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Sample records for muscle volume comparison

  1. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (p<0.0001), adductors (p=0.01), and wrist flexors (p<0.0001). Young adults were strongest at the shoulder, which was not the case for older adults. In older adults, 40.6% of the variation in IJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  2. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  3. Comparison of Multi-Echo Dixon Methods with Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Gradient Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Fat-Signal Fraction Quantification of Paravertebral Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hak-Sun; Lee, Young Han; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Paek, Mun Young; Yoo, Hanna; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Chung, Tae-Sub; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2* estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2*-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2*-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2*-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2*-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. Results A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. Conclusion T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification. PMID:26357503

  4. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  5. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Machann, Juergen; Blatzonis, Konstantinos; Rapp, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years) was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628), leg push power (r = 0.550), isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442), hand grip strength (r = 0.367), fast gait speed (r = 0.291), habitual gait speed (r = 0.256), body mass index (r = 0.411) and age (r = -0.392). Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power. PMID:27315060

  6. Thigh muscle volume in relation to age, sex and femur volume.

    PubMed

    Maden-Wilkinson, T M; McPhee, J S; Rittweger, J; Jones, D A; Degens, H

    2014-02-01

    Secular changes and intra-individual differences in body shape and size can confound cross-sectional studies of muscle ageing. Normalising muscle mass to height squared is often suggested as a solution for this. We hypothesised that normalisation of muscle volume to femur volume may be a better way of determining the extent of muscle lost with ageing (sarcopenia). Thigh and femur muscle volumes were measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging sections in 20 recreationally active young men (mean age 22.4 years), 25 older men (72.3 years), 18 young women (22.1 years) and 28 older women (72.0 years). There were no age-related differences in femur volume. The relationship between thigh muscle volume and femur volume (R (2) = 0.76; exponent of 1.12; P < 0.01) was stronger than that with height (R (2) = 0.49; exponent of 3.86; P < 0.01) in young participants. For young subjects, the mean muscle/bone ratios were 16.0 and 14.6 for men and women, respectively. For older men and women, the mean ratios were 11.6 and 11.5, respectively. The Z score for the thigh muscle/bone volume ratio relative to young subjects was -2.2 ± 0.7 for older men and -1.4 ± 0.8 for older women. The extent of sarcopenia judged by the muscle/bone ratio was approximately twice that determined when normalising to height squared. These data suggest that the muscle/bone ratio captures the intra-individual loss of muscle mass during ageing, and that the age-related loss of muscle mass may be underestimated when normalised to height squared. The quadriceps seems relatively more affected by ageing than other thigh muscles. PMID:23934008

  7. Endocranial and masticatory muscle volumes in myostatin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Nathan; Mendias, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Structural and functional trade-offs are integral to the evolution of the mammalian skull and its development. This paper examines the potential for enlargement of the masticatory musculature to limit the size of the endocranial cavity by studying a myostatin-deficient mouse model of hypermuscularity (MSTN−/−). The study tests the null prediction that the larger MSTN−/− mice have larger brains compared with wild-type (WT) mice in order to service the larger muscles. Eleven post-mortem MSTN−/− mice and 12 WT mice were imaged at high resolution using contrast enhanced micro-CT. Masticatory muscle volumes (temporalis, masseter, internal and external pterygoids) and endocranial volumes were measured on the basis of two-dimensional manual tracings and the Cavalieri principle. Volumes were compared using Kruskal–Wallis and Student's t-tests. Results showed that the masticatory muscles of the MSTN−/− mice were significantly larger than in the WT mice. Increases were in the region of 17–36% depending on the muscle. Muscles increased in proportion to each other, maintaining percentages in the region of 5, 10, 21 and 62% of total muscle volume for the external ptyergoid, internal pterygoid, temporalis and masseter, respectively. Kruskal–Wallis and t-tests demonstrated that the endocranial volume was significantly larger in the WT mice, approximately 16% larger on average than that seen in the MSTN−/− mice. This comparative reduction of MSTN−/− endocranial size could not be explained in terms of observer bias, ageing, sexual dimorphism or body size scaling. That the results showed a reduction of brain size associated with an increase of muscle size falsifies the null prediction and lends tentative support to the view that the musculature influences brain growth. It remains to be determined whether the observed effect is primarily physical, nutritional, metabolic or molecular in nature. PMID:26064569

  8. Gender differences in muscle blood volume reduction in the tibialis anterior muscle during passive plantarflexion.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Aki; Muraoka, Yoshiho; Fujita, Emi; Kubo, Sayaka; Yoshida, Misaki; Komuro, Yuko; Ikegawa, Shigeki; Ohta, Yuji; Kuno-Mizumura, Mayumi

    2016-09-01

    Physical flexibility, such as joint range of motion and muscle extension, may influence muscle blood volume. Women have been shown to have a greater degree of flexibility than men. We examined whether there is a gender difference in the relationship between fascicle length and muscle blood volume or oxygenation in untrained men and women. In 16 untrained men and thirteen untrained women, we measured the total-[haemoglobin (Hb) + myoglobin (Mb)] (total-[Hb + Mb]) and relative oxy-[Hb + Mb] after calibrating baseline and arterial occlusion deoxygenation levels with near-infrared spectroscopy. Also, fascicle length was measured with B-mode ultrasonography at the tibialis anterior muscle during passive plantarflexion. Increases in fascicle length from baseline (ankle joint angle 120°, composed from the caput fibulae, the malleolus (pivot), and the distal epiphysis of the fifth metatarsal bone) were greater in women than in men during plantarflexion of 140° and 160° and the maximal angle without pain. However, the decreases in total-[Hb + Mb] and relative oxy-[Hb + Mb] from baseline were not different between women and men at any degree of plantarflexion. Moreover, fascicle length and total-[Hb + Mb]/muscle thickness (men > women) showed a similar relationship, with muscle thickness increasing capillary compression. These findings indicate the possibility of a mechanical function underlying muscle blood volume during muscle stretching, which is greater in women than in men. PMID:25620638

  9. Gender differences in muscle blood volume reduction in the tibialis anterior muscle during passive plantarflexion.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Aki; Muraoka, Yoshiho; Fujita, Emi; Kubo, Sayaka; Yoshida, Misaki; Komuro, Yuko; Ikegawa, Shigeki; Ohta, Yuji; Kuno-Mizumura, Mayumi

    2016-09-01

    Physical flexibility, such as joint range of motion and muscle extension, may influence muscle blood volume. Women have been shown to have a greater degree of flexibility than men. We examined whether there is a gender difference in the relationship between fascicle length and muscle blood volume or oxygenation in untrained men and women. In 16 untrained men and thirteen untrained women, we measured the total-[haemoglobin (Hb) + myoglobin (Mb)] (total-[Hb + Mb]) and relative oxy-[Hb + Mb] after calibrating baseline and arterial occlusion deoxygenation levels with near-infrared spectroscopy. Also, fascicle length was measured with B-mode ultrasonography at the tibialis anterior muscle during passive plantarflexion. Increases in fascicle length from baseline (ankle joint angle 120°, composed from the caput fibulae, the malleolus (pivot), and the distal epiphysis of the fifth metatarsal bone) were greater in women than in men during plantarflexion of 140° and 160° and the maximal angle without pain. However, the decreases in total-[Hb + Mb] and relative oxy-[Hb + Mb] from baseline were not different between women and men at any degree of plantarflexion. Moreover, fascicle length and total-[Hb + Mb]/muscle thickness (men > women) showed a similar relationship, with muscle thickness increasing capillary compression. These findings indicate the possibility of a mechanical function underlying muscle blood volume during muscle stretching, which is greater in women than in men.

  10. An In Vitro Model of Skeletal Muscle Volume Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wibberley, Anna; Staunton, Caroline A.; Feetham, Claire H.; Vereninov, Alexey A.; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertonic media causes cells to shrink due to water loss through aquaporin channels. After acute shrinkage, cells either regulate their volume or, alternatively, undergo a number of metabolic changes which ultimately lead to cell death. In many cell types, hypertonic shrinkage is followed by apoptosis. Due to the complex 3D morphology of skeletal muscle and the difficulty in obtaining isolated human tissue, we have begun skeletal muscle volume regulation studies using the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD. In this study we investigated whether hypertonic challenge of the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD triggered cell death or evoked a cell volume recovery response. Methods The cellular volume of TE671RD cells was calculated from the 2D surface area. Cell death was assessed by both the trypan blue live/dead assay and the TUNEL assay. Results Medium osmolality was increased by addition of up to 200mM sucrose. Addition of 200mM sucrose resulted in mean cell shrinkage of 44±1% after 30mins. At later time points (2 and 4 hrs) two separate cell subpopulations with differing mean cell volume became apparent. The first subpopulation (15±2% of the total cell number) continued to shrink whereas the second subpopulation had an increased cell volume. Cell death was observed in a small proportion of cells (approximately 6-8%). Conclusion We have established that a substantial proportion of TE671RD cells respond to hypertonic challenge with RVI, but that these cells are resistant to hypertonicity triggered cell death. PMID:26029913

  11. Validity of estimating limb muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Miyatani, M; Kanehisa, H; Masuo, Y; Ito, M; Fukunaga, T

    2001-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the validity of estimating muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Bioelectrical impedance and series cross-sectional images of the forearm, upper arm, lower leg, and thigh on the right side were determined in 22 healthy young adult men using a specially designed bioelectrical impedance acquisition system and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, respectively. The impedance index (L(2)/Z) for every segment, calculated as the ratio of segment length squared to the impedance, was significantly correlated to the muscle volume measured by MRI, with r = 0.902-0.976 (P < 0.05). In these relationships, the SE of estimation was 38.4 cm(3) for the forearm, 40.9 cm(3) for the upper arm, 107.2 cm(3) for the lower leg, and 362.3 cm(3) for the thigh. Moreover, isometric torque developed in elbow flexion or extension and knee flexion or extension was significantly correlated to the L(2)/Z values of the upper arm and thigh, respectively, with correlation coefficients of 0.770-0.937 (P < 0.05), which differed insignificantly from those (0.799-0.958; P < 0.05) in the corresponding relationships with the muscle volume measured by MRI of elbow flexors or extensors and knee flexors or extensors. Thus the present study indicates that bioelectrical impedance analysis may be useful to predict the muscle volume and to investigate possible relations between muscle size and strength capability in a limited segment of the upper and lower limbs.

  12. Relationship between muscle volume and muscle torque of the hamstrings after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yu; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    The muscle torque per unit volume of the hamstrings on the injured and uninjured sides in patients with ACL reconstruction were compared with participants with no history of knee injury to examine whether a similar mechanism leading to quadriceps weakness exists in the hamstrings of these patients. The study population consisted of 18 and 52 patients at volume was measured on MRI. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume, the peak torque of knee flexion was divided by the hamstring volume. Most muscle torque per unit volume indexes were not significantly different between the patients at muscle torque per unit volume of patients at 12 months in both injured (0.118+/-0.03 Nm/cm(3), 60 degrees /s; 0.092+/-0.02 Nm/cm(3), 180 degrees /s) and uninjured sides (0.120+/-0.03 Nm/cm(3) at 60 degrees /s; 0.094+/-0.02 Nm/cm(3), 180 degrees /s) were significantly lower than those of controls (P<0.01). We found no evidence of recruitment disorder in the hamstrings of the patients. The results of this study indicated that the mechanism of muscle weakness of the hamstrings after reconstruction was different from that of the quadriceps, although the precise mechanism remains to be determined.

  13. Changes in Extraocular Muscle Volume During Ocular Duction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been tacitly assumed that overall extraocular muscle (EOM) volume is conserved during contraction and relaxation, yet this assumption has been untested up to now. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if total EOM volume changes during relaxation and contraction. Methods Surface coil MRI in quasi-coronal planes was obtained in target-controlled, maximal secondary gaze positions in 30 orbits of 15 normal subjects at 312-μm resolution. Ductions were quantified by changes in globe-optic nerve positions. Cross-sections of EOM were manually outlined in contiguous image planes so that volumes could be calculated by multiplying summed cross sections by the 2-mm slice thickness. Three-dimensional reconstruction allowed measurement of the lengths of terminal, unresolvable EOM segments, providing estimates of terminal EOM volumes to be summed with measured midorbital volumes to obtain total EOM volumes. Results Duction range averaged 44.3 ± 4.8° from relaxation to contraction. There was a significant increase in total volume in each rectus EOM from relaxation to contraction: superior rectus (SR) 92 ± 36 mm3 (+18%, P < 10−11); inferior rectus (IR) 51 ± 18 mm3 (+9%, P < 10−11); medial rectus (MR) 78 ± 36 mm3 (+11%, P < 10−5); and lateral rectus (LR) 47 ± 45 mm3 (+7%, P = 0.005). Because volume changes for SR and MR exceed IR and LR, total rectus EOM volume increases in supraduction 41 ± 42 mm3 (+3.7%) and adduction 32 ± 63 mm3 (+2.3%). Conclusions Total EOM volume is not conserved but instead increases with contraction and decreased with relaxation. Contractile volume increases may be secondary to increased actin-myosin lattice spacing, so that density decreases. This effect is opposite that of possible hemodynamic changes. PMID:26968741

  14. Cat heart muscle in vitro. I. Cell volumes and intracellular concentrations in papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    PAGE, E; SOLOMON, A K

    1960-11-01

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of total water, inulin space, and K and Na content in muscles of 0.5 to 10 mg. wet weight. These methods have been used to define steady state conditions with respect to intracellular K concentration in papillary muscles from cat hearts perfused and contracting isometrically at 27-28 degrees C. and at 37-38 degrees C. Cell volumes and intracellular ionic concentrations have been followed as a function of the external K concentration and compared with values predicted on the basis of electroneutrality and osmotic equilibrium.

  15. The volume of vascular compartment in rat hind limb muscles

    PubMed Central

    Law, R. O.; Phelps, C. F.

    1966-01-01

    1. A non-recirculatory perfusion system has been developed suitable for the perfusion of the hind limbs of small experimental animals. 2. By means of it a solution of T. 1824-labelled serum albumin has been introduced into the vascular compartment of the hind limbs of female rats under isogravimetric conditions. Excision and analysis of certain muscles has been used to provide information concerning the percentage distribution of the labelled albumin within these muscles. 3. Experiments have been carried out in vivo employing [131I]labelled serum albumin and [51Cr]labelled erythrocytes in order to compare the vascular volumes determined under in vivo conditions and in perfusions, and to estimate the capillary haematocrit in vivo. 4. The physiological validity of the methods used and the results obtained has been discussed. PMID:5972152

  16. Increased lung volume limits endurance of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, G; McCool, F D; Leith, D E; Hoppin, F G

    1988-05-01

    We examined the influence of lung volume on the ability of normal subjects to sustain breathing against inspiratory resistive loading. Four normal subjects breathed on a closed circuit in which inspiration was loaded by a flow resistor. Subjects were assigned a series of breathing tasks over a range of pressures and flows. In each task there was a specified resistor and also targets for either mean esophageal or airway opening pressure, respiratory frequency, and duty cycle. Endurance was assessed as the length of time to failure of the assigned task. The prime experimental variable was lung volume, which was increased by approximately 1 liter during some tasks; 8 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure was applied to increase lung volume without increasing elastic load. As previously shown (McCool et al.J. Appl. Physiol. 60: 299-303, 1986), for tasks that could be sustained for the same time, there was an inverse linear relationship of mean esophageal pressure with inspiratory flow rate. This trade-off of pressure and flow was apparent both with and without the increase of lung volume. Comparable tasks, however, could not be sustained as long at the higher lung volumes. This effect of volume on endurance was greater for tasks characterized by high inspiratory pressures and low flow rates than for tasks that could be sustained for the same time but that had lower inspiratory pressures and higher flow rates. This is probably due to the effects of shortening of the sarcomere on fatiguability. Increased lung volume, per se, may contribute to respiratory failure because of increased inspiratory muscle fatiguability by mechanisms independent of elastic load. PMID:3391883

  17. Effect of unloading on muscle volume with and without resistance training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akima, Hiroshi; Ushiyama, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Junjiro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2007-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resistance training on the volume of four muscle groups and/or 17 individual muscles of the human lower limb during 20 days of 6∘ head-down tilt bed rest. Twelve healthy men were divided into two groups: the resistance training group: BR-Tr (n=6) and the control group: BR-Cont (n=6). The volumes of the knee extensor, knee flexor, adductor, plantar flexor, and dorsiflexor muscle groups and their individual muscles were calculated. After the bed rest, the BR-Tr subjects showed no significant change in the volume in almost all tested muscles; in contrast, the volumes of the four muscle groups significantly decreased in the BR-Cont group ( -12% to -8%). These results suggest that resistance training during bed rest can prevent the deteriorating of thigh muscles and calf muscles.

  18. Evaluation of a simple method for determining muscle volume in vivo.

    PubMed

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Challis, John H

    2016-06-14

    The quantification in vivo of muscle volume is important, for example, to understand how muscles change with aging, and respond to rehabilitation. Albracht et al. (2008) suggested that muscle volume can be estimated in vivo from the measurement of muscle cross-sectional area and muscle belly length only. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this proposed relationship for determining muscle volume for both the Vastus Lateralis (VL) and First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) using ultrasound imaging. The cross-sectional area and length of 22 cadaver FDI and 6 VL muscles in cadavers were imaged using ultrasound, these muscles were then dissected and muscle volumes measured directly using the water displacement technique. Estimated muscle volumes were compared with their direct measurement, and for the VL the percentage root mean square error in the estimation of muscle volume was 5.0%, and the Bland-Altman analysis had all volume estimates within the 95% confidence interval, with no evidence of bias (proportional or constant) in the volume estimates. In contrast, percentage root mean square error for the FDI was 18.8%, with the Bland-Altman analysis showing volume estimates outside of the 95% confidence interval and proportional bias. These results indicate that the simple method proposed by Albracht et al. (2008) for the estimation of muscle volume is appropriate the VL but not the FDI using ultrasound imaging. Morphological disparities likely account for these differences, if accurate and fast measures of the volume of the FDI are required other approaches should be explored.

  19. Muscle-like actuators? A comparison between three electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Kenneth; Rosenthal, Marc S.; Full, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    Muscles fulfill several functions within an animal's body. During locomotion they propel and control the limbs in unstructured environments. Therefore, the functional workspace of muscle needs to be represented by variables describing energy management (i.e. power output, efficiency) as well as control aspects (i.e. stiffness, damping). Muscles in the animal kingdom vary greatly with respect to those variables. To study if ElectroActive Polymer's (EAP) can be considered as artificial muscles we are making a direct comparison between the contractile properties of EAP's and biological muscle. We have measured the functional workspace of EAP actuators using the same setup and techniques that we use to test biological muscle. We evaluated the properties of three different EAP materials; the acrylic and silicone dielectric elastomers developed at SRI International and the high-energy electron-irradiated co-polymers (p(VDF-TrFE)) developed at the MRL laboratory at Penn State University. Initial results indicate that the EAP materials partly capture the functional workspace of natural muscle and sometimes even exceed the capabilities of muscle. Based on the data we have collected it seems that both EAP technologies have characteristics that could qualify them as artificial muscles.

  20. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque after anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Ikeda, K; Nishino, A; Sunaga, M; Aihara, Y; Fukubayashi, T

    2007-12-01

    This study was performed to obtain evidence regarding bilateral hindrance of motor unit (MU) recruitment in the quadriceps femoris (QF) of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The subjects included 70 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and 35 healthy subjects. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume (MTPUV), the peak torque of each velocity of isokinetic performance was divided by muscle volume of the QF measured by a series of cross-sectional images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging scans. Tests revealed that the mean MTPUV of the uninjured (0.113+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.081+/-0.02 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) and injured sides (0.109+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.079+/-0.023 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) were significantly lower than those of the control group (0.144+/-0.05 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.096+/-0.04 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s). Previous studies suggested that MU recruitment in the QF of patients with ACL injury was hindered bilaterally. However, the design of their studies could not provide evidence of bilateral hindrance of MU recruitment in the QF. The results of the present study demonstrated that the MTPUV of both injured and uninjured sides of patients were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  1. Palisade endings and proprioception in extraocular muscles: a comparison with skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Lienbacher, Karoline; Horn, Anja K E

    2012-12-01

    This article describes current views on motor and sensory control of extraocular muscles (EOMs) based on anatomical data. The special morphology of EOMs, including their motor innervation, is described in comparison to classical skeletal limb and trunk muscles. The presence of proprioceptive organs is reviewed with emphasis on the palisade endings (PEs), which are unique to EOMs, but the function of which is still debated. In consideration of the current new anatomical data about the location of cell bodies of PEs, a hypothesis on the function of PEs in EOMs and the multiply innervated muscle fibres they are attached to is put forward.

  2. Relationship between muscle volume and contractile properties of the human knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Brown, Niklas; Bollinger, Robert; Bubeck, Dieter; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Zschorlich, Volker; Bruhn, Sven; Alt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between volume and electrically evoked twitch properties of the quadriceps muscle. Supramaximal single and doublet stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to assess contractile properties at 45° and 80° knee flexion. Muscle volume was measured using a 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Quadriceps muscle volume was only significantly correlated (r = 0.629) with peak twitch torque induced by doublet stimulation at 80° but not at 45° knee flexion.

  3. In vivo pediatric shoulder muscle volumes and their relationship to 3D strength.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyun Soo; Alter, Katharine E; Brochard, Sylvain; Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T

    2014-08-22

    In the pediatric shoulder, injury and pathology can disrupt the muscle force balance, resulting in severe functional losses. As little data exists pertaining to in vivo pediatric shoulder muscle function, musculoskeletal data are crucially needed to advance the treatment of pediatric shoulder pathology/injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a pediatric database of in vivo volumes for the major shoulder muscles and correlate these volumes with maximum isometric flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and abduction/adduction joint moments. A methodology was developed to derive 3D shoulder muscle volumes and to divide the deltoid into sub-units with unique torque producing capabilities, based on segmentation of three-dimensional magnetic resonance images. Eleven typically developing children/adolescents (4F/7M, 12.0 ± 3.2 years, 150.8 ± 16.7 cm, 49.2 ± 16.4 kg) participated. Correlation and regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between volume and maximum, voluntary, isometric joint torques. The deltoid demonstrated the largest (30.4 ± 1.2%) and the supraspinatus the smallest (4.8 ± 0.5%) percent of the total summed volume of all six muscles evaluated. The anterior and posterior deltoid sections were 43.4 ± 3.9% and 56.6 ± 3.9% of the total deltoid volume. The percent volumes were highly consistent across subjects. Individual muscle volumes demonstrated moderate-high correlations with torque values (0.70-0.94, p<0.001). This study presents a comprehensive database documenting normative pediatric shoulder muscle volume. Using these data a clear relationship between shoulder volume and the torques they produce was established in all three rotational degrees-of-freedom. This study furthers the understanding of shoulder muscle function and serves as a foundation for evaluating shoulder injury/pathology in the pediatric/adolescent population. PMID:24925254

  4. Upper Limb Strength and Muscle Volume in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Saul, Katherine R; Vidt, Meghan E; Gold, Garry E; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose was to characterize shoulder muscle volume and isometric moment, as well as their relationship, for healthy middle- aged adults. Muscle volume and maximum isometric joint moment were assessed for 6 functional muscle groups of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in 10 middle-aged adults (46–60 y, 5M, 5F). Compared with young adults, shoulder abductors composed a smaller percentage of total muscle volume (P = .0009) and there was a reduction in shoulder adductor strength relative to elbow flexors (P = .012). We observed a consistent ordering of moment-generating capacity among functional groups across subjects. Although total muscle volume spanned a 2.3-fold range, muscle volume was distributed among functional groups in a consistent manner across subjects. On average, 72% of the variation in joint moment could be explained by the corresponding functional group muscle volume. These data are useful for improved modeling of upper limb musculoskeletal performance in middle-aged subjects, and may improve computational predictions of function for this group. PMID:26155870

  5. Angiotensin AT1 and AT2 Receptors Regulate Basal Skeletal Muscle Microvascular Volume and Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Eugene J.; Carey, Robert M.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction via the type 1 receptor (AT1R) and vasodilatation through the type 2 receptor (AT2R). Both are expressed in muscle microvasculature where substrate exchanges occur. Whether they modulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion and substrate metabolism is not known. We measured microvascular blood volume (MBV), a measure of microvascular surface area and perfusion, in rats during systemic infusion of angiotensin II at either 1 or 100 ng/kg/min. Each caused a significant increase in muscle MBV. Likewise, administration of AT1R blocker losartan increased muscle MBV by >3-fold (p<0.001). Hindleg glucose extraction and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation simultaneously increased by 2–3-fold. By contrast, infusing AT2R antagonist PD123319 significantly decreased muscle MBV by up to 80% (p<0.001). This was associated with a significant decrease in hindleg glucose extraction and muscle oxygen saturation. AT2R antagonism and inhibition of nitric oxide synthase each blocked the losartan-induced increase in muscle MBV and glucose uptake. In conclusion, angiotensin II acts on both AT1R and AT2R to regulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion. Basal AT1R tone restricts muscle MBV and glucose extraction while basal AT2R activity increases muscle MBV and glucose uptake. Pharmacologic manipulation of the balance of AT1R and AT2R activity affords the potential to improve glucose metabolism. PMID:19996061

  6. Inward flux of lactate⁻ through monocarboxylate transporters contributes to regulatory volume increase in mouse muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew J; Hawke, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Mouse and rat skeletal muscles are capable of a regulatory volume increase (RVI) after they shrink (volume loss resultant from exposure to solutions of increased osmolarity) and that this RVI occurs mainly by a Na-K-Cl-Cotransporter (NKCC)-dependent mechanism. With high-intensity exercise, increased extracellular osmolarity is accompanied by large increases in extracellular [lactate⁻]. We hypothesized that large increases in [lactate⁻] and osmolarity augment the NKCC-dependent RVI response observed with a NaCl (or sucrose)-induced increase in osmolarity alone; a response that is dependent on lactate⁻ influx through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Single mouse muscle fibres were isolated and visualized under light microscopy under varying osmolar conditions. When solution osmolarity was increased by adding NaLac by 30 or 60 mM, fibres lost significantly less volume and regained volume sooner compared to when NaCl was used. Phloretin (MCT1 inhibitor) accentuated the volume loss compared to both NaLac controls, supporting a role for MCT1 in the RVI response in the presence of elevated [lactate⁻]. Inhibition of MCT4 (with pCMBS) resulted in a volume loss, intermediate to that seen with phloretin and NaLac controls. Bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor), in combination with pCMBS, reduced the magnitude of volume loss, but volume recovery was complete. While combined phloretin-bumetanide also reduced the magnitude of the volume loss, it also largely abolished the cell volume recovery. In conclusion, RVI in skeletal muscle exposed to raised tonicity and [lactate⁻] is facilitated by inward flux of solute by NKCC- and MCT1-dependent mechanisms. This work demonstrates evidence of a RVI response in skeletal muscle that is facilitated by inward flux of solute by MCT-dependent mechanisms. These findings further expand our understanding of the capacities for skeletal muscle to volume regulate, particularly in instances of raised tonicity and lactate⁻ concentrations, as

  7. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque at least 18 months after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Oda, T; Tsukazaki, S; Kinugasa, R; Fukubayashi, T

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate motor unit recruitment in the quadriceps femoris (QF) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and repair. Subjects included 24 patients at ≥ 18 months after ACL reconstruction and 22 control subjects with no history of knee injury. A series of cross-sectional magnetic resonance images were obtained to compare the QF of patients' injured side with that of their uninjured sides and that of uninjured control subjects. Muscle torque per muscle volume was calculated as isokinetic peak torque divided by QF muscle volume (cm(3)). The mean muscle torque per unit volume of the injured side of patients was not significantly different from that of the uninjured side or control subjects (one-way ANOVA) Results of the present study were contrary to the results of a previous study that evaluated patients at ≤ 12 months after ACL reconstruction. The present study found that high-threshold motor unit recruitment was restored at ≥ 18 months after ACL reconstruction. Thus, clinicians must develop techniques that increase the recruitment of high-threshold motor units in the QF from the period immediately after the injury until approximately 18 months after ACL reconstruction.

  8. NMR imaging estimates of muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in the thigh: variations with muscle, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Barnouin, Yoann; Azzabou, Noura; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Voit, Thomas; Moraux, Amélie; Leroux, Gaëlle; Behin, Anthony; McPhee, Jamie S; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-06-01

    Muscle mass is particularly relevant to follow during aging, owing to its link with physical performance and autonomy. The objectives of this work were to assess muscle volume (MV) and intramuscular fat (IMF) for all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy individuals using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test the effect of gender and age on MV and IMF and to determine the best representative slice for the estimation of MV and IMF. The study enrolled 105 healthy young (range 20-30 years) and older (range 70-80 years) subjects. MRI scans were acquired along the femur length using a three-dimension three-point Dixon proton density-weighted gradient echo sequence. MV and IMF were estimated from all the slices. The effects of age and gender on MV and IMF were assessed. Predictive equations for MV and IMF were established using a single slice at various femur levels for each muscle in order to reduce the analysis process. MV was decreased with aging in both genders, particularly in the quadriceps femoris. IMF was largely increased with aging in men and, to a lesser extent, in women. Percentages of MV decrease and IMF increase with aging varied according to the muscle. Predictive equations to predict MV and IMF from single slices are provided and were validated. This study is the first one to provide muscle volume and intramuscular fat infiltration in all the muscles of the thigh in a large population of young and elderly healthy subjects. PMID:26040416

  9. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  10. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  11. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  12. Muscle metastases: comparison of features in different primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle metastases (MM) from solid tumours are rare. The aim of this study was to describe radiological features of MM, and to compare their patterns in different malignancies. Methods A retrospective search in the statistical database of our institution revealed 61 cases of MM. Additionally, a retrospective search in Pubmed database was performed. Together with our cases the present analysis comprises 461 patients (682 MM). Results MM derived from the following malignancies: lung cancer (25.1%), gastrointestinal tumours (21.0%), and urological tumours (13.2%). Other neoplasias with MM were rare. MM were localised most frequently in the thigh muscles, the extraocular musculature, and the gluteal and paravertebral muscles. The localisation of MM was different in several primary malignancies. On computed tomography (CT), five different patterns of MM occurred: masses with homogeneous contrast enhancement (type I, 46.5%), abscess-like lesions (type II, 27.7%), diffuse infiltration with muscle swelling (type III, 18.1%), intramuscular calcifications (type IV, 6.5%), or MM presented as intramuscular bleeding (type V, 1.2%). MM from several primary tumours manifested with different CT patterns. On MRI, most MM were hyperintense in comparison to unaffected musculature in T2 weighted images and hypo- to isointense on T1 weighted images with a heterogeneous enhancement. There were no differences in MRI features of MM in different primary tumours. On ultrasound, most MM were hypoechoic. On positron emission tomography, MM presented as focally abnormal intramuscular uptake. Conclusion MM present with a broad spectrum of radiological features. Different CT imaging findings of MM were observed in different primary tumours. The localisation of MM also varies with different primary malignancies. PMID:25608474

  13. [Relation between neck accessory inspiratory muscle electromyographic activity and lung volume].

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Y; Abe, T; Yokoba, M; Yamada, T; Katagiri, M; Tomita, T

    2001-04-01

    Years ago it was reported that, as lung volume increased, there was a corresponding increase in scalene EMG activity (Raper et al. J Appl Physiol 21: 497-502, 1966). Otherwise, the relationship between changing lung volume and the EMG of the respiratory muscles has not been defined. We therefore inserted fine wire electrodes into the scalene (SCLN), sternocleidomastoid (STERNO), and trapezius (TRAPEZ) muscles in 6 healthy subjects under direct vision using high-resolution ultrasound. Maximum EMG activity (EMGmax) was obtained for each muscle by a variety of respiratory and postural maneuvers. Then, in the standing posture, air flow, raw and moving average EMG signals were sampled and input to a computer during quasi-static inspiration from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity (TLC). We found that the relationship between EMG and lung volume for SCLN, but not for STERNO or TRAPEZ, was expressed by exponential curves. The onset of SCLN, STERNO and TRAPEZ EMG occurred at 13.3 +/- 7.4 (mean +/- SE), 67.8 +/- 14.6, and 89.2 +/- 3.9% of inspiratory capacity. The EMG of SCLN, STERNO, TRAPEZ, reached 85.7 +/- 2.6, 60.7 +/- 8.6, and 11.8 +/- 5.2% of EMGmax, respectively, at TLC. We conclude that: 1) SCLN is the most, and TRAPEZ the least, active neck accessory inspiratory muscle, while STERNO is intermediate, and 2) there is a lung volume dependency of the neck accessory muscle EMG activity.

  14. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  15. Physiological comparison of rat muscle in body suspension and weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrovski, J.

    1987-01-01

    Hind limb unloading is achieved with whole body suspension (WBS) and with tail suspension (TS). Comparable levels of muscle mass loss and decreases in protein levels result during one to three weeks of exposure to microgravity (microG), WBS, and TS. Losses are most apparent in soleus (S), intermediate in gastrocnemius (G) and least in extensor digigorum longus (EDL). Comparison of S and EDL type I and II fiber changes (numbers and area) after seven days of microG flight and WBS showed, in S, an increase in Type I and Type II fiber density and a decrease in area. Except for a decrease in Type I fiber density in EDL, all other parameters remained comparable. The general conclusions were that the S under microG and WBS responds in a similar manner. The EDL, for the most part, shows little change under both conditions.

  16. Respiratory muscle force and lung volume changes in a population of children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Bruce A; Caboot, Jason; Jawad, Abbas; McDonough, Joseph; Jackson, Tannoa; Arens, Raanan; Marcus, Carole L; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mason, Thornton B A; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Allen, Julian L

    2013-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disorder known to impact the respiratory system. We sought to identify respiratory muscle force and lung volume relationships in a paediatric SCD population. Thirty-four SCD-SS subjects underwent pulmonary function testing. Height, weight, age, and gender-adjusted percent predicted maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) values were compared to spirometry and lung volumes. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and paired two-tailed t-test. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) MIP and MEP was 69·6 ± 31·6 cm H2 O and 66·9 ± 22·9 cm H2 O, respectively, and mean ± SD percent predicted MIP (101·3 ± 45·9) exceeded MEP (72·1 ± 26·0) (P = 0·002). MIP correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC; r = 0·51, P = 0·001) and TLC (r = 0·54, P < 0·0001). MEP also correlated with FVC (r = 0·43, P = 0·011) and total lung capacity (TLC; r = 0·42, P = 0·013). Pearson's correlation coefficient testing yielded relationships between MIP and MEP (r = 0·64, P < 0·0001). SCD-SS patients showed correlations between respiratory muscle force and lung volume, and reduced percent predicted expiratory muscle force compared to inspiratory muscle force. Respiratory muscle strength may affect lung volumes in these patients, and expiratory muscles may be more susceptible than the diaphragm to SCD-induced vaso-occlusive damage.

  17. Influence of exercise order on maximum strength and muscle volume in nonlinear periodized resistance training.

    PubMed

    Spineti, Juliano; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Rhea, Matthew R; Lavigne, Danielle; Matta, Thiago; Miranda, Fabrício; Fernandes, Liliam; Simão, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of exercise order on strength and muscle volume (MV) after 12 weeks of nonlinear periodized resistance training. The participants were randomly assigned into 3 groups. One group began performing large muscle group exercises and progressed to small muscle group exercises (LG-SM), whereas another group started with small muscle group exercises and advanced to large muscle group exercises (SM-LG). The exercise order for LG-SM was bench press (BP), machine lat pull-down (LPD), triceps extension (TE), and biceps curl (BC). The order for the SM-LG was BC, TE, LPD, and BP. The third group did not exercise and served as a control group (CG). Training frequency was 2 sessions per week with at least 72 hours of rest between sessions. Muscle volume was assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks and 12 weeks of training by ultrasound techniques. One repetition maximum strength for all exercises was assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks of training. Effect size data demonstrated that differences in strength and MV were exhibited based on exercise order. Both training groups demonstrated greater strength improvements than the CG, but only BP strength increased to a greater magnitude in the LG-SM group as compared with the SM-LG. In all other strength measures (LPD, TE, and BC), the SM-LG group showed significantly greater strength increases. Triceps MV increased in the SM-LG group; however, biceps MV did not differ significantly between the training groups. In conclusion, if an exercise is important for the training goals of a program, then it should be placed at the beginning of the training session, regardless of whether or not it is a large muscle group exercise or a small muscle group exercise.

  18. Upper extremity muscle volumes and functional strength after resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Melissa; Vidt, Meghan E; Eggebeen, Joel D; Simpson, W Greg; Miller, Michael E; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2013-04-01

    Aging leads to a decline in strength and an associated loss of independence. The authors examined changes in muscle volume, maximum isometric joint moment, functional strength, and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) after resistance training (RT) in the upper extremity of older adults. They evaluated isometric joint moment and muscle volume as predictors of functional strength. Sixteen healthy older adults (average age 75 ± 4.3 yr) were randomized to a 6-wk upper extremity RT program or control group. The RT group increased 1RM significantly (p < .01 for all exercises). Compared with controls, randomization to RT led to greater functional pulling strength (p = .003), isometric shoulder-adduction moment (p = .041), elbow-flexor volume (p = .017), and shoulder-adductor volume (p = .009). Shoulder-muscle volumes and isometric moments were good predictors of functional strength. The authors conclude that shoulder strength is an important factor for performing functional reaching and pulling tasks and a key target for upper extremity RT interventions. PMID:22952203

  19. Upper extremity muscle volumes and functional strength after resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Daly, Melissa; Vidt, Meghan E; Eggebeen, Joel D; Simpson, W Greg; Miller, Michael E; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2013-04-01

    Aging leads to a decline in strength and an associated loss of independence. The authors examined changes in muscle volume, maximum isometric joint moment, functional strength, and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) after resistance training (RT) in the upper extremity of older adults. They evaluated isometric joint moment and muscle volume as predictors of functional strength. Sixteen healthy older adults (average age 75 ± 4.3 yr) were randomized to a 6-wk upper extremity RT program or control group. The RT group increased 1RM significantly (p < .01 for all exercises). Compared with controls, randomization to RT led to greater functional pulling strength (p = .003), isometric shoulder-adduction moment (p = .041), elbow-flexor volume (p = .017), and shoulder-adductor volume (p = .009). Shoulder-muscle volumes and isometric moments were good predictors of functional strength. The authors conclude that shoulder strength is an important factor for performing functional reaching and pulling tasks and a key target for upper extremity RT interventions.

  20. Ground and Space Radar Volume Matching and Comparison Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth; Schwaller, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    This software enables easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. The software was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground based Sand C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite s Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The software is also applicable to other ground-based and space-based radars. The ground and space radar volume matching and comparison software was developed in response to requirements defined by the Ground Validation System (GVS) of Goddard s Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) project. This software innovation is specifically concerned with simplifying the comparison of ground- and spacebased radar measurements for the purpose of GPM algorithm and data product validation. This software is unique in that it provides an operational environment to routinely create comparison products, and uses a direct geometric approach to derive common volumes of space- and ground-based radar data. In this approach, spatially coincident volumes are defined by the intersection of individual space-based Precipitation Radar rays with the each of the conical elevation sweeps of the ground radar. Thus, the resampled volume elements of the space and ground radar reflectivity can be directly compared to one another.

  1. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, p<0.05) after training. Muscle desaturation was not enhanced by low volume aerobic training in this study, possibly because the training volume was too low. However, our findings suggest that aerobic training may potentially enhance muscle desaturation at peak exercise in elderly subjects.

  2. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  3. Determination of equine deep digital flexor muscle volume based on distances between anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Lamers, A A H; van der Kolk, J H; Back, W; Wijnberg, I D

    2014-10-01

    In equine medicine the use of Botox® is experimental. Dosages are determined from human treatment-protocols and limited numbers of equine studies. Determination of target-muscle volume can be helpful to extrapolate human dosages. The aim of the study was to calculate a formula enabling the estimation of the deep digital flexor muscle (DDFM) volume based on distances between anatomical landmarks. Nineteen cadaveric limbs were collected and distance A (top of olecranon to Os carpi accessorium) and B (circumference of limb) were measured. Converting mathematical formulas, C was calculated: π × (((0.5B)/π)(2)) × A. DDFM volume was determined by water displacement. Linear Regression Analysis was used to analyse data. The line best fitting the observed points was: Ln(volume[ml]) = -1.89 + 0.98 × Ln(value C[cm(3)]). Correlation was highest when natural logarithm was applied to both variables and was 0.97. The calculated formula enables estimating DDFM volume of a living horse. This estimated volume can be useful to apply human Botox® treatment-protocols. PMID:25264361

  4. Comparison of muscle fiber directions between different levator ani muscle subdivisions: in vivo MRI measurements in women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyong; Miller, Janis M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis This study describes a technique to quantify muscle fascicle directions in the levator ani (LA) and tests the null hypothesis that the in vivo fascicle directions for each LA subdivision subtend the same parasagittal angle relative to a horizontal reference axis. Methods Visible muscle fascicle direction in the each of the three LA muscle subdivisions, the pubovisceral (PVM; synonymous with pubococcygeal), puborectal (PRM), and iliococcygeal (ICM) muscles, as well as the external anal sphincter (EAS), were measured on 3-T sagittal MRI images in a convenience sample of 14 healthy women in whom muscle fascicles were visible. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) angle values relative to the horizontal were calculated for each muscle subdivision. Repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t tests were used to compare muscle groups. Results Pubovisceral muscle fiber inclination was 41±8.0°, PRM was −19±10.1°, ICM was 33±8.8°, and EAS was −43±6.4°. These fascicle directions were statistically different (p<0.001). Pairwise comparisons among levator subdivisions showed angle differences of 60° between PVM and PRM, and 52° between ICM and PRM. An 84° difference existed between PVM and EAS. The smallest angle difference between levator divisions was between PVM and ICM 8°. The difference between PRM and EAS was 24°. All pairwise comparisons were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The null hypothesis that muscle fascicle inclinations are similar in the three subdivisions of the levator ani and the external anal sphincter was rejected. The largest difference in levator subdivision inclination, 60°, was found between the PVM and PRM. PMID:24832855

  5. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  6. The Development of a Flexible Measuring System for Muscle Volume Using Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Kiyotaka; Fukuda, Osamu; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Muraki, Satoshi

    Quantification of muscle volume can be used as a means for the estimation of muscle strength. Its measuring process does not need the subject's muscular contractions so it is completely safe and particularly suited for elderly people. Therefore, we have developed a flexible measuring system for muscle volume using ultrasonography. In this system, an ultrasound probe is installed on a link mechanism which continuously scans fragmental images along the human body surface. These images are then measured and composed into a wide area cross-sectional image based on the spatial compounding method. The flexibility of the link mechanism enables the operator to measure the images under any body postures and body site. The spatial compounding method significantly reduces speckle and artifact noises from the composed cross-sectional image so that the operator can observe the individual muscles, such as Rectus femoris, Vastus intermedius, and so on, in detail. We conducted the experiments in order to examine the advantages of this system we have developed. The experimental results showed a high accuracy of the measuring position which was calculated using the link mechanism and presented the noise reduction effect based on the spatial compounding method. Finally, we confirmed high correlations between the MRI images and the ones of the developed system to verify the validity of the system.

  7. Low Volume Aerobic Training Heightens Muscle Deoxygenation in Early Post-Angina Pectoris Patients.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Murase, Norio; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low volume aerobic exercise training on muscle O2 dynamics during exercise in early post-angina pectoris (AP) patients, as a pilot study. Seven AP patients (age: 72 ± 6 years) participated in aerobic exercise training for 12 weeks. Training consisted of continuous cycling exercise for 30 min at the individual's estimated lactate threshold, and the subjects trained for 15 ± 5 exercise sessions over 12 weeks. Before and after training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise until exhaustion. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) and relative changes from rest in deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (∆Deoxy-Hb) and total hemoglobin concentration (∆Total-Hb) were monitored at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy during exercise. The SmO2 was significantly lower and ∆Deoxy-Hb was significantly higher after training than before training, while there were no significant changes in ∆Total-Hb. These results indicated that muscle deoxygenation and muscle O2 extraction were potentially heightened by aerobic exercise training in AP patients, even though the exercise training volume was low. PMID:27526151

  8. Comparison of quadriceps inactivation between nerve and muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Casartelli, Nicola; Glatthorn, Julia F; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-12-01

    We evaluated the use of direct muscle stimulation for quantifying quadriceps inactivation at different contraction levels as opposed to conventional twitch interpolation using nerve stimulation. Fourteen healthy volunteers were tested. Paired stimuli were delivered to the femoral nerve or to the quadriceps muscle belly during voluntary contractions ranging from 20% to 100% of maximum, and the amplitude of the superimposed doublet was quantified to investigate inactivation. Superimposed doublet for muscle and nerve stimulation, respectively between the range of 60% to 100% of maximum (e.g., at 100%, muscle stimulation was 14 ± 5 Nm and nerve stimulation was 15 ± 6 Nm). Despite higher current doses, muscle stimulation was associated with less discomfort than nerve stimulation (P < 0.05). Collectively, our data suggest that direct muscle stimulation could be used to assess quadriceps inactivation at maximal and quasi-maximal contraction levels as a valid alternative to motor nerve stimulation.

  9. Editorial Commentary: Single-Image Slice Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments Do Not Predict 3-Dimensional Muscle Volume.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-01-01

    No single-image magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment-Goutallier classification, Fuchs classification, or cross-sectional area-is predictive of whole-muscle volume or fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus. Rather, 3-dimensional MRI measurement of whole-muscle volume and fat-free muscle volume is required and is associated with shoulder strength, which is clinically relevant. Three-dimensional MRI may represent a new gold standard for assessment of the rotator cuff musculature using imaging and may help to predict the feasibility of repair of a rotator cuff tear as well as the postoperative outcome. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional MRI assessment of muscle volume is labor intensive and is not widely available for clinical use.

  10. Comparison between muscle activation measured by electromyography and muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography for effective muscle assessment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Ji-Whan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the intrarater reliability and validity of muscle thickness measured using ultrasonography (US) and muscle activity via electromyography (EMG) during manual muscle testing (MMT) of the external oblique (EO) and lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles. The study subjects were 30 healthy individuals who underwent MMT at different grades. EMG was used to measure the muscle activity in terms of ratio to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and root mean square (RMS) metrics. US was used to measure the raw muscle thickness, the ratio of muscle thickness at MVC, and the ratio of muscle thickness at rest. One examiner performed measurements on each subject in 3 trials. The intrarater reliabilities of the % MVC RMS and raw RMS metrics for EMG and the % MVC thickness metrics for US were excellent (ICC=0.81-0.98). There was a significant difference between all the grades measured using the % MVC thickness metric (p<0.01). Further, this % MVC thickness metric of US showed a significantly higher correlation with the EMG measurement methods than with the others (r=0.51-0.61). Our findings suggest that the % MVC thickness determined by US was the most sensitive of all methods for assessing the MMT grade.

  11. Comparison of Estimated and Measured Muscle Activity During Inclined Walking.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathalie; Schwameder, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    While inclined walking is a frequent daily activity, muscle forces during this activity have rarely been examined. Musculoskeletal models are commonly used to estimate internal forces in healthy populations, but these require a priori validation. The aim of this study was to compare estimated muscle activity using a musculoskeletal model with measured EMG data during inclined walking. Ten healthy male participants walked at different inclinations of 0°, ± 6°, ± 12°, and ± 18° on a ramp equipped with 2 force plates. Kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activity of the musculus (m.) biceps femoris, m. rectus femoris, m. vastus lateralis, m. tibialis anterior, and m. gastrocnemius lateralis were recorded. Agreement between estimated and measured muscle activity was determined via correlation coefficients, mean absolute errors, and trend analysis. Correlation coefficients between estimated and measured muscle activity for approximately 69% of the conditions were above 0.7. Mean absolute errors were rather high with only approximately 38% being ≤ 30%. Trend analysis revealed similar estimated and measured muscle activities for all muscles and tasks (uphill and downhill walking), except m. tibialis anterior during uphill walking. This model can be used for further analysis in similar groups of participants.

  12. Effect of exercise intervention on thigh muscle volume and anatomical cross-sectional areas--quantitative assessment using MRI.

    PubMed

    Hudelmaier, Martin; Wirth, Wolfgang; Himmer, Maria; Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne; Sänger, Alexandra; Eckstein, Felix

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the location-specific magnitudes of an exercise intervention on thigh muscle volume and anatomical cross-sectional area, using MRI. Forty one untrained women participated in strength, endurance, or autogenic training for 12 weeks. Axial MR images of the thigh were acquired before and after the intervention, using a T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence (10 mm sections, 0.78 mm in-plane resolution). The extensor, flexor, adductor, and sartorius muscles were segmented between the femoral neck and the rectus femoris tendon. Muscle volumes were determined, and anatomical cross-sectional areas were derived from 3D reconstructions at 10% (proximal-to-distal) intervals. With strength training, the volume of the extensors (+3.1%), flexors (+3.5%), and adductors (+3.9%) increased significantly (P < 0.05) between baseline and follow-up, and with endurance training, the volume of the extensor (+3.7%) and sartorius (+5.1%) increased significantly (P < 0.05). No relevant or statistically significant change was observed with autogenic training. The greatest standardized response means were observed for the anatomical cross-sectional area in the proximal aspect (10-30%) of the thigh and generally exceeded those for muscle volumes. The study shows that MRI can be used to monitor location-specific effects of exercise intervention on muscle cross-sectional areas, with the proximal aspect of the thigh muscles being most responsive. PMID:20665894

  13. Limb volume measurements: comparison of accuracy and decisive parameters of the most used present methods.

    PubMed

    Chromy, Adam; Zalud, Ludek; Dobsak, Petr; Suskevic, Igor; Mrkvicova, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Limb volume measurements are used for evaluating growth of muscle mass and effectivity of strength training. Beside sport sciences, it is used e.g. for detection of oedemas, lymphedemas or carcinomas or for examinations of muscle atrophy. There are several commonly used methods, but there is a lack of clear comparison, which shows their advantages and limits. The accuracy of each method is uncertainly estimated only. The aim of this paper is to determine and experimentally verify their accuracy and compare them among each other. Water Displacement Method (WD), three methods based on circumferential measures-Frustum Sign Model (FSM), Disc Model (DM), Partial Frustum Model (PFM) and two 3D scan based methods Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were compared. Precise reference cylinders and limbs of two human subjects were measured 10 times by each method. Personal dependency of methods was also tested by measuring 10 times the same object by 3 different people. Accuracies: WD 0.3 %, FSM 2-8 % according person, DM, PFM 1-8 %, MRI 2 % (hand) or 8 % (finger), CT 0.5 % (hand) or 2 % (finger);times: FSM 1 min, CT 7 min, WD, DM, PFM 15 min, MRI 19 min; and more. WD was found as the best method for most of uses with best accuracy. The CT disposes with almost the same accuracy and allows measurements of specific regions (e.g. particular muscles), as same as MRI, which accuracy is worse though, but it is not harmful. Frustum Sign Model is usable for very fast estimation of limb volume, but with lower accuracy, Disc Model and Partial Frustum Model is useful in cases when Water Displacement cannot be used. PMID:26618096

  14. Leg muscle volume during 30-day 6-degree head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Lee, P. L.; Ellis, S.; Selzer, R. H.; Ortendahl, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to compare the effect of two modes of lower-extremity exercise training on the mass (volume) of posterior leg group (PLG) muscles (soleus, flexor hallucis longus, tibialis posterior, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and flexor digitorum longus) on 19 men (ages 32-42 years) subjected to intense dynamic-isotonic (ITE, cycle ergometer, number of subjects (N) = 7), isokinetic (IKE, torque egrometer, N = 7), and no exercise (NOE, N = 5) training for 60 min/day during head-down bed rest (HDBR). Total volume of the PLG muscles decreased (p less than 0.05) similarly: ITE = 4.3 +/- SE 1.6%, IKE = 7.7 +/- 1.6%, and NOE = 6.3 +/- 0.8%; combined volume (N = 19) loss was 6.1 +/- 0.9%. Ranges of volume changes were 2.6% to -9.0% (ITE), -2.1% to -14.9% (IKE), and -3.4% to -8/1% (NOE). Correlation coefficients (r) of muscle volume versus thickness measured with ultrasonography were: ITE r + 0.79 (p less than 0.05), IKE r = 0.27 (not significant (NS)), and NOE r = 0.63 (NS). Leg-muscle volume and thickness were highly correlated (r = 0.79) when plasma volume was maintained during HDBR with ITE. Thus, neither intensive lower extremity ITE nor IKE training influence the normal non-exercised posterior leg muscle atrophy during HDBR. The relationship of muscle volume and thickness may depend on the mode of exercise training associated with the maintenance of plasma volume.

  15. Reducing resistance training volume during Ramadan improves muscle strength and power in football players.

    PubMed

    Rebaï, H; Chtourou, H; Zarrouk, N; Harzallah, A; Kanoun, I; Dogui, M; Souissi, N; Tabka, Z

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of maintaining or reducing resistance training volume during Ramadan-intermittent-fasting (RIF) on short-term maximal performances. 20 footballers (age: 18.4 ± 0.8 years; body-mass: 72.4 ± 4.1 kg; height: 183.4 ± 4.6 cm) were matched and randomly assigned to a normal-training-group (G1) or a tapering-group (G2). They were tested for muscular strength (maximal-voluntary-contraction) and power (squat-jump and counter-movement-jump) 1 month before RIF (T0), 1 week before RIF (T1), after 2 weeks of fasting (T2) and at the end of RIF (T3). From T1 to T2, subjects performed a whole-body resistance training program (8-repetitions × 4-sets with 4-min recovery in-between). During RIF, G1 maintained the same training program, while G2 performed a period of reduced training volume (3 sets/exercise; - 22%). Muscle strength and power increased significantly from T0 to T1, from T0 to T2 and from T0 to T3 in G1 and G2 and from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3 only in G2 (p<0.05). Performance was higher in G2 than G1 during T2 (p<0.01). Moreover, the ∆-change of performance between T0 and T2 and T3 was significantly higher in G2 than G1 (p<0.05). For young soccer players, a tapering period characterized by a reduced training volume during RIF may lead to significant improvement in muscle strength and power.

  16. Reducing resistance training volume during Ramadan improves muscle strength and power in football players.

    PubMed

    Rebaï, H; Chtourou, H; Zarrouk, N; Harzallah, A; Kanoun, I; Dogui, M; Souissi, N; Tabka, Z

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of maintaining or reducing resistance training volume during Ramadan-intermittent-fasting (RIF) on short-term maximal performances. 20 footballers (age: 18.4 ± 0.8 years; body-mass: 72.4 ± 4.1 kg; height: 183.4 ± 4.6 cm) were matched and randomly assigned to a normal-training-group (G1) or a tapering-group (G2). They were tested for muscular strength (maximal-voluntary-contraction) and power (squat-jump and counter-movement-jump) 1 month before RIF (T0), 1 week before RIF (T1), after 2 weeks of fasting (T2) and at the end of RIF (T3). From T1 to T2, subjects performed a whole-body resistance training program (8-repetitions × 4-sets with 4-min recovery in-between). During RIF, G1 maintained the same training program, while G2 performed a period of reduced training volume (3 sets/exercise; - 22%). Muscle strength and power increased significantly from T0 to T1, from T0 to T2 and from T0 to T3 in G1 and G2 and from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3 only in G2 (p<0.05). Performance was higher in G2 than G1 during T2 (p<0.01). Moreover, the ∆-change of performance between T0 and T2 and T3 was significantly higher in G2 than G1 (p<0.05). For young soccer players, a tapering period characterized by a reduced training volume during RIF may lead to significant improvement in muscle strength and power. PMID:24048913

  17. Time course of low- and high-volume strength training on neuromuscular adaptations and muscle quality in older women.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Regis; Botton, Cíntia E; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Bottaro, Martim; Brown, Lee E; Lacerda, Fabiano; Gaya, Anelise; Moraes, Kelly; Peruzzolo, Amanda; Pinto, Ronei S

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of low- and high-volume strength trainings on neuromuscular adaptations of lower- and upper-body muscles in older women after 6 weeks (6WE), 13 weeks (13WE), and 20 weeks (20WE) of training. Healthy older women were assigned to low-volume (LV) or high-volume (HV) training groups. The LV group performed one set of each exercise, while the HV group performed three sets, 2 days/week. Knee extension and elbow flexion one-repetition maximum (1-RM), maximal isometric strength, maximal muscle activation, and muscle thickness (MT) of the lower- and upper-body muscles, as well as lower-body muscle quality (MQ) obtained by ultrasonography, were evaluated. Knee extension and elbow flexion 1-RM improved at all time points for both groups; however, knee extension 1-RM gains were greater for the HV group after 20WE. Maximal isometric strength of the lower body for both groups increased only at 20WE, while upper-body maximal isometric strength increased after 13WE and 20WE. Maximal activation of the lower and upper body for both groups increased only after 20WE. Both groups showed significant increases in MT of their lower and upper body, with greater gains in lower-body MT for the HV group at 20WE. MQ improved in both groups after 13WE and 20WE, whereas the HV group improved more than the LV group at 20WE. These results showed that low- and high-volume trainings have a similar adaptation time course in the muscular function of upper-body muscles. However, high-volume training appears to be more efficient for lower-body muscles after 20 weeks of training.

  18. Comparison of a space shuttle flight (STS-78) and bed rest on human muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Lee, G. A.; Widrick, J. J.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess muscle fiber size, composition, and in vivo contractile characteristics of the calf muscle of four male crew members during a 17-day spaceflight (SF; Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission) and eight men during a 17-day bed rest (BR). The protocols and timelines of these two investigations were identical, therefore allowing for direct comparisons between SF and the BR. The subjects' age, height, and weight were 43 +/- 2 yr, 183 +/- 4 cm, and 86 +/- 3 kg for SF and 43 +/- 2 yr, 182 +/- 3 cm, and 82 +/- 4 kg for BR, respectively. Calf muscle strength was examined before SF and BR; on days 2, 8, and 12 during SF and BR; and on days 2 and 8 of recovery. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and within 3 h after SF (gastrocnemius and soleus) and BR (soleus) before reloading. Maximal isometric calf strength and the force-velocity characteristics were unchanged with SF or BR. Additionally, neither SF nor BR had any effect on fiber composition or fiber size of the calf muscles studied. In summary, no changes in calf muscle strength and morphology were observed after the 17-day SF and BR. Because muscle strength is lost during unloading, both during spaceflight and on the ground, these data suggest that the testing sequence employed during the SF and BR may have served as a resistance training countermeasure to attenuate whole muscle strength loss.

  19. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  20. Automatic electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles increases tidal volume and cough peak flow in tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gollee, H; Hunt, K J; Allan, D B; Fraser, M H; McLean, A N

    2008-01-01

    Paralysis of the respiratory muscles in people with tetraplegia affects their ability to breathe and contributes to respiratory complications. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) of abdominal wall muscles can be used to increase tidal volume (V_{T}) and improve cough peak flow (CPF) in tetraplegic subjects who are able to breathe spontaneously. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel abdominal FES system which generates stimulation automatically, synchronised with the subjects' voluntary breathing activity. Four subjects with complete tetraplegia (C4-C6), breathing spontaneously, were recruited. The automatic stimulation system ensured that consistent stimulation was achieved. We compared spirometry during unassisted and FES-assisted quiet breathing and coughing, and measured the effect of stimulation on end-tidal CO_2 (EtCO_2) during quiet breathing. The system dependably recognised spontaneous respiratory effort, stimulating appropriately, and was well tolerated by patients. Significant increases in V_T during quiet breathing (range 0.05-0.23 L) and in CPF (range 0.04-0.49 L/s) were observed. Respiratory rate during quiet breathing decreased in all subjects when stimulated, whereas minute ventilation increased by 1.05-2.07 L/min. The changes in EtCO_2 were inconclusive. The automatic stimulation system augmented spontaneous breathing and coughing in tetraplegic patients and may provide a potential means of respiratory support for tetraplegic patients with reduced respiratory capacity.

  1. Tidal volume and diaphragm muscle activity in rats with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Imagita, Hidetaka; Nishikawa, Akira; Sakata, Susumu; Nishii, Yasue; Minematsu, Akira; Moriyama, Hideki; Kanemura, Naohiko; Shindo, Hanae

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to make an experimental model of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) using Wistar rats, in order to analyze the influence of CSCI on the respiratory function. [Subjects] Thirty-two male 12-week-old Wistar rats were used. [Methods] The CSCI was made at the levels from C3 to C7, and we performed pneumotachography and electromyography (EMG) on the diaphragm. Computed tomography was used to determine the level of spinal cord damage. [Results] After the operation, the tidal volume of the rats with a C3 level injury decreased to approximately 22.3% of its pre-injury value. In addition, in the same rats, the diaphragmatic electromyogram activity decreased remarkably. Compared with before CSCI, the tidal volume decreased to 78.6% of its pre-injury value in CSCI at the C5 level, and it decreased to 94.1% of its pre-injury value in CSCI at the C7 level. [Conclusion] In the rats that sustained a CSCI in this study, the group of respiratory muscles that receive innervation from the thoracic spinal cord was paralyzed. Therefore, the EMG signal of the diaphragm increased. These results demonstrate that there is a relationship between respiratory function and the level of CSCI. PMID:25931732

  2. The validity of anthropometric leg muscle volume estimation across a wide spectrum: from able-bodied adults to individuals with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Venturelli, Massimo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of muscle volume, and changes over time, have significant clinical and research-related implications. Methods to assess muscle volume vary from simple and inexpensive to complex and expensive. Therefore this study sought to examine the validity of muscle volume estimated simply by anthropometry compared with the more complex proton magnetic resonance imaging ((1)H-MRI) across a wide spectrum of individuals including those with a spinal cord injury (SCI), a group recognized to exhibit significant muscle atrophy. Accordingly, muscle volume of the thigh and lower leg of eight subjects with a SCI and eight able-bodied subjects (controls) was determined by anthropometry and (1)H-MRI. With either method, muscle volumes were significantly lower in the SCI compared with the controls (P < 0.05) and, using pooled data from both groups, anthropometric measurements of muscle volume were strongly correlated to the values assessed by (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (r(2) = 0.89; P < 0.05) and lower leg (r(2) = 0.98; P < 0.05). However, the anthropometric approach systematically overestimated muscle volume compared with (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (mean bias = 2407cm(3)) and the lower (mean bias = 170 cm(3)) leg. Thus with an appropriate correction for this systemic overestimation, muscle volume estimated from anthropometric measurements is a valid approach and provides acceptable accuracy across a spectrum of adults with normal muscle mass to a SCI and severe muscle atrophy. In practical terms this study provides the formulas that add validity to the already simple and inexpensive anthropometric approach to assess muscle volume in clinical and research settings.

  3. Comparison of muscle force, muscle endurance, and electromyogram activity during an expedition at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Sakai, A.; Yanagidaira, N.; Asano, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kashimura, N.; Ueda, G.; Wu, T.; Zhang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Handgrip force (HF), maximal pinch force (MF), muscle endurance (ME), and the median power frequency (MdPF) of the activity shown in the electromyogram (EMG) were studied at various altitudes in eight normal healthy subjects. MF and ME were measured between the index finger and thumb, and all measurements were obtained at altitudes ranging from 610 to 4860 m during an expedition in the Qinghai Plateau in China. With the change in altitude HF, ME, and MF showed no significant change. Compared to the MdPF at 2260 m on ascent, the MdPF at other altitudes showed a significant decrease ( P<0.01). Thus, we conclude that muscle performance (HF, MF, and ME) was not affected by the environment at high altitude. However, MdPF was affected and the mean MdPF at 610 m after the expedition did not recover to initial values of MdPF. We suggest these results may have been affected by fatigue and chronic exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic environment, since the members of the expedition party expressed feelings of sluggishness and fatigue after the expedition.

  4. Novel muscle and connective tissue design enables high extensibility and controls engulfment volume in lunge-feeding rorqual whales.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Robert E; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Potvin, Jean; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Vogl, A Wayne

    2013-07-15

    Muscle serves a wide variety of mechanical functions during animal feeding and locomotion, but the performance of this tissue is limited by how far it can be extended. In rorqual whales, feeding and locomotion are integrated in a dynamic process called lunge feeding, where an enormous volume of prey-laden water is engulfed into a capacious ventral oropharyngeal cavity that is bounded superficially by skeletal muscle and ventral groove blubber (VGB). The great expansion of the cavity wall presents a mechanical challenge for the physiological limits of skeletal muscle, yet its role is considered fundamental in controlling the flux of water into the mouth. Our analyses of the functional properties and mechanical behaviour of VGB muscles revealed a crimped microstructure in an unstrained, non-feeding state that is arranged in parallel with dense and straight elastin fibres. This allows the muscles to accommodate large tissue deformations of the VGB yet still operate within the known strain limits of vertebrate skeletal muscle. VGB transverse strains in routine-feeding rorquals were substantially less than those observed in dead ones, where decomposition gas stretched the VGB to its elastic limit, evidence supporting the idea that eccentric muscle contraction modulates the rate of expansion and ultimate size of the ventral cavity during engulfment.

  5. A comparison of static and dynamic optimization muscle force predictions during wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Melissa M; Rankin, Jeffery W; Neptune, Richard R; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the shoulder and elbow muscle moment arms and net joint moments from the dynamic optimization were used as inputs into the static optimization routine. RMS errors between model predictions were calculated to quantify model agreement. There was a wide range of individual muscle force agreement that spanned from poor (26.4% Fmax error in the middle deltoid) to good (6.4% Fmax error in the anterior deltoid) in the prime movers of the shoulder. The predicted muscle forces from the static optimization were sufficient to create the appropriate motion and joint moments at the shoulder for the push phase of wheelchair propulsion, but showed deviations in the elbow moment, pronation-supination motion and hand rim forces. These results suggest the static approach does not produce results similar enough to be a replacement for forward dynamics simulations, and care should be taken in choosing the appropriate method for a specific task and set of constraints. Dynamic optimization modeling approaches may be required for motions that are greatly influenced by muscle activation dynamics or that require significant co-contraction. PMID:25282075

  6. A comparison of static and dynamic optimization muscle force predictions during wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Melissa M; Rankin, Jeffery W; Neptune, Richard R; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the shoulder and elbow muscle moment arms and net joint moments from the dynamic optimization were used as inputs into the static optimization routine. RMS errors between model predictions were calculated to quantify model agreement. There was a wide range of individual muscle force agreement that spanned from poor (26.4% Fmax error in the middle deltoid) to good (6.4% Fmax error in the anterior deltoid) in the prime movers of the shoulder. The predicted muscle forces from the static optimization were sufficient to create the appropriate motion and joint moments at the shoulder for the push phase of wheelchair propulsion, but showed deviations in the elbow moment, pronation-supination motion and hand rim forces. These results suggest the static approach does not produce results similar enough to be a replacement for forward dynamics simulations, and care should be taken in choosing the appropriate method for a specific task and set of constraints. Dynamic optimization modeling approaches may be required for motions that are greatly influenced by muscle activation dynamics or that require significant co-contraction.

  7. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter III, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least −60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  8. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-06-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least -60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  9. Ventilatory muscle loads and the frequency-tidal volume pattern during inspiratory pressure-assisted (pressure-supported) ventilation.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R; Leatherman, N E

    1990-02-01

    Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a new form of mechanical ventilatory support that assists a patient's spontaneous ventilatory effort with a clinician-selected amount of inspiratory pressure. In order to assess the muscle unloading effect and the ventilatory pattern response to increasing levels of this inspiratory pressure assist, we first utilized a computer respiratory system model with variable alveolar ventilation demands and impedances. From this model, we calculated ventilatory muscle loads (expressed either as the work/min or as the pressure time index) during simulated, unassisted breathing and during simulated breathing with levels of inspiratory pressure assist up to that which resulted in a VT of 800 ml and no work being performed by the muscles (defined as PSVmax for the model conditions being studied). The optimal ventilatory pattern (i.e., frequency-tidal volume) under each ventilation and impedance condition was defined as that which resulted in minimal muscle load. Under these model conditions, we found that PSVmax ranged from 5 to 41 cm H2O and that as the level of inspiratory pressure assist was increased from zero to PSVmax, there was a biphasic response of both the ventilatory muscle loading and the ventilatory pattern. Specifically, at low levels of inspiratory pressure assist, the model predicted that the applied pressure would only partially unload the ventilatory muscles. Continued muscle energy expenditure would thus still be required, whereas the ventilatory pattern would change little. Conversely, at higher levels of inspiratory pressure assist, the model predicted that the applied pressure would be sufficient to completely unload the ventilatory muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James; Hays, David; Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  11. Adolescent Volume Conservation Abilities: A Comparison of Three Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protinsky, Howard O.; Hughston, George

    1980-01-01

    In a study to determine procedural effects of volume conservation tasks performed by adolescent females, the results revealed that the LaVatelli water displacement test was significantly more difficult than the Elkind test or Piaget's test. (Author/RL)

  12. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  13. Comparison of volume estimation methods for pancreatic islet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, JiřÃ.­; Å vihlík, Jan; Habart, David; Kybic, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution we study different methods of automatic volume estimation for pancreatic islets which can be used in the quality control step prior to the islet transplantation. The total islet volume is an important criterion in the quality control. Also, the individual islet volume distribution is interesting -- it has been indicated that smaller islets can be more effective. A 2D image of a microscopy slice containing the islets is acquired. The input of the volume estimation methods are segmented images of individual islets. The segmentation step is not discussed here. We consider simple methods of volume estimation assuming that the islets have spherical or ellipsoidal shape. We also consider a local stereological method, namely the nucleator. The nucleator does not rely on any shape assumptions and provides unbiased estimates if isotropic sections through the islets are observed. We present a simulation study comparing the performance of the volume estimation methods in different scenarios and an experimental study comparing the methods on a real dataset.

  14. Comparisons of muscle oxygenation changes between arm and leg muscles during incremental rowing exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Wang, Bangde; Gong, Hui; Xu, Guodong; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose is to compare the changes in muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps brachii (BB) muscles simultaneously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during incremental rowing exercise in eight rowers. Based on the BB and VL muscle oxygenation patterns, two points are used to characterize the muscle oxygenation kinetics in both the arm and the leg muscles. The first point is the breaking point (Bp), which refers to an accelerated fall in muscle oxygenation that correlates with the gas exchange threshold (GET). The second point is the leveling-off point (Lo), which suggests the upper limit of O2 extraction. The GET occurred at 63.3+/-2.4% of maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2 max). The Bp appeared at 45.0+/-3.8% and 55.6+/-2.4% V˙O2 max in the BB and VL, respectively. The Lo appeared at 63.6+/-4.1% and 86.6+/-1.0% V˙O2 max in these two muscles, respectively. Both the Bp and the Lo occurred earlier in BB compared with VL. These results suggest that arm muscles have lower oxidative capacity than leg muscles during rowing exercise. The rowers with higher exercise performances showed heavier workloads, as evaluated by Bp and Lo. The monitoring of muscle oxygenation by NIRS in arm and leg muscles during rowing could be a useful guide for evaluation and training.

  15. Comparison of incremental and constant load tests of inspiratory muscle endurance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Jenkins, S C; Philippe, D L; Shepherd, K L; Hillman, D R; Eastwood, P R

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relative value of incremental and constant load tests in detecting changes in inspiratory muscle endurance following high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (H-IMT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In total, 16 subjects (11 males; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 37.4+/-12.5%) underwent H-IMT. In addition, 17 subjects (11 males; FEV(1) 36.5+/-11.5%) underwent sham inspiratory muscle training (S-IMT). Training took place three times a week for 8 weeks. Baseline and post-training measurements were obtained of maximum threshold pressure sustained during an incremental load test (P(th,max)) and time breathing against a constant load (t(lim)). Breathing pattern was unconstrained. H-IMT increased P(th,max) and t(lim) relative to baseline and to any change seen following S-IMT. The effect size for P(th,max) was greater than for t(lim). Post-training tests were accompanied by changes in breathing pattern, including decreased duty cycle, which may have served to decrease inspiratory work and thereby contribute to the increase in P(th,max) and t(lim) in both groups. When assessing inspiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via tests in which the pattern of breathing is unconstrained, the current authors recommend incremental load tests be used in preference to constant load tests. However, to attribute changes in these tests to improvements in inspiratory muscle endurance, breathing pattern should be controlled.

  16. Inter-sport variability of muscle volume distribution identified by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis in four ball sports

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yosuke; Masuo, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Eitaro; Oda, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify differences in muscle distribution in athletes of various ball sports using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA). Participants were 115 male collegiate athletes from four ball sports (baseball, soccer, tennis, and lacrosse). Percent body fat (%BF) and lean body mass were measured, and SBIA was used to measure segmental muscle volume (MV) in bilateral upper arms, forearms, thighs, and lower legs. We calculated the MV ratios of dominant to nondominant, proximal to distal, and upper to lower limbs. The measurements consisted of a total of 31 variables. Cluster and factor analyses were applied to identify redundant variables. The muscle distribution was significantly different among groups, but the %BF was not. The classification procedures of the discriminant analysis could correctly distinguish 84.3% of the athletes. These results suggest that collegiate ball game athletes have adapted their physique to their sport movements very well, and the SBIA, which is an affordable, noninvasive, easy-to-operate, and fast alternative method in the field, can distinguish ball game athletes according to their specific muscle distribution within a 5-minute measurement. The SBIA could be a useful, affordable, and fast tool for identifying talents for specific sports. PMID:24379714

  17. Inter-sport variability of muscle volume distribution identified by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis in four ball sports.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Masuo, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Eitaro; Oda, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify differences in muscle distribution in athletes of various ball sports using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA). Participants were 115 male collegiate athletes from four ball sports (baseball, soccer, tennis, and lacrosse). Percent body fat (%BF) and lean body mass were measured, and SBIA was used to measure segmental muscle volume (MV) in bilateral upper arms, forearms, thighs, and lower legs. We calculated the MV ratios of dominant to nondominant, proximal to distal, and upper to lower limbs. The measurements consisted of a total of 31 variables. Cluster and factor analyses were applied to identify redundant variables. The muscle distribution was significantly different among groups, but the %BF was not. The classification procedures of the discriminant analysis could correctly distinguish 84.3% of the athletes. These results suggest that collegiate ball game athletes have adapted their physique to their sport movements very well, and the SBIA, which is an affordable, noninvasive, easy-to-operate, and fast alternative method in the field, can distinguish ball game athletes according to their specific muscle distribution within a 5-minute measurement. The SBIA could be a useful, affordable, and fast tool for identifying talents for specific sports.

  18. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  19. Expiratory muscle fatigue does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; How, Stephen C; Romer, Lee M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether expiratory muscle fatigue (EMF) is involved in regulating operating lung volumes during exercise, nine recreationally active subjects cycled at 90% of peak work rate to the limit of tolerance with prior induction of EMF (EMF-ex) and for a time equal to that achieved in EMF-ex without prior induction of EMF (ISO-ex). EMF was assessed by measuring changes in magnetically evoked gastric twitch pressure. Changes in end-expiratory and end-inspiratory lung volume (EELV and EILV) and the degree of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) were quantified using maximal expiratory flow-volume curves and inspiratory capacity maneuvers. Resistive breathing reduced gastric twitch pressure (-24 ± 14%, P = 0.004). During EMF-ex, EELV decreased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise [39 ± 8 vs. 27 ± 7% of forced vital capacity (FVC), P = 0.001] before increasing toward baseline (34 ± 8% of FVC end exercise, P = 0.073 vs. rest). EILV increased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise (54 ± 8 vs. 84 ± 9% of FVC, P = 0.006) and remained elevated to end exercise (88 ± 9% of FVC). Neither EELV (P = 0.18) nor EILV (P = 0.26) was different at any time point during EMF-ex vs. ISO-ex. Four subjects became expiratory flow limited during the final minute of EMF-ex and ISO-ex; the degree of EFL was not different between trials (37 ± 18 vs. 35 ± 16% of tidal volume, P = 0.38). At end exercise in both trials, EELV was greater in subjects without vs. subjects with EFL. These findings suggest that 1) contractile fatigue of the expiratory muscles in healthy humans does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity sustained cycle exercise; and 2) factors other than "frank" EFL cause the terminal increase in EELV.

  20. Expiratory muscle fatigue does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; How, Stephen C; Romer, Lee M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether expiratory muscle fatigue (EMF) is involved in regulating operating lung volumes during exercise, nine recreationally active subjects cycled at 90% of peak work rate to the limit of tolerance with prior induction of EMF (EMF-ex) and for a time equal to that achieved in EMF-ex without prior induction of EMF (ISO-ex). EMF was assessed by measuring changes in magnetically evoked gastric twitch pressure. Changes in end-expiratory and end-inspiratory lung volume (EELV and EILV) and the degree of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) were quantified using maximal expiratory flow-volume curves and inspiratory capacity maneuvers. Resistive breathing reduced gastric twitch pressure (-24 ± 14%, P = 0.004). During EMF-ex, EELV decreased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise [39 ± 8 vs. 27 ± 7% of forced vital capacity (FVC), P = 0.001] before increasing toward baseline (34 ± 8% of FVC end exercise, P = 0.073 vs. rest). EILV increased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise (54 ± 8 vs. 84 ± 9% of FVC, P = 0.006) and remained elevated to end exercise (88 ± 9% of FVC). Neither EELV (P = 0.18) nor EILV (P = 0.26) was different at any time point during EMF-ex vs. ISO-ex. Four subjects became expiratory flow limited during the final minute of EMF-ex and ISO-ex; the degree of EFL was not different between trials (37 ± 18 vs. 35 ± 16% of tidal volume, P = 0.38). At end exercise in both trials, EELV was greater in subjects without vs. subjects with EFL. These findings suggest that 1) contractile fatigue of the expiratory muscles in healthy humans does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity sustained cycle exercise; and 2) factors other than "frank" EFL cause the terminal increase in EELV. PMID:23558390

  1. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  2. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K81: Chloramphenicol in pig muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzer, Joachim; Henrion, Andre; Gowik, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM) a key comparison, CCQM-K81 'Chloramphenicol in pig muscle', was coordinated by BVL and PTB in 2009/2010. Six NMIs/DIs participated in this comparison. Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an effective broad-spectrum antibiotic which can in principle be used for the treatment of humans and animals. Its use for the treatment of food-producing animals is, however, forbidden worldwide in many countries due to potential severe side effects. The key comparison was the follow-up to the successful pilot study 'CCQM-P90: chloramphenicol in milk'. With this key comparison it was intended to demonstrate the capability of NMIs/DIs to analyse traces of CAP in food at concentration levels resulting from legal requirements for food control. Additionally, the quality of this kind of analysis with respect to compliance with legal requirements for food control methods and the international comparability of measurements should be evaluated in general. The study was classified as a 'track C' study (studies in emerging areas of global interest). For the study incurred lyophilised pig muscle material containing CAP (at a mass-fraction level around the maximum allowable level for import for a number of countries) has been produced as a candidate reference material by BVL and IRMM (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC of the European Commission). Animal treatment and slaughtering of the animal to gain incurred muscle material as well as pre-testing of the CAP content was done at the BVL. The IRMM did further processing of the material and testing of homogeneity and stability. Participants were invited to assign the mass fraction of free CAP in the comparison sample. CCQM-K81 demonstrated successfully the capability of the participating laboratories to assign chloramphenicol values in tissue down to residue levels of around 0.3 ng/g (referring to the

  3. Bone geometry in response to long-term tennis playing and its relationship with muscle volume: a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ducher, G; Courteix, D; Même, S; Magni, C; Viala, J F; Benhamou, C L

    2005-10-01

    The benefit of impact-loading activity for bone strength depends on whether the additional bone mineral content (BMC) accrued at loaded sites is due to an increased bone size, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) or both. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the aim of this study was to characterize the geometric changes of the dominant radius in response to long-term tennis playing and to assess the influence of muscle forces on bone tissue by investigating the muscle-bone relationship. Twenty tennis players (10 men and 10 women, mean age: 23.1+/-4.7 years, with 14.3+/-3.4 years of playing) were recruited. The total bone volume, cortical volume, sub-cortical volume and muscle volume were measured at both distal radii by MRI. BMC was assessed by DXA and was divided by the total bone volume to derive vBMD. Grip strength was evaluated with a dynamometer. Significant side-to-side differences (P<0.0001) were found in muscle volume (+9.7%), grip strength (+13.3%), BMC (+13.5%), total bone volume (+10.3%) and sub-cortical volume (+20.6%), but not in cortical volume (+2.6%, ns). The asymmetry in total bone volume explained 75% of the variance in BMC asymmetry (P<0.0001). vBMD was slightly higher on the dominant side (+3.3%, P<0.05). Grip strength and muscle volume correlated with all bone variables (except vBMD) on both sides (r=0.48-0.86, P<0.05-0.0001) but the asymmetries in muscle parameters did not correlate with those in bone parameters. After adjustment for muscle volume or grip strength, BMC was still greater on the dominant side. This study showed that the greater BMC induced by long-term tennis playing at the dominant radius was associated to a marked increase in bone size and a slight improvement in volumetric BMD, thereby improving bone strength. In addition to the muscle contractions, other mechanical stimuli seemed to exert a direct effect on bone tissue, contributing to the specific bone response to tennis

  4. Comparison of Cerebral Blood Volume and Plasma Volume in Untreated Intracranial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Joana; Eldeniz, Cihat; An, Hongyu; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plasma volume and blood volume are imaging-derived parameters that are often used to evaluation intracranial tumors. Physiologically, these parameters are directly related, but their two different methods of measurements, T1-dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)- and T2-dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MR utilize different model assumptions and approaches. This poses the question of whether the interchangeable use of T1-DCE-MRI derived fractionated plasma volume (vp) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) assessed using DSC-MRI, particularly in glioblastoma, is reliable, and if this relationship can be generalized to other types of brain tumors. Our goal was to examine the hypothetical correlation between these parameters in three most common intracranial tumor types. Methods Twenty-four newly diagnosed, treatment naïve brain tumor patients, who had undergone DCE- and DSC-MRI, were classified in three histologically proven groups: glioblastoma (n = 7), meningioma (n = 9), and intraparenchymal metastases (n = 8). The rCBV was obtained from DSC after normalization with the normal-appearing anatomically symmetrical contralateral white matter. Correlations between these parameters were evaluated using Pearson (r), Spearman's (ρ) and Kendall’s tau-b (τB) rank correlation coefficient. Results The Pearson, Spearman and Kendall’s correlation between vp with rCBV were r = 0.193, ρ = 0.253 and τB = 0.33 (p-Pearson = 0.326, p-Spearman = 0.814 and p-Kendall = 0.823) in glioblastoma, r = -0.007, ρ = 0.051 and τB = 0.135 (p-Pearson = 0.970, p-Spearman = 0.765 and p-Kendall = 0.358) in meningiomas, and r = 0.289, ρ = 0.228 and τB = 0.239 (p-Pearson = 0.109, p-Spearman = 0.210 and p-Kendall = 0.095) in metastasis. Conclusion Results indicate that no correlation exists between vp with rCBV in glioblastomas, meningiomas and intraparenchymal metastatic lesions. Consequently, these parameters, as calculated in this study, should not be used interchangeably in

  5. Triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise improves session volume load and reduces muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen P; Mabon, Tom; Pryde, Mitchell; Feebrey, Sarah; Cannon, Jack

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise would enhance muscular performance, produce a more favorable anabolic profile, and reduce biochemical markers of muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. Fifteen male strength-trained athletes completed two acute lower-body resistance exercise sessions to fatigue 7 days apart. After a 4-hour fast, participants consumed either a multinutrient supplement (Musashi 1-2-3 Step System, Notting Hill, Australia) (SUPP) or placebo (PLA) beverage preexercise (PRE), during (DUR), and immediately postexercise (IP). Session volume loads were calculated as kilograms × repetitions. Lower-body peak power was measured using unloaded repeated countermovement jumps, and blood samples were collected to assess biochemistry, serum hormones, and muscle damage markers at PRE, DUR, IP, 30 minutes postexercise (P30), and 24 hours postexercise (P24h). The SUPP demonstrated increased glucose concentrations at DUR and IP compared with at PRE (P < .01), whereas PLA demonstrated higher glucose at P30 compared with at PRE (P < .001). Session volume load was higher for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). Cortisol increased at DUR, IP, and P30 compared with at PRE in both treatments (P < .05); however, SUPP also displayed lower cortisol at P24h compared with at PRE and PLA (P < .01). The total testosterone response to exercise was higher for PLA compared with SUPP (P < .01); however, total creatine kinase and C-reactive protein responses to exercise were lower for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). These data indicate that although triphasic multinutrient supplementation did not produce a more favorable anabolic profile, it improved acute resistance exercise performance while attenuating muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

  6. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis. PMID:26180321

  7. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: COOMET.RI(II)-S1.Rn-222 (169/UA/98): Rn-222 volume activity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliarov, V.; Röttger, A.; Honig, A.; Korostin, S.; Kuznetsov, S.; Lapenas, A.; Milevsky, V.; Ivaniukovich, A.; Kharitonov, I.; Sepman, S.

    2009-01-01

    According to a first program, a supplementary comparison of Rn-222 volume activity was drawn up as a bilateral supplementary comparison between NSC 'Institute of Metrology', Ukraine, and VNIIFTRI, Russia. It took place in March 2005. In April 2005, at the 5th meeting of COOMET held in Braunschweig (Germany), representatives of these institutes exchanged data which showed the comparability of the national standards of Ukraine and Russia for the check points. During the discussion of the procedure some other institutes decided to join the comparison program, which was extended to BelGIM (Belarus), PTB (Germany), VNIIM (Russia) and RMTC (Latvia). The national standards of volume activity of radon-222 were thus calibrated using one standard radon radiometer as the transfer standard. Results are shown in the Final Report of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  8. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  9. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  10. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  11. Intensive training and reduced volume increases muscle FXYD1 expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise in athletes.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Martin; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Christensen, Peter M; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the effect of intensive training in combination with marked reduction in training volume on phospholemman (FXYD1) expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (10-12 × ∼30-s sprints) two or three times per week and aerobic high-intensity training (4-5 × 3-4 min at 90-95% of peak aerobic power output) 1-2 times per week for 7 wk and reduced the training volume by 70%. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and during a repeated high-intensity exercise protocol, and protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Expression of FXYD1 (30%), actin (40%), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (12%), phospholamban (PLN) (16%), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) γ/δ (25%) was higher (P < 0.05) than before the training intervention. In addition, after the intervention, nonspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation was higher (P < 0.05) at rest and during exercise, mainly achieved by an increased FXYD1 Ser-68 phosphorylation, compared with before the intervention. CaMKII, Thr-287, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 Thr-56 phosphorylation at rest and during exercise, overall PKCα/β, Thr-638/641, and mTOR Ser-2448 phosphorylation during repeated intense exercise as well as resting PLN Thr-17 phosphorylation were also higher (P < 0.05) compared with before the intervention period. Thus, a period of high-intensity training with reduced training volume increases expression and phosphorylation levels of FXYD1, which may affect Na(+)/K(+) pump activity and muscle K(+) homeostasis during intense exercise. Furthermore, higher expression of CaMKII and PLN, as well as increased phosphorylation of CaMKII Thr-287 may have improved intracellular Ca(2+) handling.

  12. Intensive training and reduced volume increases muscle FXYD1 expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise in athletes.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Martin; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Christensen, Peter M; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the effect of intensive training in combination with marked reduction in training volume on phospholemman (FXYD1) expression and phosphorylation at rest and during exercise. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (10-12 × ∼30-s sprints) two or three times per week and aerobic high-intensity training (4-5 × 3-4 min at 90-95% of peak aerobic power output) 1-2 times per week for 7 wk and reduced the training volume by 70%. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and during a repeated high-intensity exercise protocol, and protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Expression of FXYD1 (30%), actin (40%), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (12%), phospholamban (PLN) (16%), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) γ/δ (25%) was higher (P < 0.05) than before the training intervention. In addition, after the intervention, nonspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation was higher (P < 0.05) at rest and during exercise, mainly achieved by an increased FXYD1 Ser-68 phosphorylation, compared with before the intervention. CaMKII, Thr-287, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 Thr-56 phosphorylation at rest and during exercise, overall PKCα/β, Thr-638/641, and mTOR Ser-2448 phosphorylation during repeated intense exercise as well as resting PLN Thr-17 phosphorylation were also higher (P < 0.05) compared with before the intervention period. Thus, a period of high-intensity training with reduced training volume increases expression and phosphorylation levels of FXYD1, which may affect Na(+)/K(+) pump activity and muscle K(+) homeostasis during intense exercise. Furthermore, higher expression of CaMKII and PLN, as well as increased phosphorylation of CaMKII Thr-287 may have improved intracellular Ca(2+) handling. PMID:26791827

  13. Comparison of Muscle Transcriptome between Pigs with Divergent Meat Quality Phenotypes Identifies Genes Related to Muscle Metabolism and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Marie; Wyszynska-Koko, Joanna; Vincent, Annie; Hérault, Frédéric; Lebret, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    Background Meat quality depends on physiological processes taking place in muscle tissue, which could involve a large pattern of genes associated with both muscle structural and metabolic features. Understanding the biological phenomena underlying muscle phenotype at slaughter is necessary to uncover meat quality development. Therefore, a muscle transcriptome analysis was undertaken to compare gene expression profiles between two highly contrasted pig breeds, Large White (LW) and Basque (B), reared in two different housing systems themselves influencing meat quality. LW is the most predominant breed used in pig industry, which exhibits standard meat quality attributes. B is an indigenous breed with low lean meat and high fat contents, high meat quality characteristics, and is genetically distant from other European pig breeds. Methodology/Principal Findings Transcriptome analysis undertaken using a custom 15 K microarray, highlighted 1233 genes differentially expressed between breeds (multiple-test adjusted P-value<0.05), out of which 635 were highly expressed in the B and 598 highly expressed in the LW pigs. No difference in gene expression was found between housing systems. Besides, expression level of 12 differentially expressed genes quantified by real-time RT-PCR validated microarray data. Functional annotation clustering emphasized four main clusters associated to transcriptome breed differences: metabolic processes, skeletal muscle structure and organization, extracellular matrix, lysosome, and proteolysis, thereby highlighting many genes involved in muscle physiology and meat quality development. Conclusions/Significance Altogether, these results will contribute to a better understanding of muscle physiology and of the biological and molecular processes underlying meat quality. Besides, this study is a first step towards the identification of molecular markers of pork quality and the subsequent development of control tools. PMID:22470472

  14. Prediction and validation of total and regional skeletal muscle volume using B-mode ultrasonography in Japanese prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Taishi; Ohta, Megumi; Hikihara, Yuki; Torii, Suguru; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2015-10-28

    Very few effective field methods are available for accurate, non-invasive estimation of skeletal muscle volume (SMV) and mass in children. We aimed to develop regression-based prediction equations for SMV, using ultrasonography, in Japanese prepubertal children, and to assess the validity of these equations. In total, 145 healthy Japanese prepubertal children aged 6-12 years were randomly divided into two groups: the model development group (sixty boys, thirty-seven girls) and the validation group (twenty-nine boys, nineteen girls). Reference data in the form of contiguous MRI with 1-cm slice thickness were obtained from the first cervical vertebra to the ankle joints. The SMV was calculated by the summation of digitised cross-sectional areas. Muscle thickness was measured using B-mode ultrasonography at nine sites in different regions. In the model development group, strong, statistically significant correlations were observed between the site-matched SMV (total, arms, trunk, thigh and lower legs) measured by MRI and the muscle thickness×height measures obtained by ultrasonography, for both boys and girls. When these SMV prediction equations were applied to the validation groups, the measured total and regional SMV were also very similar to the values predicted for boys and girls, respectively. With the exception of the trunk region in girls, the Bland-Altman analysis for the validation group did not indicate any bias for either boys or girls. These results suggest that ultrasonography-derived prediction equations for boys and girls are useful for the estimation of total and regional SMV.

  15. Conditions that maximize floodplain downed wood volumes: a comparison across three biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lininger, K.; Wohl, E.; Rose, J. R.; Sutfin, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain downed wood can provide important habitat for aquatic, riparian, and terrestrial organisms. This wood, which can function as both a storage area and source for large wood in river channels, can also be a significant organic carbon stock in river-floodplain ecosystems. We present data on downed wood volumes for different floodplain vegetation communities in the central Yukon River Basin in interior Alaska. We measured downed wood volume per unit floodplain area and wood decay characteristics within four distinct floodplain vegetation communities, and equate downed wood volumes per unit area to total organic carbon per unit area. Preliminary results suggest that downed wood volumes are greatest in disturbed white spruce forests, compared to undisturbed white spruce, deciduous forests, and black spruce woody wetlands. Disturbances contributing to large wood volumes include fire, wind, and ice jam floods. We also compare wood volumes in interior Alaska to downed wood volumes in other unmanaged floodplain vegetation communities, including a subtropical lowland alluvial river-floodplain and a semi-arid mountainous river-floodplain. These three datasets provide comparisons of unmanaged riparian forests across diverse climatic settings and highlight the climatic conditions and biomes that result in substantial downed wood and organic carbon storage in floodplain environments.

  16. Noninvasive, low-noise, fast imaging of blood volume and deoxygenation changes in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous-wave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanqing; Lech, Gwen; Nioka, Shoko; Intes, Xavier; Chance, Britton

    2002-08-01

    This article focuses on optimizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a three-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) near-infrared continuous-wave (cw) imager and its application to in vivo muscle metabolism measurement. The shot-noise limited SNR is derived and calculated to be 2 x104 for the physiological blood concentrations of muscle. Aiming at shot-noise limited SNR performance and fast imaging, we utilize sample and hold circuits to reduce high-frequency noise. These circuits have also been designed to be parallel integrating, through which SNR of 2 x103 and 2 Hz imaging acquisition rate have been achieved when the probe is placed on a muscle model. The noise corresponds to 2 x10-4 optical density error, which suggests an in vitro resolution of 15. 4 nM blood volume and 46.8 nM deoxygenation changes. A 48 dB digital gain control circuit with 256 steps is employed to enlarge the dynamic range of the imager. We utilize cuff ischemia as a living model demonstration and its results are reported. The instrument is applied during exercise to measure the changes of blood volume and deoxygenation, which provides important information about muscle metabolism. We find that the primary source of noise encountered during exercise experiment is from the random motion of muscle. The results demonstrate that the LED cw imager is ideal for the noninvasive study of muscle metabolism.

  17. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  18. Amygdalar and hippocampal volume: A comparison between manual segmentation, Freesurfer and VBM.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Oliver; Pohlack, Sebastian; Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Winkelmann, Tobias; Plichta, Michael M; Demirakca, Traute; Flor, Herta

    2015-09-30

    Automated segmentation of the amygdala and the hippocampus is of interest for research looking at large datasets where manual segmentation of T1-weighted magnetic resonance tomography images is less feasible for morphometric analysis. Manual segmentation still remains the gold standard for subcortical structures like the hippocampus and the amygdala. A direct comparison of VBM8 and Freesurfer is rarely done, because VBM8 results are most often used for voxel-based analysis. We used the same region-of-interest (ROI) for Freesurfer and VBM8 to relate automated and manually derived volumes of the amygdala and the hippocampus. We processed a large manually segmented dataset of n=92 independent samples with an automated segmentation strategy (VBM8 vs. Freesurfer Version 5.0). For statistical analysis, we only calculated Pearsons's correlation coefficients, but used methods developed for comparison such as Lin's concordance coefficient. The correlation between automatic and manual segmentation was high for the hippocampus [0.58-0.76] and lower for the amygdala [0.45-0.59]. However, concordance coefficients point to higher concordance for the amygdala [0.46-0.62] instead of the hippocampus [0.06-0.12]. VBM8 and Freesurfer segmentation performed on a comparable level in comparison to manual segmentation. We conclude (1) that correlation alone does not capture systematic differences (e.g. of hippocampal volumes), (2) calculation of ROI volumes with VBM8 gives measurements comparable to Freesurfer V5.0 when using the same ROI and (3) systematic and proportional differences are caused mainly by different definitions of anatomic boundaries and only to a lesser part by different segmentation strategies. This work underscores the importance of using method comparison techniques and demonstrates that even with high correlation coefficients, there can be still large differences in absolute volume. PMID:26057114

  19. Whole-body and segmental muscle volume are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yosuke; Yamashita, Daichi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsui, Tomoyuki; Seo, Kazuya; Azuma, Yoshikazu; Kida, Yoshikazu; Morihara, Toru; Kimura, Misaka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between pitching ball velocity and segmental (trunk, upper arm, forearm, upper leg, and lower leg) and whole-body muscle volume (MV) in high school baseball pitchers. Forty-seven male high school pitchers (40 right-handers and seven left-handers; age, 16.2 ± 0.7 years; stature, 173.6 ± 4.9 cm; mass, 65.0 ± 6.8 kg, years of baseball experience, 7.5 ± 1.8 years; maximum pitching ball velocity, 119.0 ± 9.0 km/hour) participated in the study. Segmental and whole-body MV were measured using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis. Maximum ball velocity was measured with a sports radar gun. The MV of the dominant arm was significantly larger than the MV of the non-dominant arm (P < 0.001). There was no difference in MV between the dominant and non-dominant legs. Whole-body MV was significantly correlated with ball velocity (r = 0.412, P < 0.01). Trunk MV was not correlated with ball velocity, but the MV for both lower legs, and the dominant upper leg, upper arm, and forearm were significantly correlated with ball velocity (P < 0.05). The results were not affected by age or years of baseball experience. Whole-body and segmental MV are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers. However, the contribution of the muscle mass on pitching ball velocity is limited, thus other fundamental factors (ie, pitching skill) are also important. PMID:24379713

  20. Whole-body and segmental muscle volume are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Yamashita, Daichi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsui, Tomoyuki; Seo, Kazuya; Azuma, Yoshikazu; Kida, Yoshikazu; Morihara, Toru; Kimura, Misaka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between pitching ball velocity and segmental (trunk, upper arm, forearm, upper leg, and lower leg) and whole-body muscle volume (MV) in high school baseball pitchers. Forty-seven male high school pitchers (40 right-handers and seven left-handers; age, 16.2 ± 0.7 years; stature, 173.6 ± 4.9 cm; mass, 65.0 ± 6.8 kg, years of baseball experience, 7.5 ± 1.8 years; maximum pitching ball velocity, 119.0 ± 9.0 km/hour) participated in the study. Segmental and whole-body MV were measured using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis. Maximum ball velocity was measured with a sports radar gun. The MV of the dominant arm was significantly larger than the MV of the non-dominant arm (P < 0.001). There was no difference in MV between the dominant and non-dominant legs. Whole-body MV was significantly correlated with ball velocity (r = 0.412, P < 0.01). Trunk MV was not correlated with ball velocity, but the MV for both lower legs, and the dominant upper leg, upper arm, and forearm were significantly correlated with ball velocity (P < 0.05). The results were not affected by age or years of baseball experience. Whole-body and segmental MV are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers. However, the contribution of the muscle mass on pitching ball velocity is limited, thus other fundamental factors (ie, pitching skill) are also important. PMID:24379713

  1. Whole-body and segmental muscle volume are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Yamashita, Daichi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsui, Tomoyuki; Seo, Kazuya; Azuma, Yoshikazu; Kida, Yoshikazu; Morihara, Toru; Kimura, Misaka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between pitching ball velocity and segmental (trunk, upper arm, forearm, upper leg, and lower leg) and whole-body muscle volume (MV) in high school baseball pitchers. Forty-seven male high school pitchers (40 right-handers and seven left-handers; age, 16.2 ± 0.7 years; stature, 173.6 ± 4.9 cm; mass, 65.0 ± 6.8 kg, years of baseball experience, 7.5 ± 1.8 years; maximum pitching ball velocity, 119.0 ± 9.0 km/hour) participated in the study. Segmental and whole-body MV were measured using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis. Maximum ball velocity was measured with a sports radar gun. The MV of the dominant arm was significantly larger than the MV of the non-dominant arm (P < 0.001). There was no difference in MV between the dominant and non-dominant legs. Whole-body MV was significantly correlated with ball velocity (r = 0.412, P < 0.01). Trunk MV was not correlated with ball velocity, but the MV for both lower legs, and the dominant upper leg, upper arm, and forearm were significantly correlated with ball velocity (P < 0.05). The results were not affected by age or years of baseball experience. Whole-body and segmental MV are associated with ball velocity in high school baseball pitchers. However, the contribution of the muscle mass on pitching ball velocity is limited, thus other fundamental factors (ie, pitching skill) are also important.

  2. Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity and volume of extraocular muscles in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    PubMed Central

    Higashiyama, Tomoaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Ohji, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the relationship between inflammation and swelling of extraocular muscles in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy before and after methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Methods The signal intensities and volumes of the superior rectus (SR), inferior rectus (IR), lateral rectus (LR), medial rectus (MR), and superior oblique (SO) muscles were measured with magnetic resonance imaging in 25 eyes of 25 patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in the acute inflammatory phase before and after methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The signal intensity ratios (SIRs) of muscles and brain white matter were calculated. Result The mean SIRs before treatment were 2.28±0.74 in SR, 2.66±0.57 in IR, 2.03±0.42 in LR, 2.45±0.49 in MR, and 1.98±0.48 in SO muscles. The mean SIRs after treatment were 1.82±0.62, 1.84±0.52, 1.70±0.35, 1.95±0.46, and 1.60±0.36, respectively. The mean volumes (cm3) before treatment were 1.35±0.67 in SR, 1.21±0.39 in IR, 0.66±0.13 in LR, 0.94±0.31 in MR, and 0.58±0.14 in SO muscles. Those after treatment were 1.12±0.45, 0.91±0.31, 0.61±0.12, 0.85±0.28, and 0.49±0.11, respectively. The SIRs showed significantly positive correlations with volumes both before and after treatment in SR muscles (before, r=0.77; after, r=0.69), IR muscles (before, r=0.65; after, r=0.60), MR muscles (before, r=0.69; after, r=0.73), and SO muscles (before, r=0.52; after, r=0.50) (P<0.01 for all correlations). Conclusion Swelling reflected the inflammation in extraocular muscles of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy both before and after treatment. PMID:27143850

  3. Comparison of Guidelines on Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (EAU, CUA, AUA, NCCN, NICE)

    PubMed Central

    Power, Nicholas E.; Izawa, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a considerably diverse patient group and the management of this complex disease is debatable. A number of panels from Europe and North America have convened on the topic and recently released guideline documents. Objective: The purpose was to compare and contrast the NMIBC guideline recommendations from the EAU (Europe), CUA (Canada), NCCN (United States), AUA (United States), and NICE (United Kingdom). Methods: All unabridged guideline documents were reviewed by the authors and comparisons were completed according to major topics in NMIBC. Results: Despite a paucity of high level evidence regarding the majority of management topics in NMIBC, there was general agreement among the various guideline panels. Differences mainly centered on the categories of evidence synthesized and grades of recommendations. Each document offers a unique presentation of the available literature and guideline recommendation. Conclusions: The guidelines for NMIBC from the EAU, CUA, AUA, NCCN, and NICE provide considerable consensus regarding the management of this often difficult disease. Clinicians are encouraged to familiarize themselves with all of the guidelines in order to determine which style of presentation would be most useful to their current practice. PMID:27376122

  4. Measuring the volume of uterine fibroids using 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound and comparison with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Nikica; Zivković, Kreiimir; Despot, Albert; Paić, Josip; Zelić, Ana

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was clinical testing of the reliability and usability of three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) technology. The ultimate aim and purpose of this study was to establish ultrasound methods, standards and protocols for determining the volume of any gynecologic organ or tumor. The study included 31 women in reproductive age and postmenopause. All patients were examined with a RIC 5-9 3D-endovaginal probe (4.3-7.5 MHz) on a Voluson 730 Pro ultrasound device. The volume of myomas was measured by using the existing 2D and 3D ultrasound methods on the above mentioned device. All patients underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy due to clinically and ultrasonographically diagnosed uterine myomas indicating operative intervention. After the operation, the pathologist determined the volume of removed myomas by measuring them in a gauge bowl containing water, i.e. using Archimedes' principle (lift), serving as the control group with histopathologic diagnosis. A total of 155 myoma volumes were processed on 2D display, 31 myoma volumes were preoperatively measured on 3D display and 31 myoma volumes were measured by the pathologist. The values of US measurements for each US method were expressed as mean value of all measurements of myoma volumes. Statistical processing of the results and Student's t-test for independent samples revealed that the 2nd examined US method (measuring of myoma by using an ellipse and the longer tumor diameter) and 4th examined US method (measuring of myoma by using the longer and shorter tumor diameters together with establishing their mean values) in 2D US technique, as well as the 6th examined US method in 3D US technique showed no significant measurement differences in comparison with control measurement in a gauge bowl containing water (p < 0.05), indicating acceptability of the US methods for verifying tumor volumes. The standard error in determining the volume of myomas by the above US methods varied

  5. Comparison of gray matter volume and thickness for analysis of cortical changes in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kunchen; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2011-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two indices of concern in brain structure magnetic resonance imaging research. Gray matter volume reflects mixed-measurement information of cerebral cortex, while cortical thickness reflects only the information of distance between inner surface and outer surface of cerebral cortex. Using Scaled Subprofile Modeling based on Principal Component Analysis (SSM_PCA) and Pearson's Correlation Analysis, this study further provided quantitative comparisons and depicted both global relevance and local relevance to comprehensively investigate morphometrical abnormalities in cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and thirteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that factor scores from the first 8 principal components accounted for ~53.38% of the total variance for gray matter volume, and ~50.18% for cortical thickness. Factor scores from the fifth principal component showed significant correlation. In addition, gray matter voxel-based volume was closely related to cortical thickness alterations in most cortical cortex, especially, in some typical abnormal brain regions such as insula and the parahippocampal gyrus in AD. These findings suggest that these two measurements are effective indices for understanding the neuropathology in AD. Studies using both gray matter volume and cortical thickness can separate the causes of the discrepancy, provide complementary information and carry out a comprehensive description of the morphological changes of brain structure.

  6. Comparison of Abdominal Muscle Thickness with Vaginal Pressure Changes in Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-In; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Kim, Ha-Roo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the efficacy of a pelvic floor muscle exercise program by comparing subjects’ muscle thickness with changes in vaginal pressure. [Subjects] Two groups of female participants without a medical history of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction were evaluated. The mean age of Group I was 33.5 years and that of Group II was 49.69 years. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform a pelvic floor muscle contraction. While measuring the vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscle, biofeedback was given on five levels, and the thicknesses of the transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique muscles were measured with ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of the transversus abdominis muscle was significantly increased at 30 cmH2O in Group I, and at 20 cmH2O in Group II. The thickness of the internal oblique abdominal muscle significantly increased at maximum contraction in Group II. [Conclusion] Different abdominal muscles contracted depending on vaginal pressure. The result may be used to create and implement an exercise program that effectively strengthens the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:24707099

  7. Comparison of contraction times of a muscle and its motor units.

    PubMed

    Eldred, E; Smith, L; Edgerton, V R

    1992-11-01

    The twitch contraction time (CT) for each of 13 soleus (SOL) and 13 medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles was compared with the mean CT from a sample of its motor units (MUs; 356 total) to see if the CT of a whole muscle when tested at its optimal length (Lo) differed systematically from that of its MUs tested at their individual Lo's. The CTs of the whole muscle were significantly longer in the ratio of 1.13. This is consistent with a hypothesis that electrical-field effects result in a more protracted contraction of the individual muscle fiber. PMID:1491789

  8. A comparison of optimisation methods and knee joint degrees of freedom on muscle force predictions during single-leg hop landings.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Perraton, Luke; Fok, Laurence; Muñoz, Mario A; Clark, Ross; Pivonka, Peter; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of different optimisation methods and different knee joint degrees of freedom (DOF) on muscle force predictions during a single legged hop. Nineteen subjects performed single-legged hopping manoeuvres and subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed to predict muscle forces during the movement. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC) methods using either 1 or 3 DOF knee joint models. All sagittal and transverse plane joint angles calculated using inverse kinematics or CMC in a 1 DOF or 3 DOF knee were well-matched (RMS error<3°). Biarticular muscles (hamstrings, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) showed more differences in muscle force profiles when comparing between the different muscle prediction approaches where these muscles showed larger time delays for many of the comparisons. The muscle force magnitudes of vasti, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were not greatly influenced by the choice of muscle force prediction method with low normalised root mean squared errors (<48%) observed in most comparisons. We conclude that SO and CMC can be used to predict lower-limb muscle co-contraction during hopping movements. However, care must be taken in interpreting the magnitude of force predicted in the biarticular muscles and the soleus, especially when using a 1 DOF knee. Despite this limitation, given that SO is a more robust and computationally efficient method for predicting muscle forces than CMC, we suggest that SO can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal models that have a 1 or 3 DOF knee joint to study the relative differences and the role of muscles during hopping activities in future studies. PMID:25129166

  9. A comparison of optimisation methods and knee joint degrees of freedom on muscle force predictions during single-leg hop landings.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Perraton, Luke; Fok, Laurence; Muñoz, Mario A; Clark, Ross; Pivonka, Peter; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of different optimisation methods and different knee joint degrees of freedom (DOF) on muscle force predictions during a single legged hop. Nineteen subjects performed single-legged hopping manoeuvres and subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed to predict muscle forces during the movement. Muscle forces were predicted using static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC) methods using either 1 or 3 DOF knee joint models. All sagittal and transverse plane joint angles calculated using inverse kinematics or CMC in a 1 DOF or 3 DOF knee were well-matched (RMS error<3°). Biarticular muscles (hamstrings, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) showed more differences in muscle force profiles when comparing between the different muscle prediction approaches where these muscles showed larger time delays for many of the comparisons. The muscle force magnitudes of vasti, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were not greatly influenced by the choice of muscle force prediction method with low normalised root mean squared errors (<48%) observed in most comparisons. We conclude that SO and CMC can be used to predict lower-limb muscle co-contraction during hopping movements. However, care must be taken in interpreting the magnitude of force predicted in the biarticular muscles and the soleus, especially when using a 1 DOF knee. Despite this limitation, given that SO is a more robust and computationally efficient method for predicting muscle forces than CMC, we suggest that SO can be used in conjunction with musculoskeletal models that have a 1 or 3 DOF knee joint to study the relative differences and the role of muscles during hopping activities in future studies.

  10. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Mark W.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Frechette, Danielle M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  11. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Frechette, Danielle M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  12. Special computer-aided computed tomography (CT) volume measurement and comparison method for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingming; Sun, Zhaogang; Xie, Ruming; Gao, Mengqiu; Li, Chuanyou

    2015-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) manifestations in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients are complex and could not be quantitatively evaluated. We aimed to establish a new method to objectively measure the lung injury level in PTB by thoracic CT and make quantitative comparisons. In the retrospective study, a total of 360 adults were selected and divided into four groups according to their CT manifestations and medical history: Normal group, PTB group, PTB with diabetes mellitus (DM) group and Death caused by PTB group. Five additional patients who had continuous CT scans were chosen for preliminary longitudinal analysis. We established a new computer-aided CT volume measurement and comparison method for PTB patients (CACTV-PTB) which measured lung volume (LV) and thoracic volume (TV). RLT was calculated as the ratio of LV to TV and comparisons were performed among different groups. Standardized RLT (SRLT) was used in the longitudinal analysis among different patients. In the Normal group, LV and TV were positively correlated in linear regression (Ŷ=-0.5+0.46X, R2=0.796, P<0.01). RLT values were significantly different among four groups (Normal: 0.40±0.05, PTB: 0.37±0.08, PTB+DM: 0.34±0.06, Death: 0.23±0.04). The curves of SRLT value from different patients shared a same start point and could be compared directly. Utilizing the novel objective method CACTV-PTB makes it possible to compare the severity and dynamic change among different PTB patients. Our early experience also suggested that the lung injury is severer in the PTB+DM group than in the PTB group. PMID:26628995

  13. Extraocular Muscle Compartments in Superior Oblique Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Clark, Robert A.; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate changes in volumes of extraocular muscle (EOM) compartments in unilateral superior oblique (SO) palsy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods High-resolution, surface-coil MRI was obtained in 19 patients with unilateral SO palsy and 19 age-matched orthotropic control subjects. Rectus EOMs and the SO were divided into two anatomic compartments for volume analysis in patients with unilateral SO palsy, allowing comparison of total compartmental volumes versus controls. Medial and lateral compartmental volumes of the SO muscle were compared in patients with isotropic (round shape) versus anisotropic (elongated shape) SO atrophy. Results The medial and lateral compartments of the ipsilesional SO muscles were equally atrophic in isotropic SO palsy, whereas the lateral compartment was significantly smaller than the medial in anisotropic SO palsy (P = 0.01). In contrast to the SO, there were no differential compartmental volume changes in rectus EOMs; however, there was significant total muscle hypertrophy in the ipsilesional inferior rectus (IR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles and contralesional superior rectus (SR) muscles. Medial rectus (MR) volume was normal both ipsi- and contralesionally. Conclusions A subset of patients with SO palsy exhibit selective atrophy of the lateral, predominantly vertically acting SO compartment. Superior oblique atrophy is associated with whole-muscle volume changes in the ipsilesional IR, ipsilesional LR, and contralesional SR; however, SO muscle atrophy is not associated with compartmentally selective volume changes in the rectus EOMs. Selective compartmental SO pathology may provide an anatomic mechanism that explains some of the variability in clinical presentations of SO palsy. PMID:27768791

  14. Comparison of immediate complete denture, tooth and implant-supported overdenture on vertical dimension and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Farhan Khalid; Gebreel, Ashraf; Elshokouki, Ali hamed; Habib, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the changes in the occlusal vertical dimension, activity of masseter muscles and biting force after insertion of immediate denture constructed with conventional, tooth-supported and Implant-supported immediate mandibular complete denture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were selected and treatment was carried out with all the three different concepts i.e, immediate denture constructed with conventional (Group A), tooth-supported (Group B) and Implant-supported (Group C) immediate mandibular complete dentures. Parameters of evaluation and comparison were occlusal vertical dimension measured by radiograph (at three different time intervals), Masseter muscle electromyographic (EMG) measurement by EMG analysis (at three different positions of jaws) and bite force measured by force transducer (at two different time intervals). The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA-F test at 5% level of significance. If the F test was significant, Least Significant Difference test was performed to test further significant differences between variables. RESULTS Comparison between mean differences in occlusal vertical dimension for tested groups showed that it was only statistically significant at 1 year after immediate dentures insertion. Comparison between mean differences in wavelet packet coefficients of the electromyographic signals of masseter muscles for tested groups was not significant at rest position, but significant at initial contact position and maximum voluntary clench position. Comparison between mean differences in maximum biting force for tested groups was not statistically significant at 5% level of significance. CONCLUSION Immediate complete overdentures whether tooth or implant supported prosthesis is recommended than totally mucosal supported prosthesis. PMID:22737309

  15. The comparison of abdominal muscle activation on unstable surface according to the different trunk stability exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Da-yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of abdominal muscle activities and the activation ratio related to trunk stabilization to compare the effects between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and lumbar stabilization exercises on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain, who were equally and randomly assigned to either the abdominal drawing-in maneuver group and the lumbar stabilization exercise group. Abdominal muscle activation and ratio was measured using a wireless TeleMyo DTS during right leg raise exercises while sitting on a Swiss ball. [Results] Differences in rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and internal oblique abdominis muscle activation were observed before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the groups in the muscle activation of the external oblique abdominis and internal oblique abdominis, and the muscle activation ratio of external oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis and internal oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis. [Conclusion] Consequently trunk stability exercise enhances internal oblique abdominis activity and increases trunk stabilization. In addition, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver facilitates the deep muscle more than LSE in abdominal muscle. Therefore, abdominal drawing-in maneuver is more effective than lumbar stabilization exercises in facilitating trunk stabilization. PMID:27134401

  16. Comparison of skeletal muscle miRNA and mRNA profiles among three pig breeds.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xinhua; Yang, Yalan; Zhu, Shiyun; Hua, Chaoju; Zhou, Rong; Mu, Yulian; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui

    2016-04-01

    The pig is an important source of animal protein, and is also an ideal model for human disease. There are significant differences in growth rate, muscle mass, and meat quality between different breeds. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying porcine skeletal muscle phenotypes, we performed mRNA and miRNA profiling of muscle from three different breeds of pig, Landrace (lean-type), Tongcheng (obese-type), and Wuzhishan (mini-type) by Solexa sequencing. Forty-three genes and 106 miRNAs were differentially expressed between Landrace and Tongcheng pigs, 92 genes and 151 miRNAs were differentially expressed between Tongcheng and Wuzhishan pigs, and 145 genes and 156 miRNAs were differential expressed between Landrace and Wuzhishan pigs. Gene ontology analysis suggested that genes differentially expressed between Landrace and Tongcheng pigs were mainly involved in the biological processes of oxidative stress and muscle organ development. Meanwhile, for Tongcheng vs Wuzhishan and Landrace vs Wuzhishan pigs, the differentially expressed genes were involved in fatty acid metabolism, oxidative stress, muscle contraction, and muscle organ development, processes that are closely related to meat quality. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying meat quality diversity based on differentially expressed genes and miRNAs, interaction networks were constructed, according to target prediction results and integration analysis of up-regulated genes with down-regulated miRNAs or down-regulated genes with up-regulated miRNAs. Our findings identify candidate genes and miRNAs associated with muscle development and indicate their potential roles in muscle phenotype variance between different pig breeds. These results serve as a foundation for further studies on muscle development and molecular breeding. PMID:26458558

  17. Muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming: Comparison between elite swimmers and beginners.

    PubMed

    Vaz, João R; Olstad, Bjørn Harald; Cabri, Jan; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Hug, François

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to compare muscle coordination strategies of the upper and lower limb muscles between beginners and elite breaststroke swimmers. Surface electromyography (EMG) of eight muscles was recorded in 16 swimmers (8 elite, 8 beginners) during a 25 m swimming breaststroke at 100% of maximal effort. A decomposition algorithm was used to identify the muscle synergies that represent the temporal and spatial organisation of muscle coordination. Between-groups indices of similarity and lag times were calculated. Individual muscle patterns were moderately to highly similar between groups (between-group indices range: 0.61 to 0.84). Significant differences were found in terms of lag time for pectoralis major (P < 0.05), biceps brachii, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior (P < 0.01), indicating an earlier activation for these muscles in beginners compared to elites (range: -13.2 to -3.8% of the swimming cycle). Three muscle synergies were identified for both beginners and elites. Although their composition was similar between populations, the third synergy exhibited a high within-group variability. Moderate to high indices of similarity were found for the shape of synergy activation coefficients (range: 0.63 to 0.88) but there was a significant backward shift (-8.4% of the swimming cycle) in synergy #2 for beginners compared to elites. This time shift suggested differences in the global arm-to-leg coordination. These results indicate that the synergistic organisation of muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming is not profoundly affected by expertise. However, specific timing adjustments were observed between lower and upper limbs. PMID:26878097

  18. Muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming: Comparison between elite swimmers and beginners.

    PubMed

    Vaz, João R; Olstad, Bjørn Harald; Cabri, Jan; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Hug, François

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to compare muscle coordination strategies of the upper and lower limb muscles between beginners and elite breaststroke swimmers. Surface electromyography (EMG) of eight muscles was recorded in 16 swimmers (8 elite, 8 beginners) during a 25 m swimming breaststroke at 100% of maximal effort. A decomposition algorithm was used to identify the muscle synergies that represent the temporal and spatial organisation of muscle coordination. Between-groups indices of similarity and lag times were calculated. Individual muscle patterns were moderately to highly similar between groups (between-group indices range: 0.61 to 0.84). Significant differences were found in terms of lag time for pectoralis major (P < 0.05), biceps brachii, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior (P < 0.01), indicating an earlier activation for these muscles in beginners compared to elites (range: -13.2 to -3.8% of the swimming cycle). Three muscle synergies were identified for both beginners and elites. Although their composition was similar between populations, the third synergy exhibited a high within-group variability. Moderate to high indices of similarity were found for the shape of synergy activation coefficients (range: 0.63 to 0.88) but there was a significant backward shift (-8.4% of the swimming cycle) in synergy #2 for beginners compared to elites. This time shift suggested differences in the global arm-to-leg coordination. These results indicate that the synergistic organisation of muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming is not profoundly affected by expertise. However, specific timing adjustments were observed between lower and upper limbs.

  19. Exploring Muscle Activation during Nordic Walking: A Comparison between Conventional and Uphill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Bacchi, Elisabetta; Figard-Fabre, Hélène; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) owes much of its popularity to the benefits of greater energy expenditure and upper body engagement than found in conventional walking (W). Muscle activation during NW is still understudied, however. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in muscle activation and physiological responses between NW and W in level and uphill walking conditions. Nine expert Nordic Walkers (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; BMI 24.2±1.8 kg/m2) performed 5-minute treadmill trials of W and NW at 4 km/h on inclines of 0% and 15%. The electromyographic activity of seven upper body and five leg muscles and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded and pole force during NW was measured. VO2 during NW was 22.3% higher at 0% and only 6.9% higher at 15% than during W, while upper body muscle activation was 2- to 15-fold higher under both conditions. Lower body muscle activation was similarly increased during NW and W in the uphill condition, whereas the increase in erector spinae muscle activity was lower during NW than W. The lack of a significant increase in pole force during uphill walking may explain the lower extra energy expenditure of NW, indicating less upper body muscle activation to lift the body against gravity. NW seemed to reduce lower back muscle contraction in the uphill condition, suggesting that walking with poles may reduce effort to control trunk oscillations and could contribute to work production during NW. Although the difference in extra energy expenditure between NW and W was smaller in the uphill walking condition, the increased upper body muscle involvement during exercising with NW may confer additional benefit compared to conventional walking also on uphill terrains. Furthermore, people with low back pain may gain benefit from pole use when walking uphill. PMID:26418339

  20. Comparison of skeletal muscle miRNA and mRNA profiles among three pig breeds.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xinhua; Yang, Yalan; Zhu, Shiyun; Hua, Chaoju; Zhou, Rong; Mu, Yulian; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui

    2016-04-01

    The pig is an important source of animal protein, and is also an ideal model for human disease. There are significant differences in growth rate, muscle mass, and meat quality between different breeds. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying porcine skeletal muscle phenotypes, we performed mRNA and miRNA profiling of muscle from three different breeds of pig, Landrace (lean-type), Tongcheng (obese-type), and Wuzhishan (mini-type) by Solexa sequencing. Forty-three genes and 106 miRNAs were differentially expressed between Landrace and Tongcheng pigs, 92 genes and 151 miRNAs were differentially expressed between Tongcheng and Wuzhishan pigs, and 145 genes and 156 miRNAs were differential expressed between Landrace and Wuzhishan pigs. Gene ontology analysis suggested that genes differentially expressed between Landrace and Tongcheng pigs were mainly involved in the biological processes of oxidative stress and muscle organ development. Meanwhile, for Tongcheng vs Wuzhishan and Landrace vs Wuzhishan pigs, the differentially expressed genes were involved in fatty acid metabolism, oxidative stress, muscle contraction, and muscle organ development, processes that are closely related to meat quality. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying meat quality diversity based on differentially expressed genes and miRNAs, interaction networks were constructed, according to target prediction results and integration analysis of up-regulated genes with down-regulated miRNAs or down-regulated genes with up-regulated miRNAs. Our findings identify candidate genes and miRNAs associated with muscle development and indicate their potential roles in muscle phenotype variance between different pig breeds. These results serve as a foundation for further studies on muscle development and molecular breeding.

  1. Comparison between the changes in muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration in finswimmers during incremental exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bangde; Tian, Qingping; Zhang, Zhongxing; Gong, Hui

    2009-08-01

    For the purpose of comparing the response in local skeletal muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration during incremental exercise, 8 female finswimmers were recruited to take an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer. Muscle oxygenation in right vastus lateralis (VL) were monitored by continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CW NIRS), respiratory gas exchange and blood lactate concentration ([La]b) were simultaneously measured by a metabolic system and a portable blood lactate analyzer respectively. NIRS measurements showed a muscle oxygenation index inflection point (OIip), from which the muscle oxygenation started to decrease dramatically. Significant correlations have been found between OIip and blood lactate threshold identified at the lowest [La]b value which was >0.5 mmol/L lower than that obtained at the following workload. These results might suggest that the CW NIRS measurement could be applied to monitor lactate threshold noninvasively.

  2. Muscle fiber type characteristics of M. deltoideus in wheelchair athletes. Comparison with other trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Karlsson, J

    1983-10-01

    Muscle biopsies were obtained from the midportion of m. deltoideus of seven male wheelchair basketball athletes. High caliber kayak paddlers (n = 8) and wrestlers (n = 8) as well as mountain ranger soldiers (n = 8) served as controls. Histochemical methods were applied to identify fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and furthermore assess muscle fiber type distribution and muscle fiber cross-sectional area. The relative percentage of FT fibers averaged (+/-SD) 47 +/- 12% and 52 +/- 9% in wheelchair athletes and soldiers. The value obtained in kayakers was significantly lower (30 +/- 11). Both FT area (p less than 0.01) and mean fiber area (p less than 0.05) were significantly larger in wheelchair athletes as compared with soldiers and kayakers. It is suggested that the involvement in specific physical training was the main cause for hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers observed in m. deltoideus of wheelchair athletes.

  3. Comparison in muscle damage between maximal voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contractions of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Jubeau, Marc; Muthalib, Makii; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-02-01

    This study compared between maximal voluntary (VOL) and electrically stimulated (ES) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage to investigate whether ES would induce greater muscle damage than VOL. Twelve non-resistance-trained men (23-39 years) performed VOL with one arm and ES with the contralateral arm separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counterbalanced order. Both VOL and ES (frequency 75 Hz, pulse duration 250 μs, maximally tolerated intensity) exercises consisted of 50 maximal isometric contractions (4-s on, 15-s off) of the elbow flexors at a long muscle length (160°). Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC), range of motion, muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following exercise. The average peak torque over the 50 isometric contractions was greater (P < 0.05) for VOL (32.9 ± 9.8 N m) than ES (16.9 ± 6.3 N m). MVC decreased greater and recovered slower (P < 0.05) after ES (15% lower than baseline at 96 h) than VOL (full recovery). Serum CK activity increased (P < 0.05) only after ES, and the muscles became more sore and tender after ES than VOL (P < 0.05). These results showed that ES induced greater muscle damage than VOL despite the lower torque output during ES. It seems likely that higher mechanical stress imposed on the activated muscle fibres, due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment in ES, resulted in greater muscle damage. PMID:21573775

  4. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasound in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Comparison of Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Shklyar, Irina; Geisbush, Tom R.; Mijialovic, Aleksandar S.; Pasternak, Amy; Darras, Basil T.; Wu, Jim S.; Rutkove, Seward B.; Zaidman, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can be quantified using ultrasound by measuring either the amplitudes of sound-waves scattered back from the tissue [quantitative backscatter analysis (QBA)] or by measuring these backscattered amplitudes after compression into grayscale levels obtained from the images (GSL). Methods We measured and compared QBA and GSL from 6 muscles of 25 boys with DMD and 25 healthy subjects, aged 2–14 years, with age and, in DMD, with function (North Star Ambulatory Assessment). Results Both QBA and GSL were measured reliably (intraclass correlation ≥ 0.87) and were higher in DMD than controls (P<0.0001). In DMD, average QBA and GSL measured from superficial regions of muscle increased (rho ≥ 0.47, P < 0.05) with both higher age and worse function; in contrast, GSL measured from whole regions of muscle did not. Discussion QBA and GSL measured from superficial regions of muscle can similarly quantify muscle pathology in DMD. PMID:24862337

  5. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander. PMID:24409013

  6. Serial temperature monitoring and comparison of rectal and muscle temperatures in immobilized free-ranging black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis).

    PubMed

    vdB Morkel, Peter; Miller, Michele; Jago, Mark; Radcliffe, Robin W; du Preez, Pierre; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Sefton, Jennifer; Taft, Arthur; Nydam, Daryl; Gleed, Robin D

    2012-03-01

    Control of body temperature is critical to a successful anesthetic outcome, particularly during field immobilization of wild animals. Hyperthermia associated with exertion can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening complications such as organ damage (including myopathy) and death. Methods for monitoring core body temperature must accurately reflect the physiologic status of the animal in order for interventions to be effective. The goal of this preliminary study was to compare serial rectal and muscle temperatures in field-immobilized black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) and evaluate a possible association. Twenty-four free-ranging black rhinoceros were immobilized between February and March of 2010 in Ethosha National Park, Namibia. Pairwise comparisons showed a correlation of 0.73 (95% CI; 0.70-0.75) between rectal and muscle temperature measurements. Results from a multivariable model indicate that muscle temperature readings were, on average, 0.46 degrees C (95% CI; 0.36-0.57 degrees C) higher than rectal temperatures while adjusting for repeated measurements on the same rhinoceros, effect of duration of immobilization, and effect of ambient temperature on rhinoceroses' temperature readings. As immobilization time increased, muscle and rectal temperature values within an individual rhinoceros tended to equilibrate. The overall temperatures decreased by an average of 0.00059 degrees C/min (95% CI; -0.0047 to -0.0035 degrees C/min; P = 0.779). As the ambient temperature at time of immobilization increased by 1 degree C, the average rhinoceros temperature increased by 0.09 degrees C (95% CI; 0.06-0.11 degrees C, P < 0.0001). Higher body temperature creates a potential for cellular damage leading to complications that include myopathy. Methods for monitoring rectal, muscle, and ambient temperatures should be incorporated into anesthetic monitoring protocols for large ungulates, particularly under field conditions.

  7. Determination of skeletal muscle perfusion using arterial spin labeling NMRI: validation by comparison with venous occlusion plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J S; Duteil, S; Vaughan, J T; Hennel, F; Wary, C; Leroy-Willig, A; Carlier, P G

    2001-08-01

    T(1)-based determination of perfusion was performed with the high temporal and spatial resolution that monitoring of exercise physiology requires. As no data were available on the validation of this approach in human muscles, T(1)-based NMRI of perfusion was compared to standard strain-gauge venous occlusion plethysmography performed simultaneously within a 4 T magnet. Two different situations were investigated in 21 healthy young volunteers: 1) a 5-min ischemia of the leg, or 2) a 2-3 min ischemic exercise consisting of a plantar flexion on an amagnetic ergometer. Leg perfusion was monitored over 5-15 min of the recovery phase, after the air-cuff arterial occlusion had been released. The interesting features of the sequence were the use of a saturation-recovery module for the introduction of a T(1) modulation and of single-shot spin echo for imaging. Spatial resolution was 1.7 x 2.0 mm and temporal resolution was 2 s. For data analysis, ROIs were traced on different muscles and perfusion was calculated from the differences in muscle signal intensity in successive images. To allow comparison with the global measurement of perfusion by plethysmography, the T(1)-based NMR measurements in exercising muscles were rescaled to the leg cross-section. The perfusion measurements obtained by plethysmography and NMRI were in close agreement with a correlation coefficient between 0.87 and 0.92. This indicates that pulsed arterial techniques provide determination of muscle perfusion not only with superior spatial and temporal resolution but also with exactitude.

  8. Volume quantification by contrast-enhanced ultrasound: an in-vitro comparison with true volumes and thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has recently been proposed as a minimally- invasive, alternative method for blood volume measurement. This study aims at comparing the accuracy of CEUS and the classical thermodilution techniques for volume assessment in an in-vitro set-up. Methods The in-vitro set-up consisted of a variable network between an inflow and outflow tube and a roller pump. The inflow and outflow tubes were insonified with an ultrasound array transducer and a thermistor was placed in each tube. Indicator dilution curves were made by injecting indicator which consisted of an ultrasound-contrast-agent diluted in ice-cold saline. Both acoustic intensity- and thermo-dilution curves were used to calculate the indicator mean transit time between the inflow and outflow tube. The volumes were derived by multiplying the estimated mean transit time by the flow rate. We compared the volumes measured by CEUS with the true volumes of the variable network and those measured by thermodilution by Bland-Altman and intraclass-correlation analysis. Results The measurements by CEUS and thermodilution showed a very strong correlation (rs = 0.94) with a modest volume underestimation by CEUS of −40 ± 28 mL and an overestimation of 84 ± 62 mL by thermodilution compared with the true volumes. Both CEUS and thermodilution showed a high statistically significant correlation with the true volume (rs = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95 - 0.98; P<0.0001) and rs = 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94 - 0.98; P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions CEUS volume estimation provides a strong correlation with both the true volumes in-vitro and volume estimation by thermodilution. It may therefore represent an interesting alternative to the standard, invasive thermodilution technique. PMID:24134671

  9. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects.

    PubMed

    Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Ikhsanov, Renat S; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; O'Reilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-05-01

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles--surface and volume ones--and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to a substantial (by ∼5 times) increase of the internal photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle compared to the case when such a discontinuity is absent. For a plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of the two photoeffect mechanisms was undertaken for the first time which showed that the surface photoeffect can in the general case be larger than the volume one, which agrees with the results obtained for a flat metal surface first formulated by Tamm and Schubin in their pioneering development of a quantum-mechanical theory of photoeffect in 1931. In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism through the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary. The latter is stronger at relatively lower photon energies and correspondingly is more substantial for internal photoemission than for an external one. We show that in the general case, it is essential to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna.

  10. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; O'Reilly, Eoin P.; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-04-01

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles - surface and volume ones - and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to a substantial (by ~5 times) increase of the internal photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle compared to the case when such a discontinuity is absent. For a plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of the two photoeffect mechanisms was undertaken for the first time which showed that the surface photoeffect can in the general case be larger than the volume one, which agrees with the results obtained for a flat metal surface first formulated by Tamm and Schubin in their pioneering development of a quantum-mechanical theory of photoeffect in 1931. In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism through the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary. The latter is stronger at relatively lower photon energies and correspondingly is more substantial for internal photoemission than for an external one. We show that in the general case, it is essential to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna.

  11. A comparison of muscle energy models for simulating human walking in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ross H

    2014-04-11

    The popular Hill model for muscle activation and contractile dynamics has been extended with several different formulations for predicting the metabolic energy expenditure of human muscle actions. These extended models differ considerably in their approach to computing energy expenditure, particularly in their treatment of active lengthening and eccentric work, but their predictive abilities have never been compared. In this study, we compared the predictions of five different Hill-based muscle energy models in 3D forward dynamics simulations of normal human walking. In a data-tracking simulation that minimized muscle fatigue, the energy models predicted metabolic costs that varied over a three-fold range (2.45-7.15 J/m/kg), with the distinction arising from whether or not eccentric work was subtracted from the net heat rate in the calculation of the muscle metabolic rate. In predictive simulations that optimized neuromuscular control to minimize the metabolic cost, all five models predicted similar speeds, step lengths, and stance phase durations. However, some of the models predicted a hip circumduction strategy to minimize metabolic cost, while others did not, and the accuracy of the predicted knee and ankle angles and ground reaction forces also depended on the energy model used. The results highlights the need to clarify how eccentric work should be treated when calculating muscle energy expenditure, the difficulty in predicting realistic metabolic costs in simulated walking even with a detailed 3D musculoskeletal model, the potential for using such models to predict energetically-optimal gait modifications, and the room for improvement in existing muscle energy models and locomotion simulation frameworks.

  12. Comparison of soleus muscles from rats exposed to microgravity for 10 versus 14 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staron, R. S.; Kraemer, W. J.; Hikida, R. S.; Reed, D. W.; Murray, J. D.; Campos, G. E.; Gordon, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of two different duration space-flights on the extent of atrophy, fiber type composition, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) content of rat soleus muscles were compared. Adult male Fisher rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-57 and exposed to 10 days of microgravity and adult ovariectomized female Spraque-Dawley rats (n=12) were aboard flight STS-62 for 14 days. Soleus muscles were bilaterally removed from the flight and control animals and frozen for subsequent analyses. Muscle wet weights, fiber types (I, IC, IIC, and IIA), cross-sectional area, and MHC content were determined. Although a significant difference was found between the soleus wet weights of the two ground-based control groups, they were similar with regard to MHC content (ca 90% MHCI and ca 10% MHCIIa) and fiber type composition. Unloading of the muscles caused slow-to-fast transformations which included a decrease in the percentage of type I fibers and MHCI, an increase in fibers classified as type IC, and the expression of two fast myosin heavy chains not found in the control rat soleus muscles (MHCIId and MHCIIb). Although the amount of atrophy (ca 26%) and the extent of slow-to-fast transformation (decrease in the percentage of MHCI from 90% to 82.5%) in the soleus muscles were similar between the two spaceflights, the percentages of the fast MHCs differed. After 14 days of spaceflight, the percentage of MHCIIa was significantly lower and the percentages of MHCIId and MHCIIb were significantly higher than the corresponding MHC content of the soleus muscles from the 10-day animals. Indeed, MHCIId became the predominant fast MHC after 14 days in space. These data suggest fast-to-faster transformations continued during the longer spaceflight.

  13. Comparison Between Pre-Exhaustion and Traditional Exercise Order on Muscle Activation and Performance in Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Enrico Gori; Brown, Lee E.; Gomes, Willy Andrade; Corrêa, Daniel Alves; Serpa, Érica Paes; da Silva, Josinaldo Jarbas; Junior, Guanis de Barros Vilela; Fioravanti, Gustavo zorzi; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the acute effects of pre-exhaustion vs. traditional exercise order on neuromuscular performance and sEMG in trained men. Fourteen young, healthy, resistance trained men (age: 25.5 ± 4.0 years, height: 174.9 ± 4.1 cm, and total body mass: 80.0 ± 11.1 kg) took part of this study. All tests were randomized and counterbalanced for all subjects and experimental conditions. Volunteers attended one session in the laboratory. First, they performed ten repetition maximum (10RM) tests for each exercise (bench press and triceps pushdown) separately. Secondly, they performed all three conditions at 10RM: pre-test (bench press and triceps pushdown, separately), pre-exhaustion (triceps pushdown+bench press, PE) and traditional (bench press+triceps pushdown, TR), and rested 30 minutes between conditions. Results showed that pre-test was significantly greater than PE (p = 0.031) but not different than TR, for total volume load lifted. There was a significant difference between the pre-test and the time-course of lactate measures (p = 0.07). For bench press muscle activity of the pectoralis major, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005). Also, for muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.001, PE: p = 0.005, and TR: p = 0.006). For triceps pushdown, muscle activity of the triceps brachii, the last repetition was significantly greater than the first repetition (pre-test: p = 0.006, PE: p = 0.016, and TR: p = 0.005). For RPE, there were no significant differences between PE and TR (p = 0.15). Our results suggest that exercise order decreases repetitions performed, however, neuromuscular fatigue, lactate, and RPE are not impacted. The lack of difference in total volume load lifted between PE and TR might explain, at least in part, the similar metabolic and perceptual

  14. Volume shrinkage of bone, brain and muscle tissue in sample preparation for micro-CT and light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan; Goyens, Jana; De Greef, Daniel; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-08-01

    Two methods are especially suited for tomographic imaging with histological detail of macroscopic samples that consist of multiple tissue types (bone, muscle, nerve or fat): Light sheet (based) fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT requires staining with heavy chemical elements (and thus fixation and sometimes dehydration) in order to make soft tissue imageable when measured alongside denser structures. LSMF requires fixation, decalcification, dehydration, clearing and staining with a fluorescent dye. The specimen preparation of both imaging methods is prone to shrinkage, which is often not mentioned, let alone quantified. In this paper the presence and degree of shrinkage are quantitatively identified for the selected preparation methods/stains. LSFM delivers a volume shrinkage of 17% for bone, 56% for muscle and 62% for brain tissue. The three most popular micro-CT stains (phosphotungstic acid, iodine with potassium iodide, and iodine in absolute ethanol) deliver a volume shrinkage ranging from 10 to 56% for muscle and 27-66% for brain, while bone does not shrink in micro-CT preparation. PMID:24963987

  15. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Sousa, Vanessa Oliveira; Gameiro, Luiz Felipe; Muchailh, Rosana Carneiro; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Amaro, João Luiz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1) (n = 50) included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2) (n = 50) included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m2 in G1 and 25.0 kg/m2 in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004). In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006) and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001) compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21915489

  16. Comparison of swim recovery and muscle stimulation on lactate removal after sprint swimming.

    PubMed

    Neric, Francis B; Beam, William C; Brown, Lee E; Wiersma, Lenny D

    2009-12-01

    Competitive swimming requires multiple bouts of high-intensity exercise, leading to elevated blood lactate. Active exercise recovery has been shown to lower lactate faster than passive resting recovery but may not always be practical. An alternative treatment, electrical muscle stimulation, may have benefits similar to active recovery in lowering blood lactate but to date is unstudied. Therefore, this study compared submaximal swimming and electrical muscle stimulation in reducing blood lactate after sprint swimming. Thirty competitive swimmers (19 men and 11 women) participated in the study. Each subject completed 3 testing sessions consisting of a warm-up swim, a 200-yard maximal frontcrawl sprint, and 1 of 3 20-minute recovery treatments administered in random order. The recovery treatments consisted of a passive resting recovery, a submaximal swimming recovery, or electrical muscle stimulation. Blood lactate was tested at baseline, after the 200-yard sprint, and after 10 and 20 minutes of recovery. A significant interaction (p < 0.05) between recovery treatment and recovery time was observed. Blood lactate levels for the swimming recovery were significantly lower at 10 minutes (3.50 +/- 1.57 mmol.L-1) and 20 minutes (1.60 +/- 0.57 mmol.L-1) of recovery than either of the other 2 treatments. Electrical muscle stimulation led to a lower mean blood lactate (3.12 +/- 1.41 mmol.L-1) after 20 minutes of recovery compared with passive rest (4.11 +/- 1.35 mmol.L-1). Submaximal swimming proved to be most effective at lowering blood lactate, but electrical muscle stimulation also reduced blood lactate 20 minutes postexercise significantly better than resting passive recovery. Electrical muscle stimulation shows promise as an alternate recovery treatment for the purpose of lowering blood lactate.

  17. Comparison of trunk and hip muscle activity during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activity of trunk and hip muscles during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension. [Subjects] The study enrolled 18 participants. [Methods] Two exercises (hip and lumbar extension) and two ranges (180° and <180°) were studied. [Results] Differences in degree of extension affected the percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles, with significantly higher average values at >180° than at 180° lumbar extension. No significant differences were found in gluteus maximus activity according to exercise type or range. [Conclusion] Hip extension may be more effective and safer for lumbar rehabilitation than lumbar extension.

  18. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Comparison between real rockfall volumes measurements and production calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, B.; Pedrazzini, A.; Humair, F.; Pedrozzi, G.; Carrea, D.; Loye, A.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    only the steepest parts of the cliffs. The direction of maximum discontinuity frequency is also calculated and corresponds to the azimuth direction in which the maximum number of discontinuities is crossed. The comparison between the measured volumes of blocks in the dams and the Matterocking rating shows a good correlation. However, the correlation with the direction of maximum discontinuity frequency is poor, suggesting that this is not an implicit parameter for susceptibility rating. Therefore, the rockfall production of the cliff is much more depending on the structures rather than on the maximum fracturing direction. Eventually, the hypothesis that the theoretically most rockfall-prone portions of the cliff correspond to those with the larger volumes of blocks measured in the protective dams is confirmed.

  19. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  20. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  1. A comparison of muscle activations during traditional and abbreviated tennis serves.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Matthew K; Uhl, Tim L; McCrory, Jean; McGinn, Patricia; Kibler, W Ben; Shapiro, Robert

    2008-05-01

    The abbreviated tennis serve is a relatively novel modification of the traditional serve that has been reported to provide performance advantages over the traditional technique. However, there are limited objective data regarding the benefits and biomechanics of the abbreviated serve; no data exist that describe shoulder muscle activations during the abbreviated serve. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activations between the traditional and abbreviated serves. Electromyographic data were collected for the anterior and posterior deltoid, infraspinatus, middle trapezius, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, and pectoralis major. When muscle activations were compared during each serve phase, no significant differences were observed between the traditional and abbreviated tennis serve techniques, indicating that the traditional and abbreviated serves are similar regarding shoulder muscle activations. These results could have implications for performance of and injury related to the abbreviated versus traditional serve technique. Although the abbreviated serve has anecdotally been described as advantageous, the present data do not indicate any significant advantages or disadvantages in performing the abbreviated serve technique versus the traditional serve. PMID:18610776

  2. Comparison of muscle activity patterns of transfemoral amputees and control subjects during walking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only few studies have looked at electromyography (EMG) during prosthetic gait. Differences in EMG between normal and prosthetic gait for stance and swing phase were never separately analyzed. These differences can give valuable information if and how muscle activity changes in prosthetic gait. Methods In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls. On and off timings for stance and swing phase were determined together with the level of co-activity and inter-subject variability. Results and conclusions Gait phase changes in amputees mainly consisted of an increased double support phase preceding the prosthetic stance phase. For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration. The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls. PMID:23914785

  3. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  4. Comparison of cloned and non-cloned Holstein heifers in muscle contractile and metabolic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jurie, C; Picard, B; Heyman, Y; Cassar-Malek, I; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Richard, C; Hocquette, J F

    2009-02-01

    Muscle contractile and metabolic characteristics were studied on nine cloned and eight non-cloned (control) heifers. The animals were submitted to repeated biopsies of the semitendinosus (ST) muscle at the ages of 8, 12, 18 and 24 months. The contractile type was determined from the proportion of the different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms separated by electrophoresis. Glycolytic metabolism was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and oxidative metabolism was assessed by isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activities. In cloned heifers at 8 months of age, there was a greater proportion of MyHC I (slow oxidative isoform) and MyHC IIa (fast oxido-glycolytic isoform), a lower proportion of MyHC IIx (fast glycolytic isoform), greater COX and HAD activity and a lower LDH/ICDH ratio compared with control heifers. Thus, young cloned heifers had slower muscle types associated with a more oxidative muscular metabolism than control heifers. From 12 months of age onwards, no significant differences were observed between cloned and control heifers. A delay in muscle differentiation and maturation in cloned heifers is hypothesised and discussed.

  5. Comparison of Blepharoptosis Correction Using Müller-aponeurosis Composite Flap Advancement and Frontalis Muscle Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhan, Anwar; Han, Dong Gil; Shim, Jeong Su; Lee, Yong Jig; Ha, Won Ho; Lee, Byung Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatments for severe blepharoptosis are well documented and include the most common operations for restoring upper eyelid ptosis, which are levator surgery and frontal muscle transfers; however, the choice of treatment is still controversial. There are different approaches to the restoration of upper eyelid ptosis, and the choice will be based on ptosis severity and the surgeon’s skill and experience. Methods: Two hundred and fourteen patients presenting with a levator function of between 2 and 4 mm received ptosis correction between 1991 and 2010 at our clinic. Of these, 71 patients underwent Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement for correction of 89 eyelids, and frontalis muscle transfer was performed on 143 patients (217 eyelids). Postoperative results were evaluated with an average follow-up period of 23 months. Results: The preoperative average for marginal reflex distance (MRD1) in the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group was 1.25 mm, and in the frontal muscle transfer group, it was 0.59 mm. The area of corneal exposure (ACE) was 57.2% in the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group and 53.6% in the frontal muscle transfer group. The postoperative average distance was not significantly different for the 2 techniques. In the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group, MRD1 was 2.7 mm and ACE was improved to 73.5%. In the frontal muscle transfer group, MRD1 was 2.3 mm and ACE was 71.2%. Undercorrection and eyelid asymmetry were the most frequently observed postoperative complications for both techniques. Conclusions: In our study, we confirmed that Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement and the frontalis transfer technique are both effective in the correction of severe blepharoptosis; our results showed no significant differences between the 2 techniques. PMID:25426383

  6. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  7. Comparison of the isolated contraction ratios of the hip extensors and erector spinae muscles of the lumbar region and thoracic muscles during different back extension exercises

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the isolated contraction ratios of the hip extensors, erector spinae muscles of the lumbar region, and thoracic muscles during different back extension exercises. [Subjects] Twelve males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects performed various back extension exercises. The activities of the T7 erector spinae muscles, L3 erector spinae muscles, and the gluteus maximus were measured, and the isolation contraction ratios were calculated. [Results] The isolated contraction ratio of the T7 erector spinae muscles significantly increased during exercise 2. The isolated contraction ratio of the gluteus maximus increased by a significant degree during exercise 1 compared with the other exercises. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the back extension exercises 1 and 2 can be applied to selectively exercise the hip extensors, thoracic muscles, and muscles of the lumbar region. PMID:25729158

  8. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion.

  9. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion. PMID:26737049

  10. A comparison of adenine and some derivatives on pig isolated tracheal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Dieterle, Y.; Holden, W. E.; Junod, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    We studied the muscle relaxation induced by adenine and several adenine derivatives in strips of tracheal smooth muscle from pigs; in addition their metabolism by the tissue was examined. Adenine relaxed tissue which was contracted by carbachol, histamine, or KCl. Adenine's potency was similar to that of adenosine and ATP (threshold about 4 X 10(-5)M). In tissues with carbachol-induced tone, the adenine effect differed from adenosine and ATP by being slower in onset and in 'washout' time. Furthermore, neither dipyridamole nor theophylline modified the response to adenine. The relationship was examined between pharmacological effects and the metabolism of [3H]-adenosine and [3H]-adenine. Both substrates were taken up by the tissue and converted to nucleotides, but relaxation correlated with nucleotide accumulation only in the case of [3H]-adenine. We conclude that the site and mechanism of adenine-induced relaxation is different from that of adenosine and ATP in porcine tracheal muscle. PMID:6571222

  11. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  12. Comparison of abdominal muscle thickness according to feedback method used during abdominal hollowing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangyong; Han, Seulki; Lee, Daehee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was intended to examine the most effective feedback method for contracting the musculus transversus abdominis muscle by using basic training, a pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging during abdominal hollowing exercise training. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects in this study were 30 healthy young students in their twenties. Thirty subjects were divided randomly and equally into the basic training, the pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging groups. All of the subjects received abdominal hollowing exercise training for 15 minutes. The subjects in the pressure biofeedback unit group were trained by using a pressure biofeedback unit. Those in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group received training with monitoring of possible contraction of their musculus transversus abdominis muscles on ultrasonography. [Results] In all the three groups, the musculus transversus abdominis became significantly thicker, but more significantly in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group than in the basic training group. [Conclusion] The feedback method using real-time ultrasonographic imaging may be more effective in thickening the musculus transversus abdominis muscle during exercise than the traditional feedback method with manual contact only. However, it is insufficient in terms of overall qualitative improvement of exercise outcome. PMID:27799683

  13. Motor nerve terminals on abdominal muscles in larval flesh flies, Sarcophaga bullata: comparisons with Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Feeney, C J; Karunanithi, S; Pearce, J; Govind, C K; Atwood, H L

    1998-12-14

    Motor nerve terminals on abdominal body-wall muscles 6A and 7A in larval flesh flies were investigated to establish their general structural features with confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and freeze-fracture procedures. As in Drosophila and other dipterans, two motor axons supply these muscles, and two morphologically different terminals were discerned with confocal microscopy: thin terminals with relatively small varicosities (Type Is), and thicker terminals with larger varicosities (Type Ib). In serial electron micrographs, Type Ib terminals were distinguished from Type Is terminals by their larger cross-sectional area, more extensive subsynaptic reticulum, more mitochondrial profiles, and more clear synaptic vesicles. Type Ib terminals possessed larger synapses and more synaptic contact area per unit terminal length. Although presynaptic dense bars of active zones were similar in mean length for the two terminal types, there were almost twice as many dense bars per synapse for Type Ib terminals. Freeze-fractures through the presynaptic membrane showed particle-free areas indicative of synapses on the P-face, within which were localized aggregations of large intramembranous particles indicative of active zones. These particles were similar in number to those found at active zones of several other arthropod neuromuscular junctions. In general, synaptic structural parameters strongly paralleled those of the anatomically homologous muscles in Drosophila melanogaster. In live preparations, simultaneous focal recording from identified varicosities and intracellular recording indicated that the two terminals produced excitatory junction potentials of similar amplitude in a physiological solution similar to that used for Drosophila.

  14. Identification and comparison of microRNAs from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues from two porcine breeds.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yi; Xi, Qian-Yun; Xiong, Yuan-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Xiao; Shu, Gang; Wang, Song-Bo; Wang, Li-Na; Gao, Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Tong; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small regulatory RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Although an increasing number of porcine miRNAs recently have been identified, research has yet to identify the full repertoire of miRNAs in pig skeletal and adipose tissues and their differences between breeds. We extracted small RNA from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues of Landrace and Lantang pigs, and the expression of a total of 184 known porcine miRNAs (113 from Solexa sequencing and 171 from miRNA chip hybridization) as well as 521 novel miRNA candidates was detected. Moreover, 20 miRNAs were selected randomly from the 184 miRNAs and analysed by quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the aforementioned results. In the skeletal muscle tissues, 21 miRNAs were up-regulated in Lantang and another 33 were highly expressed in Landrace pigs. In the adipose tissues, 25 miRNAs were down-regulated in Lantang and another 23 were lowly expressed in Landrace pigs. miRNA divergence between tissues was also detected in this study. Ten miRNAs were highly expressed in the skeletal muscle tissue in comparison with adipose tissue, and another 10 miRNAs exhibited the opposite expression profile. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the miRNAs in muscle and adipose tissues, the 10 miRNAs with the most divergent expression profiles were functionally categorized using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. Most of the miRNAs strongly corresponded to myogenesis and adipogenesis processes. In addition, 84 of the 521 miRNA candidates were potentially porcine-specific miRNAs. This study adds new valuable information to comparative miRNA profiles of skeletal muscle and adipose tissues in porcine species. The great diversity of miRNA composition and expression levels both between breeds and between tissues suggests that a complex regulatory network exists in porcine subcutaneous fat development.

  15. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  16. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects.

    PubMed

    Lui, Y F; Ip, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  17. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  18. Comparison of muscle fatty acid profiles and cholesterol concentrations of bison, beef cattle, elk, and chicken.

    PubMed

    Rule, D C; Broughton, K S; Shellito, S M; Maiorano, G

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fatty acid weight percentages and cholesterol concentrations of longissimus dorsi (LD), semitendinosus (ST), and supraspinatus (SS) muscles (n = 10 for each) of range bison (31 mo of age), feedlot-finished bison (18 mo of age), range beef cows (4 to 7 yr of age), feedlot steers (18 mo of age), free-ranging cow elk (3 to 5 yr of age), and chicken breast. Lipids were analyzed by capillary GLC. Total saturated fatty acids (SFA) were greater (P < 0.01) in range bison than in feedlot bison and were greater (P < 0.01) in SS of range beef cattle than in feedlot steers. Muscles of elk and range bison were similar (P > 0.05) in SAT. In LD, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were highest (P < 0.01) for elk and range bison and lowest (P < 0.01) for feedlot steers within each muscle. Range bison and range beef cows had greater (P < 0.01) PUFA in LD and ST than feedlot bison or steers, respectively. Range-fed animals had higher (P < 0.01) n-3 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals or chicken breast. Chicken breast n-6 fatty acids were greater (P < 0.01) than for muscles from bison, beef, or elk. Elk had higher (P < 0.01) n-6 fatty acids than bison or beef cattle; however, range-fed animals had higher (P < 0.01) n-6 fatty acids than feedlot-fed animals in ST. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 18:2cis-9, trans-11) in LD was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.4%), and lowest for chicken breast and elk (mean = 0.1%). In ST, CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range and feedlot bison and range beef cows (mean = 0.4%) and lowest for elk and chicken breast (mean = 0.1%). Also, SS CLA was greatest (P < 0.01) for range beef cows (0.5%) and lowest for chicken breast (0.1%). Mean total fatty acid concentration (g/100 g tissue) for all muscles was highest (P < 0.01) for feedlot bison and feedlot cattle and lowest (P < 0.01) for range bison, range beef cows, elk, and chicken. Chicken breast cholesterol (mg/100 g tissue) was higher (P < 0.01) than LD

  19. Comparison of reduction of edema after rest and after muscle exercises in treatment of chronic venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Quilici, Belczak Cleusa Ema; Gildo, Cavalheri; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira; Quilici, Belczak Sergio; Augusto, Caffaro Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work was to compare the reduction in edema obtained in the conservative treatment of phlebopathies after resting and after performing a muscle exercise program in the Trendelenburg position. Methods Twenty-eight limbs of 24 patients with venous edema of distinct etiologies and classified as between C3 and C5 using CEAP classification. Volumetric evaluation by water displacement was carried out before and after resting in the Trendelenburg position and after performing programmed muscle exercises 24 hours later under identical conditions of time, position and temperature. For the statistical analysis the paired t-test was used with an alpha error of 5% being considered acceptable. Results The average total volume of the lower limbs was 3,967.46 mL. The mean reduction in edema obtained after resting was 92.9 mL, and after exercises it was 135.4 mL, giving a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.0007). Conclusion In conclusion, exercises are more efficient to reduce the edema of lower limbs than resting in the Trendelenburg position. PMID:19602249

  20. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands.

    PubMed

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Usherwood, James R

    2015-09-01

    Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the 'cost of muscle force' approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds--adult humans--accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds--children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  1. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the ‘cost of muscle force’ approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds – adult humans – accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds – children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  2. High muscle mitochondrial volume and aerobic capacity in a small marsupial (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) reveals flexible links between energy-use levels in mammals.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Webster, Koa N; Lee, Enhua; Buttemer, William A

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the muscle structure-function relationships that underlie the aerobic capacity of an insectivorous, small (~15 g) marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata (Family: Dasyuridae), to obtain further insight into energy use patterns in marsupials relative to those in placentals, their sister clade within the Theria (advanced mammals). Disparate hopping marsupials (Suborder Macropodiformes), a kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a rat-kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata), show aerobic capabilities as high as those of 'athletic' placentals. Equivalent muscle mitochondrial volumes and cardiovascular features support these capabilities. We examined S. crassicaudata to determine whether highly developed aerobic capabilities occur elsewhere in marsupials, rather than being restricted to the more recently evolved Macropodiformes. This was the case. Treadmill-trained S. crassicaudata attained a maximal aerobic metabolic rate ( or MMR) of 272 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1) (N=8), similar to that reported for a small (~20 g), 'athletic' placental, Apodemus sylvaticus, 264 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1). Hopping marsupials have comparable aerobic levels when body mass variation is considered. Sminthopsis crassicaudata has a basal metabolic rate (BMR) about 75% of placental values but it has a notably large factorial aerobic scope (fAS) of 13; elevated fAS also features in hopping marsupials. The of S. crassicaudata was supported by an elevated total muscle mitochondrial volume, which was largely achieved through high muscle mitochondrial volume densities, Vv(mt,f), the mean value being 14.0±1.33%. These data were considered in relation to energy use levels in mammals, particularly field metabolic rate (FMR). BMR is consistently lower in marsupials, but this is balanced by a high fAS, such that marsupial MMR matches that of placentals. However, FMR shows different mass relationships in the two clades, with the FMR of small (<125 g) marsupials, such as S. crassicaudata, being higher than that in

  3. Comparison of gel contraction mediated by airway smooth muscle cells from patients with and without asthma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hisako; Moir, Lyn M; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent E

    2007-01-01

    Backgrounds Exaggerated bronchial constriction is the most significant and life threatening response of patients with asthma to inhaled stimuli. However, few studies have investigated the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from these patients. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to measure contraction of ASM cells by embedding them into a collagen gel, and to compare the contraction between subjects with and without asthma. Methods Gel contraction to histamine was examined in floating gels containing cultured ASM cells from subjects with and without asthma following overnight incubation while unattached (method 1) or attached (method 2) to casting plates. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase protein levels were also examined. Results Collagen gels containing ASM cells reduced in size when stimulated with histamine in a concentration‐dependent manner and reached a maximum at a mean (SE) of 15.7 (1.2) min. This gel contraction was decreased by inhibitors for phospholipase C (U73122), myosin light chain kinase (ML‐7) and Rho kinase (Y27632). When comparing the two patient groups, the maximal decreased area of gels containing ASM cells from patients with asthma was 19 (2)% (n = 8) using method 1 and 22 (3)% (n = 6) using method 2, both of which were greater than that of cells from patients without asthma: 13 (2)% (n = 9, p = 0.05) and 10 (4)% (n = 5, p = 0.024), respectively. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase levels were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The increased contraction of asthmatic ASM cells may be responsible for exaggerated bronchial constriction in asthma. PMID:17412779

  4. Comparison of Lower Extremity Kinematics and Hip Muscle Activation During Rehabilitation Tasks Between Sexes

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Maureen K.; Boudreau, Samantha N.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Uhl, Timothy L.; Lattermann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Closed kinetic chain exercises are an integral part of rehabilitation programs after lower extremity injury. Sex differences in lower extremity kinematics have been reported during landing and cutting; however, less is known about sex differences in movement patterns and activation of the hip musculature during common lower extremity rehabilitation exercises. Objective: To determine whether lower extremity kinematics and muscle activation levels differ between sexes during closed kinetic chain rehabilitation exercises. Design: Cross-sectional with 1 between-subjects factor (sex) and 1 within-subjects factor (exercise). Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 21 women (age  =  23 ± 5.8 years, height  =  167.6 ± 5.1 cm, mass  =  63.7 ± 5.9 kg) and 21 men (age  =  23 ± 4.0 years, height  =  181.4 ± 7.4 cm, mass  =  85.6 ± 16.5 kg). Intervention(s): In 1 testing session, participants performed 3 trials each of single-leg squat, lunge, and step-up-and-over exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded the peak joint angles (degrees) of knee flexion and valgus and hip flexion, extension, adduction, and external rotation for each exercise. We also recorded the electromyographic activity of the gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, adductor longus, and bilateral gluteus medius muscles for the concentric and eccentric phases of each exercise. Results: Peak knee flexion angles were smaller and peak hip extension angles were larger for women than for men across all tasks. Peak hip flexion angles during the single-leg squat were smaller for women than for men. Mean root-mean-square amplitudes for the gluteus maximus and rectus femoris muscles in both the concentric and eccentric phases of the 3 exercises were greater for women than for men. Conclusions: Sex differences were observed in sagittal-plane movement patterns during the rehabilitation exercises. Because of the sex differences

  5. Imaging of the muscle-bone relationship.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Alex; Ferretti, José Luis; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-12-01

    Muscle can be assessed by imaging techniques according to its size (as thickness, area, volume, or alternatively, as a mass) and architecture (fiber length and pennation angle), with values used as an anthropometric measure or a surrogate for force production. Similarly, the size of the bone (as area or volume) can be imaged using MRI or pQCT, although typically bone mineral mass is reported. Bone imaging measures of mineral density, size, and geometry can also be combined to calculate bone's structural strength-measures being highly predictive of bone's failure load ex vivo. Imaging of muscle-bone relationships can, hence, be accomplished through a number of approaches by adoption and comparison of these different muscle and bone parameters, dependent on the research question under investigation. These approaches have revealed evidence of direct, mechanical muscle-bone interactions independent of allometric associations. They have led to important information on bone mechanoadaptation and the influence of muscular action on bone, in addition to influences of age, gender, exercise, and disuse on muscle-bone relationships. Such analyses have also produced promising diagnostic tools for clinical use, such as identification of primary, disuse-induced, and secondary osteoporosis and estimation of bone safety factors. Standardization of muscle-bone imaging methods is required to permit more reliable comparisons between studies and differing imaging modes, and in particular to aid adoption of these methods into widespread clinical practice.

  6. Imaging of the muscle-bone relationship.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Alex; Ferretti, José Luis; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-12-01

    Muscle can be assessed by imaging techniques according to its size (as thickness, area, volume, or alternatively, as a mass) and architecture (fiber length and pennation angle), with values used as an anthropometric measure or a surrogate for force production. Similarly, the size of the bone (as area or volume) can be imaged using MRI or pQCT, although typically bone mineral mass is reported. Bone imaging measures of mineral density, size, and geometry can also be combined to calculate bone's structural strength-measures being highly predictive of bone's failure load ex vivo. Imaging of muscle-bone relationships can, hence, be accomplished through a number of approaches by adoption and comparison of these different muscle and bone parameters, dependent on the research question under investigation. These approaches have revealed evidence of direct, mechanical muscle-bone interactions independent of allometric associations. They have led to important information on bone mechanoadaptation and the influence of muscular action on bone, in addition to influences of age, gender, exercise, and disuse on muscle-bone relationships. Such analyses have also produced promising diagnostic tools for clinical use, such as identification of primary, disuse-induced, and secondary osteoporosis and estimation of bone safety factors. Standardization of muscle-bone imaging methods is required to permit more reliable comparisons between studies and differing imaging modes, and in particular to aid adoption of these methods into widespread clinical practice. PMID:25095743

  7. Volume expansion with modified hemoglobin solution, colloids, or crystalloid after hemorrhagic shock in rabbits: effects in skeletal muscle oxygen pressure and use versus arterial blood velocity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Boura, Cédric; Caron, Alexis; Longrois, Dan; Mertes, Paul Michel; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick

    2003-02-01

    Therapeutic goals for hemorrhagic shock resuscitation are the increase of cardiac output and oxygen delivery. The possibility exists that because of microcirculatory effects, different volume expanders result in different tissue oxygen delivery and oxygen use. In a rabbit model of resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock (50% blood loss), we compared the effects of an hemoglobin-based O2-carrying solution (HbOC) with those elicited by albumin, hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or saline on systemic hemodynamics, skeletal muscle O2 pressure (PtiO2), and interstitial concentration of lactate (LACi) through the combined implantation of a microdialysis probe and a sensitive O2 electrode into the hind limb. Hemorrhagic shock induced a 50% decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), femoral artery blood flow (BF), and PtiO2. After resuscitation, there were statistically significant differences among the volume expanders. The increase in MAP was faster with HbOC and colloids, and slower with saline, mainly obtained by vasoconstriction for HbOC and by increased BF with albumin and HES. The maximum MAP values were significantly higher for HbOC compared with the other volume expanders. HbOC and colloids induced a faster increase in PtiO2 as compared with saline, but maximum PtiO2 values were not different among the volume expanders. Tissue oxygen use as estimated by LACi increased transiently at the beginning of volume expansion with similar maximum values. Animals resuscitated with saline had significantly higher LACi concentrations after the onset of volume expansion as compared with HbOC but not with colloids. Our results demonstrate that there are measurable differences in MAP and BF upon resuscitation with the four different solutions and there is a slower increase in tissue PtiO2 with saline than with colloids associated with significantly increased LACi consistent with delayed reoxygenation upon resuscitation with saline.

  8. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  9. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  10. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  11. Men, muscles, and body image: comparisons of competitive bodybuilders, weight trainers, and athletically active controls

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, T; Lewis, R; Cash, T; Pope, H

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate body image and psychosocial adjustment among competitive bodybuilders, non-competitive weight trainers, and athletically active men. Methods: Participants were 40 men in each of the three groups who were assessed on body composition and multiple facets of body image evaluation, investment and anxiety, eating attitudes, and social self esteem. Results: Relative to the other two groups, competitive bodybuilders had greater body mass due to fat-free body mass. Although groups did not differ in their situational body image discomfort, competitive bodybuilders and weight trainers had a more positive global appearance evaluation and were more psychologically invested in their physical appearance. Compared with active controls, men in both weightlifting groups were more satisfied with their upper torso and muscle tone. Competitive bodybuilders reported more mid torso satisfaction than the other two groups. Competitive bodybuilders also wished to be significantly heavier than controls did and reported higher social self esteem but greater eating disturbance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that competitive bodybuilders as a group are not more "muscle dysmorphic" than either non-competitive weight trainers or physically active men who do not train with weights. PMID:15793091

  12. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  13. Volume calculation of subsurface structures and traps in hydrocarbon exploration — a comparison between numerical integration and cell based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavinić, Petra; Cvetković, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The volume calculation of geological structures is one of the primary goals of interest when dealing with exploration or production of oil and gas in general. Most of those calculations are done using advanced software packages but still the mathematical workflow (equations) has to be used and understood for the initial volume calculation process. In this paper a comparison is given between bulk volume calculations of geological structures using trapezoidal and Simpson's rule and the ones obtained from cell-based models. Comparison in calculation is illustrated with four models; dome - 1/2 of ball/sphere, elongated anticline, stratigraphic trap due to lateral facies change and faulted anticline trap. Results show that Simpson's and trapezoidal rules give a very accurate volume calculation even with a few inputs(isopach areas - ordinates). A test of cell based model volume calculation precision against grid resolution is presented for various cases. For high accuracy, less the 1% of an error from coarsening, a cell area has to be 0.0008% of the reservoir area

  14. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. PMID:27065532

  15. Comparison of acute responses to isotonic or isokinetic eccentric muscle action: differential outcomes in skeletal muscle damage and implications for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Alemany, J A; Delgado-Díaz, D C; Mathews, H; Davis, J M; Kostek, M C

    2014-01-01

    Both isotonic and isokinetic eccentric muscle contractions are commonly used in muscle research laboratories to induce muscle damage, yet, the muscle damage outcomes between these 2 modes of eccentric contraction have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare modes of contraction for differences in muscle damage. 16 men were placed in the isotonic (IT: 110% of maximal isometric torque) or the isokinetic (IK: 120°/s) group, with each group performing 200 eccentric muscle actions of the knee extensors. Isometric peak torque, perceived soreness and CK activity were measured immediately pre and post exercise, and 48-h post exercise. Mean total work (~1700 J) and peak torque per set (~265 Nm) decreased over the 200 repetitions (p<0.01), and was not different between groups. Damage markers changed 48-h post exercise (p<0.05): peak isometric torque (-13%), creatine kinase activity (+200%) and self-perceived muscular soreness (+4 unit change). Significant group×time interactions (p<0.01) indicated that peak isometric torque was 22% lower, and creatine kinase and self-perceived muscular soreness were 330% and 3 unit difference higher in the IT as compared to the IK groups, 48-h post exercise. When equating for total work, skeletal muscle damage markers are higher during IT vs. IK modes. This reflects differences inherent in contraction type and suggests that this should be taken into account during physical rehabilitation.

  16. A Comparison of Cough Assistance Techniques in Patients with Respiratory Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Won Ah; Won, Yu Hui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of a mechanical in-exsufflator (MI-E), either alone or in combination with manual thrust, to augment cough in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) and respiratory muscle dysfunction. Materials and Methods For this randomized crossover single-center controlled trial, patients with noninvasive ventilator-dependent NMD were recruited. The primary outcome was peak cough flow (PCF), which was measured in each patient after a cough that was unassisted, manually assisted following a maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) maneuver, assisted by MI-E, or assisted by manual thrust plus MI-E. The cough augmentation techniques were provided in random order. PCF was measured using a new device, the Cough Aid. Results All 40 enrolled participants (37 males, three females; average age, 20.9±7.2 years) completed the study. The mean (standard deviation) PCFs in the unassisted, manually assisted following an MIC maneuver, MI-E-assisted, and manual thrust plus MI-E-assisted conditions were 95.7 (40.5), 155.9 (53.1), 177.2 (33.9), and 202.4 (46.6) L/min, respectively. All three interventions significantly improved PCF. However, manual assistance following an MIC maneuver was significantly less effective than MI-E alone. Manual thrust plus MI-E was significantly more effective than both of these interventions. Conclusion In patients with NMD and respiratory muscle dysfunction, MI-E alone was more effective than manual assistance following an MIC maneuver. However, MI-E used in conjunction with manual thrust improved PCF even further. PMID:27593879

  17. Innervation patterns of the canine masticatory muscles in comparison to human.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Song, Woo-Chul; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Heung-Joong; Koh, Ki-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the nerve distribution of the masseter, temporalis, and zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscles to elucidate the phylogenetic traits of canine mastication. A detailed dissection was made of 15 hemisectioned heads of adult beagle dogs. The innervations of the masticatory nerve twigs exhibited a characteristic pattern and were classified into seven groups. Twig innervating the anterior portion of the temporalis (aTM) was defined as the anterior temporal nerve (ATN). Anterior twig of ATN branched from the buccal nerve and innervated only the aTM, whereas posterior twig of ATN innervated both of the aTM and deep layer of the tempolaris (dTM). From this and morphological observations, it was proposed that the action of the canine aTM is more independent than that of the human. The middle temporal nerve ran superoposteriorly within the dTM and superficial layer of the temporalis (sTM) innervating both of them, whereas the posterior temporal nerve innervated only the posterior region of the sTM. The masseteric nerve (MSN) innervated the ZM and the three layers of the masseter. Deep twig of MSN was also observed innervating sTM after entering the ZM in all cases. The major role played by the canine ZM might thus underlie the differential arrangement of the distribution of the masticatory nerve bundles in dogs and humans. Although the patterns of innervation to the canine and human masticatory muscles were somewhat similar, there were some differences that might be due to evolutionary adaptation to their respective feeding styles.

  18. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J B; Ramos, Isalira P; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F; Santos, Raquel S; de Oliveira, Milena V; Souza, Sergio A; Goldenberg, Regina C; Luiz, Ronir R; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  19. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J B; Ramos, Isalira P; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F; Santos, Raquel S; de Oliveira, Milena V; Souza, Sergio A; Goldenberg, Regina C; Luiz, Ronir R; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  20. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A.; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J. B.; Ramos, Isalira P.; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F.; Santos, Raquel S.; de Oliveira, Milena V.; Souza, Sergio A.; Goldenberg, Regina C.; Luiz, Ronir R.; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G.; Silva, Pedro L.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  1. Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes after Postisometric Muscle Relaxation or Kinesio Taping Application for Normalization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle Tone and the Pain Relief: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Slupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Kołcz-Trzęsicka, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Kamil; Halska, Urszula; Przestrzelska, Monika; Mucha, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the resting bioelectrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (the UT muscle) before and after one of the two interventions: postisometric muscle relaxation (PIR) and Kinesio Taping (KT). Moreover a comparison between group results was conducted. From the initial 61 volunteers, 52 were selected after exclusion criteria and were allocated randomly to 2 groups: PIR group and KT group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was change in bioelectrical activity of UT muscle evaluated by surface electromyography (sEMG). Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Significant differences were found only in KT group: the average resting bioelectrical activity decreased by 0.8 μV (p = 0.0237) and the average VAS result reduced by 2.0 points (p = 0.0001). Greater decrease of VAS results was recorded in KT group compared to PIR group (p = 0.0010). Both PIR and KT intervention did not influence significantly the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle. KT application was better for pain relief in the studied sample compared with PIR intervention. PMID:26347792

  2. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on EUROMET key comparison EUROMET.M.FF-K4 for volume intercomparison of 100 ml Gay-Lussac pycnometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Elsa

    2006-01-01

    Pycnometers are currently used for the measurement of the density of different liquids (from water to high viscosity inks). In order to have a correct density measurement the volume of the pycnometer must be obtained by calibration. Usually the calibration method is a gravimetric method. In 2002 a project for the comparison of the volume of 100 ml Gay-Lussac pycnometer was initially proposed in the EUROMET TC Flow. Fourteen NMIs agreed to participate and the EUROMET 692 project started officially in September 2002 and was concluded in March 2004. The main purpose of the project was to compare the experimental method and the uncertainty calculation in the pycnometer volume determination and it was expected to be representative for all types of laboratory glassware. In the EUROMET TC Flow 2006 in Lisbon it was decided to propose this project as a EUROMET Key Comparison due to the good overall agreement found. It was therefore necessary to link the EUROMET 692 results with the Key Comparison CCM.FF-K4. Because the pycnometers were not identical in both intercomparisons, some calculations on equivalence were performed based on BIPM rules. The results of all laboratories participating in EUROMET project 692 are presented in this report as well as their equivalence with the reference value of the key comparison CCM.FF-K4. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Mathematical comparison between volume of distribution (V) and volume of distribution at steady-state (Vss) utilizing model-independent approach.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Eyal; Bialer, Meir

    2004-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic textbooks state that the (apparent) volume of distribution based on drug concentration in plasma (V or Vbeta) is always greater than the volume of distribution (apparent) under steady state conditions (Vss), but do not provide a general model-independent mathematical proof. Wagner's mathematical comparison between Vbeta and Vss is based on microscopic rate constants of either specific models and is restricted solely to the two-compartment open body model. Nakashima and Benet utilizing a model-dependent approach showed a mathematical relationship between Vbeta and Vss for a multicompartment model, but again by using microscopic model constants. The limitation of these two above mentioned mathematical comparisons is the necessity of knowledge of the model's structure and its microscopic rate constants. The present article describes a new non-compartmental, model-independent, general mathematical proof for Vbeta to be always greater than Vss. This new method does not require any knowledge of microscopical rate constants and is based solely on an exponentially decreasing function, which is the common way to describe drug disposition following i.v. bolus.

  4. Comparison of palatability characteristics of beef gluteus medius and triceps brachii muscles.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate triceps brachii steaks as a substitute for gluteus medius steaks in foodservice and retail applications, including the effect of aging time and USDA quality grade on the palatability of both muscles. Top sirloin butts (n = 600) and shoulder clod arm roasts (n = 600) representing US Choice and US Select quality grades were selected at 48 h postmortem and aged for 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, or 42 d. Steaks were evaluated using a trained sensory panel, slice shear force, sarcomere length, and Western blotting of desmin measurements. Sarcomere length was measured only on steaks at 14 and 42 d. Triceps brachii and gluteus medius steaks were similar in tenderness rating at 7 and 14 d, but triceps brachii steaks aged longer were more tender (P < 0.05) than were gluteus medius steaks. Triceps brachii steaks reached ultimate tenderness values by 21 d. Gluteus medius steak tenderness ratings improved through 35 d, and at 42 d were similar to those given to triceps brachii steaks at 21 d. Sarcomere lengths were longer (P < 0.05) in triceps brachii than in gluteus medius (2.09 and 1.58 mum, respectively). Significant increases in desmin degradation were detected through 42 d in both muscles (30.9, 46.3, 50.6, 51.0, 57.6, and 64.1% at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 for gluteus medius and 28.9, 40.8, 49.3, 59.2, 61.8, and 71.9% at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 for triceps brachii). At 14 d, gluteus medius had more (P < 0.05) desmin degraded than triceps brachii, but by 28 d, desmin degradation was greater (P < 0.05) in triceps brachii. Quality grade had minimal effects on palatability traits. Desmin degradation contributed to gluteus medius tenderness variation (r = 0.36) across all aging times, but not at individual aging times. Sarcomere length contributed to variation in slice shear force values of gluteus medius at 14 and 42 d (r = -0.59 and -0.48, respectively). Sarcomere length contributed to triceps brachii tenderness variation at 14 d

  5. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on COOMET.RI(II)-S2.Cs-137 (319/RU/04): Comparison measurements of radionuclide volume sources (Cs-137)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostin, S.; Hernandez, T.; Oropesa, P.; Arnold, D.; Evseev, V.; Ivanukovich, A.; Milevskiy, V.; Svec, A.; Lapenas, A.; Andonova, V.; Steiner, V.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the Cs-137 specific activity in artificial volume material of water density were performed in nine laboratories with the HPGe spectrometry technique. Analysis of the gamma radiation absorption in the measured material and in the most important substances for environmental monitoring (food, water, biological materials, soils) confirmed Compton scattering as the main mechanism of interaction. The list of CMCs supported by the comparison is suggested in the report of this comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  6. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons.

  7. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons. PMID:10333012

  8. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  9. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  10. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  11. Comparison of energy output during ramp and staircase shortening in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, M; Woledge, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We compared the rates of work and heat production during ramp shortening with those during staircase shortening (sequence of step releases of the same amplitude, separated by regular time intervals). Ramp or staircase shortening was applied to isolated muscle fibres (sarcomere length, 2.2 microns; temperature, approximately 1 degree C) at the plateau of an isometric tetanus. The total amount of shortening was no greater than 6% of the fibre length. 2. During ramp shortening the power output showed a maximum at about 0.8 fibre lengths per second (Lo s-1), which corresponds to 1/3 the maximum shortening velocity (Vo). For the same average shortening velocity during staircase shortening (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) the power output was 40-60% lower. The rate of heat production for the same average shortening velocity was approximately 45% higher during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. 3. The relation between rate of total energy output and shortening velocity was well described by a second order regression line in the range of velocities used (0.1-2.3 Lo s-1). For any shortening velocity the rate of total energy output (power plus heat rate) was not statistically different for staircase (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) and ramp shortening. 4. The mechanical efficiency (the ratio of the power over the total energy rate) during ramp shortening had a maximum value of 0.36 at 1/5 Vo; during staircase shortening, for any given shortening velocity, the mechanical efficiency was reduced compared with ramp shortening: with a staircase step of about 0.5% Lo at 1/5 Vo the efficiency was approximately 0.2. 5. The results indicate that a cross-bridge is able to convert different quantities of energy into work depending on the different shortening protocol used. The fraction of energy dissipated as heat is larger during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. PMID:8544132

  12. A comparison of low volume 'high-intensity-training' and high volume traditional resistance training methods on muscular performance, body composition, and subjective assessments of training.

    PubMed

    Giessing, J; Eichmann, B; Steele, J; Fisher, J

    2016-09-01

    Most studies of resistance training (RT) examine methods that do not resemble typical training practices of persons participating in RT. Ecologically valid RT programs more representative of such practices are seldom compared. This study compared two such approaches to RT. Thirty participants (males, n = 13; females, n = 17) were randomised to either a group performing low volume 'High Intensity Training' (HIT; n = 16) or high volume 'Body-building' (3ST; n = 14) RT methods 2x/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included muscular performance, body composition, and participant's subjective assessments. Both HIT and 3ST groups improved muscular performance significantly (as indicated by 95% confidence intervals) with large effect sizes (ES; 0.97 to 1.73 and 0.88 to 1.77 respectively). HIT had significantly greater muscular performance gains for 3 of 9 tested exercises compared with 3ST (p < 0.05) and larger effect sizes for 8 of 9 exercises. Body composition did not significantly change in either group. However, effect sizes for whole body muscle mass changes were slightly more favourable in the HIT group compared with the 3ST group (0.27 and -0.34 respectively) in addition to whole body fat mass (0.03 and 0.43 respectively) and whole body fat percentage (-0.10 and -0.44 respectively). Significant muscular performance gains can be produced using either HIT or 3ST. However, muscular performance gains may be greater when using HIT. Future research should look to identify which components of ecologically valid RT programs are primarily responsible for these differences in outcome. PMID:27601778

  13. A comparison of low volume 'high-intensity-training' and high volume traditional resistance training methods on muscular performance, body composition, and subjective assessments of training

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, J; Eichmann, B; Fisher, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of resistance training (RT) examine methods that do not resemble typical training practices of persons participating in RT. Ecologically valid RT programs more representative of such practices are seldom compared. This study compared two such approaches to RT. Thirty participants (males, n = 13; females, n = 17) were randomised to either a group performing low volume 'High Intensity Training' (HIT; n = 16) or high volume 'Body-building' (3ST; n = 14) RT methods 2x/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included muscular performance, body composition, and participant's subjective assessments. Both HIT and 3ST groups improved muscular performance significantly (as indicated by 95% confidence intervals) with large effect sizes (ES; 0.97 to 1.73 and 0.88 to 1.77 respectively). HIT had significantly greater muscular performance gains for 3 of 9 tested exercises compared with 3ST (p < 0.05) and larger effect sizes for 8 of 9 exercises. Body composition did not significantly change in either group. However, effect sizes for whole body muscle mass changes were slightly more favourable in the HIT group compared with the 3ST group (0.27 and -0.34 respectively) in addition to whole body fat mass (0.03 and 0.43 respectively) and whole body fat percentage (-0.10 and -0.44 respectively). Significant muscular performance gains can be produced using either HIT or 3ST. However, muscular performance gains may be greater when using HIT. Future research should look to identify which components of ecologically valid RT programs are primarily responsible for these differences in outcome.

  14. A comparison of low volume 'high-intensity-training' and high volume traditional resistance training methods on muscular performance, body composition, and subjective assessments of training

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, J; Eichmann, B; Fisher, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of resistance training (RT) examine methods that do not resemble typical training practices of persons participating in RT. Ecologically valid RT programs more representative of such practices are seldom compared. This study compared two such approaches to RT. Thirty participants (males, n = 13; females, n = 17) were randomised to either a group performing low volume 'High Intensity Training' (HIT; n = 16) or high volume 'Body-building' (3ST; n = 14) RT methods 2x/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included muscular performance, body composition, and participant's subjective assessments. Both HIT and 3ST groups improved muscular performance significantly (as indicated by 95% confidence intervals) with large effect sizes (ES; 0.97 to 1.73 and 0.88 to 1.77 respectively). HIT had significantly greater muscular performance gains for 3 of 9 tested exercises compared with 3ST (p < 0.05) and larger effect sizes for 8 of 9 exercises. Body composition did not significantly change in either group. However, effect sizes for whole body muscle mass changes were slightly more favourable in the HIT group compared with the 3ST group (0.27 and -0.34 respectively) in addition to whole body fat mass (0.03 and 0.43 respectively) and whole body fat percentage (-0.10 and -0.44 respectively). Significant muscular performance gains can be produced using either HIT or 3ST. However, muscular performance gains may be greater when using HIT. Future research should look to identify which components of ecologically valid RT programs are primarily responsible for these differences in outcome. PMID:27601778

  15. Dose–volume-related dysphagia after constrictor muscles definition in head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, R; Ricchetti, F; Fiorentino, A; Fersino, S; Giaj Levra, N; Naccarato, S; Sicignano, G; Albanese, S; Di Paola, G; Alterio, D; Ruggieri, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Dysphagia remains a side effect influencing the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) after radiotherapy. We evaluated the relationship between planned dose involvement and acute and late dysphagia in patients with HNC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), after a recontouring of constrictor muscles (PCs) and the cricopharyngeal muscle (CM). Methods: Between December 2011 and December 2013, 56 patients with histologically proven HNC were treated with IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy. The PCs and CM were recontoured. Correlations between acute and late toxicity and dosimetric parameters were evaluated. End points were analysed using univariate logistic regression. Results: An increasing risk to develop acute dysphagia was observed when constraints to the middle PCs were not respected [mean dose (Dmean) ≥50 Gy, maximum dose (Dmax) >60 Gy, V50 >70% with a p = 0.05]. The superior PC was not correlated with acute toxicity but only with late dysphagia. The inferior PC was not correlated with dysphagia; for the CM only, Dmax >60 Gy was correlated with acute dysphagia ≥ grade 2. Conclusion: According to our analysis, the superior PC has a major role, being correlated with dysphagia at 3 and 6 months after treatments; the middle PC maintains this correlation only at 3 months from the beginning of radiotherapy, but it does not have influence on late dysphagia. The inferior PC and CM have a minimum impact on swallowing symptoms. Advances in knowledge: We used recent guidelines to define dose constraints of the PCs and CM. Two results emerge in the present analysis: the superior PC influences late dysphagia, while the middle PC influences acute dysphagia. PMID:25348370

  16. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and complexity are studied for four nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme and three cell-centered schemes - a node-averaging scheme and two schemes with nearest-neighbor and adaptive compact stencils for least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Tests from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The tests of the second class are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes may degenerate on mixed grids, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to that of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly anisotropic

  17. Glacier volume estimation of Cascade Volcanoes—an analysis and comparison with other methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Kennard, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, the occurrence of floods and mudflows made apparent a need to assess mudflow hazards on other Cascade volcanoes. A basic requirement for such analysis is information about the volume and distribution of snow and ice on these volcanoes. An analysis was made of the volume-estimation methods developed by previous authors and a volume estimation method was developed for use in the Cascade Range. A radio echo-sounder, carried in a backpack, was used to make point measurements of ice thickness on major glaciers of four Cascade volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Washington; Mount Hood and the Three Sisters, Oregon; and Mount Shasta, California). These data were used to generate ice-thickness maps and bedrock topographic maps for developing and testing volume-estimation methods. Subsequently, the methods were applied to the unmeasured glaciers on those mountains and, as a test of the geographical extent of applicability, to glaciers beyond the Cascades having measured volumes. Two empirical relationships were required in order to predict volumes for all the glaciers. Generally, for glaciers less than 2.6 km in length, volume was found to be estimated best by using glacier area, raised to a power. For longer glaciers, volume was found to be estimated best by using a power law relationship, including slope and shear stress. The necessary variables can be estimated from topographic maps and aerial photographs.

  18. Volume estimation of cerebral aneurysms from biplane DSA: a comparison with measurements on 3D rotational angiography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivan Bescos, Javier; Slob, Marian; Sluzewski, Menno; van Rooij, Willem J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2003-05-01

    A cerebral aneurysm is a persistent localized dilatation of the wall of a cerebral vessel. One of the techniques applied to treat cerebral aneurysms is the Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) embolization. The goal of this technique is to embolize the aneurysm with a mesh of platinum coils to reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture. However, due to the blood pressure it is possible that the platinum wire is deformed. In this case, re-embolization of the aneurysm is necessary. The aim of this project is to develop a computer program to estimate the volume of cerebral aneurysms from archived laser hard copies of biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. Our goal is to determine the influence of the packing percentage, i.e., the ratio between the volume of the aneurysm and the volume of the coil mesh, on the stability of the coil mesh in time. The method we apply to estimate the volume of the cerebral aneurysms is based on the generation of a 3-D geometrical model of the aneurysm from two biplane DSA images. This 3-D model can be seen as an stack of 2-D ellipsis. The volume of the aneurysm is the result of performing a numerical integration of this stack. The program was validated using balloons filled with contrast agent. The availability of 3-D data for some of the aneurysms enabled to perform a comparison of the results of this method with techniques based on 3-D data.

  19. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa.

  20. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa. PMID:22391410

  1. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  2. Dosimetric comparison of split field and fixed jaw techniques for large IMRT target volumes in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Das, Indra J; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ± 1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  3. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-04-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  4. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy. PMID:26678599

  5. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of pineal gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Acer, Niyazi; Ilıca, Ahmet Turan; Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Yıldırım, Birdal; Turgut, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI) on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males) who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55 ± 51.34, 102.69 ± 40.39, and 104.33 ± 40.45 mm(3), respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P > 0.05). From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  6. Characterization of the single tyrosine containing troponin C from lungfish white muscle. Comparison with several fast skeletal muscle troponin C's from fish species.

    PubMed

    François, J M; Altintas, A; Gerday, C

    1997-08-01

    Troponin C molecules from fast skeletal muscle of the following fish species (trout, whiting, lungfish, tilapia, and cod) have been purified to homogeneity. Upon binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+, lungfish troponin C is the only troponin C from fish white muscle to show the typical increase of tyrosine fluorescence emission quantum yield reported for rabbit fast skeletal muscle troponin C. The increase of tyrosine fluorescence signal occurring upon Ca2+ and Mg2+ titration of lungfish troponin C has been used to determine the corresponding affinity constants. With K(Ca) = 7.0 10(7) M-1 and K(Mg) = 3.6 10(3) M-1, the sites probed by the tyrosine residue of lungfish troponin C are typical of the COOH-terminal domain of fast skeletal troponin C's. The amino acid sequencing of the tyrosine containing tryptic peptides has allowed us to position the single tyrosine residue at position 7 in the Ca2+ binding loop of the third site, in identical position to Tyr109 of troponin C from rabbit fast skeletal muscle. Metal ion binding studies followed by intrinsic fluorescence or Tb3+ luminescence indicate that the conformation of the structural domain of lungfish troponin C with one metal ion bound is close to the physiological conformation of this domain.

  7. A comparison of the moment arms of pelvic limb muscles in horses bred for acceleration (Quarter Horse) and endurance (Arab)

    PubMed Central

    Crook, T C; Cruickshank, S E; McGowan, C M; Stubbs, N; Wilson, A M; Hodson-Tole, E; Payne, R C

    2010-01-01

    Selective breeding for performance has resulted in distinct breeds of horse, such as the Quarter Horse (bred for acceleration) and the Arab (bred for endurance). Rapid acceleration, seen during Quarter Horse racing, requires fast powerful muscular contraction and the generation of large joint torques, particularly by the hind limb muscles. This study compared hind limb moment arm lengths in the Quarter Horse and Arab. We hypothesized that Quarter Horse hind limb extensor muscles would have longer moment arms when compared to the Arab, conferring a greater potential for torque generation at the hip, stifle and tarsus during limb extension. Six Quarter Horse and six Arab hind limbs were dissected to determine muscle moment arm lengths for the following muscles: gluteus medius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius (medialis and lateralis) and tibialis cranialis. The moment arms of biceps femoris (acting at the hip) and gastrocnemius lateralis (acting at the stifle) were significantly longer in the Quarter Horse, although the length of the remaining muscle moment arms were similar in both breeds of horse. All the Quarter Horse muscles were capable of generating greater muscle moments owing to their greater physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and therefore greater isometric force potential, which suggests that PCSA is a better determinant of muscle torque than moment arm length in these two breeds of horse. With the exception of gastrocnemius and tibialis cranialis, the observed muscle fascicle length to moment arm ratio (MFL : MA ratio) was greater for the Arab horse muscles. It appears that the Arab muscles have the potential to operate at slower velocities of contraction and hence generate greater force outputs when compared to the Quarter Horse muscles working over a similar range of joint motion; this would indicate that Arab hind limb muscles are optimized to function at maximum economy rather than maximum power output. PMID

  8. A comparison of the moment arms of pelvic limb muscles in horses bred for acceleration (Quarter Horse) and endurance (Arab).

    PubMed

    Crook, T C; Cruickshank, S E; McGowan, C M; Stubbs, N; Wilson, A M; Hodson-Tole, E; Payne, R C

    2010-07-01

    Selective breeding for performance has resulted in distinct breeds of horse, such as the Quarter Horse (bred for acceleration) and the Arab (bred for endurance). Rapid acceleration, seen during Quarter Horse racing, requires fast powerful muscular contraction and the generation of large joint torques, particularly by the hind limb muscles. This study compared hind limb moment arm lengths in the Quarter Horse and Arab. We hypothesized that Quarter Horse hind limb extensor muscles would have longer moment arms when compared to the Arab, conferring a greater potential for torque generation at the hip, stifle and tarsus during limb extension. Six Quarter Horse and six Arab hind limbs were dissected to determine muscle moment arm lengths for the following muscles: gluteus medius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius (medialis and lateralis) and tibialis cranialis. The moment arms of biceps femoris (acting at the hip) and gastrocnemius lateralis (acting at the stifle) were significantly longer in the Quarter Horse, although the length of the remaining muscle moment arms were similar in both breeds of horse. All the Quarter Horse muscles were capable of generating greater muscle moments owing to their greater physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and therefore greater isometric force potential, which suggests that PCSA is a better determinant of muscle torque than moment arm length in these two breeds of horse. With the exception of gastrocnemius and tibialis cranialis, the observed muscle fascicle length to moment arm ratio (MFL : MA ratio) was greater for the Arab horse muscles. It appears that the Arab muscles have the potential to operate at slower velocities of contraction and hence generate greater force outputs when compared to the Quarter Horse muscles working over a similar range of joint motion; this would indicate that Arab hind limb muscles are optimized to function at maximum economy rather than maximum power output.

  9. Comparison of water immersion and saline infusion as a means of inducing volume expansion in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Pins, D. S.; Arrington, R.; Denunzio, A. G.; Engstrom, R.

    1975-01-01

    The study compares the natriuresis induced by head-out water immersion to that of a standard saline infusion and assesses the relative effectiveness of these two techniques as volume determinants of renal sodium and water handling in humans in a seated posture. The data obtained show that the volume stimulus of immersion is identical to that of standard saline-induced extracellular fluid volume expansion (ECVE) in normal seated subjects. The ability of head-out water immersion to induce a natriuresis without a concomitant increase in total blood volume and with a decrease in body weight suggests that water immersion may be preferred as an investigative tool for assessing the effects of ECVE in man.

  10. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on COOMET.RI(II)-S2.Eu-152 (319/RU/04): Comparison measurements of radionuclide volume sources (Eu-152)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostin, S.; Hernandez, T.; Oropesa, P.; Arnold, D.; Evseev, V.; Ivanukovich, A.; Milevskiy, V.; Svec, A.; Lapenas, A.; Andonova, V.; Steiner, V.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the Eu-152 specific activity in an artificial volume sample of water density were performed in nine laboratories with the HPGe spectrometry technique. Analysis of the gamma radiation absorption in the sample material confirmed Compton scattering as the main mechanism of interaction of photons with energy between 300-600 keV and 779-1408 keV in the most important substances for environmental monitoring (food, water, biological materials, soils). A list of CMCs supported by the comparison is suggested in the report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  12. Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound to assess semitendinosus muscle morphology.

    PubMed

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Maas, Huub; Harlaar, Jaap; Becher, Jules G; Buizer, Annemieke I; Jaspers, Richard T

    2016-10-01

    In several neurological disorders and muscle injuries, morphological changes of the m. semitendinosus (ST) are presumed to contribute to movement limitations around the knee. Freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), using position tracking of two-dimensional US images to reconstruct a 3D voxel array, can be used to assess muscle morphology in vivo. The aims of this study were: (i) to introduce a newly developed 3D US protocol for ST; and (ii) provide a first comparison of morphological characteristics determined by 3D US with those measured on dissected cadaveric muscles. Morphological characteristics of ST (e.g. muscle belly length, tendon length, fascicle length and whole muscle volume, and volumes of both compartments) were assessed in six cadavers using a 3D US protocol. Subsequently, ST muscles were removed from the body to measure the same morphological characteristics. Mean differences between morphological characteristics measured by 3D US and after dissection were smaller than 10%. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were higher than 0.75 for all variables except for the lengths of proximal fascicles (ICC = 0.58). Measurement of the volume of proximal compartment by 3D US was not feasible, due to low US image quality proximally. We conclude that the presented 3D US protocol allows for reasonably accurate measurements of key morphological characteristics of ST muscle.

  13. Comparison of volume study by left ventriculography and gated SPECT in endoventricular circular patchplasty.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiromichi; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Tsutsumi, Yasushi; Kawai, Takahiro; Iino, Kenji; Onaka, Masateru

    2005-01-01

    Although quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) is widely used for left ventricular (LV) volume study, its accuracy is not established for those who have a large myocardial infarction scar or who had endoventricular circular patch plasty (EVCPP). Therefore, we compared LV volumes and LVEF calculated by QGS and those calculated by left ventriculography (LVG) before and after EVCPP. Sixteen patients (13 men and 3 women, mean age 67 +/- 9.5 years) were treated with EVCPP for postinfarction LV dyskinetic and/or akinetic scar. All patients were evaluated with both QGS and LVG before and after surgery. QGS was performed using eight frames per cardiac cycle, 1 hour after 740 MBq (99 m)Tc-tetrofosimin was administered. LVG images were acquired at a frame rate of 30 frames per second in the right anterior oblique 30-degree projection. We compared LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) between QGS and LVG. There was an excellent linear correlation between QGS and LVG in LVEDV (preoperative; r = 0.87, postoperative; r = 0.94), LVESV (preoperative; r = 0.95, postoperative; r = 0.89), and LVEF (preoperative; r = 0.73, postoperative; r = 0.81) before and after EVCPP. However, both preoperative LV volumes and postoperative LVEF calculated from QGS gave a smaller value than those calculated from LVG. Postoperative volume data by QGS was much close to LVG. The present study indicated that volume study by QGS is very useful to evaluate the LV function after EVCPP. However, we should pay attention to those facts. PMID:15985130

  14. Deoxygenation and the blood volume signals in the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles obtained during the execution of the Mirallas's test of judo athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Mirallas, Jaume A.

    1996-12-01

    The technique of execution of any movement in Judo is extremely important. The coaches want tests and tools easy to use and cheaper, to evaluate the progress of a judoist in the tatame. In this paper we present a test developed by Mirallas, which has his name 'Test of Mirallas' to evaluate the maximal power capacity of the judoist. The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals were obtained to have a measurement of the metabolic work of the flexor carpi ulnaris and radialis muscles, during the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement, allowing this measurement to assess by NIRS the maximal oxygen uptake. Also obtained were tympanic, skin forehead, and biceps brachii temperatures during the test time and recovery phase to study the effects of ambient conditions and the post-exercise oxygen consumption. The deoxygenation and blood volume signals obtained gave different results, demonstrating the hypothesis of the coaches that some judoist do the execution of the ippon-seoi-nage movement correctly and the rest didn't. The heart rate frequency obtained in the group of judoist was between 190-207 bpm, and in the minute five of post-exercise was 114-137 bpm; the time employed in the MIrallas's test were from 7 feet 14 inches to 13 feet 49 inches, and the total of movements were from 199 to 409. The data obtained in the skin forehead, and skin biceps brachii confirms previous works that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied. According to the results, the test developed by Mirallas is a good tool to evaluate the performance of judoist any time, giving better results compared with standard tests.

  15. A direct multi-volume rendering method aiming at comparisons of 3-D images and models.

    PubMed

    Jacq, J J; Roux, C J

    1997-03-01

    We present a new method for direct volume rendering of multiple three-dimensional (3-D) functions using a density emitter model. This work aims at obtaining visual assessment of the results of a 3-D image registration algorithm which operates on anisotropic and non segmented medical data. We first discuss the fundamentals associated with direct, simultaneous rendering of such datasets. Then, we recall the fuzzy classification and fuzzy surface rendering theory within the density emitter model terminology, and propose an extension of standard direct volume rendering that can handle the rendering of two or more 3-D functions; this consists of the definition of merging rules that are applied on emitter clouds. The included rendering applications are related on one hand, to volume-to-volume registration, and on the other hand, to surface-to-volume registration: the first case is concerned with global elastic registration of CT data, and the second one presents fitting of an implicit surface over a CT data subset. In these two medical imaging application cases, our rendering scheme offers a comprehensive appreciation of the relative position of structural information.

  16. [Comparison of postmortal changes in the ultrastructure of the masseter muscle and the longissimus dorsi muscle in pigs with PSE-meat].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, V

    1975-01-01

    Samples of the two muscles were taken from 8 Landrace fattened pigs, affected with pale, soft exudative meat, during stunning and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after death; also 2, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after slaughter, with storage at 20 degrees C for the first six hours and 2-5 degrees C subsequently. Considerable changes were found during the first hour after death, or even in samples taken during stunning, in longissimus dorsi samples. These consisted of destruction of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, breakdown of cell membranes, liberation of clumps of fibre protein, disappearance of glycogen, rigor and destruction of capillaries. Such changes would account for the features of pale, soft exudative meat such as water loss, brief rigor, pale colour, deficiency of energy-rich phosphates. By contrast, in the masseter muscles of the same animal these changes did not occur until later, or were in port absent. In both muscle the breakdown of fibres took place by destruction of the "I" bands and the "Z" strips, and this process also commenced in longissimus dorsi before masseter.

  17. Final report on regional supplementary comparison SIM.M.FF-S5: Volume of liquids at 50 mL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Abed; Malta, Dalni; Kornblit, Fernando; Ramírez, Ruben R.; Arias, Roberto; Trujillo, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    A regional supplementary comparison for the volume of liquid at 50 mL was conducted during October 2009 to June 2010 between the SIM members CENAM, INTI, INMETRO, INDECOPI and INTN. The transfer standard consisted of two 50 mL glass pycnometers, of the Gay Lussac type. CENAM acted as the pilot, collected the measurement results, analyzed the data and produced the comparison report. The median of all participants' results was used to calculate the regional comparison reference value because the result for one of the two pycnometers in one laboratory failed the chi-squared test at the 0.05 probability level. The measurements reported by the participants show an excellent overlap in four out of the five NMIs (-34×10-6 < Di < 29×10-6). The degree of equivalence obtained herein will be taken into account for the preparation of calibration and measurement capabilities claims from the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the SIM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Interspecific sequence comparison of the muscle-myosin heavy-chain genes from Drosophila hydei and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miedema, K; Harhangi, H; Mentzel, S; Wilbrink, M; Akhmanova, A; Hooiveld, M; Bindels, P; Hennig, W

    1994-10-01

    The muscle-myosin heavy-chain (mMHC) gene of Drosophila hydei has been sequenced completely (size 23.3 kb). The sequence comparison with the D. melanogaster mMHC gene revealed that the exon-intron pattern is identical. The protein coding regions show a high degree of conservation (97%). The alternatively spliced exons (3a-b, 7a-d, 9a-c, 11a-e, and 15a-b) display more variations in the number of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions than the common exons (2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, and 19). The base composition at synonymous sites of fourfold degenerate codons (third position) is not biased in the alternative exons. In the common exons there exists a bias for C and against A. These findings imply that the alternative exons of the Drosophila mMHC gene evolve at a different, in several cases higher, rate than the common ones. The 5' splice junctions and 5' and 3' untranslated regions show a high level of similarity, indicating a functional constraint on these sequences. The intron regions vary considerably in length within one species, but the corresponding introns are very similar in length between the two species and all contain stretches of sequence similarity. A particular example is the first intron, which contains multiple regions of similarity. In the conserved regions of intron 12 (head-tail border) sequences were found which have the potential to direct another smaller mMHC transcript.

  19. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  20. A comparison of gradient estimation methods for volume rendering on unstructured meshes.

    PubMed

    Correa, Carlos D; Hero, Robert; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of gradient estimation methods for rendering unstructured-mesh volume data. Gradient estimation is necessary for rendering shaded isosurfaces and specular highlights, which provide important cues for shape and depth. Gradient estimation has been widely studied and deployed for regular-grid volume data to achieve local illumination effects, but has been, otherwise, for unstructured-mesh data. As a result, most of the unstructured-mesh volume visualizations made so far were unlit. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of gradient estimation methods for unstructured meshes with respect to their cost and performance. Through a number of benchmarks, we discuss the effects of mesh quality and scalar function complexity in the accuracy of the reconstruction, and their impact in lighting-enabled volume rendering. Based on our study, we also propose two heuristic improvements to the gradient reconstruction process. The first heuristic improves the rendering quality with a hybrid algorithm that combines the results of the multiple reconstruction methods, based on the properties of a given mesh. The second heuristic improves the efficiency of its GPU implementation, by restricting the computation of the gradient on a fixed-size local neighborhood. PMID:21233515

  1. COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION/LARGE VOLUME INJECTION PROCEDURES FOR METHOD 8270

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two solid phase (SPE) and one traditional continuous liquid-liquid extraction method are compared for analysis of Method 8270 SVOCs. Productivity parameters include data quality, sample volume, analysis time and solvent waste.

    One SPE system, unique in the U.S., uses aut...

  2. Hippocampal volumes among older Indian adults: Comparison with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Dhikav, Vikas; Duraisamy, Sharmila; Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hippocampal volume data from India have recently been reported in younger adults. Data in older adults are unknown. The present paper describes hippocampal volume from India among older adults and compares the same with patients having Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Materials and Methods: A total of 32 cognitively normal subjects, 20 patients with AD, and 13 patients with MCI were enrolled. Patients were evaluated for the diagnosis of AD/MCI using the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Related Disorders Association criteria and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale (score = 0.5), respectively. Hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine by manual segmentation (Megnatom Symphony 1.5T scanner) three-dimensional (3D) sequences. Results: Age and duration of illness in the MCI group were 70.6 ± 8.6 years and 1.9 ± 0.9 years, respectively. In the AD group, age and duration of illness were 72 ± 8.1 years and 3.1 ± 2.2 years, respectively. In cognitively normal subjects, the age range was 45-88 years (66.9 ± 10.32) years. Mean mini–mental status examination (MMSE) score of healthy subjects was 28.28 ± 1.33. In the MCI group, MMSE was 27.05 ± 1.79. In the AD group, MMSE was 13.32 ± 5.6. In the healthy group, the hippocampal volume was 2.73 ± 0.53 cm3 on the left side and 2.77 ± 0.6 cm3 on the right side. Likewise, in MCI, the volume on the left side was 2.35 ± 0.42 cm3 and the volume on the right side was 2.36 ± 0.38 cm3. Similarly, in the AD group, the volume on the right side was 1.64 ± 0.55 cm3 and on the left side it was 1.59 ± 0.55 cm3. Post hoc analysis using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) showed, using analysis of variance (ANOVA) that there was a statistically significant difference between healthy and AD (P ≤ 0.01), and between healthy and MCI (P ≤ 0.01) subjects. There was a correlation between MMSE

  3. Comparison of volume-rendered and surface-rendered MR colonography.

    PubMed

    Heuschmid, Martin; Luz, Oliver; Schaefer, Juergen F; Stuecker, Dietmar; Vonthein, Reinhard; Luboldt, Wolfgang; Claussen, Claus D; Seemann, Marcus D

    2003-02-01

    In the United States and Europe, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. It is well known that colorectal carcinomas may originate from preexisting adenomas. For the visualization of colorectal cancer and other pathologic changes such as polyps, two 3D methods (volume-rendering (VR) and surface-rendering (SR)) in MR colonography were compared in our study. MR colonography was carried out in 17 patients on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a 10 mmolar gadolinium water solution enema. Coronal as well as rotated VR and SR views were compared in order to examine the technical quality (TQ) of the visualization model and grade of confidence (GC) in the pathological findings. Colonoscopic findings revealed 8 colorectal carcinoma, 10 patients with polyps, 4 diverticular disease, and 2 with redundant bowel loops. Based on a total of 248 colonic segments for both visualization methods, volume rendering were significantly superior to surface rendering for both, TQ (p<0.0001) and GC (p<0.0001). Volume rendering and surface rendering were not dependent on individual colon segments (p=0.13 for TQ and p=0.18 for GC) or on image rotation (p=0.06 for TQ and p=0.062 for GC). It is also independent of the type of pathology (p=0.31 for TQ and p=0.42 for GC) and the reviewers (p=0.62 for TQ and p=0.88 for GC). This indicates, that for the purpose of interpreting the technical quality and pathological findings, volume rendering is superior to surface rendering in MR colonography. Volume rendering could be used as an 3D visualization tool, enabling MR colonography examinations to be completed sooner in cases where colon distension is sufficient, and it would also provide an overview of potential mass lesions. PMID:12625749

  4. Quantitative Comparison of Volume Maintenance between Inlay and Onlay Bone Grafts in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Rosenthal, Andrew H.; Ozaki, Wayne; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonvascularized autologous bone grafts are the criterion standard in craniofacial reconstruction for bony defects involving the craniofacial skeleton. The authors have previously demonstrated that graft microarchitecture is the major determinant of volume maintenance for both inlay and onlay bone grafts following transplantation. This study performs a head-to-head quantitative analysis of volume maintenance between inlay and onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton using a rabbit model to comparatively determine their resorptive kinetics over time. Methods Fifty rabbits were divided randomly into six experimental groups: 3-week inlay, 3-week onlay, 8-week inlay, 8-week onlay, 16-week inlay, and 16-week onlay. Cortical bone from the lateral mandible and both cortical and cancellous bone from the ilium were harvested from each animal and placed either in or on the cranium. All bone grafts underwent micro–computed tomographic analysis at 3, 8, and 16 weeks. Results All bone graft types in the inlay position increased their volume over time, with the greatest increase in endochondral cancellous bone. All bone graft types in the onlay position decreased their volume over time, with the greatest decrease in endochondral cancellous bone. Inlay bone grafts demonstrated increased volume compared with onlay bone grafts of identical embryologic origin and microarchitecture at all time points (p < 0.05). Conclusions Inlay bone grafts, irrespective of their embryologic origin, consistently display less resorption over time compared with onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton. Both inlay and onlay bone grafts are driven by the local mechanical environment to recapitulate the recipient bed. PMID:23629083

  5. Evolution of a novel muscle design in sea urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Alexander; Schröder, Leif; Ogurreck, Malte; Faber, Cornelius; Stach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sea urchin (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) masticatory apparatus, or Aristotle's lantern, is a complex structure composed of numerous hard and soft components. The lantern is powered by various paired and unpaired muscle groups. We describe how one set of these muscles, the lantern protractor muscles, has evolved a specialized morphology. This morphology is characterized by the formation of adaxially-facing lobes perpendicular to the main orientation of the muscle, giving the protractor a frilled aspect in horizontal section. Histological and ultrastructural analyses show that the microstructure of frilled muscles is largely identical to that of conventional, flat muscles. Measurements of muscle dimensions in equally-sized specimens demonstrate that the frilled muscle design, in comparison to that of the flat muscle type, considerably increases muscle volume as well as the muscle's surface directed towards the interradial cavity, a compartment of the peripharyngeal coelom. Scanning electron microscopical observations reveal that the insertions of frilled and flat protractor muscles result in characteristic muscle scars on the stereom, reflecting the shapes of individual muscles. Our comparative study of 49 derived "regular" echinoid species using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows that frilled protractor muscles are found only in taxa belonging to the families Toxopneustidae, Echinometridae, and Strongylocentrotidae. The onset of lobe formation during ontogenesis varies between species of these three families. Because frilled protractor muscles are best observed in situ, the application of a non-invasive imaging technique was crucial for the unequivocal identification of this morphological character on a large scale. Although it is currently possible only to speculate on the functional advantages which the frilled muscle morphology might confer, our study forms the anatomical and evolutionary framework for future analyses of this unusual muscle design among sea

  6. Evolution of a Novel Muscle Design in Sea Urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Alexander; Schröder, Leif; Ogurreck, Malte; Faber, Cornelius; Stach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sea urchin (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) masticatory apparatus, or Aristotle's lantern, is a complex structure composed of numerous hard and soft components. The lantern is powered by various paired and unpaired muscle groups. We describe how one set of these muscles, the lantern protractor muscles, has evolved a specialized morphology. This morphology is characterized by the formation of adaxially-facing lobes perpendicular to the main orientation of the muscle, giving the protractor a frilled aspect in horizontal section. Histological and ultrastructural analyses show that the microstructure of frilled muscles is largely identical to that of conventional, flat muscles. Measurements of muscle dimensions in equally-sized specimens demonstrate that the frilled muscle design, in comparison to that of the flat muscle type, considerably increases muscle volume as well as the muscle's surface directed towards the interradial cavity, a compartment of the peripharyngeal coelom. Scanning electron microscopical observations reveal that the insertions of frilled and flat protractor muscles result in characteristic muscle scars on the stereom, reflecting the shapes of individual muscles. Our comparative study of 49 derived “regular” echinoid species using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows that frilled protractor muscles are found only in taxa belonging to the families Toxopneustidae, Echinometridae, and Strongylocentrotidae. The onset of lobe formation during ontogenesis varies between species of these three families. Because frilled protractor muscles are best observed in situ, the application of a non-invasive imaging technique was crucial for the unequivocal identification of this morphological character on a large scale. Although it is currently possible only to speculate on the functional advantages which the frilled muscle morphology might confer, our study forms the anatomical and evolutionary framework for future analyses of this unusual muscle design among

  7. Evolution of a novel muscle design in sea urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Alexander; Schröder, Leif; Ogurreck, Malte; Faber, Cornelius; Stach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sea urchin (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) masticatory apparatus, or Aristotle's lantern, is a complex structure composed of numerous hard and soft components. The lantern is powered by various paired and unpaired muscle groups. We describe how one set of these muscles, the lantern protractor muscles, has evolved a specialized morphology. This morphology is characterized by the formation of adaxially-facing lobes perpendicular to the main orientation of the muscle, giving the protractor a frilled aspect in horizontal section. Histological and ultrastructural analyses show that the microstructure of frilled muscles is largely identical to that of conventional, flat muscles. Measurements of muscle dimensions in equally-sized specimens demonstrate that the frilled muscle design, in comparison to that of the flat muscle type, considerably increases muscle volume as well as the muscle's surface directed towards the interradial cavity, a compartment of the peripharyngeal coelom. Scanning electron microscopical observations reveal that the insertions of frilled and flat protractor muscles result in characteristic muscle scars on the stereom, reflecting the shapes of individual muscles. Our comparative study of 49 derived "regular" echinoid species using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows that frilled protractor muscles are found only in taxa belonging to the families Toxopneustidae, Echinometridae, and Strongylocentrotidae. The onset of lobe formation during ontogenesis varies between species of these three families. Because frilled protractor muscles are best observed in situ, the application of a non-invasive imaging technique was crucial for the unequivocal identification of this morphological character on a large scale. Although it is currently possible only to speculate on the functional advantages which the frilled muscle morphology might confer, our study forms the anatomical and evolutionary framework for future analyses of this unusual muscle design among sea

  8. Comparison of Metabolic Network between Muscle and Intramuscular Adipose Tissues in Hanwoo Beef Cattle Using a Systems Biology Approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Hye-Sun; Kim, Woonsu; Yoon, Duhak; Seo, Seongwon

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationship between muscle and adipose tissues plays a major role in determining the quality of carcass traits. The objective of this study was to compare metabolic differences between muscle and intramuscular adipose (IMA) tissues in the longissimus dorsi (LD) of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) using the RNA-seq technology and a systems biology approach. The LD sections between the 6th and 7th ribs were removed from nine (each of three cows, steers, and bulls) Hanwoo beef cattle (carcass weight of 430.2 ± 40.66 kg) immediately after slaughter. The total mRNA from muscle, IMA, and subcutaneous adipose and omental adipose tissues were isolated and sequenced. The reads that passed quality control were mapped onto the bovine reference genome (build bosTau6), and differentially expressed genes across tissues were identified. The KEGG pathway enrichment tests revealed the opposite direction of metabolic regulation between muscle and IMA. Metabolic gene network analysis clearly indicated that oxidative metabolism was upregulated in muscle and downregulated in IMA. Interestingly, pathways for regulating cell adhesion, structure, and integrity and chemokine signaling pathway were upregulated in IMA and downregulated in muscle. It is thus inferred that IMA may play an important role in the regulation of development and structure of the LD tissues and muscle/adipose communication.

  9. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  10. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness. PMID:26171383

  11. Comparison of an EMG-based and a stress-based method to predict shoulder muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Malfroy Camine, Valérie; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of muscle forces in musculoskeletal shoulder models is still controversial. Two different methods are widely used to solve the indeterminacy of the system: electromyography (EMG)-based methods and stress-based methods. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of these two methods on the prediction of muscle forces, glenohumeral load and joint stability after total shoulder arthroplasty. An EMG-based and a stress-based method were implemented into the same musculoskeletal shoulder model. The model replicated the glenohumeral joint after total shoulder arthroplasty. It contained the scapula, the humerus, the joint prosthesis, the rotator cuff muscles supraspinatus, subscapularis and infraspinatus and the middle, anterior and posterior deltoid muscles. A movement of abduction was simulated in the plane of the scapula. The EMG-based method replicated muscular activity of experimentally measured EMG. The stress-based method minimised a cost function based on muscle stresses. We compared muscle forces, joint reaction force, articular contact pressure and translation of the humeral head. The stress-based method predicted a lower force of the rotator cuff muscles. This was partly counter-balanced by a higher force of the middle part of the deltoid muscle. As a consequence, the stress-based method predicted a lower joint load (16% reduced) and a higher superior-inferior translation of the humeral head (increased by 1.2 mm). The EMG-based method has the advantage of replicating the observed cocontraction of stabilising muscles of the rotator cuff. This method is, however, limited to available EMG measurements. The stress-based method has thus an advantage of flexibility, but may overestimate glenohumeral subluxation.

  12. Motoneuronal and muscle synergies involved in cat hindlimb control during fictive and real locomotion: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Markin, Sergey N; Lemay, Michel A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A

    2012-04-01

    We compared the activity profiles and synergies of spinal motoneurons recorded during fictive locomotion evoked in immobilized decerebrate cat preparations by midbrain stimulation to the activity profiles and synergies of the corresponding hindlimb muscles obtained during forward level walking in cats. The fictive locomotion data were collected in the Spinal Cord Research Centre, University of Manitoba, and provided by Dr. David McCrea; the real locomotion data were obtained in the laboratories of M. A. Lemay and B. I. Prilutsky. Scatterplot representation and minimum spanning tree clustering algorithm were used to identify the possible motoneuronal and muscle synergies operating during both fictive and real locomotion. We found a close similarity between the activity profiles and synergies of motoneurons innervating one-joint muscles during fictive locomotion and the profiles and synergies of the corresponding muscles during real locomotion. However, the activity patterns of proximal nerves controlling two-joint muscles, such as posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) and rectus femoris (RF), were not uniform in fictive locomotion preparations and differed from the activity profiles of the corresponding two-joint muscles recorded during forward level walking. Moreover, the activity profiles of these nerves and the corresponding muscles were unique and could not be included in the synergies identified in fictive and real locomotion. We suggest that afferent feedback is involved in the regulation of locomotion via motoneuronal synergies controlled by the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) but may also directly affect the activity of motoneuronal pools serving two-joint muscles (e.g., PBSt and RF). These findings provide important insights into the organization of the spinal CPG in mammals, the motoneuronal and muscle synergies engaged during locomotion, and their afferent control.

  13. Intracranial spaces in childhood macrocephaly: comparison of length measurements and volume calculations.

    PubMed

    Gooskens, R H; Gielen, C C; Hanlo, P W; Faber, J A; Willemse, J

    1988-08-01

    CT scanning was done to calculate the volume of intracranial spaces in children with the purpose of developing a reliable method of differentiating the various causes of macrocephaly. The technique has been applied to the CT scans of 60 apparently normal children, and the resulting graphs show the normal relationship between intracranial volumes and age from birth to 15 years. The measurements for 25 children with macrocephaly and normal rate of growth of head circumference were then compared with the reference values. It was possible to make accurate differentiations between megalencephaly, extraventricular hydrocephalus and communicating hydrocephalus. The advantage of this technique in relation to length measurements on CT scans is discussed. The authors advocate the estimation of the product of head circumference and head height as a much more reliable indication of normal and deviant head-size than head circumference alone.

  14. Representative volume size: A comparison of statistical continuum mechanics and statistical physics

    SciTech Connect

    AIDUN,JOHN B.; TRUCANO,TIMOTHY G.; LO,CHI S.; FYE,RICHARD M.

    1999-05-01

    In this combination background and position paper, the authors argue that careful work is needed to develop accurate methods for relating the results of fine-scale numerical simulations of material processes to meaningful values of macroscopic properties for use in constitutive models suitable for finite element solid mechanics simulations. To provide a definite context for this discussion, the problem is couched in terms of the lack of general objective criteria for identifying the size of the representative volume (RV) of a material. The objective of this report is to lay out at least the beginnings of an approach for applying results and methods from statistical physics to develop concepts and tools necessary for determining the RV size, as well as alternatives to RV volume-averaging for situations in which the RV is unmanageably large. The background necessary to understand the pertinent issues and statistical physics concepts is presented.

  15. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  16. COMPARISON OF TRUNK AND LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLE ACTIVITY AMONG FOUR STATIONARY EQUIPMENT DEVICES: UPRIGHT BIKE, RECUMBENT BIKE, TREADMILL, AND ELLIPTIGO®

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan; Gibson, Chris; Kearney, Andrew; Busemeyer, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    Background Stationary equipment devices are often used to improve fitness. The ElliptiGO® was recently developed that blends the elements of an elliptical trainer and bicycle, allowing reciprocal lower limb pedaling in an upright position. However, it is unknown whether the muscle activity used for the ElliptiGO® is similar to walking or cycling. To date, there is no information comparing muscle activity for exercise on the treadmill, stationary upright and recumbent bikes, and the ElliptiGO®. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to assess trunk and lower extremity muscle activity among treadmill walking, cycling (recumbent and upright) and the ElliptiGO® cycling. It was hypothesized that the ElliptiGO® and treadmill would elicit similar electromyographic muscle activity responses compared to the stationary bike and recumbent bike during an exercise session. Study Design Cohort, repeated measures Methods Twelve recreationally active volunteers participated in the study and were assigned a random order of exercise for each of the four devices (ElliptiGO®, stationary upright cycle ergometer, recumbent ergometer, and a treadmill). Two-dimensional video was used to monitor the start and stop of exercise and surface electromyography (SEMG) were used to assess muscle activity during two minutes of cycling or treadmill walking at 40-50% heart rate reserve (HRR). Eight muscles on the dominant limb were used for analysis: gluteus maximus (Gmax), gluteus medius (Gmed), biceps femoris (BF), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG), tibialis anterior (TA), rectus femoris (RF). Two trunk muscles were assessed on the same side; lumbar erector spinae at L3-4 level (LES) and rectus abdominus (RA). Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were determined for each muscle and SEMG data were expressed as %MVIC in order to normalize outputs. Results The %MVIC for RF during ElliptiGO® cycling was higher than recumbent cycling. The LG muscle activity was highest

  17. Volume-of-fluid algorithm with different modified dynamic material ordering methods and their comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2010-05-01

    Volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface reconstruction methods are used to define material interfaces to separate different materials in a mixed cell. These material interfaces are then used to evaluate transport flux at each cell edges in multi-material hydrodynamic calculations. Most of the VOF interface reconstruction methods and volume transport schemes rely on an accurate material order unique to each computational cell. Similarly, to achieve overshoot-free volume fractions, a non-intersecting interface reconstruction procedure has to be performed with the help of a 'material-order list' determined prior to interface reconstruction. It is, however, the least explored area of VOF technique especially for 'onion-skin' or 'layered' model. Also, important technical details how to prevent intersection among different material interfaces are missing in many literature. Here, we present an efficient VOF interface tracking algorithm along with modified 'material order' methods and different interface reconstruction methods. The relative accuracy of different methods are evaluated for sample problems. Finally, a convergence study with respect to mesh-size is performed.

  18. Age-related differences in regional brain volumes: A comparison of optimized voxel-based morphometry to manual volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Kristen M.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Voss, Michelle W.; Colcombe, Stan J.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Acker, James D.; Raz, Naftali

    2009-01-01

    Regional manual volumetry is the gold standard of in vivo neuroanatomy, but is labor-intensive, can be imperfectly reliable, and allows for measuring limited number of regions. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has perfect repeatability and assesses local structure across the whole brain. However, its anatomic validity is unclear, and with its increasing popularity, a systematic comparison of VBM to manual volumetry is necessary. The few existing comparison studies are limited by small samples, qualitative comparisons, and limited selection and modest reliability of manual measures. Our goal was to overcome those limitations by quantitatively comparing optimized VBM findings with highly reliable multiple regional measures in a large sample (N = 200) across a wide agespan (18–81). We report a complex pattern of similarities and differences. Peak values of VBM volume estimates (modulated density) produced stronger age differences and a different spatial distribution from manual measures. However, when we aggregated VBM-derived information across voxels contained in specific anatomically defined regions (masks), the patterns of age differences became more similar, although important discrepancies emerged. Notably, VBM revealed stronger age differences in the regions bordering CSF and white matter areas prone to leukoaraiosis, and VBM was more likely to report nonlinearities in age-volume relationships. In the white matter regions, manual measures showed stronger negative associations with age than the corresponding VBM-based masks. We conclude that VBM provides realistic estimates of age differences in the regional gray matter only when applied to anatomically defined regions, but overestimates effects when individual peaks are interpreted. It may be beneficial to use VBM as a first-pass strategy, followed by manual measurement of anatomically-defined regions. PMID:18276037

  19. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages. PMID:26241869

  20. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  1. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  2. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity.

    PubMed

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Seamon, Bryant A; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R (2)). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97-.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54-1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  3. Ultrasound estimates of muscle quality in older adults: reliability and comparison of Photoshop and ImageJ for the grayscale analysis of muscle echogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Seamon, Bryant A.; Teixeira, Carla; Ismail, Catheeja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quantitative diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a method of estimating muscle quality using measures of echogenicity. The Rectangular Marquee Tool (RMT) and the Free Hand Tool (FHT) are two types of editing features used in Photoshop and ImageJ for determining a region of interest (ROI) within an ultrasound image. The primary objective of this study is to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability of Photoshop and ImageJ for the estimate of muscle tissue echogenicity in older adults via grayscale histogram analysis. The secondary objective is to compare the mean grayscale values obtained using both the RMT and FHT methods across both image analysis platforms. Methods. This cross-sectional observational study features 18 community-dwelling men (age = 61.5 ± 2.32 years). Longitudinal views of the rectus femoris were captured using B-mode ultrasound. The ROI for each scan was selected by 2 examiners using the RMT and FHT methods from each software program. Their reliability is assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of the measurement (SEM). Measurement agreement for these values is depicted using Bland-Altman plots. A paired t-test is used to determine mean differences in echogenicity expressed as grayscale values using the RMT and FHT methods to select the post-image acquisition ROI. The degree of association among ROI selection methods and image analysis platforms is analyzed using the coefficient of determination (R2). Results. The raters demonstrated excellent intrarater and interrater reliability using the RMT and FHT methods across both platforms (lower bound 95% CI ICC = .97–.99, p < .001). Mean differences between the echogenicity estimates obtained with the RMT and FHT methods was .87 grayscale levels (95% CI [.54–1.21], p < .0001) using data obtained with both programs. The SEM for Photoshop was .97 and 1.05 grayscale levels when using the RMT and FHT ROI selection methods

  4. Comparison between several muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure in obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bellefeuille, P; Robillard, M-E; Ringuet, M-E; Aubertin-Leheudre, M; Karelis, A D

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship of several muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure in obese postmenopausal women. This was a cross-sectional study involving 72 obese postmenopausal women (age: 60.0±4.8 years; body mass index: 34.1±3.5 kg/m²). Muscle strength was determined by hand dynamometer and cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by indirect calorimetry. Muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness were expressed in absolute (kg and L/min, respectively) and in relative values (kg/body weight (BW) and kg/lean body mass (LBM) for muscle strength and ml/min/kg BW and ml/min kg LBM for cardiorespiratory fitness). Body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Anthropometric (waist and thigh circumference), physical activity energy expenditure and daily number of steps (SenseWear armband) as well as blood pressure were also assessed. Correlations of muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness indices with body composition and energy expenditure showed several similarities, however, several variations were also observed. Furthermore, our results showed that age and waist circumference were the primary independent predictors for the muscle strength indices, explaining 22-37% of the variance and % body fat and age were the primary predictors for the cardiorespiratory fitness indices, explaining 18-40% of the variance. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the different methods of expressing muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness may display several variations and similarities with body composition and energy expenditure associations. Therefore, interpretations of relationships between muscle strength and cardiorespiratory indices with body composition and energy expenditure factors should take in account the method used to express them.

  5. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  6. Food control by applied biochemistry of marine organisms: Comparison of proteins and metabolites from fish and invertebrate muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, H.

    1995-03-01

    Most fishery products consist of muscle tissue from fish and invertebrates. Differences in the molecular structure and in metabolism of muscles can be utilized to characterize and identify various seafood. Creatine and arginine were found to be useful for the differentiation between imitation crab/shrimp meat and real crustacean meat. Octopine served as an indicator for the meat of cephalopods and mussels. In order to identify the animal species of a fishery product, several electrophoretic methods were used. It depended on the type of product, whether sarcoplasmic or myofibrillar proteins were better suited. Raw products were best analysed by isoelectric focusing of sarcoplasmic proteins. Two types of sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumins of fish and soluble calcium-binding proteins of invertebrates, were especially useful for species identification. Due to their thermal stability, these proteins gave species-specific patterns for cooked products, too. Two other techniques were also investigated: urea gel isoelectric focusing, and sodium dodecyl sulphate — polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These methods were applied in the analysis of products where the sarcoplasmic proteins had been removed by washing steps, i.e. imitation crab meat made from surimi, and of other raw and cooked products. The myosin light chains gave protein patterns that were characteristic for many species. Paramyosin, which is absent from vertebrate muscle, indicated the presence of mollusc muscle. It was shown that the determination, of arginine kinase activity enabled differentiation between raw fish muscle and invertebrate muscles.

  7. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  8. A Comparison of Increases in Volume Load Over 8 Weeks of Low-Versus High-Load Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Ogborn, Dan; Contreras, Bret; Cappaert, Tom; Silva Ribeiro, Alex; Alvar, Brent A.; Vigotsky, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that the ability to increase volume load (VL) via a progressive increase in the magnitude of load for a given exercise within a given repetition range could enhance the adaptive response to resistance training. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare changes in volume load (VL) over eight weeks of resistance training (RT) in high-versus low-load protocols. Materials and Methods Eighteen well-trained men were matched according to baseline strength were randomly assigned to either a low-load RT (LOW, n = 9) where 25 - 35 repetitions were performed per exercise, or a high-load RT (HIGH, n = 9) where 8 - 12 repetitions were performed per exercise. Both groups performed three sets of seven exercises for all major muscles three times per week on non-consecutive days. Results After adjusting for the pre-test scores, there was a significant difference between the two intervention groups on post-intervention total VL with a very large effect size (F (1, 15) = 16.598, P = .001, ηp2 = .525). There was a significant relationship between pre-intervention and post-intervention total VL (F (1, 15) = 32.048, P < .0001, ηp2 = .681) in which the pre-test scores explained 68% of the variance in the post-test scores. Conclusions This study indicates that low-load RT results in greater accumulations in VL compared to high-load RT over the course of 8 weeks of training. PMID:27625750

  9. A Comparison of Increases in Volume Load Over 8 Weeks of Low-Versus High-Load Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Ogborn, Dan; Contreras, Bret; Cappaert, Tom; Silva Ribeiro, Alex; Alvar, Brent A.; Vigotsky, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that the ability to increase volume load (VL) via a progressive increase in the magnitude of load for a given exercise within a given repetition range could enhance the adaptive response to resistance training. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare changes in volume load (VL) over eight weeks of resistance training (RT) in high-versus low-load protocols. Materials and Methods Eighteen well-trained men were matched according to baseline strength were randomly assigned to either a low-load RT (LOW, n = 9) where 25 - 35 repetitions were performed per exercise, or a high-load RT (HIGH, n = 9) where 8 - 12 repetitions were performed per exercise. Both groups performed three sets of seven exercises for all major muscles three times per week on non-consecutive days. Results After adjusting for the pre-test scores, there was a significant difference between the two intervention groups on post-intervention total VL with a very large effect size (F (1, 15) = 16.598, P = .001, ηp2 = .525). There was a significant relationship between pre-intervention and post-intervention total VL (F (1, 15) = 32.048, P < .0001, ηp2 = .681) in which the pre-test scores explained 68% of the variance in the post-test scores. Conclusions This study indicates that low-load RT results in greater accumulations in VL compared to high-load RT over the course of 8 weeks of training.

  10. Numerical comparison of spectral properties of volume-integral-equation formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Johannes; Ylä-Oijala, Pasi

    2016-07-01

    We study and compare spectral properties of various volume-integral-equation formulations. The equations are written for the electric flux, current, field, and potentials, and discretized with basis functions spanning the appropriate function spaces. Each formulation leads to eigenvalue distributions of different kind due to the effects of discretization procedure, namely, the choice of basis and testing functions. The discrete spectrum of the potential formulation reproduces the theoretically predicted spectrum almost exactly while the spectra of other formulations deviate from the ideal one. It is shown that the potential formulation has the spectral properties desired from the preconditioning perspective.

  11. Rating the resolving hypertrophic scar: comparison of the Vancouver Scar Scale and scar volume.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, B; Shankowsky, H A; Tredget, E E

    2000-01-01

    The increased focus of research interests and clinical documentation on outcomes demands that evaluation tools provide reliable and valid data. The Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was developed to provide a more objective measurement of burn scars; however, the validity (a test's ability to measure the phenomenon for which it was designed) of the VSS has not been tested. To examine the construct validity of the VSS, we compared it with scar volume, which has established face validity. Burn scars were evaluated monthly for a minimum of 7 months. Three scar volume measurements were performed on each scar. In addition, 3 independent examiners completed the VSS for the same scar. The data generated by these 2 measurements were used to establish the following: (1) the interrater agreement estimated by interclass correlation coefficient, (2) convergence validity, (3) the sensitivity of the assessments to discriminate changes in the scar over time, and (4) the prevalence of related parameters that are not currently being captured by the VSS. In an attempt to address some of the deficiencies of the VSS, we propose several modifications. We anticipate that these changes will increase the reliability and validity of the VSS through an increase in the awareness that training in the use of this scale is required, through improvement in the quality of the subscales, and through the documentation of additional pertinent information.

  12. Origin of extracted negative ions by 3D PIC-MCC modeling. Surface vs Volume comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Minea, T.

    2011-09-01

    The development of a high performance negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) of the future fusion reactor ITER. NI source should deliver 40 A of H- (or D-), which is a technical and scientific challenge, and requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics of the source and its magnetic filter. The present knowledge of the ion extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is limited and concerns magnetized plasma sheaths used to avoid electrons being co-extracted from the plasma together with the NI. Moreover, due to the asymmetry induced by the ITER crossed magnetic configuration used to filter the electrons, any realistic study of this problem must consider the three spatial dimensions. To address this problem, a 3D Particles-in-Cell electrostatic collisional code was developed, specifically designed for this system. Binary collisions between the particles are introduced using Monte Carlo Collision scheme. The complex orthogonal magnetic field that is applied to deflect electrons is also taken into account. This code, called ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction), was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of the charged particles close to a typical extraction aperture [1]. This contribution focuses on the limits for the extracted NI current from both, plasma volume and aperture wall. Results of production, destruction, and transport of H- in the extraction region are presented. The extraction efficiency of H- from the volume is compared to the one of H- coming from the wall.

  13. Sea level variation as an indicator of Florida current volume transport: comparisons with direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Maul, G A; Chew, F; Bushnell, M; Mayer, D A

    1985-01-18

    Sea level measurements from tide gauges at Miami, Florida, and Cat Cay, Bahamas, and bottom pressure measurements from a water depth of 50 meters off Jupiter, Florida, and a water depth of 10 meters off Memory Rock, Bahamas, were correlated with 81 concurrent direct volume transport observations in the Straits of Florida. Daily-averaged sea level from either gauge on the Bahamian side of the Straits was poorly correlated with transport. Bottom pressure off Jupiter had a linear coefficient of determination ofr(2) = 0.93, and Miami sea level, when adjusted for weather effects, had r(2) = 0.74; the standard errors of estimating transports were +/- 1.2 x 10(6) and +/- 1.9 x 10(6) cubic meters per second, respectively. A linear multivariate regression, which combined bottom pressure, weather, and the submarine cable observations between Jupiter and the Bahamas, had r(2) = 0.94 with a standard error of estimating transport of +/- 1.1 x 10(6) cubic meters per second. These results suggest that a combination of easily obtained observations is sufficient to adequatelv monitor the daily volume transport fluctuations of the Florida Current. PMID:17742102

  14. A Comparison of Visual Fields with Fixed and Moving Fixation Points. Volume I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, William E.

    2002-09-01

    Four procedures were used to measure the extent of the detection fields of four primary meridians of the binocular visual fields of four subjects. Procedure I (Moving Target) used a horizontally moving target and a stationary fixation point. Procedure II (Fixed Target) used a stationary target and a horizontally moving fixation point. Procedure III (Saccadic Move) used a saccadic eye movement between two stationary horizontal fixation points and a stationary target. Procedure IV (Flashed Target) used a stationary fixation point and a .6 second flashed target. The results from the dynamic procedures (I and II) and the two static procedures (III and IV) were very similar for each subject. In the dynamic procedures, the relationship between a change in contrast and an equivalent change in velocity tends to support Bloch's Law (IxT=C) between 2 deg/s and 20 deg/s for a given retinal location. The relationship between the reciprocal of relative single glimpse probability of four subjects measured in this study and the mean detection times for comparable stimuli taken from Krendel and Wodinsky's study (1960) appear to be linear and highly correlated (.92 to .99). Volume I of this report details the technical report and volume II contains the appendices.

  15. Comparison of brain structure volumes in Insectivora and Primates. I. Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Frahm, H D; Stephan, H; Stephan, M

    1982-01-01

    Based on volume measurements the total neocortex increases enormously from the lower ('basal') Insectivora, through prosimians, monkeys and apes up to man. In man it is about 132 times larger than in the average basal Insectivora of (theoretical) equal body weight and 232 times larger than in the insectivoran species which has the least developed neocortex. Within the neocortex the white matter increases more markedly than the grey matter. For man the white matter reaches a value 298 times that of the basal Insectivora and the grey matter reaches a value 198 times greater. Within the grey matter the cell dense layers (laminae 2-6) increase distinctly more than the molecular layer (lamina 1). Thus in man the volume of layers 2-6 is 272 times greater than that in basal Insectivora and the molecular layer is 68 times greater. When related to the total grey matter the percentage of the molecular layer clearly decreases from about 32% in the lower Insectivora to 12% in higher primates.

  16. Partial volume correction using structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery: comparison with geometric transfer matrix method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euitae; Shidahara, Miho; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; McGinnity, Colm J; Kwon, Jun Soo; Howes, Oliver D; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2013-06-01

    We validated the use of a novel image-based method for partial volume correction (PVC), structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery (SFS-RR) for the accurate quantification of dopamine synthesis capacity measured using [(18)F]DOPA positron emission tomography. The bias and reliability of SFS-RR were compared with the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. Both methodologies were applied to the parametric maps of [(18)F]DOPA utilization rates (ki(cer)). Validation was first performed by measuring repeatability on test-retest scans. The precision of the methodologies instead was quantified using simulated [(18)F]DOPA images. The sensitivity to the misspecification of the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanner point-spread-function on both approaches was also assessed. In the in-vivo data, the ki(cer) was significantly increased by application of both PVC procedures while the reliability remained high (intraclass correlation coefficients >0.85). The variability was not significantly affected by either PVC approach (<10% variability in both cases). The corrected ki(cer) was significantly influenced by the FWHM applied in both the acquired and simulated data. This study shows that SFS-RR can effectively correct for partial volume effects to a comparable degree to GTM but with the added advantage that it enables voxelwise analyses, and that the FWHM used can affect the PVC result indicating the importance of accurately calibrating the FWHM used in the recovery model.

  17. Brain structure volumes in the mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi (Spalacidae, Rodentia) in comparison to the rat and subterrestrial insectivores.

    PubMed

    Frahm, H D; Rehkämper, G; Nevo, E

    1997-01-01

    Natural blindness and a subterranean, digging mode of life demand peculiar adaptations of the central nervous system in the mole rat Spalax ehrenbergi, which are the focus of this quantitative investigation. Volumes of 25 brain structures in Spalax were evaluated allometrically, using the least encephalized mammalian species, the Madagassian hedgehog-like tenrecs (Tenrecinae) as a reference base, and their sizes compared with those of the rat (as a more generalized representative of rodents) and of some subterranean Insectivora. The allometric approach reveals that Spalax has a larger brain than tenrecs and the rat. Within the brain, the neocortex and diencephalon are well developed, an observation also made in other mammalian species with a relatively high encephalization. An unique feature in Spalax is the enlargement of motor structures of the brain, such as the cerebellum (and cerebellar nuclei), and the striatum. Most conspicuous is the large size of the nucleus motorius nervi trigemini, reflecting the importance of masticatory muscles for the special digging technique, which demand an intense use of the teeth for loosening the soil.

  18. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the groups for knee extension power. The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance

  19. Comparison of growth characteristics between skeletal muscle satellite cell lines from diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-hao; Tan, Xungang; Jiao, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. According to myosatellite cell lines (MSCs) established in vitro from diploid and triploid flounder, we compared the characters of growth and differentiation of their MSCs. The results would be useful for learning the muscle development mechanism in teleosts. Materials and Methods. The skeletal muscle cells from the diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were isolated and cultured in vitro, respectively, and the cells were characterized at the morphology and molecular level; meanwhile, the performance of these cells’ proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Results. Two new skeletal muscle cell lines (POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n)) from diploid and triploid flounder have been respectively subcultured for 67 times and 66 times. The cultured cells were mostly spindle-like mononuclear cells. They have normal flounder diploid karyotype (2n=48t) and triploid karyotype (3n=72t), respectively. Muscle satellite cell gene marker (pax7b) and myogenic cell protein marker (Desmin) were all expressed in cells of two cell lines. Both of the cells could differentiate into the large polynucleated muscle fibre cells, and immunofluorescence reactions of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were positive. There were more cells of POMSCS(3n) to differentiate into the muscle fibre cells than that of POMSCS(2n). However, POMSCS(2n) cells proliferated more rapidly than those of POMSCS(3n) (P < 0.05). The significant fluorescent signals were observed in both POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n) cells after transfected with pEGFP-N3 reporter plasmid. Conclusions. The two cell lines have been established and characterized as MSCs. We suppose that it might be the differentiation capacity, rather than the proliferation activity of MSCs to play a key role in the better growth of triploid ones than diploid. Both cell lines will become the ideal tools to learn the mechanism of fish MSCs proliferation, differentiation and regeneration during muscle development in the future. PMID

  20. The response of the cat anococcygeus muscle to nerve or drug stimulation and a comparison with the rat anococcygeus

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J.S.; McGrath, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    1 The cat anococcygeus muscle is shown to possess a dual innervation similar to the rat anococcygeus, with a motor adrenergic innervation and an inhibitory innervation whose transmitter is unknown. The pharmacological properties of the cat muscle were investigated and compared with those of the rat muscle. 2 The cat muscle contracts to noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, tyramine, amphetamine, guanethidine, cocaine and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). The effects of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine are blocked by phentolamine and methysergide respectively. 3 The cat anococcygeus is relaxed by acetylcholine, carbachol, isoprenaline, ATP, prostaglandins E1, E2 and F2α and vasopressin, all of which contract the rat muscle. The effects of acetylcholine and carbachol are blocked by atropine and those of isoprenaline by propranolol. 4 Field stimulation produces contraction of the cat anococcygeus, which is blocked by phentolamine and guanethidine but unaffected by hexamethonium, atropine or neostigmine. 5 In the presence of guanethidine (10-5 M), the tone of the muscle is raised and field stimulation produces relaxation of the muscle. These inhibitory responses are unaffected by phentolamine, hexamethonium, atropine or neostigmine. 6 Neostigmine potentiates the effects of acetylcholine, but not of carbachol in relaxing the cat anococcygeus and in contracting the rat anococcygeus, but has no effect on either motor or inhibitory responses to field stimulation. 7 Cold storage for up to eight days had little effect on either the motor response to noradrenaline or the motor or inhibitory response to field stimulation of the cat anococcygeus. Beyond eight days, the response to field stimulation diminishes more rapidly than the response to noradrenaline. PMID:4823462

  1. Wind Profiles Derived from Volume Imaging Lidar Data: Enhancements to the Algorithm and Comparisons with Insitu Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piironen, A. K.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents wind measurements made with the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) during Aug. 1989 as part of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE). Enhancements to the algorithm are described. Comparisons of these results to aircraft, balloon, and surface based wind measurements are presented. Observations of the spatial variance of aerosol backscatter are also compared to measurements of the convective boundary layer depth. Measurements are based on two-dimensional cross correlations between horizontal image planes showing the spatial distribution of aerosol scattering observed by the lidar at intervals of approximately 3 minutes. Each image plane covers an area of 500-1000 sq km and the winds calculated represent area averages.

  2. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  3. Plasma cytokine and exertional responses in relation to exercise intensity and volume of exercising muscle mass during arm-crank ergometry.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Thomas A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2015-08-01

    This original study investigated the effect of submaximal exercise intensity and volume of contracting muscle mass on plasma inflammation-mediating cytokine and perceived exertional responses to acute arm-crank ergometry (ACE). Twelve recreationally active but upper limb untrained males performed 30 min of (i) low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) ACE (LOW); (ii) moderate-intensity (60% peak oxygen uptake) ACE (MOD); and (iii) concurrent low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) ACE plus lower limb cycle ergometry to match total power output in MOD (HYB). Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1ra, adrenaline, and cortisol were determined at rest, immediately postexercise, and 1 h and 2 h postexercise. Heart rate (HR) and differentiated ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were also recorded. Plasma IL-6 concentrations were elevated (p < 0.05) immediately postexercise and 1 h postexercise (∼ 2.5-fold) in all trials and 2 h postexercise in MOD (3-fold). Plasma IL-1ra concentrations were elevated (p < 0.05) 2 h postexercise in MOD only (2-fold). No plasma IL-10, cortisol, and adrenaline responses were observed. HR and differentiated RPE were significantly higher during MOD than HYB and LOW. Peripheral RPE were significantly higher than central and overall RPE in each trial. Thirty minutes of moderate intensity ACE initiated a plasma cytokine response associated with the protective effect of regular exercise against cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk. Further work is required to establish an optimal intensity and duration of upper limb exercise to maximise the anti-inflammatory potential whilst managing the risk of over-use injury.

  4. Comparison of 2-D and 3-D estimates of placental volume in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aye, Christina Y L; Stevenson, Gordon N; Impey, Lawrence; Collins, Sally L

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound estimation of placental volume (PlaV) between 11 and 13 wk has been proposed as part of a screening test for small-for-gestational-age babies. A semi-automated 3-D technique, validated against the gold standard of manual delineation, has been found at this stage of gestation to predict small-for-gestational-age at term. Recently, when used in the third trimester, an estimate obtained using a 2-D technique was found to correlate with placental weight at delivery. Given its greater simplicity, the 2-D technique might be more useful as part of an early screening test. We investigated if the two techniques produced similar results when used in the first trimester. The correlation between PlaV values calculated by the two different techniques was assessed in 139 first-trimester placentas. The agreement on PlaV and derived "standardized placental volume," a dimensionless index correcting for gestational age, was explored with the Mann-Whitney test and Bland-Altman plots. Placentas were categorized into five different shape subtypes, and a subgroup analysis was performed. Agreement was poor for both PlaV and standardized PlaV (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001), with the 2-D technique yielding larger estimates for both indices compared with the 3-D method. The mean difference in standardized PlaV values between the two methods was 0.007 (95% confidence interval: 0.006-0.009). The best agreement was found for regular rectangle-shaped placentas (p = 0.438 and p = 0.408). The poor correlation between the 2-D and 3-D techniques may result from the heterogeneity of placental morphology at this stage of gestation. In early gestation, the simpler 2-D estimates of PlaV do not correlate strongly with those obtained with the validated 3-D technique.

  5. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  6. Myosin light chain kinase steady-state kinetics: comparison of smooth muscle myosin II and nonmuscle myosin IIB as substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Diego B.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Krenc, Agata K.; Baker, Josh E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates S19 of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), which is required to activate myosin's ATPase activity and contraction. Smooth muscles are known to display plasticity in response to factors such as inflammation, developmental stage, or stress, which lead to differential expression of nonmuscle and smooth muscle isoforms. Here, we compare steady-state kinetics parameters for phosphorylation of different MLCK substrates: (1) nonmuscle RLC, (2) smooth muscle RLC, and heavy meromyosin subfragments of (3) nonmuscle myosin IIB, and (4) smooth muscle myosin II. We show that MLCK has a ~2-fold higher kcat for both smooth muscle myosin II substrates compared with nonmuscle myosin IIB substrates, whereas Km values were very similar. Myosin light chain kinase has a 1.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher specificity (kcat/Km) for smooth versus nonmuscle-free RLC and heavy meromyosin, respectively, suggesting that differences in specificity are dictated by RLC sequences. Of the 10 non-identical RLC residues, we ruled out 7 as possible underlying causes of different MLCK kinetics. The remaining 3 residues were found to be surface exposed in the N-terminal half of the RLC, consistent with their importance in substrate recognition. These data are consistent with prior deletion/chimera studies and significantly add to understanding of MLCK myosin interactions. PMID:27528075

  7. Disaster warning system: Satellite feasibility and comparison with terrestrial systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spoor, J. H.; Hodge, W. H.; Fluk, M. J.; Bamford, T. F.

    1974-01-01

    The Disaster Warning System (DWS) is a conceptual system which will provide the National Weather Service (NWS) with communication services in the 1980s to help minimize losses caused by natural disasters. The object of this study is a comparative analysis between a terrestrial DWS and a satellite DWS. Baseline systems satisfying the NOAA requirements were synthesized in sufficient detail so that a comparison could be made in terms of performance and cost. The cost of both baseline systems is dominated by the disaster warning and spotter reporting functions. An effort was undertaken to reduce system cost through lower-capacity alternative systems generated by modifying the baseline systems. By reducing the number of required channels and modifying the spotter reporting techniques, alternative satellite systems were synthesized. A terrestrial alternative with the coverage reduced to an estimated 95 percent of the population was considered.

  8. Comparison Between Neck and Shoulder Stiffness Determined by Shear Wave Ultrasound Elastography and a Muscle Hardness Meter.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Kusama, Saki

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this study were to compare neck and shoulder stiffness values determined by shear wave ultrasound elastography with those obtained with a muscle hardness meter and to verify the correspondence between objective and subjective stiffness in the neck and shoulder. Twenty-four young men and women participated in the study. Their neck and shoulder stiffness was determined at six sites. Before the start of the measurements, patients rated their present subjective symptoms of neck and shoulder stiffness on a 6-point verbal scale. At all measurement sites, the correlation coefficients between the values of muscle hardness indices determined by the muscle hardness meter and shear wave ultrasound elastography were not significant. Furthermore, individuals' subjective neck and shoulder stiffness did not correspond to their objective symptoms. These results suggest that the use of shear wave ultrasound elastography is essential to more precisely assess neck and shoulder stiffness.

  9. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  12. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  13. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    PubMed Central

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  14. Comparison of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability estimated by one stability- and three EMG-assisted optimization approaches.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Yousef; Arjmand, Navid; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl

    2015-08-01

    Various hybrid EMG-assisted optimization (EMGAO) approaches are commonly used to estimate muscle forces and joint loads of human musculoskeletal systems. Use of EMG data and optimization enables the EMGAO models to account for inter- and intra-individual variations in muscle recruitments while satisfying equilibrium requirements. Due to implications in ergonomics/prevention and rehabilitation/treatment managements of low-back disorders, there is a need to evaluate existing approaches. The present study aimed to compare predictions of three different EMGAO and one stability-based optimization (OPT) approaches for trunk muscle forces, spinal loads, and stability. Identical measured kinematics/EMG data and anatomical model were used in all approaches when simulating several sagittally symmetric static activities. Results indicated substantial inter-model differences in predicted muscle forces (up to 123% and 90% for total muscle forces in tasks with upright and flexed postures, respectively) and spinal loads (up to 74% and 78% for compression loads in upright and flexed postures, respectively). Results of EMGAO models markedly varied depending on the manner in which correction (gain) factors were introduced. Large range of gain values (from ∼0.47 to 41) was estimated in each model. While EMGAO methods predicted an unstable spine for some tasks, OPT predicted, as intended, either a meta-stable or stable states in all simulated tasks. An unrealistic unstable state of the spine predicted by EMGAO methods for some of the simulated tasks (which are in reality stable) could be an indication of the shortcoming of these models in proper prediction of muscle forces.

  15. Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. II. Detection in simulations and comparison with theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-02-01

    Measuring the volume weighted velocity power spectrum suffers from a severe systematic error due to imperfect sampling of the velocity field from the inhomogeneous distribution of dark matter particles/halos in simulations or galaxies with velocity measurement. This "sampling artifact" depends on both the mean particle number density n¯P and the intrinsic large scale structure (LSS) fluctuation in the particle distribution. (1) We report robust detection of this sampling artifact in N -body simulations. It causes ˜12 % underestimation of the velocity power spectrum at k =0.1 h /Mpc for samples with n¯ P=6 ×10-3 (Mpc /h )-3 . This systematic underestimation increases with decreasing n¯P and increasing k . Its dependence on the intrinsic LSS fluctuations is also robustly detected. (2) All of these findings are expected based upon our theoretical modeling in paper I [P. Zhang, Y. Zheng, and Y. Jing, Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. I. Theoretical modeling, arXiv:1405.7125.]. In particular, the leading order theoretical approximation agrees quantitatively well with the simulation result for n¯ P≳6 ×10-4 (Mpc /h )-3 . Furthermore, we provide an ansatz to take high order terms into account. It improves the model accuracy to ≲1 % at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc over 3 orders of magnitude in n¯P and over typical LSS clustering from z =0 to z =2 . (3) The sampling artifact is determined by the deflection D field, which is straightforwardly available in both simulations and data of galaxy velocity. Hence the sampling artifact in the velocity power spectrum measurement can be self-calibrated within our framework. By applying such self-calibration in simulations, it is promising to determine the real large scale velocity bias of 1013M⊙ halos with ˜1 % accuracy, and that of lower mass halos with better accuracy. (4) In contrast to suppressing the velocity power spectrum at large scale, the sampling artifact causes an overestimation of the velocity

  16. Large Volume Calorimeter Comparison Measurement Results Collected at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    A calorimeter capable of measuring the power output from special nuclear material in 208-liter (55-gal) shipping or storatge containers was designed and fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This high-sensitivity, large-volume calorimeter (LVC) provides a reliable NDA method to measure many difficult-to-assay forms of plutonium and tritium more accurately. The entire calorimeter is 104 cm wide x 157 cm deep x 196 cm high in the closed position. The LVC also requires space for a standard electronics rack. A standard 208-1 drum with a 60-cm-diameter retaining ring with bolt will fit into the LVC measurement chamber. With careful positioning, cylindrical items up to 66 cm in diameter and 100 cm tall can be assayed in the LVC. The LVC was used to measure numerous plutonium-bearing items in 208-1 drums at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. Measurement results from real waste drums that were previously assayed using multiple NDA systems are compared with the LVC results. The calorimeter previously performed well under laboratory conditions using Pu-238 heat standards. The in-plant instrument performance is compared with the laboratory performance. Assay times, precision, measurement threshold, and operability of the LVC are also presented.

  17. Mushroom body volumes and visual interneurons in ants: comparison between sexes and castes.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Birgit; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2004-02-01

    The mushroom bodies are brain centers involved in complex behaviors such as learning and orientation. Here we examine the organization of mushroom bodies in ants, focusing on visual input. We describe the structure of visual neurons and compare the volume of brain structures involved in visual processing, especially the optic lobes and parts of the mushroom bodies receiving visual input in males, winged females, and workers of carpenter ants (Camponotus). A relatively small number of neurons connect the medulla with the mushroom bodies, and these neurons have relatively large dendritic fields in the medulla, suggesting low spatial resolution in ants. These neurons terminate in different yet overlapping strata in the mushroom bodies' collar region. While males have larger optic lobes than workers, their collar region is smaller than in females. Male ants have an additional type of medulla-mushroom body neuron with dendrites probing the distal medulla. These neurons are absent in female and worker ants. Most mushroom body Kenyon cells that are postsynaptic to visual input neurons appear to integrate visual as well as antennal input. This is in contrast to honey bees, where visual input to the mushroom bodies is more prominent and where Kenyon cells are not known to combine visual and antennal input.

  18. 3D volume MR temperature mapping for HIFU heating trajectory comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Nick; Vyas, Urvi; de Bever, Josh; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2012-10-01

    Many areas of MR-guided thermal therapy research would benefit from temperature maps with high spatial and temporal resolution that cover a large 3-D volume. This paper describes an approach to achieve these goals that is suitable for research applications where retrospective reconstruction of the temperature maps is acceptable. The method acquires undersampled data from a modified 3-D segmented EPI sequence and creates images using a temporally constrained reconstruction algorithm. The 3-D images can be zero-filled to arbitrarily small voxel spacing in all directions and then converted into temperature maps using the standard proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift technique. During HIFU heating experiments, the proposed method was used to obtain temperature maps with 1.5×1.5×3.0 mm resolution, 288×162×78 mm field of view, and 1.7 second temporal resolution. The approach is validated to demonstrate that it can accurately capture the spatial characteristics and time dynamics of rapidly changing HIFU-induced temperature distributions. An example application is presented where the method is used to analyze and compare different HIFU volumetric heating trajectories.

  19. Comparisons and Limitations of Gradient Augmented Level Set and Algebraic Volume of Fluid Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumolu, Lakshman; Ryddner, Douglas; Trujillo, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Recent numerical methods for implicit interface transport are generally presented as enjoying higher order of spatial-temporal convergence when compared to classical methods or less sophisticated approaches. However, when applied to test cases, which are designed to simulate practical industrial conditions, significant reduction in convergence is observed in higher-order methods, whereas for the less sophisticated approaches same convergence is achieved but a growth in the error norms occurs. This provides an opportunity to understand the underlying issues which causes this decrease in accuracy in both types of methods. As an example we consider the Gradient Augmented Level Set method (GALS) and a variant of the Volume of Fluid (VoF) method in our study. Results show that while both methods do suffer from a loss of accuracy, it is the higher order method that suffers more. The implication is a significant reduction in the performance advantage of the GALS method over the VoF scheme. Reasons for this lie in the behavior of the higher order derivatives, particular in situations where the level set field is highly distorted. For the VoF approach, serious spurious deformations of the interface are observed, albeit with a deceptive zero loss of mass.

  20. Mushroom body volumes and visual interneurons in ants: comparison between sexes and castes.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Birgit; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2004-02-01

    The mushroom bodies are brain centers involved in complex behaviors such as learning and orientation. Here we examine the organization of mushroom bodies in ants, focusing on visual input. We describe the structure of visual neurons and compare the volume of brain structures involved in visual processing, especially the optic lobes and parts of the mushroom bodies receiving visual input in males, winged females, and workers of carpenter ants (Camponotus). A relatively small number of neurons connect the medulla with the mushroom bodies, and these neurons have relatively large dendritic fields in the medulla, suggesting low spatial resolution in ants. These neurons terminate in different yet overlapping strata in the mushroom bodies' collar region. While males have larger optic lobes than workers, their collar region is smaller than in females. Male ants have an additional type of medulla-mushroom body neuron with dendrites probing the distal medulla. These neurons are absent in female and worker ants. Most mushroom body Kenyon cells that are postsynaptic to visual input neurons appear to integrate visual as well as antennal input. This is in contrast to honey bees, where visual input to the mushroom bodies is more prominent and where Kenyon cells are not known to combine visual and antennal input. PMID:14694534

  1. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  2. S-2 stage 1/25 scale model base region thermal environment test. Volume 1: Test results, comparison with theory and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadunas, J. A.; French, E. P.; Sexton, H.

    1973-01-01

    A 1/25 scale model S-2 stage base region thermal environment test is presented. Analytical results are included which reflect the effect of engine operating conditions, model scale, turbo-pump exhaust gas injection on base region thermal environment. Comparisons are made between full scale flight data, model test data, and analytical results. The report is prepared in two volumes. The description of analytical predictions and comparisons with flight data are presented. Tabulation of the test data is provided.

  3. Robust estimation of physiological cross-sectional area and geometric reconstruction for human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwoon; Ravichandiran, Kajeandra; Jackson, Ken; Fiume, Eugene; Agur, Anne

    2012-05-11

    Understanding muscle architecture is crucial to determining the mechanical function of muscle during body movements, because architectural parameters directly correspond to muscle performance. Accurate parameters are thus essential for reliable simulation. Human cadaveric muscle specimen data provides the anatomical detail needed for in-depth understanding of muscle and accurate parameter estimation. However, as muscle generally has non-uniform architecture, parameter estimation, specifically, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), is rarely straightforward. To deal effectively with this non-uniformity, we propose a geometric approach in which a polygon is sought to best approximate the cross-sectional area of each fascicle by accounting for its three-dimensional trajectory and arrangement in the muscle. Those polygons are then aggregated to determine PCSA and volume of muscle. Experiments are run using both synthetic data and muscle specimen data. From comparison of PCSA using synthetic data, we conclude that the proposed method enhances the robustness of PCSA estimation against variation in muscle architecture. Furthermore, we suggest reconstruction methods to extract 3D muscle geometry directly from fascicle data and estimated parameters using the level set method. PMID:22406468

  4. Muscle activity during stance phase of walking: comparison of males with transfemoral amputation with osseointegrated fixations to nondisabled male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pantall, Annette; Ewins, David

    2013-01-01

    A recent development in prosthetics is the osseointegrated fixation (OF), with improvements in comfort, fatigue, hip movement, and ease of prosthetic attachment reported. However, little information is available regarding muscle function. This study reports on selected gait parameters of the residual limb during the stance phase of level overground walking, focusing on muscle activity. Five males with transfemoral amputation (TFA) with OFs were recruited. Ground reaction force (GRF), lower-limb kinematics, and surface electromyography (sEMG) from residual-limb muscles were recorded. sEMG data were also collected from a group of 10 nondisabled male subjects. Interstance variability of gait parameters was assessed by coefficient of multiple correlations. Repeatability of GRF and hip kinematics was high, whereas repeatability of the sEMG was low for four of the five individuals with TFA. Interstance variability of the sEMG for gluteus medius (GMED) was significantly greater in the group with TFA. The main difference in sEMG between the groups was the phase, with GMED and adductor magnus displaying greater differences than their counterparts in the nondisabled group. Results demonstrate that muscles in the residual limb retain aspects of their previous functional pattern.

  5. Comparison of electromyographic signals from monopolar current and potential amplifiers derived from a penniform muscle, the gastrocnemius medialis.

    PubMed

    von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Maurer, Christian; Ruf, Florian; Nigg, Benno M

    2013-10-01

    Electromyograms (EMGs) are measured by bipolar surface electrodes that quantify potential differences. Bipolar potentials over penniform muscles may be associated with errors. Our assumption was that muscle activity can be quantified more reliably and with a higher spatial resolution using current measurements. The purpose of this work is: (a) to introduce the concept of current measurements to detect muscle activity, (b) to show the coherences observed over a segment of a typical penniform muscle, the gastrocnemius medialis where one would expect a synchronicity of the activation, and (c) to show the amount of mixing that is caused by the finite inter electrode resistance. A current amplifier was developed. EMGs were recorded at 40% of maximum voluntary contraction during isometric contractions of the gastrocnemius medialis. EMGs of twelve persons were recorded with an array of four peripheral and one central electrode. Monopolar EMGs were recorded for "all-potential", "center at current" and "all-current" conditions. Coherence revealed the similarity of signals recorded from neighboring electrodes. Coherence was high for the "all-potential", significant for the "current at center" condition and disappeared in the "all-current" condition. It was concluded that EMG array recordings strongly depends on the measurement configuration. The proposed current amplifier significantly improves spatial resolution of EMG array recordings because the inter-electrode cross talk is reduced.

  6. Adaptations for rapid and forceful contraction in wing muscles of the male golden-collared manakin: sex and species comparisons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J D; Hertel, F; Bauch, M; Schlinger, B A

    2001-11-01

    The courtship display of the male golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus) of Panamanian rainforests is noteworthy for several types of whip-crack-like sounds created by a rapid overhead flip of the wings. We have hypothesized that this courtship behavior. which is not performed by females, is associated with steroid-sensitive and sexually dimorphic neuromuscular systems. Presumably, muscles creating the motion of the wingsnap in males are specialized for greater force generation and speed of contraction. We tested this hypothesis by examining mass, fiber diameter, metabolic enzyme activity, and myosin isoform expression in several muscles of male and female manakins and in both sexes of a non-wingsnapping bird, the zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata). We have identified three wing muscles, the scapulohumeralis caudalis, the supracoracoideus, and the pectoralis major, that differ in one or more of these characteristics across sex and species, suggesting they are specialized for faster contraction and greater force production in male manakins. These muscles normally function to raise and lower the wings during flight. As this movement is the principal motion of the wingsnap, these adaptations presumably underlie the performance of the wingsnap display. PMID:11778830

  7. Meta-analysis of the comparison of the metabolic and contractile characteristics of two bovine muscles: longissimus thoracis and semitendinosus.

    PubMed

    Chriki, Sghaier; Picard, Brigitte; Jurie, Catherine; Reichstadt, Matthieu; Micol, Didier; Brun, Jean-Paul; Journaux, Laurent; Hocquette, Jean-François

    2012-08-01

    This study used the BIF-Beef data warehouse to determine whether semitendinosus (ST) was a muscle with a faster contraction speed and more glycolytic than longissimus thoracis (LT), regardless of the sex and breed of animals. With more than 500 animals from 7 breeds, we confirmed that LT was more oxidative than ST in males and females, but not in steers, and in all the breeds studied except Montbéliard. The LT had more slow oxidative (SO) and fewer fast oxido-glycolytic (FOG) and fast-glycolytic (FG) muscle fibres than the ST muscle, regardless of sex, in all breeds except Montbéliard and Holstein. SO proportion and the oxidative activity were negatively correlated to FG proportion and to the glycolytic activity. Similarly, FOG proportion was positively correlated to the glycolytic activity and negatively to FG proportion. However, these relationships are not consistent across sexes and breeds. In conclusion, differences in muscle types may be affected by sex or breed but to a moderate extent only.

  8. Comparison of mercury concentrations in liver, muscle, whole bodies, and composites of fish from the Red River of the North

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Brigham, Mark E.; Stauffer, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    Carp (Cyprinus carpio) from four sites and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from one site in the Red River of the North in 1994 were analyzed for total mercury content. In carp, mercury concentrations differed among liver, muscle, and whole bodies (0.11, 0.31, and 0.18 µg/g wet weight, respectively), between large and small size groups, but not location. Mercury distribution in channel catfish tissues differed from that in carp. Liver and muscle tissue had similar mean concentrations; each was higher than whole-body concentrations (0.16, 0.18, and 0.11 µg/g, respectively). Mercury concentrations were not significantly different between the two size groups of channel catfish. Weighted-mean mercury concentrations from seven individual fish agreed closely (usually within 10%) with concentrations determined on physical composites of the same fish. The ratio of mercury in whole bodies to mercury in muscle was similar for both carp and channel catfish. Historical data indicate that this ratio may be applicable to other species and locations. The ratio of mercury in livers to whole bodies and muscle differed between carp and channel catfish, which may reflect physiological differences between different trophic groups.

  9. Comparison of Lower Extremity Strength, Power and Muscle Area between Healthy Subjects and Mobility-Limited Elders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared muscle strength, power and cross sectional area (CSA) in healthy middle-aged adults (mean age: 47.3 +/- 5 yrs, n = 26), healthy older adults (73.8 +/- 4 yrs, n = 21), and older adults with mobility impairments (77.1 +/- 5 yrs, n = 21). One repetition maximum strength (1RM) and pe...

  10. Comparison of Puff Volume With Cigarettes per Day in Predicting Nicotine Uptake Among Daily Smokers.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Nicolle M; Chen, Allshine; Zhu, Junjia; Sun, Dongxiao; Liao, Jason; Stennett, Andrea L; Muscat, Joshua E

    2016-07-01

    The role of inhalation behaviors as predictors of nicotine uptake was examined in the Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study (2012-2014), a study of 332 adults whose cigarette smoking was measured in a naturalistic environment (e.g., at home) with portable handheld topography devices. Piecewise regression analyses showed that levels of salivary cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and total salivary nicotine metabolites (cotinine + trans-3'-hydroxycotinine) increased linearly up to a level of about 1 pack per day (20 cigarettes per day (CPD)) (P < 0.01). Total daily puff volume (TDPV; in mL) (P < 0.05) and total daily number of puffs (P < 0.05), but not other topographical measures, increased linearly with CPD up to a level of about 1 pack per day. The mean level of cotinine per cigarette did not change above 20 CPD and was 36% lower in heavy smokers (≥20 CPD) than in lighter smokers (<20 CPD) (15.6 ng/mL vs. 24.5 ng/mL, respectively; P < 0.01). Mediation models showed that TDPV accounted for 43%-63% of the association between CPD and nicotine metabolites for smokers of <20 CPD. TDPV was the best predictor of nicotine metabolite levels in light-to-moderate smokers (1-19 CPD). In contrast, neither CPD, total daily number of puffs, nor TDPV predicted nicotine metabolite levels above 20 CPD (up to 40 CPD). Finally, although light smokers are traditionally considered less dependent on nicotine, these findings suggest that they are exposed to more nicotine per cigarette than are heavy smokers due to more frequent, intensive puffing.

  11. Seismic Imaging of the Waltham Canyon Fault, California: Comparison of Ray-Theoretical and Fresnel Volume Prestack Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Ryberg, T.; Fuis, G. S.; Lueth, S.

    2011-12-01

    Steep faults can be imaged by migration of reflected refractions observed in controlled-source seismic data. The processing can be focussed on the enhancement of the reflected refractions and simultaneous suppression of undesired phases. The Kirchhoff prestack migration is then applied where migration noise is suppressed by constructive stacking of multi-fold data. The Fresnel volume migration is an efficient alternative method, where smearing along isochrones (potential reflection points, partly migration noise) is limited to the first Fresnel zone in this technique. This makes the Fresnel volume migration particularly interesting for the imaging of steep faults using only low-fold data. We depeloped a ray-theroretical line drawing migration, which can be considered as the high-frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume migration. The ray-theoretical migration is less time consuming, and, hence, can be used to optimize the migration parameters before the final application of Fresnel volume migration. Another advantage of our ray-theoretical migration is possible wave field separation before and after migration. This feature can be used to optimize the pre-processing of the data before migration. We tested the prestack migration techniques with synthetic data. The methods were then applied to low-fold data collected across the SAFOD drill site near Parkfield, California. We chose five shot gathers with clear phases interpreted as reflected refractions. The phases are not obvious in shot gathers apart from the five shot locations. The resulting images show near-vertical reflector segments at 1-5 km depth, which project close to the surface track of the Waltham Canyon fault running approximately 10 km eastward and parallel to the San Andreas fault. Some more details were resolved in comparison with previous investigations. Based on modeling studies, the imaged features can be interpreted as reflections from a fault with lower internal velocities compared with the

  12. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Inviscid Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-centered and node-centered approaches have been compared for unstructured finite-volume discretization of inviscid fluxes. The grids range from regular grids to irregular grids, including mixed-element grids and grids with random perturbations of nodes. Accuracy, complexity, and convergence rates of defect-correction iterations are studied for eight nominally second-order accurate schemes: two node-centered schemes with weighted and unweighted least-squares (LSQ) methods for gradient reconstruction and six cell-centered schemes two node-averaging with and without clipping and four schemes that employ different stencils for LSQ gradient reconstruction. The cell-centered nearest-neighbor (CC-NN) scheme has the lowest complexity; a version of the scheme that involves smart augmentation of the LSQ stencil (CC-SA) has only marginal complexity increase. All other schemes have larger complexity; complexity of node-centered (NC) schemes are somewhat lower than complexity of cell-centered node-averaging (CC-NA) and full-augmentation (CC-FA) schemes. On highly anisotropic grids typical of those encountered in grid adaptation, discretization errors of five of the six cell-centered schemes converge with second order on all tested grids; the CC-NA scheme with clipping degrades solution accuracy to first order. The NC schemes converge with second order on regular and/or triangular grids and with first order on perturbed quadrilaterals and mixed-element grids. All schemes may produce large relative errors in gradient reconstruction on grids with perturbed nodes. Defect-correction iterations for schemes employing weighted least-square gradient reconstruction diverge on perturbed stretched grids. Overall, the CC-NN and CC-SA schemes offer the best options of the lowest complexity and secondorder discretization errors. On anisotropic grids over a curved body typical of turbulent flow simulations, the discretization errors converge with second order and are small for the CC

  13. Comparison of Two Methods for Noninvasive Determination of Stroke Volume During Orthostatic Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, Donald F.; Ratliff, Duane A.; Sithole, Joseph; Convertino, Victor A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The real time, beat-by-beat, non-invasive determination of stroke volume (SV) is an important parameter in many aerospace related physiologic protocols. In this study, we compared simultaneous estimates of SV calculated from peripheral pulse waveforms with a more conventional non-invasive technique. Methods: Using a prospective, randomized blinded protocol, ten males and nine females completed 12-mm tilt table protocols. The relative change (%(Delta)) in beat-to-beat SV was estimated non-invasively from changes in pulse waveforms measured by application of infrared finger photoplethysmography (IFP) with a Portapres(Registered TradeMark) blood pressure monitoring device and by thoracic impedance cardiography (TIC). The %(Delta) SV values were calculated from continuous SV measurements in the supine posture and over the first 10 s (T1), second 10 s (T2), and 3.5 minutes (T3) of 80deg head-up tilt (HUT). Results: The average %(Delta) SV measured by IFP at T1 (-11.7 +/- 3.7 %) was statistically less (P <0.02) than the average %(Delta) SV measured by TIC at T1 (-21.7 +/- 3.1 %), while the average %(Delta) SV measured by 1FF at T2 (-16.2 +/- 3.9 %) and T3 (-19.1 +/- 3.8 %) were not statistically distinguishable (P > or = 0.322) than the average %(Delta) SV measured by TIC at T2 (-21.8 +/- 2.5 %), and T3 (-22.6 +/- 2.9 %). Correlation coefficients (r(sup 2)) between IFP and TIC were 0.117 (T1), 0.387 (T2), and 0.7 18 (T3). Conclusion: IFP provides beat-to-beat (real time) assessment of %(Delta) SV after 20 sec of transition to an orthostatic challenge that is comparable to the commonly accepted TIC. Our data support the notion that IFP technology which has flown during space missions can be used to accurately assess physiological status and countermeasure effectiveness for orth static problems that may arise in astronauts after space flight. While the peripherally measured IFP response is slightly delayed, the ease of implementing this monitor in the field is

  14. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume. PMID:27653488

  15. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume.

  16. Comparison of three-shell and simplified volume conductor models in magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Stenroos, Matti; Hunold, Alexander; Haueisen, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Experimental MEG source imaging studies have typically been carried out with either a spherically symmetric head model or a single-shell boundary-element (BEM) model that is shaped according to the inner skull surface. The concepts and comparisons behind these simplified models have led to misunderstandings regarding the role of skull and scalp in MEG. In this work, we assess the forward-model errors due to different skull/scalp approximations and due to differences and errors in model geometries. We built five anatomical models of a volunteer using a set of T1-weighted MR scans and three common toolboxes. Three of the models represented typical models in experimental MEG, one was manually constructed, and one contained a major segmentation error at the skull base. For these anatomical models, we built forward models using four simplified approaches and a three-shell BEM approach that has been used as reference in previous studies. Our reference model contained in addition the skull fine-structure (spongy bone). We computed signal topographies for cortically constrained sources in the left hemisphere and compared the topographies using relative error and correlation metrics. The results show that the spongy bone has a minimal effect on MEG topographies, and thus the skull approximation of the three-shell model is justified. The three-shell model performed best, followed by the corrected-sphere and single-shell models, whereas the local-spheres and single-sphere models were clearly worse. The three-shell model was the most robust against the introduced segmentation error. In contrast to earlier claims, there was no noteworthy difference in the computation times between the realistically-shaped and sphere-based models, and the manual effort of building a three-shell model and a simplified model is comparable. We thus recommend the realistically-shaped three-shell model for experimental MEG work. In cases where this is not possible, we recommend a realistically

  17. Comparison of electromyography fatigue threshold in lower limb muscles in trained cyclists and untrained non-cyclists.

    PubMed

    Smirmaul, B P C; Dantas, J L; Fontes, E B; Altimari, L R; Okano, A H; Moraes, A C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the Electromyographic Fatigue Threshold (EMG(FT)) determined in the Vastus Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris (RF), Biceps Femoris (BF), Semitendinosus (ST) and Tibialis Anterior (TA) during stationary cycling in trained cyclists and non-cyclists. Using a cycle ergometer, 13 cyclists (28.4 +/- 6.9 years; 70.3 +/- 13 kg; 176.1 +/- 8.5 cm) and 11 non-cyclists (25.8 +/- 4 years; 73 +/- 9.1 kg; 175 +/- 6.4 cm), performed a maximum incremental test (ITmax) (90 rpm) to determine the (EMG(FT)). Maximal power output (W(PEAK)) reached by cyclists was higher than for non-cyclists (372.6 W and 248.9 W respectively) (P < 0.01). For the five muscles analyzed in cyclists, EMG(FT) occurred at 85.7% of cases in the VL, 92.9% in RE 78.6% in BE 78.6% in ST and 50% in TA, while in the non-cyclists group, this occurrence was 100% to muscle VL, 100% to RF, 92.6% to BF, 78.6% to ST, and 78.6% to TA. Analyzing the percentage corresponding to the power at EMG(FT) in relation to W(PEAK) reached, no differences between groups were observed for RF, BF and ST, however VL and TA, as well as the mean from all muscles were lower for cyclists than non-cyclists (P < 0.05). The present results showed that EMG(FT) is more easily identified in RF and VL muscles for both groups, and it may be an interesting method to evaluate the adaptive responses from aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms during cycling training programs.

  18. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function: A comparison between ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, P; Herzog, W

    2015-06-01

    Due to a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury in alpine ski racers, this study aims to assess functional asymmetry in the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and leg muscle mass in elite ski racers with and without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs) for kinetic impulse (CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI). Dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning was used to assess asymmetry in lower body muscle mass. Compared with controls, ACL-R skiers had increased AI in muscle mass (P < 0.001), kinetic impulse AI in the CMJ concentric phase (P < 0.05), and the final phase of the SJ (P < 0.05). Positive associations were observed between muscle mass and AI in the CMJ concentric phase (r = 0.57, P < 0.01) as well as in the late SJ phase (r = 0.66, P < 0.01). Future research is required to assess the role of the CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI as a part of a multifaceted approach for improving outcome following ACL-R in elite ski racers.

  19. Laboratory experiments for inter-comparison of three volume scattering meters to measure angular scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Harmel, T; Hieronymi, M; Slade, W; Röttgers, R; Roullier, F; Chami, M

    2016-01-25

    Measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) of hydrosols is of primary importance to investigate the interaction of light with hydrosols and to further interpret in situ and remote sensing data of ocean color. In this paper, a laboratory inter-comparison experiment of three recently developed VSF meters that are able to measure the scattered light for a wide range of scattering angle at 515 nm wavelength is performed using phytoplankton cultures and mineral-like hydrosols. A rigorous measurement protocol was employed to ensure good quality data. In particular, the protocol enabled removing the influence of bacteria on the hydrosols within the sample. The differences in the VSF measurements between the instruments vary from 10 to 25% depending on the composition of the hydrosols. The analysis of the angular features of the VSF revealed a sharp increase of the VSF beyond the scattering angle of 150° for some phytoplankton species. Such behavior is observed for two of the three VSF meters, thus suggesting that it is not due to instrumental artifacts but more likely to phytoplankton optical properties themselves. Moreover, comparisons with currently used theoretical phase functions show that the models are not able to reproduce satisfactorily the directional patterns in the backscattering region. This study suggests that a better modelling of the VSF shape of phytoplankton at high scattering angles is required to correctly represent the angular shape of the VSF in the backscattering hemisphere. Tabulated values of the measured phase functions are provided for scattering angles from 0.1 to 175°.

  20. Comparison of Acute and Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury Using Semi-Automatic Multimodal Segmentation of MR Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Micah C.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W.; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A.; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W.; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options. PMID:21787171

  1. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  2. Comparison of short- with long-term regeneration results after digital nerve reconstruction with muscle-in-vein conduits

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Schulz, Lukas; Rath, Rebekka; Stahl, Stéphane; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Manoli, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Muscle-in-vein conduits are used alternatively to nerve grafts for bridging nerve defects. The purpose of this study was to examine short- and long-term regeneration results after digital nerve reconstruction with muscle-in-vein conduits. Static and moving two-point discriminations and Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments were used to evaluate sensory recovery 6–12 months and 14–35 months after repair of digital nerves with muscle-in-vein in 7 cases. Both follow-ups were performed after clinical signs of progressing regeneration disappeared. In 4 of 7 cases, a further recovery of both two-point discriminations and in another case of only the static two-point discrimination of 1–3 mm could be found between the short-term and long-term follow-up examination. Moreover, a late recovery of both two-point discriminations was demonstrated in another case. Four of 7 cases showed a sensory improvement by one Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments. This pilot study suggests that sensory recovery still takes place even when clinical signs of progressing regeneration disappear. PMID:26692868

  3. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: NORAMET intercomparison of volume standards at 50 mL and 100 mL (SIM.M.FF-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, C.; Trujillo Juarez, S.; Maldonado, J. M.; Bean, V.

    2003-01-01

    An intercomparison of volume standards, 50 mL and 100 mL pycnometers, was decided on at the NORAMET Technical Contacts Meeting of 8-9 June 1998. The participating laboratories were CENAM, NIST, and NRC. NRC acted as the pilot laboratory. The comparison was done between April 1999 and October 1999. The pycnometers were not protected against evaporation by a supplementary cap. Even with this handicap, the three laboratories agreed with one another very well. The difference between maximum and minimum reported volumes never exceeded 0.014%. This comparison was assigned the number SIM.M.FF-S1. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the SIM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. Transcript profiles in longissimus dorsi muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue: a comparison of pigs with different postweaning growth rates.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, C M; Jones, C K; Schroyen, M; Severin, A J; Patience, J F; Tuggle, C K; Koltes, J E

    2015-05-01

    Although most pigs recover rapidly from stresses associated with the transition of weaning, a portion of the population lags behind their contemporaries in growth performance. The underlying biological and molecular mechanisms involved in postweaning differences in growth performance are poorly understood. The objective of this experiment was to use transcriptional profiling of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue to develop a better understanding of the metabolic basis for poor weaned-pig transition. A total of 1,054 pigs was reared in commercial conditions and weighed at birth, weaning, and 3 wk postweaning. Transition ADG (tADG) was calculated as the ADG for the 3-wk period postweaning. Nine pigs from both the lowest 10th percentile (low tADG) and the 60th to 70th percentile (high tADG) were harvested at 3 wk postweaning. Differential expression analysis was conducted in longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) and subcutaneous adipose tissue using RNA-Seq methodology. In LM, 768 transcripts were differentially expressed (DE), 327 with higher expression in low tADG and 441 with higher expression in high tADG pigs (q < 0.10). Expression patterns measured in LM by RNA-Seq were verified in 30 of 32 transcripts using quantitative PCR. No DE transcripts were identified in adipose tissue. To identify biological functions potentially underlying the effects of tADG on skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology, functional annotation analysis of the DE transcripts was conducted using DAVID and Pathway Studio analytic tools. The group of DE genes with lower expression in LM of low tADG pigs was enriched in genes with functions related to muscle contraction, glucose metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, muscle development, and response to hormone stimulus (enrichment score > 1.3). The list of DE genes with higher expression in low tADG LM was enriched in genes with functions related to protein catabolism (enrichment score > 1.3). Analysis of known gene-gene interactions identified

  5. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity.

  6. [Fiber morphometry of the external intercostal muscle. Comparison of dominant and nondominant sides in patients with severe COPD].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fuentes, M A; Gea, J; Pallás, O; Gallego, F; Félez, M A; Broquetas, J M

    1998-04-01

    The general morphometric characteristics of the external intercostal muscle (EIM) of patients with chronic respiratory disease have been well described. Because this muscle is highly accessible, it can provide an ideal model for longitudinal studies using consecutive biopsies of both sides. Whether or not the EIM fiber phenotype is homogeneous on dominant (D) and non dominant (ND) sides is unknown, however. To evaluate possible structural differences in right and left EIM in patients with COPD, eight patients (63 +/- 7 years of age) were enrolled. Lung function, respiratory muscle power, general muscle power and nutritional state were evaluated. Biopsies of the fifth EIM were taken from both sides. Specimens were processed in parallel manner to determine conventional morphometry (hematoxylin-eosin staining), including minimum diameter (Dm) and fiber area (Ar) in cross sections. Fibers were typed by ATPase (at pH 4.2, 4.6 and 9.4) and NADH-TR staining. Nutrition was normal in all patients. All patients had severe COPD (FEV1 27 +/- 7% of reference, limits 13 to 38% of reference) with air entrapment (RV 163 +/- 36% of reference, limits 181 to 276% of reference). None of the patients showed respiratory insufficiency at rest (PaO2 72 +/- 7 mmHg). Peripheral musculoskeletal power measured by manual dynamometer showed no significant right-left differences: D 29 +/- 2 and ND 28 +/- 3 dynes. Morphometric study of 16 muscle specimens showed no significant differences between fiber size on D and ND sides. DmD was 47 +/- 10 microns and ArD, was 2,595 +/- 1,249 microns2. DmD was 49 +/- 9 microns and ArD was 2,636 +/- 953 microns2. Likewise, no significant differences were found between D and ND fiber types: type ID 51 +/- 4% and type IID 49 +/- 5% versus type IND 52 +/- 4% and type IIND 48 +/- 4%. EIM on N and ND sides is homogeneous at the fifth intercostal space. This finding, along with the scarcely invasive nature of the technique for collecting specimens leads us to

  7. Comparison of regional skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in college athletes and sedentary control subjects using quantitative BOLD MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Qiu, Maolin; Pal, Prasanta; Varga, Tyler; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-08-01

    Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging permits noninvasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. We hypothesized that BOLD imaging would allow for regional evaluation of differences in skeletal muscle oxygenation between athletes and sedentary control subjects, and dynamic BOLD responses to ischemia (i.e., proximal cuff occlusion) and reactive hyperemia (i.e., rapid cuff deflation) would relate to lower extremity function, as assessed by jumping ability. College football athletes (linemen, defensive backs/wide receivers) were compared to sedentary healthy controls. BOLD signal of the gastrocnemius, soleus, anterior tibialis, and peroneus longus was assessed for peak hyperemic value (PHV), time to peak (TTP), minimum ischemic value (MIV), and time to recovery (TTR). Significantly higher PHVs were identified in athletes versus controls for the gastrocnemius (linemen, 15.8 ± 9.1%; defensive backs/wide receivers, 17.9 ± 5.1%; controls, 7.4 ± 3.5%), soleus (linemen, 25.9 ± 11.5%; backs/receivers, 22.0 ± 9.4%; controls, 12.9 ± 5.8%), and anterior tibialis (linemen, 12.8 ± 5.3%; backs/receivers, 12.6 ± 3.9%; controls, 7.7 ± 4.0%), whereas no differences in PHV were found for the peroneus longus (linemen, 14.1 ± 6.9%; backs/receivers, 11.7 ± 4.6%; controls, 9.0 ± 4.9%). In all subject groups, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited the lowest MIVs during cuff occlusion. No differences in TTR were found between muscles for any subject group. PHV of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly and positively related to maximal vertical (r = 0.56, P = 0.002) and broad jump (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). These results suggest that BOLD MR imaging is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating differences in tissue oxygenation of specific muscles between active and sedentary individuals, and peak BOLD responses may relate to functional capacity. PMID:27535483

  8. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  9. Comparison of the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure left atrial volume.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Erick; Durst, Ronen; Rosito, Guido A; Thangaroopan, Molly; Kumar, Simi; Tournoux, Francois; Chan, Raymond C; Hung, Judy; Hoffmann, Udo; Abbara, Suhny; Brady, Thomas; Cury, Ricardo C

    2010-07-01

    Left atrial (LA) volume is an important prognostic factor in cardiovascular disease. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is an emerging cardiac imaging modality; however, its accuracy in measuring the LA volume has not been well studied. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of MDCT in quantifying the LA volume. A total of 48 patients underwent MDCT and 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2DE) on the same day. The area-length and Simpson's methods were used to obtain the 2D echocardiographic LA volume. The LA volume assessment by MDCT was obtained using the modified Simpson's method. Four artificial phantoms were created, and their true volume was assessed by an independent observer using both imaging modalities. The correlation between the LA volume by MDCT and 2DE was significant (r = 0.68). The mean 2D echocardiographic LA volume was lower than the LA volume obtained with MDCT (2DE 79 +/- 37 vs MDCT 103 +/- 32, p <0.05). In the phantom experiment, the volume obtained using MDCT and 2DE correlated significantly with the true volume (r = 0.97, p <0.05 vs r = 0.96, p <0.05, respectively). However, the mean 2D echocardiographic phantom volume was 16% lower than the true volume (2DE, Simpson's method 53 +/- 24 vs the true volume 61 +/- 24, p <0.05). The mean volume calculated using MDCT did not differ from the true volume (MDCT 60 +/- 21 vs true volume 61 +/- 24, p = NS). 2DE appeared to systematically underestimate the LA volume compared to phantom and cardiac MDCT, suggesting that different normal cutoff values should be used for each modality. In conclusion, LA volume quantification using MDCT is an accurate and feasible method. PMID:20609656

  10. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  11. A comparison of the electrical properties and morphological characteristics of the smooth muscle of the rat and guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Goto, K; Millecchia, L L; Westfall, D P; Fleming, W W

    1977-04-25

    Microelectrodes were used to compare a variety of electrophysiological parameters of the rat and guinea-pig vas deferens. In comparison to the guinea pig, spontaneous junction potentials in the rat tissue were of shorter duration and occurred with greater frequency and amplitude. Action potentials induced by nerve stimulation could be observed in the smooth muscle of both species. However, in the rat tissue the majority of action potentials were generated in the impaled cell while 60% of the action potentials in the guinea-pig vas deferens were propagated. When current was intracellularly applied, spike potentials could be induced in approximately 90% of the cells of the rat vas deferens but in less than 10% of the cells of the guinea-pig vas deferens. The space constant was 1.48 mm for the guinea-pig vas deferens, but less than 0.5 mm for the rat vas deferens. Electromicroscopic examination of the homologous tissues indicates that the differences in electrical properties can be accounted for in part by differences in morphology. The incidence and intimacy of neuromuscular contacts was greater in the rat vas deferens while the incidence of nexuses between smooth muscle cells was greater in the guinea-pig tissue. PMID:559295

  12. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    PubMed

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates.

  13. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  14. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  15. Comparison of four specific dynamic office chairs with a conventional office chair: impact upon muscle activation, physical activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, Rolf P; Kraft, Kathrin; Groenesteijn, Liesbeth; Krause, Frank; Berger, Helmut; Vink, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged and static sitting postures provoke physical inactivity at VDU workplaces and are therefore discussed as risk factors for the musculoskeletal system. Manufacturers have designed specific dynamic office chairs featuring structural elements which promote dynamic sitting and therefore physical activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of four specific dynamic chairs on erector spinae and trapezius EMG, postures/joint angles and physical activity intensity (PAI) compared to those of a conventional standard office chair. All chairs were fitted with sensors for measurement of the chair parameters (backrest inclination, forward and sideward seat pan inclination), and tested in the laboratory by 10 subjects performing 7 standardized office tasks and by another 12 subjects in the field during their normal office work. Muscle activation revealed no significant differences between the specific dynamic chairs and the reference chair. Analysis of postures/joint angles and PAI revealed only a few differences between the chairs, whereas the tasks performed strongly affected the measured muscle activation, postures and kinematics. The characteristic dynamic elements of each specific chair yielded significant differences in the measured chair parameters, but these characteristics did not appear to affect the sitting dynamics of the subjects performing their office tasks.

  16. A comparison of muscle stiffness and musculoarticular stiffness of the knee joint in young athletic males and females.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; De Vito, Giuseppe; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Fong, Daniel T P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the gender-specific differences in peak torque (PT), muscle stiffness (MS) and musculoarticular stiffness (MAS) of the knee joints in a young active population. Twenty-two male and twenty-two female recreational athletes participated. PT of the knee joint extensor musculature was assessed on an isokinetic dynamometer, MS of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle was measured in both relaxed and contracted conditions, and knee joint MAS was quantified using the free oscillation technique. Significant gender differences were observed for all dependent variables. Females demonstrated less normalized PT (mean difference (MD)=0.4Nm/kg, p=0.005, η(2)=0.17), relaxed MS (MD=94.2N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.53), contracted MS (MD=162.7N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.53) and MAS (MD=422.1N/m, p<.001, η(2)=0.23) than males. MAS increased linearly with the external load in both genders with males demonstrating a significantly higher slope (p=0.019) than females. The observed differences outlined above may contribute to the higher knee joint injury incidence and prevalence in females when compared to males.

  17. The treatment of muscle tension dysphonia: a comparison of two treatment techniques by means of an objective multiparameter approach.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, Kristiane M; De Bodt, Marc; Dhaeseleer, Evelien; Wuyts, Floris; Claeys, Sofie

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to measure the effectiveness of two treatment techniques--vocalization with abdominal breath support and manual circumlaryngeal therapy (MCT)--in patients with muscle tension dysphonia (MTD). The vocal quality before and after the two treatment techniques was measured by means of the dysphonia severity index (DSI), which is designed to establish an objective and quantitative correlate of the perceived vocal quality. The DSI is based on the weighted combination of the following set of voice measurements: maximum phonation time (MPT), highest frequency, lowest intensity, and jitter. The repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant difference between the objective overall vocal quality before and after MCT. No significant differences were measured between the objective overall vocal quality before and after vocalization with abdominal breath support. This study showed evidence that MCT is an effective treatment technique for patients with elevated laryngeal position, increased laryngeal muscle tension, and MTD. The precise way in which MCT has an effect on vocal quality has not been addressed in this experiment, but merits study. Further research into this topic could focus on electromyography (EMG) recordings in relation to vocal improvements with larger sample of subjects. PMID:19497709

  18. COMPARISON BETWEEN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ESTIMATES OF EXTRACRANIAL CEREBROSPINAL FLUID VOLUME AND PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, László Z; Bajzik, Gábor; Garamvölgyi, Rita; Petneházy, Örs; Lassó, András; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Lőrincz, Borbála; Sótonyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Dosages for myelography procedures in dogs are based on a hypothetical proportional relationship between bodyweight and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Anecdotal radiographic evidence and recent studies have challenged the existence of such a defined relationship in dogs. The objectives of this prospective cross-sectional study were to describe CSF volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of clinically healthy dogs, measure the accuracy of MRI CSF volumes, and compare MRI CSF volumes with dog physical measurements. A sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolution MRI examination of the central nervous system was carried out on 12 healthy, male mongrel dogs, aged between 3 and 5 years with a bodyweight range of 7.5-35.0 kg. The images were processed with image analysis freeware (3D Slicer) in order to calculate the volume of extracranial CSF. Cylindrical phantoms of known volume were included in scans and used to calculate accuracy of MRI volume estimates. The accuracy of MRI volume estimates was 99.8%. Extracranial compartment CSF volumes ranged from 20.21 to 44.06 ml. Overall volume of the extracranial CSF increased linearly with bodyweight, but the proportional volume (ml/bodyweight kilograms) of the extracranial CSF was inversely proportional to bodyweight. Relative ratios of volumes in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions were constant. Findings indicated that the current standard method of using body weight to calculate dosages of myelographic contrast agents in dogs may need to be revised. PMID:26311617

  19. Measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J M; Roberts, N; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method for measurement of the cross sectional area and volume of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with stereology, and to compare the results of measurements obtained by the MRI method with those obtained by the conventional method of static B-mode ultrasound in order to evaluate whether MRI is a reliable alternative to ultrasound. METHODS: A preliminary MRI study was undertaken on a single female volunteer in order to optimise the scanning technique and sampling design for estimating the muscle volume using the Cavalieri method. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the method comparison study. Each volunteer underwent static B-mode ultrasonography, immediately followed by MRI. The cross sectional area of the quadriceps femoris was estimated at the junction of the proximal one third and distal two thirds of the thigh, and seven systematic sections of the thigh were obtained in order to estimate muscle volume by both modalities. RESULTS: Seven sections through the muscle are required to achieve a coefficient of error of 4-5%. There was no significant difference in the cross sectional area estimates or volume estimates when ultrasound and MRI were compared. CONCLUSION: Muscle cross sectional area and volume can be measured without bias by MRI in conjunction with stereological methods and the method is a reliable alternative to static B-mode ultrasound for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9132215

  20. Comparison of pressure-volume loop and echocardiographic measures of diastolic function in patients with a single-ventricle physiology.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shahryar M; Butts, Ryan J; Buckley, Jason; Hlavacek, Anthony M; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Khambadkone, Sachin; Baker, G Hamilton

    2014-08-01

    Echocardiographic measurements of diastolic function have not been validated against invasive pressure-volume loop (PVL) analysis in the single-ventricle population. The authors hypothesized that echocardiographic measures of diastolic function would correlate with PVL indices of diastolic function in patients with a single-ventricle physiology. The conductance-derived PVL measures of diastolic function included the isovolumic relaxation time constant (τ), the maximum rate of ventricular pressure decline (peak -dP/dt), and a measure of passive diastolic stiffness (μ). The echocardiographic measures included Doppler inflow patterns of the dominant atrioventricular valve (DAVV), tissue Doppler velocities (TDI) at the lateral (ventricular free wall) component of the DAVV annulus, and the TDI-derived isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT'). The correlation between PVL and echocardiographic measures was examined. The study enrolled 13 patients at various stages of surgical palliation. The median age of the patients was 3 years (range 3 months to 19 years). τ correlated well with Doppler E:A (r = 0.832; p = 0.005), lateral E:E' (r = 0.747; p = 0.033), and IVRT' (r = 0.831; p = 0.001). Peak -dP/dt also was correlated with IVRT' (r = 0.609; p = 0.036), and μ also was correlated with IVRT' (r = 0.884; p = 0.001). This study represents the first-ever comparison of diastolic echocardiographic and PVL indices in a single-ventricle population. The findings show that Doppler E:A, lateral E:E', and IVRT' correlate well with PVL measures of diastolic function. This study supports further validation of echocardiographic measures of diastolic function versus PVL measures of diastolic function in the single-ventricle population.

  1. Comparison of Recovery Strategies on Maximal Force-Generating Capacity and Electromyographic Activity Level of the Knee Extensor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Context: With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. Objective: To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Interventions : Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. Results: The reduction in PT observed after electromyo-stimulation was less than that seen after passive (P < .001) or active recovery (P < .001). The reduction in PT was less after passive recovery than after active recovery (P < .001). The maximal EMG activity level observed after electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P < .05). Conclusions: Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue. PMID:21944070

  2. Profile of muscle tissue gene expression specific to water buffalo: Comparison with domestic cattle by genome array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Hongbao; Gui, Linsheng; Wang, Hongcheng; Mei, Chugang; Zhang, Yaran; Xu, Huaichao; Jia, Cunlin; Zan, Linsen

    2016-02-10

    In contrast with the past, the water buffalo is now not only a draft animal, but also an important food source of milk and meat. It is increasingly apparent that the water buffalo have huge potential for meat production, but its breeding needs to be investigated. Regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the meat quality difference between the buffalo (Bubalus bulabis) and yellow cattle (Bos taurus), 12 chemical-physical characteristics related to the meat quality of longissimus thoracis muscles (LTM) have been compared at the age of 36 months. Intramuscular lipid and b* (yellowness) were greater in cattle than the buffalo, whereas a* (redness) was greater in the buffalo. Gene expression profiles were constructed by bovine genome array. A total of 8884 and 10,960 probes were detected in buffalo and cattle, respectively, with 1580 genes being differentially expressed. Over 400 probes were upregulated and nearly 1200 were downregulated in LTM of the buffalo, most being involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, cholesterol homeostasis, regulation of transcription, response to hypoxia, and glycolysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the microarray data. Enriched GO analyses of highly expressed genes in LTM showed that protein biosynthesis, striated muscle contraction, iron homeostasis, iron transport, glycolysis and glucose metabolism were similar between the buffalo and cattle. High protein content, low fat content and deep meat color of buffalo LTM may be closely associated with the increased expression of genes involved in cholesterol and iron homeostasis, while also reducing the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and protein oxidative phosphorylation. These results establish the groundwork for further studies on buffalo meat quality and will be beneficial in improving water buffalo breeding by molecular biotechnology. PMID:26598327

  3. A ground-based comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Kirk L.; Hackney, Kyle J.; De Witt, John K.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Goetchius, Elizabeth L.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2013-11-01

    IntroductionInternational Space Station (ISS) crewmembers perform muscle strength and endurance testing pre- and postflight to assess the physiologic adaptations associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity. However, a reliable and standardized method to document strength changes in-flight has not been established. To address this issue, a proprietary dynamometer, the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) has been developed and flown aboard the ISS. The aims of this ground-based investigation were to: (1) evaluate the test-retest reliability of MARES and (2) determine its agreement with a commercially available isokinetic dynamometer previously used for pre- and postflight medical testing. MethodsSix males (179.5±4.7 cm; 82.0±8.7 kg; 31.3±4.0 yr) and four females (163.2±7.3 cm; 63.2±1.9 kg; 32.3±6.8 yr) completed two testing sessions on a HUMAC NORM isokinetic dynamometer (NORM) and two sessions on MARES using a randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over design. Peak torque values at 60° and 180° s-1 were calculated from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF) for each session. Total work at 180° s-1 was determined from the area under the torque versus displacement curve during 20 maximal repetitions of KE and KF. ResultsIntraclass correlation coefficients were relatively high for both devices (0.90-0.99). Only one dependent measure, KE peak torque at 60° s-1 exhibited good concordance between devices (ρ=0.92) and a small average difference (0.9±17.3 N m). ConclusionMARES demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability and thus should serve as a good tool to monitor in-flight strength changes. However, due to poor agreement with NORM, it is not advisable to compare absolute values obtained on these devices.

  4. A comparison of muscle damage, soreness and performance following a simulated contact and non-contact team sport activity circuit.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tarveen K R; Guelfi, Kym J; Landers, Grant; Dawson, Brian; Bishop, David

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to compare the effect of a simulated team sport activity circuit (reflective of the activity demands of Australian football) either with or without body 'contact' on muscle soreness, damage, and performance when the circuit was repeated 48 h later. Eleven male, team-sport athletes completed a 'non-contact' (NCON) and a 'contact' (CON) version of the team sport activity circuit in a crossover design with at least 1 week between trials. The effect of CON and NCON on repeated 15m sprint and vertical jump performance was assessed by completing the same version of the circuit 48 h after the initial trial. The effect on perceived soreness and blood markers of muscle damage and inflammation was also determined. Subsequent performance was affected to a greater extent by CON, with both best and mean sprint times significantly slower 48h following CON (p<0.05), while performance was maintained after NCON. Best and mean vertical jump performance was significantly impaired following CON (p<0.05), while only best vertical jump was affected by NCON (p<0.05). Perceived soreness and pressure sensitivity were elevated following both NCON and CON (p<0.001); however, the increase in soreness was greater with CON (p=0.012). Both CON and NCON resulted in elevated serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase, while c-reactive protein increased following CON but not NCON. In conclusion, Greater perceived soreness and decrements in performance of the simulated team sport activity circuit when repeated 48 h later were observed following CON.

  5. Why are some mitochondria more powerful than others: insights from comparisons of muscle mitochondria from three terrestrial vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Turner, Nigel; Else, Paul L; Hulbert, A J

    2005-10-01

    We studied the molecular composition of muscle mitochondria to evaluate whether the contents of cytochromes or adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) or phospholipid acyl compositions reflect differences in mitochondrial oxidative capacities. We isolated mitochondria from three vertebrates of similar size and preferred temperature, the rat (Rattus norvegicus), the cane toad (Bufo marinus) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps). Mitochondrial oxidative capacities were higher in rats and cane toads than in bearded dragon, whether rates were expressed relative to protein, cytochromes or ANT. Inter-specific differences were least pronounced when rates were expressed relative to cytochrome A, a component of cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), or ANT. In mitochondria from rat and cane toad, cytochrome A was more abundant than C followed by B and then C(1), while in bearded dragon mitochondria, the cytochromes were present in roughly equal levels. Analysis of correlations between mitochondrial oxidative capacities and macromolecular components revealed that cytochrome A explained at least half of the intra- and inter-specific variability in substrate oxidation rates. ANT levels were an excellent correlate of state 3 rates while phospholipid contents were correlated with state 4 rates. As the % poly-unsaturation and the % 20:4n-6 in mitochondrial phospholipids were equivalent in toads and rats, and exceeded the levels in lizards, they may contribute to the inter-specific differences in oxidative capacities. We suggest that the numbers of CCO and ANT together with the poly-unsaturation of phospholipids explain the higher oxidative capacities in muscle mitochondria from rats and cane toads. PMID:16085440

  6. Profile of muscle tissue gene expression specific to water buffalo: Comparison with domestic cattle by genome array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Hongbao; Gui, Linsheng; Wang, Hongcheng; Mei, Chugang; Zhang, Yaran; Xu, Huaichao; Jia, Cunlin; Zan, Linsen

    2016-02-10

    In contrast with the past, the water buffalo is now not only a draft animal, but also an important food source of milk and meat. It is increasingly apparent that the water buffalo have huge potential for meat production, but its breeding needs to be investigated. Regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the meat quality difference between the buffalo (Bubalus bulabis) and yellow cattle (Bos taurus), 12 chemical-physical characteristics related to the meat quality of longissimus thoracis muscles (LTM) have been compared at the age of 36 months. Intramuscular lipid and b* (yellowness) were greater in cattle than the buffalo, whereas a* (redness) was greater in the buffalo. Gene expression profiles were constructed by bovine genome array. A total of 8884 and 10,960 probes were detected in buffalo and cattle, respectively, with 1580 genes being differentially expressed. Over 400 probes were upregulated and nearly 1200 were downregulated in LTM of the buffalo, most being involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, cholesterol homeostasis, regulation of transcription, response to hypoxia, and glycolysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the microarray data. Enriched GO analyses of highly expressed genes in LTM showed that protein biosynthesis, striated muscle contraction, iron homeostasis, iron transport, glycolysis and glucose metabolism were similar between the buffalo and cattle. High protein content, low fat content and deep meat color of buffalo LTM may be closely associated with the increased expression of genes involved in cholesterol and iron homeostasis, while also reducing the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and protein oxidative phosphorylation. These results establish the groundwork for further studies on buffalo meat quality and will be beneficial in improving water buffalo breeding by molecular biotechnology.

  7. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  8. Comparison of transcriptomic responses to pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) in heart of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L).

    PubMed

    Johansen, Lill-Heidi; Thim, Hanna L; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Afanasyev, Sergey; Strandskog, Guro; Taksdal, Torunn; Fremmerlid, Kjersti; McLoughlin, Marion; Jørgensen, Jorunn B; Krasnov, Aleksei

    2015-10-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) are viral diseases associated with SAV (salmonid alphavirus) and PRV (piscine reovirus), which induce systemic infections and pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L), resulting in severe morbidity and mortality. While general features of the clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of salmonid viral diseases are relatively well studied, much less is known about molecular mechanisms associated with immunity and disease-specific changes. In this study, transcriptomic analyses of heart tissue from PD and HSMI challenged Atlantic salmon were done, focusing on the mature phases of both diseases at respectively 28-35 and 42-77 days post infection. A large number of immune genes was activated in both trials with prevalence of genes associated with early innate antiviral responses, their expression levels being slightly higher in PD challenged fish. Activation of the IFN axis was in parallel with inflammatory changes that involved diverse humoral and cellular factors. Adaptive immune response genes were more pronounced in fish with HSMI, as suggested by increased expression of a large number of genes associated with differentiation and maturation of B lymphocytes and cytotoxic T cells. A similar down-regulation of non-immune genes such as myofiber and mitochondrial proteins between diseases was most likely reflecting myocardial pathology. A suite of genes important for cardiac function including B-type natriuretic peptide and four neuropeptides displayed differential expression between PD and HSMI. Comparison of results revealed common and distinct features and added to the understanding of both diseases at their mature phases with typical clinical pictures. A number of genes that showed disease-specific changes can be of interest for diagnostics.

  9. Comparison of pinaverium bromide, manganese chloride and D600 effects on electrical and mechanical activities in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mironneau, J; Lalanne, C; Mironneau, C; Savineau, J P; Lavie, J L

    1984-02-10

    The effects of pinaverium bromide, were compared with those of D600 and manganese chloride (Mn), on membrane potentials, ionic currents and isometric contractions in uterine smooth muscle strips from pregnant rats. Pinaverium bromide (10(-7) - 10(-6) M) depressed twitch contractions and K-contractures within 15-20 min while D600 (2 X 10(-6) M) and Mn (10(-3) M) abolished both contractions. D600 and pinaverium bromide were more potent inhibitors in K-depolarized preparations than in polarized tissues. At a supramaximal dose (10(-5) M), pinaverium bromide decreased the rate of rise, amplitude, and rate of repolarization of the action potential, and prolonged the potential duration. The inward Ca current was depressed and the reduction in Cai was responsible for the decrease in K current. Pinaverium bromide (10(-5) M) depressed the myometrial contractions induced in Ca-free solution by acetylcholine (10(-4) M) and by prolonged membrane depolarizations. Mn (2.5 X 10(-3) M) only reduced the Ach-induced contraction and D600 (10(-5) M) had no effect on intracellular Ca stores. The results indicate that pinaverium bromide has Ca channel blocking properties similar to those of currently used Ca antagonists; it may also exert an effect to depress contractions supported by intracellular Ca release. PMID:6325214

  10. Noninvasive optical diagnostics of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in skeletal muscle for comparison of electroporation and sonoporation efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošiūnas, Mindaugas; Kadikis, Roberts; Saknīte, Inga; Baltušnikas, Juozas; Kilikevičius, Audrius; Lihachev, Alexey; Petrovska, Ramona; Jakovels, Dainis; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2016-04-01

    We highlight the options available for noninvasive optical diagnostics of reporter gene expression in mouse tibialis cranialis muscle. An in vivo multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements has been used for the transcutaneous detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, providing information on location and duration of EGFP expression and allowing quantification of EGFP expression levels. For EGFP coding plasmid (pEGFP-Nuc Vector, 10 μg/50 ml) transfection, we used electroporation or ultrasound enhanced microbubble cavitation [sonoporation (SP)]. The transcutaneous EGFP fluorescence in live mice was monitored over a period of one year using the described parameters: area of EGFP positive fibers, integral intensity, and mean intensity of EGFP fluorescence. The most efficient transfection of EGFP coding plasmid was achieved, when one high voltage and four low voltage electric pulses were applied. This protocol resulted in the highest short-term and long-term EGFP expression. Other electric pulse protocols as well as SP resulted in lower fluorescence intensities of EGFP in the transfected area. We conclude that noninvasive multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements is a suitable method to estimate the dynamics and efficiency of reporter gene transfection in vivo.

  11. A comparison of human smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cells as potential cell sources for tissue-engineered vascular patches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Corin; Xie, Angela W; Emani, Sirisha; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Emani, Sitaram M; Wong, Joyce Y

    2012-05-01

    In pediatric patients requiring vascular reconstruction, the development of a cell-based tissue-engineered vascular patch (TEVP) has great potential to overcome current issues with nonliving graft materials. Determining the optimal cell source is especially critical to TEVP success. In this study, we compared the ability of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HuAoSMCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to form cell sheets on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) substrates. hMSCs treated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and ascorbic acid (AA) had higher expression of SMC-specific proteins compared to HuAoSMCs. hMSCs also had larger cell area and grew to confluence more quickly on PIPAAm than did HuAoSMCs. hMSCs typically formed cell sheets in 2-3 weeks and had greater wet tissue weight and collagen content compared with HuAoSMC sheets, which generally required growth for up to 5 weeks. Assays for calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the osteogenic potential of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs was low; however, Alcian Blue staining suggested high chondrogenic behavior of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs. Although hMSCs are promising for cell-based TEVPs in their ability to form robust tissue with significant extracellular matrix content, improved control over hMSC behavior will be required for long-term TEVP success.

  12. A comparison of self-hypnosis versus progressive muscle relaxation in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M; Molton, Ivan R; Raichle, Katherine A; Osborne, Travis L; Engel, Joyce M; Stoelb, Brenda L; Kraft, George H; Patterson, David R

    2009-04-01

    Twenty-two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic pain we recruited into a quasi-experimental trial comparing the effects of self-hypnosis training (HYP) with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on pain intensity and pain interference; 8 received HYP and the remaining 14 participants were randomly assigned to receive either HYP or PMR. HYP-condition participants reported significantly greater pre- to postsession as well as pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain and pain interference than PMR-condition participants, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Most of the participants in both conditions reported that they continued to use the skills they learned in treatment and experienced pain relief when they did so. General hypnotizability was not significantly related to treatment outcome, but treatment-outcome expectancy assessed before and after the first session was. The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS. PMID:19234967

  13. A Comparison of Self-Hypnosis Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Pain1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Molton, Ivan R.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Osborne, Travis L.; Engel, Joyce M.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Kraft, George H.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic pain we recruited into a quasi-experimental trial comparing the effects of self-hypnosis training (HYP) with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on pain intensity and pain interference; 8 received HYP and the remaining 14 participants were randomly assigned to receive either HYP or PMR. HYP-condition participants reported significantly greater pre- to postsession as well as pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain and pain interference than PMR-condition participants, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Most of the participants in both conditions reported that they continued to use the skills they learned in treatment and experienced pain relief when they did so. General hypnotizability was not significantly related to treatment outcome, but treatment-outcome expectancy assessed before and after the first session was. The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS. PMID:19234967

  14. A Comparison of Vaginal Pressures and Abdominal Muscle Thickness According to Childbirth Delivery Method during the Valsalva Maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haroo; Kak, Hwang-Bo; Kim, Boin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of childbirth delivery method on vaginal pressure and abdominal thickness during the Valsalva maneuver (VAL). [Subjects] Thirty healthy female volunteers (26–39 years of age) were selected for this research. Their delivery histories were: nulliparous 10, vaginal delivery 10, and Cesarean delivery 10. None of the participants had a history of incontinence. [Methods] In the crook-lying position, a perineometer probe was inserted into the vagina and the transducer was placed transversely on the right side of the body during the Valsalva maneuver. [Results] There were significant differences in the thickness of the transverses abdominis (TrA) between in all the groups rest and the Valsalva maneuver, and there were significant differences in the internus oblique (IO) in the nulliparous group. During the Valsalva maneuver, there were significant differences in the TrA between the nulliparous group and the vaginal delivery group, and there were significant differences in the IO between the nulliparous delivery group and the vaginal delivery group, and between the nulliparous group and the Cesarean section group. Delivery history changed vaginal pressure, and there were significant differences between the nulliparous group and the vaginal delivery group, and between the nulliparous group and the Cesarean delivery group. [Conclusion] Pregnancy and delivery method may affect pelvic floor and abdominal muscles during the Valsalva maneuver. PMID:24707104

  15. Comparison of neck and upper-limb muscle activities between able-bodied and paraplegic individuals during wheelchair propulsion on the ground.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, So Hyun; Lee, Chang-Ryeol

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles between able-bodied individuals and persons with paraplegia during wheelchair propulsion on the ground. [Subjects and Methods] The muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles of 8 normal individuals and 8 individuals with paraplegia were analyzed during wheelchair propulsion. The activities of the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, anterior/posterior deltoids, triceps brachii, extensor carpi radialis, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were assessed. [Results] The paraplegic group showed significantly higher sternocleidomastoid activity than the normal group. Latissimus dorsi activity was also higher in the paraplegia group than in the normal group, but the difference was not significant. There were no significant differences in the other muscle activities between groups. [Conclusion] Paraplegic patients tend to use the sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi muscles with greater degrees of activity. Therefore, physiotherapists should not overlook the treatment of these muscles for paraplegic patients who are long-term wheelchair users.

  16. Comparison of transesophageal echocardiographic and scintigraphic estimates of left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and ejection fraction in patients following coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanowicz, J.H.; Shaaban, M.J.; Cohen, N.H.; Cahalan, M.K.; Botvinick, E.H.; Chatterjee, K.; Schiller, N.B.; Dae, M.W.; Matthay, M.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a commonly used monitor of left ventricular (LV) function and filling during cardiac surgery. Its use is based on the assumption that changes in LV short-axis ID reflect changes in LV volume. To study the ability of TEE to estimate LV volume and ejection immediately following CABG, 10 patients were studied using blood pool scintigraphy, TEE, and thermodilution cardiac output (CO). A single TEE short-axis cross-sectional image of the LV at the midpapillary muscle level was used for area analysis. Between 1 and 5 h postoperatively, simultaneous data sets (scintigraphy, TEE, and CO) were obtained three to five times in each patient. End-diastolic (EDa) and end-systolic (ESa) areas were measured by light pen. Ejection fraction area (EFa) was calculated (EFa = (EDa - ESa)/EDa). When EFa was compared with EF by scintigraphy, correlation was good (r = 0.82 SEE = 0.07). EDa was taken as an indicator of LV volume and compared with LVEDVI which was derived from EF by scintigraphy and CO. Correlation between EDa and LVEDVI was fair (r = 0.74 SEE = 3.75). The authors conclude that immediately following CABG, a single cross-sectional TEE image provides a reasonable estimate of EF but not LVEDVI.

  17. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations. Part 1; Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and efficiency are studied for six nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme, cell-centered node-averaging schemes with and without clipping, and cell-centered schemes with unweighted, weighted, and approximately mapped least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Results from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The second class of tests are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes are less accurate, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to the complexity of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly

  18. Accuracy of three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound in uterus volume measurements; comparison with two-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Cemil; Jesacher, Klaus; Pölz, Werner

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the accuracy of 3-D uterus volume and to compare it with 2-D measurements. Transvaginal ultrasound (US) examinations were performed in 48 consecutive patients before hysterectomy. The examinations were stored digitally on an internal disk drive for subsequent measurements in virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) program. Immediately after the hysterectomy, the true volume was measured in a water bath. A total of 5 patients were excluded due to difficulty of identifying the borders of their uterus; 8 patients were excluded because of too large fibroids or diffuse hypertrophic enlargement of uterus (volume > 220 mL). Although the volumes estimated by the 3-D method were not significantly different (p = 0.126 first measurement, p = 0.561 second measurement), the volumes estimated by the 2-D method were significantly different (p = 0.005 first measurement, p = 0.012 second measurement). The mean error rates of the two 3-D volume measurements by the same observer were 7.4% and 7.9%, and they were 22.2% and 21.0% for the 2-D volume measurements. It may be concluded that the volume of the uterus can be measured more accurately by 3-D US than by 2-D US.

  19. A Ground-Based Comparison of the Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) and a Standard Isokinetic Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, K. J.; English, K. L.; Redd, E.; DeWitt, J. K.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: 1) To compare the test-to-test reliability of Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System (MARES) with a standard laboratory isokinetic dynamometer (ISOK DYN) and; 2) to determine if measures of peak torque and total work differ between devices. METHODS: Ten subjects (6M, 4F) completed two trials on both MARES and an ISOK DYN in a counterbalanced order. Peak torque values at 60 deg & 180 deg / s were obtained from five maximal repetitions of knee extension (KE) and knee flexion (KF). Total work at 180 deg / s was determined from the area under the torque vs. displacement curve during twenty maximal repetitions of KE and KF. Reliability of measures within devices was interpreted from the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and compared between devices using the ratio of the within-device standard deviations. Indicators of agreement for the two devices were evaluated from: 1) a calculation of concordance (rho) and; 2) the correlation between the mean of measures versus the delta difference between measures (m u vs delta). RESULTS: For all outcome measures ICCs were high for both the ISOK DYN (0.95-0.99) and MARES (0.90-0.99). However, ratios of the within-device standard deviation were 1.3 to 4.3 times higher on MARES. On average, a wide range (3.3 to 1054 Nm) of differences existed between the values obtained. Only KE peak torque measured at 60 deg & 180 deg / s showed similarities between devices (rho = 0.91 & 0.87; Pearson's r for m u vs delta = -0.22 & -0.37, respectively). CONCLUSION: Although MARES was designed for use in microgravity it was quite reliable during ground-based testing. However, MARES was consistently more variable than an ISOK DYN. Future longitudinal studies evaluating a change in isokinetic peak torque or total work should be limited within one device.

  20. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training. PMID:15705030

  1. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training.

  2. Estimation of virus density in sewage effluents by two counting techniques: comparison of precisions as a function of inoculum volume.

    PubMed

    Hugues, B; Pietri, C; Andre, M

    1985-12-01

    Two titration methods for the quantification of viruses present in the environment are compared--plaque counting and determination of the most probable number with a large number of inocula at each dilution. Titration of virus suspensions and of sewage samples showed that, for a given volume of inoculum, in most cases there was no statistically significant difference between the virus titres given by the two methods. The precision of the results was the same for the two methods. When the volume of inoculum used at each dilution differed from one method to another, the width of the confidence interval increased as the volume of inoculum decreased.

  3. A preliminary comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT-1 HRV multispectral data for estimating coniferous forest volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.; Wang, S.; Isaacson, Dennis L.; Paine, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Digital Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Satellite Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) High Resolution Visible (HRV) images of coniferous forest canopies were compared in their relationship to forest wood volume using correlation and regression analyses. Significant inverse relationships were found between softwood volume and the spectral bands from both sensors (P less than 0.01). The highest correlations were between the log of softwood volume and the near-infrared bands (HRV band 3, r = -0.89; TM band 4, r = -0.83).

  4. The comparison of the immediate effects of application of the suboccipital muscle inhibition and self-myofascial release techniques in the suboccipital region on short hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the effect of performing the suboccipital muscle inhibition (SMI) and self-myofascial release (SMFR) techniques in the suboccipital area on the flexibility of the hamstring. [Subjects] Fifty persons with short hamstrings participated in this research. According to the results of the finger-floor distance (FFD) test, the subjects were allocated to SMI and SMFR groups of 25 subjects each. [Methods] The SMI and SMFR techniques were applied to the groups. For the analysis, we used the FFD test and the straight leg raise (SLR) test for the flexibility of hamstring. The evaluator was blindfolded. [Results] In the SMI group, FFD, SLR, and PA were significantly changed after the intervention, and in the SMFR group, there was a significant change in SLR after the intervention. In a comparison between the groups, FED was found to be significantly increased in the SMI group. [Conclusion] Application of the SMI and SMFR to persons with short hamstrings resulted in immediate increases in flexibility of the hamstring. However, we could see that the SMI technique was more effective. PMID:25642072

  5. The comparison of the immediate effects of application of the suboccipital muscle inhibition and self-myofascial release techniques in the suboccipital region on short hamstring.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the effect of performing the suboccipital muscle inhibition (SMI) and self-myofascial release (SMFR) techniques in the suboccipital area on the flexibility of the hamstring. [Subjects] Fifty persons with short hamstrings participated in this research. According to the results of the finger-floor distance (FFD) test, the subjects were allocated to SMI and SMFR groups of 25 subjects each. [Methods] The SMI and SMFR techniques were applied to the groups. For the analysis, we used the FFD test and the straight leg raise (SLR) test for the flexibility of hamstring. The evaluator was blindfolded. [Results] In the SMI group, FFD, SLR, and PA were significantly changed after the intervention, and in the SMFR group, there was a significant change in SLR after the intervention. In a comparison between the groups, FED was found to be significantly increased in the SMI group. [Conclusion] Application of the SMI and SMFR to persons with short hamstrings resulted in immediate increases in flexibility of the hamstring. However, we could see that the SMI technique was more effective.

  6. The comparison of the immediate effects of application of the suboccipital muscle inhibition and self-myofascial release techniques in the suboccipital region on short hamstring.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han; Park, Du-Jin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to research the effect of performing the suboccipital muscle inhibition (SMI) and self-myofascial release (SMFR) techniques in the suboccipital area on the flexibility of the hamstring. [Subjects] Fifty persons with short hamstrings participated in this research. According to the results of the finger-floor distance (FFD) test, the subjects were allocated to SMI and SMFR groups of 25 subjects each. [Methods] The SMI and SMFR techniques were applied to the groups. For the analysis, we used the FFD test and the straight leg raise (SLR) test for the flexibility of hamstring. The evaluator was blindfolded. [Results] In the SMI group, FFD, SLR, and PA were significantly changed after the intervention, and in the SMFR group, there was a significant change in SLR after the intervention. In a comparison between the groups, FED was found to be significantly increased in the SMI group. [Conclusion] Application of the SMI and SMFR to persons with short hamstrings resulted in immediate increases in flexibility of the hamstring. However, we could see that the SMI technique was more effective. PMID:25642072

  7. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  8. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Myrehaug, Sten; Chan, Gordon; Craig, Tim; Weinberg, Vivian; Cheng, Chun; Roach, Mack; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  9. Two-dimensional tissue tracking: a novel echocardiographic technique to measure left atrial volume: comparison with biplane area length method and real time three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bo-Wen; Yu, Chan; Xu, Li-Long; Li, Peng; Xu, Ke; Pan, Mei; Wang, Bei

    2014-07-01

    Enlargement of the left atrium is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, and an accurate, convenient imaging modality is necessary for clinical practice. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of a novel imaging technique, two-dimensional tissue tracking (2DTT), for assessment of left atrial (LA) volume and function and to compare its correlation and agreement with biplane area length (AL) method and real time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE). A total of 105 patients prospectively underwent 2DTT, AL and RT3DE. The LA volume index (LAVI) and emptying fraction were measured. In addition, intra- and inter-observer agreement were calculated by using the intraclass correlation coefficient. There were no significant differences in LAVI and emptying fraction measured by 2DTT in comparison with those made by AL or RT3DE, furthermore Bland-Altman analysis showed that 2DTT had significantly better agreement for LAVI and emptying fraction with AL and RT3DE. 2DTT also exhibited smaller intra- and inter-observer variability as compared with AL or RT3DE. Furthermore, the time to measure LA volume and acquire time-volume curve was significantly less by 2DTT than that by RT3DE (U = 49.00, P < 0.001). These observations suggest that the 2DTT could provide valuable information which is consistent with the standard AL and RT3DE measurements for LAVI and function with potentially lower intra- and inter-observer variability.

  10. Comparison of the effect of volume conduction on EEG coherence with the effect of field spread on MEG coherence.

    PubMed

    Winter, William R; Nunez, Paul L; Ding, Jian; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2007-09-20

    We analyzed models of volume conduction and magnetic field spread to account for aspects of spatial structure in electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) coherence. The head volume conduction model consisted of three confocal ellipsoids, representing three layers (brain, skull, and scalp) with different tissue conductivities, while the magnetic field model follows from the Biot-Savart law in a spherically symmetric medium. Source models were constructed based on magnetic resonance imaging data from three subjects, approximating neocortical current source distributions as dipoles oriented perpendicular to the local cortical surface. Assuming that every source is uncorrelated to every other source, coherence between sensors due to volume conduction and field-spread effects was estimated. Spatial properties of the model coherences were then compared with simultaneously recorded spontaneous EEG and MEG. In both models and experimental data, EEG and MEG coherence was elevated between closely spaced channels. At very large channel separations, the field-spread effect on MEG coherence appears smaller than the volume conduction effect on EEG coherence. In EEG coherence studies, surface Laplacian methods can be used to remove volume conduction effects. With single-coil magnetometers, MEG coherences are free of field effects only for sensor pairs separated by more than 20 cm. Model coherences resemble most high-frequency (e.g. >20 Hz) data; volume conduction and field-spread effects are independent of frequency, suggesting mostly uncorrelated sources in these bands. High-frequency EEG and MEG coherence can evidently serve as an estimate of coherence effects due to volume conduction and field effects, when source and head models are not available for individual subjects. PMID:17607723

  11. Morphometry of human thigh muscles. Determination of fascicle architecture by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, S H; Engstrom, C M; Loeb, G E

    1993-01-01

    A previous investigation suggested that striation patterns spanning individual muscles in longitudinally oriented MR images may represent the orientation of its fascicles. In this study, we confirmed that these striation patterns could be used to infer fascicle orientation and to compute other architectural features of muscles from MR images. The volumes of 14 muscles within a cadaveric thigh were shown to be estimated accurately from cross-sectional MR images by comparison with direct measures from muscle mass. The angles of striations were measured at several positions within vastus medialis and semimembranosus from sagittal and frontal-plane MR images. Mathematical techniques were developed to infer the 3-dimensional orientation of fascicles based on these striation angles. The angle of striations in a 3rd oblique plane was shown to agree with mathematical predictions based on these computed orientations. The pennation angle, defined as the angle between the fascicles and the line of action of the muscle, predicted from the MR images, was similar to directly measured values. Interestingly, the pennation angle of these fascicles varied along the length of the muscle; in vastus medialis, pennation angle ranged from 5 degrees to 50 degrees in a proximodistal direction. Procedures were developed and validated to compute fascicle length by projection of fascicle orientation across the 3D shape of the muscles. The use of MR images to estimate muscle morphometry could improve greatly the predictive capabilities of musculoskeletal modelling by reducing the number of unknown model parameters. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8376199

  12. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 1, Third comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive wastes in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This volume contains an overview of WIPP performance assessment and a preliminary comparison with the long-term requirements of the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B).

  13. Comparison of changes in the contraction of the lateral abdominal muscles between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and breathe held at the maximum expiratory level.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryohei; Watanabe, Susumu

    2012-10-01

    The abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) is commonly used as a fundamental component of lumbar stabilization training programs. One potential limitation of lumbar stabilization programs is that it can be difficult and time consuming to train people to perform the ADIM. The transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles are the most powerful muscles involved in expiration. However, little is known about the differences in the recruitment of the abdominal muscles between the ADIM and breathe held at maximum expiratory level (maximum expiration). The thickness of the TrA and IO muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging, and the activity of the EO muscle was measured by electromyography (EMG) in 33 healthy male performing the ADIM and maximum expiration. Maximum expiration produced a significant increase in the thickness of the TrA and IO muscles compared to the ADIM (p < 0.001). The EMG activity of the EO muscle was significantly higher during maximum expiration than during the ADIM (p < 0.001). The intensity of the EMG activity of the EO muscle was approximately 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction during maximum expiration. Thus, maximum expiration may be an effective method for training of co-activation of the lateral abdominal muscles.

  14. A Comparison of Surgical Invasions for Spinal Nerve Ligation with or without Paraspinal Muscle Removal in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats is one of the most popular models for studying neuropathic pain because of its high reproducibility. During the surgery, a part of the L5 paraspinal muscle is usually removed, which produces extra trauma and may potentially affect the physiological processes involved in neuropathic pain. To reduce the surgical trauma, the paraspinal muscle retraction was developed for exposure of the spinal nerve. The current study was aimed at comparing the surgical invasions between the L5 SNL models with paraspinal muscle removal or retraction. The results showed that both methods induced similar neuropathic pain behavior. However, the paraspinal muscle retraction group exhibited an average of 2.7 mg less blood loss than the muscle removal group. This group also showed a significantly lower increase in serum myoglobin and creatine phosphokinase levels on postoperative days 1 and 2, as well as a lower increase in interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels on postoperative day 1. The paraspinal muscle maintained normal morphological features following paraspinal muscle retraction. Our results indicate that the SNL rat model with paraspinal muscle retraction is a reliable physiological model that is reproducible, readily available, and less invasive than the model with muscle removal. PMID:27597970

  15. A Comparison of Surgical Invasions for Spinal Nerve Ligation with or without Paraspinal Muscle Removal in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats is one of the most popular models for studying neuropathic pain because of its high reproducibility. During the surgery, a part of the L5 paraspinal muscle is usually removed, which produces extra trauma and may potentially affect the physiological processes involved in neuropathic pain. To reduce the surgical trauma, the paraspinal muscle retraction was developed for exposure of the spinal nerve. The current study was aimed at comparing the surgical invasions between the L5 SNL models with paraspinal muscle removal or retraction. The results showed that both methods induced similar neuropathic pain behavior. However, the paraspinal muscle retraction group exhibited an average of 2.7 mg less blood loss than the muscle removal group. This group also showed a significantly lower increase in serum myoglobin and creatine phosphokinase levels on postoperative days 1 and 2, as well as a lower increase in interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels on postoperative day 1. The paraspinal muscle maintained normal morphological features following paraspinal muscle retraction. Our results indicate that the SNL rat model with paraspinal muscle retraction is a reliable physiological model that is reproducible, readily available, and less invasive than the model with muscle removal.

  16. A Comparison of Surgical Invasions for Spinal Nerve Ligation with or without Paraspinal Muscle Removal in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats is one of the most popular models for studying neuropathic pain because of its high reproducibility. During the surgery, a part of the L5 paraspinal muscle is usually removed, which produces extra trauma and may potentially affect the physiological processes involved in neuropathic pain. To reduce the surgical trauma, the paraspinal muscle retraction was developed for exposure of the spinal nerve. The current study was aimed at comparing the surgical invasions between the L5 SNL models with paraspinal muscle removal or retraction. The results showed that both methods induced similar neuropathic pain behavior. However, the paraspinal muscle retraction group exhibited an average of 2.7 mg less blood loss than the muscle removal group. This group also showed a significantly lower increase in serum myoglobin and creatine phosphokinase levels on postoperative days 1 and 2, as well as a lower increase in interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels on postoperative day 1. The paraspinal muscle maintained normal morphological features following paraspinal muscle retraction. Our results indicate that the SNL rat model with paraspinal muscle retraction is a reliable physiological model that is reproducible, readily available, and less invasive than the model with muscle removal. PMID:27597970

  17. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  18. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  19. A Comparison of Two Different High-Volume Image-Guided Injection Procedures for Patients With Chronic Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pragmatic Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Patrick C; Mahadevan, Dev; Bhatt, Raj; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a comparison evaluation of outcomes after 2 different high-volume image-guided injection (HVIGI) procedures performed under direct ultrasound guidance in patients with chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. In group A, the HVIGI involved high-volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 40 mL of saline) and no dry needling. In group B, the HVIGI involved a smaller volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 20 mL of saline) and dry needling of the Achilles tendon. A total of 34 patients were identified from the clinical records, with a mean overall age of 50.6 (range 26 to 83) years and an overall mean follow-up duration of 277 (range 49 to 596) days. The change between the preinjection and postinjection Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles scores of 33.4 ± 22.5 points in group A and 6.94 ± 22.2 points in group B, was statistically significant (p = .002). In group A, 3 patients (16.7%) required surgical treatment compared with 6 patients (37.5%) in group B requiring surgical treatment (p = .180). Our results indicated that a higher volume without dry needling compared with a lower volume with dry needling resulted in greater improvement in noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. However, confounding factors mean it is not possible to categorically state that this difference was solely due to different injection techniques. PMID:27286927

  20. A Comparison of Two Different High-Volume Image-Guided Injection Procedures for Patients With Chronic Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pragmatic Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Patrick C; Mahadevan, Dev; Bhatt, Raj; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a comparison evaluation of outcomes after 2 different high-volume image-guided injection (HVIGI) procedures performed under direct ultrasound guidance in patients with chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. In group A, the HVIGI involved high-volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 40 mL of saline) and no dry needling. In group B, the HVIGI involved a smaller volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 20 mL of saline) and dry needling of the Achilles tendon. A total of 34 patients were identified from the clinical records, with a mean overall age of 50.6 (range 26 to 83) years and an overall mean follow-up duration of 277 (range 49 to 596) days. The change between the preinjection and postinjection Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles scores of 33.4 ± 22.5 points in group A and 6.94 ± 22.2 points in group B, was statistically significant (p = .002). In group A, 3 patients (16.7%) required surgical treatment compared with 6 patients (37.5%) in group B requiring surgical treatment (p = .180). Our results indicated that a higher volume without dry needling compared with a lower volume with dry needling resulted in greater improvement in noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. However, confounding factors mean it is not possible to categorically state that this difference was solely due to different injection techniques.

  1. Variation in Brain Morphology of Intertidal Gobies: A Comparison of Methodologies Used to Quantitatively Assess Brain Volumes in Fish.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; Brown, Culum

    2015-01-01

    When correlating brain size and structure with behavioural and environmental characteristics, a range of techniques can be utilised. This study used gobiid fishes to quantitatively compare brain volumes obtained via three different methods; these included the commonly used techniques of histology and approximating brain volume to an idealised ellipsoid, and the recently established technique of X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). It was found that all three methods differed significantly from one another in their volume estimates for most brain lobes. The ellipsoid method was prone to over- or under-estimation of lobe size, histology caused shrinkage in the telencephalon, and although micro-CT methods generated the most reliable results, they were also the most expensive. Despite these differences, all methods depicted quantitatively similar relationships among the four different species for each brain lobe. Thus, all methods support the same conclusions that fishes inhabiting rock pool and sandy habitats have different patterns of brain organisation. In particular, fishes from spatially complex rock pool habitats were found to have larger telencephalons, while those from simple homogenous sandy shores had a larger optic tectum. Where possible we recommend that micro-CT be used in brain volume analyses, as it allows for measurements without destruction of the brain and fast identification and quantification of individual brain lobes, and minimises many of the biases resulting from the histology and ellipsoid methods. PMID:26183604

  2. Variation in Brain Morphology of Intertidal Gobies: A Comparison of Methodologies Used to Quantitatively Assess Brain Volumes in Fish.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; Brown, Culum

    2015-01-01

    When correlating brain size and structure with behavioural and environmental characteristics, a range of techniques can be utilised. This study used gobiid fishes to quantitatively compare brain volumes obtained via three different methods; these included the commonly used techniques of histology and approximating brain volume to an idealised ellipsoid, and the recently established technique of X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). It was found that all three methods differed significantly from one another in their volume estimates for most brain lobes. The ellipsoid method was prone to over- or under-estimation of lobe size, histology caused shrinkage in the telencephalon, and although micro-CT methods generated the most reliable results, they were also the most expensive. Despite these differences, all methods depicted quantitatively similar relationships among the four different species for each brain lobe. Thus, all methods support the same conclusions that fishes inhabiting rock pool and sandy habitats have different patterns of brain organisation. In particular, fishes from spatially complex rock pool habitats were found to have larger telencephalons, while those from simple homogenous sandy shores had a larger optic tectum. Where possible we recommend that micro-CT be used in brain volume analyses, as it allows for measurements without destruction of the brain and fast identification and quantification of individual brain lobes, and minimises many of the biases resulting from the histology and ellipsoid methods.

  3. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness. PMID:27190744

  4. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness.

  5. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3–L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness. PMID:27190744

  6. CT Pulmonary Angiography at Reduced Radiation Exposure and Contrast Material Volume Using Iterative Model Reconstruction and iDose4 Technique in Comparison to FBP

    PubMed Central

    Laqmani, Azien; Kurfürst, Maximillian; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess image quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) at reduced radiation exposure (RD-CTPA) and contrast medium (CM) volume using two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms (iDose4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in comparison to filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods 52 patients (body weight < 100 kg, mean BMI: 23.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent RD-CTPA (tube voltage: 80 kV; mean CTDIvol: 1.9 mGy) using 40 ml CM. Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR algorithms (iDose4 and IMR). Subjective and objective image quality and conspicuity of PE were assessed in central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Results Noise reduction of 55% was achieved with iDose4 and of 85% with IMR compared to FBP. Contrast-to-noise ratio significantly increased with iDose4 and IMR compared to FBP (p<0.05). Subjective image quality was rated significantly higher at IMR reconstructions in comparison to iDose4 and FBP. Conspicuity of central and segmental PE significantly improved with the use of IMR. In subsegmental arteries, iDose4 was superior to IMR. Conclusions CTPA at reduced radiation exposure and contrast medium volume is feasible with the use of IMR, which provides improved image quality and conspicuity of pulmonary embolism in central and segmental arteries. PMID:27611448

  7. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  8. Comparison of toe grip strength and muscle activities during maximal toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt.

    PubMed

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt and to examine the relationship between the differences in muscle activity and toe grip strength. [Subjects] The Subjects were 13 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion in the presence and absence of an ankle immobilization belt using electromyography. Activity in the following leg muscles was recorded: rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial head of the gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior. We then calculated the percent integrated electromyography during toe gripping. [Results] Toe grip strength and percent integrated electromyography of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle were significantly higher with ankle belt immobilization compared with without ankle belt immobilization. In addition, in the presence of ankle belt immobilization, the percent integrated electromyography of the tibialis anterior muscle and medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated a positive correlation with toe grip strength (r = 0.75 and r = 0.65, respectively). [Conclusion] These findings suggest that greater toe grip strength could be exerted in the presence of ankle belt immobilization. The measured values reflect the percent integrated electromyography of the crural muscles. Therefore, it was shown that toe grip strength should be measured in the presence of an immobilization belt.

  9. Metabolic responses to low temperature in fish muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga

    2004-05-01

    For most fish, body temperature is very close to that of the habitat. The diversity of thermal habitats exploited by fish as well as their capacity to adapt to thermal change makes them excellent organisms in which to examine the evolutionary and phenotypic responses to temperature. An extensive literature links cold temperatures with enhanced oxidative capacities in fish tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. Closer examination of inter-species comparisons (i.e. the evolutionary perspective) indicates that the proportion of muscle fibres occupied by mitochondria increases at low temperatures, most clearly in moderately active demersal species. Isolated muscle mitochondria show no compensation of protein-specific rates of substrate oxidation during evolutionary adaptation to cold temperatures. During phenotypic cold acclimation, mitochondrial volume density increases in oxidative muscle of some species (striped bass Morone saxatilis, crucian carp Carassius carassius), but remains stable in others (rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss). A role for the mitochondrial reticulum in distributing oxygen through the complex architecture of skeletal muscle fibres may explain mitochondrial proliferation. In rainbow trout, compensatory increases in the protein-specific rates of mitochondrial substrate oxidation maintain constant capacities except at winter extremes. Changes in mitochondrial properties (membrane phospholipids, enzymatic complement and cristae densities) can enhance the oxidative capacity of muscle in the absence of changes in mitochondrial volume density. Changes in the unsaturation of membrane phospholipids are a direct response to temperature and occur in isolated cells. This fundamental response maintains the dynamic phase behaviour of the membrane and adjusts the rates of membrane processes. However, these adjustments may have deleterious consequences. For fish living at low temperatures, the increased polyunsaturation of mitochondrial membranes should raise

  10. Metabolic responses to low temperature in fish muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga

    2004-05-01

    For most fish, body temperature is very close to that of the habitat. The diversity of thermal habitats exploited by fish as well as their capacity to adapt to thermal change makes them excellent organisms in which to examine the evolutionary and phenotypic responses to temperature. An extensive literature links cold temperatures with enhanced oxidative capacities in fish tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. Closer examination of inter-species comparisons (i.e. the evolutionary perspective) indicates that the proportion of muscle fibres occupied by mitochondria increases at low temperatures, most clearly in moderately active demersal species. Isolated muscle mitochondria show no compensation of protein-specific rates of substrate oxidation during evolutionary adaptation to cold temperatures. During phenotypic cold acclimation, mitochondrial volume density increases in oxidative muscle of some species (striped bass Morone saxatilis, crucian carp Carassius carassius), but remains stable in others (rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss). A role for the mitochondrial reticulum in distributing oxygen through the complex architecture of skeletal muscle fibres may explain mitochondrial proliferation. In rainbow trout, compensatory increases in the protein-specific rates of mitochondrial substrate oxidation maintain constant capacities except at winter extremes. Changes in mitochondrial properties (membrane phospholipids, enzymatic complement and cristae densities) can enhance the oxidative capacity of muscle in the absence of changes in mitochondrial volume density. Changes in the unsaturation of membrane phospholipids are a direct response to temperature and occur in isolated cells. This fundamental response maintains the dynamic phase behaviour of the membrane and adjusts the rates of membrane processes. However, these adjustments may have deleterious consequences. For fish living at low temperatures, the increased polyunsaturation of mitochondrial membranes should raise

  11. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  12. Study of the Career Intern Program. Task D Final Report, Volume I. A Comparison of Implementation Issues in YEDPA Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromquist, Nelly P.

    Five Youth Employment and Demonstration Program Act (YEDPA) programs are compared with the Career Intern Program (CIP) (an alternative high school program aiming to prepare dropouts, and those likely to abandon school, for employment) in terms of emphasizing issues related to program implementation. The YEDPA programs selected for comparison upon…

  13. Statistical issues in the comparison of quantitative imaging biomarker algorithms using pulmonary nodule volume as an example.

    PubMed

    Obuchowski, Nancy A; Barnhart, Huiman X; Buckler, Andrew J; Pennello, Gene; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Kim, Hyun J Grace; Reeves, Anthony P

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers are being used increasingly in medicine to diagnose and monitor patients' disease. The computer algorithms that measure quantitative imaging biomarkers have different technical performance characteristics. In this paper we illustrate the appropriate statistical methods for assessing and comparing the bias, precision, and agreement of computer algorithms. We use data from three studies of pulmonary nodules. The first study is a small phantom study used to illustrate metrics for assessing repeatability. The second study is a large phantom study allowing assessment of four algorithms' bias and reproducibility for measuring tumor volume and the change in tumor volume. The third study is a small clinical study of patients whose tumors were measured on two occasions. This study allows a direct assessment of six algorithms' performance for measuring tumor change. With these three examples we compare and contrast study designs and performance metrics, and we illustrate the advantages and limitations of various common statistical methods for quantitative imaging biomarker studies.

  14. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Kato, Takahiro; Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

  15. Separating chemical and excluded volume interactions of polyethylene glycols with native proteins: Comparison with PEG effects on DNA helix formation.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Irina A; Knowles, D B; Record, M Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Small and large PEGs greatly increase chemical potentials of globular proteins (μ2), thereby favoring precipitation, crystallization, and protein-protein interactions that reduce water-accessible protein surface and/or protein-PEG excluded volume. To determine individual contributions of PEG-protein chemical and excluded volume interactions to μ2 as functions of PEG molality m3 , we analyze published chemical potential increments μ23  = dμ2/dm3 quantifying unfavorable interactions of PEG (PEG200-PEG6000) with BSA and lysozyme. For both proteins, μ23 increases approximately linearly with the number of PEG residues (N3). A 1 molal increase in concentration of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups, for any chain-length PEG, increases μBSA by ∼2.7 kcal/mol and μlysozyme by ∼1.0 kcal/mol. These values are similar to predicted chemical interactions of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups with these protein components (BSA ∼3.3 kcal/mol, lysozyme ∼0.7 kcal/mol), dominated by unfavorable interactions with amide and carboxylate oxygens and counterions. While these chemical effects should be dominant for small PEGs, larger PEGS are expected to exhibit unfavorable excluded volume interactions and reduced chemical interactions because of shielding of PEG residues in PEG flexible coils. We deduce that these excluded volume and chemical shielding contributions largely compensate, explaining why the dependence of μ23 on N3 is similar for both small and large PEGs. PMID:25924886

  16. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  17. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  18. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, {>=}3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week <64 cm{sup 3} and V10 Gy/week <54 cm{sup 3}. At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week ({>=}64 vs. <64 cm{sup 3}) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is <50-60 cm{sup 3}. These data warrant prospective validation.

  19. Hyperammonemia results in reduced muscle function independent of muscle mass.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, John; Davuluri, Gangarao; Hill, Elizabeth Ann; Moyer, Michelle; Runkana, Ashok; Prayson, Richard; van Lunteren, Erik; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism of the nearly universal decreased muscle strength in cirrhosis is not known. We evaluated whether hyperammonemia in cirrhosis causes contractile dysfunction independent of reduced skeletal muscle mass. Maximum grip strength and muscle fatigue response were determined in cirrhotic patients and controls. Blood and muscle ammonia concentrations and grip strength normalized to lean body mass were measured in the portacaval anastomosis (PCA) and sham-operated pair-fed control rats (n = 5 each). Ex vivo contractile studies in the soleus muscle from a separate group of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7) were performed. Skeletal muscle force of contraction, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were measured. Muscles were also subjected to a series of pulse trains at a range of stimulation frequencies from 20 to 110 Hz. Cirrhotic patients had lower maximum grip strength and greater muscle fatigue than control subjects. PCA rats had a 52.7 ± 13% lower normalized grip strength compared with control rats, and grip strength correlated with the blood and muscle ammonia concentrations (r(2) = 0.82). In ex vivo muscle preparations following a single pulse, the maximal force, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were 12.1 ± 3.5 g vs. 6.2 ± 2.1 g; 398.2 ± 100.4 g/s vs. 163.8 ± 97.4 g/s; -101.2 ± 22.2 g/s vs. -33.6 ± 22.3 g/s in ammonia-treated compared with control muscle preparation, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Tetanic force, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were depressed across a range of stimulation from 20 to 110 Hz. These data provide the first direct evidence that hyperammonemia impairs skeletal muscle strength and increased muscle fatigue and identifies a potential therapeutic target in cirrhotic patients.

  20. AB070. Comparison of photoselective vaporization versus holmium laser enucleation for treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia in a small prostate volume

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Bashraheel, Fahad; Choi, Sae Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes <40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at one month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  1. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 2: Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation for the orbital radar mapping mission of the planet Venus are discussed. Designs are recommended which best satisfy the science objectives of the Venus radar mapping concept. Attention is given to the interaction and integration of those specific mission-systems recommendations with one another, and the final proposed designs are presented. The feasibility, cost, and scheduling of these configurations are evaluated against assumptions of reasonable state-of-the-art growth and space funding expectations.

  2. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 3: Parametric studies and subsystem comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Parametric studies and subsystem comparisons for the orbital radar mapping mission to planet Venus are presented. Launch vehicle requirements and primary orbiter propulsion system requirements are evaluated. The systems parametric analysis indicated that orbit size and orientation interrelated with almost all of the principal spacecraft systems and influenced significantly the definition of orbit insertion propulsion requirements, weight in orbit capability, radar system design, and mapping strategy.

  3. Functional linkage of Na+-Ca2+-exchanger to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in coronary artery: comparison of smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kim A; Samson, Sue E; Hammel, Kaitlin E; Kiss, Lorand; Fulop, Ferenc; Grover, Ashok K

    2009-08-01

    An increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in coronary artery smooth muscle causes a contraction but in endothelium it causes relaxation. Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) may play a role in Ca(2+) dynamics in both the cell types. Here, the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was compared in Na(+)-loaded pig coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells. In both the cell types, this uptake was inhibited by KB-R7943, SEA 0400 and by monensin, but not by cariporide. Prior loading of the cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA increased the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake in smooth muscle but not in endothelial cells. In the presence or absence of BAPTA loading, the Na(+)-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was greater in endothelial than in smooth muscle cells. In smooth muscle cells without BAPTA loading, thapsigargin diminished the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) entry. This effect was not observed in endothelial cells or in either cell type after BAPTA loading. The results in the smooth muscle cells are consistent with a limited diffusional space model in which the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was enhanced by chelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) or by its sequestration by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA). They suggest a functional linkage between NCX and SERCA in the smooth muscle but not in the endothelial cells. The concept of a linkage between NCX and SERCA in smooth muscle was also confirmed by similar distribution of NCX and SERCA2 proteins when detergent-treated microsomes were fractionated by flotation on sucrose density gradients. Thus, the coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells differ not only in the relative activities of NCX but also in its functional linkage to SERCA.

  4. Influence of ankle plantar flexor muscle architecture and strength on gait in boys with haemophilia in comparison to typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, D; Drechsler, W I; Scott, O M

    2014-05-01

    Altered gait patterns, muscle weakness and atrophy have been reported in young boys with severe haemophilia when compared to unaffected peers. The aim of this study was to determine whether lateral gastrocnemius muscle size and architecture influenced biomechanical walking patterns of boys with haemophilia and if these relationships differed from age-matched typically developing boys. Biomechanical function of the knee and ankle during level walking, lateral gastrocnemius anatomical cross-sectional area, thickness, width, fascicle length and pennation angle and ankle plantar flexor muscle strength were recorded in 19 typically developing boys aged 7-12 years and 19 age-matched haemophilic boys with a history of ankle joint bleeding. Associations between gait, strength and architecture were compared using correlations of peak gait values. Haemophilic boys walked with significantly larger (P < 0.05) ankle dorsi flexion angles and knee flexion moments. The ankle plantar flexor muscles of haemophilic boys were significantly weaker and smaller when compared to typically developing peers. In the typically developing boys there was no apparent association between muscle architecture, strength and walking patterns. In haemophilic boys maximum muscle strength and ACSA normalized torque of the ankle plantar flexors together with the muscle width, thickness, fascicle length and angulation (P < 0.05) were associated with motion at the ankle and peak moments at the knee joint. Muscle strength deficits of the ankle plantar flexors and changes in muscle size and architecture may underpin the key biomechanical alterations in walking patterns of haemophilic boys with a history of ankle joint bleeding.

  5. Seismic imaging of the Waltham Canyon fault, California: comparison of ray‐theoretical and Fresnel volume prestack depth migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Klaus; Ryberg, Trond; Fuis, Gary S.; Lüth, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Near‐vertical faults can be imaged using reflected refractions identified in controlled‐source seismic data. Often theses phases are observed on a few neighboring shot or receiver gathers, resulting in a low‐fold data set. Imaging can be carried out with Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in which migration noise is suppressed by constructive stacking of large amounts of multifold data. Fresnel volume migration can be used for low‐fold data without severe migration noise, as the smearing along isochrones is limited to the first Fresnel zone around the reflection point. We developed a modified Fresnel volume migration technique to enhance imaging of steep faults and to suppress noise and undesired coherent phases. The modifications include target‐oriented filters to separate reflected refractions from steep‐dipping faults and reflections with hyperbolic moveout. Undesired phases like multiple reflections, mode conversions, direct P and S waves, and surface waves are suppressed by these filters. As an alternative approach, we developed a new prestack line‐drawing migration method, which can be considered as a proxy to an infinite frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume migration. The line‐drawing migration is not considering waveform information but requires significantly shorter computational time. Target‐oriented filters were extended by dip filters in the line‐drawing migration method. The migration methods were tested with synthetic data and applied to real data from the Waltham Canyon fault, California. The two techniques are applied best in combination, to design filters and to generate complementary images of steep faults.

  6. Comparison of epicardial fat volume by computed tomography in black versus white patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Paul; Schindler, Andreas; Schoepf, U Joseph; Nance, John W; Tricarico, Francesco; Ebersberger, Ullrich; McQuiston, Andrew D; Meyer, Mathias; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Bamberg, Fabian; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2014-02-01

    Disparities in the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) between races may be influenced by differences in the thoracic adipose tissue. We compared computed tomography (CT)-derived volumes of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT), and pericoronary fat thickness (PFT) and correlations with CAD between black and white patients. This institutional review board-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included 372 age- and gender-matched black versus white patients (186 black, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men; 186 white, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men) who underwent CT for chest pain evaluation. EAT, MAT, and PFT were measured. The amount of coronary calcium was quantified as calcium score. CAD was defined as ≥50% coronary artery narrowing. EAT and MAT volumes were significantly lower in black than white patients (59 [twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth percentile 39 to 84] vs 97 [67 to 132] cm(3) and 44 [27 to 77] vs 87 [52 to 157] cm(3), for both p <0.001). Mean PFT in black patients was slightly lower than white patients (17.2 ± 3.2 vs 18.1 ± 3.4 mm, p <0.01). The relation between race and extent of adipose tissue remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Significant correlations were observed between EAT and MAT volumes and calcium score in black and white patients (r = 0.19 to 0.26, p <0.01). For both races, the level of thoracic fat measurements was higher in present versus absent coronary calcification. A greater amount of thoracic fat was found with obstructive CAD only in white patients. In conclusion, CT-derived measurements of thoracic fat differ between symptomatic black and white patients, suggesting a differential relation between thoracic adipose tissue and CAD pathophysiology by race.

  7. Muscle damage and muscle remodeling: no pain, no gain?

    PubMed

    Flann, Kyle L; LaStayo, Paul C; McClain, Donald A; Hazel, Mark; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2011-02-15

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic tissue that responds adaptively to both the nature and intensity of muscle use. This phenotypic plasticity ensures that muscle structure is linked to patterns of muscle use throughout the lifetime of an animal. The cascade of events that result in muscle restructuring - for example, in response to resistance exercise training - is often thought to be initiated by muscle damage. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that symptomatic (i.e. detectable) damage is a necessary precursor for muscle remodeling. Subjects were divided into two experimental populations: pre-trained (PT) and naive (NA). Demonstrable muscle damage was avoided in the PT group by a three-week gradual 'ramp-up' protocol. By contrast, the NA group was subjected to an initial damaging bout of exercise. Both groups participated in an eight-week high-force eccentric-cycle ergometry program (20 min, three times per week) designed to equate the total work done during training between the groups. The NA group experienced signs of damage, absent in the PT group, as indicated by greater than five times higher levels of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and self-reporting of initial perceived soreness and exertion, yet muscle size and strength gains were not different for the two groups. RT-PCR analysis revealed similar increases in levels of the growth factor IGF-1Ea mRNA in both groups. Likewise, the significant (P<0.01) increases in mean cross-sectional area (and total muscle volume) were equal in both groups. Finally, strength increases were identical for both groups (PT=25% and NA=26% improvement). The results of this study suggest that muscle rebuilding - for example, hypertrophy - can be initiated independent of any discernible damage to the muscle.

  8. SIM.M.FF-S7: Final report on SIM/ANDIMET supplementary comparison for volume of liquids at 100 mL and 100 μL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, S.; Maldonado, J. M.; Vega, M. C.; Santalla, E.; Sica, A.; Cantero, D.; Salazar, M.; Morales, A.; Solano, P.; Rodríguez, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    A SIM/ANDIMET comparison for liquid volume using two 100 mL pycnometers and two 100 μL piston pipettes was performed between January 2012 and October 2013. The National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Bolivia was the coordinating laboratory and the Mexican NMI provided technical assistance. The participating labs were IBMETRO (Bolivia), INM (Colombia), INEN (Ecuador), INDECOPI (Peru), LACOMET (Costa Rica), LATU (Uruguay), INTN (Paraguay), and CENAM (Mexico). Based on measurements made by CENAM at the beginning and end of the comparison, the transfer standards were stable during the comparison within 0.0001 mL for the 100 mL pycnometers and 0.03 μL for the 100 μL pipettes. For 100 mL, six of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.003 % and had standardized degrees of equivalence (EN) less than 1. Two participants (INEN and INM) had EN values greater than 1. For the 100 μL pipettes, the results were corrected for the influence of altitude and seven of the eight participants agreed within ± 0.3 %. Results from INEN and some from INM and IBMETRO had EN values greater than 1 for the 100 μL pipettes. Uncertainties recommended by Guideline DKD-R 8-1 for micropipettes were included. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Estimating the volume of the First Dorsal Interossoeus using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Infantolino, Benjamin W; Challis, John H

    2011-04-01

    Accurate in vivo estimation of muscle volume is important as it indicates the amount of power a muscle can produce. By tracking muscle volume changes in vivo, a muscle's response to disease or rehabilitation training can be quantified. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of imaging ultrasound to estimate the volume of a small muscle, specifically the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle. The perimeter of the FDI was imaged using ultrasound in 22 cadaver hands. For each FDI, serial cross-sectional areas were determined by manual digitization, volumes were then estimated using the Cavalieri principle. The muscles were then dissected from the cadavers, and muscle volume was determined via the water displacement method. The water displacement measures of muscle volumes were used as the criterion, and compared with those estimated via ultrasound. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated that all measures fell within the 95% confidence interval, with no statistical evidence of changes in measurement accuracy with size of specimen, or of a constant deviation in the accuracy of estimated volumes. For superficial muscles these results indicate that ultrasound imaging is an accurate method for determining muscle volumes in vivo even for a relatively small muscle (volume ∼4 mL). PMID:21112233

  10. Comparison of blood volume pulse and skin conductance responses to mental and affective stimuli at different anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Kushki, Azadeh; Fairley, Jillian; Merja, Satyam; King, Gillian; Chau, Tom

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of blood volume pulse (BVP) and skin conductance are commonly used as indications of psychological arousal in affective computing and human-machine interfaces. To date, palmar surfaces remain the primary site for these measurements. Placement of sensors on palmar surfaces, however, is undesirable when recordings are fraught with motion and pressure artifacts. These artifacts are frequent when the human participant has involuntary movements as in hyperkinetic cerebral palsy. This motivates the use of alternative measurement sites. The present study examined the correlation between measurements of blood volume pulse and skin conductance obtained from three different sites on the body (fingers, toes and ear for BVP; fingers, toes and arch of the foot for skin conductance) in response to cognitive and affective stimuli. The results of this pilot study indicated significant inter-site correlation among signal features derived from different sites, with the exception of BVP amplitude, the number of electrodermal reactions and the slope of the electrodermal activity response. We attribute these differences in part to inter-site discrepancies in local skin conditions, such as skin temperature. Despite these differences, significant changes from baseline were present in the responses to the cognitive and affective stimuli at non-palmar sites, suggesting that these sites may provide viable signal measurements for use in affective computing and human-machine interface applications.

  11. Comparison of blood volume pulse and skin conductance responses to mental and affective stimuli at different anatomical sites

    PubMed Central

    Kushki, Azadeh; Fairley, Jillian; Merja, Satyam; King, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of blood volume pulse (BVP) and skin conductance are commonly used as indications of psychological arousal in affective computing and human–machine interfaces. To date, palmar surfaces remain the primary site for these measurements. Placement of sensors on palmar surfaces, however, is undesirable when recordings are fraught with motion and pressure artifacts. These artifacts are frequent when the human participant has involuntary movements as in hyperkinetic cerebral palsy. This motivates the use of alternative measurement sites. The present study examined the correlation between measurements of blood volume pulse and skin conductance obtained from three different sites on the body (fingers, toes and ear for BVP; fingers, toes and arch of the foot for skin conductance) in response to cognitive and affective stimuli. The results of this pilot study indicated significant inter-site correlation among signal features derived from different sites, with the exception of BVP amplitude, the number of electrodermal reactions and the slope of the electrodermal activity response. We attribute these differences in part to inter-site discrepancies in local skin conditions, such as skin temperature. Despite these differences, significant changes from baseline were present in the responses to the cognitive and affective stimuli at non-palmar sites, suggesting that these sites may provide viable signal measurements for use in affective computing and human–machine interface applications. PMID:21849720

  12. Comparison of solvent and sacrificial volume-material-based lamination processes of low-temperature co-fired ceramics tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecha, Karol; Jurków, Dominik; Golonka, Leszek J.

    2009-06-01

    The lamination process determines the quality of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) based spatial structures. This paper compares two methods of the microchannel fabrication process in zero-shrinkage LTCC substrates. The first one is based on a two-step lamination process and uses various sacrificial volume materials (SVM). The second one is based on the cold chemical lamination (CCL) process. On the one hand, the SVM gives the possibility of decreasing the deformation of the three-dimensional (3D) structures during the lamination process. The channel volume is filled with a special fugitive material. It protects the spatial structure from deformation during lamination, and evaporates completely during the co-firing process. The bonding quality and strength depend strongly on the fugitive phase type. On the other hand, the CCL is a solvent-based method. It is another alternative for bonding of green ceramic tapes. A special liquid agent is screen printed on the green tape, which melts the tape surface. Then the tapes are stacked and compressed at room temperature by a printing roll. The influence of each method on the microchannel geometry is analyzed in this paper. The resulting structures' bonding quality and mechanical properties are examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  13. Comparison of the transcriptional responses of skeletal muscle and bone to a flooding dose of leucine in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; LA Vieira, Vera; Power, Deborah M; Johnston, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, cartilage and bone must function in a co-ordinated fashion during locomotion and growth. In the present study on the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) we tested the hypothesis that muscle and bone differ in their responsiveness to stimuli eliciting fast growth, providing a potential mechanism for generating the skeletal deformities observed in aquaculture. To investigate transcription regulation in skeletal muscle and bone we stimulated protein synthesis using a flooding dose of the branched chain amino acid leucine and compared the results with saline-injected controls. To increase the amount of available sequence information for gene expression analysis a de novo transcriptome was assembled using publicly available Next Generation Sequencing libraries from embryo, fast skeletal muscle, bone and cartilage. The resulting 5 million reads were assembled into 125,646 isotigs representing around 16,000 unique genes, including most components of the Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling pathway. Principal components analysis was able to distinguish the transcriptional responses between leucine and saline injected controls in skeletal muscle, but not in the bone. General Linear Modelling revealed significant temporal changes in gene expression following leucine injection including the tissue-specific markers sparc, bglap (bone), mlc2 and myod2 (muscle) and gene transcripts associated with Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling, p70sk6, akt2, ampka and mtor. Skeletal muscle showed more pronounced and rapid changes in transcript abundance than the bone to the same pro-growth signal. The observed differences in transcriptional response are consistent with the idea that fast growth results in a miss-match between muscle and bone development and may contribute to a higher incidence of skeletal deformities. PMID:26921774

  14. Comparison of the transcriptional responses of skeletal muscle and bone to a flooding dose of leucine in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A; LA Vieira, Vera; Power, Deborah M; Johnston, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, cartilage and bone must function in a co-ordinated fashion during locomotion and growth. In the present study on the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) we tested the hypothesis that muscle and bone differ in their responsiveness to stimuli eliciting fast growth, providing a potential mechanism for generating the skeletal deformities observed in aquaculture. To investigate transcription regulation in skeletal muscle and bone we stimulated protein synthesis using a flooding dose of the branched chain amino acid leucine and compared the results with saline-injected controls. To increase the amount of available sequence information for gene expression analysis a de novo transcriptome was assembled using publicly available Next Generation Sequencing libraries from embryo, fast skeletal muscle, bone and cartilage. The resulting 5 million reads were assembled into 125,646 isotigs representing around 16,000 unique genes, including most components of the Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling pathway. Principal components analysis was able to distinguish the transcriptional responses between leucine and saline injected controls in skeletal muscle, but not in the bone. General Linear Modelling revealed significant temporal changes in gene expression following leucine injection including the tissue-specific markers sparc, bglap (bone), mlc2 and myod2 (muscle) and gene transcripts associated with Pi3k/Akt/mTor signalling, p70sk6, akt2, ampka and mtor. Skeletal muscle showed more pronounced and rapid changes in transcript abundance than the bone to the same pro-growth signal. The observed differences in transcriptional response are consistent with the idea that fast growth results in a miss-match between muscle and bone development and may contribute to a higher incidence of skeletal deformities.

  15. Internal comparison between deuterium oxide (D2O) and L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine for acute measurement of muscle protein synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Cegielski, Jessica; Phillips, Bethan E; Boereboom, Catherine; Lund, Jonathan N; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope tracer methodologies are becoming increasingly widespread in metabolic research; yet a number of factors restrict their implementation, such as, i.v infusions, multiple cannulae, tissue samples, and significant cost. We recently validated the sensitivity of the orally administered stable isotope tracer deuterium oxide (D2O) for quantifying day-to-day changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS). This method is less invasive, restrictive, and more cost-effective than traditional amino acid (AA) tracer techniques. In the present study, we hypothesized the sensitivity of our analytical techniques (GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS) would permit D2O-derived measurements of MPS over much shorter periods (i.e., hours) usually only possible using AA-tracer techniques. We recruited nine males (24 ± 3 year, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m−²) into an internally controlled comparison of D2O versus 13C AA-tracers. The day before the acute study subjects consumed 400 mL D2O, and on the study day, received a primed (0.3 mg·kg−1) continuous (0.6 mg·kg·h−1) i.v infusion of L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine to quantify MPS under both: (1) basal [postabsorptive] and; (2) stimulated [postprandial] that is, consumption of 20 g EAA, conditions. Measures of MPS yielded indistinguishable technique differences with respect to EAA, 13C: 0.065 ± 0.004 to 0.089 ± 0.006%·h−1 (P < 0.05) and D2O: 0.050 ± 0.007 to 0.088 ± 0.008%·h−1 (P < 0.05) with qualitatively similar increases. Our findings reveal that acute measurement of MPS, usually only possible using AA-tracers, are feasible over shorter periods with orally administered D2O when used in tandem with GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS. We conclude that this D2O approach provides a less invasive, cost-effective, and flexible means by which to quantify MPS acutely over several hours. PMID:26149278

  16. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Fan, Tingyong; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Materials and methods Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A), middle (group B), and distal (group C) thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv) was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. Results The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were <0.3 cm for the three groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ2=−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ2 =−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was <2% for all groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue for PTV3D was decreased by 11.81% and 11.86% in groups A and B, respectively, but was increased by 2.93% in group C. Conclusion For proximal and middle esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using asymmetrical margins provides good coverage of PTV4D; however, for distal

  17. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  18. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  19. Comparison of high-intensity vs. high-volume resistance training on the BDNF response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Church, David D; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Wang, Ran; La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the acute and chronic response of circulating plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to high-intensity low-volume (HI) and low-intensity high volume (HV) resistance training. Twenty experienced resistance-trained men (23.5 ± 2.6 y, 1.79 ± 0.05 m, 75.7 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Before the resistance training program (PRE), participants performed an acute bout of exercise using either the HI [3-5 reps; 90% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] or HV (10-12 reps; 70% 1RM) training paradigm. The acute exercise protocol was repeated after 7 wk of training (POST). Blood samples were obtained at rest (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), and 60 min (60P) post exercise at PRE and POST. A three-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze acute changes in BDNF concentrations during HI and HV resistance exercise and the effect of 7 wk of training. No training × time × group interaction in BDNF was noted (P = 0.994). Significant main effects for training (P = 0.050) and time (P < 0.001) in BDNF were observed. Significant elevations in BDNF concentrations were seen from BL at IP (P = 0.001), 30P (P < 0.001), and 60P (P < 0.001) in both HI and HV combined during PRE and POST. BDNF concentrations were also observed to increase from PRE to POST when collapsed across groups and time. No significant group × training interaction (P = 0.342), training (P = 0.105), or group (P = 0.238) effect were noted in the BDNF area under the curve response. Results indicate that BDNF concentrations are increased after an acute bout of resistance exercise, regardless of training paradigm, and are further increased during a 7-wk training program in experienced lifters. PMID:27231312

  20. A comparison of the effects of measured, predicted, estimated and constant residual volumes on the body density of male athletes.

    PubMed

    Withers, R T; Borkent, M; Ball, C T

    1990-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use the measured residual volume (RV) of male athletes (n = 207) as a criterion and assess the error in their RV, body density (BD) and relative body fat (%BF) associated with using RVs predicted from regression equations, RVs estimated from vital capacity (VC) and an assumed constant RV of 1300 ml. The ventilated residual volume (RV) was determined both before and after the underwater weighing by helium dilution with the subject immersed to neck level. The mean of the absolute differences Idl and SEE between the 2 RV trials were 66 and 89 ml, respectively. These increased to values ranging 195-747 and 259-308 ml, respectively, when the means of the 2 RV trials for each subject were compared with the RVs predicted via regression equations, estimated from the VC and assumed to be a constant of 1300 ml. A similar trend emerged with variation of only the RV in the BD formula for each subject. The 2 RV trials resulted in a Idl and SEE of .00109 (.5% BF) and .00145 g.cm-3 (.6% BF), respectively, but these increased to values ranging .00306 (1.3% BF)-.01207 (5.1% BF) and .00394 (1.7% BF)-.00441 g.cm-3 (1.9% BF), respectively, for predicted, estimated and assumed constant RVs. In all cases the lowest Idl and SEE were associated with the RVs predicted by a multiple regression equation (R = .616; SEE = 259 ml) which was generated on our sample.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in the United States: A Comparison of National Volume, Patient Demographics, Complications, and Surgical Indications

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Martin, Christopher T.; Gao, Yubo; Wolf, Brian R.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder arthroplasty is increasing in the United States. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has emerged as an alternative treatment for end-stage glenohumeral pathology. Until recently, administrative coding practices have not differentiated RSA from traditional total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), and thus national procedural volume has been unknown. The purpose of this study was to define the utilization, patient characteristics, indications and complications for RSA, and contrast these to TSA and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Methods The 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) dataset was queried using ICD-9-CM codes to identify patients undergoing RSA, TSA, or HA. We used weighted estimates of national procedure volume, per-capita utilization, patient comorbidities, and inpatient complications denned by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and identified them using standard methods described by Elixhauser. ANOVA statistical analysis was used and significance was denned as p value <0.05. Results In 2011, 66,485 patients underwent shoulder arthroplasty; there were 21,692 cases of RSA, 29,359 of TSA, and 15,434 of HA. Utilization of RSA and TSA increased between 2002-2011, and decreased for HA. RSA patients were older (72.7 years vs 67.4 TSA vs 66.8 HA) and more commonly female. Comorbidity burden was highest in patients undergoing HA. Inpatient complications were highest after RSA (p < 0.001). When compared to TSA, RSA was more commonly used in the setting of rotator cuff disease, and posttraumatic sequelae (p<0.001). Conclusions Our findings represent the first national estimates of RSA within the United Sates. RSA is a significant contributor to increasing shoulder arthroplasty utilization nationally representing one-third of arthroplasty cases. Conditions traditionally managed with HA in older populations appear to now be more commonly managed with RSA. RSA is performed on older patients with expanded indications. PMID:26361437

  2. Comparison of high-intensity vs. high-volume resistance training on the BDNF response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Church, David D; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Wang, Ran; La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the acute and chronic response of circulating plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to high-intensity low-volume (HI) and low-intensity high volume (HV) resistance training. Twenty experienced resistance-trained men (23.5 ± 2.6 y, 1.79 ± 0.05 m, 75.7 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Before the resistance training program (PRE), participants performed an acute bout of exercise using either the HI [3-5 reps; 90% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] or HV (10-12 reps; 70% 1RM) training paradigm. The acute exercise protocol was repeated after 7 wk of training (POST). Blood samples were obtained at rest (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), and 60 min (60P) post exercise at PRE and POST. A three-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze acute changes in BDNF concentrations during HI and HV resistance exercise and the effect of 7 wk of training. No training × time × group interaction in BDNF was noted (P = 0.994). Significant main effects for training (P = 0.050) and time (P < 0.001) in BDNF were observed. Significant elevations in BDNF concentrations were seen from BL at IP (P = 0.001), 30P (P < 0.001), and 60P (P < 0.001) in both HI and HV combined during PRE and POST. BDNF concentrations were also observed to increase from PRE to POST when collapsed across groups and time. No significant group × training interaction (P = 0.342), training (P = 0.105), or group (P = 0.238) effect were noted in the BDNF area under the curve response. Results indicate that BDNF concentrations are increased after an acute bout of resistance exercise, regardless of training paradigm, and are further increased during a 7-wk training program in experienced lifters.

  3. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  4. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction

    PubMed Central

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema. PMID:26102076

  5. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction.

    PubMed

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema.

  6. Comparison of the Levels of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Released in the Vastus Lateralis Muscle of Patients with Fibromyalgia and Healthy Controls during Contractions of the Quadriceps Muscle – A Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Löfgren, Monika; Bjersing, Jan; Kosek, Eva; Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is associated with central hyperexcitability, but it is suggested that peripheral input is important to maintain central hyperexcitability. The primary aim was to investigate the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in the vastus lateralis muscle during repetitive dynamic contractions of the quadriceps muscle in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Secondarily, to investigate if the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were correlated with pain or fatigue during these repetitive dynamic contractions. Material and Methods 32 women with fibromyalgia and 32 healthy women (controls) participated in a 4 hour microdialysis session, to sample IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF from the most painful point of the vastus lateralis muscle before, during and after 20 minutes of repeated dynamic contractions. Pain (visual analogue scale; 0–100) and fatigue Borg’s Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale; 6–20) were assessed before and during the entire microdialysis session. Results The repetitive dynamic contractions increased pain in the patients with fibromyalgia (P < .001) and induced fatigue in both groups (P < .001). Perceived fatigue was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia than controls (P < .001). The levels of IL-1β did not change during contractions in either group. The levels of TNF did not change during contractions in patients with fibromyalgia, but increased in controls (P < .001) and were significantly higher compared to patients with fibromyalgia (P = .033). The levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased in both groups alike during and after contractions (P’s < .001). There were no correlations between pain or fatigue and cytokine levels after contractions. Conclusion There were no differences between patients with fibromyalgia and controls in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and no correlations between levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and pain or fatigue. Thus, this study indicates that IL-1β, IL-6, IL

  7. Oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio, or total distance: a comparison of methods to equalize exercise volume in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Paes, L.S.; Borges, J.P.; Cunha, F.A.; Souza, M.G.C.; Cyrino, F.Z.G.A.; Bottino, D.A.; Bouskela, E.; Farinatti, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared strategies to equalize the volume of aerobic exercise performed with different intensities by Wistar rats, based on the distance covered during exercise bouts and energy expenditure (EE, isocaloric sessions) obtained from oxygen uptake (V̇O2) or respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Thirty-three male rats (270.5±12.8 g) underwent maximal exercise tests to determine V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2R), being randomly assigned to three groups: moderate-intensity continuous exercise at speed corresponding to 50% V̇O2R (MIC; n=11); high-intensity continuous exercise at 80% V̇O2R (HIC; n=11); and high-intensity intermittent exercise (HII; n=11) at 60% V̇O2R (3 min) and 80% V̇O2R (4 min). Exercise duration was calculated individually to elicit EE of 5 kcal in each session. No difference between groups was found for total running distance (MIC: 801±46, HIC: 734±42, HII: 885±64 m; P=0.13). Total EE measured by RER was systematically underestimated compared to values obtained from V̇O2 (HII: 4.5% and MIC: 6.2%, P<0.05). Total EE (calculated from V̇O2), and duration of HIC bouts (2.8 kcal and 30.8±2.2 min) were lower (P<0.0001) than in MIC (4.9 kcal and 64.7±1.8 min) and HII (4.7 kcal and 46.9±2.2 min). Predicted and actual values of total V̇O2, total EE, and duration of isocaloric sessions were similar in MIC and HII (P>0.05), which were both higher than in HIC (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the time to achieve a given EE in exercise bouts with different intensities did not correspond to the total distance. Therefore, the volume of aerobic exercise in protocols involving Wistar rats should be equalized using EE rather than total covered distance. PMID:27487418

  8. Oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio, or total distance: a comparison of methods to equalize exercise volume in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Paes, L S; Borges, J P; Cunha, F A; Souza, M G C; Cyrino, F Z G A; Bottino, D A; Bouskela, E; Farinatti, P

    2016-07-28

    This study compared strategies to equalize the volume of aerobic exercise performed with different intensities by Wistar rats, based on the distance covered during exercise bouts and energy expenditure (EE, isocaloric sessions) obtained from oxygen uptake (V̇O2) or respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Thirty-three male rats (270.5±12.8 g) underwent maximal exercise tests to determine V̇O2 reserve (V̇O2R), being randomly assigned to three groups: moderate-intensity continuous exercise at speed corresponding to 50% V̇O2R (MIC; n=11); high-intensity continuous exercise at 80% V̇O2R (HIC; n=11); and high-intensity intermittent exercise (HII; n=11) at 60% V̇O2R (3 min) and 80% V̇O2R (4 min). Exercise duration was calculated individually to elicit EE of 5 kcal in each session. No difference between groups was found for total running distance (MIC: 801±46, HIC: 734±42, HII: 885±64 m; P=0.13). Total EE measured by RER was systematically underestimated compared to values obtained from V̇O2 (HII: 4.5% and MIC: 6.2%, P<0.05). Total EE (calculated from V̇O2), and duration of HIC bouts (2.8 kcal and 30.8±2.2 min) were lower (P<0.0001) than in MIC (4.9 kcal and 64.7±1.8 min) and HII (4.7 kcal and 46.9±2.2 min). Predicted and actual values of total V̇O2, total EE, and duration of isocaloric sessions were similar in MIC and HII (P>0.05), which were both higher than in HIC (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the time to achieve a given EE in exercise bouts with different intensities did not correspond to the total distance. Therefore, the volume of aerobic exercise in protocols involving Wistar rats should be equalized using EE rather than total covered distance. PMID:27487418

  9. Influence of Body Composition on Lung Function and Respiratory Muscle Strength in Children With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Costa Junior, Dirceu; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana S.; Araujo, Poliane N.; Barbalho-Moulin, Marcela C.; Alves, Viviane C.; Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity affects lung function and respiratory muscle strength. The aim of the present study was to assess lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children with obesity and determine the influence of body composition on these variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 75 children (40 with obesity and 35 within the ideal weight range) aged 6 - 10 years. Body mass index, z score, waist circumference, body composition (tetrapolar bioimpedance), respiratory muscle strength and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated. Results Children with obesity exhibited larger quantities of both lean and fat mass in comparison to those in the ideal weight range. No significant differences were found between groups regarding the respective reference values for respiratory muscle strength. Male children with obesity demonstrated significantly lower lung function values (forced expiratory volume in the first second % (FEV1%) and FEV1/forced vital capacity % (FVC%) : 93.76 ± 9.78 and 92.29 ± 3.8, respectively) in comparison to males in the ideal weight range (99.87 ± 9.72 and 96.31 ± 4.82, respectively). The regression models demonstrated that the spirometric variables were influenced by all body composition variables. Conclusion Children with obesity demonstrated a reduction in lung volume and capacity. Thus, anthropometric and body composition characteristics may be predictive factors for altered lung function. PMID:26767078

  10. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, John M; Logan, Andrew; Shultz, Rebecca; Koval, Jeffrey J; Roh, Eugene Y; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis. PMID:27403454

  11. Histological comparison of the smooth uterine muscle of healthy golden retriever bitches, carriers of the progressive muscular dystrophy (GRMD) gene, and GRMD-affected bitches.

    PubMed

    Brolio, M P; Cima, D S; Miglino, M A; Ambrósio, C E

    2014-11-10

    There is evidence to suggest that weakness of the pelvic and/or uterine musculature may negatively affect the obstetric performance of women who carry the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The golden retriever dog is the ideal animal model for preclinical studies of progressive muscular dystrophy, and this model is referred to as "golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD)". This study evaluated and compared the histopathological aspects of the uterine muscle of eleven dogs: health, n=4; carriers of GRMD gene, n=5; and affected females, n=2. The obtained results showed that the uterine muscle of healthy dogs was exclusively composed of type III collagen, while a predominance of type I collagen and small amounts of type III were observed in the uterine muscle of the carriers. The myometrium of the affected bitches showed small quantities of both collagen types. The differences noted in the three evaluated groups suggest that female carrier and those individuals affected by muscular dystrophy had collagen alteration and muscle fiber commitment in the uterine muscle, a deficiency which could directly influence the composition and function of this tissue. In addition, this information is highly relevant to the reproductive management of these animals. This data open important venues for translate reproductive protocols for women, who carry the dystrophin gene.

  12. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, John M; Logan, Andrew; Shultz, Rebecca; Koval, Jeffrey J; Roh, Eugene Y; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

  13. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis. PMID:27403454

  14. A comparison of flexural properties of aramid reinforced pultrusions having constant fiber volume and varied matrices, pretreatments, and postcures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Johnson, Gary S.; Macconochie, Ian O.

    1986-01-01

    Aramid reinforcement composite materials of equal fiber volume having varied polymer thermoset matrices have been pultruded and flexurally tested to failure. The objective was to improve flexural properties of aramid reinforced pultrusions. Pultrusions of both sized and unsized aramid fiber with four different resin systems were compared to determine the effects of sizing compounds and post-thermal treatments on the flexural strength as an indication of fiber wettability and fiber-to-resin interface bonding. Improvements in flexural strength as the result of pretreatments with sizing solutions used in this study were marginal. The most significant improvements in flexural properties were the results of postcuring. Overall improvements ranged from a low 39,647 Psi(273 Mpa) to a high of 80,390 Psi(554 Mpa), or 103 percent. The fact that post-thermal treatments improved the flexural properties of the four pultrusions indicates that a full cure did not occur in either resin system during the pultrusion process. The increased flexural strengths of the polyester and vinyl ester pultrusions were the most surprising. Based on data presented, the most promising resin system of the four examined (VE 8300, Aropol 7430, Epon 9302, and Epon 9310) for Kevlar reinforced pultrusion is Epon 9310 epoxy.

  15. Volume doubling time of lung cancers detected in a chest radiograph mass screening program: Comparison with CT screening

    PubMed Central

    KANASHIKI, MAKI; TOMIZAWA, TAKUJI; YAMAGUCHI, IWAO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; HIZAWA, NOBUYUKI; ISHIKAWA, HIROICHI; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the volume doubling time (VDT) of lung cancer detected in our annual chest radiograph screening program and to compare it with those previously reported for computed tomography (CT) screening. In total, 209 patients who had a measurable tumor shadow and a history of participating in our chest radiograph mass screening program between 2006 and 2009 were included in this study. Indirect roentgenograms for patients with lung cancer were converted into digital images, and the section showing the tumor was enlarged on the monitor to a size of 0.01 mm. The mean VDT for all the patients was 158 days. Only 3.8% of the patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. In 140 patients with adenocarcinoma, the mean VDT was 177 days, and 5.0% of these patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. In the 44 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, the mean VDT was 133 days, and only 2.3% of these patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. These results were different from those previously reported for CT screening. In several reports on CT screening, more than 20% of the lung cancers had VDTs of more than 400 days. Since it is common knowledge that there are ‘indolent’ lung cancers with a VDT of more than 400 days, screening by annual chest radiography with rare overdiagnosis may need to be reconsidered. PMID:22970048

  16. Free-volume theory coupled with soft-SAFT for viscosity calculations: comparison with molecular simulation and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Llovell, F; Marcos, R M; Vega, L F

    2013-07-11

    The evaluation of phase equilibria and solubility properties through theoretical approaches is a well-known field, where a significant amount of models are able to describe them with a good degree of accuracy. However, the simultaneous calculation of transport properties together with thermodynamic phase properties still remains a challenge, due to the difficulties in describing the behavior of properties like the viscosity of fluids with the same approach. In this work, the free-volume theory (FVT) has been coupled with the soft-SAFT equation for the first time to extend the capabilities of the equation to the calculation of transport properties. The theory has been first tested using simulation data of the viscosity of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid and LJ chains over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Good agreement has been found at all chain lengths, except for some deviations at near-zero density values. Several trends of the viscosity parameters with the length of the chain are identified, allowing the prediction of other chain fluids. Finally, the new equation has been applied to the n-alkanes family, where viscosity is a key property, and results are compared with experimental data. The three viscosity parameters were fitted to viscosity data of the pure fluid at several isotherms or isobars, whereas the density and pressure (or temperature) were taken from the soft-SAFT output. Again, the effect of these parameters on the viscosity has been investigated and compared with results obtained for the LJ chains and with previous work of other authors. The new equation performs very well in all cases, with a global average absolute deviation of 2.12% and shows predictive capabilities for heavier compounds. This empowers soft-SAFT with new capabilities, allowing the equation to calculate phase, interfacial, and transport properties with the same model and degree of accuracy.

  17. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  18. Comparison of Efficacy of Regional and Extensive Clinical Target Volumes in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Xueying; Wang Wei; Zhou Zhiguo; Gao Xianshu; Chang, Joe Y.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the effect of different clinical target volumes (CTVs) on survival rate after postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We studied 102 patients who underwent postoperative RT after radical resection for esophageal SCC (T3/4 or N1). The radiation dose was {>=}50 Gy. In the extensive portal group (E group, 43 patients), the CTV encompassed the bilateral supraclavicular region, all mediastinal lymph nodes, the anastomosis site, and the left gastric and pericardial lymphatic. In the regional portal group (R group, 59 patients), the CTV was confined to tumor bed and the lymph nodes in the immediate region of the primary lesion. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were compared between the groups, and multivariate/univariate analysis for factors predicting survival was studied. Results: For the entire group, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 76.3%, 50.5%, and 42.9%, respectively (median survival, 30 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 76.5%, 52.1%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the E group and 76.2%, 49.2%, and 44.6%, respectively, in the R group (not significant). According to the multivariate analysis, N stage, number of lymph nodes with metastatic disease, and tumor length were the independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions: Using a regional portal in postoperative RT for esophageal SCC is not associated with compromised survival compared with extensive portal RT and therefore should be considered. N stage, number of affected lymph nodes, and tumor length predict poor survival.

  19. A comparison of the effects of measured, predicted, estimated and constant residual volumes on the body density of female athletes.

    PubMed

    Withers, R T; Ball, C T

    1988-02-01

    The body density (BD), and hence the relative body fat (% BF) was measured for 182 female athletes. The residual volume (RV) was determined both before and after the underwater weighing by a multiple breath helium dilution technique with the subject immersed to neck level. The absolute mean difference (lXdl) and SEE between the two RV trials were 63 and 75 ml, respectively. These increased to values ranging 144-685 and 187-252 ml, respectively, when the mean of the two RV trials for each subject was compared with the RVs predicted via regression equations, estimated from the vital capacity (VC) and assumed to be a constant of 1000 ml. A similar trend resulted from variation of only the RV in the BD formula for each subject. The two RV trials resulted in an lXdl and SEE of .00121 (.5% BF) and .00141 g.cm-3 (.6% BF), respectively, but these increased to values ranging .00283 (1.3% BF) -.01291 (5.7% BF) and .00362 (1.6% BF) -.00527 g.cm-3 (2.5% BF), respectively, for predicted, estimated and assumed constant RVs. In all cases, the lowest lXdl and SEE were associated with the RVs predicted by a multiple regression equation (R = .725; SEE = 187 ml) which was generated on our sample while the largest lXdl values were registered by the other regression equations. These data emphasize that the use of predicted, estimated and constant RVs result in substantial errors in BD and % BF compared with those when the RV is measured.

  20. A systematic comparison of mathematical models for inherent measurement of ciliary length: how a cell can measure length and volume.

    PubMed

    Ludington, William B; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F

    2015-03-24

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models-an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model-show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum.

  1. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  2. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  3. Comparison between the collagen intensity and mast cell density in the lingual muscles and myocardium of autopsied chronic chagasic and nonchagasic patients.

    PubMed

    Roldão, José A; Beghini, Marcela; Ramalho, Luciana S; Porto, Carla Souza; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Teixeira, Vicente P A; de Lima Pereira, Sanívia A

    2012-08-01

    In chronic Chagas' disease (CD), an increase in collagen intensity and mast cell density has been described individually in the myocardium and tongue muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of collagen, mast cell tryptase (MCT) density, and mast cell chymase (MCH) density in the lingual muscles and myocardium from autopsied chagasic (CP) and nonchagasic patients (NCP). The selected cases were divided into two groups: (1) CP (n = 10) and (2) NCP (n = 10). Fragments were removed from the tongue and heart. After histological processing, the slices were stained with picrosirius, and immunohistochemistry was performed for MCH and MCT. The CP group showed the highest MCH and MCT densities and the highest percentage of collagen in the lingual muscles and myocardium when compared with the NCP group (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between the collagen intensity and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group. Although there are no reports in the literature of MCT and MCH in CD, its higher densities as well as higher percentage of collagen were found in the lingual muscles and myocardium in the CP group, suggesting that tryptase and chymase are associated with the pathogenesis of CD in these organs. Furthermore, the positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group suggests that the chymase is associated with fibrosis in CD, as demonstrated in other diseases.

  4. Quantitative MRI of Vastus Medialis, Vastus Lateralis and Gluteus Medius Muscle Workload after Squat Exercise: Comparison Between Squatting with Hip Adduction and Hip Abduction

    PubMed Central

    Baffa, Augusto P.; Felicio, Lilian R.; Saad, Marcelo C.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Santos, Antonio C.; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use MRI to quantify the workload of gluteus medius (GM), vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in different types of squat exercises. Fourteen female volunteers were evaluated, average age of 22 ± 2 years, sedentary, without clinical symptoms, and without history of previous lower limb injuries. Quantitative MRI was used to analyze VM, VL and GM muscles before and after squat exercise, squat associated with isometric hip adduction and squat associated with isometric hip abduction. Multi echo images were acquired to calculate the transversal relaxation times (T2) before and after exercise. Mixed Effects Model statistical analysis was used to compare images before and after the exercise (ΔT2) to normalize the variability between subjects. Imaging post processing was performed in Matlab software. GM muscle was the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip adduction and VM the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip abduction, while VL was the most active during squat associated with isometric hip adduction. Our data suggests that isometric hip adduction during the squat does not increase the workload of VM, but decreases the GM muscle workload. Squat associated with isometric hip abduction does not increase VL workload. PMID:23486653

  5. The comparison of wavelet- and Fourier-based electromyographic indices of back muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions: validity and reliability results.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R A; Larivière, C; Arsenault, A B; Nadeau, S; Plamondon, A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) fatigue indices computed from short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and wavelet transform (WAV), by analyzing their criterion validity and test-retest reliability. The effect of averaging spectral estimates within and between repeated contractions (cycles) on EMG fatigue indices was also demonstrated. Thirty-one healthy subjects performed trunk flexion-extension cycles until exhaustion on a Biodex dynamometer. The load was determined theoretically as twice the L5-S1 moment produced by the trunk mass. To assess reliability, 10 subjects performed the same experimental protocol after a two-week interval. EMG signals were recorded bilaterally with 12 pairs of electrodes placed on the back muscles (at L4, L3, L1 and T10 levels), as well as on the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris. The endurance time and perceived muscle fatigue (Borg CR-10 scale) were used as fatigue criteria. EMG signals were processed using STFT and WAV to extract global (e.g, median frequency and instantaneous median frequency, respectively) or local (e.g., intensity contained in 8 frequency bands) information from the power spectrum. The slope values of these variables over time, obtained from regression analyses, were retained as EMG fatigue indices. EMG fatigue indices (STFT vs. WAV) were not significantly different within each muscle, had a variable association (Pearson's r range.: 0.06 to 0.68) with our fatigue criteria, and showed comparable reliability (Intra-class correlation range: 0.00 to 0.88), although they varied between muscles. The effect of averaging, within and between cycles, contributed to the strong association between EMG fatigue indices computed from STFT and WAV. As for EMG spectral indices of muscle fatigue, the conclusion is that both transforms carry essentially the same information.

  6. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( <21; 21-25; and >25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  7. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Andrea; Atyeo, John; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  8. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-01-01

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 °C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, i.m. isotonic saline of 48 °C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 ± 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the ‘thermal hot’ and ‘dullness’ word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 °C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 °C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  9. Downregulation of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases and Mitophagy-Related Genes in Skeletal Muscle of Physically Inactive, Frail Older Women: A Cross-Sectional Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Addison, Odessa; Brunker, Lucille; Hopkins, Paul N.; McClain, Donald A.; LaStayo, Paul C.; Marcus, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Reduced lean mass and physical function is a characteristic of frailty. However, it is currently unknown if proteolysis through the E3 ubiquitin ligases and the autophagic lysosomal pathway is dysregulated in inactive frail older women. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of key markers of ubiquitin-mediated and autophagic lysosomal proteolysis in inactive (N = 7) compared with active (N = 7) older women. Methods. Strength, mobility, leg lean mass, and physical activity assessment were used to characterize activity levels and frailty in older women. Vastus lateralis biopsies were collected after an overnight fast and were assessed for gene and protein targets related to E3 ubiquitin ligases and the autophagic lysosomal system. Results. We found that AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (Thr172) was increased (p = .045), and forkhead box O3A (FOXO3A) gene expression (p = .047) was lower in inactive frail older women. Foxo3a (Ser253), Beclin1 (Ser93/96), and class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (VPS34) protein expression were not different between the groups (p > .05). Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 4, muscle ring finger 1, muscle atrophy F-box, and the autophagy/mitophagy gene expression markers, Beclin1, autophagy-related-7, BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), dynamin-related protein 1, and Parkinson protein 2 (PARKIN) were lower in inactive frail older women (p < .05). Autophagy/mitophagy markers were positively correlated with the 6-minute walk and leg lean mass (p < .05). Conclusions. We conclude that physical inactivity in frail older women is associated with a downregulation of ubiquitin-mediated and autophagic lysosomal skeletal muscle gene expression, perhaps related to low muscle mass and poor physical function. PMID:24526667

  10. Comparison of muscle functional electrical stimulation to conventional bicycle exercise on endothelium and functional status indices in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Kaoukis, Andreas; Driva, Metaxia; Pappas, Loukas; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Ntzouvara, Olga; Karavidas, Apostolos; Pyrgakis, Vlasios; Rentoukas, Ilias; Aggeli, Constadina; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, open-label, cohort study was to compare the effect of muscle functional electrical stimulation (FES) on endothelial function to that of conventional bicycle training. Eligible patients were those with New York Heart Association class II or III heart failure symptoms and ejection fractions ≤ 0.35. Two physical conditioning programs were delivered: FES of the muscles of the lower limbs and bicycle training, each lasting for 6 weeks, with a 6-week washout period between them. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and other parameters were assessed before and after FES and the bicycle training program. FES resulted in a significant improvement in FMD, which increased from 5.9 ± 0.5% to 7.7 ± 0.5% (95% confidence interval for the difference 1.5% to 2.3%, p < 0.001). Bicycle training also resulted in a substantial improvement of endothelial function. FMD increased from 6.2 ± 0.4% to 9.2 ± 0.4% (95% confidence interval for the difference 2.5% to 3.5%, p < 0.001). FES was associated with a 41% relative increase in FMD, compared to 57% with bicycle exercise (95% confidence interval for the difference between the relative changes 1.2% to 30.5%, p = 0.034). This resulted in attaining a significantly higher FMD value after bicycle training compared to FES (9.2 ± 0.4% vs 7.7 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the effect of muscle FES in patients with heart failure on endothelial function, although not equivalent to that of conventional exercise, is substantial. Muscle FES protocols may prove very useful in the treatment of patients with heart failure who cannot or will not adhere to conventional exercise programs.

  11. A comparison of melatonin and α-lipoic acid in the induction of antioxidant defences in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Favero, Gaia; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Nardo, Lorenzo; Giugno, Lorena; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Borsani, Elisa; Reiter, Russel J; Rezzani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive deterioration in physiological functions and metabolic processes. The loss of cells during aging in vital tissues and organs is related to several factors including oxidative stress and inflammation. Skeletal muscle degeneration is common in elderly people; in fact, this tissue is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress since it requires large amounts of oxygen, and thus, oxidative damage is abundant and accumulates with increasing age. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a highly efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species and it also exhibits beneficial anti-inflammatory and anti-aging effects. This study investigated the susceptibility of rat L6 skeletal muscle cells to an induced oxidative stress following their exposure to hydrogen peroxide (50 μM) and evaluating the potential protective effects of pre-treatment with melatonin (10 nM) compared to the known beneficial effect of alpha-lipoic acid (300 μM). Hydrogen peroxide-induced obvious oxidative stress; it increased the expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and in turn promoted nuclear factor kappa-B and overrode the endogenous defence mechanisms. Conversely, pre-treatment of the hydrogen peroxide-exposed cells to melatonin or alpha-lipoic acid increased endogenous antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase-2 and heme oxygenase-1; moreover, they ameliorated significantly oxidative stress damage and partially reduced alterations in the muscle cells, which are typical of aging. In conclusion, melatonin was equally effective as alpha-lipoic acid; it exhibited marked antioxidant and anti-aging effects at the level of skeletal muscle in vitro even when it was given in a much lower dose than alpha-lipoic acid.

  12. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  13. Comparison of the validity of Hill and Huxley muscle-tendon complex models using experimental data obtained from rat m. soleus in situ.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Koen K; Baan, Guus C; Jaspers, Richard T; van Soest, A J Knoek

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between mechanical and metabolic behaviour in the widely used Hill muscle-tendon complex (MTC) model is not straightforward, whereas this is an integral part of the Huxley model. In this study, we assessed to what extent Huxley- and Hill-type MTC models yield adequate predictions of mechanical muscle behaviour during stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). In fully anaesthetized male Wistar rats (N=3), m. soleus was dissected completely free, except for the insertion. Cuff electrodes were placed over the n. ischiadicus. The distal end of the tendon was connected to a servo motor, via a force transducer. The setup allowed for full control over muscle stimulation and length, while force was measured. Quick-release and isovelocity contractions (part 1), and SSCs (part 2) were imposed. Simulations of part 2 were made with both a Hill and a Huxley MTC model, using parameter values determined from part 1. Modifications to the classic two-state Huxley model were made to incorporate series elasticity, activation dynamics, and active and passive force-length relationships. Results were similar for all rats. Fitting of the free parameters to the data of part 1 was near perfect (R(2)>0.97). During SSCs, predicted peak force and force during relaxation deviated from the experimental data for both models. Overall, both models yielded similarly adequate predictions of the experimental data. We conclude that Huxley and Hill MTC models are equally valid with respect to mechanical behaviour.

  14. Comparison of surface EMG signals between electrode types, interelectrode distances and electrode orientations in isometric exercise of the erector spinae muscle.

    PubMed

    Zedka, M; Kumar, S; Narayan, Y

    1997-10-01

    The influence of electrode type, interelectrode distance (IED) and electrode orientation on EMG signals from the paraspinal muscles was investigated. Bipolar electrodes were placed at distances 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 cm over the erector spinae in the cranio-caudal direction ("in series") as well as in the direction perpendicular to it ("in parallel"). Ten subjects performed 5 s isometric contractions of the erector spinae at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% MVC by pulling upward on a handlebar attached to the floor. RMS EMG signals were analyzed for mean average amplitude (AA). Mean total power (TP) and mean median frequency (MF) of the raw EMG signal were determined using fast Fourier transform. In addition to graded loading, sustained fatiguing contractions were performed from which TP and MF were obtained. With increasing IED the AA and TP increased while MF decreased. Although a trend towards higher AA, TP and MF was found for electrodes "in series", as compared to those "in parallel", the difference never reached significance. It is concluded that consistent information about muscle activity was obtained with Miniature Biopotential Skin Electrodes and 14445C Hewlett-Packard electrodes independently from IED or orientation. Orientation "in parallel" prevented the electrodes from sliding during muscle contraction. The third tested type, electrodes developed in the Neuromuscular Research Center, Boston, proved extremely sensitive to movement.

  15. Comparison of inflammatory responses and muscle damage indices following a soccer, basketball, volleyball and handball game at an elite competitive level.

    PubMed

    Souglis, A; Bogdanis, G C; Giannopoulou, I; Papadopoulos, Ch; Apostolidis, N

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses and muscle damage indices were compared between four popular team sports at an elite level. Seventy two male elite players of four team sports: soccer (n = 18), basketball (n = 18), volleyball (n = 18) and handball (n = 18), completed an official match, while 18 non-athletes served as controls. Blood samples were drawn before, immediately after and 13 and 37 h post-match. Soccer produced the greatest increase in inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6), which were increased by 3-4 fold immediately after the game, as well as in C-reactive protein, which was increased by threefold in the next morning after the match. Metabolic stress (urea, ammonia and cortisol) and muscle damage indices (creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase) were also higher after soccer, with creatine kinase responses being almost 2-3 times higher than the other sports. Volleyball showed the smallest increase in inflammation and muscle damage markers compared with the other three sports.

  16. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  17. Validation of the individualised neuromuscular quality of life for the USA with comparison of the impact of muscle disease on those living in USA versus UK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Individualised Neuromuscular Quality of Life (INQoL) questionnaire is a published muscle disease specific measure of QoL that has been validated using both qualitative and quantitative methods in a United Kingdom population of adults with muscle disease. If INQoL is to be used in other countries it needs to be linguistically and culturally validated for those countries. It may be important to understand any cultural differences in how patients rate their QoL when applying QoL measures in multi-national clinical trials. Methods We conducted a postal survey of QoL issues in US adults with muscle disease using an agreed translation, from UK to US English, of the same questionnaire as was used in the original construction of INQoL. This questionnaire included an opportunity for free text comments on any aspects of QoL that might not have been covered by the questionnaire. We examined the responses using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The frequency of the responses in US versus UK populations was compared using appropriate correlation tests and Rasch analysis. A phenomenological approach was used to guide the qualitative analysis and facilitate the exploration of patients' perceptions and experiences. Results The US survey received 333 responses which were compared with 251 UK survey responses. We found that INQoL domains covered all the issues raised by US subjects with no additional domains required. The experiences of those with muscle disease were remarkably similar in the US and UK but there were differences related to the impact of muscle disease on relationships and on employment which was greater for those living in the United States. The greater impact on employment was associated with a higher importance rating given to employment in the US. This may reflect the lower level of financial support for those who are unemployed, and the loss of employment related health benefits. Conclusions INQoL is appropriate for use in US

  18. Muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Kazunori; Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; Chen, Trevor C

    2011-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) induces muscle damage that is characterised by histological alterations of muscle fibres and connective tissue, increases in circulating creatine kinase (CK) activity, decreases in muscle strength and development of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Muscle damage is induced not only by eccentric contractions with ES but also by isometric contractions evoked by ES. Muscle damage profile following 40 isometric contractions of the knee extensors is similar between pulsed current (75 Hz, 400 μs) and alternating current (2.5 kHz delivered at 75 Hz, 400 μs) ES for similar force output. When comparing maximal voluntary and ES-evoked (75 Hz, 200 μs) 50 isometric contractions of the elbow flexors, ES results in greater decreases in maximal voluntary contraction strength, increases in plasma CK activity and DOMS. It appears that the magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES-evoked isometric contractions is comparable to that induced by maximal voluntary eccentric contractions, although the volume of affected muscles in ES is not as large as that of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. It seems likely that the muscle damage in ES is associated with high mechanical stress on the activated muscle fibres due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment (i.e., non-selective, synchronous and spatially fixed manner). The magnitude of muscle damage induced by ES is significantly reduced when the second ES bout is performed 2-4 weeks later. It is possible to attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage by "pre-conditioning" muscles, so that muscle damage should not limit the use of ES in training and rehabilitation. PMID:21811767

  19. Molecular events in skeletal muscle during disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandarian, Susan C.; Stevenson, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular processes underlying skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse. Because the processes involved with muscle wasting due to illness are similar to disuse, this literature is used for comparison. Areas that are ripe for further study and that will advance our understanding of muscle atrophy are suggested.