. PT of the knee joint extensor musculature was assessed on an isokinetic dynamometer, MS of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle was measured in both relaxed and contracted conditions, and knee joint MAS was quantified using the free oscillation technique. Significant gender differences were observed for all dependent variables. Females demonstrated less normalized PT (mean difference (MD)=0.4Nm/kg, p=0.005, η(2)=0.17), relaxed MS (MD=94.2N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.53), contracted MS (MD=162.7N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.53) and MAS (MD=422.1N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.23) than males. MAS increased linearly with the external load in both genders with males demonstrating a significantly higher slope (p=0.019) than females. The observed differences outlined above may contribute to the higher knee joint injury incidence and prevalence in females when compared to males.

  3. Comparison of stress-induced modulation of smooth-muscle activity between ileum and colon in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Mari; Zeredo, Jorge L; Ota, Masato S; Nihei, Zenro; Toda, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    Stress is a well-known cause of numerous digestive conditions, including gastrointestinal-function disorders. The autonomic nervous system regulates intestinal movements via cholinergic and adrenergic efferent fibers; however it is not clear how stress could affect these control mechanisms and in particular whether in a site-dependent manner. In this study we tested in vitro the effects of topical application of acetylcholine (Ach) and adrenalin (Adr) on smooth-muscle contractions of intestinal segments isolated from stress-conditioned rats. Stress was loaded by hypergravity stimulation (10min/day) for periods of 1, 6 or 30days. As a result, stress-conditioning affected intestinal sensitivity to Ach and Adr differently at sections of the ileum and colon. In the ileum no significant differences were found between control and stress-conditioned rats, whereas in the colon, samples from 6- and 30-day stress-conditioned rats showed larger amplitudes of Ach-induced contraction, as well as greater antagonization by Adr application. These results suggest that stress conditioning can modify autonomic control of intestinal movements by altering smooth-muscle sensitivity to Ach and Adr.

  4. Myofascial pain of the jaw muscles: comparison of short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and fascial manipulation technique.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Stecco, Antonio; Stecco, Carla; Masiero, Stefano; Manfredini, Daniele

    2012-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and physiatric treatment provided by means of Fascial Manipulation techniques in the management of myofascial pain of jaw muscles. Thirty patients with a Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) diagnosis of myofascial pain were randomized to receive either single-session botulinum toxin injections (Group A) or multiple-session Fascial Manipulation (Group B). Maximum pain levels (VAS ratings) and jaw range of motion in millimeters (maximum mouth opening, protrusion, right and left laterotrusion) were assessed at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Both treatment protocols provided significant improvement over time for pain symptoms. The two treatments seem to be almost equally effective, Fascial Manipulation being slightly superior to reduce subjective pain perception, and botulinum toxin injections being slightly superior to increase jaw range of motion. Differences between the two treatment protocols as to changes in the outcome parameters at the three-months follow-up were not relevant clinically. Findings from the present investigation are in line with literature data supporting the effectiveness of a wide spectrum of conservative treatment approaches to myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Future studies on larger samples over a longer follow-up span are needed on the way to identify tailored treatment strategies.

  5. Interaction of bovine skeletal muscle lactate dehydrogenase with liposomes. Comparison with the data for the heart enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, A; Terlecki, G; Gutowicz, J

    1989-04-28

    The effects of pH, salt concentration and the presence of oxidized and reduced forms of coenzyme on the interaction of skeletal muscle lactate dehydrogenase with the liposomes derived from the total fraction of bovine erythrocyte lipids were investigated by ultracentrifugation and were compared with those results obtained using the heart-rate isoenzyme which we have previously studied. Liposomes are good adsorptive systems for both types of isoenzyme. In the presence of erythrocyte lipid liposomes, bovine muscle and heart lactate dehydrogenases form two kinds of complex: lactate dehydrogenase adsorbed to liposomes and soluble lactate dehydrogenase-phospholipid complexes. Soluble protein-phospholipid complexes reveal different dependences of their stabilities on pH values and it seems that the nature of the binding site in either isozyme is different. In addition, absorption of the isoenzymes on the liposomes also reveals in difference in the effects of NAD and NADH. While the presence of NAD dissociates LDH-H4 from the liposomes and NADH does not influence its adsorption, NAD promotes the binding of LDH-M4, and NADH favors the dissociation.

  6. Investigation of techniques to quantify in vivo lesion volume based on comparison of water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with histology in focal cerebral ischemia of rats.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mark; Silva, Matthew D; Li, Fuhai; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-06-01

    Stroke lesion-volume estimates derived from calculated water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide a quantitative surrogate end-point for investigating the efficacy of drug treatment or studying the temporal evolution of cerebral ischemia. Methodology is described for estimating ischemic lesion volumes in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) based on absolute and percent-reduction threshold values of the water ADC at 3 h post-MCAO. Volume estimates derived from average ADC (ADC(av)) maps were compared with those derived from post-mortem histological sections. Optimum ADC thresholds were established as those that provided the best correlation and one-to-one correspondence between ADC- and histologically derived lesion-volume estimates. At 3 h post-MCAO, an absolute-ADC(av) threshold of 47 x 10(-5) mm(2)/s (corresponding to a 33% reduction in ADC(av) based on a contralateral hemisphere comparison) provided the most accurate estimate of percent hemispheric lesion volume (%HLV). Experimental and data analysis issues for improving and validating the usefulness of DWI as a surrogate endpoint for the quantification of ischemic lesion volume are discussed.

  7. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  8. Comparison of pressure-volume loop and echocardiographic measures of diastolic function in patients with a single-ventricle physiology.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shahryar M; Butts, Ryan J; Buckley, Jason; Hlavacek, Anthony M; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Khambadkone, Sachin; Baker, G Hamilton

    2014-08-01

    Echocardiographic measurements of diastolic function have not been validated against invasive pressure-volume loop (PVL) analysis in the single-ventricle population. The authors hypothesized that echocardiographic measures of diastolic function would correlate with PVL indices of diastolic function in patients with a single-ventricle physiology. The conductance-derived PVL measures of diastolic function included the isovolumic relaxation time constant (τ), the maximum rate of ventricular pressure decline (peak -dP/dt), and a measure of passive diastolic stiffness (μ). The echocardiographic measures included Doppler inflow patterns of the dominant atrioventricular valve (DAVV), tissue Doppler velocities (TDI) at the lateral (ventricular free wall) component of the DAVV annulus, and the TDI-derived isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT'). The correlation between PVL and echocardiographic measures was examined. The study enrolled 13 patients at various stages of surgical palliation. The median age of the patients was 3 years (range 3 months to 19 years). τ correlated well with Doppler E:A (r = 0.832; p = 0.005), lateral E:E' (r = 0.747; p = 0.033), and IVRT' (r = 0.831; p = 0.001). Peak -dP/dt also was correlated with IVRT' (r = 0.609; p = 0.036), and μ also was correlated with IVRT' (r = 0.884; p = 0.001). This study represents the first-ever comparison of diastolic echocardiographic and PVL indices in a single-ventricle population. The findings show that Doppler E:A, lateral E:E', and IVRT' correlate well with PVL measures of diastolic function. This study supports further validation of echocardiographic measures of diastolic function versus PVL measures of diastolic function in the single-ventricle population.

  9. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  10. Accuracy and precision of a new portable ultrasound scanner, the BME-150A, in residual urine volume measurement: a comparison with the BladderScan BVI 3000.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jin Ho; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relative accuracy of a new portable ultrasound unit, BME-150A, and the BladderScan BVI 3000, as assessed in comparison with the catheterized residual urine volume. We used both of these machines to prospectively measure the residual urine volumes of 89 patients (40 men and 49 women) who were undergoing urodynamic studies. The ultrasound measurements were compared with the post-scan bladder volumes obtained by catheterization in the same patients. The ultrasounds were followed immediately (within 5 min) by in-and-out catheterizations while the patients were in a supine position. There were a total of 116 paired measurements made. The BME-150A and the BVI 3000 demonstrated a correlation with the residual volume of 0.92 and 0.94, and a mean difference from the true residual volume of 7.8 and 3.6 ml, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the accuracy of the two bladder scans were 0.90 for BME-150A and 0.95 for BVI 3000. The difference of accuracy between the two models was not significant (p = 0.2421). There were six cases in which a follow-up evaluation of falsely elevated post-void residual urine volume measurements on the ultrasound studies resulted in comparatively low catheterized volumes, with a range of differences from 66 to 275.5 ml. These cases were diagnosed with an ovarian cyst, uterine myoma, or uterine adenomyosis on pelvic ultrasonography. The accuracy of the BME-150A is comparable to that of the BVI 3000 in estimating the true residual urine volumes and is sufficient enough for us to recommend its use as an alternative to catheterization.

  11. A comparison of the effect of doxorubicin and phenol on the skeletal muscle. May doxorubicin be a new alternative treatment agent for spasticity?

    PubMed

    Cullu, Emre; Ozkan, Ilhan; Culhaci, Nil; Alparslan, Bulent

    2005-03-01

    Since spasticity is still an unsolved problem for orthopaedic surgeons, different chemical agents are tried before surgery. Phenol is a chemical agent which has been used for spasticity treatment for a long time. Doxorubicin is an antitumoral agent that has recently been used for chemomyectomy. The intramuscular effects of phenol and two different dose of doxorubicin were compared in that experimental study. In the first group 0.5 mg/0.5 cm3 doxorubicin, in the second group 1 mg/0.5 doxorubicin and in the third group 5% aqueous solution of fenol/0.5 injection were applied into left quadriceps muscle of rats. Degeneration areas were wider in the high dose doxorubicin group (29.9%; 8.5-61), in comparison with the low dose doxorubicin group (6.4%; 3.1-12) and phenol group (4%; 0-14) after 6 weeks. Differences in degeneration area among three groups were statistically significant (P<0.001). The difference was significant between the high dose doxorubicin group and the phenol group (P=0.001) and also between the high dose doxorubicin group and the low dose doxorubicin group (P<0.001). The results of this study suggested that doxorubicin could provide an alternative treatment modality for neuromuscular disease causing spasticity and it has a dose-dependent effect. Further studies are needed for long-term comparison and clinical use of doxorubicin for spasticity treatment.

  12. Reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurements made by a hand-held dynamometer and a belt: a comparison of two types of device.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Munenori

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of 2 hand-held dynamometers (HHD-1, 2) with different designs, by performing isometric knee muscle extension measurements two times each. [Subjects] The subjects were 40 young healthy adults. [Methods] The reliability of the measurements was examined using Bland-Altman analysis. [Results] Bland-Altman analysis found a fixed bias in measurements made by HHD-1 with an average limits of agreement (LOA) value of -2.1 kgf. For HHD-2, only random errors were detected, and the minimal detectable change (MDC) was 11.4 kgf. Fixed biases were observed between the two devices with an average LOA value of 2.2 kgf. When the bodyweight ratio was used, fixed biases were observed in measurements made by both devices, and the average value of LOA was -0.03 kgf/kg. The comparison of the two devices revealed only random errors, and MDC was 0.22 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] For HHD measurements using these two devices, the appropriate number of measurements is two times, and comparison of measurement values between the two devices should be avoided.

  13. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  14. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  15. Profile of muscle tissue gene expression specific to water buffalo: Comparison with domestic cattle by genome array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Hongbao; Gui, Linsheng; Wang, Hongcheng; Mei, Chugang; Zhang, Yaran; Xu, Huaichao; Jia, Cunlin; Zan, Linsen

    2016-02-10

    In contrast with the past, the water buffalo is now not only a draft animal, but also an important food source of milk and meat. It is increasingly apparent that the water buffalo have huge potential for meat production, but its breeding needs to be investigated. Regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the meat quality difference between the buffalo (Bubalus bulabis) and yellow cattle (Bos taurus), 12 chemical-physical characteristics related to the meat quality of longissimus thoracis muscles (LTM) have been compared at the age of 36 months. Intramuscular lipid and b* (yellowness) were greater in cattle than the buffalo, whereas a* (redness) was greater in the buffalo. Gene expression profiles were constructed by bovine genome array. A total of 8884 and 10,960 probes were detected in buffalo and cattle, respectively, with 1580 genes being differentially expressed. Over 400 probes were upregulated and nearly 1200 were downregulated in LTM of the buffalo, most being involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, cholesterol homeostasis, regulation of transcription, response to hypoxia, and glycolysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the microarray data. Enriched GO analyses of highly expressed genes in LTM showed that protein biosynthesis, striated muscle contraction, iron homeostasis, iron transport, glycolysis and glucose metabolism were similar between the buffalo and cattle. High protein content, low fat content and deep meat color of buffalo LTM may be closely associated with the increased expression of genes involved in cholesterol and iron homeostasis, while also reducing the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and protein oxidative phosphorylation. These results establish the groundwork for further studies on buffalo meat quality and will be beneficial in improving water buffalo breeding by molecular biotechnology.

  16. Comparison of contractions produced by carbachol, thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid in the guinea-pig tracheal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, M; Takagi, K; Ogino, K; Tomita, T

    1998-01-01

    Thapsigargin (TPG, 3 μM) and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 10 μM) slowly increased muscle tone in the guinea-pig isolated tracheal muscle. A large sustained contraction was produced when 2.4 mM Ca2+ was readmitted after 10 min exposure to Ca2+-free solution following 30 min treatment with TPG or CPA.The sustained contraction after Ca2+ readmission was partially inhibited by nifedipine (3 μM) and highly dependent on external Ca2+. The TPG- and CPA-induced sustained contractions were 75% and 67%, respectively, of the sustained contraction produced by carbachol (Cch, 1 μM, EC80) in the presence of nifedipine.The contractions produced by Cch, TPG and CPA were all inhibited by isoprenaline (ISO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). In the presence of nifedipine, the IC50 of ISO was 11, 17, and 23 nM and that of SNP was 0.5, 1, 0.8 μM for Cch-, TPG-, and CPA-induced contractions, respectively. The contraction produced by 60 mM K+ was only weakly inhibited by ISO and SNP. As with ISO and SNP, the Cch-, TPG- and CPA-induced contractions were also similarly inhibited by SKF 96365 (100 μM) and cadmium (Cd2+, 100 μM).It was concluded that TPG and CPA increased Ca2+ influx probably via a mechanism activated by Ca2+ depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The susceptibility of the contraction produced by TPG, CPA and Cch to inhibition by ISO and SNP and also by SKF-96365 and Cd2+ suggests that the contractions use common pathways for increasing intracellular Ca2+, and that the contractions produced by K+ involve a different mechanism. PMID:9723957

  17. A ground-based comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Kirk L.; Hackney, Kyle J.; De Witt, John K.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Goetchius, Elizabeth L.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2013-11-01

    IntroductionInternational Space Station (ISS) crewmembers perform muscle strength and endurance testing pre- and postflight to assess the physiologic adaptations associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity. However, a reliable and standardized method to document strength changes in-flight has not been established. To address this issue, a proprietary dynamometer, the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) has been developed and flown aboard the ISS. The aims of this ground-based investigation were to: (1) evaluate the test-retest reliability of MARES and (2) determine its agreement with a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer previously used for pre- and postflight medical testing. MethodsSix males (179.5±4.7 cm; 82.0±8.7 kg; 31.3±4.0 yr) and four females (163.2±7.3 cm; 63.2±1.9 kg; 32.3±6.8 yr) completed two testing sessions on a HUMAC NORM isokinetic dynamometer (NORM) and two sessions on MARES using a randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over design. Peak torque values at 60° and 180° s-1 were calculated from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF) for each session. Total work at 180° s-1 was determined from the area under the torque versus displacement curve during 20 maximal repetitions of KE and KF. ResultsIntraclass correlation coefficients were relatively high for both devices (0.90-0.99). Only one dependent measure, KE peak torque at 60° s-1 exhibited good concordance between devices (ρ=0.92) and a small average difference (0.9±17.3 N m). ConclusionMARES demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability and thus should serve as a good tool to monitor in-flight strength changes. However, due to poor agreement with NORM, it is not advisable to compare absolute values obtained on these devices.

  18. Why are some mitochondria more powerful than others: insights from comparisons of muscle mitochondria from three terrestrial vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Turner, Nigel; Else, Paul L; Hulbert, A J

    2005-10-01

    We studied the molecular composition of muscle mitochondria to evaluate whether the contents of cytochromes or adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) or phospholipid acyl compositions reflect differences in mitochondrial oxidative capacities. We isolated mitochondria from three vertebrates of similar size and preferred temperature, the rat (Rattus norvegicus), the cane toad (Bufo marinus) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps). Mitochondrial oxidative capacities were higher in rats and cane toads than in bearded dragon, whether rates were expressed relative to protein, cytochromes or ANT. Inter-specific differences were least pronounced when rates were expressed relative to cytochrome A, a component of cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), or ANT. In mitochondria from rat and cane toad, cytochrome A was more abundant than C followed by B and then C(1), while in bearded dragon mitochondria, the cytochromes were present in roughly equal levels. Analysis of correlations between mitochondrial oxidative capacities and macromolecular components revealed that cytochrome A explained at least half of the intra- and inter-specific variability in substrate oxidation rates. ANT levels were an excellent correlate of state 3 rates while phospholipid contents were correlated with state 4 rates. As the % poly-unsaturation and the % 20:4n-6 in mitochondrial phospholipids were equivalent in toads and rats, and exceeded the levels in lizards, they may contribute to the inter-specific differences in oxidative capacities. We suggest that the numbers of CCO and ANT together with the poly-unsaturation of phospholipids explain the higher oxidative capacities in muscle mitochondria from rats and cane toads.

  19. Comparison of muscle involvement and posture between the conventional deadlift and a 'walk-in' style deadlift machine.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Benjamin J; Cauthen, Courtney P; Senger, Scott R

    2016-11-16

    The deadlift exercise is one of the most effective exercises for developing lower-body strength; however, technique errors can lead to low back injuries. The use of a 'walk-in' deadlift machine removes the weight bar by using a lever system with independent handles on either side of the body. Theoretically, this would allow alignment of the load with the center of gravity, encouraging a more upright torso and decreasing the involvement of the low back extensors. This study compared trunk angle, knee angle and electrical activity of key muscles between the conventional deadlift (CDL) and two foot positions (ball of foot or toe alignment) with pronated grip, (called BallPro and ToePro) of a walk-in deadlift machine among high-skilled and low-skilled lifters. While there were no skill group differences, in the combined groups the walk-in deadlift resulted in a significantly more upright trunk angle (p≤.05) for both the BallPro (29.9° ± 12.0 SD) and the ToePro (32.4° ± 10.4) compared to the CDL (23.7° ± 11.3) at the start of the lift. Similar results were noted in the mid-concentric phase, with trunk angles for the ToePro (46.9° ± 6.8) significantly different from CDL (42.66° ± 3.7), and for the mid-eccentric phase of the lift, with ToePro (47.2° ± 7.0) significantly higher than CDL (42.9° ± 6.5). ToePro knee angle was significantly more flexed (101.6° ± 10.6) than CDL (110.8° ± 11.5) at the starting position, with both BallPro (135.7° ± 14.2) and ToePro (136.5° ± 8.8) significantly more flexed than CDL (159.3° ± 5.9) in both the mid-concentric phase and the mid-eccentric phase (BallPro 129.2° ± 14.0, ToePro 127.7° ± 8.9, and CDL 150.5° ± 7.8). In the combined low and high skilled groups, electrical activity as a percent of maximum isometric root mean square activity of the erector spinae during the BallPro variation (53.1% ± 33.8) was significantly lower than CDL (73.19% ± 23.9), while vastus lateralis activity was significantly

  20. Comparison of transcriptomic responses to pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in heart of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L).

    PubMed

    Johansen, Lill-Heidi; Thim, Hanna L; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Afanasyev, Sergey; Strandskog, Guro; Taksdal, Torunn; Fremmerlid, Kjersti; McLoughlin, Marion; Jørgensen, Jorunn B; Krasnov, Aleksei

    2015-10-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) are viral diseases associated with SAV (salmonid alphavirus) and PRV (piscine reovirus), which induce systemic infections and pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L), resulting in severe morbidity and mortality. While general features of the clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of salmonid viral diseases are relatively well studied, much less is known about molecular mechanisms associated with immunity and disease-specific changes. In this study, transcriptomic analyses of heart tissue from PD and HSMI challenged Atlantic salmon were done, focusing on the mature phases of both diseases at respectively 28-35 and 42-77 days post infection. A large number of immune genes was activated in both trials with prevalence of genes associated with early innate antiviral responses, their expression levels being slightly higher in PD challenged fish. Activation of the IFN axis was in parallel with inflammatory changes that involved diverse humoral and cellular factors. Adaptive immune response genes were more pronounced in fish with HSMI, as suggested by increased expression of a large number of genes associated with differentiation and maturation of B lymphocytes and cytotoxic T cells. A similar down-regulation of non-immune genes such as myofiber and mitochondrial proteins between diseases was most likely reflecting myocardial pathology. A suite of genes important for cardiac function including B-type natriuretic peptide and four neuropeptides displayed differential expression between PD and HSMI. Comparison of results revealed common and distinct features and added to the understanding of both diseases at their mature phases with typical clinical pictures. A number of genes that showed disease-specific changes can be of interest for diagnostics.

  1. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations. Part 1; Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and efficiency are studied for six nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme, cell-centered node-averaging schemes with and without clipping, and cell-centered schemes with unweighted, weighted, and approximately mapped least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Results from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The second class of tests are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes are less accurate, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to the complexity of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly

  2. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  3. Visualizing and quantifying oxidized protein thiols in tissue sections: a comparison of dystrophic mdx and normal skeletal mouse muscles.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tomohito; Terrill, Jessica; Shavlakadze, Tea; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not only a cause of oxidative stress in a range of disease conditions but are also important regulators of physiological pathways in vivo. One mechanism whereby ROS can regulate cell function is by modification of proteins through the reversible oxidation of their thiol groups. An experimental challenge has been the relative lack of techniques to probe the biological significance of protein thiol oxidation in complex multicellular tissues and organs. We have developed a sensitive and quantitative fluorescence labeling technique to detect and localize protein thiol oxidation in histological tissue sections. In our technique, reduced and oxidized protein thiols are visualized and quantified on two consecutive tissue sections and the extent of protein thiol oxidation is expressed as a percentage of total protein thiols (reduced plus oxidized). We tested the application of this new technique using muscles of dystrophic (mdx) and wild-type C57Bl/10Scsn (C57) mice. In mdx myofibers, protein thiols were consistently more oxidized (19 ± 3%) compared with healthy myofibers (10 ± 1%) in C57 mice. A striking observation was the localization of intensive protein thiol oxidation (70 ± 9%) within myofibers associated with necrotic damage. Oxidative stress is an area of active investigation in many fields of research, and this technique provides a useful tool for locating and further understanding protein thiol oxidation in normal, damaged, and diseased tissues.

  4. The measurement of tremor using a velocity transducer: comparison to simultaneous recordings using transducers of displacement, acceleration and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Norman, K E; Edwards, R; Beuter, A

    1999-10-15

    Precise kinematic measurements of tremor have historically been obtained using accelerometers. However, current technology permits precise measurements in velocity and displacement. The primary advantage of velocity recording is that only one step of integration or differentiation is required for either displacement or acceleration. A method is presented of measuring finger tremor using a laser system that transduces velocity precisely. Measurements of postural finger tremor thus obtained were compared to those simultaneously obtained from a laser system that transduces displacement, from an accelerometer and from surface electromyography (EMG) of the extensor digitorum communis. A range of amplitude and frequency content was obtained by testing control subjects and subjects with Parkinson's disease. The velocity transducer showed excellent correspondence of amplitude and frequency measurement with the displacement transducer. Measures of absolute and relative amplitude correlated well (r > or = 0.96 in amplitude measures in displacement, velocity and acceleration), and high coherence was found throughout the frequency range of interest. Measurements by the accelerometer generally showed poorer correspondence with those of the other instruments. EMG measurements showed good correspondence in some trials but poorer correspondence in others, attributed to the low level of muscle activity required in the task. Precise kinematic measurements appear to be highly sensitive to neuromotor impairment.

  5. Noninvasive optical diagnostics of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in skeletal muscle for comparison of electroporation and sonoporation efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošiūnas, Mindaugas; Kadikis, Roberts; Saknīte, Inga; Baltušnikas, Juozas; Kilikevičius, Audrius; Lihachev, Alexey; Petrovska, Ramona; Jakovels, Dainis; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2016-04-01

    We highlight the options available for noninvasive optical diagnostics of reporter gene expression in mouse tibialis cranialis muscle. An in vivo multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements has been used for the transcutaneous detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, providing information on location and duration of EGFP expression and allowing quantification of EGFP expression levels. For EGFP coding plasmid (pEGFP-Nuc Vector, 10 μg/50 ml) transfection, we used electroporation or ultrasound enhanced microbubble cavitation [sonoporation (SP)]. The transcutaneous EGFP fluorescence in live mice was monitored over a period of one year using the described parameters: area of EGFP positive fibers, integral intensity, and mean intensity of EGFP fluorescence. The most efficient transfection of EGFP coding plasmid was achieved, when one high voltage and four low voltage electric pulses were applied. This protocol resulted in the highest short-term and long-term EGFP expression. Other electric pulse protocols as well as SP resulted in lower fluorescence intensities of EGFP in the transfected area. We conclude that noninvasive multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements is a suitable method to estimate the dynamics and efficiency of reporter gene transfection in vivo.

  6. Scaling of neuron number and volume of the pulvinar complex in New World primates: comparisons with humans, other primates, and mammals.

    PubMed

    Chalfin, Brandon P; Cheung, Desmond T; Muniz, José Augusto P C; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos; Finlay, Barbara L

    2007-09-20

    The lateral posterior nucleus and pulvinar (LP-pulvinar complex) are the principal thalamic nuclei associated with the elaborate development of the dorsal and ventral streams of the parietal cortex in primates. In humans, a novel site of origin for a subpopulation of pulvinar neurons has been observed, the ganglionic eminence of the telencephalon. This additional site of neuron origin has been proposed to contribute to the pulvinar's evolutionary expansion (Letinic and Rakic [2001] Nat Neurosci 4:930-936). Studies of neuron number in the LP-pulvinar complex in gibbon, chimpanzee, and gorilla compared to humans, however, did not show that the human LP-pulvinar was unexpectedly large (Armstrong [1981] Am J Phys Anthropol 55:369-383). Here we enlarge the allometric basis for comparison by determining neuron number in the LP-pulvinar complex of six New World primates (Cebus apella, Saimiri ustius, Saguinus midas niger, Alouatta caraya, Aotus azarae, and Callicebus moloch) as well as measuring LP-pulvinar volume in a further set of 24 species including additional primates, carnivores, and rodents. The volume of the LP-pulvinar complex scaled with positive allometry with respect to brain volume across all species examined. The scaling of the number of neurons in the LP-pulvinar complex was extremely similar in New World primates and anthropoid apes, with the human LP-pulvinar value close to the regression line. Comparison of the relative volumes of the LP-pulvinar in the larger sample confirmed this observation, and further demonstrated that both primates and carnivores showed a "grade shift" in its size compared to rodents, with the pulvinar comprising a greater proportion of total brain volume across the board. Diurnal, nocturnal, or crepuscular niche did not discriminate LP-pulvinar size across taxa.

  7. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of the pituitary gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging: a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Tolga; Acer, Niyazi; Turgut, Ahmet T; Aycan, Kenan; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Turgut, Mehmet

    2011-03-01

    Stereological techniques using point counting and planimetry have been used to estimate pituitary gland volume. However, many studies have estimated pituitary gland volume by the mathematical approach the elliptic formula. The objective of the current study was to determine pituitary gland volume using stereological methods and elliptic formula on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, pituitary gland volumes were estimated in a total of 28 subjects (22 females, 6 males,) who were free of any pituitary or neurological symptoms and signs. The mean ± SD pituitary gland volumes for the point counting, planimetry and elliptic formulae groups were 582.14 ± 140.16 mm³, 610.08 ± 133.17 mm³, and 432.82 ± 147.38 mm³, respectively. The mean CE for the pituitary gland volume estimates derived from the point counting technique was 8.07%. No significant difference was found between point counting and planimetric methods for the pituitary gland volume (P > 0.05). In addition, there was a 26.14 and 29.71% underestimation of pituitary volume as measured by the elliptic formula compared to the point counting and planimetric techniques, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that stereological techniques are unbiased, efficient and reliable methods and are ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pituitary gland volume estimation. Hence, we suggest that estimating pituitary gland volume using MRI study and stereology may be clinically relevant for pituitary surgeons for the investigation of the structure and function of the pituitary gland.

  8. Comparison of neck and upper-limb muscle activities between able-bodied and paraplegic individuals during wheelchair propulsion on the ground.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, So Hyun; Lee, Chang-Ryeol

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles between able-bodied individuals and persons with paraplegia during wheelchair propulsion on the ground. [Subjects and Methods] The muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles of 8 normal individuals and 8 individuals with paraplegia were analyzed during wheelchair propulsion. The activities of the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, anterior/posterior deltoids, triceps brachii, extensor carpi radialis, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were assessed. [Results] The paraplegic group showed significantly higher sternocleidomastoid activity than the normal group. Latissimus dorsi activity was also higher in the paraplegia group than in the normal group, but the difference was not significant. There were no significant differences in the other muscle activities between groups. [Conclusion] Paraplegic patients tend to use the sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi muscles with greater degrees of activity. Therefore, physiotherapists should not overlook the treatment of these muscles for paraplegic patients who are long-term wheelchair users.

  9. Comparison of pre/post-operative CT image volumes to preoperative digitization of partial hepatectomies: a feasibility study in surgical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumpuri, Prashanth; Clements, Logan W.; Li, Rui; Waite, Jonathan M.; Stefansic, James D.; Geller, David A.; Miga, Michael I.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2009-02-01

    Preoperative planning combined with image-guidance has shown promise towards increasing the accuracy of liver resection procedures. The purpose of this study was to validate one such preoperative planning tool for four patients undergoing hepatic resection. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images acquired before surgery were used to identify tumor margins and to plan the surgical approach for resection of these tumors. Surgery was then performed with intraoperative digitization data acquire by an FDA approved image-guided liver surgery system (Pathfinder Therapeutics, Inc., Nashville, TN). Within 5-7 days after surgery, post-operative CT image volumes were acquired. Registration of data within a common coordinate reference was achieved and preoperative plans were compared to the postoperative volumes. Semi-quantitative comparisons are presented in this work and preliminary results indicate that significant liver regeneration/hypertrophy in the postoperative CT images may be present post-operatively. This could challenge pre/post operative CT volume change comparisons as a means to evaluate the accuracy of preoperative surgical plans.

  10. A Ground-Based Comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a Standard Isokinetic Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, K. J.; English, K. L.; Redd, E.; DeWitt, J. K.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: 1) To compare the test-to-test reliability of Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) with a standard laboratory isokinetic dynamometer (ISOK DYN) and; 2) to determine if measures of peak torque and total work differ between devices. METHODS: Ten subjects (6M, 4F) completed two trials on both MARES and an ISOK DYN in a counterbalanced order. Peak torque values at 60 deg & 180 deg / s were obtained from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF). Total work at 180 deg / s was determined from the area under the torque vs. displacement curve during twenty maximal repetitions of KE and KF. Reliability of measures within devices was interpreted from the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and compared between devices using the ratio of the within-device standard deviations. Indicators of agreement for the two devices were evaluated from: 1) a calculation of concordance (rho) and; 2) the correlation between the mean of measures versus the delta difference between measures (m u vs delta). RESULTS: For all outcome measures ICCs were high for both the ISOK DYN (0.95-0.99) and MARES (0.90-0.99). However, ratios of the within-device standard deviation were 1.3 to 4.3 times higher on MARES. On average, a wide range (3.3 to 1054 Nm) of differences existed between the values obtained. Only KE peak torque measured at 60 deg & 180 deg / s showed similarities between devices (rho = 0.91 & 0.87; Pearson's r for m u vs delta = -0.22 & -0.37, respectively). CONCLUSION: Although MARES was designed for use in microgravity it was quite reliable during ground-based testing. However, MARES was consistently more variable than an ISOK DYN. Future longitudinal studies evaluating a change in isokinetic peak torque or total work should be limited within one device.

  11. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  12. A preliminary comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT-1 HRV multispectral data for estimating coniferous forest volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.; Wang, S.; Isaacson, Dennis L.; Paine, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Digital Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Satellite Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) High Resolution Visible (HRV) images of coniferous forest canopies were compared in their relationship to forest wood volume using correlation and regression analyses. Significant inverse relationships were found between softwood volume and the spectral bands from both sensors (P less than 0.01). The highest correlations were between the log of softwood volume and the near-infrared bands (HRV band 3, r = -0.89; TM band 4, r = -0.83).

  13. A Comparison of Accelerated and Non-accelerated MRI Scans for Brain Volume and Boundary Shift Integral Measures of Volume Change: Evidence from the ADNI Dataset.

    PubMed

    Manning, Emily N; Leung, Kelvin K; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Malone, Ian B; Cardoso, M Jorge; Schott, Jonathan M; Fox, Nick C; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-03-18

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of accelerated MRI scans in place of non-accelerated scans influenced brain volume and atrophy rate measures in controls and subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. We used data from 861 subjects at baseline, 573 subjects at 6 months and 384 subjects at 12 months from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We calculated whole-brain, ventricular and hippocampal atrophy rates using the k-means boundary shift integral (BSI). Scan quality was visually assessed and the proportion of good quality accelerated and non-accelerated scans compared. We also compared MMSE scores, vascular burden and age between subjects with poor quality scans with those with good quality scans. Finally, we estimated sample size requirements for a hypothetical clinical trial when using atrophy rates from accelerated scans and non-accelerated scans. No significant differences in whole-brain, ventricular and hippocampal volumes and atrophy rates were found between accelerated and non-accelerated scans. Twice as many non-accelerated scan pairs suffered from at least some motion artefacts compared with accelerated scan pairs (p ≤ 0.001), which may influence the BSI. Subjects whose accelerated scans had significant motion had a higher mean vascular burden and age (p ≤ 0.05) whilst subjects whose non-accelerated scans had significant motion had poorer MMSE scores (p ≤ 0.05). No difference in estimated sample size requirements was found when using accelerated vs. non-accelerated scans. Accelerated scans reduce scan time and are better tolerated. Therefore it may be advantageous to use accelerated over non-accelerated scans in clinical trials that use ADNI-type protocols, especially in more cognitively impaired subjects.

  14. Four weeks of speed endurance training reduces energy expenditure during exercise and maintains muscle oxidative capacity despite a reduction in training volume.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Hellsten, Ylva; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Fernström, Maria; Sahlin, Kent; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of an alteration from regular endurance to speed endurance training on muscle oxidative capacity, capillarization, as well as energy expenditure during submaximal exercise and its relationship to mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in humans. Seventeen endurance-trained runners were assigned to either a speed endurance training (SET; n = 9) or a control (Con; n = 8) group. For a 4-wk intervention (IT) period, SET replaced the ordinary training ( approximately 45 km/wk) with frequent high-intensity sessions each consisting of 8-12 30-s sprint runs separated by 3 min of rest (5.7 +/- 0.1 km/wk) with additional 9.9 +/- 0.3 km/wk at low running speed, whereas Con continued the endurance training. After the IT period, oxygen uptake was 6.6, 7.6, 5.7, and 6.4% lower (P < 0.05) at running speeds of 11, 13, 14.5, and 16 km/h, respectively, in SET, whereas remained the same in Con. No changes in blood lactate during submaximal running were observed. After the IT period, the protein expression of skeletal muscle UCP3 tended to be higher in SET (34 +/- 6 vs. 47 +/- 7 arbitrary units; P = 0.06). Activity of muscle citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, as well as maximal oxygen uptake and 10-km performance time, remained unaltered in both groups. In SET, the capillary-to-fiber ratio was the same before and after the IT period. The present study showed that speed endurance training reduces energy expenditure during submaximal exercise, which is not mediated by lowered mitochondrial UCP3 expression. Furthermore, speed endurance training can maintain muscle oxidative capacity, capillarization, and endurance performance in already trained individuals despite significant reduction in the amount of training.

  15. Comparison of myoplasmic calcium movements during excitation-contraction coupling in frog twitch and mouse fast-twitch muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Stephen; Baylor, Stephen M

    2013-05-01

    Single twitch fibers from frog leg muscles were isolated by dissection and micro-injected with furaptra, a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. Indicator resting fluorescence (FR) and the change evoked by an action potential (ΔF) were measured at long sarcomere length (16°C); ΔF/FR was scaled to units of ΔfCaD, the change in fraction of the indicator in the Ca(2+)-bound form. ΔfCaD was simulated with a multicompartment model of the underlying myoplasmic Ca(2+) movements, and the results were compared with previous measurements and analyses in mouse fast-twitch fibers. In frog fibers, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release evoked by an action potential appears to be the sum of two components. The time course of the first component is similar to that of the entire Ca(2+) release waveform in mouse fibers, whereas that of the second component is severalfold slower; the fractional release amounts are ~0.8 (first component) and ~0.2 (second component). Similar results were obtained in frog simulations with a modified model that permitted competition between Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for occupancy of the regulatory sites on troponin. An anatomical basis for two release components in frog fibers is the presence of both junctional and parajunctional SR Ca(2+) release channels (ryanodine receptors [RyRs]), whereas mouse fibers (usually) have only junctional RyRs. Also, frog fibers have two RyR isoforms, RyRα and RyRβ, whereas the mouse fibers (usually) have only one, RyR1. Our simulations suggest that the second release component in frog fibers functions to supply extra Ca(2+) to activate troponin, which, in mouse fibers, is not needed because of the more favorable location of their triadic junctions (near the middle of the thin filament). We speculate that, in general, parajunctional RyRs permit increased myofilament activation in fibers whose triadic junctions are located at the z-line.

  16. Comparison of myoplasmic calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in frog twitch and mouse fast-twitch muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Single twitch fibers from frog leg muscles were isolated by dissection and micro-injected with furaptra, a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. Indicator resting fluorescence (FR) and the change evoked by an action potential (ΔF) were measured at long sarcomere length (16°C); ΔF/FR was scaled to units of ΔfCaD, the change in fraction of the indicator in the Ca2+-bound form. ΔfCaD was simulated with a multicompartment model of the underlying myoplasmic Ca2+ movements, and the results were compared with previous measurements and analyses in mouse fast-twitch fibers. In frog fibers, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release evoked by an action potential appears to be the sum of two components. The time course of the first component is similar to that of the entire Ca2+ release waveform in mouse fibers, whereas that of the second component is severalfold slower; the fractional release amounts are ∼0.8 (first component) and ∼0.2 (second component). Similar results were obtained in frog simulations with a modified model that permitted competition between Mg2+ and Ca2+ for occupancy of the regulatory sites on troponin. An anatomical basis for two release components in frog fibers is the presence of both junctional and parajunctional SR Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors [RyRs]), whereas mouse fibers (usually) have only junctional RyRs. Also, frog fibers have two RyR isoforms, RyRα and RyRβ, whereas the mouse fibers (usually) have only one, RyR1. Our simulations suggest that the second release component in frog fibers functions to supply extra Ca2+ to activate troponin, which, in mouse fibers, is not needed because of the more favorable location of their triadic junctions (near the middle of the thin filament). We speculate that, in general, parajunctional RyRs permit increased myofilament activation in fibers whose triadic junctions are located at the z-line. PMID:23630340

  17. Morphological comparison of five species of poison dart frogs of the genus Ranitomeya (Anura: Dendrobatidae) including the skeleton, the muscle system and inner organs.

    PubMed

    Krings, Markus; Klein, Benjamin; Heneka, Markus J; Rödder, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of larvae stages of most amphibians are often completely different than in adults. Tadpole descriptions have historically been based on external characters like morphometrics, color pattern and oral disc structure. Other papers described anatomical details by the use of dissections. The increase in micro-CT scanning technology provides an opportunity to quantify and describe in detail internal characters like skeleton, musculature and organs. To date, no such tadpole descriptions exist for the well-studied Neotropical poison dart frog genus Ranitomeya (Anura: Dendrobatidae). Here we provide descriptions of the internal skeletal, musculature and organ structures of five Ranitomeya species and then provide morphological comparisons. Contrary to previous observations, closely related species display several morphological differences. For example, we observed considerable variation in chondrocranial characters, the extent of cranial ossifications, the appearance of some cranial muscles and the arrangement of inner organs. Further studies on the tadpole morphology of more species of Ranitomeya and other dendrobatid genera are needed to enable us to understand the complete morphological variation in this group.

  18. Morphological comparison of five species of poison dart frogs of the genus Ranitomeya (Anura: Dendrobatidae) including the skeleton, the muscle system and inner organs

    PubMed Central

    Krings, Markus; Klein, Benjamin; Heneka, Markus J.

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of larvae stages of most amphibians are often completely different than in adults. Tadpole descriptions have historically been based on external characters like morphometrics, color pattern and oral disc structure. Other papers described anatomical details by the use of dissections. The increase in micro-CT scanning technology provides an opportunity to quantify and describe in detail internal characters like skeleton, musculature and organs. To date, no such tadpole descriptions exist for the well-studied Neotropical poison dart frog genus Ranitomeya (Anura: Dendrobatidae). Here we provide descriptions of the internal skeletal, musculature and organ structures of five Ranitomeya species and then provide morphological comparisons. Contrary to previous observations, closely related species display several morphological differences. For example, we observed considerable variation in chondrocranial characters, the extent of cranial ossifications, the appearance of some cranial muscles and the arrangement of inner organs. Further studies on the tadpole morphology of more species of Ranitomeya and other dendrobatid genera are needed to enable us to understand the complete morphological variation in this group. PMID:28235032

  19. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject and seven patients with different types of unilateral degenerative facial nerve lesions. Results The US results were correlated to the duration of palsy and the electromyography results. Consistent 3D US based volumetry through bilateral comparison was feasible for parts of the frontalis muscle, orbicularis oculi muscle, depressor anguli oris muscle, depressor labii inferioris muscle, and mentalis muscle. With the exception of the frontal muscle, the facial muscles volumes were much smaller on the palsy side (minimum: 3% for the depressor labii inferior muscle) than on the healthy side in patients with severe facial nerve lesion. In contrast, the frontal muscles did not show a side difference. In the two patients with defective healing after spontaneous regeneration a decrease in muscle volume was not seen. Synkinesis and hyperkinesis was even more correlated to muscle hypertrophy on the palsy compared with the healthy side. Conclusion 3D ultrasonography seems to be a promising tool for regional and quantitative evaluation of facial muscles in patients with facial palsy receiving a facial reconstructive surgery or conservative treatment. PMID:24782657

  20. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 1, Third comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive wastes in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This volume contains an overview of WIPP performance assessment and a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B).

  1. Validation of a semi-classical signal analysis method for stroke volume variation assessment: a comparison with the PiCCO technique.

    PubMed

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Médigue, Claire; Papelier, Yves; Cottin, François; Van de Louw, Andry

    2010-12-01

    This study proposes a Semi-Classical Signal Analysis (SCSA) method for stroke volume (SV) variations assessment from arterial blood pressure measurements. One of the SCSA parameters, the first systolic invariant (INVS₁), has been shown to be linearly related to SV. To technically validate this approach, the comparison between INVS₁ and SV measured with the currently used PiCCO technique was performed during a 15-min recording in 20 mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care. A strong correlation was estimated by linear regression and cross-correlation analysis (mean coefficient = 0.90 ± 0.01 SEM at the two tests).

  2. Comparison of locoregional versus extended locoregional radiation volumes for patients with non-metastatic gastro-esophageal junction carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Milton, Denái R.; He, Liru; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Crane, Christopher H.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Thall, Peter F.; Lin, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To delineate an optimal clinical target volume (CTV) for gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers by comparing locoregional vs. extended locoregional radiation volumes. Materials This retrospective analysis examined 222 patients (111 matched pairs treated with locoregional vs. extended locoregional radiation) with non-metastatic GEJ carcinomas treated with concurrent chemoradiation +/- surgery. The CTV for locoregional volumes was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV) + elective coverage of first-echelon nodes and sometimes the celiac axis. The CTV for extended locoregional volumes was defined as GTV + elective coverage of celiac and splenic (+/- porta) nodes. Variables used for matching included gender, stage, performance status, histology, receipt of induction chemotherapy, type of concurrent chemotherapy, radiation modality, receipt of surgery, type of surgery, and Siewert classification. Regression models stratified by matched pairs were fit to estimate effect of radiation volume on clinical endpoints. Results Adjusting p-values for multiple testing, patients treated with extended locoregional vs. locoregional radiation had increased odds of grade 2+ acute chemoradiation-associated GI toxicity (OR 2.92, adj. p=0.0447). However, differing radiation volumes were not significantly associated with postoperative complication rates, pathologic T-stage, frequency of positive perigastric/regional nodes on surgical specimen, distant-metastases progression free survival, locoregional progression free survival, or overall survival (adj. p>0.05). Of the patients who did (N=124) and did not (N=72) receive elective celiac radiation, 2 (1.6%) and 2 (2.8%) patients, respectively, relapsed in the celiac nodes. No patients failed in the splenic or porta nodes. Conclusions Most GEJ cancers can be safely treated without elective inclusion of splenic/porta nodes. PMID:25695222

  3. Estimating time series phytoplankton carbon biomass: Inter-lab comparison of species identification and comparison of volume-to-carbon scaling ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Carstensen, Jacob; Harrison, Paul J.; Zingone, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    An inter-calibration exercise was conducted to assess the performance of six phytoplankton taxonomists working within the Danish National Aquatic Monitoring and Assessment Program (DNAMAP). For species abundance and cell volume, a 2-fold difference was found among different estimates for subsamples from the same sample, which in turn cascaded into large differences in the species-specific carbon biomass contribution. The mean total carbon biomass estimated showed high variability (CV 43%) among the six taxonomists, but large variations were present within results produced by individual taxonomists (CV 8-50%), and one of the taxonomists produced significantly lower estimates than the others. Using data from phytoplankton time series samples, we also assessed the effect using a table of species-specific cell volumes versus cell volume measurements from a sample on carbon biomass values. For an example, the older cell-volume-to-carbon conversion method with fixed carbon-conversion constants was compared to the more recent approach of scaling biovolume to carbon biomass based on established regressions. We found that the regression between community biomass estimated by the old method versus the more recent equation yielded a slope close to 1, thus indicating general similar community biomass estimated between the methods. Type II regression suggested a high degree of variability in the estimates (17%). The highest degree of uncertainty was found by type II linear regression, when we compared the community biomass of diatoms estimated by cell sizes measured by sample to diatom community biomass estimated from cell sizes from a table of fixed cell sizes. In this analysis variation among methods for carbon estimation of individual samples was as high as 114%. Therefore, we recommend that, particularly for diatoms, cell volumes should be determined from the sample, or that table values be based on monthly estimates for at least the dominant diatom species for each study

  4. Comparison of (31)P saturation and inversion magnetization transfer in human liver and skeletal muscle using a clinical MR system and surface coils.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2015-02-01

    (31)P MRS magnetization transfer ((31)P-MT) experiments allow the estimation of exchange rates of biochemical reactions, such as the creatine kinase equilibrium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Although various (31)P-MT methods have been successfully used on isolated organs or animals, their application on humans in clinical scanners poses specific challenges. This study compared two major (31)P-MT methods on a clinical MR system using heteronuclear surface coils. Although saturation transfer (ST) is the most commonly used (31)P-MT method, sequences such as inversion transfer (IT) with short pulses might be better suited for the specific hardware and software limitations of a clinical scanner. In addition, small NMR-undetectable metabolite pools can transfer MT to NMR-visible pools during long saturation pulses, which is prevented with short pulses. (31)P-MT sequences were adapted for limited pulse length, for heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils with inhomogeneous B1 , for the need for volume selection and for the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a clinical 3-T MR system. The ST and IT sequences were applied to skeletal muscle and liver in 10 healthy volunteers. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the behavior of the IT measurements with increasing imperfections. In skeletal muscle of the thigh, ATP synthesis resulted in forward reaction constants (k) of 0.074 ± 0.022 s(-1) (ST) and 0.137 ± 0.042 s(-1) (IT), whereas the creatine kinase reaction yielded 0.459 ± 0.089 s(-1) (IT). In the liver, ATP synthesis resulted in k = 0.267 ± 0.106 s(-1) (ST), whereas the IT experiment yielded no consistent results. ST results were close to literature values; however, the IT results were either much larger than the corresponding ST values and/or were widely scattered. To summarize, ST and IT experiments can both be implemented on a clinical body scanner with heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils; however, ST results are

  5. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  6. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (P<0.05). Mean IPP was significantly greater in obstructed patients (P<0.001). Area under ROC curve was 0.700 for PV and 0.821 for IPP. Prostate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  7. Comparison of bone volume and strength as measures of skeletal integrity in caged laying hens with access to perches.

    PubMed

    Hughes, B O; Wilson, S; Appleby, M C; Smith, S F

    1993-03-01

    Fractures in spent laying hens are now recognised as a major welfare problem; the objective of this work was to determine whether provision of perches for caged layers would increase bone strength, bone volume or both. Sixteen ISA Brown hens were housed from 18 to 72 weeks old in cages with perches and 16 in similar cages without perches. At the end of lay the birds' tibiotarsi were examined for strength by a three-point loading test and their tarsometatarsi for bone volume by histomorphometry. There was no significant effect of perches on tibiotarsal breaking strength. Hens from both groups showed evidence of osteoporosis, but it was more severe in the birds from conventional cages: tarsometatarsal trabecular bone volume was greater in the hens which had access to perches. A positive correlation was found between trabecular bone volume and the degree of day-time perch usage by individual hens. Provision of perches can have a slight but significant beneficial effect, at least for the leg bones, in increasing the bone volume of caged laying hens.

  8. Comparison of different methods of cell lysis and protein measurements in Clostridium perfringens: application to the cell volume determination.

    PubMed

    Guerlava, P; Izac, V; Tholozan, J L

    1998-03-01

    Four cell lysis methods (NaOH-SDS solubilization, French press treatment, sonication, mutanolysin treatment) and three methods of protein assays (Lowry, Bradford, Pierce) were studied for their applicability to determination of cell volume in Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798 cell suspensions. Protein contents were higher after a mechanical disruption of the cells than with the other techniques of lysis. The lowest concentrations of protein were obtained with the Bradford procedure. With each of the three protein assay methods, Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798 protein cell contents were 45% to 58% of protein. Other factors possibly involved in variations of the intracellular volume measurements were examined. A control of the level of protein concentration in the test sample and the type of silicone oil used for the centrifugation were of prime importance during sample preparation. Under our conditions, an intracellular volume of 4 microl/(mg of protein) was routinely found for Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798.

  9. Comparison of Mammographic Density Assessed as Volumes and Areas among Women Undergoing Diagnostic Image-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gierach, Gretchen L.; Geller, Berta M.; Shepherd, John A.; Patel, Deesha A.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Weaver, Donald L.; Chicoine, Rachael E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fan, Bo; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Wang, Jeff; Johnson, Jason M.; Herschorn, Sally D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD), the area of non-fatty appearing tissue divided by total breast area, is a strong breast cancer risk factor. Most MD analyses have employed visual categorizations or computer-assisted quantification, which ignore breast thickness. We explored MD volume and area, using a volumetric approach previously validated as predictive of breast cancer risk, in relation to risk factors among women undergoing breast biopsy. Methods Among 413 primarily white women, ages 40–65, undergoing diagnostic breast biopsies between 2007–2010 at an academic facility in Vermont, MD volume (cm3) was quantified in cranio-caudal views of the breast contralateral to the biopsy target using a density phantom, while MD area (cm2) was measured on the same digital mammograms using thresholding software. Risk factor associations with continuous MD measurements were evaluated using linear regression. Results Percent MD volume and area were correlated (r=0.81) and strongly and inversely associated with age, body mass index (BMI), and menopause. Both measures were inversely associated with smoking and positively associated with breast biopsy history. Absolute MD measures were correlated (r=0.46) and inversely related to age and menopause. Whereas absolute dense area was inversely associated with BMI, absolute dense volume was positively associated. Conclusions Volume and area MD measures exhibit some overlap in risk factor associations, but divergence as well, particularly for BMI. Impact Findings suggest that volume and area density measures differ in subsets of women; notably, among obese women, absolute density was higher with volumetric methods, suggesting that breast cancer risk assessments may vary for these techniques. PMID:25139935

  10. Reduced volume but increased training intensity elevates muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and NHE1 expression as well as short-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Thomassen, Martin; Kolding, Helle; Gunnarsson, Thomas; Wendell, Jesper; Rostgaard, Thomas; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-03-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners after a change from endurance to sprint training. Fifteen runners were assigned to either a sprint training (ST, n = 8) or a control (CON, n = 7) group. ST replaced their normal training by 30-s sprint runs three to four times a week, whereas CON continued the endurance training (approximately 45 km/wk). After the 4-wk sprint period, the expression of the muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and Na+/H+-exchanger isoform 1 was 29 and 30% higher (P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, plasma K+ concentration was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running. In ST, performance in a 30-s sprint test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, and two supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7, 19, 27, and 19%, respectively, after the sprint training period, whereas pulmonary maximum oxygen uptake and 10-k time were unchanged. No changes in CON were observed. The present data suggest a role of the Na+-K+ pump in the control of K+ homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, performance during intense exercise can be improved and endurance performance maintained even with a reduction in training volume if the intensity of training is very high.

  11. Comparison of mean frequency and median frequency in evaluating muscle fiber type selection in varying gait speed across healthy young adult individuals.

    PubMed

    Chan, C K; Timothy, G Fu; Yeow, C H

    2016-08-01

    The preferential slow and fast twitches fiber involvement in varying gait speed has not been thoroughly investigated. Attempt to classify fiber type in changing speed should be closely investigated and scrutinized as the histochemical-related experiments are cumbersome and time consuming. In addressing this issue, electromyography (EMG) is utilized to extract the muscle fiber type features by altering the muscle fatigue indices, namely mean frequency (MNF) and median frequency (MDF). Recently, there are no universal indices to determine the muscle type. In this paper, the MNF and MDF are employed in discovering the muscle type variation as the speed changes. Besides drawing the potential of MNF and MDF in unveiling the muscle type, both the parameters are applied to investigate the muscles that are recruited and which muscle type are involved as the gait velocity changes. In this study, six healthy and young participants are recruited, whereby the EMG sensors are placed on twelve lower extremity muscles. The EMG signals are then processed via Matlab software to deduce MNF and MDF. The MNF and MDF are determined from every of the phase gait, namely stance and swing. From the results obtained, it reveals that the superiority of the MNF over the MDF in determining and interpreting the muscle recruitment in both gait phases as the speed increases. The MNF, moreover, is able to show an apparent difference in muscle type selection compared to MDF. Interestingly, it is discovered that as the speed increases from slow to fast, the MNF decreases, which indicates that more muscle fiber type I is recruited. Contrarily, the MNF increases as the speed intensity decreases, which indicates that the distribution of muscle type II is prominent.

  12. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  13. Comparison of changes in the contraction of the lateral abdominal muscles between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and breathe held at the maximum expiratory level.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryohei; Watanabe, Susumu

    2012-10-01

    The abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) is commonly used as a fundamental component of lumbar stabilization training programs. One potential limitation of lumbar stabilization programs is that it can be difficult and time consuming to train people to perform the ADIM. The transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles are the most powerful muscles involved in expiration. However, little is known about the differences in the recruitment of the abdominal muscles between the ADIM and breathe held at maximum expiratory level (maximum expiration). The thickness of the TrA and IO muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging, and the activity of the EO muscle was measured by electromyography (EMG) in 33 healthy male performing the ADIM and maximum expiration. Maximum expiration produced a significant increase in the thickness of the TrA and IO muscles compared to the ADIM (p < 0.001). The EMG activity of the EO muscle was significantly higher during maximum expiration than during the ADIM (p < 0.001). The intensity of the EMG activity of the EO muscle was approximately 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction during maximum expiration. Thus, maximum expiration may be an effective method for training of co-activation of the lateral abdominal muscles.

  14. A Comparison of Surgical Invasions for Spinal Nerve Ligation with or without Paraspinal Muscle Removal in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats is one of the most popular models for studying neuropathic pain because of its high reproducibility. During the surgery, a part of the L5 paraspinal muscle is usually removed, which produces extra trauma and may potentially affect the physiological processes involved in neuropathic pain. To reduce the surgical trauma, the paraspinal muscle retraction was developed for exposure of the spinal nerve. The current study was aimed at comparing the surgical invasions between the L5 SNL models with paraspinal muscle removal or retraction. The results showed that both methods induced similar neuropathic pain behavior. However, the paraspinal muscle retraction group exhibited an average of 2.7 mg less blood loss than the muscle removal group. This group also showed a significantly lower increase in serum myoglobin and creatine phosphokinase levels on postoperative days 1 and 2, as well as a lower increase in interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels on postoperative day 1. The paraspinal muscle maintained normal morphological features following paraspinal muscle retraction. Our results indicate that the SNL rat model with paraspinal muscle retraction is a reliable physiological model that is reproducible, readily available, and less invasive than the model with muscle removal. PMID:27597970

  15. CT Pulmonary Angiography at Reduced Radiation Exposure and Contrast Material Volume Using Iterative Model Reconstruction and iDose4 Technique in Comparison to FBP

    PubMed Central

    Laqmani, Azien; Kurfürst, Maximillian; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess image quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) at reduced radiation exposure (RD-CTPA) and contrast medium (CM) volume using two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms (iDose4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in comparison to filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods 52 patients (body weight < 100 kg, mean BMI: 23.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent RD-CTPA (tube voltage: 80 kV; mean CTDIvol: 1.9 mGy) using 40 ml CM. Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR algorithms (iDose4 and IMR). Subjective and objective image quality and conspicuity of PE were assessed in central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Results Noise reduction of 55% was achieved with iDose4 and of 85% with IMR compared to FBP. Contrast-to-noise ratio significantly increased with iDose4 and IMR compared to FBP (p<0.05). Subjective image quality was rated significantly higher at IMR reconstructions in comparison to iDose4 and FBP. Conspicuity of central and segmental PE significantly improved with the use of IMR. In subsegmental arteries, iDose4 was superior to IMR. Conclusions CTPA at reduced radiation exposure and contrast medium volume is feasible with the use of IMR, which provides improved image quality and conspicuity of pulmonary embolism in central and segmental arteries. PMID:27611448

  16. Comparison and evaluation of mouse cardiac MRI acquired with open birdcage, single loop surface and volume birdcage coils.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobing; Markiewicz, Erica J; Zamora, Marta; Karczmar, Gregory S; Roman, Brian B

    2006-12-21

    Although the quality and speed of MR images have vastly improved with the development of novel RF coil technologies, the engineering expertise required to implement them is often not available in many animal in vivo MR laboratories. We present here an open birdcage coil design which is easily constructed with basic RF coil expertise and produces high quality images. The quality and advantages of mouse cardiac MR images acquired with open birdcage coils were evaluated and compared to images acquired with a bent single loop surface, and standard birdcage coils acquired at 4.7 Tesla. Two low pass open birdcage coils, two single loop surface coils, and a low pass volume birdcage coil were constructed and their B(1) distributions were evaluated and compared. The calculated average signal-to-noise ratio for the left ventricular wall was 10, 23 and 32 for the volume birdcage coil, single loop surface coil and open birdcage coil, respectively. The results demonstrate that the open birdcage coil provides greater sensitivity than the volume coil and a higher signal/contrast-to-noise ratio and B(1) homogeneity than the single loop surface coil. The open birdcage coil offers easy access and better quality mouse cardiac imaging than both the single loop surface coil and volume birdcage coil and does not require extensive RF engineering expertise to construct.

  17. NOTE: Comparison and evaluation of mouse cardiac MRI acquired with open birdcage, single loop surface and volume birdcage coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobing; Markiewicz, Erica J.; Zamora, Marta; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Roman, Brian B.

    2006-12-01

    Although the quality and speed of MR images have vastly improved with the development of novel RF coil technologies, the engineering expertise required to implement them is often not available in many animal in vivo MR laboratories. We present here an open birdcage coil design which is easily constructed with basic RF coil expertise and produces high quality images. The quality and advantages of mouse cardiac MR images acquired with open birdcage coils were evaluated and compared to images acquired with a bent single loop surface, and standard birdcage coils acquired at 4.7 Tesla. Two low pass open birdcage coils, two single loop surface coils, and a low pass volume birdcage coil were constructed and their B1 distributions were evaluated and compared. The calculated average signal-to-noise ratio for the left ventricular wall was 10, 23 and 32 for the volume birdcage coil, single loop surface coil and open birdcage coil, respectively. The results demonstrate that the open birdcage coil provides greater sensitivity than the volume coil and a higher signal/contrast-to-noise ratio and B1 homogeneity than the single loop surface coil. The open birdcage coil offers easy access and better quality mouse cardiac imaging than both the single loop surface coil and volume birdcage coil and does not require extensive RF engineering expertise to construct.

  18. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  19. Skeletal muscle adaptations and muscle genomics of performance horses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, José-Luis L; Hill, Emmeline W

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscles in horses are characterised by specific adaptations, which are the result of the natural evolution of the horse as a grazing animal, centuries of selective breeding and the adaptability of this tissue in response to training. These adaptations include an increased muscle mass relative to body weight, a great locomotor efficiency based upon an admirable muscle-tendon architectural design and an adaptable fibre-type composition with intrinsic shortening velocities greater than would be predicted from an animal of comparable body size. Furthermore, equine skeletal muscles have a high mitochondrial volume that permits a higher whole animal aerobic capacity, as well as large intramuscular stores of energy substrates (glycogen in particular). Finally, high buffer and lactate transport capacities preserve muscles against fatigue during anaerobic exercise. Many of these adaptations can improve with training. The publication of the equine genome sequence in 2009 has provided a major advance towards an improved understanding of equine muscle physiology. Equine muscle genomics studies have revealed a number of genes associated with elite physical performance and have also identified changes in structural and metabolic genes following exercise and training. Genes involved in muscle growth, muscle contraction and specific metabolic pathways have been found to be functionally relevant for the early performance evaluation of elite athletic horses. The candidate genes discussed in this review are important for a healthy individual to improve performance. However, muscle performance limiting conditions are widespread in horses and many of these conditions are also genetically influenced.

  20. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness.

  1. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  2. Comparison of the puborectal muscle on MRI in women with POP and levator ani defects with those with normal support and no defect

    PubMed Central

    DeLancey, John O. L.; Sørensen, Helle Christina; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The objective of this study was to compare puborectal muscle integrity and bulk in women with both major levator ani (LA) defects on MRI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) to women with normal LA muscle and normal support. Methods This is a case-control study comparing 24 cases with known major LA defects and POP to 24 controls with normal LA and normal support. Axial T-2 weighted MRI scans of the pelvis were evaluated for integrity of the puborectal muscle and degree of muscle bulk. Results There were no significant group differences in age, body mass index, vaginal deliveries, or hysterectomy status. In all 48 subjects, the puborectal muscle was visible and had no disruption noted. There was no difference in muscle bulk between groups (control/case, thin 42% vs. 25%, average 42% vs. 38%, thick-17% vs. 38%; P=0.47). Conclusions Defects and loss of muscle bulk in the puborectal muscle are not seen on MRI in women with major LA defects and POP. PMID:21822711

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-1 and myostatin mRNA expression in muscle: comparison between 62-77 and 21-31 yr old men.

    PubMed

    Welle, Stephen; Bhatt, Kirti; Shah, Bharati; Thornton, Charles

    2002-06-01

    The present study was done to determine the effect of age on muscle concentrations of mRNAs encoding two growth factors that are thought to be important regulators of muscle mass: insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and myostatin. Quantitative RT-PCR assays indicated that the mean IGF-1 mRNA concentration in older muscle (62-77 yr, n=15 men) was approximately 25% less, per ng total RNA (P<0.005), than in young adult muscle (21-31 yr, n=12 men). One third of the older men had IGF-1 mRNA levels below the lowest concentration observed in young muscle. Myostatin mRNA concentrations were similar in young and old muscle. Muscle mass and myofibrillar protein synthesis rates among eight older men did not correlate with either IGF-1 or myostatin mRNA levels. We conclude that IGF-1 gene expression in muscle tends to decline with normal aging. The functional significance is uncertain.

  4. Statistical Issues in the Comparison of Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Algorithms using Pulmonary Nodule Volume as an Example

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs) are being used increasingly in medicine to diagnose and monitor patients’ disease. The computer algorithms that measure QIBs have different technical performance characteristics. In this paper we illustrate the appropriate statistical methods for assessing and comparing the bias, precision, and agreement of computer algorithms. We use data from three studies of pulmonary nodules. The first study is a small phantom study used to illustrate metrics for assessing repeatability. The second study is a large phantom study allowing assessment of four algorithms’ bias and reproducibility for measuring tumor volume and the change in tumor volume. The third study is a small clinical study of patients whose tumors were measured on two occasions. This study allows a direct assessment of six algorithms’ performance for measuring tumor change. With these three examples we compare and contrast study designs and performance metrics, and we illustrate the advantages and limitations of various common statistical methods for QIB studies. PMID:24919828

  5. Statistical issues in the comparison of quantitative imaging biomarker algorithms using pulmonary nodule volume as an example.

    PubMed

    Obuchowski, Nancy A; Barnhart, Huiman X; Buckler, Andrew J; Pennello, Gene; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Kim, Hyun J Grace; Reeves, Anthony P

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers are being used increasingly in medicine to diagnose and monitor patients' disease. The computer algorithms that measure quantitative imaging biomarkers have different technical performance characteristics. In this paper we illustrate the appropriate statistical methods for assessing and comparing the bias, precision, and agreement of computer algorithms. We use data from three studies of pulmonary nodules. The first study is a small phantom study used to illustrate metrics for assessing repeatability. The second study is a large phantom study allowing assessment of four algorithms' bias and reproducibility for measuring tumor volume and the change in tumor volume. The third study is a small clinical study of patients whose tumors were measured on two occasions. This study allows a direct assessment of six algorithms' performance for measuring tumor change. With these three examples we compare and contrast study designs and performance metrics, and we illustrate the advantages and limitations of various common statistical methods for quantitative imaging biomarker studies.

  6. A comparison of organs at risk doses in GYN intracavitary brachytherapy for different tandem lengths and bladder volumes.

    PubMed

    Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Jaberi, Ramin; ZareAkha, Naser; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamid Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Sedaghat, Mahbod

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent effects of tandem length and bladder volume on dose to pelvic organs at risk (OARs) in HDR intracavitary brachytherapy treatment of cervical cancer. Twenty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were selected for brachytherapy using Rotterdam applicators. The patients were CT scanned twice with empty and full bladder. Two treatment plans were prepared on each of the image sets. Patients were categorized into two groups; those treated with a tandem length of 4 cm or smaller (T ≤ 4 cm) and those with tandem length larger than 4 cm (T > 4 cm). Only one tandem tip angle of 30° was studied. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of OARs were calculated and compared. Bladder dose was significantly affected by both bladder volume and tandem physical length for T ≤ 4 cm. This was reflected on the values obtained for D2cm³, D1cm³, and D0.1cm³ for both empty and full bladder cases. When T > 4 cm, no correlation could be established between variations in bladder dose and blad-der volume. Rectum dose was generally lower when the bladder was empty and T > 4 cm. Dose to sigmoid was increased when T > 4 cm; this increase was larger when the bladder was full. Our results suggest that, for tandems longer than 4 cm, keeping the bladder empty may reduce the dose to rectum and sigmoid. This is contrary to cases where a shorter than 4 cm tandem is used in which a full bladder (about 50-120 cm³) tends to result in a lower dose to rectum and sigmoid. Attention should be given to doses to sigmoid with long tandem lengths, as a larger tandem generally results in a larger dose to sigmoid.

  7. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Kato, Takahiro; Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

  8. Comparison between staggered grid finite-volume and edge-based finite-element modelling of geophysical electromagnetic data on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahandari, Hormoz; Ansari, SeyedMasoud; Farquharson, Colin G.

    2017-03-01

    This study compares two finite-element (FE) and three finite-volume (FV) schemes which use unstructured tetrahedral grids for the modelling of electromagnetic (EM) data. All these schemes belong to a group of differential methods where the electric field is defined along the edges of the elements. The FE and FV schemes are based on both the EM-field and the potential formulations of Maxwell's equations. The EM-field FE scheme uses edge-based (vector) basis functions while the potential FE scheme uses vector and scalar basis functions. All the FV schemes use staggered tetrahedral-Voronoï grids. Three examples are used for comparisons in terms of accuracy and in terms of the computation resources required by generic iterative and direct solvers for solving the problems. Two of these examples represent survey scenarios with electric and magnetic sources and the results are compared with those from the literature while the third example is a comparison against analytical solutions for an electric dipole source. Exactly the same mesh is used for all examples to allow for direct comparison of the various schemes. The results show that while the FE and FV schemes are comparable in terms of accuracy and computation resources, the FE schemes are slightly more accurate but also more expensive than the FV schemes.

  9. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  10. Comparison of two flow-based imaging methods to measure individual red blood cell area and volume.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Domenico; Caserta, Sergio; Cesarelli, Mario; Guido, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    The red blood cells (RBCs) population is characterized by a high heterogeneity in membrane area, cellular volume, and mechanical properties, mainly due to the variety of mechanical and chemical stresses that a red cell undergoes in its entire life span. Here, we provide the first simultaneous area and volume measurements of RBCs flowing in microcapillaries, by using high-speed video microscopy imaging and quantitative data processing based on image analysis techniques. Both confined and unbounded flow conditions (depending on the relative size of RBCs and microcapillary diameter) are investigated. The results are compared with micropipette experiments from the literature and data from Coulter counter routine clinical blood tests. Good agreement is found for RBC volume, especially in the case of confined flow conditions. Surface area measurements, which are lacking in the routine clinical test, are of special interest being a potential diagnostic parameter of altered cell deformability and aggregability. Overall, our results provide a novel flow methodology suitable for high-throughput measurements of RBC geometrical parameters, allowing one to overcome the limits of classical static methods, such as micropipette aspiration, which are not suitable for handling a large number of cells.

  11. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  12. Comparison of the lipid and apolipoprotein composition of skeletal muscle and peripheral lymph in control dogs and in dogs fed a high fat, high cholesterol, hypothyroid-inducing diet.

    PubMed

    Sloop, C H; Castle, C K; Lefevre, M; Wong, L

    1993-08-11

    Most studies of peripheral interstitial fluid lipoprotein composition have been made on interstitial fluid-derived from skin and connective tissue. We developed techniques which allowed simultaneous comparison of lymph (a model of interstitial fluid) from skeletal muscle and skin in control (C) and cholesterol-fed (CF) dogs. Lipoprotein fractions were separated by ultracentrifugation. Skeletal muscle interstitial fluid HDL concentrations were approximately twice those of skin. However, the concentration of VLDL-LDL particles was similar in both interstitial spaces. HDL particles from both microvascular beds showed evidence of extensive remodelling when compared to plasma HDL from the same animal. Relative to apo A-I, skeletal muscle HDL was enriched in free cholesterol and apo E (C and CF dogs) and apo A-IV (CF dogs). Skin-derived HDL was consistently enriched in free cholesterol, apo E and A-IV in both C and CF dogs. These studies indicate that similar remodeling of plasma HDL occurs in widely different tissues which together constitute approximately 70% of the total interstitial space. The relatively high concentration of plasma-derived and remodeled HDL within the interstitial space of skeletal muscle is consistent with that tissue's importance in reverse cholesterol transport.

  13. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 2: Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation for the orbital radar mapping mission of the planet Venus are discussed. Designs are recommended which best satisfy the science objectives of the Venus radar mapping concept. Attention is given to the interaction and integration of those specific mission-systems recommendations with one another, and the final proposed designs are presented. The feasibility, cost, and scheduling of these configurations are evaluated against assumptions of reasonable state-of-the-art growth and space funding expectations.

  14. Design, cost and performance comparisons of several solar thermal systems for process heat. Volume 4: Energy centralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannucci, J. J.; Hostetler, L. D.

    1981-03-01

    A large matrix of self-consistent piping systems for dishes, troughs, and central receivers are designed, costed, and analyzed for performance. The solar installations collect thermal energy at temperatures ranging from 2000 to 20000 F, at sizes of 3, 30, 300, and 1500 megawatts thermal. First order design differences and similaies are highlighted, with emphasis on the comparison of dish and trough piping. Dishes are found to inefficient piping networks due to the large length of piping required.

  15. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 3: Parametric studies and subsystem comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Parametric studies and subsystem comparisons for the orbital radar mapping mission to planet Venus are presented. Launch vehicle requirements and primary orbiter propulsion system requirements are evaluated. The systems parametric analysis indicated that orbit size and orientation interrelated with almost all of the principal spacecraft systems and influenced significantly the definition of orbit insertion propulsion requirements, weight in orbit capability, radar system design, and mapping strategy.

  16. SIM.M.FF-S7: Final report on SIM/ANDIMET supplementary comparison for volume of liquids at 100 mL and 100 μL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, S.; Maldonado, J. M.; Vega, M. C.; Santalla, E.; Sica, A.; Cantero, D.; Salazar, M.; Morales, A.; Solano, P.; Rodríguez, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    A SIM/ANDIMET comparison for liquid volume using two 100 mL pycnometers and two 100 μL piston pipettes was performed between January 2012 and October 2013. The National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Bolivia was the coordinating laboratory and the Mexican NMI provided technical assistance. The participating labs were IBMETRO (Bolivia), INM (Colombia), INEN (Ecuador), INDECOPI (Peru), LACOMET (Costa Rica), LATU (Uruguay), INTN (Paraguay), and CENAM (Mexico). Based on measurements made by CENAM at the beginning and end of the comparison, the transfer standards were stable during the comparison within 0.0001 mL for the 100 mL pycnometers and 0.03 μL for the 100 μL pipettes. For 100 mL, six of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.003 % and had standardized degrees of equivalence (EN) less than 1. Two participants (INEN and INM) had EN values greater than 1. For the 100 μL pipettes, the results were corrected for the influence of altitude and seven of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.3 %. Results from INEN and some from INM and IBMETRO had EN values greater than 1 for the 100 μL pipettes. Uncertainties recommended by Guideline DKD-R 8-1 for micropipettes were included. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  18. Seismic imaging of the Waltham Canyon fault, California: comparison of ray‐theoretical and Fresnel volume prestack depth migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Klaus; Ryberg, Trond; Fuis, Gary S.; Lüth, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Near‐vertical faults can be imaged using reflected refractions identified in controlled‐source seismic data. Often theses phases are observed on a few neighboring shot or receiver gathers, resulting in a low‐fold data set. Imaging can be carried out with Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in which migration noise is suppressed by constructive stacking of large amounts of multifold data. Fresnel volume migration can be used for low‐fold data without severe migration noise, as the smearing along isochrones is limited to the first Fresnel zone around the reflection point. We developed a modified Fresnel volume migration technique to enhance imaging of steep faults and to suppress noise and undesired coherent phases. The modifications include target‐oriented filters to separate reflected refractions from steep‐dipping faults and reflections with hyperbolic moveout. Undesired phases like multiple reflections, mode conversions, direct P and S waves, and surface waves are suppressed by these filters. As an alternative approach, we developed a new prestack line‐drawing migration method, which can be considered as a proxy to an infinite frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume migration. The line‐drawing migration is not considering waveform information but requires significantly shorter computational time. Target‐oriented filters were extended by dip filters in the line‐drawing migration method. The migration methods were tested with synthetic data and applied to real data from the Waltham Canyon fault, California. The two techniques are applied best in combination, to design filters and to generate complementary images of steep faults.

  19. Comparison of epicardial fat volume by computed tomography in black versus white patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Paul; Schindler, Andreas; Schoepf, U Joseph; Nance, John W; Tricarico, Francesco; Ebersberger, Ullrich; McQuiston, Andrew D; Meyer, Mathias; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Bamberg, Fabian; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2014-02-01

    Disparities in the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) between races may be influenced by differences in the thoracic adipose tissue. We compared computed tomography (CT)-derived volumes of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT), and pericoronary fat thickness (PFT) and correlations with CAD between black and white patients. This institutional review board-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included 372 age- and gender-matched black versus white patients (186 black, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men; 186 white, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men) who underwent CT for chest pain evaluation. EAT, MAT, and PFT were measured. The amount of coronary calcium was quantified as calcium score. CAD was defined as ≥50% coronary artery narrowing. EAT and MAT volumes were significantly lower in black than white patients (59 [twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth percentile 39 to 84] vs 97 [67 to 132] cm(3) and 44 [27 to 77] vs 87 [52 to 157] cm(3), for both p <0.001). Mean PFT in black patients was slightly lower than white patients (17.2 ± 3.2 vs 18.1 ± 3.4 mm, p <0.01). The relation between race and extent of adipose tissue remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Significant correlations were observed between EAT and MAT volumes and calcium score in black and white patients (r = 0.19 to 0.26, p <0.01). For both races, the level of thoracic fat measurements was higher in present versus absent coronary calcification. A greater amount of thoracic fat was found with obstructive CAD only in white patients. In conclusion, CT-derived measurements of thoracic fat differ between symptomatic black and white patients, suggesting a differential relation between thoracic adipose tissue and CAD pathophysiology by race.

  20. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, {>=}3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week <64 cm{sup 3} and V10 Gy/week <54 cm{sup 3}. At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week ({>=}64 vs. <64 cm{sup 3}) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is <50-60 cm{sup 3}. These data warrant prospective validation.

  1. Comparison of the transcriptional responses of skeletal muscle and bone to a flooding dose of leucine in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; LA Vieira, Vera; Power, Deborah M; Johnston, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, cartilage and bone must function in a co-ordinated fashion during locomotion and growth. In the present study on the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) we tested the hypothesis that muscle and bone differ in their responsiveness to stimuli eliciting fast growth, providing a potential mechanism for generating the skeletal deformities observed in aquaculture. To investigate transcription regulation in skeletal muscle and bone we stimulated protein synthesis using a flooding dose of the branched chain amino acid leucine and compared the results with saline-injected controls. To increase the amount of available sequence information for gene expression analysis a de novo transcriptome was assembled using publicly available Next Generation Sequencing libraries from embryo, fast skeletal muscle, bone and cartilage. The resulting 5 million reads were assembled into 125,646 isotigs representing around 16,000 unique genes, including most components of the Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling pathway. Principal components analysis was able to distinguish the transcriptional responses between leucine and saline injected controls in skeletal muscle, but not in the bone. General Linear Modelling revealed significant temporal changes in gene expression following leucine injection including the tissue-specific markers sparc, bglap (bone), mlc2 and myod2 (muscle) and gene transcripts associated with Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling, p70sk6, akt2, ampka and mtor. Skeletal muscle showed more pronounced and rapid changes in transcript abundance than the bone to the same pro-growth signal. The observed differences in transcriptional response are consistent with the idea that fast growth results in a miss-match between muscle and bone development and may contribute to a higher incidence of skeletal deformities.

  2. Internal comparison between deuterium oxide (D2O) and L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine for acute measurement of muscle protein synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Cegielski, Jessica; Phillips, Bethan E; Boereboom, Catherine; Lund, Jonathan N; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Stable isotope tracer methodologies are becoming increasingly widespread in metabolic research; yet a number of factors restrict their implementation, such as, i.v infusions, multiple cannulae, tissue samples, and significant cost. We recently validated the sensitivity of the orally administered stable isotope tracer deuterium oxide (D2O) for quantifying day-to-day changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS). This method is less invasive, restrictive, and more cost-effective than traditional amino acid (AA) tracer techniques. In the present study, we hypothesized the sensitivity of our analytical techniques (GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS) would permit D2O-derived measurements of MPS over much shorter periods (i.e., hours) usually only possible using AA-tracer techniques. We recruited nine males (24 ± 3 year, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m(-)²) into an internally controlled comparison of D2O versus (13)C AA-tracers. The day before the acute study subjects consumed 400 mL D2O, and on the study day, received a primed (0.3 mg·kg(-1)) continuous (0.6 mg·kg·h(-1)) i.v infusion of L-[ring-(13)C6]-phenylalanine to quantify MPS under both: (1) basal [postabsorptive] and; (2) stimulated [postprandial] that is, consumption of 20 g EAA, conditions. Measures of MPS yielded indistinguishable technique differences with respect to EAA, (13)C: 0.065 ± 0.004 to 0.089 ± 0.006%·h(-1) (P < 0.05) and D2O: 0.050 ± 0.007 to 0.088 ± 0.008%·h(-1) (P < 0.05) with qualitatively similar increases. Our findings reveal that acute measurement of MPS, usually only possible using AA-tracers, are feasible over shorter periods with orally administered D2O when used in tandem with GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS. We conclude that this D2O approach provides a less invasive, cost-effective, and flexible means by which to quantify MPS acutely over several hours.

  3. Internal comparison between deuterium oxide (D2O) and L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine for acute measurement of muscle protein synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Cegielski, Jessica; Phillips, Bethan E; Boereboom, Catherine; Lund, Jonathan N; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope tracer methodologies are becoming increasingly widespread in metabolic research; yet a number of factors restrict their implementation, such as, i.v infusions, multiple cannulae, tissue samples, and significant cost. We recently validated the sensitivity of the orally administered stable isotope tracer deuterium oxide (D2O) for quantifying day-to-day changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS). This method is less invasive, restrictive, and more cost-effective than traditional amino acid (AA) tracer techniques. In the present study, we hypothesized the sensitivity of our analytical techniques (GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS) would permit D2O-derived measurements of MPS over much shorter periods (i.e., hours) usually only possible using AA-tracer techniques. We recruited nine males (24 ± 3 year, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m−²) into an internally controlled comparison of D2O versus 13C AA-tracers. The day before the acute study subjects consumed 400 mL D2O, and on the study day, received a primed (0.3 mg·kg−1) continuous (0.6 mg·kg·h−1) i.v infusion of L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine to quantify MPS under both: (1) basal [postabsorptive] and; (2) stimulated [postprandial] that is, consumption of 20 g EAA, conditions. Measures of MPS yielded indistinguishable technique differences with respect to EAA, 13C: 0.065 ± 0.004 to 0.089 ± 0.006%·h−1 (P < 0.05) and D2O: 0.050 ± 0.007 to 0.088 ± 0.008%·h−1 (P < 0.05) with qualitatively similar increases. Our findings reveal that acute measurement of MPS, usually only possible using AA-tracers, are feasible over shorter periods with orally administered D2O when used in tandem with GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS. We conclude that this D2O approach provides a less invasive, cost-effective, and flexible means by which to quantify MPS acutely over several hours. PMID:26149278

  4. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  5. Cost and accuracy comparison between the diffuse interface method and the geometric volume of fluid method for simulating two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirjalili, Shahab; Ivey, Christopher Blake; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The diffuse interface(DI) and volume of fluid(VOF) methods are mass conserving front capturing schemes which can handle large interfacial topology changes in realistic two phase flows. The DI method is a conservative phase field method that tracks an interface with finite thickness spread over a few cells and does not require reinitialization. In addition to having the desirable properties of level set methods for naturally capturing curvature and surface tension forces, the model conserves mass continuously and discretely. The VOF method, which tracks the fractional tagged volume in a cell, is discretely conservative by requiring costly geometric reconstructions of the interface and the fluxes. Both methods however, suffer from inaccuracies in calculation of curvature and surface tension forces. We present a quantitative comparison of these methods in terms of their accuracy, convergence rate, memory, and computational cost using canonical 2D two-phase test cases: damped surface wave, oscillating drop, equilibrium static drop, and dense moving drop. We further compared the models in their ability to handle thin films by looking at the impact of a water drop onto a deep water pool. Considering these results, we suggest qualitative guidelines for using the DI and VOF methods. Supported by ONR.

  6. Comparison of relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles from rabbits by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists; prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin.

    PubMed Central

    Seo, K. K.; Lee, M. Y.; Lim, S. W.; Kim, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Alpha1a-adrenergic receptor (AR) primarily mediates the contraction of the prostatic and cavernous smooth muscles. Among clinically available alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), tamsulosin has a modest selectivity for alpha1A- and alpha1D- over alpha1B-ARs. To compare the effects of various alpha1-AR antagonists on relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles, isometric tension studies with relatively selective (tamsulosin) and non-selective (prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin) alpha1A-AR antagonists, were conducted in the cavernous and trigonal muscle strips of rabbits (n=10 each). Tamsulosin had the strongest inhibitory effect on contraction of trigonal smooth muscle among the various alpha1-AR antagonists, and the inhibitory activities of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin were not statistically different. All alpha1-AR antagonists caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the cavernous muscle strips. Tamsulosin was shown to have greater potency than prazosin (more than 100-fold), doxazosin (more than 1000-fold), and terazosin (more than 1000-fold), in relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle. In conclusion, tamsulosin might be the most effective drug among the four commonly used alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of BPH. Tamsulosin might be a potential substitute for phentolamine in combination with vasoactive agents as an intracavernous injection therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10102527

  7. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Appendix B. In-structure response spectra comparisons. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) develop building response calibration factors, i.e., factors which relate best estimate or median level response to responses calculated by selected design procedures. Soil-structure interaction was the phenomenon of interest because significant simplifications are frequently introduced in its treatment; and (2) the second objective can be viewed in the context of a question: what effect does placing an identical structure on different sites and with different foundation conditions have on structure response. The structure selected for this study is a part of the Zion AFT complex. Only the auxiliary, fuel-handling, and diesel generator buildings were studied. This structure is a connected group of shear-wall buildings constructed of reinforced concrete, typical of nuclear power plant structures. The bases of comparison for this study were structure responses: peak in-structure accelerations (27 components), and peak wall forces and moments (111 components). In-structure response spectra were also considered. This appendix contains in-structure response spectra comparisons in detail.

  8. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in the United States: A Comparison of National Volume, Patient Demographics, Complications, and Surgical Indications

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Martin, Christopher T.; Gao, Yubo; Wolf, Brian R.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder arthroplasty is increasing in the United States. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has emerged as an alternative treatment for end-stage glenohumeral pathology. Until recently, administrative coding practices have not differentiated RSA from traditional total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), and thus national procedural volume has been unknown. The purpose of this study was to define the utilization, patient characteristics, indications and complications for RSA, and contrast these to TSA and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Methods The 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) dataset was queried using ICD-9-CM codes to identify patients undergoing RSA, TSA, or HA. We used weighted estimates of national procedure volume, per-capita utilization, patient comorbidities, and inpatient complications denned by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and identified them using standard methods described by Elixhauser. ANOVA statistical analysis was used and significance was denned as p value <0.05. Results In 2011, 66,485 patients underwent shoulder arthroplasty; there were 21,692 cases of RSA, 29,359 of TSA, and 15,434 of HA. Utilization of RSA and TSA increased between 2002-2011, and decreased for HA. RSA patients were older (72.7 years vs 67.4 TSA vs 66.8 HA) and more commonly female. Comorbidity burden was highest in patients undergoing HA. Inpatient complications were highest after RSA (p < 0.001). When compared to TSA, RSA was more commonly used in the setting of rotator cuff disease, and posttraumatic sequelae (p<0.001). Conclusions Our findings represent the first national estimates of RSA within the United Sates. RSA is a significant contributor to increasing shoulder arthroplasty utilization nationally representing one-third of arthroplasty cases. Conditions traditionally managed with HA in older populations appear to now be more commonly managed with RSA. RSA is performed on older patients with expanded indications. PMID:26361437

  9. In-vivo Comparison of 18F-FLT uptake, CT Number, Tumor Volume in Evaluation of Repopulation during Radiotherapy for Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jinming; Li, Chengming; Sun, Xindong; Meng, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated repopulation has been observed in various tumors. This study was aimed to evaluate the potential of 3′-deoxy-3′-18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake and Computed Tomography Number (CTN) in monitoring tumor responses to radiotherapy compared with tumor volume (TV) changes. Tumor bearing nude mice were assigned to either irradiated daily or every second day group and then randomized to 6 sub-groups to receive 0Gy, 6Gy, 12Gy, 18Gy, 24Gy, 36Gy irradiation, respectively. TV was measured every 3 days. 18F-FLT micro-PET/CT scans were performed after irradiation being completed. Tumor sections were stained to calculate the immunohistochemical (Ki-67) labeling index (LI). Comparison analysis between FLT uptake parameters, CTNs, VTs and Ki-67 LI results were conducted to determine the correlation. Ki-67 LI increased significantly after 6 times of irradiation at irradiated daily group and after 3 times at irradiated every second day group, suggesting accelerated repopulation. No shrinkage of TV was noticed at two groups during irradiation delivery. Both 18F-FLT uptake and CTN increased significantly after irradiation of 12Gy/6f/6d and 6Gy/3f/6d. Comparison analysis found a significant relationship between Ki-67 LI and 18F-FLT uptake parameters as well as CTN. Both 18F-FLT PET and CT have the potential to reflect the tumor proliferative response during radiation delivery. PMID:28387306

  10. Some electrical properties of the rabbit anococcygeus muscle and a comparison of the effects of inhibitory nerve stimulation in the rat and rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Kate E.; Gillespie, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    1. Simultaneous recordings of mechanical activity and membrane potential of individual smooth muscle cells have been made in the rabbit anococcygeus muscle and the effect of field stimulation on these examined. 2. In the absence of tone the mean resting membrane potential was - 48 mV. In the stretched muscle spontaneous tone and rhythmic activity quite frequently appeared and this was associated with depolarization of the muscle cells. 3. The response to field stimulation depended on the frequency of stimulation, the level of membrane potential and the presence of myogenic tone. The usual response to single pulses or low frequency stimulation was a hyperpolarization of up to 30 mV (mean 14±6·8 mV) after a latency of 185 msec and accompanied by muscle relaxation. Higher frequencies (over 8 Hz) produced an initial depolarization often with a spike potential and followed by hyperpolarization. The mechanical response in these instances was contraction or contraction followed by relaxation. At all frequencies rebound depolarization and an associated contraction followed the end of stimulation). 4. Phentolamine (5×10-6 M) and guanethidine (10-6 M) blocked the initial depolarization and contraction but had no effect on hyperpolarization, muscle relaxation or rebound depolarization and contraction. 5. The effect of field stimulation in the presence of guanethidine (4×10-5 M) was re-examined in the rat anococcygeus. Single pulses were ineffective, repetitive stimulation produced muscle relaxation but no hyperpolarization comparable to the rabbit. Any oscillations in membrane potential were damped during field stimulation and sometimes a small hyperpolarization was produced with a maximum amplitude of 13 mV and a mean of 1·9±1·2 mV. 6. The transmembrane potential at the peak of hyperpolarization in the rabbit was rarely more than -70 mV. Passive displacement of the membrane potential by current pulses altered the amplitude of the hyperpolarization and suggested that

  11. Influence of Body Composition on Lung Function and Respiratory Muscle Strength in Children With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Costa Junior, Dirceu; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana S.; Araujo, Poliane N.; Barbalho-Moulin, Marcela C.; Alves, Viviane C.; Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity affects lung function and respiratory muscle strength. The aim of the present study was to assess lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children with obesity and determine the influence of body composition on these variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 75 children (40 with obesity and 35 within the ideal weight range) aged 6 - 10 years. Body mass index, z score, waist circumference, body composition (tetrapolar bioimpedance), respiratory muscle strength and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated. Results Children with obesity exhibited larger quantities of both lean and fat mass in comparison to those in the ideal weight range. No significant differences were found between groups regarding the respective reference values for respiratory muscle strength. Male children with obesity demonstrated significantly lower lung function values (forced expiratory volume in the first second % (FEV1%) and FEV1/forced vital capacity % (FVC%) : 93.76 ± 9.78 and 92.29 ± 3.8, respectively) in comparison to males in the ideal weight range (99.87 ± 9.72 and 96.31 ± 4.82, respectively). The regression models demonstrated that the spirometric variables were influenced by all body composition variables. Conclusion Children with obesity demonstrated a reduction in lung volume and capacity. Thus, anthropometric and body composition characteristics may be predictive factors for altered lung function. PMID:26767078

  12. Muscle strain histories in swimming milkfish in steady and sprinting gaits

    PubMed

    Katz; Shadwick; Rapoport

    1999-03-01

    Adult milkfish (Chanos chanos) swam in a water-tunnel flume over a wide range of speeds. Fish were instrumented with sonomicrometers to measure shortening of red and white myotomal muscle. Muscle strain was also calculated from simultaneous overhead views of the swimming fish. This allowed us to test the hypothesis that the muscle shortens in phase with local body bending. The fish swam at slow speeds [U<2.6 fork lengths s-1 (=FL s-1)] where only peripheral red muscle was powering body movements, and also at higher speeds (2. 6>U>4.6 FL s-1) where they adopted a sprinting gait in which the white muscle is believed to power the body movements. For all combinations of speeds and body locations where we had simultaneous measurements of muscle strain and body bending (0.5 and 0.7FL), both techniques were equivalent predictors of muscle strain histories. Cross-correlation coefficients for comparisons between these techniques exceeded 0.95 in all cases and had temporal separations of less than 7 ms on average. Muscle strain measured using sonomicrometry within the speed range 0.9-2.6 FL s-1 showed that muscle strain did not increase substantially over that speed range, while tail-beat frequency increased by 140 %. While using a sprinting gait, muscle strains became bimodal, with strains within bursts being approximately double those between bursts. Muscle strain calculated from local body bending for a range of locations on the body indicated that muscle strain increases rostrally to caudally, but only by less than 4 %. These results suggest that swimming muscle, which forms a large fraction of the body volume in a fish, undergoes a history of strain that is similar to that expected for a homogeneous, continuous beam. This has been an implicit assumption for many studies of muscle function in many fish, but has not been tested explicitly until now. This result is achieved in spite of the presence of complex and inhomogeneous geometry in the folding of myotomes

  13. Comparisons of different myosin heavy chain types, AMPK, and PGC-1α gene expression in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Ao, Q W; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-07-14

    Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs are the local fatty and lean breeds, respectively, in China. We compared differences in carcass traits, meat quality traits, and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) types in the longissimus dorsi muscles between Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs. This was done in pigs of the same age, using real-time PCR, to investigate the relationship between MyHC fiber types and carcass characteristics, meat quality traits, and the key factors regulating muscle fiber type. Bama Xiang pigs exhibited smaller size and slower growth than Landrace pigs (P < 0.01). We found that the superior meat quality, especially the high intramuscular fat (IMF) content in Bama Xiang pig, was related to elevated type I oxidative muscle fiber content (P < 0.01). In contrast, Landrace pig muscle had a higher glycolytic type IIb muscle fiber content (P < 0.01). MyHC I gene expression was significantly positively correlated with backfat thickness and IMF content (P < 0.01). MyHC IIb was significantly negatively correlated with IMF content (P < 0.05), and positively correlated with carcass yield (P < 0.05). AMP-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g coactivator-1a are suggested to be the two key factors regulating muscle fiber type in pigs. Our results indicate that muscle fiber composition is one of the key differences leading to the differences of meat quality between Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs. These results may provide a theoretical basis for further studies of the molecular mechanism underlying the excellent meat quality of the Bama Xiang pig.

  14. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction.

    PubMed

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema.

  15. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction

    PubMed Central

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema. PMID:26102076

  16. Oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio, or total distance: a comparison of methods to equalize exercise volume in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Paes, L S; Borges, J P; Cunha, F A; Souza, M G C; Cyrino, F Z G A; Bottino, D A; Bouskela, E; Farinatti, P

    2016-07-28

    This study compared strategies to equalize the volume of aerobic exercise performed with different intensities by Wistar rats, based on the distance covered during exercise bouts and energy expenditure (EE, isocaloric sessions) obtained from oxygen uptake (V̇O2) or respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Thirty-three male rats (270.5±12.8 g) underwent maximal exercise tests to determine V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2R), being randomly assigned to three groups: moderate-intensity continuous exercise at speed corresponding to 50% V̇O2R (MIC; n=11); high-intensity continuous exercise at 80% V̇O2R (HIC; n=11); and high-intensity intermittent exercise (HII; n=11) at 60% V̇O2R (3 min) and 80% V̇O2R (4 min). Exercise duration was calculated individually to elicit EE of 5 kcal in each session. No difference between groups was found for total running distance (MIC: 801±46, HIC: 734±42, HII: 885±64 m; P=0.13). Total EE measured by RER was systematically underestimated compared to values obtained from V̇O2 (HII: 4.5% and MIC: 6.2%, P<0.05). Total EE (calculated from V̇O2), and duration of HIC bouts (2.8 kcal and 30.8±2.2 min) were lower (P<0.0001) than in MIC (4.9 kcal and 64.7±1.8 min) and HII (4.7 kcal and 46.9±2.2 min). Predicted and actual values of total V̇O2, total EE, and duration of isocaloric sessions were similar in MIC and HII (P>0.05), which were both higher than in HIC (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the time to achieve a given EE in exercise bouts with different intensities did not correspond to the total distance. Therefore, the volume of aerobic exercise in protocols involving Wistar rats should be equalized using EE rather than total covered distance.

  17. Oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio, or total distance: a comparison of methods to equalize exercise volume in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Paes, L.S.; Borges, J.P.; Cunha, F.A.; Souza, M.G.C.; Cyrino, F.Z.G.A.; Bottino, D.A.; Bouskela, E.; Farinatti, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared strategies to equalize the volume of aerobic exercise performed with different intensities by Wistar rats, based on the distance covered during exercise bouts and energy expenditure (EE, isocaloric sessions) obtained from oxygen uptake (V̇O2) or respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Thirty-three male rats (270.5±12.8 g) underwent maximal exercise tests to determine V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2R), being randomly assigned to three groups: moderate-intensity continuous exercise at speed corresponding to 50% V̇O2R (MIC; n=11); high-intensity continuous exercise at 80% V̇O2R (HIC; n=11); and high-intensity intermittent exercise (HII; n=11) at 60% V̇O2R (3 min) and 80% V̇O2R (4 min). Exercise duration was calculated individually to elicit EE of 5 kcal in each session. No difference between groups was found for total running distance (MIC: 801±46, HIC: 734±42, HII: 885±64 m; P=0.13). Total EE measured by RER was systematically underestimated compared to values obtained from V̇O2 (HII: 4.5% and MIC: 6.2%, P<0.05). Total EE (calculated from V̇O2), and duration of HIC bouts (2.8 kcal and 30.8±2.2 min) were lower (P<0.0001) than in MIC (4.9 kcal and 64.7±1.8 min) and HII (4.7 kcal and 46.9±2.2 min). Predicted and actual values of total V̇O2, total EE, and duration of isocaloric sessions were similar in MIC and HII (P>0.05), which were both higher than in HIC (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the time to achieve a given EE in exercise bouts with different intensities did not correspond to the total distance. Therefore, the volume of aerobic exercise in protocols involving Wistar rats should be equalized using EE rather than total covered distance. PMID:27487418

  18. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  19. Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle – A Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Löfgren, Monika; Bjersing, Jan; Kosek, Eva; Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0–100) and fatigue Borg’s Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6–20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P < .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P < .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P < .001). The levels of IL-1β did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P < .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (P’s < .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1β, IL-6, IL

  20. Characteristics of Movement-Induced Dose Reduction in Target Volume: A Comparison Between Photon and Proton Beam Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Shin, Dongho; Kwak, Jungwon; Park, Soah; Lim, Young Kyung; Kim, Dongwook; Park, Sung Yong Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-10-01

    We compared the main characteristics of movement-induced dose reduction during photon and proton beam treatment, based on an analysis of dose-volume histograms. To simulate target movement, a target contour was delineated in a scanned phantom and displaced by 3 to 20 mm. Although the dose reductions to the target in the 2 treatment systems were similar for transverse (perpendicular to beam direction) target motion, they were completely different for longitudinal (parallel to beam direction) target motion. While both modalities showed a relationship between the degree of target shift and the reduction in dose coverage, dose reduction showed a strong directional dependence in proton beam treatment. Clinical simulation of target movement for a prostate cancer patient showed that, although coverage and conformity indices for a 6-mm lateral movement of the prostate were reduced by 9% and 16%, respectively, for proton beam treatment, they were reduced by only 1% and 7%, respectively, for photon treatment. This difference was greater for a 15-mm target movement in the lateral direction, which lowered the coverage and conformity indices by 34% and 54%, respectively, for proton beam treatment, but changed little during photon treatment. In addition, we found that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and homogeneity index show similar characteristics during target movement. These results suggest that movement-induced dose reduction differs significantly between photon and proton beam treatment. Attention should be paid to the target margin in proton beam treatment due to the distinct characteristics of heavy ion beams.

  1. Molar volumes of ethylcyclohexane and butyronitrile glasses resulting from vapor deposition: dependence on deposition temperature and comparison to alkylbenzenes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideyuki; Omori, Kio; Ino-u-e, Katsunobu; Ishii, Kikujiro

    2013-09-05

    Molar volumes (Vm) of vapor-deposited ethylcyclohexane (ECH) and butyronitrile (BN, sometimes called butanenitrile) glasses were studied as a function of deposition temperature (Td). ECH glasses deposited at Td sufficiently below their glass-transition temperature (Tg) exhibited changes in Vm on heating similarly to alkylbenzenes. At Td close to Tg, ECH formed dense glasses as alkylbenzenes do, although these glasses were only slightly more dense than its supercooled liquid (SCL) states at the same temperatures. For BN, no indication of the formation of dense glasses was observed even at Td close to Tg, and the variations in Vm with the temperature elevation were different from those of alkylbenzenes. Analysis of the initial Vm of the deposited glasses of different compounds demonstrated that its Td-dependence was well correlated with the steepness index (m) of the corresponding SCL. Quantum-chemical calculations concerning dimer formation by the studied compounds showed that the hydrogen bond between a C-H bond in the alkyl group and π-electrons in the phenyl ring stabilizes the alkylbenzene dimers, suggesting the possibility of the dense glass formation and large m of these compounds. The small m value of BN was also discussed on the basis of the calculation results.

  2. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  3. Comparison of the efficiencies of esophageal manometry, vector volume analysis and esophagus pH monitoring in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Emrah; Özcan, Rahşan; Erdoğan, Ergun; Tekant, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare the superiorities of esophageal manometry, vector volume analysis and 24-hour pH meter studies in showing gastroesophageal reflux disease. Material and Methods: The files of the patients who presented to pediatric surgery and pediatric gastroenterology outpatient clinics of our hospital with suspicious gastroesophageal reflux disease between 2011 and 2012 and who were investigated were examined and 21 patients whose investigations had been completed were included in the study. The patients were evaluated by treatment method and were divided into three groups as Group 1 who were followed up with medical treatment, Group 2 in whom surgical intervention was performed and Group 3 who were not treated. Chi-square test was used in evaluation of the categorical variables, Kruskal Wallis test was used in comparison of the mean values between the groups and Dunn test was used in subgroup analyses when Kruskal Wallis test was found to be significant. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Thirteen of 21 patients included in the study were female and eight were male. The mean age of the patients was 5.71 years (one-16 years). In the 24-hour pH monitoring study, the mean reflux index was found to be 48.7% in Group 1, 42.4% in Group 2 and 28.3% in Group 3. In esophageal manometry studies, the pressure difference at lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was found to be 13,4 cm H2O in Group 1, 31.8 cm H2O in Group 2 and 4.3 cmH2O in Group 3. In vector volume analyses, the mean vector volume was calculated to be 96.01 cm3 in Group 1, 2 398.9 cm3 in Group 2 and 196.3 cm3 in Group 3. In the 24-hour pH monitoring study, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found in terms of showing reflux, whereas statistical significance could not be shown in terms of need for surgical treatment or need for medical treatment in any other method (p>0.05). Conclusions: Twenty-four-hour pH monitoring was found to be

  4. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis. PMID:27403454

  5. Histological comparison of the smooth uterine muscle of healthy golden retriever bitches, carriers of the progressive muscular dystrophy (GRMD) gene, and GRMD-affected bitches.

    PubMed

    Brolio, M P; Cima, D S; Miglino, M A; Ambrósio, C E

    2014-11-10

    There is evidence to suggest that weakness of the pelvic and/or uterine musculature may negatively affect the obstetric performance of women who carry the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The golden retriever dog is the ideal animal model for preclinical studies of progressive muscular dystrophy, and this model is referred to as "golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD)". This study evaluated and compared the histopathological aspects of the uterine muscle of eleven dogs: health, n=4; carriers of GRMD gene, n=5; and affected females, n=2. The obtained results showed that the uterine muscle of healthy dogs was exclusively composed of type III collagen, while a predominance of type I collagen and small amounts of type III were observed in the uterine muscle of the carriers. The myometrium of the affected bitches showed small quantities of both collagen types. The differences noted in the three evaluated groups suggest that female carrier and those individuals affected by muscular dystrophy had collagen alteration and muscle fiber commitment in the uterine muscle, a deficiency which could directly influence the composition and function of this tissue. In addition, this information is highly relevant to the reproductive management of these animals. This data open important venues for translate reproductive protocols for women, who carry the dystrophin gene.

  6. [Comparison of cross face nerve graft with masseteric nerve as donor nerves for free functional muscle transfers in facial reanimation surgery].

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, S U; Thiele, J R; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H

    2013-08-01

    Several surgical techniques have been proposed for the reconstruction of the smile in facial paralysis. The 2-stage approach utilising a cross-facial nerve graft (CFNG) and subsequent free functional muscle transfer represents the "gold standard". A single-stage alternative is the use of the masseteric nerve as donor nerve. Here we have retrospectively analysed the outcome of 8 patients who were treated with either of these procedures (4 per treatment group). We compared the oral commisure excursion between the 2 groups. Use of the masseteric nerve led to reinnervation of the muscle graft within 3 months. The 2-stage procedure required more than 12 months from the first procedure until first muscle contractions could be observed. A spontaneous smile could not be achieved in all patients when the masseteric nerve was used. The oral commisure excursion was symmetrical when compared to the healthy side in both groups, however the excursion was significantly higher in the masseteric nerve group compared to the CFNG group of patients. Most patients with the masseteric nerve as a donor nerve underwent a secondary procedure, which involved thinning of the muscle flap. In conclusion, the use of the masseteric nerve as a donor nerve for facial reanimation surgery is a single-stage alternative to the use of a CFNG as donor nerve. It delivers reliable results with strong muscle contractions with limitations in regard to achieving a spontaneous smile.

  7. A comparison of the shoulder and trunk muscle activity according to the various resistance condition during push up plus in four point kneeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-bin; Yun, Chang-kyo; Lee, Myoung-hyo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to compare the shoulder and trunk muscle activity according to the various resistance condition during knee push-up-plus. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults participated in this study (9 males and 11 females). The subjects performed dominant-leg-extended knee push-up-plus apply to resistance in the direction of abduction, adduction, extension and the flexion. The surface Electromyography activities of the upper trapezius, serratus anterior, homolateral external oblique and the heterolateral internal oblique were measured. The Electromyography activities of each muscle were compared using a one-way repeated analysis of variance. [Results] The Electromyography activities of serratus anterior and external oblique muscles between the resistance directions were significantly increased extension. The Electromyography activities of heterolateral internal oblique muscle between the resistance directions were significantly increased adduction. [Conclusion] To suggest use of the decision exercise tolerance orientation when muscle strengthening exercises for shoulder and trunk according to variation resistance in lower extremity during Push-up-plus. PMID:28210034

  8. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  9. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 14; A Comparison of GEOS Assimilated Data with FIFE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Schubert, Siegfried D.

    1998-01-01

    First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) observations have been used to validate the near-surface proper- ties of various versions of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System. The site- averaged FIFE data set extends from May 1987 through November 1989, allowing the investigation of several time scales, including the annual cycle, daily means and diurnal cycles. Furthermore, the development of the daytime convective planetary boundary layer is presented for several days. Monthly variations of the surface energy budget during the summer of 1988 demonstrate the affect of the prescribed surface soil wetness boundary conditions. GEOS data comes from the first frozen version of the assimilation system (GEOS-1 DAS) and two experimental versions of GEOS (v. 2.0 and 2.1) with substantially greater vertical resolution and other changes that influence the boundary layer. This report provides a baseline for future versions of the GEOS data assimilation system that will incorporate a state-of-the-art land surface parameterization. Several suggestions are proposed to improve the generality of future comparisons. These include the use of more diverse field experiment observations and an estimate of gridpoint heterogeneity from the new land surface parameterization.

  10. Comparison of Cryotop and micro volume air cooling methods for cryopreservation of bovine matured oocytes and blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    PUNYAWAI, Kanchana; ANAKKUL, Nitira; SRIRATTANA, Kanokwan; AIKAWA, Yoshio; SANGSRITAVONG, Siwat; NAGAI, Takashi; IMAI, Kei; PARNPAI, Rangsun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficiency of the Cryotop method and that of two methods that employ a micro volume air cooling (MVAC) device by analyzing the survival and development of bovine oocytes and blastocysts vitrified using each method. In experiment I, in vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes were vitrified using an MVAC device without direct contact with liquid nitrogen (LN2; MVAC group) or directly plunged into LN2 (MVAC in LN2 group). A third group of IVM ooc