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  1. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids, and I also enjoy such hobbies as computer technology and music com- position (including the publication ... treating SMA and moving toward a cure. Medical, computer and assistive technologies enable even very young children ...

  2. Isolation of cDNA clones from within the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, M.; Roy, N.; Tamai, K.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by death of spinal cord {alpha} motor neurons, resulting in skeletal muscle atrophy. The critical SMA disease gene region on 5q13.1 contains families of microsatellite repeat sequences which exist at multiple subloci that are dispersed over a 100 to 200 kbp region. We have detected significant linkage disequilibrium between SMA type 1, the most severe form of the disorder, and two subloci of one such microsatellite, the CATT-1 family of microsatellites. Furthermore, a recombination event in a chromosome of an individual with SMA type 1 mapping between the members of two other extended microsatellite families, including CMS-1, has been observed. Combining this with previously reported recombinants refines the critical SMA region to approximately 300 kbp. P1 artificial chromosome (PAC), YAC and cosmid clones which possess both CMS-1 alleles which bracket this recombination event, as well as CATT-1 alleles showing linkage disequilibrium with SMA, have been used to probe cDNA libraries from human and other mammalian sources in search of genes within this interval; three of these cDNAs are currently being tested as candidates for the SMA gene.

  3. Plastin 3 Expression Does Not Modify Spinal Muscular Atrophy Severity in the ∆7 SMA Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueyong; Le, Thanh T.; Le, Hao T.; Beattie, Christine E.; Rich, Mark M.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the SMN1 gene and retention of SMN2. The SMN2 copy number inversely correlates with phenotypic severity and is a modifier of disease outcome. The SMN2 gene essentially differs from SMN1 by a single nucleotide in exon 7 that modulates the incorporation of exon 7 into the final SMN transcript. The majority of the SMN2 transcripts lack exon 7 and this leads to a SMN protein that does not effectively oligomerize and is rapidly degraded. However the SMN2 gene does produce some full-length SMN and the SMN2 copy number along with how much full-length SMN the SMN2 gene makes correlates with severity of the SMA phenotype. However there are a number of discordant SMA siblings that have identical haplotypes and SMN2 copy number yet one has a milder form of SMA. It has been suggested that Plastin3 (PLS3) acts as a sex specific phenotypic modifier where increased expression of PLS3 modifies the SMA phenotype in females. To test the effect of PLS3 overexpression we have over expressed full-length PLS3 in SMA mice. To ensure no disruption of functionality or post-translational processing of PLS3 we did not place a tag on the protein. PLS3 protein was expressed under the Prion promoter as we have shown previously that SMN expression under this promoter can rescue SMA mice. High levels of PLS3 mRNA were expressed in motor neurons along with an increased level of PLS3 protein in total spinal cord, yet there was no significant beneficial effect on the phenotype of SMA mice. Specifically, neither survival nor the fundamental electrophysiological aspects of the neuromuscular junction were improved upon overexpression of PLS3 in neurons. PMID:26134627

  4. Biomarker for Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Expression of SMN in Peripheral Blood of SMA Patients and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Christian; Tang, Wakana; Bugawan, Teodorica; Mano, Calvin; Horn, Carsten; Iglesias, Victor Alejandro; Fröhner, Stefanie; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Paushkin, Sergey; Chen, Karen; Kremer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by a functional deletion of SMN1 on Chromosome 5, which leads to a progressive loss of motor function in affected patients. SMA patients have at least one copy of a similar gene, SMN2, which produces functional SMN protein, although in reduced quantities. The severity of SMA is variable, partially due to differences in SMN2 copy numbers. Here, we report the results of a biomarker study characterizing SMA patients of varying disease severity. SMN copy number, mRNA and Protein levels in whole blood of patients were measured and compared against a cohort of healthy controls. The results show differential regulation of expression of SMN2 in peripheral blood between patients and healthy subjects. PMID:26468953

  5. Treatment of scoliosis in intermediate spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type II) in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fujak, Albert; Ingenhorst, Anne; Heuser, Katja; Forst, Raimund; Forst, Jürgen

    2005-04-30

    Summary. Progressive scoliosis with increasing pelvic obliquity in early childhood of patients with SMA type II is a common feature in this disease. Spinal surgery in muscle disorders should be carried out as soon as a progressive curve of more then 20 Celsius Cobb and a preserved FVC of 20-30% is proved. In later stages or severe forms of SMA II spinal stabilization becomes often impossible due to the respiratory insufficiency, the poor general condition and the severity of the scoliosis with marked pelvic obliquity. A special telescope rod was developed in order to enable a lengthening of this instrumentation during growth for children treated in early childhood. In 15 of 20 patients with SMA II in early childhood not satisfactory results after telescope rod implantation were observed. In spite of the telescope technique crankshaft phenomenon appeared and curve progression were observed. So then we stopped telescope rod implantation. This instrumentation could be in principle a good therapeutical tool for this indication, but its technical manufacturing has firstly to be improved decisively. For SMA II patients younger than 10 years with progressive scoliosis our therapeutic recommendation is nowadays a corset until the age of 10-12 years followed by definitive surgical correction using other multisegmental instrumentation like the Isola(R) system. PMID:17615511

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myoclonic epilepsy spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  7. The Power of Human Protective Modifiers: PLS3 and CORO1C Unravel Impaired Endocytosis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Rescue SMA Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hosseinibarkooie, Seyyedmohsen; Peters, Miriam; Torres-Benito, Laura; Rastetter, Raphael H; Hupperich, Kristina; Hoffmann, Andrea; Mendoza-Ferreira, Natalia; Kaczmarek, Anna; Janzen, Eva; Milbradt, Janine; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Büschges, Ansgar; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Riessland, Markus; Kye, Min Jeong; Clemen, Christoph S; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous loss of SMN1 causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common and devastating childhood genetic motor-neuron disease. The copy gene SMN2 produces only ∼10% functional SMN protein, insufficient to counteract development of SMA. In contrast, the human genetic modifier plastin 3 (PLS3), an actin-binding and -bundling protein, fully protects against SMA in SMN1-deleted individuals carrying 3-4 SMN2 copies. Here, we demonstrate that the combinatorial effect of suboptimal SMN antisense oligonucleotide treatment and PLS3 overexpression-a situation resembling the human condition in asymptomatic SMN1-deleted individuals-rescues survival (from 14 to >250 days) and motoric abilities in a severe SMA mouse model. Because PLS3 knockout in yeast impairs endocytosis, we hypothesized that disturbed endocytosis might be a key cellular mechanism underlying impaired neurotransmission and neuromuscular junction maintenance in SMA. Indeed, SMN deficit dramatically reduced endocytosis, which was restored to normal levels by PLS3 overexpression. Upon low-frequency electro-stimulation, endocytotic FM1-43 (SynaptoGreen) uptake in the presynaptic terminal of neuromuscular junctions was restored to control levels in SMA-PLS3 mice. Moreover, proteomics and biochemical analysis revealed CORO1C, another F-actin binding protein, whose direct binding to PLS3 is dependent on calcium. Similar to PLS3 overexpression, CORO1C overexpression restored fluid-phase endocytosis in SMN-knockdown cells by elevating F-actin amounts and rescued the axonal truncation and branching phenotype in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings emphasize the power of genetic modifiers to unravel the cellular pathomechanisms underlying SMA and the power of combinatorial therapy based on splice correction of SMN2 and endocytosis improvement to efficiently treat SMA. PMID:27499521

  8. SMA CARNI-VAL TRIAL PART II: A Prospective, Single-Armed Trial of L-Carnitine and Valproic Acid in Ambulatory Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kissel, John T.; Scott, Charles B.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Simard, Louise R.; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Acsadi, Gyula; Elsheik, Bakri; Schroth, Mary K.; D'Anjou, Guy; LaSalle, Bernard; Prior, Thomas W.; Sorenson, Susan; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Bromberg, Mark B.; Chan, Gary M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that valproic acid (VPA) might benefit patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL was a two part prospective trial to evaluate oral VPA and l-carnitine in SMA children. Part 1 targeted non-ambulatory children ages 2–8 in a 12 month cross over design. We report here Part 2, a twelve month prospective, open-label trial of VPA and L-carnitine in ambulatory SMA children. Methods This study involved 33 genetically proven type 3 SMA subjects ages 3–17 years. Subjects underwent two baseline assessments over 4–6 weeks and then were placed on VPA and L-carnitine for 12 months. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes included safety, adverse events and the change at 6 and 12 months in motor function assessed using the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Extend (MHFMS-Extend), timed motor tests and fine motor modules. Secondary outcomes included changes in ulnar compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CMAP), handheld dynamometry, pulmonary function, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores. Results Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. VPA and carnitine were generally well tolerated. Although adverse events occurred in 85% of subjects, they were usually mild and transient. Weight gain of 20% above body weight occurred in 17% of subjects. There was no significant change in any primary outcome at six or 12 months. Some pulmonary function measures showed improvement at one year as expected with normal growth. CMAP significantly improved suggesting a modest biologic effect not clinically meaningful. Conclusions This study, coupled with the CARNIVAL Part 1 study, indicate that VPA is not effective in improving strength or function in SMA children. The outcomes used in this study are feasible and reliable, and can be employed in future trials in SMA. Trial Regsitration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00227266 PMID:21754985

  9. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  10. Refined physical map of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy gene (SMA) region at 5q13 based on YAC and cosmid contiguous arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.; Yaraghi, Z.; McLean, M.D.

    1995-04-10

    The gene for the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder spinal muscular atrophy has been mapped to a region of 5q13 flanked proximally by CMS-1 and distally by D5S557. We present a 2-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig constructed from three libraries encompassing the D5S435/D5S629/CMS-1-SMA-D5S557/D5S112 interval. The D5S629/CMS-1-SMA-D5S557 interval is unusual insofar as chromosome 5-specific repetitive sequences are present and many of the simple tandem repeats (STR) are located at multiple loci that are unstable in our YAC clones. A long-range restriction map that demonstrates the SMA-containing interval to be 550 kb is presented. Moreover, a 210-kb cosmid array from both a YAC-specific and a chromosome 5-specific cosmid library encompassing the multilocus STRs CATT-1, CMS-1, D5F149, D5F150, and D5F153 has been assembled. We have recently reported strong linkage disequilibrium with Type I SMA for two of these STRs, indicating that the gene is located in close proximity to or within our cosmid clone array. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-06

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  12. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    PubMed Central

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  13. Bone and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vai, Silvia; Bianchi, Maria Luisa; Moroni, Isabella; Mastella, Chiara; Broggi, Francesca; Morandi, Lucia; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Bussolino, Chiara; Baranello, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, leading to progressive denervation atrophy in the involved skeletal muscles. Bone status has been poorly studied. We assessed bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures in 30 children (age range 15-171 months) affected by SMA types 2 and 3. Eighteen children (60%) had higher than normal levels of CTx (bone resorption marker); 25-OH vitamin D was in the lower range of normal (below 20 ng/ml in 9 children and below 12 ng/ml in 2). Lumbar spine BMAD (bone mineral apparent density) Z-score was below -1.5 in 50% of children. According to clinical records, four children had sustained four peripheral fractures; on spine X-rays, we observed 9 previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in 7 children. There was a significant inverse regression between PTH and 25-OH D levels, and a significant regression between BMC and BMAD values and the scores of motor-functional tests. Even if this study could not establish the pathogenesis of bone derangements in SMA, its main findings - reduced bone density, low 25OH vitamin D levels, increased bone resorption markers and asymptomatic vertebral fractures also in very young patients - strongly suggest that even young subjects affected by SMA should be considered at risk of osteopenia and even osteoporosis and fractures. PMID:26055105

  14. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  15. SMA CARNI-VAL Trial Part I: Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of L-Carnitine and Valproic Acid in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scott, Charles B.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Simard, Louise R.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Acsadi, Gyula; Elsheik, Bakri; Schroth, Mary K.; D'Anjou, Guy; LaSalle, Bernard; Prior, Thomas W.; Sorenson, Susan L.; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Bromberg, Mark B.; Chan, Gary M.; Kissel, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Valproic acid (VPA) has demonstrated potential as a therapeutic candidate for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in vitro and in vivo. Methods Two cohorts of subjects were enrolled in the SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL, a non-ambulatory group of “sitters” (cohort 1) and an ambulatory group of “walkers” (cohort 2). Here, we present results for cohort 1: a multicenter phase II randomized double-blind intention-to-treat protocol in non-ambulatory SMA subjects 2–8 years of age. Sixty-one subjects were randomized 1∶1 to placebo or treatment for the first six months; all received active treatment the subsequent six months. The primary outcome was change in the modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) score following six months of treatment. Secondary outcomes included safety and adverse event data, and change in MHFMS score for twelve versus six months of active treatment, body composition, quantitative SMN mRNA levels, maximum ulnar CMAP amplitudes, myometry and PFT measures. Results At 6 months, there was no difference in change from the baseline MHFMS score between treatment and placebo groups (difference = 0.643, 95% CI = −1.22–2.51). Adverse events occurred in >80% of subjects and were more common in the treatment group. Excessive weight gain was the most frequent drug-related adverse event, and increased fat mass was negatively related to change in MHFMS values (p = 0.0409). Post-hoc analysis found that children ages two to three years that received 12 months treatment, when adjusted for baseline weight, had significantly improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.03) compared to those who received placebo the first six months. A linear regression analysis limited to the influence of age demonstrates young age as a significant factor in improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.007). Conclusions This study demonstrated no benefit from six months treatment with VPA and L-carnitine in a young non-ambulatory cohort of subjects with SMA. Weight gain, age

  16. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  17. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Gerrit; Fujak, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective “survival motor neuron” (SMN) protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. PMID:24399883

  18. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Stephen J.; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence The incidence of SMA is 1:11,000 live births [1]. Prevalence The prevalence of the carrier state is approximately 1 in 54 [1]. Severity The clinical severity of SMA correlates inversely with SMN2 gene copy number and varies from an extreme weakness and paraplegia of infancy to a mild proximal weakness of adulthood. Natural History The natural history of SMA is complex and variable. For this reason, clinical subgroups have been defined based upon best motor function attainment during development. Type 1 SMA infants never sit independently. Type 2 SMA children sit at some point during their childhood, but never walk independently. And Type 3 SMA children and adults are able to walk independently at some point in their childhood. PMID:26515624

  19. Spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... type II have less severe symptoms during early infancy, but they become weaker with time. SMA type ... MM, De Vivo DC, eds. Neuromuscular Disorders of Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  20. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  1. Cure SMA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accepted by FDA Biogen today announced that its New Drug Application (NDA) for nusinersen, an investigational treatment for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), has... READ MORE October 27, 2016 6th Annual Congressional Dinner Furthers SMA Advocacy Work ...

  2. Cervical Spinal Cord Atrophy Profile in Adult SMN1-Linked SMA

    PubMed Central

    El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Lenglet, Timothée; Stojkovic, Tanya; Behin, Anthony; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Salachas, François; Meininger, Vincent; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Le Forestier, Nadine; Laforêt, Pascal; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Benali, Habib; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The mechanisms underlying the topography of motor deficits in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remain unknown. We investigated the profile of spinal cord atrophy (SCA) in SMN1-linked SMA, and its correlation with the topography of muscle weakness. Materials and Methods Eighteen SMN1-linked SMA patients type III/V and 18 age/gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Patients were scored on manual muscle testing and functional scales. Spinal cord was imaged using 3T MRI system. Radial distance (RD) and cord cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements in SMA patients were compared to those in controls and correlated with strength and disability scores. Results CSA measurements revealed a significant cord atrophy gradient mainly located between C3 and C6 vertebral levels with a SCA rate ranging from 5.4% to 23% in SMA patients compared to controls. RD was significantly lower in SMA patients compared to controls in the anterior-posterior direction with a maximum along C4 and C5 vertebral levels (p-values < 10−5). There were no correlations between atrophy measurements, strength and disability scores. Conclusions Spinal cord atrophy in adult SMN1-linked SMA predominates in the segments innervating the proximal muscles. Additional factors such as neuromuscular junction or intrinsic skeletal muscle defects may play a role in more complex mechanisms underlying weakness in these patients. PMID:27089520

  3. Prenatal Carrier Screening for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, S Lindsay; Brewer, Fallon; Ellison, Rebecca; Biggio, Joseph R; Edwards, Rodney K

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative genetic disorder, affects 1:5,000 to 1:10,000 infants. Carrier rates are 1:25 to 1:50. We implemented ACOG-endorsed prenatal SMA screening in mid-2014 and sought to assess uptake, observed carrier rate, and providers' knowledge and attitudes toward genetic conditions and carrier screening. Methods Retrospective cohort study of all patients receiving prenatal genetic counseling at our institution from August 2014 to April 2015. Factors associated with screening uptake were assessed. Proportions who accepted screening, were screen-positive, had partners tested, had partners who were screen-positive, and had fetuses tested were calculated. Providers' knowledge and attitudes were assessed using a validated questionnaire. Results Of 1,158 patients offered SMA screening, 224 accepted (19.3%, 95% CI 17.2-21.7). Uptake differed by race, parity, religion, and genetic counselor seen. Five (2.2% or 1:45, 95% CI 0.8-5.3 or 1:19-1:125) women were identified as carriers. Of 3 partners screened, none screened positive (0%, 95% CI 0-5.3). There were no prenatal SMA diagnoses (0%, 95% CI 0-1.4). Of 90 survey respondents, 42% incorrectly answered 1 of 9 knowledge questions. Provider attitudes toward screening were contradictory. Conclusion Despite significant resources utilized, prenatal SMA carrier screening identified no fetal cases. Cost-effectiveness and other barriers should be considered prior to large-scale adoption of more comprehensive genetic screening. PMID:27611803

  4. Differential induction of muscle atrophy pathways in two mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Boyer, Justin G.; McFall, Emily R.; Yazdani, Armin; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron loss and neurogenic atrophy are hallmarks of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant deaths. Previous studies have focused on deciphering disease pathogenesis in motor neurons. However, a systematic evaluation of atrophy pathways in muscles is lacking. Here, we show that these pathways are differentially activated depending on severity of disease in two different SMA model mice. Although proteasomal degradation is induced in skeletal muscle of both models, autophagosomal degradation is present only in Smn2B/− mice but not in the more severe Smn−/−; SMN2 mice. Expression of FoxO transcription factors, which regulate both proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation, is elevated in Smn2B/− muscle. Remarkably, administration of trichostatin A reversed all molecular changes associated with atrophy. Cardiac muscle also exhibits differential induction of atrophy between Smn2B/− and Smn−/−; SMN2 mice, albeit in the opposite direction to that of skeletal muscle. Altogether, our work highlights the importance of cautious analysis of different mouse models of SMA as distinct patterns of atrophy induction are at play depending on disease severity. We also revealed that one of the beneficial impacts of trichostatin A on SMA model mice is via attenuation of muscle atrophy through reduction of FoxO expression to normal levels. PMID:27349908

  5. Reliability of telephone administration of the PedsQL Generic Quality of Life Inventory and Neuromuscular Module in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Dunaway, Sally; Montes, Jacqueline; Montgomery, Megan; Battista, Vanessa; Koo, Benjamin; Marra, Jonathan; De Vivo, Darryl C; Hynan, Linda S; Iannaccone, Susan T; Kaufmann, Petra

    2010-03-01

    Clinical research visits are challenging for people with SMA because of limited mobility and intercurrent illnesses. Missing data threaten the validity of research results. Obtaining outcomes remotely would represent a solution. To evaluate reliability of telephone administration of the PedsQL Pediatric Generic Core Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (Generic) and Neuromuscular Module 3.0 (NM) in SMA, we recruited 21 participants of a Natural History Study for telephone administration of both modules no more than 7 days before or after an in-person study visit. We found excellent reliability between telephone and in-person administration of both modules with the NM slightly better than the Generic. Reliability of the child and parent forms was similar. We concluded that both modules can be administered reliably over the telephone to SMA patients and caregivers, expanding the utility of these tools in clinical trials. Notably, telephone administration is reliable in children as young as 8 years.

  6. Establishing a standardized therapeutic testing protocol for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Shung; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Li, Hung

    2006-11-01

    Several mice models have been created for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); however, there is still no standard preclinical testing system for the disease. We previously generated type III-specific SMA model mice, which might be suitable for use as a preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA. To establish such a system and test its applicability, we first created a testing protocol and then applied it as a means to investigate the use of valproic acid (VPA) as a possible treatment for SMA. These SMA mice revealed tail/ear/foot deformity, muscle atrophy, poorer motor performances, smaller compound muscle action potential and lower spinal motoneuron density at the age of 9 to 12 months in comparison with age-matched wild-type littermate mice. In addition, VPA attenuates motoneuron death, increases spinal SMN protein level and partially normalizes motor function in SMA mice. These results suggest that the testing protocol developed here is well suited for use as a standardized preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA.

  7. Dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Allred, P.; Gardner, R.; Fernandes Filho, J.A.; Florence, J.; Pestronk, A.; Al-Lozi, M.; Baloh, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are hereditary disorders characterized by weakness from degeneration of spinal motor neurons. Although most SMA cases with proximal weakness are recessively inherited, rare families with dominant inheritance have been reported. We aimed to clinically, pathologically, and genetically characterize a large North American family with an autosomal dominant proximal SMA. Methods: Affected family members underwent clinical and electrophysiologic evaluation. Twenty family members were genotyped on high-density genome-wide SNP arrays and linkage analysis was performed. Results: Ten affected individuals (ages 7–58 years) showed prominent quadriceps atrophy, moderate to severe weakness of quadriceps and hip abductors, and milder degrees of weakness in other leg muscles. Upper extremity strength and sensation was normal. Leg weakness was evident from early childhood and was static or very slowly progressive. Electrophysiology and muscle biopsies were consistent with chronic denervation. SNP-based linkage analysis showed a maximum 2-point lod score of 5.10 (θ = 0.00) at rs17679127 on 14q32. A disease-associated haplotype spanning from 114 cM to the 14q telomere was identified. A single recombination narrowed the minimal genomic interval to Chr14: 100,220,765–106,368,585. No segregating copy number variations were found within the disease interval. Conclusions: We describe a family with an early onset, autosomal dominant, proximal SMA with a distinctive phenotype: symptoms are limited to the legs and there is notable selectivity for the quadriceps. We demonstrate linkage to a 6.1-Mb interval on 14q32 and propose calling this disorder spinal muscular atrophy–lower extremity, dominant. GLOSSARY lod = logarithm of the odds; SMA = spinal muscular atrophy; SMA-LED = spinal muscular atrophy–lower extremity, dominant; SNP = single-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:20697106

  8. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  9. Disease Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases are neurological disorders characterized primarily by the degeneration of spinal motor neurons, skeletal muscle atrophy, and debilitating and often fatal motor dysfunction. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive motor neuron disease of high incidence and severity and the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by homozygous mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and retention of at least one copy of the hypomorphic gene paralog SMN2. Early studies established a loss-of-function disease mechanism involving ubiquitous SMN deficiency and suggested SMN upregulation as a possible therapeutic approach. In recent years, greater knowledge of the central role of SMN in RNA processing combined with deep characterization of animal models of SMA has significantly advanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of the disease. SMA is emerging as an RNA disease not limited to motor neurons, but one that involves dysfunction of motor circuits that comprise multiple neuronal subpopulations and possibly other cell types. Advances in SMA research have also led to the development of several potential therapeutics shown to be effective in animal models of SMA that are now in clinical trials. These agents offer unprecedented promise for the treatment of this still incurable neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26063904

  10. Spinal muscular atrophy, John Griffin, and mentorship.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy is an inherited motor neuron disease that occurs in Brittany Spaniels and has remarkable similarities with human spinal muscular atrophy. Both disorders are characterized by proximal limb and truncal muscle weakness of variable severity. Detailed pathological studies indicate that there is early dysfunction of motor neuron synapses, particularly the neuromuscular junction synapse, prior to motor neuron death. This period of synaptic dysfunction may define a critical window of opportunity for disease reversibility in motor neuron disease.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saif; Bhatia, Kanchan; Kannan, Annapoorna; Gangwani, Laxman

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a) regulation of SMN gene expression and (b) degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA. PMID:27042141

  12. De novo and inherited deletions of the 5q13 region in spinal muscular atrophies

    SciTech Connect

    Melki, J.; Lefebvre, S.; Burglen, L.; Burlet, P.; Clermont, O.; Reboullet, S.; Benichou, B.; Zeviani, M. ); Millasseau, P. ); Le Paslier, D. )

    1994-06-03

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) represent the second most common fatal autosomal recessive disorder after cystic fibrosis. Childhood spinal muscular atrophies are divided into severe (type I) and mild forms (types II and III). By a combination of genetic and physical mapping, a yeast artificial chromosome contig of the 5q13 region spanning the disease locus was constructed that showed the presence of low copy repeats in this region. Allele segregation was analyzed at the closest genetic loci detected by markers C212 and C272 in 201 SMA families. Inherited and de novo deletions were observed in nine unrelated SMA patients. Moreover, deletions were strongly suggested in at least 18 percent of SMA type I patients by the observation of marked heterozygosity deficiency for the loci studied. These results indicate that deletion events are statistically associated with the severe form of spinal muscular atrophy. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Resistance Strength Training Exercise in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A.; White, Andrea T.; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H.; Carey, John C.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. Methods We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Results Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4±3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. Conclusions A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3 days/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. PMID:25597614

  14. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  15. Outcome and experience of implementing spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening on sperm donors.

    PubMed

    Callum, Pamela; Iger, Jennifer; Ray, Marilyn; Sims, Charles A; Falk, Rena E

    2010-10-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) carrier screening was performed on 277 active semen donors and new semen donor applicants; five men tested positive as carriers for SMA. The risk for specific medical problems in donor offspring can be significantly reduced by incorporating new genetic tests, such as spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening, into donor screening practices; however, future efforts should focus on communicating the limitations of genetic screening to donor gamete recipients and on the development of guidelines for implementing new genetic tests on donors. PMID:20152968

  16. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... necessary to ensure adequate nutrition that doesn't overload a child with unnecessary calories. Children who can' ... Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  17. Mapping of the bovine spinal muscular atrophy locus to Chromosome 24.

    PubMed

    Medugorac, Ivica; Kemter, Juliane; Russ, Ingolf; Pietrowski, Detlef; Nüske, Stefan; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Förster, Martin

    2003-06-01

    A hereditary form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by an autosomal recessive gene has been reported for American Brown-Swiss cattle and in advanced backcrosses between American Brown-Swiss and many European brown cattle breeds. Bovine SMA (bovSMA) bears remarkable resemblance to the human SMA (SMA1). Affected homozygous calves also show progressive symmetric weakness and neurogenic atrophy of proximal muscles. The condition is characterized by severe muscle atrophy, quadriparesis, and sternal recumbency as result of neurogenic atrophy. We report on the localization of the gene causing bovSMA within a genomic interval between the microsatellite marker URB031 and the telomeric end of bovine Chromosome (Chr) 24 (BTA24). Linkage analysis of a complex pedigree of German Braunvieh cattle revealed a recombination fraction of 0.06 and a three-point lod score of 11.82. The results of linkage and haplotyping analysis enable a marker-assisted selection against bovSMA based on four microsatellite markers most telomeric on BTA24 to a moderate accuracy of 89-94%. So far, this region is not orthologous to any human chromosome segments responsible for twelve distinct disease phenotypes of autosomal neuropathies. Our results indicate the apoptosis-inhibiting protein BCL2 as the most promising positional candidate gene causing bovSMA. Our findings offer an attractive animal model for a better understanding of human forms of SMA and for a probable anti-apoptotic synergy of SMN-BCL2 aggregates in mammals.

  18. [A case of spinal muscular atrophy type 0 in Japan].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kentaro; Saito, Kayoko; Sato, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Funatsuka, Makoto; Osawa, Makiko

    2012-09-01

    The patient was a 2-month-old female infant born at 41 weeks and 2 days of gestation presenting multiple arthrogryposis, severe muscle hypotonia and respiratory distress with difficulty in feeding. She suffered from repeated complications with aspiration pneumonia. On admission to our hospital, she exhibited fasciculation and absence of deep tendon reflexes. Examination of the motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) revealed no muscle contraction. Deletions of the SMN and NAIP genes were noted. Based on severe clinical course and disease development in utero, she was given a diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 0 (very severe type). Arthrogryposis and disappearance of MCV are exclusion criteria for SMA. However, the clinical course of the infant was very severe and included such exclusion items. Consequently, when an infant presents muscle hypotonia and respiratory distress, SMA must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses, even though arthrogryposis is an exclusion criterion for SMA. We discuss this case in relation to the few extant reports on SMA type 0 in Japanese infants in the literature. PMID:23012868

  19. Isolated exon 8 deletion in type 1 spinal muscular atrophy with bilateral optic atrophy: unusual genetic mutation leading to unusual manifestation?

    PubMed

    Maiti, D; Bhattacharya, M; Yadav, S

    2012-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or type 1 SMA is a fatal autosomal recessive disorder usually caused by homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 in the survivor motor neuron (SMN) gene. Additional deletion of the neuronal apotosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene exacerbates the clinical severity. Isolated exon 8 deletion has been reported in a single case series of SMA types 2 and 3 and never with SMA type 1. While extraocular muscles are typically spared, there are a few case reports documenting associated external ophthalmoplegia. Optic atrophy is a hitherto unreported association of SMA. We report a 10-month-old male infant with SMA type 1 with optic atrophy due to isolated deletion of exon 8 of the SMN gene with intact exon 7 and NAIP gene. PMID:23298926

  20. Impaired Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Myogenesis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ripolone, Michela; Ronchi, Dario; Violano, Raffaella; Vallejo, Dionis; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Barca, Emanuele; Lucchini, Valeria; Colombo, Irene; Villa, Luisa; Berardinelli, Angela; Balottin, Umberto; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Parisi, Daniela; Toscano, Antonio; Sciacco, Monica; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Moggio, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The important depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the general depression of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex levels (including complex II) have been confirmed, implying an increasing paucity of mitochondria in the muscle from patients with types I, II, and III spinal muscular atrophy (SMA-I, -II, and -III, respectively). OBJECTIVE To investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in a large series of muscle biopsy samples from patients with SMA. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied quadriceps muscle samples from 24 patients with genetically documented SMA and paraspinal muscle samples from 3 patients with SMA-II undergoing surgery for scoliosis correction. Postmortem muscle samples were obtained from 1 additional patient. Age-matched controls consisted of muscle biopsy specimens from healthy children aged 1 to 3 years who had undergone analysis for suspected myopathy. Analyses were performed at the Neuromuscular Unit, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Foundation Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico-Milano, from April 2011 through January 2015. EXPOSURES We used histochemical, biochemical, and molecular techniques to examine the muscle samples. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Respiratory chain activity and mitochondrial content. RESULTS Results of histochemical analysis revealed that cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) deficiency was more evident in muscle samples from patients with SMA-I and SMA-II. Residual activities for complexes I, II, and IV in muscles from patients with SMA-I were 41%, 27%, and 30%, respectively, compared with control samples (P < .005). Muscle mtDNA content and cytrate synthase activity were also reduced in all 3 SMA types (P < .05). We linked these alterations to downregulation of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor coactivator 1α, the transcriptional activators nuclear respiratory factor 1 and nuclear respiratory factor 2, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and their downstream targets

  1. [Fractures in spinal muscular atrophy].

    PubMed

    Febrer, Anna; Vigo, Meritxell; Rodríguez, Natalia; Medina, Julita; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés

    2013-09-01

    Objetivo. Determinar la frecuencia de fracturas en pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal, mecanismo de produccion, edad de aparicion y repercusion funcional. Pacientes y metodos. Se estudian 65 pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal. Se recogen las fracturas diagnosticadas mediante radiografia y se analizan los siguientes parametros: tipo de atrofia muscular espinal, marcha, edad en el momento de la fractura, mecanismo de produccion, localizacion, tratamiento aplicado y repercusion funcional. Resultados. Presentaron fracturas 13 pacientes (20%), con un total de 20 (cuatro presentaron dos o mas fracturas). La edad media fue de 6,35 años. La localizacion fue en su mayoria en el femur y el mecanismo de produccion, en 12 casos por caidas y en 8 por traumatismo menor. No detectamos ninguna fractura vertebral. Todas se trataron de manera conservadora. El unico paciente ambulante que presento una fractura dejo de caminar despues de la inmovilizacion. Conclusiones. La existencia de fracturas en estos pacientes interfiere en su calidad de vida y en el nivel funcional. Es importante la prevencion de las mismas en el manejo del paciente y vigilando la correcta postura en la silla de ruedas con sistemas de sujecion Deberian emprenderse mas estudios sobre la perdida de densidad mineral osea en estos pacientes y su posible relacion con las fracturas.

  2. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Cardozo, Christopher; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels (HCs) formed by connexins (Cxs) and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), and transient receptor potential, sub-family V, member 2 (TRPV2) channels was demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically reduced in denervated muscles deficient in Cxs 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned non-selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), agrin/LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4)/muscle-specific receptor kinase (MuSK) and acetylcholine (Ach) are among the possible signals for repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression. PMID:25540609

  3. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant

    PubMed Central

    Gathwala, Geeta; Silayach, Joginder; Bhakhari, Bhanu Kiran; Narwal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature. PMID:24891907

  4. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, Geeta; Silayach, Joginder; Bhakhari, Bhanu Kiran; Narwal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature. PMID:24891907

  5. [Spinal muscular atrophy in Braunvieh calves].

    PubMed

    Stocker, H; Ossent, P; Heckmann, R; Oertle, C

    1992-01-01

    Clinical, neurophysiological and histopathological findings of sixteen cases of spinal muscular atrophy in calves are described. The first clinical signs usually were noticed at 2-6 weeks of age. The animals showed weakness in the hindquarters, trembling and ultimate recumbency. There was a marked muscular atrophy in all four extremities. In addition, secondary bronchopneumonia was evident in 11 cases. Histopathological lesions consisted of degenerative changes in the neurons of the ventral horns and the axons of the spinal cord as well as degeneration of nerve axons in the extremities. Neurophysiological measurements revealed spontaneous activity in the muscles of the limbs. The conditions is autosomal recessive. So far 11 bulls have been identified and excluded from breeding.

  6. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  7. Genetic findings of Cypriot spinal muscular atrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, L; Nicolaou, P; Koutsou, P; Georghiou, A; Anastasiadou, V; Tanteles, G; Kyriakides, T; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Christodoulou, K

    2015-10-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disorder characterised commonly by proximal muscle weakness and wasting in the absence of sensory signs. Deletion or disruption of the SMN1 gene causes the disease. The SMN1 gene is located within an inverted duplication on chromosome 5q13 with the genes SMN2, NAIP and GTF2H2. MLPA analysis of 13 Cypriot SMA patients revealed that, 12 patients carried a homozygous SMN1 gene deletion and one patient carried two copies of the SMN1 gene. Two of 13 cases were a consequence of a paternally originating de novo mutation. Five genotypes were identified within the population, with the most frequent being a homozygous SMN1 and NAIP genes deletion. In conclusion, genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that SMN2 is inversely related to disease severity and that NAIP and GTF2H2 act as negative modifiers. This study provided, for the first time, a comprehensive overview of gene copy numbers and inheritance patterns within Cypriot SMA families. PMID:26017350

  8. Spinal muscular atrophy: a motor neuron disorder or a multi-organ disease?

    PubMed

    Shababi, Monir; Lorson, Christian L; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. SMA is characterized by loss of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, leading to weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA occurs as a result of homozygous deletion or mutations in Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). Loss of SMN1 leads to a dramatic reduction in SMN protein, which is essential for motor neuron survival. SMA disease severity ranges from extremely severe to a relatively mild adult onset form of proximal muscle atrophy. Severe SMA patients typically die mostly within months or a few years as a consequence of respiratory insufficiency and bulbar paralysis. SMA is widely known as a motor neuron disease; however, there are numerous clinical reports indicating the involvement of additional peripheral organs contributing to the complete picture of the disease in severe cases. In this review, we have compiled clinical and experimental reports that demonstrate the association between the loss of SMN and peripheral organ deficiency and malfunction. Whether defective peripheral organs are a consequence of neuronal damage/muscle atrophy or a direct result of SMN loss will be discussed.

  9. Spinal muscular atrophy: a motor neuron disorder or a multi-organ disease?

    PubMed Central

    Shababi, Monir; Lorson, Christian L; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. SMA is characterized by loss of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, leading to weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA occurs as a result of homozygous deletion or mutations in Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). Loss of SMN1 leads to a dramatic reduction in SMN protein, which is essential for motor neuron survival. SMA disease severity ranges from extremely severe to a relatively mild adult onset form of proximal muscle atrophy. Severe SMA patients typically die mostly within months or a few years as a consequence of respiratory insufficiency and bulbar paralysis. SMA is widely known as a motor neuron disease; however, there are numerous clinical reports indicating the involvement of additional peripheral organs contributing to the complete picture of the disease in severe cases. In this review, we have compiled clinical and experimental reports that demonstrate the association between the loss of SMN and peripheral organ deficiency and malfunction. Whether defective peripheral organs are a consequence of neuronal damage/muscle atrophy or a direct result of SMN loss will be discussed. PMID:23876144

  10. Severe spinal muscular atrophy variant associated with congenital bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Grohmann, Katja; Harder, Anja; Stadelmann, Christine; Zerres, Klaus; Bührer, Christoph; Obladen, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Infantile autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (type I) represents a lethal disorder leading to progressive symmetric muscular atrophy of limb and trunk muscles. Ninety-six percent cases of spinal muscular atrophy type I are caused by deletions or mutations in the survival motoneuron gene (SMNI) on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. However, a number of chromosome 5q-negative patients with additional clinical features (respiratory distress, cerebellar hypoplasia) have been designated in the literature as infantile spinal muscular atrophy plus forms. In addition, the combination of severe spinal muscular atrophy and neurogenic arthrogryposis has been described. We present clinical, molecular, and autopsy findings of a newborn boy presenting with generalized muscular atrophy in combination with congenital bone fractures and extremely thin ribs but without contractures.

  11. Spinal muscular atrophy: from tissue specificity to therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Iascone, Daniel M.; Lee, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most frequent genetic cause of death in infants and toddlers. All cases of spinal muscular atrophy result from reductions in levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, and so SMN upregulation is a focus of many preclinical and clinical studies. We examine four issues that may be important in planning for therapeutic success. First, neuromuscular phenotypes in the SMNΔ7 mouse model closely match those in human patients but peripheral disease manifestations differ, suggesting that endpoints other than mouse lifespan may be more useful in predicting clinical outcome. Second, SMN plays important roles in multiple central and peripheral cell types, not just motor neurons, and it remains unclear which of these cell types need to be targeted therapeutically. Third, should SMN-restoration therapy not be effective in all patients, blocking molecular changes downstream of SMN reduction may confer significant benefit, making it important to evaluate therapeutic targets other than SMN. Lastly, for patients whose disease progression is slowed, but who retain significant motor dysfunction, additional approaches used to enhance regeneration of the neuromuscular system may be of value. PMID:25705387

  12. Deletions of the survival motor neuron gene in unaffected siblings of patients with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cobben, J.M.; Steege, G. van der; Grootscholten, P.

    1995-10-01

    DNA studies in 103 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients from The Netherlands revealed homozygosity for a survival motor neuron (SMN) deletion in 96 (93%) of 103. Neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein deletions were found in 38 (37%) of 103 and occurred most frequently in SMA type 1. SMN deletions have not yet been described to occur in healthy subjects. In this study, however, four unaffected sibs from two SMA families showed homozygosity for SMN deletions. Homozygosity for an SMN deletion in unaffected persons seems to be very rare. Therefore, demonstration of a homozygous SMN deletion in a clinically presumed SMA patient should be considered as a confirmation of the diagnosis, whether or not SMN is in fact the causal gene for SMA. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  14. SMN-inducing compounds for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lorson, Monique A; Lorson, Christian L

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. A neurodegenerative disease, it is caused by loss of SMN1, although low, but essential, levels of SMN protein are produced by the nearly identical gene SMN2. While no effective treatment or therapy currently exists, a new wave of therapeutics has rapidly progressed from cell-based and preclinical animal models to the point where clinical trials have initiated for SMA-specific compounds. There are several reasons why SMA has moved relatively rapidly towards novel therapeutics, including: SMA is monogenic; the molecular understanding of SMN gene regulation has been building for nearly 20 years; and all SMA patients retain one or more copies of SMN2 that produces low levels of full-length, fully functional SMN protein. This review primarily focuses upon the biology behind the disease and examines SMN1- and SMN2-targeted therapeutics. PMID:23157239

  15. Gene therapy: a promising approach to treating spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Pádraig J; Iremonger, Kayleigh; Karyka, Evangelia; Herranz-Martín, Saúl; Shum, Ka-To; Tam, Janice Kal Van; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2014-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic defect in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, which encodes SMN, a protein widely expressed in all eukaryotic cells. Depletion of the SMN protein causes muscle weakness and progressive loss of movement in SMA patients. The field of gene therapy has made major advances over the past decade, and gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by in vivo or ex vivo techniques is a rapidly emerging field in neuroscience. Despite Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis being among the most common neurodegenerative diseases in humans and attractive targets for treatment development, their multifactorial origin and complicated genetics make them less amenable to gene therapy. Monogenic disorders resulting from modifications in a single gene, such as SMA, prove more favorable and have been at the fore of this evolution of potential gene therapies, and results to date have been promising at least. With the estimated number of monogenic diseases standing in the thousands, elucidating a therapeutic target for one could have major implications for many more. Recent progress has brought about the commercialization of the first gene therapies for diseases, such as pancreatitis in the form of Glybera, with the potential for other monogenic disease therapies to follow suit. While much research has been carried out, there are many limiting factors that can halt or impede translation of therapies from the bench to the clinic. This review will look at both recent advances and encountered impediments in terms of SMA and endeavor to highlight the promising results that may be applicable to various associated diseases and also discuss the potential to overcome present limitations. PMID:24845847

  16. Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by an expanded repeat in the androgen receptor gene. The mutant protein is toxic to motor neurons and muscle. The toxicity is ligand-dependent and likely involves aberrant interaction of the mutant androgen receptor with other nuclear factors leading to transcriptional dysregulation. Various therapeutic strategies have been effective in transgenic animal models, and the challenge now is to translate these strategies into safe and effective treatment in patients. PMID:26547319

  17. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis among Polish families with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Brzustowicz, L.M.; Wang, C.H.; Matseoane, D.; Kleyn, P.W.; Vitale, E.; Das, K.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C.; Munsat, T.L.; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited degenerative disorder of anterior horn cells that results in progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The autosomal recessive forms of childhood-onset SMA have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-13.3, in a number of studies examining different populations. A total of 9 simple sequence repeat markers were genotyped against 32 Polish families with SMA. The markers span an {approximately}0.7 cM region defined by the SMA flanking markers D5S435 and MAP1B. Significant linkage disequilibrium (corrected P<0.5) was detected at four of these markers, with D/D{sub max} values of {le}.89. Extended haplotype analysis revealed a predominant haplotype associated with SMA. The apparently high mutation rate of some of the markers has resulted in a number of haplotypes that vary slightly from this predominant haplotype. The predominant haplotype and these closely related patterns represent 25% of the disease chromosomes and none of the nontransmitted parental chromosomes. This predominant haplotype is present both in patients with acute (type I) and in chronic (types II and III) forms of SMA and occurs twice in a homozygous state, both times in children with chronic SMA. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Riluzole pharmacokinetics in young patients with spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abbara, Chadi; Estournet, Brigitte; Lacomblez, Lucette; Lelièvre, Benedicte; Ouslimani, Amal; Lehmann, Blandine; Viollet, Louis; Barois, Annie; Diquet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    AIMS The objective of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of riluzole in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). METHODS Fourteen patients were enrolled in an open-label, nonrandomized and repeat-dose pharmacokinetic study. All participants were assigned to receive 50 mg riluzole orally for 5 days. Riluzole plasma concentrations were determined from samples obtained at day 5. RESULTS The pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that a dose of 50 mg once a day was sufficient to obtain a daily total exposure [AUC(0,24 h) = 2257 ng ml−1 h] which was comparable with results obtained in adult healthy volunteers or ALS patients in whom a dose of 50 mg twice a day is recommended. The pharmacokinetic simulation demonstrated that the administration of 50 mg twice a day could result in higher concentrations, hence reduced safety margin. CONCLUSION The dose of 50 mg once a day was chosen for the clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of riluzole in SMA patients. PMID:21284699

  19. Mechanistic principles of antisense targets for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natalia N; Lee, Brian M; DiDonato, Christine J; Singh, Ravindra N

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a major neurodegenerative disorder of children and infants. SMA is primarily caused by low levels of SMN protein owing to deletions or mutations of the SMN1 gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, fails to compensate for the loss of the production of the functional SMN protein due to predominant skipping of exon 7. Several compounds, including antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that elevate SMN protein from SMN2 hold the promise for treatment. An ASO-based drug currently under Phase III clinical trial employs intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) as its target. Cumulative studies on ISS-N1 reveal a wealth of information with significance to the overall therapeutic development for SMA. Here, the authors summarize the mechanistic principles behind various antisense targets currently available for SMA therapy.

  20. Mechanistic principles of antisense targets for the treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Natalia N.; Lee, Brian M.; DiDonato, Christine J.; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a major neurodegenerative disorder of children and infants. SMA is primarily caused by low levels of SMN protein owing to deletions or mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, fails to compensate for the loss of the production of the functional SMN protein due to predominant skipping of exon 7. Several compounds, including antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that elevate SMN protein from SMN2 hold the promise for treatment. An ASO-based drug currently under phase 3 clinical trial employs intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) as its target. Cumulative studies on the ISS-N1 reveal a wealth of information with significance to the overall therapeutic development for SMA. Here we summarize the mechanistic principles behind various antisense targets currently available for SMA therapy. PMID:26381381

  1. Electrophysiological biomarkers in spinal muscular atrophy: proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    David Arnold, W; Porensky, Paul N; McGovern, Vicki L; Iyer, Chitra C; Duque, Sandra; Li, Xiaobai; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Kaspar, Brian K; Kolb, Stephen J; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preclinical therapies that restore survival motor neuron (SMN) protein levels can dramatically extend survival in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) mouse models. Biomarkers are needed to effectively translate these promising therapies to clinical trials. Our objective was to investigate electrophysiological biomarkers of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and electromyography (EMG) using an SMA mouse model. Methods Sciatic CMAP, MUNE, and EMG were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice at ages 3–13 days and at 21 days in mice with SMN selectively reduced in motor neurons (ChATCre). To investigate these measures as biomarkers of treatment response, measurements were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice treated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or gene therapy. Results CMAP was significantly reduced in SMNΔ7 mice at days 6–13 (P < 0.01), and MUNE was reduced at days 7–13 (P < 0.01). Fibrillations were present on EMG in SMNΔ7 mice but not controls (P = 0.02). Similar findings were seen at 21 days in ChATCre mice. MUNE in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice were similar to controls at day 12 and 30. CMAP reduction persisted in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice at day 12 but was corrected at day 30. Similarly, CMAP and MUNE responses were corrected with gene therapy to restore SMN. Interpretation These studies confirm features of preserved neuromuscular function in the early postnatal period and subsequent motor unit loss in SMNΔ7 mice. SMN restoring therapies result in preserved MUNE and gradual repair of CMAP responses. This provides preclinical evidence for the utilization of CMAP and MUNE as biomarkers in future SMA clinical trials. PMID:24511555

  2. Systemic restoration of UBA1 ameliorates disease in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Rachael A.; Karyka, Evangelia; Boyd, Penelope; Côme, Julien; Jones, Ross A.; Zheng, Yinan; Szunyogova, Eva; Groen, Ewout J.N.; Hunter, Gillian; Thomson, Derek; Wishart, Thomas M.; Becker, Catherina G.; Parson, Simon H.; Martinat, Cécile; Azzouz, Mimoun; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by loss of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Molecular pathways that are disrupted downstream of SMN therefore represent potentially attractive therapeutic targets for SMA. Here, we demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of ubiquitin pathways disrupted as a consequence of SMN depletion, by increasing levels of one key ubiquitination enzyme (ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1 [UBA1]), represents a viable approach for treating SMA. Loss of UBA1 was a conserved response across mouse and zebrafish models of SMA as well as in patient induced pluripotent stem cell–derive motor neurons. Restoration of UBA1 was sufficient to rescue motor axon pathology and restore motor performance in SMA zebrafish. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9–UBA1 (AAV9-UBA1) gene therapy delivered systemic increases in UBA1 protein levels that were well tolerated over a prolonged period in healthy control mice. Systemic restoration of UBA1 in SMA mice ameliorated weight loss, increased survival and motor performance, and improved neuromuscular and organ pathology. AAV9-UBA1 therapy was also sufficient to reverse the widespread molecular perturbations in ubiquitin homeostasis that occur during SMA. We conclude that UBA1 represents a safe and effective therapeutic target for the treatment of both neuromuscular and systemic aspects of SMA. PMID:27699224

  3. Systemic restoration of UBA1 ameliorates disease in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Rachael A.; Karyka, Evangelia; Boyd, Penelope; Côme, Julien; Jones, Ross A.; Zheng, Yinan; Szunyogova, Eva; Groen, Ewout J.N.; Hunter, Gillian; Thomson, Derek; Wishart, Thomas M.; Becker, Catherina G.; Parson, Simon H.; Martinat, Cécile; Azzouz, Mimoun; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by loss of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Molecular pathways that are disrupted downstream of SMN therefore represent potentially attractive therapeutic targets for SMA. Here, we demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of ubiquitin pathways disrupted as a consequence of SMN depletion, by increasing levels of one key ubiquitination enzyme (ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1 [UBA1]), represents a viable approach for treating SMA. Loss of UBA1 was a conserved response across mouse and zebrafish models of SMA as well as in patient induced pluripotent stem cell–derive motor neurons. Restoration of UBA1 was sufficient to rescue motor axon pathology and restore motor performance in SMA zebrafish. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9–UBA1 (AAV9-UBA1) gene therapy delivered systemic increases in UBA1 protein levels that were well tolerated over a prolonged period in healthy control mice. Systemic restoration of UBA1 in SMA mice ameliorated weight loss, increased survival and motor performance, and improved neuromuscular and organ pathology. AAV9-UBA1 therapy was also sufficient to reverse the widespread molecular perturbations in ubiquitin homeostasis that occur during SMA. We conclude that UBA1 represents a safe and effective therapeutic target for the treatment of both neuromuscular and systemic aspects of SMA.

  4. Six-Minute Walk Test demonstrates motor fatigue in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Montes, J.; McDermott, M. P.; Martens, W. B.; Dunaway, S.; Glanzman, A. M.; Riley, S.; Quigley, J.; Montgomery, M. J.; Sproule, D.; Tawil, R.; Chung, W. K.; Darras, B. T.; De Vivo, D. C.; Kaufmann, P.; Finkel, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), weakness, decreased endurance, and fatigue limit mobility. Scales have been developed to measure function across the wide spectrum of disease severity. However, these scales typically are observer dependent, and scores are based on sums across Likert-scaled items. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is an objective, easily administered, and standardized evaluation of functional exercise capacity that has been proven reliable in other neurologic disorders and in children. Methods: To study the performance of the 6MWT in SMA, 18 ambulatory participants were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. Clinical measures were 6MWT, 10-m walk/run, Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale–Expanded (HFMSE), forced vital capacity, and handheld dynamometry. Associations between the 6MWT total distance and other outcomes were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficients. A paired t test was used to compare the mean distance walked in the first and sixth minutes. Results: The 6MWT was associated with the HFMSE score (r = 0.83, p < 0.0001), 10-m walk/run (r = −0.87, p < 0.0001), and knee flexor strength (r = 0.62, p = 0.01). Gait velocity decreased during successive minutes in nearly all participants. The average first minute distance (57.5 m) was significantly more than the sixth minute distance (48 m) (p = 0.0003). Conclusion: The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) can be safely performed in ambulatory patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), correlates with established outcome measures, and is sensitive to fatigue-related changes. The 6MWT is a promising candidate outcome measure for clinical trials in ambulatory subjects with SMA. GLOSSARY FVC = forced vital capacity; HFMSE = Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale–Expanded; HHD = handheld dynamometry; 6MWT = Six-Minute Walk Test; SMA = spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:20211907

  5. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Ori-McKenney, K.M.; Scoto, M.; Tuck, E.P.; Bell, S.; Ma, D.; Masi, S.; Allred, P.; Al-Lozi, M.; Reilly, M.M.; Miller, L.J.; Jani-Acsadi, A.; Pestronk, A.; Shy, M.E.; Muntoni, F.; Vallee, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene responsible for 14q32-linked dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED, OMIM 158600). Methods: Target exon capture and next generation sequencing was used to analyze the 73 genes in the 14q32 linkage interval in 3 SMA-LED family members. Candidate gene sequencing in additional dominant SMA families used PCR and pooled target capture methods. Patient fibroblasts were biochemically analyzed. Results: Regional exome sequencing of all candidate genes in the 14q32 interval in the original SMA-LED family identified only one missense mutation that segregated with disease state—a mutation in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 (I584L). Sequencing of DYNC1H1 in 32 additional probands with lower extremity predominant SMA found 2 additional heterozygous tail domain mutations (K671E and Y970C), confirming that multiple different mutations in the same domain can cause a similar phenotype. Biochemical analysis of dynein purified from patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the I584L mutation dominantly disrupted dynein complex stability and function. Conclusions: We demonstrate that mutations in the tail domain of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein (DYNC1H1) cause spinal muscular atrophy and provide experimental evidence that a human DYNC1H1 mutation disrupts dynein complex assembly and function. DYNC1H1 mutations were recently found in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (type 2O) and in a child with mental retardation. Both of these phenotypes show partial overlap with the spinal muscular atrophy patients described here, indicating that dynein dysfunction is associated with a range of phenotypes in humans involving neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:22459677

  6. Fasudil improves survival and promotes skeletal muscle development in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant death. It is caused by mutations/deletions of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and is typified by the loss of spinal cord motor neurons, muscular atrophy, and in severe cases, death. The SMN protein is ubiquitously expressed and various cellular- and tissue-specific functions have been investigated to explain the specific motor neuron loss in SMA. We have previously shown that the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway is misregulated in cellular and animal SMA models, and that inhibition of ROCK with the chemical Y-27632 significantly increased the lifespan of a mouse model of SMA. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of the clinically approved ROCK inhibitor fasudil. Methods Fasudil was administered by oral gavage from post-natal day 3 to 21 at a concentration of 30 mg/kg twice daily. The effects of fasudil on lifespan and SMA pathological hallmarks of the SMA mice were assessed and compared to vehicle-treated mice. For the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the log-rank test was used and survival curves were considered significantly different at P < 0.05. For the remaining analyses, the Student's two-tail t test for paired variables and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to test for differences between samples and data were considered significantly different at P < 0.05. Results Fasudil significantly improves survival of SMA mice. This dramatic phenotypic improvement is not mediated by an up-regulation of Smn protein or via preservation of motor neurons. However, fasudil administration results in a significant increase in muscle fiber and postsynaptic endplate size, and restores normal expression of markers of skeletal muscle development, suggesting that the beneficial effects of fasudil could be muscle-specific. Conclusions Our work underscores the importance of muscle as a therapeutic target in SMA and highlights the beneficial potential of ROCK

  7. Copy Number Variations in the Survival Motor Neuron Genes: Implications for Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an early-onset, autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of spinal α-motor neurons. This loss of α-motor neurons is associated with muscle weakness and atrophy. SMA can be classified into five clinical grades based on age of onset and severity of the disease. Regardless of clinical grade, proximal SMA results from the loss or mutation of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) on chromosome 5q13. In humans a large tandem chromosomal duplication has lead to a second copy of the SMN gene locus known as SMN2. SMN2 is distinguishable from SMN1 by a single nucleotide difference that disrupts an exonic splice enhancer in exon 7. As a result, most of SMN2 mRNAs lack exon 7 (SMNΔ7) and produce a protein that is both unstable and less than fully functional. Although only 10–20% of the SMN2 gene product is fully functional, increased genomic copies of SMN2 inversely correlates with disease severity among individuals with SMA. Because SMN2 copy number influences disease severity in SMA, there is prognostic value in accurate measurement of SMN2 copy number from patients being evaluated for SMA. This prognostic value is especially important given that SMN2 copy number is now being used as an inclusion criterion for SMA clinical trials. In addition to SMA, copy number variations (CNVs) in the SMN genes can affect the clinical severity of other neurological disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). This review will discuss how SMN1 and SMN2 CNVs are detected and why accurate measurement of SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers is relevant for SMA and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27014701

  8. Neurodegeneration in spinal muscular atrophy: from disease phenotype and animal models to therapeutic strategies and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Monani, Umrao R; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2014-01-01

    Of the numerous inherited diseases known to afflict the pediatric population, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is among the most common. It has an incidence of approximately one in 10,000 newborns and a carrier frequency of one in 50. Despite its relatively high incidence, SMA remains somewhat obscure among the many neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans. Nevertheless, the last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathology, underlying biology and especially the molecular genetics of SMA. This has led to a genuine expectation within the scientific community that a robust treatment will be available to patients before the end of the decade. The progress made in our understanding of SMA and, therefore, towards a viable therapy for affected individuals is in large measure a consequence of the simple yet fascinating genetics of the disease. Nevertheless, important questions remain. Addressing these questions promises not only to accelerate the march towards a cure for SMA, but also to uncover novel therapies for related neurodegenerative disorders. This review discusses our current understanding of SMA, considers the challenges ahead, describes existing treatment options and highlights state-of-the-art research being conducted as a means to a better, safer and more effective treatment for the disease. PMID:24648831

  9. Apparent autosomal recessive inheritance in families with proximal spinal muscular atrophy affecting individuals in two generations

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Zerres, K.; Hahnen, E.

    1996-11-01

    With the evidence that deletions in the region responsible for childhood- and juvenile-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are on chromosome 5 it is now possible to confirm autosomal recessive inheritance in most patients (denoted {open_quotes}SMA 5q{close_quotes}). Homozygous deletions in the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene can be detected in 95%-98% of patients with early-onset SMA (types I and II), whereas as many as 10%-20% of patients with the milder, juvenile-onset form (type III SMA) do not show deletions. In families with affected subjects in two generations, it is difficult to decide whether they are autosomal dominantly inherited or caused by three independent recessive mutations (pseudodominant inheritance). Given an incidence of >1/10,000 of SMA 5q, patients with autosomal recessive SMA have an {approximately}1% recurrence risk to their offspring. Although the dominant forms are not linked to chromosome 5q, pseudodominant families can now be identified by the presence of homozygous deletions in the SMN gene. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Clinical and Genetic Study of Algerian Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sifi, Y; Sifi, K; Boulefkhad, A; Abadi, N; Bouderda, Z; Cheriet, R; Magen, M; Bonnefont, J P; Munnich, A; Benlatreche, C; Hamri, A

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the second most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder. It is divided into the acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (type I), the intermediate form (type II), the Kugelberg-Welander disease (type III), and the adult form (type IV). The gene involved in all four forms of SMA, the so-called survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, is duplicated, with a telomeric (tel SMN or SMN1) and a centromeric copy (cent SMN or SMN2). SMN1 is homozygously deleted in over 95% of SMA patients. Another candidate gene in SMA is the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene; it shows homozygous deletions in 45-67% of type I and 20-42% of type II/type III patients. Here we studied the SMN and NAIP genes in 92 Algerian SMA patients (20 type I, 16 type II, 53 type III, and 3 type IV) from 57 unrelated families, using a semiquantitative PCR approach. Homozygous deletions of SMN1 exons 7 and/or 8 were found in 75% of the families. Deletions of exon 4 and/or 5 of the NAIP gene were found in around 25%. Conversely, the quantitative analysis of SMN2 copies showed a significant correlation between SMN2 copy number and the type of SMA. PMID:26317002

  11. Inhibition of myostatin does not ameliorate disease features of severe spinal muscular atrophy mice

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Charlotte J.; Wee, Claribel D.; Warsing, Leigh C.; Choe, Dong W.; Ng, Andrew S.; Lutz, Cathleen; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2009-01-01

    There is currently no treatment for the inherited motor neuron disease, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Severe SMA causes lower motor neuron loss, impaired myofiber development, profound muscle weakness and early mortality. Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-β family member that inhibits muscle growth. Loss or blockade of myostatin signaling increases muscle mass and improves muscle strength in mouse models of primary muscle disease and in the motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of blocking myostatin signaling in severe SMA mice (hSMN2/delta7SMN/mSmn−/−) by two independent strategies: (i) transgenic overexpression of the myostatin inhibitor follistatin and (ii) post-natal administration of a soluble activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB-Fc). SMA mice overexpressing follistatin showed little increase in muscle mass and no improvement in motor function or survival. SMA mice treated with ActRIIB-Fc showed minimal improvement in motor function, and no extension of survival compared with vehicle-treated mice. Together these results suggest that inhibition of myostatin may not be a promising therapeutic strategy in severe forms of SMA. PMID:19477958

  12. A large animal model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy and correction of phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Sandra I.; Arnold, W. David; Odermatt, Philipp; Li, Xiaohui; Porensky, Paul N.; Schmelzer, Leah; Meyer, Kathrin; Kolb, Stephen J.; Schümperli, Daniel; Kaspar, Brian K.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN which results in motoneuron loss. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN levels including drug compounds, antisense oligonucleotides or scAAV9 gene therapy have proved effective in mice. We wished to determine whether reduction of SMN in postnatal motoneurons resulted in SMA in a large animal model, whether SMA could be corrected after development of muscle weakness and the response of clinically relevant biomarkers. Methods Using intrathecal delivery of scAAV9 expressing a shRNA targeting pig SMN1, SMN was knocked down in motoneurons postnatally to SMA levels. This resulted in an SMA phenotype representing the first large animal model of SMA. Restoration of SMN was performed at different time points with scAAV9 expressing human SMN (scAAV9-SMN) and electrophysiology measures and pathology were performed. Results Knockdown of SMN in postnatal motoneurons results in overt proximal weakness, fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) indicating active denervation, and reduced compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimates (MUNE), like human SMA. Neuropathology showed loss of motoneurons and motor axons. Pre-symptomatic delivery of scAAV9-SMN prevented SMA symptoms indicating all changes are SMN dependent. Delivery of scAAV9-SMN after symptom onset had a marked impact on phenotype, electrophysiological measures and pathology. Interpretation High SMN levels are critical in postnatal motoneurons and reduction of SMN results in a SMA phenotype which is SMN dependent. Importantly, clinically relevant biomarkers including CMAP and MUNE are responsive to SMN restoration and abrogation of phenotype can be achieved even after symptom onset. PMID:25516063

  13. Spinal muscular atrophy type III: Molecular genetic characterization of Turkish patients.

    PubMed

    Bora-Tatar, Gamze; Yesbek-Kaymaz, Ayse; Bekircan-Kurt, Can Ebru; Erdem-Özdamar, Sevim; Erdem-Yurter, Hayat

    2015-12-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease with autosomal recessive inheritance. Homozygous loss of exon 7 of the Survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene is the main cause of SMA. Although progressive muscle weakness and atrophy are common symptoms, disease severity varies from severe to mild. Type III is one of the milder and less frequent forms of SMA. In this study, we report molecular genetic characteristics of 24 Turkish type III SMA patients. Homozygous loss of SMN1 exon 7 and 8 was analysed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA). SMN2, homologue of SMN1, and Neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) genes were also evaluated considering their influence on disease severity. We determined that male patients who were born in consanguineous families were predominant in our cohort and these patients mostly carry the homozygous loss of SMN1 exon 7 and 8 and four copies of SMN2 gene without NAIP deletions. PMID:26548498

  14. Intrathecal Injections in Children With Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sethna, Navil; Farrow-Gillespie, Alan; Khandji, Alexander; Xia, Shuting; Bishop, Kathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nusinersen (ISIS-SMNRx or ISIS 396443) is an antisense oligonucleotide drug administered intrathecally to treat spinal muscular atrophy. We summarize lumbar puncture experience in children with spinal muscular atrophy during a phase 1 open-label study of nusinersen and its extension. During the studies, 73 lumbar punctures were performed in 28 patients 2 to 14 years of age with type 2/3 spinal muscular atrophy. No complications occurred in 50 (68%) lumbar punctures; in 23 (32%) procedures, adverse events were attributed to lumbar puncture. Most common adverse events were headache (n = 9), back pain (n = 9), and post–lumbar puncture syndrome (n = 8). In a subgroup analysis, adverse events were more frequent in older children, children with type 3 spinal muscular atrophy, and with a 21- or 22-gauge needle compared to a 24-gauge needle or smaller. Lumbar punctures were successfully performed in children with spinal muscular atrophy; lumbar puncture–related adverse event frequency was similar to that previously reported in children. PMID:26823478

  15. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Protective effects of butyrate-based compounds on a mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Butchbach, Matthew E R; Lumpkin, Casey J; Harris, Ashlee W; Saieva, Luciano; Edwards, Jonathan D; Workman, Eileen; Simard, Louise R; Pellizzoni, Livio; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2016-05-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a childhood-onset degenerative disease resulting from the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1) but retention of SMN2. The number of copies of SMN2 modifies disease severity in SMA patients as well as in mouse models, making SMN2 a target for therapeutics development. Sodium butyrate (BA) and its analog (4PBA) have been shown to increase SMN2 expression in SMA cultured cells. In this study, we examined the effects of BA, 4PBA as well as two BA prodrugs-glyceryl tributyrate (BA3G) and VX563-on the phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. Treatment with 4PBA, BA3G and VX563 but not BA beginning at PND04 significantly improved the lifespan and delayed disease end stage, with administration of VX563 also improving the growth rate of these mice. 4PBA and VX563 improved the motor phenotype of SMNΔ7 SMA mice and prevented spinal motor neuron loss. Interestingly, neither 4PBA nor VX563 had an effect on SMN expression in the spinal cords of treated SMNΔ7 SMA mice; however, they inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and restored the normal phosphorylation states of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, both of which are altered by SMN deficiency in vivo. These observations show that BA-based compounds with favorable pharmacokinetics ameliorate SMA pathology possibly by modulating HDAC and Akt signaling.

  17. Severe neuromuscular denervation of clinically relevant muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Karen K Y; Gibbs, Rebecca M; Feng, Zhihua; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a motoneuron disease caused by a deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, is characterized by motoneuron loss and muscle weakness. It remains unclear whether widespread loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is involved in SMA pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic examination of NMJ innervation patterns in >20 muscles in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. We found that severe denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) occurs selectively in many vulnerable axial muscles and several appendicular muscles at the disease end stage. Since these vulnerable muscles were located throughout the body and were comprised of varying muscle fiber types, it is unlikely that muscle location or fiber type determines susceptibility to denervation. Furthermore, we found a similar extent of neurofilament accumulation at NMJs in both vulnerable and resistant muscles before the onset of denervation, suggesting that neurofilament accumulation does not predict subsequent NMJ denervation. Since vulnerable muscles were initially innervated, but later denervated, loss of innervation in SMA may be attributed to defects in synapse maintenance. Finally, we found that denervation was amendable by trichostatin A (TSA) treatment, which increased innervation in clinically relevant muscles in TSA-treated SMNΔ7 mice. Our findings suggest that neuromuscular denervation in vulnerable muscles is a widespread pathology in SMA, and can serve as a preparation for elucidating the biological basis of synapse loss, and for evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Mechanisms involved in spinal cord central synapse loss in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tarabal, Olga; Caraballo-Miralles, Víctor; Cardona-Rossinyol, Andrea; Correa, Francisco J; Olmos, Gabriel; Lladó, Jerònia; Esquerda, Josep E; Calderó, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    Motoneuron (MN) cell death is the histopathologic hallmark of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), although MN loss seems to be a late event. Conversely, disruption of afferent synapses on MNs has been shown to occur early in SMA. Using a mouse model of severe SMA (SMNΔ7), we examined the mechanisms involved in impairment of central synapses. We found that MNs underwent progressive degeneration in the course of SMA, with MN loss still occurring at late stages. Loss of afferent inputs to SMA MNs was detected at embryonic stages, long before MN death. Reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis were present in the spinal cord of diseased animals after the onset of MN loss. Ultrastructural observations indicate that dendrites and microglia phagocytose adjacent degenerating presynaptic terminals. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase was upregulated in SMNΔ7 MNs, and there was an increase in phosphorylated myosin light chain expression in synaptic afferents on MNs; these observations implicate nitric oxide in MN deafferentation and suggest that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is activated. Together, our observations suggest that the earliest change occurring in SMNΔ7 mice is the loss of excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs to MNs; reduced excitability may enhance their vulnerability to degeneration and death.

  19. Evidence of autosomal dominant mutations in childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Wirth, B.; Zerres, K. )

    1994-07-01

    Autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance of proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are well documented. Several genetic studies found a significant deviation from the assumption of recessive inheritance in SMA, with affected children in one generation. The existence of new autosomal dominant mutations has been assumed as the most suitable explanation, which is supported by three observations of this study: (1) The segregation ratio calculated in 333 families showed a significant deviation from autosomal recessive inheritance in the milder forms of SMA (= .09[+-].06 for onset at 10-36 mo and .13[+-].07 for onset at >36 mo; and P = .09[+-]0.7 for SMA IIIa and .12[+-].07 for SMA IIIb). (2) Three families with affected subjects in two generations are reported, in whom the disease could have started as an autosomal dominant mutation. (3) Linkage studies with chromosome 5q markers showed that in 5 (5.4%) of 93 informative families the patient shared identical haplotypes with at least one healthy sib. Other mechanisms, such as the existence of phenocopies, pseudodominance, or a second autosomal recessive gene locus, cannot be excluded in single families. The postulation of spontaneous mutations, however, is a suitable explanation for all three observations. Estimated risk figures for genetic counseling are given. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Clinical applications of MARSALA for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yixin; Zhi, Xu; Zhu, Xiaohui; Huang, Jin; Lian, Ying; Li, Rong; Jin, Hongyan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenxin; Nie, Yanli; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Zhaohui; Song, Donghong; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie; Yan, Liying

    2016-09-20

    Conventional PCR methods combined with linkage analysis based on short tandem repeats (STRs) or Karyomapping with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have been applied to preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosome recessive disorder. However, it has limitations in SMA diagnosis by Karyomapping, and these methods are unable to distinguish wild-type embryos with carriers effectively. Mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses (MARSALA) is a new method allowing embryo selection by a one-step next-generation sequencing (NGS) procedure, which has been applied in PGD for both autosome dominant and X-linked diseases in our group previously. In this study, we carried out PGD based on MARSALA for two carrier families with SMA affected children. As a result, one of the couples has given birth to a healthy baby free of mutations in SMA-causing gene. It is the first time that MARSALA was applied to PGD for SMA, and we can distinguish the embryos with heterozygous deletion (carriers) from the wild-type (normal) ones accurately through this NGS-based method. In addition, direct mutation detection allows us to identify the affected embryos (homozygous deletion), which can be regarded as probands for linkage analysis, in case that the affected family member is absent. In the future, the NGS-based MARSALA method is expected to be used in PGD for all monogenetic disorders with known pathogenic gene mutation. PMID:27599922

  1. Assays for the Identification and Prioritization of Drug Candidates for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan J.; Kobayashi, Dione T.; Lynes, Maureen M.; Naryshkin, Nikolai N.; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Rubin, Lee L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in degeneration of α-motor neurons of the anterior horn and proximal muscle weakness. It is the leading cause of genetic mortality in children younger than 2 years. It affects ∼1 in 11,000 live births. In 95% of cases, SMA is caused by homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene. In addition, all patients possess at least one copy of an almost identical gene called SMN2. A single point mutation in exon 7 of the SMN2 gene results in the production of low levels of full-length survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein at amounts insufficient to compensate for the loss of the SMN1 gene. Although no drug treatments are available for SMA, a number of drug discovery and development programs are ongoing, with several currently in clinical trials. This review describes the assays used to identify candidate drugs for SMA that modulate SMN2 gene expression by various means. Specifically, it discusses the use of high-throughput screening to identify candidate molecules from primary screens, as well as the technical aspects of a number of widely used secondary assays to assess SMN messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression, localization, and function. Finally, it describes the process of iterative drug optimization utilized during preclinical SMA drug development to identify clinical candidates for testing in human clinical trials. PMID:25147906

  2. Opening the window: The case for carrier and perinatal screening for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph K; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J

    2016-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetically inherited neurodegenerative disease that leads to infant mortality worldwide. SMA is caused by genetic deletion or mutation in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, which results in a deficiency in SMN protein. For reasons that are still unclear, SMN protein deficiency predominantly affects α-motor neurons, resulting in their degeneration and subsequent paralysis of limb and trunk muscles, progressing to death in severe cases. Emerging evidence suggests that SMN protein deficiency also affects the heart, autonomic nervous system, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas and perhaps many other organs. Currently, there is no cure for SMA. Patient treatment includes respiratory care, physiotherapy, and nutritional management, which can somewhat ameliorate disease symptoms and increase life span. Fortunately, several novel therapies have advanced to human clinical trials. However, data from studies in animal models of SMA indicate that the greatest therapeutic benefit is achieved through initiating treatment as early as possible, before widespread loss of motor neurons has occurred. In this review, we discuss the merit of carrier and perinatal patient screening for SMA considering the efficacy of emerging therapeutics and the physical, emotional and financial burden of the disease on affected families and society. PMID:27460292

  3. Defects in neuromuscular junction remodelling in the Smn(2B/-) mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Beauvais, Ariane; Bhanot, Kunal; Kothary, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating childhood motor neuron disease caused by mutations and deletions within the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Although other tissues may be involved, motor neurons remain primary pathological targets, with loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) representing an early and significant event in pathogenesis. Although defects in axonal outgrowth and pathfinding have been observed in cell culture and in lower organisms upon Smn depletion, developmental defects in mouse models have been less obvious. Here, we have employed the Smn(2B/-) mouse model to investigate NMJ remodelling during SMA pathology, induced reinnervation, and paralysis. We show that whilst NMJs are capable of remodelling during pathogenesis, there is a marked reduction in paralysis-induced remodelling and in the nerve-directed re-organisation of acetylcholine receptors. This reduction in remodelling potential could not be attributed to a decreased rate of axonal growth. Finally, we have identified a loss of terminal Schwann cells which could contribute to the defects in remodelling/maintenance observed. Our work demonstrates that there are specific defects in NMJ remodelling in an intermediate SMA mouse model, which could contribute to or underlie pathogenesis in SMA. The development of strategies that can promote the remodelling potential of NMJs may therefore be of significant benefit to SMA patients. PMID:22960106

  4. A mixed methods exploration of families' experiences of the diagnosis of childhood spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Sally; Hickerton, Chriselle; Archibald, Alison D; McClaren, Belinda J; Metcalfe, Sylvia A

    2015-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease with a carrier frequency of 1 in 41 in Australia. Childhood SMA is classified into three types based on the age at which children present with symptoms and the clinical severity. Families' experiences leading up to the diagnosis have not been described, but are important when considering the potential for a diagnostic odyssey. Using a mixed methods approach, data were collected from interviews and a national survey of families of children with SMA to explore their experiences of this journey. The combined findings (n=28) revealed that the journey to receiving a diagnosis was protracted. The time from first noticing symptoms to finally receiving a diagnosis was emotional and frustrating. Once parents or other family members became aware of symptoms, almost all had consulted with multiple different health professionals before the diagnosis was ultimately made. Not surprisingly, receiving the diagnosis was devastating to the families. The nature of the information and the way it was given to them was not always optimal, particularly because of the difficulties predicting clinical severity. Most felt that their child could have been diagnosed earlier and, although there were mixed views around the benefit of this for their child, they felt it may have reduced the emotional impact on families. Overall, families were more in favour of population carrier screening for SMA when compared with newborn screening of the population. Despite an increasing awareness of SMA, the diagnostic delay continues to have negative impacts on families. PMID:25074464

  5. An ~140-kb deletion associated with feline spinal muscular atrophy implies an essential LIX1 function for motor neuron survival

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, John C.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; David, Victor A.; Brichta, Lars; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Agarwala, Richa; Murphy, William J.; Wedemeyer, William J.; Gregory, Brittany L.; Buzzell, Bethany G.; Drummond, Meghan C.; Wirth, Brunhilde; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The leading genetic cause of infant mortality is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Previously we described a domestic cat model of autosomal recessive, juvenile-onset SMA similar to human SMA type III. Here we report results of a whole-genome scan for linkage in the feline SMA pedigree using recently developed species-specific and comparative mapping resources. We identified a novel SMA gene candidate, LIX1, in an ~140-kb deletion on feline chromosome A1q in a region of conserved synteny to human chromosome 5q15. Though LIX1 function is unknown, the predicted secondary structure is compatible with a role in RNA metabolism. LIX1 expression is largely restricted to the central nervous system, primarily in spinal motor neurons, thus offering explanation of the tissue restriction of pathology in feline SMA. An exon sequence screen of 25 human SMA cases, not otherwise explicable by mutations at the SMN1 locus, failed to identify comparable LIX1 mutations. Nonetheless, a LIX1-associated etiology in feline SMA implicates a previously undetected mechanism of motor neuron maintenance and mandates consideration of LIX1 as a candidate gene in human SMA when SMN1 mutations are not found. PMID:16899656

  6. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  7. Neuromuscular Junctions as Key Contributors and Therapeutic Targets in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Boido, Marina; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive autosomal neuromuscular disease, representing the most common fatal pediatric pathology. Even though, classically and in a simplistic way, it is categorized as a motor neuron (MN) disease, there is an increasing general consensus that its pathogenesis is more complex than expected. In particular, neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are affected by dramatic alterations, including immaturity, denervation and neurofilament accumulation, associated to impaired synaptic functions: these abnormalities may in turn have a detrimental effect on MN survival. Here, we provide a description of NMJ development/maintenance/maturation in physiological conditions and in SMA, focusing on pivotal molecules and on the time-course of pathological events. Moreover, since NMJs could represent an important target to be exploited for counteracting the pathology progression, we also describe several therapeutic strategies that, directly or indirectly, aim at NMJs. PMID:26869891

  8. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons , in the spinal cord and the part of ... spinal cord ( the brainstem ). The loss of motor neurons leads to weakness and wasting ( atrophy ) of muscles ...

  9. Discovery and Optimization of Small Molecule Splicing Modifiers of Survival Motor Neuron 2 as a Treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Woll, Matthew G; Qi, Hongyan; Turpoff, Anthony; Zhang, Nanjing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Guangming; Li, Chunshi; Huang, Song; Yang, Tianle; Moon, Young-Choon; Lee, Chang-Sun; Choi, Soongyu; Almstead, Neil G; Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Welch, Ellen; Zhao, Xin; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Weetall, Marla; Karp, Gary M

    2016-07-14

    The underlying cause of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a deficiency of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Starting from hits identified in a high-throughput screening campaign and through structure-activity relationship investigations, we have developed small molecules that potently shift the alternative splicing of the SMN2 exon 7, resulting in increased production of the full-length SMN mRNA and protein. Three novel chemical series, represented by compounds 9, 14, and 20, have been optimized to increase the level of SMN protein by >50% in SMA patient-derived fibroblasts at concentrations of <160 nM. Daily administration of these compounds to severe SMA Δ7 mice results in an increased production of SMN protein in disease-relevant tissues and a significant increase in median survival time in a dose-dependent manner. Our work supports the development of an orally administered small molecule for the treatment of patients with SMA.

  10. A single administration of morpholino antisense oligomer rescues spinal muscular atrophy in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Porensky, Paul N.; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; McGovern, Vicki L.; Bevan, Adam K.; Foust, Kevin D.; Kaspar, Brain K.; Wilton, Stephen D.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by α-motor neuron loss in the spinal cord anterior horn. SMA results from deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene (SMN1) and retention of SMN2. A single nucleotide difference between SMN1 and SMN2 results in exclusion of exon 7 from the majority of SMN2 transcripts, leading to decreased SMN protein levels and development of SMA. A series of splice enhancers and silencers regulate incorporation of SMN2 exon 7; these splice motifs can be blocked with antisense oligomers (ASOs) to alter SMN2 transcript splicing. We have evaluated a morpholino (MO) oligomer against ISS-N1 [HSMN2Ex7D(−10,−29)], and delivered this MO to postnatal day 0 (P0) SMA pups (Smn−/−, SMN2+/+, SMN▵7+/+) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Survival was increased markedly from 15 days to >100 days. Delayed CNS MO injection has moderate efficacy, and delayed peripheral injection has mild survival advantage, suggesting that early CNS ASO administration is essential for SMA therapy consideration. ICV treatment increased full-length SMN2 transcript as well as SMN protein in neural tissue, but only minimally in peripheral tissue. Interval analysis shows a decrease in alternative splice modification over time. We suggest that CNS increases of SMN will have a major impact on SMA, and an early increase of the SMN level results in correction of motor phenotypes. Finally, the early introduction by intrathecal delivery of MO oligomers is a potential treatment for SMA patients. PMID:22186025

  11. AB033. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, Tran Van; Nga, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tao, Nguyen Dinh; Sang, Trieu Tien; Giang, Ngo Truong; Dung, Vu Chi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorder. Most of patients are caused by the homozygous absence of exon 7 of the telomeric copy of the SMN gene (SMNt) on chromosome 5. Setting up a molecular diagnostic protocol for detecting exon 7 gen SMNT homozygous deletion in single cell is basic to preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy. Methods This study was carried out on 17 patients and their parents. Firstly, lymphocytes of patients and their parents were isolated from fresh blood by ficoll. Taking a lymphocyte on stereoscopic microscope, lysing the cell, amplifying whole genome, then amplifying exon 7 of SMNT gene by using a polymerase chain reaction, followed by HinfI restriction digest enzyme of the PCR enabling the important SMNT gene to be distinguished from the centromic SMN gene (SMNc) which has no clinical phenotype to detect mutation. Electrophoresis PCR products after digesting by restriction enzyme and analysis. Besides, the minisequencing technique has also been used to detect the absence of exon 7 of SMNT gene based on the difference of one nucleotide at 214-position in exon 7 (C-SMNT, T-SMNc). Secondly, the application of the protocol was set up on one lymphocyte to preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy on biopsied blastomeres. Results Two different protocols which were PCR-RFLP and minisequencing, were set up on 200 lymphocytes from 17 patients and their parents to screen the homozygous deletion in exon 7 SMNT gene with the PCR efficiency in 96%. The results were similar with the gene diagnosed from fresh blood. The methods were also efficient, providing interpretable result in 96.55% (28/29) of the blastomeres tested. Three couples were treated using this method. Three normal embryos were transfer which resulted in one clinical pregnancy. Conclusions We have successfully applied the technique of PCR-RFLP and minisequencing for the preimplantation genetic

  12. Chronic generalized spinal muscular atrophy of infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J. H.; Wilson, J.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the acute fatal form of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease or spinal muscular atrophy Type I) is a distinct genetic and clinical entity. This has prompted clinical re-examination of the disease known as `arrested Werdnig-Hoffmann disease' which hitherto was thought to be a spectrum variant of the acute fatal form. A total of 18 such patients with the chronic generalized form of spinal muscular atrophy has been known to The Hospital for Sick Children over the past 10 years. Patients with this characteristic clinical syndrome comprise approximately one-fifth of children with chronic spinal muscular atrophy. Clinically, no patient was even able to crawl normally or progress further with motor milestones. Median age of clinical onset is 6 months of age, and life expectancy ranges from 2 years to the third decade. Inevitable spinal and joint deformities occur by the second decade of life. Management should be based on vigorous antibiotic therapy, orthopaedic and neurological surveillance, and a carefully planned educational programme aimed at realistic employment in late adolescence. ImagesFIG. 4p772-b PMID:4749680

  13. Non-aggregating tau phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C; Cantu, Jorge A; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J; Ma, Long; Ma, Yong-Chao

    2015-04-15

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35(-/-) compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration.

  14. Non-Aggregating Tau Phosphorylation by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Contributes to Motor Neuron Degeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M.; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C.; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C.; Cantu, Jorge A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O.; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Ma, Long

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35−/− compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration. PMID:25878277

  15. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy*,**

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tanyse Bahia Carvalho; Neves, Juliana de Carvalho; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Salge, João Marcos; Zanoteli, Edmar; Reed, Umbertina Conti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD). The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA) were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC); and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively) with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis. PMID:25410841

  16. IPLEX Administration Improves Motor Neuron Survival and Ameliorates Motor Functions in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Luchetti, Andrea; Saieva, Luciano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; de Leonibus, Elvira; Filareto, Antonio; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Novelli, Giuseppe; Musarò, Antonio; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder and the first genetic cause of death in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein that induce selective loss of α-motor neurons (MNs) in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive muscle atrophy and consequent respiratory failure. To date, no effective treatment is available to counteract the course of the disease. Among the different therapeutic strategies with potential clinical applications, the evaluation of trophic and/or protective agents able to antagonize MNs degeneration represents an attractive opportunity to develop valid therapies. Here we investigated the effects of IPLEX (recombinant human insulinlike growth factor 1 [rhIGF-1] complexed with recombinant human IGF-1 binding protein 3 [rhIGFBP-3]) on a severe mouse model of SMA. Interestingly, molecular and biochemical analyses of IGF-1 carried out in SMA mice before drug administration revealed marked reductions of IGF-1 circulating levels and hepatic mRNA expression. In this study, we found that perinatal administration of IPLEX, even if does not influence survival and body weight of mice, results in reduced degeneration of MNs, increased muscle fiber size and in amelioration of motor functions in SMA mice. Additionally, we show that phenotypic changes observed are not SMN-dependent, since no significant SMN modification was addressed in treated mice. Collectively, our data indicate IPLEX as a good therapeutic candidate to hinder the progression of the neurodegenerative process in SMA. PMID:22669476

  17. Systemic peptide-mediated oligonucleotide therapy improves long-term survival in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Suzan M; Hazell, Gareth; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Saleh, Amer F; Bowerman, Melissa; Sleigh, James N; Meijboom, Katharina E; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-09-27

    The development of antisense oligonucleotide therapy is an important advance in the identification of corrective therapy for neuromuscular diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Because of difficulties of delivering single-stranded oligonucleotides to the CNS, current approaches have been restricted to using invasive intrathecal single-stranded oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we report an advanced peptide-oligonucleotide, Pip6a-morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomer (PMO), which demonstrates potent efficacy in both the CNS and peripheral tissues in severe SMA mice following systemic administration. SMA results from reduced levels of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein because of loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. Therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate exon 7 splicing of the nearly identical SMN2 gene to generate functional SMN protein. Pip6a-PMO yields SMN expression at high efficiency in peripheral and CNS tissues, resulting in profound phenotypic correction at doses an order-of-magnitude lower than required by standard naked SSOs. Survival is dramatically extended from 12 d to a mean of 456 d, with improvement in neuromuscular junction morphology, down-regulation of transcripts related to programmed cell death in the spinal cord, and normalization of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. The potent systemic efficacy of Pip6a-PMO, targeting both peripheral as well as CNS tissues, demonstrates the high clinical potential of peptide-PMO therapy for SMA. PMID:27621445

  18. Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy a disease of the motor neurons only: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications?

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Chiara; Ramirez, Agnese; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Rideout, Hardy; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Re, Diane B.; Corti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neurological disease that causes infant mortality; no effective therapies are currently available. SMA is due to homozygous mutations and/or deletions in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and subsequent reduction of the SMN protein, leading to the death of motor neurons. However, there is increasing evidence that in addition to motor neurons, other cell types are contributing to SMA pathology. In this review, we will discuss the involvement of non-motor neuronal cells, located both inside and outside the central nervous system, in disease onset and progression. These contribution of non-motor neuronal cells to disease pathogenesis has important therapeutic implications: in fact, even if SMN restoration in motor neurons is needed, it has been shown that optimal phenotypic amelioration in animal models of SMA requires a more widespread SMN correction. It will be crucial to take this evidence into account before clinical translation of the novel therapeutic approaches that are currently under development. PMID:26681261

  19. Survival motor neuron protein in motor neurons determines synaptic integrity in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Tara L; Kong, Lingling; Wang, Xueyong; Osborne, Melissa A; Crowder, Melissa E; Van Meerbeke, James P; Xu, Xixi; Davis, Crystal; Wooley, Joe; Goldhamer, David J; Lutz, Cathleen M; Rich, Mark M; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-06-20

    The inherited motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein and results in severe muscle weakness. In SMA mice, synaptic dysfunction of both neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and central sensorimotor synapses precedes motor neuron cell death. To address whether this synaptic dysfunction is due to SMN deficiency in motor neurons, muscle, or both, we generated three lines of conditional SMA mice with tissue-specific increases in SMN expression. All three lines of mice showed increased survival, weights, and improved motor behavior. While increased SMN expression in motor neurons prevented synaptic dysfunction at the NMJ and restored motor neuron somal synapses, increased SMN expression in muscle did not affect synaptic function although it did improve myofiber size. Together these data indicate that both peripheral and central synaptic integrity are dependent on motor neurons in SMA, but SMN may have variable roles in the maintenance of these different synapses. At the NMJ, it functions at the presynaptic terminal in a cell-autonomous fashion, but may be necessary for retrograde trophic signaling to presynaptic inputs onto motor neurons. Importantly, SMN also appears to function in muscle growth and/or maintenance independent of motor neurons. Our data suggest that SMN plays distinct roles in muscle, NMJs, and motor neuron somal synapses and that restored function of SMN at all three sites will be necessary for full recovery of muscle power.

  20. Systemic peptide-mediated oligonucleotide therapy improves long-term survival in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, Gareth; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Saleh, Amer F.; Bowerman, Melissa; Meijboom, Katharina E.; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotide therapy is an important advance in the identification of corrective therapy for neuromuscular diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Because of difficulties of delivering single-stranded oligonucleotides to the CNS, current approaches have been restricted to using invasive intrathecal single-stranded oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we report an advanced peptide-oligonucleotide, Pip6a-morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomer (PMO), which demonstrates potent efficacy in both the CNS and peripheral tissues in severe SMA mice following systemic administration. SMA results from reduced levels of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein because of loss-of-function mutations in the SMN1 gene. Therapeutic splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate exon 7 splicing of the nearly identical SMN2 gene to generate functional SMN protein. Pip6a-PMO yields SMN expression at high efficiency in peripheral and CNS tissues, resulting in profound phenotypic correction at doses an order-of-magnitude lower than required by standard naked SSOs. Survival is dramatically extended from 12 d to a mean of 456 d, with improvement in neuromuscular junction morphology, down-regulation of transcripts related to programmed cell death in the spinal cord, and normalization of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. The potent systemic efficacy of Pip6a-PMO, targeting both peripheral as well as CNS tissues, demonstrates the high clinical potential of peptide-PMO therapy for SMA. PMID:27621445

  1. Late onset GM2 gangliosidosis mimicking spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Jamrozik, Z; Lugowska, A; Gołębiowski, M; Królicki, L; Mączewska, J; Kuźma-Kozakiewicz, M

    2013-09-25

    A case of late onset GM2 gangliosidodis with spinal muscular atrophy phenotype followed by cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms is presented. Genetic analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutation in exon 10 of the HEXA gene. Patient has normal intelligence and emotional reactivity. Neuroimaging tests of the brain showed only cerebellar atrophy consistent with MR spectroscopy (MRS) abnormalities. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18)F-FDG PET/CT of the brain revealed glucose hypometabolism in cerebellum and in temporal and occipital lobes bilaterally. PMID:23820084

  2. [The role of RNA splicing in the pathogenesis of spinal muscular atrophy and development of its therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Sobue, Gen

    2014-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SMN1 cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Degeneration of alpha-motor neurons that results in progressive paralysis is a pathological hallmark of SMA. Recently, peripheral-tissue involvement has also been reported in SMA. Patients have low levels of functional SMN which is attributed to alternative splicing in SMN2, a gene closely-related to SMN1. This decrease in the expression of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein involved in promoting snRNP assembly required for splicing, is responsible for SMA. However, the mechanism through which decrease in SMN levels causes SMA remains unclear. Currently, no curative treatment is available for SMA, but SMN restoration is thought to be necessary and sufficient for cure. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) can be designed to specifically alter splicing patterns of target pre-mRNAs. We identified an ASO that redirects SMN2 splicing and is currently in clinical trials for use as RNA-targeting therapeutics. Further, we have also reported a novel application of splicing-modulating ASOs--creation of animal phenocopy models of diseases by inducing mis-splicing. Exploring the relationship between the spatial and temporal effects of therapeutic and pathogenic ASOs yields relevant insights into the roles of SMN in SMA pathogenesis and into its normal physiological functions. This knowledge, in turn, contributes to the ongoing development of targeted therapeutics.

  3. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patient iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons Have Reduced Expression of Proteins Important in Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Heidi R.; Mandefro, Berhan; Shirran, Sally L.; Gross, Andrew R.; Kaus, Anjoscha S.; Botting, Catherine H.; Morris, Glenn E.; Sareen, Dhruv

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease primarily characterized by degeneration of spinal motor neurons, and caused by reduced levels of the SMN protein. Previous studies to understand the proteomic consequences of reduced SMN have mostly utilized patient fibroblasts and animal models. We have derived human motor neurons from type I SMA and healthy controls by creating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Quantitative mass spectrometry of these cells revealed increased expression of 63 proteins in control motor neurons compared to respective fibroblasts, whereas 30 proteins were increased in SMA motor neurons vs. their fibroblasts. Notably, UBA1 was significantly decreased in SMA motor neurons, supporting evidence for ubiquitin pathway defects. Subcellular distribution of UBA1 was predominantly cytoplasmic in SMA motor neurons in contrast to nuclear in control motor neurons; suggestive of neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Many of the proteins that were decreased in SMA motor neurons, including beta III-tubulin and UCHL1, were associated with neurodevelopment and differentiation. These neuron-specific consequences of SMN depletion were not evident in fibroblasts, highlighting the importance of iPSC technology. The proteomic profiles identified here provide a useful resource to explore the molecular consequences of reduced SMN in motor neurons, and for the identification of novel biomarker and therapeutic targets for SMA. PMID:26793058

  4. Use of genetic and physical mapping to locate the spinal muscular atrophy locus between two new highly polymorphic DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Clermont, O.; Burlet, P.; Burglen, L.; Lefebvre, S.; Pascal, F.; McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Cohen, D.; Le Paslier, D.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive forms of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has recently been mapped to chromosome 5q13, within a 4-cM region between the blocks D5S465/D5S125 and MAP-1B/D5S112. The authors identified two new highly polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers - namely, AFM265wf5 (D5S629) and AFM281yh9 (D5S637) - which are the closest markers to the SMA locus. Multilocus analysis by the location-score method was used to establish the best estimate of the SMA gene location. The data suggest that the most likely location for SMA is between locus D5S629 and the block D5S637/D5S351/MAP-1B/D5S112/D5S357. Genetic analysis of inbred SMA families, based on homozygosity by descent and physical mapping using meta-YACs, gave additional information for the loci order as follows: cen-D5S6-D5S125/D5S465-D5S435-D5S629-SMA-D5S637-D5S351-MAP-1B/D5S112-D5S357-D5S39-tel. These data give the direction for bidirectional walking in order to clone this interval and isolate the SMA gene. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sintusek, Palittiya; Catapano, Francesco; Angkathunkayul, Napat; Marrosu, Elena; Parson, Simon H.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON) designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome. PMID:27163330

  6. Motor neuron disease. SMN2 splicing modifiers improve motor function and longevity in mice with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Weetall, Marla; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K Y; Karp, Gary M; Qi, Hongyan; Woll, Matthew G; Chen, Guangming; Zhang, Nanjing; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Vazirani, Priya; Bhattacharyya, Anuradha; Furia, Bansri; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Kong, Ronald; Ma, Jiyuan; Turpoff, Anthony; Lee, Chang-Sun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Moon, Young-Choon; Trifillis, Panayiota; Welch, Ellen M; Colacino, Joseph M; Babiak, John; Almstead, Neil G; Peltz, Stuart W; Eng, Loren A; Chen, Karen S; Mull, Jesse L; Lynes, Maureen S; Rubin, Lee L; Fontoura, Paulo; Santarelli, Luca; Haehnke, Daniel; McCarthy, Kathleen D; Schmucki, Roland; Ebeling, Martin; Sivaramakrishnan, Manaswini; Ko, Chien-Ping; Paushkin, Sergey V; Ratni, Hasane; Gerlach, Irene; Ghosh, Anirvan; Metzger, Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease caused by mutation or deletion of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. A paralogous gene in humans, SMN2, produces low, insufficient levels of functional SMN protein due to alternative splicing that truncates the transcript. The decreased levels of SMN protein lead to progressive neuromuscular degeneration and high rates of mortality. Through chemical screening and optimization, we identified orally available small molecules that shift the balance of SMN2 splicing toward the production of full-length SMN2 messenger RNA with high selectivity. Administration of these compounds to Δ7 mice, a model of severe SMA, led to an increase in SMN protein levels, improvement of motor function, and protection of the neuromuscular circuit. These compounds also extended the life span of the mice. Selective SMN2 splicing modifiers may have therapeutic potential for patients with SMA.

  7. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Associated with Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy Is Caused by Mutations in ASAH1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Tawk, Marcel; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Veillet, Julien; Bayes, Monica; Nolent, Flora; Garcia, Virginie; Servidei, Serenella; Bertini, Enrico; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Renda, Yavuz; Carpentier, Stéphane; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Gut, Ivo; Levade, Thierry; Topaloglu, Haluk; Melki, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by the degeneration of lower motor neurons. The most frequent form is linked to mutations in SMN1. Childhood SMA associated with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) has been reported as a rare autosomal-recessive condition unlinked to mutations in SMN1. Through linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing in three unrelated SMA-PME-affected families, we identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.125C>T [p.Thr42Met]) in exon 2 of ASAH1 in the affected children of two families and the same mutation associated with a deletion of the whole gene in the third family. Expression studies of the c.125C>T mutant cDNA in Farber fibroblasts showed that acid-ceramidase activity was only 32% of that generated by normal cDNA. This reduced activity was able to normalize the ceramide level in Farber cells, raising the question of the pathogenic mechanism underlying the CNS involvement in deficient cells. Morpholino knockdown of the ASAH1 ortholog in zebrafish led to a marked loss of motor-neuron axonal branching, a loss that is associated with increased apoptosis in the spinal cord. Our results reveal a wide phenotypic spectrum associated with ASAH1 mutations. An acid-ceramidase activity below 10% results in Farber disease, an early-onset disease starting with subcutaneous lipogranulomata, joint pain, and hoarseness of the voice, whereas a higher residual activity might be responsible for SMA-PME, a later-onset phenotype restricted to the CNS and starting with lower-motor-neuron disease. PMID:22703880

  8. Observational study of spinal muscular atrophy type I and implications for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Michael P.; Kaufmann, Petra; Darras, Basil T.; Chung, Wendy K.; Sproule, Douglas M.; Kang, Peter B.; Foley, A. Reghan; Yang, Michelle L.; Martens, William B.; Oskoui, Maryam; Glanzman, Allan M.; Flickinger, Jean; Montes, Jacqueline; Dunaway, Sally; O'Hagen, Jessica; Quigley, Janet; Riley, Susan; Benton, Maryjane; Ryan, Patricia A.; Montgomery, Megan; Marra, Jonathan; Gooch, Clifton; De Vivo, Darryl C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Prospective cohort study to characterize the clinical features and course of spinal muscular atrophy type I (SMA-I). Methods: Patients were enrolled at 3 study sites and followed for up to 36 months with serial clinical, motor function, laboratory, and electrophysiologic outcome assessments. Intervention was determined by published standard of care guidelines. Palliative care options were offered. Results: Thirty-four of 54 eligible subjects with SMA-I (63%) enrolled and 50% of these completed at least 12 months of follow-up. The median age at reaching the combined endpoint of death or requiring at least 16 hours/day of ventilation support was 13.5 months (interquartile range 8.1–22.0 months). Requirement for nutritional support preceded that for ventilation support. The distribution of age at reaching the combined endpoint was similar for subjects with SMA-I who had symptom onset before 3 months and after 3 months of age (p = 0.58). Having 2 SMN2 copies was associated with greater morbidity and mortality than having 3 copies. Baseline electrophysiologic measures indicated substantial motor neuron loss. By comparison, subjects with SMA-II who lost sitting ability (n = 10) had higher motor function, motor unit number estimate and compound motor action potential, longer survival, and later age when feeding or ventilation support was required. The mean rate of decline in The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test for Neuromuscular Disorders motor function scale was 1.27 points/year (95% confidence interval 0.21–2.33, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Infants with SMA-I can be effectively enrolled and retained in a 12-month natural history study until a majority reach the combined endpoint. These outcome data can be used for clinical trial design. PMID:25080519

  9. Dominant spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutations in BICD2, an important golgin protein

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Carrera, Lilian A.; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are characterized by degeneration of spinal motor neurons and muscle weakness. Autosomal recessive SMA is the most common form and is caused by homozygous deletions/mutations of the SMN1 gene. However, families with dominant inherited SMA have been reported, for most of them the causal gene remains unknown. Recently, we and others have identified heterozygous mutations in BICD2 as causative for autosomal dominant SMA, lower extremity-predominant, 2 (SMALED2) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). BICD2 encodes the Bicaudal D2 protein, which is considered to be a golgin, due to its coiled-coil (CC) structure and interaction with the small GTPase RAB6A located at the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are resident proteins in the Golgi apparatus and form a matrix that helps to maintain the structure of this organelle. Golgins are also involved in the regulation of vesicle transport. In vitro overexpression experiments and studies of fibroblast cell lines derived from patients, showed fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. In the current review, we will discuss possible causes for this disruption, and the consequences at cellular level, with a view to better understand the pathomechanism of this disease. PMID:26594138

  10. Prospective cohort study of spinal muscular atrophy types 2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Petra; McDermott, Michael P.; Darras, Basil T.; Finkel, Richard S.; Sproule, Douglas M.; Kang, Peter B.; Oskoui, Maryam; Constantinescu, Andrei; Gooch, Clifton L.; Foley, A. Reghan; Yang, Michele L.; Tawil, Rabi; Chung, Wendy K.; Martens, William B.; Montes, Jacqueline; Battista, Vanessa; O'Hagen, Jessica; Dunaway, Sally; Flickinger, Jean; Quigley, Janet; Riley, Susan; Glanzman, Allan M.; Benton, Maryjane; Ryan, Patricia A.; Punyanitya, Mark; Montgomery, Megan J.; Marra, Jonathan; Koo, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the natural history of spinal muscular atrophy type 2 and type 3 (SMA 2/3) beyond 1 year and to report data on clinical and biological outcomes for use in trial planning. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 79 children and young adults with SMA 2/3 who participated in evaluations for up to 48 months. Clinically, we evaluated motor and pulmonary function, quality of life, and muscle strength. We also measured SMN2 copy number, hematologic and biochemical profiles, muscle mass by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the compound motor action potential (CMAP) in a hand muscle. Data were analyzed for associations between clinical and biological/laboratory characteristics cross-sectionally, and for change over time in outcomes using all available data. Results: In cross-sectional analyses, certain biological measures (specifically, CMAP, DXA fat-free mass index, and SMN2 copy number) and muscle strength measures were associated with motor function. Motor and pulmonary function declined over time, particularly at time points beyond 12 months of follow-up. Conclusion: The intermediate and mild phenotypes of SMA show slow functional declines when observation periods exceed 1 year. Whole body muscle mass, hand muscle compound motor action potentials, and muscle strength are associated with clinical measures of motor function. The data from this study will be useful for clinical trial planning and suggest that CMAP and DXA warrant further evaluation as potential biomarkers. PMID:23077013

  11. SAM68 is a physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Vittoria; Pelosi, Laura; Bustamante, Maria Blaire; Nobili, Annalisa; Berardinelli, Maria Grazia; D’Amelio, Marcello; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by loss of motor neurons in patients with null mutations in the SMN1 gene. The almost identical SMN2 gene is unable to compensate for this deficiency because of the skipping of exon 7 during pre–messenger RNA (mRNA) processing. Although several splicing factors can modulate SMN2 splicing in vitro, the physiological regulators of this disease-causing event are unknown. We found that knockout of the splicing factor SAM68 partially rescued body weight and viability of SMAΔ7 mice. Ablation of SAM68 function promoted SMN2 splicing and expression in SMAΔ7 mice, correlating with amelioration of SMA-related defects in motor neurons and skeletal muscles. Mechanistically, SAM68 binds to SMN2 pre-mRNA, favoring recruitment of the splicing repressor hnRNP A1 and interfering with that of U2AF65 at the 3′ splice site of exon 7. These findings identify SAM68 as the first physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in an SMA mouse model. PMID:26438828

  12. PTEN Depletion Decreases Disease Severity and Modestly Prolongs Survival in a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Little, Daniel; Valori, Chiara F; Mutsaers, Chantal A; Bennett, Ellen J; Wyles, Matthew; Sharrack, Basil; Shaw, Pamela J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Azzouz, Mimoun; Ning, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the second most common genetic cause of death in childhood. However, no effective treatment is available to halt disease progression. SMA is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. We previously reported that PTEN depletion leads to an increase in survival of SMN-deficient motor neurons. Here, we aimed to establish the impact of PTEN modulation in an SMA mouse model in vivo. Initial experiments using intramuscular delivery of adeno-associated vector serotype 6 (AAV6) expressing shRNA against PTEN in an established mouse model of severe SMA (SMNΔ7) demonstrated the ability to ameliorate the severity of neuromuscular junction pathology. Subsequently, we developed self-complementary AAV9 expressing siPTEN (scAAV9-siPTEN) to allow evaluation of the effect of systemic suppression of PTEN on the disease course of SMA in vivo. Treatment with a single injection of scAAV9-siPTEN at postnatal day 1 resulted in a modest threefold extension of the lifespan of SMNΔ7 mice, increasing mean survival to 30 days, compared to 10 days in untreated mice. Our data revealed that systemic PTEN depletion is an important disease modifier in SMNΔ7 mice, and therapies aimed at lowering PTEN expression may therefore offer a potential therapeutic strategy for SMA. PMID:25369768

  13. Small Molecule Suppressors of Drosophila Kinesin Deficiency Rescue Motor Axon Development in a Zebrafish Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gassman, Andrew; Hao, Le T.; Bhoite, Leena; Bradford, Chad L.; Chien, Chi-Bin; Beattie, Christine E.; Manfredi, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common inherited motor neuropathy and the leading hereditary cause of infant mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for the disease, reflecting a need for pharmacologic interventions that restore performance of dysfunctional motor neurons or suppress the consequences of their dysfunction. In a series of assays relevant to motor neuron biology, we explored the activities of a collection of tetrahydroindoles that were reported to alter the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). In Drosophila larvae the compounds suppressed aberrant larval locomotion due to mutations in the Khc and Klc genes, which respectively encode the heavy and light chains of kinesin-1. A representative compound of this class also suppressed the appearance of axonal swellings (alternatively termed axonal spheroids or neuritic beads) in the segmental nerves of the kinesin-deficient Drosophila larvae. Given the importance of kinesin-dependent transport for extension and maintenance of axons and their growth cones, three members of the class were tested for neurotrophic effects on isolated rat spinal motor neurons. Each compound stimulated neurite outgrowth. In addition, consistent with SMA being an axonopathy of motor neurons, the three axonotrophic compounds rescued motor axon development in a zebrafish model of SMA. The results introduce a collection of small molecules as pharmacologic suppressors of SMA-associated phenotypes and nominate specific members of the collection for development as candidate SMA therapeutics. More generally, the results reinforce the perception of SMA as an axonopathy and suggest novel approaches to treating the disease. PMID:24023935

  14. Chondrolectin affects cell survival and neuronal outgrowth in in vitro and in vivo models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, James N; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Oliver, Peter L; Biba, Angeliki; Becker, Thomas; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Catherina G; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons owing to reduced levels of survival motor neuron (Smn) protein. In addition to its well-established role in assembling constituents of the spliceosome, diverse cellular functions have been proposed for Smn, but the reason why low levels of this widely expressed protein result in selective motor neuron pathology is still debated. In longitudinal studies of exon-level changes in SMA mouse model tissues, designed to determine the contribution of splicing dysfunction to the disease, we have previously shown that a generalized defect in splicing is unlikely to play a causative role in SMA. Nevertheless, we identified a small subset of genes that were alternatively spliced in the spinal cord compared with control mice before symptom onset, indicating a possible mechanistic role in disease. Here, we have performed functional studies of one of these genes, chondrolectin (Chodl), known to be highly expressed in motor neurons and important for correct motor axon outgrowth in zebrafish. Using in vitro and in vivo models of SMA, we demonstrate altered expression of Chodl in SMA mouse spinal motor neurons, show that Chodl has distinct effects on cell survival and neurite outgrowth and that increasing the expression of chodl can rescue motor neuron outgrowth defects in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings thus link the dysregulation of Chodl to the pathophysiology of motor neuron degeneration in SMA.

  15. A missense mutation in the 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase FVT1 as candidate causal mutation for bovine spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Stefan; Medugorac, Ivica; Röther, Susanne; Strässer, Katja; Förster, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The bovine form of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) shows striking similarity to the human form of the disease. It has, however, been mapped to a genomic region not harboring the bovine orthologue of the SMN gene, mutation of which causes human SMA. After refinement of the mapping results we analyzed positional and functional candidate genes. One of three candidate genes, FVT1, encoding 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, which catalyzes a crucial step in the glycosphingolipid metabolism, showed a G-to-A missense mutation that changes Ala-175 to Thr. The identified mutation is limited to SMA-affected animals and carriers and always appears in context of the founder haplotype. The Ala variant found in healthy animals showed the expected 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase activity in an in vitro enzyme assay. Importantly, the Thr variant found in SMA animals showed no detectable activity. Surprisingly, in an in vivo assay the mutated gene complements the growth defect of a homologous yeast knockout strain as well as the healthy variant. This finding explains the viability of affected newborn calves and the later neuron-specific onset of the disease, which might be due to the high sensitivity of these neurons to changes in housekeeping functions. Taken together, the described mutation in FVT1 is a strong candidate for causality of SMA in cattle. This result provides an animal model for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the development of SMA and will allow efficient selection against the disease in cattle. PMID:17420465

  16. Spinal muscular atrophy phenotype is ameliorated in human motor neurons by SMN increase via different novel RNA therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Dametti, Sara; Salani, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Pagliarani, Serena; Rizzo, Federica; Frattini, Emanuele; Pagani, Franco; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a primary genetic cause of infant mortality due to mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) 1 gene. No cure is available. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) aimed at increasing SMN levels from the paralogous SMN2 gene represent a possible therapeutic strategy. Here, we tested in SMA human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-differentiated motor neurons, three different RNA approaches based on morpholino antisense targeting of the ISSN-1, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (ExSpeU1), and Transcription Activator-Like Effector-Transcription Factor (TALE-TF). All strategies act modulating SMN2 RNA: ASO affects exon 7 splicing, TALE-TF increase SMN2 RNA acting on the promoter, while ExSpeU1 improves pre-mRNA processing. These approaches induced up-regulation of full-length SMN mRNA and differentially affected the Delta-7 isoform: ASO reduced this isoform, while ExSpeU1 and TALE-TF increased it. All approaches upregulate the SMN protein and significantly improve the in vitro SMA motor neurons survival. Thus, these findings demonstrate that therapeutic tools that act on SMN2 RNA are able to rescue the SMA disease phenotype. Our data confirm the feasibility of SMA iPSCs as in vitro disease models and we propose novel RNA approaches as potential therapeutic strategies for treating SMA and other genetic neurological disorders. PMID:26123042

  17. Modeling the Early Phenotype at the Neuromuscular Junction of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Using Patient-Derived iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Michiko; Kitaoka, Shiho; Egawa, Naohiro; Yamane, Mayu; Ikeda, Ryunosuke; Tsukita, Kayoko; Amano, Naoki; Watanabe, Akira; Morimoto, Masafumi; Takahashi, Jun; Hosoi, Hajime; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Inoue, Haruhisa; Saito, Megumu K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In the pathogenesis of SMA, pathological changes of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) precede the motor neuronal loss. Therefore, it is critical to evaluate the NMJ formed by SMA patients’ motor neurons (MNs), and to identify drugs that can restore the normal condition. We generated NMJ-like structures using MNs derived from SMA patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and found that the clustering of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is significantly impaired. Valproic acid and antisense oligonucleotide treatment ameliorated the AChR clustering defects, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN transcripts. Thus, the current in vitro model of AChR clustering using SMA patient-derived iPSCs is useful to dissect the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of SMA, and to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25801509

  18. Clinical and molecular features and therapeutic perspectives of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1

    PubMed Central

    Vanoli, Fiammetta; Rinchetti, Paola; Porro, Francesca; Parente, Valeria; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene, encoding the immunoglobulin μ-binding protein 2, leading to motor neuron degeneration. It is a rare and fatal disease with an early onset in infancy in the majority of the cases. The main clinical features are muscular atrophy and diaphragmatic palsy, which requires prompt and permanent supportive ventilation. The human disease is recapitulated in the neuromuscular degeneration (nmd) mouse. No effective treatment is available yet, but novel therapeutical approaches tested on the nmd mouse, such as the use of neurotrophic factors and stem cell therapy, have shown positive effects. Gene therapy demonstrated effectiveness in SMA, being now at the stage of clinical trial in patients and therefore representing a possible treatment for SMARD1 as well. The significant advancement in understanding of both SMARD1 clinical spectrum and molecular mechanisms makes ground for a rapid translation of pre-clinical therapeutic strategies in humans. PMID:26095024

  19. An Integrative Transcriptomic Analysis for Identifying Novel Target Genes Corresponding to Severity Spectrum in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chou, Wei-Chun; Lin, Ho-Chen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Tsai, Li-Kai; Chuang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease resulting from a recessive mutation in the SMN1 gene. This disease affects multiple organ systems with varying degrees of severity. Exploration of the molecular pathological changes occurring in different cell types in SMA is crucial for developing new therapies. This study collected 39 human microarray datasets from ArrayExpress and GEO databases to build an integrative transcriptomic analysis for recognizing novel SMA targets. The transcriptomic analysis was conducted through combining weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) for gene module detection, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) for functional categorization and filtration, and Cytoscape (visual interaction gene network analysis) for target gene identification. Seven novel target genes (Bmp4, Serpine1, Gata6, Ptgs2, Bcl2, IL6 and Cntn1) of SMA were revealed, and are all known in the regulation of TNFα for controlling neural, cardiac and bone development. Sequentially, the differentially expressed patterns of these 7 target genes in mouse tissues (e.g., spinal cord, heart, muscles and bone) were validated in SMA mice of different severities (pre-symptomatic, mildly symptomatic, and severely symptomatic). In severely symptomatic SMA mice, TNFα was up-regulated with attenuation of Bmp4 and increase of Serpine1 and Gata6 (a pathway in neural and cardiac development), but not in pre-symptomatic and mildly symptomatic SMA mice. The severely symptomatic SMA mice also had the elevated levels of Ptgs2 and Bcl2 (a pathway in skeletal development) as well as IL6 and Cntn1 (a pathway in nervous system development). Thus, the 7 genes identified in this study might serve as potential target genes for future investigations of disease pathogenesis and SMA therapy. PMID:27331400

  20. Lung clearance in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy with and without CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure).

    PubMed

    Klefbeck, B; Svartengren, K; Camner, P; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Sejersen, T; Mattsson, E

    2001-09-01

    Bronchiolar clearance was studied in 7 boys in the age range of 8 to 17 years, 6 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and 1 with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA-II). These boys had healthy lungs but a severely reduced muscular strength (wheelchair dependent). In 6 of the boys, clearance was studied twice, at one occasion as a control and at the other occasion following treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A control group of healthy adults was used. In the clearance examinations, 6-microm Teflon particles, labeled with III In was inhaled extremely slowly, 0.05 L/s. This gives a deposition mainly in the bronchioles. Lung retention was measured after 0,24,48, and 72 hours. A model for deposition of particles in the adult lung was scaled down to represent the children in this study. Deposition in various airway generations was calculated to be similar in children and adults. Also the measured retentions were similar in the boys and the adults. In the clearance experiments during CPAP treatment, there was a significantly lower retention after 72 hours (but not after 24 and 48 hours) than in the control experiments. Theresults indicate that a severe reduction of muscular strength, and thereby a reduction of mechanical movement of the lung, does not affect clearance from large and small airways. However, some effect of clearance from small airways cannot be excluded due to the short measuring period. The small but significant effect of the CPAP treatment might have potential clinical importance and suggest that bronchiolar clearance can be affected by some form of mechanical force. PMID:11558965

  1. Evidence for a chronic axonal atrophy in oculopharyngeal "muscular dystrophy".

    PubMed

    Probst, A; Tackmann, W; Stoeckli, H R; Jerusalem, F; Ulrich, J

    1982-01-01

    We report on morphometric investigations of peripheral nerves in a woman, who died at the age of 69, presenting the classical symptoms of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) and a typical family history with several members (males and females) affected over three generations. Evidence for chronic axonal atrophy was found in peripheral nerves and especially in oculomotor nerves with severe axon loss in endomysial nerve twigs of extraocular, laryngeal, and tongue muscles. Whereas limb muscles presented features of neurogenic atrophy, severe changes of "myopathic" type were evident in extrinsic eye muscles, laryngeal constrictor, tongue, and diaphragma. However, we interpreted these changes as neurogenic in origin in view of the severe denervation found in those muscles. Our findings suggest that OPMD is a disease of primary neurogenic origin rather than a primary myopathic disorder. PMID:7124348

  2. Association between Ag1-CA Alleles and Severity of Autosomal Recessive Proximal Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Christine J.; Morgan, Kenneth; Carpten, John D.; Fuerst, Paul; Ingraham, Susan E.; Prescott, Gary; McPherson, John D.; Wirth, Brunhilde; Zerres, Klaus; Hurko, Orest; Wasmuth, John J.; Mendell, Jerry R.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.; Simard, Louise R.

    1994-01-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hôpital Sainte-Justine [HSJ]) and American (Ohio State University [OSU]) populations (P<.0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P=.0003 OSU; P=.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P=.0014 OSU; P=.001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P=.5 OSU; P=.25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidate SMA genes. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7977383

  3. Fasciculations masquerading as minipolymyoclonus in bulbospinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sushanth; Ma, Wei; Kozochonok, Elena; Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-01-01

    Minipolymyoclonus has been described in both anterior horn cell disorders and central nervous system degenerative conditions. While its etiology remains unclear and speculative, a central generator has been previously proposed. We describe a case of bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease), where minipolymyoclonus-like movements corresponded to fasciculations in neurophysiological studies. Our novel finding suggests that the etiologies of minipolymyoclonus in central and peripheral nervous system disorders are distinct, despite outward clinical similarity. The term “minipolyfasciculations” may be more reflective of the underlying process causing minipolymyoclonus-like movements in lower motor neuron disorders. PMID:26019432

  4. Fasciculations masquerading as minipolymyoclonus in bulbospinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sushanth; Ma, Wei; Kozochonok, Elena; Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-01-01

    Minipolymyoclonus has been described in both anterior horn cell disorders and central nervous system degenerative conditions. While its etiology remains unclear and speculative, a central generator has been previously proposed. We describe a case of bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease), where minipolymyoclonus-like movements corresponded to fasciculations in neurophysiological studies. Our novel finding suggests that the etiologies of minipolymyoclonus in central and peripheral nervous system disorders are distinct, despite outward clinical similarity. The term "minipolyfasciculations" may be more reflective of the underlying process causing minipolymyoclonus-like movements in lower motor neuron disorders. PMID:26019432

  5. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  6. Postsymptomatic restoration of SMN rescues the disease phenotype in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Cathleen M.; Kariya, Shingo; Patruni, Sunita; Osborne, Melissa A.; Liu, Don; Henderson, Christopher E.; Li, Darrick K.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Rojas, José; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Winberg, Margaret L.; Monani, Umrao R.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder in humans. In fact, it is the most frequently inherited cause of infant mortality, being the result of mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that reduce levels of SMN protein. Restoring levels of SMN protein in individuals with SMA is perceived to be a viable therapeutic option, but the efficacy of such a strategy once symptoms are apparent has not been determined. We have generated mice harboring an inducible Smn rescue allele and used them in a model of SMA to investigate the effects of turning on SMN expression at different time points during the course of the disease. Restoring SMN protein even after disease onset was sufficient to reverse neuromuscular pathology and effect robust rescue of the SMA phenotype. Importantly, our findings also indicated that there was a therapeutic window of opportunity from P4 through P8 defined by the extent of neuromuscular synapse pathology and the ability of motor neurons to respond to SMN induction, following which restoration of the protein to the organism failed to produce therapeutic benefit. Nevertheless, our results suggest that even in severe SMA, timely reinstatement of the SMN protein may halt the progression of the disease and serve as an effective postsymptomatic treatment. PMID:21785219

  7. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  8. An investigation of genetic heterogeneity and linkage disequilibrium in 161 families with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Merette, C.; Gilliam, T.C.; Brzustowicz, L.M. ); Daniels, R.J.; Davies, K.E. ); Melki, J.; Munnich, A. ); Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Siddique, T. ); Voosen, B. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors performed linkage analysis of 161 families with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in which affected individuals suffer from the intermediate or mild form of the disease (Types II or III). Markers for six loci encompassing the chromosome 5q11.2-q13.3 region were typed. The best map location for the disease locus was found to be between D5S6 and MAP1B. The corresponding 1 lod unit support interval is confined to this interval and spans 0.5 cM. The data strongly support the hypothesis of linkage heterogeneity (likelihood ratio, 1.14 [times] 10[sup 4]), with 5% of the families unlinked. Four families have a probability of less than 50% of segregating the SMA gene linked to the region 5q11.2-q13.3. A likelihood approach to test for linkage disequilibrium revealed no significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any marker under study. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Coilin forms the bridge between Cajal bodies and SMN, the Spinal Muscular Atrophy protein

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Michael D.; Szymczyk, Piotr W.; Shpargel, Karl B.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the human survival of motor neuron 1 gene, SMN1. SMN protein is part of a large complex that is required for biogenesis of various small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Here, we report that SMN interacts directly with the Cajal body signature protein, coilin, and that this interaction mediates recruitment of the SMN complex to Cajal bodies. Mutation or deletion of specific RG dipeptide residues within coilin inhibits the interaction both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, GST-pulldown experiments show that coilin also binds directly to SmB′. Competition studies show that coilin competes with SmB′ for binding sites on SMN. Ectopic expression of SMN and coilin constructs in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking endogenous coilin confirms that recruitment of SMN and splicing snRNPs to Cajal bodies depends on the coilin C-terminal RG motif. A cardinal feature of SMA patient cells is a defect in the targeting of SMN to nuclear foci; our results uncover a role for coilin in this process. PMID:11641277

  10. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  11. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of a small-molecule SMN2 splicing modifier in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K. Y.; Mollin, Anna; Sheedy, Josephine; Yeh, Shirley; Petruska, Janet; Narasimhan, Jana; Dakka, Amal; Welch, Ellen M.; Karp, Gary; Chen, Karen S.; Metzger, Friedrich; Ratni, Hasane; Lotti, Francesco; Tisdale, Sarah; Naryshkin, Nikolai A.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Paushkin, Sergey; Ko, Chien-Ping; Weetall, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by the loss or mutation of both copies of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The related SMN2 gene is retained, but due to alternative splicing of exon 7, produces insufficient levels of the SMN protein. Here, we systematically characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics properties of the SMN splicing modifier SMN-C1. SMN-C1 is a low-molecular weight compound that promotes the inclusion of exon 7 and increases production of SMN protein in human cells and in two transgenic mouse models of SMA. Furthermore, increases in SMN protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skin correlate with those in the central nervous system (CNS), indicating that a change of these levels in blood or skin can be used as a non-invasive surrogate to monitor increases of SMN protein levels in the CNS. Consistent with restored SMN function, SMN-C1 treatment increases the levels of spliceosomal and U7 small-nuclear RNAs and corrects RNA processing defects induced by SMN deficiency in the spinal cord of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. A 100% or greater increase in SMN protein in the CNS of SMNΔ7 SMA mice robustly improves the phenotype. Importantly, a ∼50% increase in SMN leads to long-term survival, but the SMA phenotype is only partially corrected, indicating that certain SMA disease manifestations may respond to treatment at lower doses. Overall, we provide important insights for the translation of pre-clinical data to the clinic and further therapeutic development of this series of molecules for SMA treatment. PMID:26931466

  12. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  13. Alternative splicing in spinal muscular atrophy underscores the role of an intron definition model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Natalia N; Singh, Ravindra N

    2011-01-01

    Humans have two nearly identical copies of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) gene: SMN1 and SMN2. The two SMN genes code for identical proteins; however, SMN2 predominantly generates a shorter transcript due to skipping of exon 7, the last coding exon. Skipping of SMN2 exon 7 leads to production of a truncated SMN protein that is highly unstable. The inability of SMN2 to compensate for the loss of SMN1 results in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the second most prevalent genetic cause of infant mortality. Since SMN2 is almost universally present in SMA patients, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise for cure. Consistently, SMN2 exon 7 splicing has emerged as one of the best studied splicing systems in humans. The vast amount of recent literature provides a clue that SMN2 exon 7 splicing is regulated by an intron definition mechanism, which does not require cross-exon communication as prerequisite for exon inclusion. Our conclusion is based on the prominent role of intronic cis-elements, some of them have emerged as the frontrunners among potential therapeutic targets of SMA. Further, the widely expressed T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1), a member of the Q-rich domain containing RNA-binding proteins, has recently been found to regulate SMN exon 7 splicing by binding to intron 7 sequences away from the 5′ ss. These findings make a strong argument for an "intron definition model", according to which regulatory sequences within a downstream intron are capable of enforcing exon inclusion even in the absence of a defined upstream 3′ ss of an alternatively spliced exon.

  14. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA. PMID:27377135

  15. SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in cell lines derived from patients with spinal muscular atrophy as measured by array digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stabley, Deborah L; Harris, Ashlee W; Holbrook, Jennifer; Chubbs, Nicholas J; Lozo, Kevin W; Crawford, Thomas O; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Funanage, Vicky L; Wang, Wenlan; Mackenzie, William; Scavina, Mena; Sol-Church, Katia; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2015-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease characterized by loss of α-motor neurons and associated muscle atrophy. SMA is caused by deletion or other disabling mutation of survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1). In the human genome, a large duplication of the SMN-containing region gives rise to a second copy of this gene (SMN2) that is distinguishable by a single nucleotide change in exon 7. Within the SMA population, there is substantial variation in SMN2 copy number; in general, those individuals with SMA who have a high SMN2 copy number have a milder disease. Because SMN2 functions as a disease modifier, its accurate copy number determination may have clinical relevance. In this study, we describe the development of an assay to assess SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in DNA samples using an array-based digital PCR (dPCR) system. This dPCR assay can accurately and reliably measure the number of SMN1 and SMN2 copies in DNA samples. In a cohort of SMA patient-derived cell lines, the assay confirmed a strong inverse correlation between SMN2 copy number and disease severity. Array dPCR is a practical technique to determine, accurately and reliably, SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers from SMA samples. PMID:26247043

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  17. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  20. Clinical and genetic diversity of SMN1-negative proximal spinal muscular atrophies

    PubMed Central

    Jordanova, Albena

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spinal muscular atrophy is a motor neuron disorder characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy due to degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. Initially, the disease was considered purely as an autosomal recessive condition caused by loss-of-function SMN1 mutations on 5q13. Recent developments in next generation sequencing technologies, however, have unveiled a growing number of clinical conditions designated as non-5q forms of spinal muscular atrophy. At present, 16 different genes and one unresolved locus are associated with proximal non-5q forms, having high phenotypic variability and diverse inheritance patterns. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the phenotypes, causative genes, and disease mechanisms associated with proximal SMN1-negative spinal muscular atrophies. We describe the molecular and cellular functions enriched among causative genes, and discuss the challenges in the post-genomics era of spinal muscular atrophy research. PMID:24970098

  1. Independent mobility after early introduction of a power wheelchair in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dunaway, Sally; Montes, Jacqueline; O'Hagen, Jessica; Sproule, Douglas M; Vivo, Darryl C De; Kaufmann, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Weakness resulting from spinal muscular atrophy causes severe limitations in functional mobility. The early introduction of power mobility has potential to enhance development and mitigate disability. These outcomes are achieved by simulating normal skill acquisition and by promoting motor learning, visuospatial system development, self-exploration, cognition, and social development. There are few reports on early power mobility in spinal muscular atrophy, and it is typically not prescribed until school age. The authors evaluated 6 children under age 2 years with neuromuscular disease (5 spinal muscular atrophy, 1 congenital muscular dystrophy) for power mobility. Parents recorded the practice hours necessary to achieve independence using the Power Mobility Skills Checklist. Four children achieved independence in all items on the checklist by 7.9 months (range: 73-458 days). Introduction of early power mobility is feasible in spinal muscular atrophy patients under age 2 years and should be introduced in late infancy when children typically acquire locomotor skills.

  2. Fibrosis, adipogenesis, and muscle atrophy in congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Xiong; Tang, Sheng-Ping; Gao, Fu-Tang; Xu, Jiang-Long; Jiang, Xian-Ping; Cao, Juan; Fu, Gui-Bing; Sun, Ke; Liu, Shi-Zhe; Shi, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the traditional view, muscle atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were regarded as the basic pathological features of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). But in the ultrastructure study, the mesenchyme-like cells, myoblasts, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts were found in the proliferation of interstitium of CMT. To investigate the characteristics of pathological features and the mechanisms of muscle atrophy in CMT, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 185 CMT patients from July 2009 to July 2011 in Shenzhen Children's Hospital in China and performed pathological studies. According to age, the 185 CMT patients were divided into 4 groups. All resected surgical specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichromic staining. Sudan III staining was used for frozen sections, whereas immunohistochemical staining for S-100, calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome was carried out on 40 CMT specimens. Eight adductor muscle specimens from 8 patients with development dysplasia of the hip were taken as control group in the immunohistochemical staining. By Masson trichromic staining, the differences in the percent area of fibrous tissue in each CMT groups were significant. In Sudan III staining and immunostaining for S-100, adipocyte hyperplasia was the pathological feature of CMT. Moreover, compared with controls, most atrophic muscle fibers in CMT specimens were found to show strong immunoreactivity for calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome. With increasing age, fibrosis peaked at both sides and it was low in middle age group. Adipocytes increased with age. The characteristics of pathological features in CMT are changeable with age. The calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system may play a role in muscle atrophy of CMT. In the CMT, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis, and myogenesis may be the results of mesenchyme-like cells in SCM (sternocleidomastoid muscle). In conclusion, the present study furthermore supports maldevelopment of the

  3. Fibrosis, Adipogenesis, and Muscle Atrophy in Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-xiong; Tang, Sheng-ping; Gao, Fu-tang; Xu, Jiang-Long; Jiang, Xian-ping; Cao, Juan; Fu, Gui-bing; Sun, Ke; Liu, Shi-zhe; Shi, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the traditional view, muscle atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were regarded as the basic pathological features of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). But in the ultrastructure study, the mesenchyme-like cells, myoblasts, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts were found in the proliferation of interstitium of CMT. To investigate the characteristics of pathological features and the mechanisms of muscle atrophy in CMT, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 185 CMT patients from July 2009 to July 2011 in Shenzhen Children's Hospital in China and performed pathological studies. According to age, the 185 CMT patients were divided into 4 groups. All resected surgical specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichromic staining. Sudan III staining was used for frozen sections, whereas immunohistochemical staining for S-100, calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome was carried out on 40 CMT specimens. Eight adductor muscle specimens from 8 patients with development dysplasia of the hip were taken as control group in the immunohistochemical staining. By Masson trichromic staining, the differences in the percent area of fibrous tissue in each CMT groups were significant. In Sudan III staining and immunostaining for S-100, adipocyte hyperplasia was the pathological feature of CMT. Moreover, compared with controls, most atrophic muscle fibers in CMT specimens were found to show strong immunoreactivity for calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome. With increasing age, fibrosis peaked at both sides and it was low in middle age group. Adipocytes increased with age. The characteristics of pathological features in CMT are changeable with age. The calpain and the ubiquitin–proteasome system may play a role in muscle atrophy of CMT. In the CMT, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis, and myogenesis may be the results of mesenchyme-like cells in SCM (sternocleidomastoid muscle). In conclusion, the present study furthermore supports

  4. A common spinal muscular atrophy deletion mutation is present on a single founder haplotype in the US Hutterites

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X; Oktay, A Afşin; Dai, Zunyan; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Prior, Thomas W; Ober, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive (AR) neuromuscular disease that is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in children, with carrier frequencies as high as ∼1 in 35 in US Whites. As part of our genetic studies in the Hutterites from South Dakota, we identified a large 22 Mb run of homozygosity, spanning the SMA locus in an affected child, of which 10 Mb was also homozygous in three affected Hutterites from Montana, supporting a single founder origin for the mutation. We developed a haplotype-based method for identifying carriers of the SMN1 deletion that leveraged existing genome-wide SNP genotype data for ∼1400 Hutterites. In combination with two direct PCR-based assays, we identified 176 carriers of the SMN1 deletion, one asymptomatic homozygous adult and three carriers of a de novo deletion. This corresponds to a carrier frequency of one in eight (12.5%) in the South Dakota Hutterites, representing the highest carrier frequency reported to date for SMA and for an AR disease in the Hutterite population. Lastly, we show that 26 SNPs can be used to predict SMA carrier status in the Hutterites, with 99.86% specificity and 99.71% sensitivity. PMID:21610747

  5. Enhancement of SMN protein levels in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy using novel drug-like compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan J; Osman, Erkan Y; Evans, Matthew C; Choi, Sungwoon; Xing, Xuechao; Cuny, Gregory D; Glicksman, Marcie A; Lorson, Christian L; Androphy, Elliot J

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive muscle weakness, which primarily targets proximal muscles. About 95% of SMA cases are caused by the loss of both copies of the SMN1 gene. SMN2 is a nearly identical copy of SMN1, which expresses much less functional SMN protein. SMN2 is unable to fully compensate for the loss of SMN1 in motor neurons but does provide an excellent target for therapeutic intervention. Increased expression of functional full-length SMN protein from the endogenous SMN2 gene should lessen disease severity. We have developed and implemented a new high-throughput screening assay to identify small molecules that increase the expression of full-length SMN from a SMN2 reporter gene. Here, we characterize two novel compounds that increased SMN protein levels in both reporter cells and SMA fibroblasts and show that one increases lifespan, motor function, and SMN protein levels in a severe mouse model of SMA. PMID:23740718

  6. Molecular prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs).

    PubMed

    Essawi, Mona L; Al-Attribi, Ghada M; Gaber, Khaled R; El-Harouni, Ashraf A

    2012-11-01

    Autosomal recessive childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMAs) is the second most common neuromuscular disorder and a common cause of infant disability and mortality. SMA patients are classified into three clinical types based on age of onset, and severity of symptoms. About 94% of patients have homozygous deletion of exon 7 in survival motor neuron (SMN1) gene. The neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene was found to be more frequently deleted in the severest form of the disease. This study aimed to comment on the implementation of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of SMAs for 85 fetuses from 75 Egyptian couples at risk of having an affected child. The homozygous deletion of exon 7 in SMN1 gene and the deletion of exon 5 of the NAIP gene were detected using PCR-REFLP and multiplex PCR methods respectively. Eighteen fetuses showed homozygous deletion of exon 7 in SMN1 gene and deletion of exon 5 in NAIP gene. In conclusion prenatal diagnosis is an important tool for accurate diagnosis and genetic counseling that help decision making in high risk families. PMID:22921322

  7. Severe impairment of male reproductive organ development in a low SMN expressing mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ottesen, Eric W.; Howell, Matthew D.; Singh, Natalia N.; Seo, Joonbae; Whitley, Elizabeth M.; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN), a multifunctional protein essential for higher eukaryotes. While SMN is one of the most scrutinized proteins associated with neurodegeneration, its gender-specific role in vertebrates remains unknown. We utilized a mild SMA model (C/C model) to examine the impact of low SMN on growth and development of mammalian sex organs. We show impaired testis development, degenerated seminiferous tubules, reduced sperm count and low fertility in C/C males, but no overt sex organ phenotype in C/C females. Underscoring an increased requirement for SMN expression, wild type testis showed extremely high levels of SMN protein compared to other tissues. Our results revealed severe perturbations in pathways critical to C/C male reproductive organ development and function, including steroid biosynthesis, apoptosis, and spermatogenesis. Consistent with enhanced apoptosis in seminiferous tubules of C/C testes, we recorded a drastic increase in cells with DNA fragmentation. SMN was expressed at high levels in adult C/C testis due to an adult-specific splicing switch, but could not compensate for low levels during early testicular development. Our findings uncover novel hallmarks of SMA disease progression and link SMN to general male infertility. PMID:26830971

  8. Apparent gene conversions involving the SMN gene in the region of the spinal muscular atrophy locus on chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Steege, G. van der; Grootscholten, P.M.; Cobben, J.M.; Scheffer, H.; Buys, C.H.C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been described as a determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMN has a closely flanking, nearly identical copy ({sup C}BCD541). Gene and copy gene can be discriminated by sequence differences in exons 7 and 8. The large majority of SMA patients show homozygous deletions of at least exons 7 and 8 of the SMN gene. A minority of patients show absence of SMN exon 7 but retention of exon 8. This is explained by results of our present analysis of 13 such patients providing evidence for apparent gene-conversion events between SMN and the centromeric copy gene. Instead of applying a separate analysis for absence or presence of SMN exons 7 and 8, we used a contiguous PCR from intron 6 to exon 8. In every case we found a chimeric gene with a fusion of exon 7 of the copy gene and exon 8 of SMN and absence of a normal SMN gene. Similar events, including the fusion counterpart, were observed in a group of controls, although in the presence of a normal SMN gene. Chimeric genes as the result of fusions of parts of SMN and {sup C}BCD541 apparently are far from rare and may partly explain the frequently observed SMN deletions in SMA patients. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Morphological characteristics of motor neurons do not determine their relative susceptibility to degeneration in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Sophie R; Nahon, Joya E; Mutsaers, Chantal A; Thomson, Derek; Hamilton, Gillian; Parson, Simon H; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infant mortality, resulting primarily from the degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons. Studies using mouse models of SMA have revealed widespread heterogeneity in the susceptibility of individual motor neurons to neurodegeneration, but the underlying reasons remain unclear. Data from related motor neuron diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggest that morphological properties of motor neurons may regulate susceptibility: in ALS larger motor units innervating fast-twitch muscles degenerate first. We therefore set out to determine whether intrinsic morphological characteristics of motor neurons influenced their relative vulnerability to SMA. Motor neuron vulnerability was mapped across 10 muscle groups in SMA mice. Neither the position of the muscle in the body, nor the fibre type of the muscle innervated, influenced susceptibility. Morphological properties of vulnerable and disease-resistant motor neurons were then determined from single motor units reconstructed in Thy.1-YFP-H mice. None of the parameters we investigated in healthy young adult mice - including motor unit size, motor unit arbor length, branching patterns, motor endplate size, developmental pruning and numbers of terminal Schwann cells at neuromuscular junctions - correlated with vulnerability. We conclude that morphological characteristics of motor neurons are not a major determinant of disease-susceptibility in SMA, in stark contrast to related forms of motor neuron disease such as ALS. This suggests that subtle molecular differences between motor neurons, or extrinsic factors arising from other cell types, are more likely to determine relative susceptibility in SMA.

  10. Onset Manifestations of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (Kennedy's Disease).

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Soraru, Gianni

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is regarded as a disorder with adult onset between third and fifth decade of life. However, there is increasing evidence that SBMA may start already before adulthood. The present study investigated the following: (1) Which clinical manifestations have been described so far in the literature as initial manifestations? (2) Which was the age at onset of these manifestations? and (3) Is age at onset dependent on the CAG-repeat length if non-motor manifestations are additionally considered? Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE using appropriate search terms. Onset manifestations in SBMA can be classified as frequent, rare, motor, non-motor, or questionable. Frequent are muscle weakness, cramps, fasciculations/twitching, tremor, dysarthria, dysphagia, or gynecomastia. Rare are myalgia, easy fatigability, exercise intolerance, polyneuropathy, hyper-CKemia, under-masculinized genitalia, scrotal hypospadias, microphallus, laryngospasm, or oligospermia. Questionable manifestations include sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment, increased pituitary volume, diabetes, reduced tongue pressure, elevated creatine-kinase, or low androgens/high estrogens. Age at onset is highly variable ranging from 4-76 years. Non-motor manifestations develop usually before motor manifestations. Age at onset depends on what is considered as an onset manifestation. Considering non-motor onset manifestations, age at onset is independent of the CAG-repeat size. In conclusion, age at onset of SBMA depends on what is regarded as onset manifestation. If non-motor manifestations are additionally considered, age at onset is independent of the CAG-repeat length. Since life expectancy is hardly reduced in SBMA, re-investigation of patients from published studies with regard to their initial disease profiles is recommended. PMID:26482145

  11. D5S351 and D5S1414 located at the spinal muscular atrophy critical region represent novel informative markers in the Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease associated with progressive symmetric weakness and atrophy of the limb muscles. In view of the involvement of numerous point mutations and deletions associated with the disease, the application of polymorphic markers flanking the SMA critical region could be valuable in molecular diagnosis of the disease. In the present study, D5S351 and D5S1414 polymorphic markers located at the SMA critical region in the Iranian populations were characterized. Genotyping of the markers indicated the presence of six and nine different alleles for D5S351 and D5S1414, respectively. Haplotype frequency estimation in 25 trios families and 75 unrelated individuals indicated the presence of six informative haplotypes with frequency higher than 0.05 in the studied population. Furthermore, the D′ coefficient and the χ2 value for D5S351 and D5S1414 markers revealed the presence of linkage disequilibrium between the two markers in the Iranians. These data suggested that D5S351 and D5S1414 could be suggested as informative markers for linkage analysis and molecular diagnosis of SMA in the Iranian population. PMID:26693404

  12. Results from a phase 1 study of nusinersen (ISIS-SMNRx) in children with spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Darras, Basil T.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Montes, Jacqueline; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Norris, Daniel A.; Bennett, C. Frank; Bishop, Kathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary clinical efficacy of intrathecal nusinersen (previously ISIS-SMNRx), an antisense oligonucleotide designed to alter splicing of SMN2 mRNA, in patients with childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Methods: Nusinersen was delivered by intrathecal injection to medically stable patients with type 2 and type 3 SMA aged 2–14 years in an open-label phase 1 study and its long-term extension. Four ascending single-dose levels (1, 3, 6, and 9 mg) were examined in cohorts of 6–10 participants. Participants were monitored for safety and tolerability, and CSF and plasma pharmacokinetics were measured. Exploratory efficacy endpoints included the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded (HFMSE) and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Results: A total of 28 participants enrolled in the study (n = 6 in first 3 dose cohorts; n = 10 in the 9-mg cohort). Intrathecal nusinersen was well-tolerated with no safety/tolerability concerns identified. Plasma and CSF drug levels were dose-dependent, consistent with preclinical data. Extended pharmacokinetics indicated a prolonged CSF drug half-life of 4–6 months after initial clearance. A significant increase in HFMSE scores was observed at the 9-mg dose at 3 months postdose (3.1 points; p = 0.016), which was further increased 9–14 months postdose (5.8 points; p = 0.008) during the extension study. Conclusions: Results from this study support continued development of nusinersen for treatment of SMA. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in children with SMA, intrathecal nusinersen is not associated with safety or tolerability concerns. PMID:26865511

  13. Moving ahead in language: observations on a report of precocious language development in 3-4 year old children with spinal muscular atrophy type II.

    PubMed

    Sieratzki, Jechil S; Woll, Bencie

    2005-01-01

    Benony and Benony in a recent issue of this Journal have presented new data on the precocity of language acquisition in children with type II spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), at age 36-47 months. They refer to our interim report of advanced early language development in these motor-impaired children, which covers the age period 18-35 months. Here, we provide more details of our findings and discuss them in relation to their report and our theory of the role of the procedural system in language learning.

  14. A Mutation in the Vesicle-Trafficking Protein VAPB Causes Late-Onset Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Agnes L.; Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Silva, Helga C. A.; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Middleton, Susan; Cascio, Duilio; Kok, Fernando; Oliveira, João R. M.; Gillingwater, Tom; Webb, Jeanette; Skehel, Paul; Zatz, Mayana

    2004-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a group of neurodegenerative disorders with involvement of upper and/or lower motor neurons, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), progressive bulbar palsy, and primary lateral sclerosis. Recently, we have mapped a new locus for an atypical form of ALS/MND (atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [ALS8]) at 20q13.3 in a large white Brazilian family. Here, we report the finding of a novel missense mutation in the vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin-associated membrane protein B (VAPB) gene in patients from this family. Subsequently, the same mutation was identified in patients from six additional kindreds but with different clinical courses, such as ALS8, late-onset SMA, and typical severe ALS with rapid progression. Although it was not possible to link all these families, haplotype analysis suggests a founder effect. Members of the vesicle-associated proteins are intracellular membrane proteins that can associate with microtubules and that have been shown to have a function in membrane transport. These data suggest that clinically variable MNDs may be caused by a dysfunction in intracellular membrane trafficking. PMID:15372378

  15. Exercise training prevents hyperinsulinemia, muscular glycogen loss and muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone treatment.

    PubMed

    Barel, Matheus; Perez, Otávio André Brogin; Giozzet, Vanessa Aparecida; Rafacho, Alex; Bosqueiro, José Roberto; do Amaral, Sandra Lia

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether exercise training could prevent the negative side effects of dexamethasone. Rats underwent a training period and were either submitted to a running protocol (60% physical capacity, 5 days/week for 8 weeks) or kept sedentary. After this training period, the animals underwent dexamethasone treatment (1 mg/kg per day, i.p., 10 days). Glycemia, insulinemia, muscular weight and muscular glycogen were measured from blood and skeletal muscle. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein was analyzed in skeletal muscles. Dexamethasone treatment evoked body weight loss (-24%), followed by muscular atrophy in the tibialis anterior (-25%) and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, -15%). Dexamethasone also increased serum insulin levels by 5.7-fold and glucose levels by 2.5-fold compared to control. The exercise protocol prevented atrophy of the EDL and insulin resistance. Also, dexamethasone-treated rats showed decreased muscular glycogen (-41%), which was further attenuated by the exercise protocol. The VEGF protein expression decreased in the skeletal muscles of dexamethasone-treated rats and was unaltered by the exercise protocol. These data suggest that exercise attenuates hyperglycemia and may also prevent insulin resistance, muscular glycogen loss and muscular atrophy, thus suggesting that exercise may have some benefits during glucocorticoid treatment.

  16. Preservation of VGLUT1 synapses on ventral calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons and normal locomotor function in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Vatsala; Behrend, Rachel M.; Birineni, Swetha; Liu, Wenfang; Blivis, Dvir

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction in sensorimotor synapses is one of the earliest pathological changes observed in a mouse model [spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)Δ7] of spinal muscular atrophy. Here, we examined the density of proprioceptive and cholinergic synapses on calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons ventral to the lateral motor column. This population includes inhibitory Renshaw interneurons that are known to receive synaptic input from muscle spindle afferents and from motoneurons. At postnatal day (P)13, near the end stage of the disease, the somatic area of calbindin+ neurons in the L1/L2 and L5/L6 segments was reduced in SMAΔ7 mice compared with controls. In addition, the number and density of terminals expressing the glutamate vesicular transporter (VGLUT1) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) were increased on calbindin+ cells in the L1-L2 but not in the L5-L6 segments of SMAΔ7 mice. In addition, the isolated spinal cord of SMA mice was able to generate locomotor-like activity at P4-P6 in the presence of a drug cocktail or in response to dorsal root stimulation. These results argue against a generalized loss of proprioceptive input to spinal circuits in SMA and suggest that the loss of proprioceptive synapses on motoneurons may be secondary to motoneuron pathology. The increased number of VGLUT1+ and VAChT+ synapses on calbindin+ neurons in the L1/L2 segments may be the result of homeostatic mechanisms. Finally, we have shown that abnormal locomotor network function is unlikely to account for the motor deficits observed in SMA mice at P4–6. PMID:23136344

  17. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern).

  18. Infantile spinal muscular atrophy (morbus Werdnig-Hoffmann) causing neonatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Kyllerman, M

    1977-02-01

    A case of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (Werdnig-Hoffmann's disease) with complete proximal pareses obvious at birth giving rise to neonatal asphyxia is reported. Reduction of fetal movements was noted from the 32nd week of pregnancy. The infant was extremely floppy at birth and spontaneous movements were restricted to hands, feet and face. Fibrillations of the tongue, diaphragmatic hemiparesis and dysphagia were observed. Unassisted ventilation was not compatible with survival and the infant succumbed to the disease in the neonatal period. Muscle biopsy and autopsy confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Infantile spinal muscular atrophy causing neonatal asphyxia seems to be unusual and not earlier described. Constant muscular hypotonus in an asphyctic newborn should raise suspicion of a neuromuscular disorder.

  19. A novel role for CARM1 in promoting nonsense-mediated mRNA decay: potential implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gabriel; Bondy-Chorney, Emma; Laframboise, Janik; Paris, Geneviève; Didillon, Andréanne; Jasmin, Bernard J; Côté, Jocelyn

    2016-04-01

    Loss of 'Survival of Motor Neurons' (SMN) leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord alpha motor neurons, resulting in muscle weakness, paralysis and death during early childhood. SMN is required for assembly of the core splicing machinery, and splicing defects were documented in SMA. We previously uncovered that Coactivator-Associated Methyltransferase-1 (CARM1) is abnormally up-regulated in SMA, leading to mis-regulation of a number of transcriptional and alternative splicing events. We report here that CARM1 can promote decay of a premature terminating codon (PTC)-containing mRNA reporter, suggesting it can act as a mediator of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Interestingly, this pathway, while originally perceived as solely a surveillance mechanism preventing expression of potentially detrimental proteins, is now emerging as a highly regulated RNA decay pathway also acting on a subset of normal mRNAs. We further show that CARM1 associates with major NMD factor UPF1 and promotes its occupancy on PTC-containing transcripts. Finally, we identify a specific subset of NMD targets that are dependent on CARM1 for degradation and that are also misregulated in SMA, potentially adding exacerbated targeting of PTC-containing mRNAs to the already complex array of molecular defects associated with this disease.

  20. [SMN1 Gene Point Mutations in Type I-IV Proximal Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients with a Single Copy of SMN1].

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Type I-IV proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal-recessive diseas- es, which are characterized in the majority of cases by a severely disabling course. Proximal SMA results from mutations in the telomeric copy of SMN-SMN1 gene. Major SMN1 gene mutation types are deletions in the exons 7 and/or 8, which were revealed to be in the homozygous state in 95% of patients. Deletions in the in- dicated exons of SMN1 gene were revealed in a compound-heterozygous state in combination with intragenic point mutations in the remainder 5% of proximal SMA cases. In the present study, we conducted an analysis of point mutations in eight patients with type I-III proximal SMA phenotype, which had a deletion in 7-8- exons of SMN1 gene in the heterozygous state. We revealed seven different mutations, two of which (c.824G > C (p.Gly275A1a) and c.825-2A > T) are described here for the first time. In addition, mutation c.824G > C (p.Gly275A1a) was observed twice in the examined sample. In seven cases a heterozygous carrier of point mutations was one of the parents of the affected children (in six cases, the father; in one case, the mother). Only one mutation, c.43C > T (p.Gln15X), emerged de novo in a genital cell of the child's father. PMID:26606804

  1. Molecular analysis of SMN1, SMN2, NAIP, GTF2H2, and H4F5 genes in 157 Chinese patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Zhang, Qi-Jie; Lin, Qi-Fang; Chen, Ya-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Zhen; Lin, Min-Ting; Murong, Shen-Xing; Wang, Ning; Chen, Wan-Jin

    2013-04-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common and lethal autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Additionally, the phenotype is modified by several genes nearby SMN1 in the 5q13 region. In this study, we analyzed mutations in SMN1 and quantified the modifying genes, including SMN2, NAIP, GTF2H2, and H4F5 by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), TA cloning, allele-specific long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing in 157 SMA patients. Most SMA patients (94.90%) possessed a homozygous SMN1 deletion, while 10 patients demonstrated only the absence of exon 7, but the presence of exon 8. Two missense mutations (c.689 C>T and c.844 C>T) were identified in 2 patients who both carried a single copy of SMN1. We found inverse correlations between SMN2, the NAIP copy number, and the clinical severity of the disease. Furthermore, 7 severe type I patients possessed large-scale deletions, including SMN1, NAIP, and GTF2H2. We conclude that SMN1 gene conversion, SMN1 subtle mutations, SMN2 copy number, and the extent of deletion in the 5q13 region should all be considered in the genotype-phenotype analysis of SMA. PMID:23352792

  2. A novel role for CARM1 in promoting nonsense-mediated mRNA decay: potential implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gabriel; Bondy-Chorney, Emma; Laframboise, Janik; Paris, Geneviève; Didillon, Andréanne; Jasmin, Bernard J; Côté, Jocelyn

    2016-04-01

    Loss of 'Survival of Motor Neurons' (SMN) leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord alpha motor neurons, resulting in muscle weakness, paralysis and death during early childhood. SMN is required for assembly of the core splicing machinery, and splicing defects were documented in SMA. We previously uncovered that Coactivator-Associated Methyltransferase-1 (CARM1) is abnormally up-regulated in SMA, leading to mis-regulation of a number of transcriptional and alternative splicing events. We report here that CARM1 can promote decay of a premature terminating codon (PTC)-containing mRNA reporter, suggesting it can act as a mediator of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Interestingly, this pathway, while originally perceived as solely a surveillance mechanism preventing expression of potentially detrimental proteins, is now emerging as a highly regulated RNA decay pathway also acting on a subset of normal mRNAs. We further show that CARM1 associates with major NMD factor UPF1 and promotes its occupancy on PTC-containing transcripts. Finally, we identify a specific subset of NMD targets that are dependent on CARM1 for degradation and that are also misregulated in SMA, potentially adding exacerbated targeting of PTC-containing mRNAs to the already complex array of molecular defects associated with this disease. PMID:26656492

  3. Proximal muscular atrophy and weakness: An unusual adverse effect of deferasirox iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vill, K; Müller-Felber, W; Teusch, V; Blaschek, A; Gerstl, L; Huetker, S; Albert, M H

    2016-01-01

    Deferasirox is a standard treatment for chronic transfusional iron overload. Adverse effects of deferasirox have been reported in large prospective studies. We report two cases of monozygotic twins manifesting with proximal muscular atrophy and weakness under deferasirox. Discontinuation of deferasirox resulted in symptom improvement and ultimately in complete remission five months after successful haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Broad diagnostic work-up could not bring evidence of another aetiology of muscular weakness. Iron overload or beta thalassemia itself as a cause is considered unlikely in our patients because the chronological coincidence of muscular symptoms was contra-directional to serum ferritin levels and significant clinical improvement was observed promptly after cessation of deferasirox even before transplantation. These observations suggest that the development of muscular weakness in patients on deferasirox should be recognised as a possible adverse effect of the drug.

  4. Upper limb module in non-ambulant patients with spinal muscular atrophy: 12 month changes.

    PubMed

    Sivo, Serena; Mazzone, Elena; Antonaci, Laura; De Sanctis, Roberto; Fanelli, Lavinia; Palermo, Concetta; Montes, Jacqueline; Pane, Marika; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that in non-ambulant patients affected by spinal muscular atrophy the Upper Limb Module can increase the range of activities assessed by the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded. The aim of this study was to establish 12-month changes in the Upper Limb Module in a cohort of non-ambulant spinal muscular atrophy patients and their correlation with changes on the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded. The Upper Limb Module scores ranged between 0 and 17 (mean 10.23, SD 4.81) at baseline and between 1 and 17 at 12 months (mean 10.27, SD 4.74). The Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded scores ranged between 0 and 34 (mean 12.43, SD 9.13) at baseline and between 0 and 34 at 12 months (mean 12.08, SD 9.21). The correlation betweeen the two scales was 0.65 at baseline and 0.72 on the 12 month changes. Our results confirm that the Upper Limb Module can capture functional changes in non-ambulant spinal muscular atrophy patients not otherwise captured by the other scale and that the combination of the two measures allows to capture changes in different subgroups of patients in whom baseline scores and functional changes may be influenced by several variables such as age.

  5. Cross‐disease comparison of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy reveals conservation of selective vulnerability but differential neuromuscular junction pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nijssen, Jik; Frost‐Nylen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions are primary pathological targets in the lethal motor neuron diseases spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Synaptic pathology and denervation of target muscle fibers has been reported prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms in mouse models of both diseases, suggesting that neuromuscular junctions are highly vulnerable from the very early stages, and are a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here we examined neuromuscular pathology longitudinally in three clinically relevant muscle groups in mouse models of ALS and SMA in order to assess their relative vulnerabilities. We show for the first time that neuromuscular junctions of the extraocular muscles (responsible for the control of eye movement) were resistant to degeneration in endstage SMA mice, as well as in late symptomatic ALS mice. Tongue muscle neuromuscular junctions were also spared in both animal models. Conversely, neuromuscular junctions of the lumbrical muscles of the hind‐paw were vulnerable in both SMA and ALS, with a loss of neuronal innervation and shrinkage of motor endplates in both diseases. Thus, the pattern of selective vulnerability was conserved across these two models of motor neuron disease. However, the first evidence of neuromuscular pathology occurred at different timepoints of disease progression, with much earlier evidence of presynaptic involvement in ALS, progressing to changes on the postsynaptic side. Conversely, in SMA changes appeared concomitantly at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that mechanisms of neuromuscular disruption are distinct in these diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1424–1442, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26502195

  6. Joint effect of the SMN2 and SERF1A genes on childhood-onset types of spinal muscular atrophy in Serbian patients.

    PubMed

    Brkušanin, Miloš; Kosać, Ana; Jovanović, Vladimir; Pešović, Jovan; Brajušković, Goran; Dimitrijević, Nikola; Todorović, Slobodanka; Romac, Stanka; Milić Rašić, Vedrana; Savić-Pavićević, Dušanka

    2015-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by functional loss of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Despite genetic homogeneity, phenotypic variability indicates the involvement of disease modifiers. SMN1 is located in 5q13.2 segmental duplication, enriched in genes and prone to unequal rearrangements, which results in copy number polymorphism (CNP). We examined the influence of CNP of 5q13.2 genes and their joint effect on childhood-onset SMA phenotype. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was used to construct 5q13.2 alleles and assess copy number of the SMN2, small EDRK-rich factor 1A (SERF1A) and NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) genes in 99 Serbian patients with SMN1 homozygous absence (23-type I, 37-type II and 39-mild type III) and 122 patients' parents. Spearman rank test was performed to test correlation of individual genes and SMA type. Generalized linear models and backward selection were performed to obtain a model explaining phenotypic variation with the smallest set of variables. 5q13.2 alleles most commonly associated with type I harbored large-scale deletions, while those detected in types II and III originated from conversion of SMN1 to SMN2. Inverse correlation was observed between SMN2, SERF1A and NAIP CNP and SMA type (P=2.2e-16, P=4.264e-10, P=2.722e-8, respectively). The best minimal model describing phenotypic variability included SMN2 (P<2e-16), SERF1A (P<2e-16) and their interaction (P=0.02628). SMN2 and SERF1A have a joint modifying effect on childhood-onset SMA phenotype. PMID:26311540

  7. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery. PMID:27652289

  8. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  9. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery. PMID:27652289

  10. Quantifiable diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is strongly based on the histological characterization of muscle biopsies. However, this morphological analysis is mostly a subjective process and difficult to quantify. We have tested if network science can provide a novel framework to extract useful information from muscle biopsies, developing a novel method that analyzes muscle samples in an objective, automated, fast and precise manner. Methods Our database consisted of 102 muscle biopsy images from 70 individuals (including controls, patients with neurogenic atrophies and patients with muscular dystrophies). We used this to develop a new method, Neuromuscular DIseases Computerized Image Analysis (NDICIA), that uses network science analysis to capture the defining signature of muscle biopsy images. NDICIA characterizes muscle tissues by representing each image as a network, with fibers serving as nodes and fiber contacts as links. Results After a ‘training’ phase with control and pathological biopsies, NDICIA was able to quantify the degree of pathology of each sample. We validated our method by comparing NDICIA quantification of the severity of muscular dystrophies with a pathologist’s evaluation of the degree of pathology, resulting in a strong correlation (R = 0.900, P <0.00001). Importantly, our approach can be used to quantify new images without the need for prior ‘training’. Therefore, we show that network science analysis captures the useful information contained in muscle biopsies, helping the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies. Conclusions Our novel network analysis approach will serve as a valuable tool for assessing the etiology of muscular dystrophies or neurogenic atrophies, and has the potential to quantify treatment outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:23514382

  11. Shift from extracellular signal-regulated kinase to AKT/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway increases survival-motor-neuron expression in spinal-muscular-atrophy-like mice and patient cells.

    PubMed

    Branchu, Julien; Biondi, Olivier; Chali, Farah; Collin, Thibault; Leroy, Felix; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Makoukji, Joelle; Pariset, Claude; Lopes, Philippe; Massaad, Charbel; Chanoine, Christophe; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a recessive neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons. No available therapy exists for SMA, which represents one of the leading genetic causes of death in childhood. SMA is caused by a mutation of the survival-of-motor-neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a quantitative defect in the survival-motor-neuron (SMN) protein expression. All patients retain one or more copies of the SMN2 gene, which modulates the disease severity by producing a small amount of stable SMN protein. We reported recently that NMDA receptor activation, directly in the spinal cord, significantly enhanced the transcription rate of the SMN2 genes in a mouse model of very severe SMA (referred as type 1) by a mechanism that involved AKT/CREB pathway activation. Here, we provide the first compelling evidence for a competition between the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/CREB signaling pathways for SMN2 gene regulation in the spinal cord of type 1 SMA-like mice. The inhibition of the MEK/ERK/Elk-1 pathway promotes the AKT/CREB pathway activation, leading to (1) an enhanced SMN expression in the spinal cord of SMA-like mice and in human SMA myotubes and (2) a 2.8-fold lifespan extension in SMA-like mice. Furthermore, we identified a crosstalk between ERK and AKT signaling pathways that involves the calcium-dependent modulation of CaMKII activity. Together, all these data open new perspectives to the therapeutic strategy for SMA patients. PMID:23467345

  12. [Sporadic case of non-progressive neurogenic muscular atrophy localized in both calf muscles].

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenju; Tateyama, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki; Shibano, Ken; Tanaka, Keiko; Ishiguro, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of difficulty in standing on her toes. Neurological examination showed muscle weakness in both calf muscles. Her serum creatine kinase (CK) level was slightly elevated. MRI revealed hyper-intense signals localized in both the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Histological examinations of biopsied muscle specimens showed a marked variation in fiber size, small angular fibers, and hypertrophic and splitting fibers, but no muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration or inflammatory cell infiltration. ATPase stained sections showed small grouped atrophy of type 1 fibers. NADH-TR stained sections showed target/targetoid fibers predominantly in type 1 fibers. Dysferlin immunoreactivity was normal. Follow-up clinical evaluation for one year showed no progression. This patient was diagnosed as having an unknown type of spinal muscular atrophy or benign calf amyotrophy. Sporadic cases characterized by elderly-onset, neurogenic muscular atrophy localized in both calf muscles, and non-progressive course are extremely rare in Japan.

  13. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons and dissociation of pre- and post-synaptic pathology at the neuromuscular junction in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Comley, Laura H; Thomson, Derek; Parkinson, Nick; Talbot, Kevin; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-04-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive childhood form of motor neuron disease. Previous studies have highlighted nerve- and muscle-specific events in SMA, including atrophy of muscle fibres and post-synaptic motor endplates, loss of lower motor neuron cell bodies and denervation of neuromuscular junctions caused by loss of pre-synaptic inputs. Here we have undertaken a detailed morphological investigation of neuromuscular synaptic pathology in the Smn-/-;SMN2 and Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mouse models of SMA. We show that neuromuscular junctions in the transversus abdominis (TVA), levator auris longus (LAL) and lumbrical muscles were disrupted in both mouse models. Pre-synaptic inputs were lost and abnormal accumulations of neurofilament were present, even in early/mid-symptomatic animals in the most severely affected muscle groups. Neuromuscular pathology was more extensive in the postural TVA muscle compared with the fast-twitch LAL and lumbrical muscles. Pre-synaptic pathology in Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mice was reduced compared with Smn-/-;SMN2 mice at late-symptomatic time-points, although post-synaptic pathology was equally severe. We demonstrate that shrinkage of motor endplates does not correlate with loss of motor nerve terminals, signifying that one can occur in the absence of the other. We also demonstrate selective vulnerability of a subpopulation of motor neurons in the caudal muscle band of the LAL. Paralysis with botulinum toxin resulted in less terminal sprouting and ectopic synapse formation in the caudal band compared with the rostral band, suggesting that motor units conforming to a Fast Synapsing (FaSyn) phenotype are likely to be more vulnerable than those with a Delayed Synapsing (DeSyn) phenotype. PMID:18065780

  14. Reduced survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein in motor neuronal progenitors functions cell autonomously to cause spinal muscular atrophy in model mice expressing the human centromeric (SMN2) gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu-Hwan; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka; Awano, Tomoyuki; Landmesser, Lynn T; Monani, Umrao R

    2010-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common (approximately 1:6400) autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by a paucity of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. Although widely recognized to cause selective spinal motor neuron loss when deficient, the precise cellular site of action of the SMN protein in SMA remains unclear. In this study we sought to determine the consequences of selectively depleting SMN in the motor neurons of model mice. Depleting but not abolishing the protein in motor neuronal progenitors causes an SMA-like phenotype. Neuromuscular weakness in the model mice is accompanied by peripheral as well as central synaptic defects, electrophysiological abnormalities of the neuromuscular junctions, muscle atrophy, and motor neuron degeneration. However, the disease phenotype is more modest than that observed in mice expressing ubiquitously low levels of the SMN protein, and both symptoms as well as early electrophysiological abnormalities that are readily apparent in neonates were attenuated in an age-dependent manner. We conclude that selective knock-down of SMN in motor neurons is sufficient but may not be necessary to cause a disease phenotype and that targeting these cells will be a requirement of any effective therapeutic strategy. This realization is tempered by the relatively mild SMA phenotype in our model mice, one explanation for which is the presence of normal SMN levels in non-neuronal tissue that serves to modulate disease severity.

  15. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields in Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Martínez-Mata, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.

    2004-09-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type I is a disease that rapidly progress to death in early infancy. A case report of a child with Werdnig-Hoffmann disease Type I that recovered at three years of age after two years exposure to electromagnetic fields (ELF) is presented. The child is now eleven years old and with the exception of slightly abnormal gait, the muscle mass of tights and gluteus, high, weight and his everyday activities correspond to those of a normal child his age. Hypothetical explanations for the effects of the electromagnetic fields are discussed.

  16. Phenotypic and molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2

    PubMed Central

    Rossor, Alexander M.; Oates, Emily C.; Salter, Hannah K.; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Sinead M.; Schule, Rebecca; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Scoto, Mariacristina; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A.; Houlden, Henry; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Iyailo; Chamova, Teodora; Litvinenko, Ivan; Zuchner, Stephan; Herrmann, David N.; Blake, Julian; Sowden, Janet E.; Acsadi, Gyuda; Rodriguez, Michael L.; Menezes, Manoj P.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Auer Grumbach, Michaela; Bullock, Simon L.; Muntoni, Francesco; North, Kathryn N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a disorder of lower motor neurons, most commonly caused by recessive mutations in SMN1 on chromosome 5q. Cases without SMN1 mutations are subclassified according to phenotype. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, is characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and wasting, associated with reduced numbers of lumbar motor neurons and is caused by mutations in DYNC1H1, which encodes a microtubule motor protein in the dynein-dynactin complex and one of its cargo adaptors, BICD2. We have now identified 32 patients with BICD2 mutations from nine different families, providing detailed insights into the clinical phenotype and natural history of BICD2 disease. BICD2 spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity predominant most commonly presents with delayed motor milestones and ankle contractures. Additional features at presentation include arthrogryposis and congenital dislocation of the hips. In all affected individuals, weakness and wasting is lower-limb predominant, and typically involves both proximal and distal muscle groups. There is no evidence of sensory nerve involvement. Upper motor neuron signs are a prominent feature in a subset of individuals, including one family with exclusively adult-onset upper motor neuron features, consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. In all cohort members, lower motor neuron features were static or only slowly progressive, and the majority remained ambulant throughout life. Muscle MRI in six individuals showed a common pattern of muscle involvement with fat deposition in most thigh muscles, but sparing of the adductors and semitendinosus. Muscle pathology findings were highly variable and included pseudomyopathic features, neuropathic features, and minimal change. The six causative mutations, including one not previously reported, result in amino acid changes within all three coiled-coil domains of the BICD2 protein, and include a possible ‘hot spot’ mutation, p.Ser107

  17. Hybrid survival motor neuron genes in patients with autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy: New insights into molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahnen, E.; Schoenling, J.; Zerres, K.

    1996-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder leading to weakness and atrophy of voluntary muscles. The survival motor-neuron gene (SMN), a strong candidate for SMA, is present in two highly homologous copies (telSMN and cenSMN) within the SMA region. Only five nucleotide differences within the region between intron 6 and exon 8 distinguish these homologues. Independent of the severity of the disease, 90%-98% of all SMA patients carry homozygous deletions in telSMN, affecting either exon 7 or both exons 7 and 8. We present the molecular analysis of 42 SMA patients who carry homozygous deletions of telSMN exon 7 but not of exon 8. The question arises whether in these cases the telSMN is truncated upstream of exon 8 or whether hybrid SMN genes exist that are composed of centromeric and telomeric sequences. By a simple PCR-based assay we demonstrate that in each case the remaining telSMN exon 8 is part of a hybrid SMN gene. Sequencing of cloned hybrid SMN genes from seven patients revealed the same composition in all but two patients: the base-pair differences in introns 6 and 7 and exon 7 are of centromeric origin whereas exon 8 is of telomeric origin. Nonetheless, haplotype analysis with polymorphic multicopy markers, Ag1-CA and C212, localized at the 5{prime} end of the SMN genes, suggests different mechanisms of occurrence, unequal rearrangements, and gene conversion involving both copies of the SMN genes. In approximately half of all patients, we identified a consensus haplotype, suggesting a common origin. Interestingly, we identified a putative recombination hot spot represented by recombination-simulating elements (TGGGG and TGAGGT) in exon 8 that is homologous to the human deletion-hot spot consensus sequence in the immunoglobulin switch region, the {alpha}-globin cluster, and the polymerase {alpha} arrest sites. This may explain why independent hybrid SMN genes show identical sequences. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Spinal muscular atrophy: classification, diagnosis, management, pathogenesis, and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Felina V; Williams, Virginia C; Heemskerk, Jill; Iannaccone, Susan; Didonato, Christine; Swoboda, Kathryn; Maria, Bernard L

    2007-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that affects the motor neurons responsible for movement of the proximal muscles of the trunk and body. To date, the disease can be classified into 3 main categories based on severity and age of onset. During the October 18th symposium held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, researchers met to (1) describe current diagnostic strategies, (2) discuss recent thoughts on pathogenesis, (3) review current therapies and clinical trials, and (4) define future research directions. In her opening remarks, Dr Story Landis, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, emphasized the degree to which the Neurobiology of Disease in Children conference series has broadened awareness of the many rare diseases affecting children, not only through the advancement of research but also by educating practitioners about diagnostic strategies. Dr Landis also discussed the role this conference may play in fostering research that seeks to develop a single mechanism of therapy for spinal muscular atrophy. She also discussed the current funding situation at the National Institutes of Health and addressed the crucial function of volunteer research organizations that sponsor research in further improving management of this condition. This article summarizes the presentations and includes the verbatim edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions.

  19. Atrophy, fibrosis, and increased PAX7-positive cells in pharyngeal muscles of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Gidaro, Teresa; Negroni, Elisa; Perié, Sophie; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Lainé, Jeanne; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2013-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited dystrophy caused by an abnormal trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A)-binding-protein-nuclear 1 (PABPN1) gene. Primary muscular targets of OPMD are the eyelid elevator and pharyngeal muscles, including the cricopharyngeal muscle (CPM), the progressive involution of which leads to ptosis and dysphagia, respectively. To understand the consequences of PABPN1 polyalanine expansion in OPMD, we studied muscle biopsies from 14 OPMD patients, 3 inclusion body myositis patients, and 9 healthy controls. In OPMD patient CPM (n = 6), there were typical dystrophic features with extensive endomysial fibrosis and marked atrophy of myosin heavy-chain IIa fibers. There were more PAX7-positive cells in all CPM versus other muscles (n = 5, control; n = 3, inclusion body myositis), and they were more numerous in OPMD CPM versus control normal CPM without any sign of muscle regeneration. Intranuclear inclusions were present in all OPMD muscles but unaffected OPMD patient muscles (i.e. sternocleidomastoid, quadriceps, or deltoid; n = 14) did not show evidence of fibrosis, atrophy, or increased PAX7-positive cell numbers. These results suggest that the specific involvement of CPM in OPMD might be caused by failure of the regenerative response with dysfunction of PAX7-positive cells and exacerbated fibrosis that does not correlate with the presence of PABPN1 inclusions.

  20. Silencing neuronal mutant androgen receptor in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Hung, Gene; Adachi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Naohide; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Tohnai, Genki; Iida, Madoka; Bennett, C Frank; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that affects males, results from a CAG triplet repeat/polyglutamine expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Patients develop progressive muscular weakness and atrophy, and no effective therapy is currently available. The tissue-specific pathogenesis, especially relative pathological contributions between degenerative motor neurons and muscles, remains inconclusive. Though peripheral pathology in skeletal muscle caused by toxic AR protein has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SBMA using mouse models, the role of motor neuron degeneration in SBMA has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we exploited synthetic antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the RNA levels of mutant AR in the central nervous system (CNS) and explore its therapeutic effects in our SBMA mouse model that harbors a mutant AR gene with 97 CAG expansions and characteristic SBMA-like neurogenic phenotypes. A single intracerebroventricular administration of the antisense oligonucleotides in the presymptomatic phase efficiently suppressed the mutant gene expression in the CNS, and delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction, improved body weight gain and survival with the amelioration of neuronal histopathology in motor units such as spinal motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions and skeletal muscle. These findings highlight the importance of the neurotoxicity of mutant AR protein in motor neurons as a therapeutic target.

  1. In vivo selection reveals combinatorial controls that define a critical exon in the spinal muscular atrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, NATALIA N.; ANDROPHY, ELLIOT J.; SINGH, RAVINDRA N.

    2004-01-01

    Humans have two near identical copies of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) gene, SMN1 and SMN2. In spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), SMN2 is not able to compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to an inhibitory mutation at position 6 (C6U mutation in transcript) of exon 7. We have recently shown that C6U creates an extended inhibitory context (Exinct) that causes skipping of exon 7 in SMN2. Previous studies have shown that an exonic splicing enhancer associated with Tra2 (Tra2-ESE) is required for exon 7 inclusion in both SMN1 and SMN2. Here we describe the method of in vivo selection that determined the position-specific role of wild-type nucleotides within the entire exon 7. Our results confirmed the existence of Exinct and revealed the presence of an additional inhibitory tract (3′-Cluster) near the 3′-end of exon 7. We also demonstrate that a single nucleotide substitution at the last position of exon 7 improves the 5′ splice site (ss) such that the presence of inhibitory elements (Exinct as well as the 3′-Cluster) and the absence of Tra2-ESE no longer determined exon 7 usage. Our results suggest that the evolutionary conserved weak 5′ ss may serve as a mechanism to regulate exon 7 splicing under different physiological contexts. This is the first report in which a functional selection method has been applied to analyze the entire exon. This method offers unparallel advantage for determining the relative strength of splice sites, as well as for identifying the novel exonic cis-elements. PMID:15272122

  2. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP. PMID:25330799

  3. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP.

  4. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  5. Insulinlike Growth Factor (IGF)-1 Administration Ameliorates Disease Manifestations in a Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1–treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease. PMID:22952056

  6. [A Case of General Anesthesia in a Patient with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy].

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Mika; Hara, Koji; Obara, Goh; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-12-01

    We report a successful management of anesthesia in a 55-year-old male patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). His respiratory and swallowing functions were preserved preoperatively. He underwent an osteosynthesis for a femoral neck fracture under general anesthesia using nondepolarizing muscle relaxant. The anesthetic concerns in patients with SBMA are the possibility of postoperative respiratory dysfunction due to anesthetics or muscle relaxants and that of postoperative neurological deterioration due to spinal or epidural anesthesia. In this case, the effect of an intubating dose of rocuronium (0.5 mg · kg(-1)) was markedly prolonged, but it was completely reversed by sugammadex (2 mg · kg(-1)). Postoperative course was uneventful and clinical symptoms of SBMA did not become exacerbated. PMID:26790333

  7. Soluble androgen receptor oligomers underlie pathology in a mouse model of spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Chevalier-Larsen, Erica S; Merry, Diane E; Diamond, Marc I

    2007-02-01

    In polyglutamine diseases such as X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), it is unknown whether the toxic form of the protein is an insoluble or soluble aggregate or a monomer. We have addressed this question by studying a full-length androgen receptor (AR) mouse model of SBMA. We used biochemistry and atomic force microscopy to immunopurify oligomers soluble after ultracentrifugation that are comprised of a single approximately 50-kDa N-terminal polyglutamine-containing AR fragment. AR oligomers appeared several weeks prior to symptom onset, were distinct and temporally dissociated from intranuclear inclusions, and disappeared rapidly after castration, which halts disease. This is the first demonstration of soluble AR oligomers in vivo and suggests that they underlie neurodegeneration in SBMA. PMID:17121819

  8. Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1): Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lingappa, Lokesh; Shah, Nikit; Motepalli, Ananth Sagar; Shaik, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1) is a rare cause of early infantile respiratory failure and death. No cases have been currently described from India. Two low-birth-weight infants presented prior to 6 months of age with recurrent apnea and respiratory distress. Both required prolonged ventilation, and had distal arthrogryposis and diaphragmatic eventration. Nerve conduction study revealed motor sensory axonopathy. Genetic testing confirmed mutations in immunoglobulin mu binding protein (IGHMBP2). These two cases establish presence of SMARD1 in our population. Both infants died on discontinuation of ventilation. Antenatal diagnoses done in one pregnancy. Though rare, high index of suspicion is essential in view of poor outcome and aid antenatal counseling. PMID:27570397

  9. Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1): Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Lokesh; Shah, Nikit; Motepalli, Ananth Sagar; Shaik, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1) is a rare cause of early infantile respiratory failure and death. No cases have been currently described from India. Two low-birth-weight infants presented prior to 6 months of age with recurrent apnea and respiratory distress. Both required prolonged ventilation, and had distal arthrogryposis and diaphragmatic eventration. Nerve conduction study revealed motor sensory axonopathy. Genetic testing confirmed mutations in immunoglobulin mu binding protein (IGHMBP2). These two cases establish presence of SMARD1 in our population. Both infants died on discontinuation of ventilation. Antenatal diagnoses done in one pregnancy. Though rare, high index of suspicion is essential in view of poor outcome and aid antenatal counseling. PMID:27570397

  10. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients. PMID:24746732

  11. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 2,4-diaminoquinazoline derivatives as SMN2 promoter activators for the potential treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, John; Butchbach, Matthew E R; Palomo, Marty; Pease, Brian; Rao, Munagala; Bedell, Louis; Keyvan, Monica; Pai, Grace; Mishra, Rama; Haraldsson, Magnus; Andresson, Thorkell; Bragason, Gisli; Thosteinsdottir, Margret; Bjornsson, Jon Mar; Coovert, Daniel D; Burghes, Arthur H M; Gurney, Mark E; Singh, Jasbir

    2008-02-14

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord that is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene ( SMN1). Adjacent to SMN1 are a variable number of copies of the SMN2 gene. The two genes essentially differ by a single nucleotide, which causes the majority of the RNA transcripts from SMN2 to lack exon 7. Although both SMN1 and SMN2 encode the same Smn protein amino acid sequence, the loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 have the consequence that Smn protein levels are insufficient for the survival of motor neurons. The therapeutic goal of our medicinal chemistry effort was to identify small-molecule activators of the SMN2 promoter that, by up-regulating gene transcription, would produce greater quantities of full-length Smn protein. Our initial medicinal chemistry effort explored a series of C5 substituted benzyl ether based 2,4-diaminoquinazoline derivatives that were found to be potent activators of the SMN2 promoter; however, inhibition of DHFR was shown to be an off-target activity that was linked to ATP depletion. We used a structure-guided approach to overcome DHFR inhibition while retaining SMN2 promoter activation. A lead compound 11a was identified as having high potency (EC50 = 4 nM) and 2.3-fold induction of the SMN2 promoter. Compound 11a possessed desirable pharmaceutical properties, including excellent brain exposure and long brain half-life following oral dosing to mice. The piperidine compound 11a up-regulated expression of the mouse SMN gene in NSC-34 cells, a mouse motor neuron hybrid cell line. In type 1 SMA patient fibroblasts, compound 11a induced Smn in a dose-dependent manner when analyzed by immunoblotting and increased the number of intranuclear particles called gems. The compound restored gems numbers in type I SMA patient fibroblasts to levels near unaffected genetic carriers of SMA.

  13. TRPV4 related scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy: Report of an Italian family and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Biasini, F; Portaro, S; Mazzeo, A; Vita, G; Fabrizi, G M; Taioli, F; Toscano, A; Rodolico, C

    2016-01-01

    Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy (SPSMA) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel (TRPV4) gene, characterized by progressive scapuloperoneal atrophy and weakness. Additional features, such as vocal cord paralysis, scoliosis and/or arthrogryposis, are likely to occur. We report the first Italian family with SPSMA, harboring the c.806G>A mutation in TRPV4 gene (p. R269H). The pattern of expression was variable: the father showed a mild muscular involvement, while the son presented at birth skeletal dysplasia and a progressive course. We reinforce the concept that the disease can be more severe in the following generations. The disorder should be considered in scapuloperoneal syndromes with autosomal dominant inheritance and a neurogenic pattern. The presence of skeletal deformities strongly supports this suspicion. An early diagnosis of SPSMA may be crucial in order to prevent the more severe congenital form. PMID:26948711

  14. High-frequency chest-wall oscillation in a noninvasive-ventilation-dependent patient with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joanna M; Collins, Nicola; Bush, Andrew; Chatwin, Michelle

    2011-11-01

    With the recent increased use of noninvasive ventilation, the prognoses of children with neuromuscular disease has improved significantly. However, children with muscle weakness remain at risk for recurrent respiratory infection and atelectasis. We report the case of a young girl with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy who was dependent on noninvasive ventilation, and in whom conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy became insufficient to clear secretions. We initiated high-frequency chest-wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a rescue therapy, and she had improved self-ventilation time. This is the first case report of HFCWO for secretion clearance in a severely weak child with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. In a patient with neuromuscular disease and severe respiratory infection and compromise, HFCWO can be used safely in combination with conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy.

  15. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets.

  16. Systemic delivery of scAAV9 expressing SMN prolongs survival in a model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Valori, Chiara F; Ning, Ke; Wyles, Matthew; Mead, Richard J; Grierson, Andrew J; Shaw, Pamela J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2010-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is one of the most common genetic causes of death in childhood, and there is currently no effective treatment. The disease is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene. Gene therapy aimed at restoring the protein encoded by this gene is a rational therapeutic approach to ameliorate the disease phenotype. We previously reported that intramuscular delivery of a lentiviral vector expressing survival motor neuron increased the life expectancy of transgenic mice with spinal muscular atrophy. The marginal efficacy of this therapeutic approach, however, prompted us to explore different strategies for gene therapy delivery to motor neurons to achieve a more clinically relevant effect. Here, we report that a single injection of self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 9 expressing green fluorescent protein or of a codon-optimized version of the survival motor neuron protein into the facial vein 1 day after birth in mice carrying a defective survival motor neuron gene led to widespread gene transfer. Furthermore, this gene therapy resulted in a substantial extension of life span in these animals. These data demonstrate a significant increase in survival in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy and provide evidence for effective therapy.

  17. MiR-298 Counteracts Mutant Androgen Receptor Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pourshafie, Naemeh; Lee, Philip R; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Bott, Laura C; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Burnett, Barrington G; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rinaldi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a currently untreatable adult-onset neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the androgen receptor (AR). In SBMA, as in other polyglutamine diseases, a toxic gain of function in the mutant protein is an important factor in the disease mechanism; therefore, reducing the mutant protein holds promise as an effective treatment strategy. In this work, we evaluated a microRNA (miRNA) to reduce AR expression. From a list of predicted miRNAs that target human AR, we selected microRNA-298 (miR-298) for its ability to downregulate AR mRNA and protein levels when transfected in cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant AR and in SBMA patient-derived fibroblasts. We showed that miR-298 directly binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the human AR transcript, and counteracts AR toxicity in vitro. Intravenous delivery of miR-298 with adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector resulted in efficient transduction of muscle and spinal cord and amelioration of the disease phenotype in SBMA mice. Our findings support the development of miRNAs as a therapeutic strategy for SBMA and other neurodegenerative disorders caused by toxic proteins. PMID:26755334

  18. Nemo-like kinase is a novel regulator of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Tiffany W; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Miranda, Helen C; Cortes, Constanza J; La Spada, Albert R; Lim, Janghoo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) protein. Despite extensive research, the exact pathogenic mechanisms underlying SBMA remain elusive. In this study, we present evidence that Nemo-like kinase (NLK) promotes disease pathogenesis across multiple SBMA model systems. Most remarkably, loss of one copy of Nlk rescues SBMA phenotypes in mice, including extending lifespan. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms by which NLK exerts its effects in SBMA. Specifically, we have found that NLK can phosphorylate the mutant polyglutamine-expanded AR, enhance its aggregation, and promote AR-dependent gene transcription by regulating AR-cofactor interactions. Furthermore, NLK modulates the toxicity of a mutant AR fragment via a mechanism that is independent of AR-mediated gene transcription. Our findings uncover a crucial role for NLK in controlling SBMA toxicity and reveal a novel avenue for therapy development in SBMA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08493.001 PMID:26308581

  19. Diverting colostomy induces mucosal and muscular atrophy in rat distal colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmeyer-Nielsen, P; Christensen, H; Laurberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The progress of adaptive changes in the left colon after diverting colostomy was studied in rats using stereological techniques. Standardised segments of left colon proximal and distal to the colostomy was examined after 0, 1, 2, 4, or 12 weeks. In excluded colon the mucosal weight was reduced by 37% (p < 0.01) and the luminal surface area by 47% (p < 0.01) after four weeks and reached a steady state at this point of time, as no further reduction was seen from 4 to 12 weeks. The number of proliferating crypt cells was determined immunohistochemically after in vivo labelling with bromodeoxyuridine and was compared with the total number of colonocytes. Total bowel rest leads to a reduction in the number of proliferating epithelial cells and not to a reduced average life span. The weight of the muscularis propria decreased by 32% after four weeks (p < 0.01) and by 48% after 12 weeks (p < 0.001), whereas the weight of the submucosa was unchanged. No adaptive changes were found in segments proximal to the colostomy. These results show that the wall composition of defunctioned colon in rats is radically changed resulting from a mucosal and muscular atrophy, and from a reduction in luminal surface area. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959237

  20. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics. PMID:25663674

  1. Postural leg tremor in X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ayumi; Sugeno, Naoto; Tateyama, Maki; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Kato, Masaaki; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset neuromuscular disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Postural hand tremor is well known as a non-motor neuron sign, but to our knowledge postural leg tremor has not been reported. We studied the occurrence and physiological features of postural leg tremor in 12 male patients (38-64 years old) with genetically proven SBMA. Three patients had postural leg tremor with a frequency of 4-7Hz. In these patients, sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) was not detected in the lower limbs. There were significant differences between the patients with postural leg tremor and those without postural leg tremor in both the SNAP of the sural nerve and the length of the CAG repeat. Phenotypical differences between shorter CAG repeats, which indicate a sensory-dominant phenotype, and longer CAG repeats, which indicate a motor-dominant phenotype, have been previously reported. In the present study, 60% of patients with shorter CAG repeats (<47) showed leg tremor and none of the patients with longer CAG repeats (≥47) did. Postural leg tremor could be a clinical feature that predicts shorter CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene.

  2. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2015-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics.

  3. MiR-298 Counteracts Mutant Androgen Receptor Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Pourshafie, Naemeh; Lee, Philip R; Chen, Ke-Lian; Harmison, George G; Bott, Laura C; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Burnett, Barrington G; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rinaldi, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a currently untreatable adult-onset neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the androgen receptor (AR). In SBMA, as in other polyglutamine diseases, a toxic gain of function in the mutant protein is an important factor in the disease mechanism; therefore, reducing the mutant protein holds promise as an effective treatment strategy. In this work, we evaluated a microRNA (miRNA) to reduce AR expression. From a list of predicted miRNAs that target human AR, we selected microRNA-298 (miR-298) for its ability to downregulate AR mRNA and protein levels when transfected in cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant AR and in SBMA patient-derived fibroblasts. We showed that miR-298 directly binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the human AR transcript, and counteracts AR toxicity in vitro. Intravenous delivery of miR-298 with adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector resulted in efficient transduction of muscle and spinal cord and amelioration of the disease phenotype in SBMA mice. Our findings support the development of miRNAs as a therapeutic strategy for SBMA and other neurodegenerative disorders caused by toxic proteins.

  4. Myocardial atrophy in children with mitochondrial disease and Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Ho; Choi, Jae Young; Kwon, Hye Eun; Lee, Young-Mock; Kim, Heung Dong; Kang, Seong-Woong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mitochondrial disease (MD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are often associated with cardiomyopathy, but the myocardial variability has not been isolated to a specific characteristic. We evaluated the left ventricular (LV) mass by echocardiography to identify the general distribution and functional changes of the myocardium in patients with MD or DMD. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the echocardiographic data of 90 children with MD and 42 with DMD. Using two-dimensional echocardiography, including time-motion (M) mode and Doppler measurements, we estimated the LV mass, ratio of early to late mitral filling velocities (E/A), ratio of early mitral filling velocity to early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/Ea), stroke volume, and cardiac output. A "z score" was generated using the lambda-mu-sigma method to standardize the LV mass with respect to body size. Results The LV mass-for-height z scores were significantly below normal in children with MD (-1.02±1.52, P<0.001) or DMD (-0.82±1.61, P=0.002), as were the LV mass-for-lean body-mass z scores. The body mass index (BMI)-for-age z scores were far below normal and were directly proportional to the LV mass-for-height z scores in both patients with MD (R=0.377, P<0.001) and those with DMD (R=0.330, P=0.033). The LV mass-for-height z score correlated positively with the stroke volume index (R=0.462, P<0.001) and cardiac index (R=0.358, P<0.001). Conclusion LV myocardial atrophy is present in patients with MD and those with DMD and may be closely associated with low BMI. The insufficient LV mass for body size might indicate deterioration of systolic function in these patients. PMID:25045366

  5. A randomized controlled trial of exercise in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shrader, Joseph A; Kats, Ilona; Kokkinis, Angela; Zampieri, Cris; Levy, Ellen; Joe, Galen O; Woolstenhulme, Joshua G; Drinkard, Bart E; Smith, Michaele R; Ching, Willie; Ghosh, Laboni; Fox, Derrick; Auh, Sungyoung; Schindler, Alice B; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Grunseich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of a home-based functional exercise program in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in 12 weeks of either functional exercises (intervention) or a stretching program (control) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. A total of 54 subjects enrolled, and 50 completed the study with 24 in the functional exercise group and 26 in the stretching control group. The primary outcome measure was the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) total score, and secondary measures included total activity by accelerometry, muscle strength, balance, timed up and go, sit-to-stand test, health-related quality of life, creatine kinase, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Results Functional exercise was well tolerated but did not lead to significant group differences in the primary outcome measure or any of the secondary measures. The functional exercise did not produce significantly more adverse events than stretching, and was not perceived to be difficult. To determine whether a subset of the subjects may have benefited, we divided them into high and low functioning based on baseline AMAT scores and performed a post hoc subgroup analysis. Low-functioning individuals receiving the intervention increased AMAT functional subscale scores compared to the control group. Interpretation Although these trial results indicate that functional exercise had no significant effect on total AMAT scores or on mobility, strength, balance, and quality of life, post hoc findings indicate that low-functioning men with SBMA may respond better to functional exercises, and this warrants further investigation with appropriate exercise intensity. PMID:26273686

  6. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients.

  7. Differences in F-Wave Characteristics between Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the differences in F-wave characteristics between spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and lower motor neuron dominant (LMND) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We compared the parameters of F-waves recorded bilaterally from the median, ulnar, tibial, and deep peroneal nerves in 32 SBMA patients, 37 patients with LMND ALS, and 30 normal controls. The maximum F-wave amplitudes, frequencies of giant F-waves, and frequencies of patients with giant F-waves in all nerves examined were significantly higher in the SBMA patients than in the ALS patients and the normal controls. The mean F-wave amplitude, maximum F-wave amplitude, frequency of giant F-waves, and frequency of patients with giant F-waves in the median and deep peroneal nerves were comparable between the ALS patients and normal controls. Giant F-waves were detected in multiple nerves and were often symmetrical in the SBMA patients compared with the ALS patients. The number of nerves with giant F-waves seems to be the most robust variable for differentiation of SBMA from ALS, with an area under the curve of 0.908 (95% CI: 0.835-0.982). A cut-off value of the number of nerves with giant F-waves (≥3) for diagnosing SBMA showed high sensitivity and specificity: 85% sensitivity and 81% specificity vs. ALS patients. No significant correlations were found between the pooled frequency of giant F-waves and disease duration in the SBMA (r = 0.162, P = 0.418) or ALS groups (r = 0.107, P = 0.529). Our findings suggested that F-waves might be used to discriminate SBMA from ALS, even at early stages of disease.

  8. Differences in F-Wave Characteristics between Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the differences in F-wave characteristics between spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and lower motor neuron dominant (LMND) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We compared the parameters of F-waves recorded bilaterally from the median, ulnar, tibial, and deep peroneal nerves in 32 SBMA patients, 37 patients with LMND ALS, and 30 normal controls. The maximum F-wave amplitudes, frequencies of giant F-waves, and frequencies of patients with giant F-waves in all nerves examined were significantly higher in the SBMA patients than in the ALS patients and the normal controls. The mean F-wave amplitude, maximum F-wave amplitude, frequency of giant F-waves, and frequency of patients with giant F-waves in the median and deep peroneal nerves were comparable between the ALS patients and normal controls. Giant F-waves were detected in multiple nerves and were often symmetrical in the SBMA patients compared with the ALS patients. The number of nerves with giant F-waves seems to be the most robust variable for differentiation of SBMA from ALS, with an area under the curve of 0.908 (95% CI: 0.835–0.982). A cut-off value of the number of nerves with giant F-waves (≥3) for diagnosing SBMA showed high sensitivity and specificity: 85% sensitivity and 81% specificity vs. ALS patients. No significant correlations were found between the pooled frequency of giant F-waves and disease duration in the SBMA (r = 0.162, P = 0.418) or ALS groups (r = 0.107, P = 0.529). Our findings suggested that F-waves might be used to discriminate SBMA from ALS, even at early stages of disease. PMID:27014057

  9. Defects in Neuromuscular Transmission May Underlie Motor Dysfunction in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Youfen; Halievski, Katherine; Henley, Casey; Atchison, William D.; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) in men is an androgen-dependent neuromuscular disease caused by expanded CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR). Whether muscle or motor neuron dysfunction or both underlies motor impairment in SBMA is unknown. Muscles of SBMA mice show significant contractile dysfunction, implicating them as a likely source of motor dysfunction, but whether disease also impairs neuromuscular transmission is an open question. Thus, we examined synaptic function in three well-studied SBMA mouse models—the AR97Q, knock-in (KI), and myogenic141 models—by recording in vitro miniature and evoked end-plate potentials (MEPPs and EPPs, respectively) intracellularly from adult muscle fibers. We found striking defects in neuromuscular transmission suggesting that toxic AR in SBMA impairs both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. Notably, SBMA causes neuromuscular synapses to become weak and muscles to become hyperexcitable in all three models. Presynaptic defects included deficits in quantal content, reduced size of the readily releasable pool, and impaired short-term facilitation. Postsynaptic defects included prolonged decay times for both MEPPs and EPPs, marked resistance to μ-conotoxin (a sodium channel blocker), and enhanced membrane excitability. Quantitative PCR revealed robust upregulation of mRNAs encoding neonatal isoforms of the AChR (γ-subunit) and the voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.5) in diseased adult muscles of all three models, consistent with the observed slowing of synaptic potentials and resistance to μ-conotoxin. These findings suggest that muscles of SBMA patients regress to an immature state that impairs neuromuscular function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have discovered that SBMA is accompanied by marked defects in neuromuscular synaptic transmission involving both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. For three different mouse models, we find that diseased synapses are weak, having reduced quantal content

  10. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  11. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system.

  12. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I.; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  13. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precedes the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5 days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development. PMID:21658376

  14. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-08-15

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precede the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development.

  15. Dilysine motifs in exon 2b of SMN protein mediate binding to the COPI vesicle protein α-COP and neurite outgrowth in a cell culture model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Custer, Sara K; Todd, Adrian G; Singh, Natalia N; Androphy, Elliot J

    2013-10-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating neuromuscular disorder that stems from low levels of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. The processes that cause motor neurons and muscle cells to become dysfunctional are incompletely understood. We are interested in neuromuscular homeostasis and the stresses put upon that system by loss of SMN. We recently reported that α-COP, a member of the coatomer complex of coat protein I (COPI) vesicles, is an SMN-binding partner, implicating this protein complex in normal SMN function. To investigate the functional significance of the interaction between α-COP and SMN, we constructed an inducible NSC-34 cell culture system to model the consequences of SMN depletion and find that depletion of SMN protein results in shortened neurites. Heterologous expression of human SMN, and interestingly over-expression of α-COP, restores normal neurite length and morphology. Mutagenesis of the canonical COPI dilysine motifs in exon 2b results in failure to bind to α-COP and abrogates the ability of human SMN to restore neurite outgrowth in SMN-depleted motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. We conclude that the interaction between SMN and α-COP serves an important function in the growth and maintenance of motor neuron processes and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of SMA. PMID:23727837

  16. Compound Muscle Action Potential and Motor Function in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lewelt, Aga J.; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Scott, Charles; Sakonju, Ai; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Elsheikh, Bakri; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Elovic, Elie; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Reliable outcome measures that reflect the underlying disease process and correlate with motor function in children with SMA are needed for clinical trials. Methods Maximum ulnar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) data were collected at 2 visits over a 4–6 week period in children with SMA types II and III, ages 2–17 years old, at 4 academic centers. Primary functional outcome measures included the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) and MHFMS-Extend. Results CMAP negative peak amplitude and area showed excellent discrimination between the ambulatory and non-ambulatory SMA cohorts (ROC=0.88). CMAP had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC=0.96–0.97, n=64) and moderate to strong correlation with the MHFMS and MHFMS-Extend (r=0.61–0.73, n=68, p<0.001). Discussion Maximum ulnar CMAP amplitude and area is a feasible, valid and reliable outcome measure for use in pediatric multicenter clinical trials in SMA. CMAP correlates well with motor function and has potential value as a relevant surrogate for disease status. PMID:20737553

  17. Disruption of snRNP biogenesis factors Tgs1 and pICln induces phenotypes that mirror aspects of SMN-Gemins complex perturbation in Drosophila, providing new insights into spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Borg, Rebecca M; Fenech Salerno, Benji; Vassallo, Neville; Bordonne, Rémy; Cauchi, Ruben J

    2016-10-01

    The neuromuscular disorder, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), results from insufficient levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Together with Gemins 2-8 and Unrip, SMN forms the large macromolecular SMN-Gemins complex, which is known to be indispensable for chaperoning the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). It remains unclear whether disruption of this function is responsible for the selective neuromuscular degeneration in SMA. In the present study, we first show that loss of wmd, the Drosophila Unrip orthologue, has a negative impact on the motor system. However, due to lack of a functional relationship between wmd/Unrip and Gemin3, it is likely that Unrip joined the SMN-Gemins complex only recently in evolution. Second, we uncover that disruption of either Tgs1 or pICln, two cardinal players in snRNP biogenesis, results in viability and motor phenotypes that closely resemble those previously uncovered on loss of the constituent members of the SMN-Gemins complex. Interestingly, overexpression of both factors leads to motor dysfunction in Drosophila, a situation analogous to that of Gemin2. Toxicity is conserved in the yeast S. pombe where pICln overexpression induces a surplus of Sm proteins in the cytoplasm, indicating that a block in snRNP biogenesis is partly responsible for this phenotype. Importantly, we show a strong functional relationship and a physical interaction between Gemin3 and either Tgs1 or pICln. We propose that snRNP biogenesis is the pathway connecting the SMN-Gemins complex to a functional neuromuscular system, and its disturbance most likely leads to the motor dysfunction that is typical in SMA. PMID:27388936

  18. Novel microsatellite repeats (MSRs) and linkage disequilibrium analysis in the SMA region of 5q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yaraghi, Z.; Roy, N.; MacKenzie, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA) are characterized by degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord, leading to muscular atrophy associated with progressive paralysis. The gene involved in SMA has been mapped by linkage analysis to a region of 5q13.1 flanked centromerically by D5S435 and telomerically by D5S557. We are in the process of identifying new microsatellite repeats to further define the genetic map of the SMA region. A contiguous array of YAC clones covering the SMA containing D5S435-D56S112 interval of 5q13.1 was established. From this contig, a 700 kb clone 76C1, which contains the 200 kb CMS-1/CATT-1 critical region, was used to generate a partial Sau3A1 phage library. We have previously shown that 2 CATT-1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 phage library has been screened for human MSRs. To date we have identified two novel polymorphic microsatellites and four further candidates are being characterized. Results of linkage disequilibrium studies currently underway will be presented. The identification of a linkage disequilibrium maximum will be helpful in the further narrowing of the SMA region.

  19. [Heart involvement in progressive spinal muscular atrophy. A review of the literature and case histories in childhood].

    PubMed

    Distefano, G; Sciacca, P; Parisi, M G; Parano, E; Smilari, P; Marletta, M; Fiumara, A

    1994-01-01

    There are few cardiological studies in progressive spinal muscular atrophy and mainly concern subjects affected by the juvenile form (Kugelberg-Welander disease). The presence of a cardiomyopathy has been reported in these patients but the cardiac involvement is often secondary to the chronic respiratory insufficiency typical of the disease. We performed a retrospective study in our Institute on 43 patients, age range 3 months to 3 years, 37 of which presented type I (Werdnig-Hoffmann disease) and 6 type II (intermediate form) of the disease. No clinical nor instrumental signs of cardiomyopathy were observed. However, ECG revealed signs of right ventricular overload in 37.3% of the patients, probably provoked by pulmonary hypertension due to respiration anomalies. The authors underline the importance of correct respiratory assistance to prevent onset of cardiological alterations.

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 enhances polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and toxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M J; Polanco, Maria J; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Taylor, J Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis.

  1. Aberrant Autophagic Response in The Muscle of A Knock-in Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Paola; Polanco, Maria Josefa; Cristofani, Riccardo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Giorgetti, Elisa; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Milioto, Carmelo; Rocchi, Anna; Aggarwal, Tanya; Pennuto, Maria; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by loss of motoneurons and sensory neurons, accompanied by atrophy of muscle cells. SBMA is due to an androgen receptor containing a polyglutamine tract (ARpolyQ) that misfolds and aggregates, thereby perturbing the protein quality control (PQC) system. Using SBMA AR113Q mice we analyzed proteotoxic stress-induced alterations of HSPB8-mediated PQC machinery promoting clearance of misfolded proteins by autophagy. In muscle of symptomatic AR113Q male mice, we found expression upregulation of Pax-7, myogenin, E2-ubiquitin ligase UBE2Q1 and acetylcholine receptor (AchR), but not of MyoD, and of two E3-ligases (MuRF-1 and Cullin3). TGFβ1 and PGC-1α were also robustly upregulated. We also found a dramatic perturbation of the autophagic response, with upregulation of most autophagic markers (Beclin-1, ATG10, p62/SQSTM1, LC3) and of the HSPB8-mediated PQC response. Both HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 were robustly upregulated together with other specific HSPB8 interactors (HSPB2 and HSPB3). Notably, the BAG3:BAG1 ratio increased in muscle suggesting preferential misfolded proteins routing to autophagy rather than to proteasome. Thus, mutant ARpolyQ induces a potent autophagic response in muscle cells. Alteration in HSPB8-based PQC machinery may represent muscle-specific biomarkers useful to assess SBMA progression in mice and patients in response to pharmacological treatments. PMID:26490709

  2. Nosology of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity: From Monomelic Amyotrophy to Hirayama Disease—Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Sahni, Hirdesh

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, “juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity” has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy. PMID:24063005

  3. Dexamethasone-induced muscular atrophy is mediated by functional expression of connexin-based hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Balboa, Elisa; Puebla, Carlos; Vargas, Aníbal A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Regueira, Tomás; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term treatment with high glucocorticoid doses induces skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanism of such atrophy remains unclear. We evaluated the possible involvement of connexin-based hemichannels (Cx HCs) in muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, on control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl)) and Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre) skeletal myofibers. Myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice treated with DEX (5h) expressed several proteins that form non-selective membrane channels (Cx39, Cx43, Cx45, Panx1, P2X7 receptor and TRPV2). After 5h DEX treatment in vivo, myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice showed Evans blue uptake, which was absent in myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Similar results were obtained in vitro using ethidium as an HC permeability probe, and DEX-induced dye uptake in control myofibers was blocked by P2X7 receptor inhibitors. DEX also induced a significant increase in basal intracellular Ca(2+) signal and a reduction in resting membrane potential in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, changes that were not elicited by myofibers deficient in Cx43/Cx45 expression. Moreover, treatment with DEX induced NFκB activation and increased mRNA levels of TNF-α in control but not in Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient myofibers. Finally, a prolonged DEX treatment (7days) increased atrogin-1 and Murf-1 and reduced the cross sectional area of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, but these parameters remained unaffected in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre myofibers. Therefore, DEX-induced expression of Cx43 and Cx45 plays a critical role in early sarcolemma changes that lead to atrophy. Consequently, this side effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment might be avoided by co-administration with a Cx HC blocker.

  4. Non-neural phenotype of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: results from a large cohort of Italian patients

    PubMed Central

    Querin, Giorgia; Bertolin, Cinzia; Da Re, Elisa; Volpe, Marco; Zara, Gabriella; Pegoraro, Elena; Caretta, Nicola; Foresta, Carlo; Silvano, Maria; Corrado, Domenico; Iafrate, Massimo; Angelini, Lorenzo; Sartori, Leonardo; Pennuto, Maria; Gaiani, Alessandra; Bello, Luca; Semplicini, Claudio; Pareyson, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Ermani, Mario; Ferlin, Alberto; Sorarù, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Objective To carry out a deep characterisation of the main androgen-responsive tissues involved in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods 73 consecutive Italian patients underwent a full clinical protocol including biochemical and hormonal analyses, genitourinary examination, bone metabolism and densitometry, cardiological evaluation and muscle pathology. Results Creatine kinase levels were slightly to markedly elevated in almost all cases (68 of the 73; 94%). 30 (41%) patients had fasting glucose above the reference limit, and many patients had total cholesterol (40; 54.7%), low-density lipoproteins cholesterol (29; 39.7%) and triglyceride (35; 48%) levels above the recommended values. Although testosterone, luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone values were generally normal, in one-third of cases we calculated an increased Androgen Sensitivity Index reflecting the presence of androgen resistance in these patients. According to the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), 7/70 (10%) patients reported severe lower urinal tract symptoms (IPSS score >19), and 21/73 (30%) patients were moderately symptomatic (IPSS score from 8 to 19). In addition, 3 patients were carriers of an indwelling bladder catheter. Videourodynamic evaluation indicated that 4 of the 7 patients reporting severe urinary symptoms had an overt prostate-unrelated bladder outlet obstruction. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan data were consistent with low bone mass in 25/61 (41%) patients. Low bone mass was more frequent at the femoral than at the lumbar level. Skeletal muscle biopsy was carried out in 20 patients and myogenic changes in addition to the neurogenic atrophy were mostly observed. Conclusions Our study provides evidence of a wide non-neural clinical phenotype in SBMA, suggesting the need for comprehensive multidisciplinary protocols for these patients. PMID:26503015

  5. Enhanced aggregation of androgen receptor in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Yoshihiro; Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Yagi, Takuya; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Okano, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-22

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of mutant AR protein is a critical characteristic of the pathogenesis of SBMA. SBMA has been modeled in AR-overexpressing animals, but precisely how the polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a new technology that can be used to model human diseases, study pathogenic mechanisms, and develop novel drugs. We established SBMA patient-derived iPSCs, investigated their cellular biochemical characteristics, and found that SBMA-iPSCs can differentiate into motor neurons. The CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene of SBMA-iPSCs and also in the atrophin-1 gene of iPSCs derived from another polyQ disease, dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA), remain unchanged during reprogramming, long term passage, and differentiation, indicating that polyQ disease-associated CAG repeats are stable during maintenance of iPSCs. The level of AR expression is up-regulated by neuronal differentiation and treatment with the AR ligand dihydrotestosterone. Filter retardation assays indicated that aggregation of ARs following dihydrotestosterone treatment in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs increases significantly compared with neurological control iPSCs, easily recapitulating the pathological feature of mutant ARs in SBMA-iPSCs. This phenomenon was not observed in iPSCs and fibroblasts, thereby showing the neuron-dominant phenotype of this disease. Furthermore, the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylaminogeldanamycin sharply decreased the level of aggregated AR in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs, indicating a potential for discovery and validation of candidate drugs. We found that SBMA-iPSCs possess disease-specific biochemical features and could thus open new avenues of research into not only SBMA, but also other polyglutamine diseases.

  6. Subcellular transcriptome alterations in a cell culture model of spinal muscular atrophy point to widespread defects in axonal growth and presynaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Lena; Briese, Michael; Kneitz, Susanne; Glinka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal function critically depends on coordinated subcellular distribution of mRNAs. Disturbed mRNA processing and axonal transport has been found in spinal muscular atrophy and could be causative for dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons. Despite the advances made in characterizing the transport mechanisms of several axonal mRNAs, an unbiased approach to identify the axonal repertoire of mRNAs in healthy and degenerating motoneurons has been lacking. Here we used compartmentalized microfluidic chambers to investigate the somatodendritic and axonal mRNA content of cultured motoneurons by microarray analysis. In axons, transcripts related to protein synthesis and energy production were enriched relative to the somatodendritic compartment. Knockdown of Smn, the protein deficient in spinal muscular atrophy, produced a large number of transcript alterations in both compartments. Transcripts related to immune functions, including MHC class I genes, and with roles in RNA splicing were up-regulated in the somatodendritic compartment. On the axonal side, transcripts associated with axon growth and synaptic activity were down-regulated. These alterations provide evidence that subcellular localization of transcripts with axonal functions as well as regulation of specific transcripts with nonautonomous functions is disturbed in Smn-deficient motoneurons, most likely contributing to the pathophysiology of spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:25246652

  7. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A: Co-existence of two rare neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Anna; Scaioli, Vidmer; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Dalla Bella, Eleonora; Gellera, Cinzia; Pareyson, Davide

    2015-10-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene; it is clinically characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive weakness and atrophy mainly affecting proximal limb and bulbar muscles. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is an autosomal dominant polyneuropathy due to peripheral myelin protein 22 gene duplication and characterized by slowly progressive distal limb muscle weakness, atrophy and sensory loss with foot deformities. Here we report the co-occurrence of both neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same male patient. Difficulties in climbing stairs and jaw weakness were presenting symptoms consistent with SBMA. However, predominant distal weakness and bilateral pes cavus were rather suggestive of a hereditary polyneuropathy. The combination of two diseases, even if extremely rare, should be considered in the presence of atypical symptoms; in the case of genetic diseases this event may have important implications on family members' counseling.

  8. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor protein accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in Spinal & Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Constanza J.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T.; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L.; Bennett, C. Frank; Shelton, G. Diane; Cleveland, Don W.; La Spada, Albert R.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked spinal & bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy, and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA, and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments. PMID:24742458

  9. Motoneuron development influences dorsal root ganglia survival and Schwann cell development in a vertebrate model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hao, Le Thi; Duy, Phan Q; Jontes, James D; Beattie, Christine E

    2015-01-15

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN) cause the disease spinal muscular atrophy. A primary characteristic of this disease is motoneuron dysfunction and paralysis. Understanding why motoneurons are affected by low levels of SMN will lend insight into this disease and to motoneuron biology in general. Motoneurons in zebrafish smn mutants develop abnormally; however, it is unclear where Smn is needed for motoneuron development since it is a ubiquitously expressed protein. We have addressed this issue by expressing human SMN in motoneurons in zebrafish maternal-zygotic (mz) smn mutants. First, we demonstrate that SMN is present in axons, but only during the period of robust motor axon outgrowth. We also conclusively demonstrate that SMN acts cell autonomously in motoneurons for proper motoneuron development. This includes the formation of both axonal and dendritic branches. Analysis of the peripheral nervous system revealed that Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons developed abnormally in mz-smn mutants. Schwann cells did not wrap axons tightly and had expanded nodes of Ranvier. The majority of DRG neurons had abnormally short peripheral axons and later many of them failed to divide and died. Expressing SMN just in motoneurons rescued both of these cell types showing that their failure to develop was secondary to the developmental defects in motoneurons. Driving SMN just in motoneurons did not increase survival of the animal, suggesting that SMN is needed for motoneuron development and motor circuitry, but that SMN in other cells types factors into survival.

  10. Analysis of the conformation of the androgen receptor in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Cato, Andrew C B

    2014-01-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) (also known as Kennedy's disease) is a motor degenerative disease caused by an amplification of the polyglutamine stretch at the N-terminus of the human androgen receptor (AR). Amplifications larger than 40 glutamine residues are thought to lead to the disease. A characteristic feature of this disease is a ligand-dependent misfolding and aggregation of the mutant receptor that lead to the death of motor neurons. Initially, large cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates reaching sizes of 6 μm were thought to be the pathogenic agents. Later studies have suggested that oligomeric species with sizes of less than 1 μm that occur prior to the formation of the larger aggregates are the toxic agents. However, there have been disagreements regarding the shape of these oligomers, as most studies have been carried out with peptide fragments of the androgen receptor containing different lengths of polyglutamine stretch. We have isolated the wild-type AR with a polyglutamine stretch of 22 (ARQ22) and a mutant receptor with a stretch of 65 (ARQ65) using a baculovirus system and have analyzed the oligomeric structures formed by these receptors with atomic force microscopy. This method has allowed us to determine the conformations of the full-length wild-type and mutant AR and revealed the conformation of the mutant AR that causes SBMA.

  11. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments.

  12. Selective Neuromuscular Denervation in Taiwanese Severe SMA Mouse Can Be Reversed by Morpholino Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Lin; Chen, Tai-Heng; Hsu, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Yu-Hua; Juang, Bi-Tzen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease caused by deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which leads to synaptic defects and spinal motor neuron death. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) abnormalities have been found to be involved in SMA pathogenesis in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. However, whether similar NMJ pathological findings present in another commonly used mouse model, the Taiwanese SMA mouse, has not been fully investigated. To examine the NMJs of the Taiwanese severe SMA mouse model (Smn-/-; SMN2tg/0), which is characterized by severe phenotype and death before postnatal day (P) 9, we investigated 25 axial and appendicular muscles from P1 to P9. We labelled the muscles with anti-neurofilament and anti-synaptophysin antibodies for nerve terminals and α-bungarotoxin for acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). We found that severe NMJ denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) selectively occurred in the flexor digitorum brevis 2 and 3 (FDB-2/3) muscles from P5, and an increased percentage of fully denervated endplates correlated with SMA progression. Furthermore, synaptophysin signals were absent at the endplate compared to control littermate mice, suggesting that vesicle transport might only be affected at the end stage. Subsequently, we treated the Taiwanese severe SMA mice with morpholino (MO) antisense oligonucleotides (80 μg/g) via subcutaneous injection at P0. We found that MO significantly reversed the NMJ denervation in FDB-2/3 muscles and extended the survival of Taiwanese severe SMA mice. We conclude that early NMJ denervation in the FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice can be reversed by MO treatment. The FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice provide a very sensitive platform for assessing the effectiveness of drug treatments in SMA preclinical studies. PMID:27124114

  13. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone (or dihydrotestosterone), and the polyQ triggers ARpolyQ misfolding and aggregation in spinal cord motoneurons and muscle cells. In motoneurons, testosterone triggers nuclear toxicity by inducing AR nuclear translocation. Thus, (i) prevention of ARpolyQ nuclear localization, combined with (ii) an increased ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, should reduce its detrimental activity. Using the antiandrogen Bicalutamide (Casodex®), which slows down AR activation and nuclear translocation, and the disaccharide trehalose, an autophagy activator, we found that, in motoneurons, the two compounds together reduced ARpolyQ insoluble forms with higher efficiency than that obtained with single treatments. The ARpolyQ clearance was mediated by trehalose-induced autophagy combined with the longer cytoplasmic retention of ARpolyQ bound to Bicalutamide. This allows an increased recognition of misfolded species by the autophagic system prior to their migration into the nucleus. Interestingly, the combinatory use of trehalose and Bicalutamide was also efficient in the removal of insoluble species of AR with a very long polyQ (Q112) tract, which typically aggregates into the cell nuclei. Collectively, these data suggest that the combinatory use of Bicalutamide and trehalose is a novel approach to facilitate ARpolyQ clearance that has to be tested in other cell types target of SBMA (i.e. muscle cells) and in vivo in animal models of SBMA. PMID:25122660

  14. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone (or dihydrotestosterone), and the polyQ triggers ARpolyQ misfolding and aggregation in spinal cord motoneurons and muscle cells. In motoneurons, testosterone triggers nuclear toxicity by inducing AR nuclear translocation. Thus, (i) prevention of ARpolyQ nuclear localization, combined with (ii) an increased ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, should reduce its detrimental activity. Using the antiandrogen Bicalutamide (Casodex(®)), which slows down AR activation and nuclear translocation, and the disaccharide trehalose, an autophagy activator, we found that, in motoneurons, the two compounds together reduced ARpolyQ insoluble forms with higher efficiency than that obtained with single treatments. The ARpolyQ clearance was mediated by trehalose-induced autophagy combined with the longer cytoplasmic retention of ARpolyQ bound to Bicalutamide. This allows an increased recognition of misfolded species by the autophagic system prior to their migration into the nucleus. Interestingly, the combinatory use of trehalose and Bicalutamide was also efficient in the removal of insoluble species of AR with a very long polyQ (Q112) tract, which typically aggregates into the cell nuclei. Collectively, these data suggest that the combinatory use of Bicalutamide and trehalose is a novel approach to facilitate ARpolyQ clearance that has to be tested in other cell types target of SBMA (i.e. muscle cells) and in vivo in animal models of SBMA.

  15. Transcriptional activator TAp63 is upregulated in muscular atrophy during ALS and induces the pro-atrophic ubiquitin ligase Trim63

    PubMed Central

    von Grabowiecki, Yannick; Abreu, Paula; Blanchard, Orphee; Palamiuc, Lavinia; Benosman, Samir; Mériaux, Sophie; Devignot, Véronique; Gross, Isabelle; Mellitzer, Georg; Gonzalez de Aguilar, José L; Gaiddon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and their understanding might help finding therapeutic solutions for pathologies such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We meta-analyzed transcriptomic experiments of muscles of ALS patients and mouse models, uncovering a p53 deregulation as common denominator. We then characterized the induction of several p53 family members (p53, p63, p73) and a correlation between the levels of p53 family target genes and the severity of muscle atrophy in ALS patients and mice. In particular, we observed increased p63 protein levels in the fibers of atrophic muscles via denervation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. At a functional level, we demonstrated that TAp63 and p53 transactivate the promoter and increased the expression of Trim63 (MuRF1), an effector of muscle atrophy. Altogether, these results suggest a novel function for p63 as a contributor to muscular atrophic processes via the regulation of multiple genes, including the muscle atrophy gene Trim63. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10528.001 PMID:26919175

  16. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 delays motor function defects in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Frank; Elflein, Nicole; Saenger, Stefanie; Wirthgen, Elisa; Rak, Kristen; Frantz, Stefan; Hoeflich, Andreas; Toyka, Klaus V; Metzger, Friedrich; Jablonka, Sibylle

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of the diaphragm and skeletal muscles, leading to death in childhood. No effective treatment is available. The neuromuscular degeneration (Nmd(2J)) mouse shares a crucial mutation in the immunoglobulin mu-binding protein 2 gene (Ighmbp2) with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 patients and also displays some basic features of the human disease. This model serves as a promising tool in understanding the complex mechanisms of the disease and in exploring novel treatment modalities such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) which supports myogenic and neurogenic survival and stimulates differentiation during development. Here we investigated the treatment effects with polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 and its mechanisms of action in neurons and muscles. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 was applied subcutaneously every second day from post-natal Day 14 to post-natal Day 42 and the outcome was assessed by morphology, electromyography, and molecular studies. We found reduced IGF1 serum levels in Nmd(2J) mice 2 weeks after birth, which was normalized by polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment. Nmd(2J) mice showed marked neurogenic muscle fibre atrophy in the gastrocnemius muscle and polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment resulted in muscle fibre hypertrophy and slowed fibre degeneration along with significantly higher numbers of functionally active axonal sprouts. In the diaphragm with predominant myogenic changes a profound protection from muscle fibre degeneration was observed under treatment. No effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 were monitored at the level of motor neuron survival. The beneficial effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 corresponded to a marked activation of the IGF1 receptor, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) and the ribosomal protein S6 kinase in

  17. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with symptoms and prevent complications. They may include machines to help with breathing, nutritional support, physical therapy, and medicines. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  18. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or missing gene known as the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1), which is responsible for the production of a protein essential to motor neurons. Without this protein, lower motor neurons in the ...

  19. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that progressively destroy lower motor neurons—nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord that control essential voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. ...

  20. Pathological impact of SMN2 mis-splicing in adult SMA mice

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Ling, Karen K Y; Hua, Yimin; Wilkinson, John Erby; Nomakuchi, Tomoki; Rigo, Frank; Hung, Gene; Xu, David; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C Frank; Krainer, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SMN1 cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The related SMN2 gene expresses suboptimal levels of functional SMN protein, due to a splicing defect. Many SMA patients reach adulthood, and there is also adult-onset (type IV) SMA. There is currently no animal model for adult-onset SMA, and the tissue-specific pathogenesis of post-developmental SMN deficiency remains elusive. Here, we use an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to exacerbate SMN2 mis-splicing. Intracerebroventricular ASO injection in adult SMN2-transgenic mice phenocopies key aspects of adult-onset SMA, including delayed-onset motor dysfunction and relevant histopathological features. SMN2 mis-splicing increases during late-stage disease, likely accelerating disease progression. Systemic ASO injection in adult mice causes peripheral SMN2 mis-splicing and affects prognosis, eliciting marked liver and heart pathologies, with decreased IGF1 levels. ASO dose–response and time-course studies suggest that only moderate SMN levels are required in the adult central nervous system, and treatment with a splicing-correcting ASO shows a broad therapeutic time window. We describe distinctive pathological features of adult-onset and early-onset SMA. PMID:24014320

  1. Upper limb evaluation and one-year follow up of non-ambulant patients with spinal muscular atrophy: an observational multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andreea Mihaela; Moraux, Amélie; Canal, Aurélie; Decostre, Valérie; Diebate, Oumar; Le Moing, Anne Gaëlle; Gidaro, Teresa; Deconinck, Nicolas; Van Parys, Frauke; Vereecke, Wendy; Wittevrongel, Sylvia; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Mayer, Michèle; Maincent, Kim; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Tiffreau, Vincent; Denis, Severine; Jousten, Virginie; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Voit, Thomas; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the upper limb strength in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients remains challenging. Although potential outcome measures have been reported, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution in spinal muscular atrophy patients are critically lacking. Our study recruited 23 non-ambulant patients, 16 patients (males/females = 6/10; median age 15.4 years with a range from 10.7 to 31.1 years) with spinal muscular atrophy type II and 7 patients (males/females = 2/5; median age 19.9 years with a range from 8.3 to 29.9 years) with type III. The Brooke functional score was on median 3 with a range from 2 to 6. The average total vital capacity was 46%, and seven patients required non-invasive ventilation at night. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate, which assess handgrip strength, key pinch strength, and hand/finger extension-flexion function, respectively. The study demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of these measures for all patients, and sensitivity to negative changes after the age of 14 years. The younger patients showed an increase of the distal force in the follow-up period. The distal force measurements and function were correlated to different functional scales. These data represent an important step in the process of validating these devices as potential outcome measures for future clinical trials.

  2. Proteasome-mediated proteolysis of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor is a late event in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heine, Erin M; Berger, Tamar R; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E

    2015-05-15

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a "toxic fragment" that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis.

  3. [Translation and validation of the Egen Klassifikation scale for the Spanish population: functional assessment for non-ambulatory individuals with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy].

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Joaquín; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Febrer, Anna; Steffensen, Birgit F

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La escala Egen Klassifikation (EK) es un cuestionario que valora la capacidad funcional de personas con distrofia muscular de Duchenne y atrofia muscular espinal no ambulantes y que estan en silla de ruedas. Objetivo. Traducir y validar la EK para la poblacion espanola, como instrumento de medicion de la capacidad funcional en dichos pacientes. Pacientes y metodos. Se realiza, en primer lugar, una traduccion-retrotraduccion de la EK en la poblacion espanola y, posteriormente, se practica el estudio de fiabilidad de la version traducida al espanol de dicha escala. Se llevan a cabo tres mediciones a 30 pacientes con edades comprendidas entre 4 y 67 anos. Dos de estas mediciones se realizan por el mismo observador, y la tercera, por un segundo observador, para evaluar la concordancia intra e interobservador. Resultados. Los valores obtenidos referidos a la puntuacion total de los items de la escala, suma EK, reflejan un indice de fiabilidad del 0,995. Tambien muestran una fiabilidad superior a 0,86 en cada uno de los items, tanto en las observaciones intra como interobservador. Conclusiones. La version espanola de la EK es un instrumento valido y fiable para la poblacion espanola, como herramienta de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes con distrofia muscular de Duchenne y atrofia muscular espinal no ambulantes y que estan en silla de ruedas.

  4. [Evolution of functional capacity, assessed with the Egen Klassifikation scale, in the Spanish population with spinal muscular atrophy or Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A three year longitudinal study].

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, J; Girabent-Farres, M; Bagur-Calafat, C; Steffensen, B F

    2015-10-16

    Introduccion. La atrofia muscular espinal (AME) y la distrofia muscular de Duchenne (DMD) son dos enfermedades neuromusculares que evolucionan con perdida progresiva de la fuerza muscular y, en consecuencia, perdida de la capacidad funcional. La valoracion con escalas de medicion permite conocer mejor y cuantificar esta involucion, asi como tomar decisiones terapeuticas para anticiparse a los problemas y mejorar la calidad de vida de las personas afectas de estas patologias. Objetivo. Estudiar los cambios de la capacidad funcional de un grupo de pacientes con AME y DMD en un periodo de tres años. Pacientes y metodos. Diecinueve personas de la poblacion española afectas de AME o DMD, a las que se valoro con la escala Egen Klassifikation en dos ocasiones, en un periodo de tres años. Resultados. Los resultados obtenidos reflejan una disminucion de la capacidad funcional de estas personas durante este periodo de tiempo, con una diferencia significativa en la suma total de la escala (p = 0,003). Todos los items de la escala tuvieron valoraciones inferiores despues de tres años, y se llego a la significacion estadistica en la valoracion de la capacidad de mover las manos y de toser. Conclusion. La capacidad funcional de los pacientes con AME y DMD disminuye de forma significativa en tres años.

  5. Increased IGF-1 in muscle modulates the phenotype of severe SMA mice

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Marcé, Marta; Wee, Claribel D.; Martinez, Tara L.; Lipkes, Celeste E.; Choe, Dong W.; Kong, Lingling; Van Meerbeke, James P.; Musarò, Antonio; Sumner, Charlotte J.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and deficiency of the SMN protein. Severe SMA mice have abnormal motor function and small, immature myofibers early in development suggesting that SMN protein deficiency results in retarded muscle growth. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) stimulates myoblast proliferation, induces myogenic differentiation and generates myocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that increased expression of IGF-1 specifically in skeletal muscle would attenuate disease features of SMAΔ7 mice. SMAΔ7 mice overexpressing a local isoform of IGF-1 (mIGF-1) in muscle showed enlarged myofibers and a 40% increase in median survival compared with mIGF-1-negative SMA littermates (median survival = 14 versus 10 days, respectively, log-rank P = 0.025). Surprisingly, this was not associated with a significant improvement in motor behavior. Treatment of both mIGF-1NEG and mIGF-1POS SMA mice with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), resulted in a further extension of survival and improved motor behavior, but the combination of mIGF-1 and TSA treatment was not synergistic. These results show that increased mIGF-1 expression restricted to muscle can modulate the phenotype of SMA mice indicating that therapeutics targeted to muscle alone should not be discounted as potential disease-modifying therapies in SMA. IGF-1 may warrant further investigation in mild SMA animal models and perhaps SMA patients. PMID:21325354

  6. Upper Limb Evaluation and One-Year Follow Up of Non-Ambulant Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy: An Observational Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Aurélie; Decostre, Valérie; Diebate, Oumar; Le Moing, Anne Gaëlle; Gidaro, Teresa; Deconinck, Nicolas; Van Parys, Frauke; Vereecke, Wendy; Wittevrongel, Sylvia; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Mayer, Michèle; Maincent, Kim; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Tiffreau, Vincent; Denis, Severine; Jousten, Virginie; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Voit, Thomas; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the upper limb strength in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients remains challenging. Although potential outcome measures have been reported, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution in spinal muscular atrophy patients are critically lacking. Our study recruited 23 non-ambulant patients, 16 patients (males/females = 6/10; median age 15.4 years with a range from 10.7 to 31.1 years) with spinal muscular atrophy type II and 7 patients (males/females = 2/5; median age 19.9 years with a range from 8.3 to 29.9 years) with type III. The Brooke functional score was on median 3 with a range from 2 to 6. The average total vital capacity was 46%, and seven patients required non-invasive ventilation at night. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate, which assess handgrip strength, key pinch strength, and hand/finger extension-flexion function, respectively. The study demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of these measures for all patients, and sensitivity to negative changes after the age of 14 years. The younger patients showed an increase of the distal force in the follow-up period. The distal force measurements and function were correlated to different functional scales. These data represent an important step in the process of validating these devices as potential outcome measures for future clinical trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00993161 PMID:25861036

  7. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1MO-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMNRT mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease. PMID:24781211

  8. Rho-kinase inactivation prolongs survival of an intermediate SMA mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Mélissa; Beauvais, Ariane; Anderson, Carrie L; Kothary, Rashmi

    2010-04-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited disease resulting in the highest mortality of children under the age of two. SMA is caused by mutations or deletions in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to aberrant neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development and the loss of spinal cord alpha-motor neurons. Here, we show that Smn depletion leads to increased activation of RhoA, a major regulator of actin dynamics, in the spinal cord of an intermediate SMA mouse model. Treating these mice with Y-27632, which inhibits ROCK, a direct downstream effector of RhoA, dramatically improves their survival. This lifespan rescue is independent of Smn expression and is accompanied by an improvement in the maturation of the NMJs and an increase in muscle fiber size in the SMA mice. Our study presents evidence linking disruption of actin cytoskeletal dynamics to SMA pathogenesis and, for the first time, identifies RhoA effectors as viable targets for therapeutic intervention in the disease.

  9. The molecular responses of skeletal muscle satellite cells to continuous expression of IGF-1: implications for the rescue of induced muscular atrophy in aged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Booth, F. W.; Spangenburg, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 50% of humans older than 85 years have physical frailty due to weak skeletal muscles. This indicates a need for determining mechanisms to combat this problem. A critical cellular factor for postnatal muscle growth is a population of myogenic precursor cells called satellite cells. Given the complex process of sarcopenia, it has been postulated that, at some point in this process, a limited satellite cell proliferation potential could become rate-limiting to the regrowth of old muscles. It is conceivable that if satellite cell proliferative capacity can be maintained or enhanced with advanced age, sarcopenia could potentially be delayed or prevented. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to describe whether IGF-I can prevent muscular atrophy induced by repeated cycles of hindlimb immobilization, increase the in vitro proliferation in satellite cells from these muscles and, if so, the molecular mechanisms by which IGF-I mediates this increased proliferation. Our results provide evidence that IGF-I can enhance aged muscle regrowth possibly through increased satellite cell proliferation. The results also suggest that IGF-I enhances satellite cell proliferation by decreasing the cell cycle inhibitor, p27Kip1, through the PI3'-K/Akt pathway. These data provide molecular evidence for IGF-I's rescue effect upon aging-associated skeletal muscle atrophy.

  10. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease. PMID:25578555

  11. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 5 in a child with spinal muscular atropy

    SciTech Connect

    Brzustowicz, L.M.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C.; Allitto, B.A.; Theve, R.; Michaud, L.; Sugarman, E.; Handelin, B.L.; Chatkupt, S.; Koenigsberger, M.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Paternal isodisomy for chromosomes 5 was detected in a 2-year-old boy with type III spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of alpha motor neurons, known to map to 5q11.2-13.3. Examination of 17 short-sequence repeat polymorphisms spanning 5p15.1-15.3. to 5q33.3-qter produced no evidence of maternally inherited alleles. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a normal male karyotype, and FISH with probes closely flanking the SMA locus confirmed the presence of two copies of chromosome 5. No developmental abnormalities, other than those attributable to classical childhood-onset SMA, were present. While the absence of a maternally derived chromosome 5 could have produced the symptoms of SMA through the mechanism of genomic imprinting, the lack of more global developmental abnormalities would be unusual. Paternal transmission of two copies of a defective gene at the SMA locus seems to be the most likely cause of disease, but proof of this will have to await the identification of the SMA gene. While uniparental isodisomy is a rare event, it must be considered as a possible mechanism involved in SMA when conducting prenatal testing and counseling for this disorder. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. SMN1 gene copy number analyses for SMA healthy carriers in Italian population

    PubMed Central

    Patitucci, Alessandra; Magariello, Angela; Ungaro, Carmine; Muglia, Maria; Conforti, Francesca L.; Gabriele, Anna L.; Citrigno, Luigi; Sproviero, William; Mazzei, Rosalucia

    2012-01-01

    The routine molecular test for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) diagnosis is based on the detection of a homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1). The presence of the centromeric copy of the SMN gene (SMN2) does not allow the detection of the hemizygous absence of the SMN1 gene, which characterizes the disease carriers. The demand for a quantitative SMN1 test is permanently growing because there is a high incidence of carriers. The disease is severe and to date there are no effective pharmacological treatments. Here, we present a non-radioactive assay based on real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed eight SMA patients, 14 SMA relatives and 50 health individuals from Southern Italy by real time quantitative method in order to identify haploid deletion occurring in SMA carriers. SMN1 copy number was determined by the comparative threshold cycle method (ΔΔCt). The results confirmed the deletion in all homozygous patients and permitted an evaluation of the number of alleles in the healthy carriers. This method is fast, reproducible, and enables us to discriminate carriers from healthy homozygous, which is impossible with normal techniques.

  13. SMN1 gene copy number analyses for SMA healthy carriers in Italian population.

    PubMed

    Patitucci, Alessandra; Magariello, Angela; Ungaro, Carmine; Muglia, Maria; Conforti, Francesca L; Gabriele, Anna L; Citrigno, Luigi; Sproviero, William; Mazzei, Rosalucia

    2012-06-01

    The routine molecular test for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) diagnosis is based on the detection of a homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1). The presence of the centromeric copy of the SMN gene (SMN2) does not allow the detection of the hemizygous absence of the SMN1 gene, which characterizes the disease carriers. The demand for a quantitative SMN1 test is permanently growing because there is a high incidence of carriers. The disease is severe and to date there are no effective pharmacological treatments. Here, we present a non-radioactive assay based on real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed eight SMA patients, 14 SMA relatives and 50 health individuals from Southern Italy by real time quantitative method in order to identify haploid deletion occurring in SMA carriers. SMN1 copy number was determined by the comparative threshold cycle method (ΔΔCt). The results confirmed the deletion in all homozygous patients and permitted an evaluation of the number of alleles in the healthy carriers. This method is fast, reproducible, and enables us to discriminate carriers from healthy homozygous, which is impossible with normal techniques. PMID:27625809

  14. The polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy inhibits the APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase complex

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Laura C.; Salomons, Florian A.; Maric, Dragan; Liu, Yuhong; Merry, Diane; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Dantuma, Nico P.

    2016-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicate that the overall activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is preserved in SBMA models. Here we report that AR selectively interferes with the function of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which, together with its substrate adaptor Cdh1, is critical for cell cycle arrest and neuronal architecture. We show that both wild-type and mutant AR physically interact with the APC/CCdh1 complex in a ligand-dependent fashion without being targeted for proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of APC/CCdh1 by mutant but not wild-type AR in PC12 cells results in enhanced neurite outgrowth which is typically followed by rapid neurite retraction and mitotic entry. Our data indicate a role of AR in neuronal differentiation through regulation of APC/CCdh1 and suggest abnormal cell cycle reactivation as a pathogenic mechanism in SBMA. PMID:27312068

  15. p62/SQSTM1 differentially removes the toxic mutant androgen receptor via autophagy and inclusion formation in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinjiro; Kondo, Naohide; Miyazaki, Yu; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Qiang, Qiang; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Yanagawa, Toru; Warabi, Eiji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Sobue, Gen

    2013-05-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are inherited neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the expansion of trinucleotide CAG repeats in the causative genes. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyQ tract within the androgen receptor (AR). p62 is a ubiquitin- and light-chain 3-binding protein that is known to regulate the degradation of targeted proteins via autophagy and inclusion formation. In this study, we examined the effects of p62 depletion and overexpression on cultured cells and in a transgenic mouse model that overexpressed the mutant AR. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of p62 significantly exacerbated motor phenotypes and the neuropathological outcome, whereas overexpression of p62 protected against mutant AR toxicity in SBMA mice. Depletion of p62 significantly increased the levels of monomeric mutant AR and mutant AR protein complexes in an SBMA mouse model via the impairment of autophagic degradation. In addition, p62 overexpression improved SBMA mouse phenotypes by inducing cytoprotective inclusion formation. Our results demonstrate that p62 provides two different therapeutic targets in SBMA pathogenesis: (1) autophagy-dependent degradation and (2) benevolent inclusion formation of the mutant AR.

  16. The polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy inhibits the APC/C(Cdh1) ubiquitin ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Bott, Laura C; Salomons, Florian A; Maric, Dragan; Liu, Yuhong; Merry, Diane; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Dantuma, Nico P

    2016-06-17

    Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicate that the overall activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is preserved in SBMA models. Here we report that AR selectively interferes with the function of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which, together with its substrate adaptor Cdh1, is critical for cell cycle arrest and neuronal architecture. We show that both wild-type and mutant AR physically interact with the APC/C(Cdh1) complex in a ligand-dependent fashion without being targeted for proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of APC/C(Cdh1) by mutant but not wild-type AR in PC12 cells results in enhanced neurite outgrowth which is typically followed by rapid neurite retraction and mitotic entry. Our data indicate a role of AR in neuronal differentiation through regulation of APC/C(Cdh1) and suggest abnormal cell cycle reactivation as a pathogenic mechanism in SBMA.

  17. Expression of Muscle-Specific MiRNA 206 in the Progression of Disease in a Murine SMA Model

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Valeria; Boido, Marina; De Amicis, Elena; Piras, Antonio; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease, the most common in infancy, and the third one among young people under 18 years. The major pathological landmark of SMA is a selective degeneration of lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. Recently, it has been shown that specific or general changes in the activity of ribonucleoprotein containing micro RNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the development of SMA. Additionally miRNA-206 has been shown to be required for efficient regeneration of neuromuscular synapses after acute nerve injury in an ALS mouse model. Therefore, we correlated the morphology and the architecture of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of quadriceps, a muscle affected in the early stage of the disease, with the expression levels of miRNA-206 in a mouse model of intermediate SMA (SMAII), one of the most frequently used experimental model. Our results showed a decrease in the percentage of type II fibers, an increase in atrophic muscle fibers and a remarkable accumulation of neurofilament (NF) in the pre-synaptic terminal of the NMJs in the quadriceps of SMAII mice. Furthermore, molecular investigation showed a direct link between miRNA-206-HDAC4-FGFBP1, and in particular, a strong up-regulation of this pathway in the late phase of the disease. We propose that miRNA-206 is activated as survival endogenous mechanism, although not sufficient to rescue the integrity of motor neurons. We speculate that early modulation of miRNA-206 expression might delay SMA neurodegenerative pathway and that miRNA-206 could be an innovative, still relatively unexplored, therapeutic target for SMA. PMID:26030275

  18. High expression level of Tra2-β1 is responsible for increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in the testis of SMA mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chia; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Yuo, Chung-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by deletion or mutation of SMN1 gene. All SMA patients carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene, which produces low level of SMN protein due to mRNA exon 7 exclusion. Previously, we found that the testis of SMA mice (smn-/- SMN2) expresses high level of SMN2 full-length mRNA, indicating a testis-specific mechanism for SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we established primary cultures of testis cells from SMA mice and analyzed them for SMN2 exon 7 splicing. We found that primary testis cells after a 2-hour culture still expressed high level of SMN2 full-length mRNA, but the level decreased after longer cultures. We then compared the protein levels of relevant splicing factors, and found that the level of Tra2-β1 also decreased during testis cell culture, correlated with SMN2 full-length mRNA downregulation. In addition, the testis of SMA mice expressed the highest level of Tra2-β1 among the many tissues examined. Furthermore, overexpression of Tra2-β1, but not ASF/SF2, increased SMN2 minigene exon 7 inclusion in primary testis cells and spinal cord neurons, whereas knockdown of Tra2-β1 decreased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in primary testis cells of SMA mice. Therefore, our results indicate that high expression level of Tra2-β1 is responsible for increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion in the testis of SMA mice. This study also suggests that the expression level of Tra2-β1 may be a modifying factor of SMA disease and a potential target for SMA treatment.

  19. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  20. Motor neuron pathology and behavioral alterations at late stages in a SMA mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fulceri, Federica; Bartalucci, Alessia; Paparelli, Silvio; Pasquali, Livia; Biagioni, Francesca; Ferrucci, Michela; Ruffoli, Riccardo; Fornai, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurogenetic autosomal recessive disorder characterized by degeneration of lower motor neurons. The validation of appropriate animal models is key in fostering SMA research. Recent studies set up an animal model showing long survival and slow disease progression. This model is knocked out for mouse SMN (Smn(-/-)) gene and carries a human mutation of the SMN1 gene (SMN1A2G), along with human SMN2 gene. In the present study we used this knock out double transgenic mouse model (SMN2(+/+); Smn(-/-); SMN1A2G(+/-)) to characterize the spinal cord pathology along with motor deficit at prolonged survival times. In particular, motor neuron loss was established stereologically (44.77%) after motor deficit reached a steady state. At this stage, spared motor neurons showed significant cell body enlargement. Moreover, similar to what was described in patients affected by SMA we found neuronal heterotopy (almost 4% of total motor neurons) in the anterior white matter. The delayed disease progression was likely to maintain fair motor activity despite a dramatic loss of large motor neurons. This provides a wonderful tool to probe novel drugs finely tuning the survival of motor neurons. In fact, small therapeutic effects protracted over considerable time intervals (even more than a year) are expected to be magnified. PMID:22306031

  1. SMA Human iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons Show Perturbed Differentiation and Reduced miR-335-5p Expression.

    PubMed

    Murdocca, Michela; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa Valentina; Sanchez, Massimo; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene, resulting in very low levels of functional Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. SMA human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) represent a useful and valid model for the study of the disorder, as they provide in vitro the target cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are often reported as playing a key role in regulating neuronal differentiation and fate specification. In this study SMA hiPSCs have been differentiated towards early motor neurons and their molecular and immunocytochemical profile were compared to those of wild type cells. Cell cycle proliferation was also evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). SMA hiPSCs showed an increased proliferation rate and also higher levels of stem cell markers. Moreover; when differentiated towards early motor neurons they expressed lower levels of NCAM and MN specific markers. The expression of miR-335-5p; already identified to control self-renewal or differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs); resulted to be reduced during the early steps of differentiation of SMA hiPSCs compared to wild type cells. These results suggest that we should speculate a role of this miRNA both in stemness characteristic and in differentiation efficiency of these cells. PMID:27483257

  2. SMA Human iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons Show Perturbed Differentiation and Reduced miR-335-5p Expression

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa Valentina; Sanchez, Massimo; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene, resulting in very low levels of functional Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. SMA human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) represent a useful and valid model for the study of the disorder, as they provide in vitro the target cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are often reported as playing a key role in regulating neuronal differentiation and fate specification. In this study SMA hiPSCs have been differentiated towards early motor neurons and their molecular and immunocytochemical profile were compared to those of wild type cells. Cell cycle proliferation was also evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). SMA hiPSCs showed an increased proliferation rate and also higher levels of stem cell markers. Moreover; when differentiated towards early motor neurons they expressed lower levels of NCAM and MN specific markers. The expression of miR-335-5p; already identified to control self-renewal or differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs); resulted to be reduced during the early steps of differentiation of SMA hiPSCs compared to wild type cells. These results suggest that we should speculate a role of this miRNA both in stemness characteristic and in differentiation efficiency of these cells. PMID:27483257

  3. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Funding Divisions Funding Opportunities Funded Programs and Projects Grant Information NIH Common Fund NIH RePORTER Research ... Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic ...

  4. [Spinal muscle atrophy in Brown Swiss x Braunvieh cross calves].

    PubMed

    Dirksen, G; Doll, K; Hafner, A; Hermanns, W; Dahme, E

    1992-05-01

    The report describes seven SMA-cases in descendents of crossbreeds of American Brown Swiss x Deutsches Braunvieh. Symptoms and course: After initially normal development of the calves for one to six weeks the disease set in suddenly followed by a rapid lethal course of one to one and a half weeks duration due to asphyxia and/or secondary diseases. Only one case was reported having been sick since birth (?). Characteristic signs were rapidly progressing muscular atrophy, paresis and paralysis of the limbs, the trunk and the diaphragm, usually accompanied by progressive dyspnoea. Signs of congenital neuromyodysplasia (arthrogryposis) of different degree were present in four of the seven calves. Six calves had contracted a secondary pneumonia. Blood gas analysis (6/7) revealed a compensated (1x) or decompensated (4x) respiratory acidosis. Neurohistological findings: Degeneration and loss of motor neurons in the ventral horns of the spinal cord and neurogenic muscular atrophy. Immunohistochemistry revealed a pronounced accumulation of type 200 kD-neurofilaments in perikarya and dendrites of ventral horn motoneurons indicating disturbed mechanisms of the axonal transport. The disease seems to be inherited as a recessive trait.

  5. Association between AgI-CA alleles and severity of autosomal recessive proximal spina lmuscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.D.; Fuerst, P.; Ingraham, S.E.; Mendell, J.R.; Burghes, A.H.M.; Morgan, K.; Prescott, G.; Simard, L.R.; McPherson, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hopital Sainte-Justine (HSJ)) and American (Ohio State University (OSU)) populations (P < .0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P = .0003 OSU; P = 0.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P = .0014 OSU; P = .001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P = .5 OSU; P = .25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidates SMA genes.

  6. Low levels of Survival Motor Neuron protein are sufficient for normal muscle function in the SMNΔ7 mouse model of SMA

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Chitra C.; McGovern, Vicki L.; Murray, Jason D.; Gombash, Sara E.; Zaworski, Phillip G.; Foust, Kevin D.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. SMA is caused by deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and retention of the SMN2 gene. The loss of SMN1 results in reduced levels of the SMN protein. SMN levels appear to be particularly important in motor neurons; however SMN levels above that produced by two copies of SMN2 have been suggested to be important in muscle. Studying the spatial requirement of SMN is important in both understanding how SMN deficiency causes SMA and in the development of effective therapies. Using Myf5-Cre, a muscle-specific Cre driver, and the Cre-loxP recombination system, we deleted mouse Smn in the muscle of mice with SMN2 and SMNΔ7 transgenes in the background, thus providing low level of SMN in the muscle. As a reciprocal experiment, we restored normal levels of SMN in the muscle with low SMN levels in all other tissues. We observed that decreasing SMN in the muscle has no phenotypic effect. This was corroborated by muscle physiology studies with twitch force, tetanic and eccentric contraction all being normal. In addition, electrocardiogram and muscle fiber size distribution were also normal. Replacement of Smn in muscle did not rescue SMA mice. Thus the muscle does not appear to require high levels of SMN above what is produced by two copies of SMN2 (and SMNΔ7). PMID:26276812

  7. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  8. Cerebral Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... In brain tissue, atrophy describes a loss of neurons and the connections between them. Atrophy can be ... syndrome, which interfere with the basic functions of neurons multiple sclerosis , which causes inflammation, myelin damage, and ...

  9. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M.

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Hypoxia is a modifier of SMN2 splicing and disease severity in a severe SMA mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bebee, Thomas W.; Dominguez, Catherine E.; Samadzadeh-Tarighat, Somayeh; Akehurst, Kristi L.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with low levels of the essential survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Reduced levels of SMN is due to the loss of the SMN1 gene and inefficient splicing of the SMN2 gene caused by a C>T mutation in exon 7. Global analysis of the severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model revealed altered splicing and increased levels of the hypoxia-inducible transcript, Hif3alpha, at late stages of disease progression. Severe SMA patients also develop respiratory deficiency during disease progression. We sought to evaluate whether hypoxia was capable of altering SMN2 exon 7 splicing and whether increased oxygenation could modulate disease in a severe SMA mouse model. Hypoxia treatment in cell culture increased SMN2 exon 7 skipping and reduced SMN protein levels. Concordantly, the treatment of SMNΔ7 mice with hyperoxia treatment increased the inclusion of SMN2 exon 7 in skeletal muscles and resulted in improved motor function. Transfection splicing assays of SMN minigenes under hypoxia revealed that hypoxia-induced skipping is dependent on poor exon definition due to the SMN2 C>T mutation and suboptimal 5′ splice site. Hypoxia treatment in cell culture led to increased hnRNP A1 and Sam68 levels. Mutation of hnRNP A1-binding sites prevented hypoxia-induced skipping of SMN exon 7 and was found to bind both hnRNP A1 and Sam68. These results implicate hypoxic stress as a modulator of SMN2 exon 7 splicing in disease progression and a coordinated regulation by hnRNP A1 and Sam68 as modifiers of hypoxia-induced skipping of SMN exon 7. PMID:22763238

  11. [Functional assessment for people unable to walk due to spinal muscular atrophy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Translation and validation of the Egen Klassifikation 2 scale for the Spanish population].

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Joaquín; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Febrer, Anna; Steffensen, Birgit F

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. La escala Egen Klassifikation 2 (EK2), ampliacion de la escala EK, evalua la capacidad funcional de personas con atrofia muscular espinal (AME) y distrofia muscular de Duchenne (DMD) que estan en fase de silla de ruedas. Esta version es mas especifica para la AME que su antecesora. Objetivo. Analizar la validez y fiabilidad de la version española de dicha escala como instrumento de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes afectos de AME y DMD que estan en silla de ruedas. Pacientes y metodos. Primeramente se realizo una traduccion-retrotraduccion al español de la version en ingles de la EK2 y, posteriormente, se estudio la fiabilidad de la version traducida. Para ello, se seleccionaron 39 pacientes, de edades comprendidas entre 4 y 60 años, que fueron valorados por dos observadores. Para evaluar la concordancia intraobservador se realizaron dos evaluaciones por un mismo observador, y para la interobservador, se realizo una tercera evaluacion por un segundo observador. Resultados. Los valores obtenidos referidos a la puntuacion total de los items de la escala (suma EK2) reflejan una fiabilidad intra e interobservador excelente, de 0,993 y 0,988, respectivamente. Asimismo, para cada uno de los items, la fiabilidad fue excelente, a excepcion de un item, en el que fue buena. Conclusiones. La version española de la escala EK2 es un instrumento valido y fiable para la poblacion española como herramienta de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes con AME y DMD que estan en silla de ruedas.

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy; Muscular dystrophy - Duchenne type ... Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a form of muscular dystrophy . It worsens quickly. Other muscular dystrophies (including Becker's muscular dystrophy ) get ...

  13. Olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    OPCA; Olivopontocerebellar degeneration; Multiple system atrophy – cerebellar predominance; MSA-C ... Tremor medications, such as those used to treat Parkinson's disease Speech and physical therapy Techniques to prevent ...

  14. Multiple System Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy Information Page Condensed from Multiple System Atrophy ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Multiple System Atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  15. Transcript, methylation and molecular docking analyses of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, SAHA and Dacinostat, on SMN2 expression in fibroblasts of SMA patients.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Jafar; Al-Najjar, Belal O; Wahab, Habibah A; Zabidi-Hussin, Z A M H; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo

    2016-09-01

    Several histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are known to increase Survival Motor Neuron 2 (SMN2) expression for the therapy of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). We aimed to compare the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and Dacinostat, a novel HDACi, on SMN2 expression and to elucidate their acetylation effects on the methylation of the SMN2. Cell-based assays using type I and type II SMA fibroblasts examined changes in transcript expressions, methylation levels and protein expressions. In silico methods analyzed the intermolecular interactions between each compound and HDAC2/HDAC7. SMN2 mRNA transcript levels and SMN protein levels showed notable increases in both cell types, except for Dacinostat exposure on type II cells. However, combined compound exposures showed less pronounced increase in SMN2 transcript and SMN protein level. Acetylation effects of SAHA and Dacinostat promoted demethylation of the SMN2 promoter. The in silico analyses revealed identical binding sites for both compounds in HDACs, which could explain the limited effects of the combined exposure. With the exception on the effect of Dacinostat in Type II cells, we have shown that SAHA and Dacinostat increased SMN2 transcript and protein levels and promoted demethylation of the SMN2 gene.

  16. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  17. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  18. Sudeck atrophy.

    PubMed

    Staunton, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the contribution of Sudeck to the understanding of the condition commonly referred to as 'Sudeck's atrophy' and which is commonly used as a synonym for a condition variously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy, causalgia, algodystrophy and others. Sudeck came to show in his later papers that the so-called atrophy was, in the majority of cases, a normal inflammatory process of bone change in the course of healing after an inflammatory/infective or traumatic insult. Contrary to the views of much current literature, the vast majority of such cases had a good prognosis. In those cases which became pathological and had a correspondingly poorer prognosis, the characteristic clinical picture becomes associated with radiological and pathological changes, which, uniquely, are described by Sudeck. A knowledge of such radiological and pathological substrate for clinical symptomatology is important in the analysis of pain following trauma. PMID:17274178

  19. SMA DOE Student Fellowship Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Steel Manufacturers Association

    2004-12-24

    Steel companies in many areas of the country have found it increasingly difficult to attract talented recent graduates of college and university engineering and applied science programs to the Electric Arc Furnace iron & steel industry. College student involvement in co-operative programs at steel companies can attract needed talent to the industry. Additionally, certain R & D needs identified in the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap are addressed as co-operative program activities. The Steel Manufacturers Association (''SMA'') therefore established a co-operative education program for selected college students who have completed the first or second year of a four or five-year college program, to be recognized as SMA Co-Operative Fellows, in regard to their summer and fall semester projects with SMA's member companies.

  20. Evaluation of muscle strength and motor abilities in children with type II and III spinal muscle atrophy treated with valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects the motoneurons of the spinal anterior horn, resulting in hypotonia and muscle weakness. The disease is caused by deletion or mutation in the telomeric copy of SMN gene (SMN1) and clinical severity is in part determined by the copy number of the centromeric copy of the SMN gene (SMN2). The SMN2 mRNA lacks exon 7, resulting in a production of lower amounts of the full-length SMN protein. Knowledge of the molecular mechanism of diseases has led to the discovery of drugs capable of increasing SMN protein level through activation of SMN2 gene. One of these drugs is the valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Methods Twenty-two patients with type II and III SMA, aged between 2 and 18 years, were treated with VPA and were evaluated five times during a one-year period using the Manual Muscle Test (Medical Research Council scale-MRC), the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (HFMS), and the Barthel Index. Results After 12 months of therapy, the patients did not gain muscle strength. The group of children with SMA type II presented a significant gain in HFMS scores during the treatment. This improvement was not observed in the group of type III patients. The analysis of the HFMS scores during the treatment period in the groups of patients younger and older than 6 years of age did not show any significant result. There was an improvement of the daily activities at the end of the VPA treatment period. Conclusion Treatment of SMA patients with VPA may be a potential alternative to alleviate the progression of the disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01033331 PMID:21435220

  1. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  2. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  3. SMA actuators for morphing wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovski, V.; Terriault, P.; Georges, T.; Coutu, D.

    An experimental morphing laminar wing was developed to prove the feasibility of aircraft fuel consumption reduction through enhancement of the laminar flow regime over the wing extrados. The morphing wing prototype designed for subsonic cruise flight conditions (Mach 0.2 … 0.3; angle of attack - 1 … +2∘), combines three principal subsystems: (1) flexible extrados, (2) rigid intrados and (3) an actuator group located inside the wing box. The morphing capability of the wing relies on controlled deformation of the wing extrados under the action of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators. A coupled fluid-structure model of the morphing wing was used to evaluate its mechanical and aerodynamic performances in different flight conditions. A 0.5 m chord and 1 m span prototype of the morphing wing was tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. In this work, SMA actuators for morphing wings were modeled using a coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model and they were windtunnel validated. If the thermo-mechanical model of SMA actuators presented in this work is coupled with the previously developed structureaerodynamic model of the morphing wing, it could serve for the optimization of the entire morphing wing system.

  4. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  5. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  6. [Unusual muscular involvement in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Wattiaux, M J; Rondier, J; Bletry, O; Godeau, P; Cayla, J

    1985-03-01

    Muscle involvement in ankylosing spondylitis has been little studied. The authors report two cases with marked muscular atrophy and functional impotence, which had directed the diagnosis towards a myopathy over a period of several years in the first case, and a suspected primary muscular disease associated with ankylosing spondylitis in the second. Muscle biopsies eliminated the diagnosis of myopathy in both cases, with rapid functional recovery with proper treatment. Following a review of the literature, two hypotheses can be considered to explain the muscular involvement in ankylosing spondylitis: one mechanism which appears well-established is a radiculitis with involvement of the paravertebral muscles: other authors suggest that there is nonspecific, generalized muscular involvement in this disorder.

  7. Resveratrol ameliorates muscular pathology in the dystrophic mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yusuke S; Kuno, Atsushi; Hosoda, Ryusuke; Tanno, Masaya; Miura, Tetsuji; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. We previously showed that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), an antioxidant and activator of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1, delays the progression of heart failure and prolongs the lifespan of δ-sarcoglycan-deficient hamsters. Because a defect of dystroglycan complex causes muscular dystrophies, and δ-sarcoglycan is a component of this complex, we hypothesized that resveratrol might be a new therapeutic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, we examined resveratrol's effect in mdx mice, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx mice that received resveratrol in the diet for 32 weeks (4 g/kg diet) showed significantly less muscle mass loss and nonmuscle interstitial tissue in the biceps femoris compared with mdx mice fed a control diet. In the muscles of these mice, resveratrol significantly decreased oxidative damage shown by the immunostaining of nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and suppressed the up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunits Nox4, Duox1, and p47(phox). Resveratrol also reduced the number of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)(+) myofibroblast cells and endomysial fibrosis in the biceps femoris, although the infiltration of CD45(+) inflammatory cells and increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were still observed. In C2C12 myoblast cells, resveratrol pretreatment suppressed the TGF-β1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, fibronectin production, and expression of α-SMA, and SIRT1 knockdown blocked these inhibitory effects. SIRT1 small interfering RNA also increased the expression of Nox4, p47(phox), and α-SMA in C2C12 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that SIRT1 activation may be a useful strategy for treating muscular dystrophies. PMID:21652783

  8. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  9. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  10. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  11. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  12. S&MA Requirements Tool (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulpa, Vyga

    2004-01-01

    In FY03 QS10 began building an S&MA web based data management tool,"Safety & Mission Assurance Requirements Tool" (SMART) that identifies S&MA requirements, tailors requirements to IAW project/program categories, tracks implementation, and provides a template for developing requirements and tracking waivers. This report provides a SMART process flow, typical application, typical data requirement deliverables, progress in 03, and FY04 activities.

  13. [Extreme atrophy of the shoulder muscles in juvenile ankylosing spondylitis as a (misleading) main symptom].

    PubMed

    Berliner, M; Schmidt, K L

    1989-01-01

    An extreme unilateral muscular atrophy of the shoulder and upper arm region was a symptom of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis in a 20-year-old female patient. No pathological patterns were found in electromyographic, bioptic, and tomographic (CT, NMR) investigations. The muscular atrophy was caused by a shoulder arthritis with severe erosive damage. The false assumption of a neurological disorder and the disregard of anamnesis and low back pain delayed for several years an accurate diagnosis. After the onset of an arthritis of hip joints a collagen disease with myositis was supposed falsely in spite of normal electromyographic results. The unusual muscular atrophy around the shoulder joint probably must be interpreted as a consequence of reflex inhibition and partly due to inactivity. A real myositis seems to not be probable, because newer investigations in contrast to earlier findings show no evidence for inflammatory muscle disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

  14. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Abhijeet; Risbud, Mukund; Kshar, Avinash; Paranjpe, Arati Oka

    2013-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. PMID:23878573

  15. An investigation on scalability of SMA composite by roughness evaluation of SMA wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanile, L. F.; Mircea, J.; Homann, S.

    2004-06-01

    Composites with embedded SMA wires as actuators work as solid-state actuators, and are therefore able to control the shape of a structure without requiring moveable parts. An important aspect to compare the behaviour and efficiency of such active structures as a function of size is scalability. In this framework it is very important to qualify the interface between SMA wires and matrix. An investigation on scalability of SMA composites by roughness evaluation of SMA wires is presented in this paper. The authors measured roughness of thin Ni-Ti wires with different diameters (0.05mm, 0.075mm and 0.1mm) by processing SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) photography with a special software package. During SEM photography of SMA wires, in the vacuum room of SEM microscope a relevant part of the electron beam emission is transformed in heat.

  16. Osteoprotegerin protects against muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Dumont, Nicolas A; Bouchard, Patrice; Lavergne, Éliane; Penninger, Josef M; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-activator of NF-κB, its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling. Although there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle atrophy/dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology still is elusive. Here, we show that muscle cells can produce and secrete osteoprotegerin and pharmacologic treatment of dystrophic mdx mice with recombinant osteoprotegerin muscles. (Recombinant osteoprotegerin-Fc mitigates the loss of muscle force in a dose-dependent manner and preserves muscle integrity, particularly in fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus.) Our data identify osteoprotegerin as a novel protector of muscle integrity, and it potentially represents a new therapeutic avenue for both muscular diseases and osteoporosis.

  17. [Enteral nutrition ameliorated superior mesenteric artery syndrome in a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Fumihito; Kumada, Tomohiro; Shibata, Minoru; Hayashi, Anri; Hiejima, Ikuko; Maizuru, Kanako; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) include acute gastric dilatation, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, ileus and constipation. We report herein a patient with DMD in whom SMA syndrome was successfully treated with enteral tube nutrition. The patient was a 16-year-old boy diagnosed with DMD at 2 years. Steroid therapy was started at 5 years, and he was unable to walk and was wheelchair-bound at 11 years. Lordoscoliosis progressed after the age of 14 years. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation was introduced due to respiratory impairment at 15 years. During 8 months with respiratory impairment, his body weight decreased from 40.3 kg to 33.4 kg. He was referred to our hospital for vomiting and hematemesis. Radiographic studies indicated a diagnosis of SMA syndrome. Enteral nutrition with a nasojejunal tube successfully treated SMA syndrome for 5 months and his body weight increased from 32.7 kg to 36.1 kg. Gastrostomy was subsequently performed and no recurrence was evident. SMA syndrome is caused by compression of the third part of the duodenum at the angle between the aorta and SMA. The conditions for duodenal vascular compression are weight loss resulting in depletion of the retroperitoneal fat and progressive lordosis. The reasons for SMA syndrome with our patient were weight loss and progressive lordoscoliosis. A conservative approach with enteral nutrition promoted weight gain, increasing retroperitoneal fat. Enteral nutrition should be considered for the treatment of SMA syndrome as a complication of DMD. PMID:27012109

  18. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  19. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji-Hyung; Kabayama, Kazuya; Opitz, Joerg; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy. PMID:25945103

  20. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji-Hyung; Kabayama, Kazuya; Opitz, Joerg; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy. PMID:25945103

  1. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  2. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  3. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  4. Muscular dystrophy of mink: a new animal model.

    PubMed

    Hegreberg, G A; Hamilton, M J; Padgett, G A

    1976-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise an important group of inherited disorders of man. Although the disease has been studied extensively, little is known about the underlying primary pathomechanisms. Consequently, treatment of patients is difficult and prognosis is poor. An animal model of muscular dystrophy is a useful research tool for approaching the basic problems of pathogenesis in muscle diseases. An inherited progressive muscular dystrophy of mink which resembles the amyotonic forms of human muscular dystrophy is currently under study. Clinically, the earliest sign is progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. Muscle enzyme activities in serum are usually elevated to pathologic levels. Urinary creatine/creatinine ratio is elevated. Pathologic changes are limited to skeletal muscle and are typical of those seen in amyotonic forms of human muscular dystrophy. These changes include variation in diameter size of muscle fibers, centralized nuclei, floccular and hyaline degeneration of scattered muscle fibers, increase in connective tissue in endomysial and perimysial areas, and regenerative attempts. Both type I and type II muscle fibers are involved in the disease process. Genetic studies indicate an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Although the primary defect in muscular dystrophy is traditionally thought to reside in skeletal muscle, recent studies have produced theories of primary involvement of other tissues and organ systems. These theories are presented and relationships to the traditional theory are discussed.

  5. Getting SMaRT in California

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-02-01

    With the year 2000 fast approaching, Waste Management`s Davis Street SMaRT Station in the San Francisco Bay Area is ramping up its yard and wood waste components to reach the magic 50% recycling figure required of california jurisdictions. Waste Management`s Davis Street Station in San Leandro, Calif., is in a growth spurt. Late last year the SMaRT facility--which stands for station for materials recycling and transfer--added 50 tph of yard and wood waste capacity, making it one of the largest facilities in the country that deal with organic wastes, and bringing the multimaterial facility to a total of more than 3,000 tpd of overall capacity.

  6. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-10-01

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously. PMID:26292164

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Massalska, D; Zimowski, J G; Bijok, J; Kucińska-Chahwan, A; Łusakowska, A; Jakiel, G; Roszkowski, T

    2016-09-01

    Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies constitute a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of rare inherited diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy, motor delay and respiratory insufficiency. To date, curative care is not available for these diseases, which may severely affect both life-span and quality of life. We discuss prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for families at risk, as well as diagnostic possibilities in sporadic cases. PMID:27197572

  8. Creatine monohydrate as a therapeutic aid in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Jared P; Fielding, Roger A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, dietary supplementation with creatine has been shown to enhance neuromuscular function in several diseases. Recent studies have suggested that creatine can be beneficial in patients with muscular dystrophy and other mitochondrial cytopathies, and may attenuate sarcopenia and facilitate rehabilitation of disuse atrophy. Though the mechanisms are still unknown, creatine has been shown to decrease cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and increase intramuscular and cerebral phosphocreatine stores, providing potential musculoskeletal and neuroprotective effects. PMID:16536185

  9. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  10. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  11. Genetics Home Reference: optic atrophy type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions optic atrophy type 1 optic atrophy type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Optic atrophy type 1 is a condition that affects vision. Individuals with ...

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Lach, Cynthia L.; Cano, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Results from an effort to fabrication shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) test specimens and characterize the material system are presented in this study. The SMAHC specimens are conventional composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The fabrication and characterization work was undertaken to better understand the mechanics of the material system, address fabrication issues cited in the literature, and provide specimens for experimental validation of a recently developed thermomechanical model for SMAHC structures. Processes and hardware developed for fabrication of the SMAHC specimens are described. Fabrication of a SMA14C laminate with quasi-isotropic lamination and ribbon-type Nitinol actuators embedded in the 0' layers is presented. Beam specimens are machined from the laminate and are the focus of recent work, but the processes and hardware are readily extensible to more practical structures. Results of thermomechanical property testing on the composite matrix and Nitinol ribbon are presented. Test results from the Nitinol include stress-strain behavior, modulus versus temperature. and constrained recovery stress versus temperature and thermal cycle. Complex thermomechanical behaviors of the Nitinol and composite matrix are demonstrated, which have significant implications for modeling of SMAHC structures.

  13. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yang, Sheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA) treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI), decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb). The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis. PMID:27274754

  14. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yang, Sheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA) treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI), decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb). The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis. PMID:27274754

  15. Switchable Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Thermal Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Fesmire, James

    2014-01-01

    Develop 2-way switchable thermal systems for use in systems that function in cold to hot temperature ranges using different alloy designs for SMA system concepts. In this project, KSC will specifically address designs of two proof of concept SMA systems with transition temperatures in the 65-95 C range and investigate cycle fatigue and "memory loss" due to thermal cycling.

  16. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  17. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  18. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  19. Multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies.

  20. Relationship between input power and power density of SMA spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Ham, Sang Yong; Son, Young Su

    2016-04-01

    The important required characteristics of an artificial muscle for a human arm-like manipulator are high strain and high power density. From this viewpoint, an SMA (shape memory alloy) spring is a good candidate for the actuator of a robotic manipulator that utilizes an artificial muscle. In this study, the maximum power density of an SMA spring was evaluated with respect to the input power. The spring samples were fabricated from SMA wires of different diameters ranging between 0.1 and 0.3 mm. For each diameter, two types of wires with different transition temperatures were used. The relationship between the transition temperature and maximum power density was also evaluated. Each SMA spring was stretched downward by an attached weight and the temperature was increased through the application of an electric current. The displacement, velocity, and temperature of the SMA spring were measured by laser displacement sensors and a thermocouple. Based on the experimental data, it was determined that the maximum power densities of the different SMA springs ranged between 1,300 and 5,500 W/kg. This confirmed the applicability of an SMA spring to human arm-like robotic manipulators. The results of this study can be used as reference for design.

  1. Superelastic SMA-FRP composite reinforcement for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, Nicholas; Andrawes, Bassem

    2010-02-01

    For many years there has been interest in using fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) as reinforcement in concrete structures. Unfortunately, due to their linear elastic behavior, FRP reinforcing bars are never considered for structural damping or dynamic applications. With the aim of improving the ductility and damping capability of concrete structures reinforced with FRP reinforcement, this paper studies the application of SMA-FRP, a relatively novel type of composite reinforced with superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. The cyclic tensile behavior of SMA-FRP composites are studied experimentally and analytically. Tests of SMA-FRP composite coupons are conducted to determine their constitutive behavior. The experimental results are used to develop and calibrate a uniaxial SMA-FRP analytical model. Parametric and case studies are performed to determine the efficacy of the SMA-FRP reinforcement in concrete structures and the key factors governing its behavior. The results show significant potential for SMA-FRP reinforcement to improve the ductility and damping of concrete structures while still maintaining its elastic characteristic, typical of FRP reinforcement.

  2. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  3. Miniature High-Force, Long-Stroke SMA Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummin, Mark A.; Donakowski, William; Cohen, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Improved long-stroke shape-memory-alloy (SMA) linear actuators are being developed to exert significantly higher forces and operate at higher activation temperatures than do prior SMA actuators. In these actuators, long linear strokes are achieved through the principle of displacement multiplication, according to which there are multiple stages, each intermediate stage being connected by straight SMA wire segments to the next stage so that relative motions of stages are additive toward the final stage, which is the output stage. Prior SMA actuators typically include polymer housings or shells, steel or aluminum stages, and polymer pads between successive stages of displacement-multiplication assemblies. Typical output forces of prior SMA actuators range from 10 to 20 N, and typical strokes range from 0.5 to 1.5 cm. An important disadvantage of prior SMA wire actuators is relatively low cycle speed, which is related to actuation temperature as follows: The SMA wires in prior SMA actuators are typically made of a durable nickel/titanium alloy that has a shape-memory activation temperature of 80 C. An SMA wire can be heated quickly from below to above its activation temperature to obtain a stroke in one direction, but must then be allowed to cool to somewhat below its activation temperature (typically, less than or equal to 60 C in the case of an activation temperature of 80 C) to obtain a stroke in the opposite direction (return stroke). At typical ambient temperatures, cooling times are of the order of several seconds. Cooling times thus limit cycle speeds. Wires made of SMA alloys having significantly higher activation temperatures [denoted ultra-high-temperature (UHT) SMA alloys] cool to the required lower return-stroke temperatures more rapidly, making it possible to increase cycle speeds. The present development is motivated by a need, in some applications (especially aeronautical and space-flight applications) for SMA actuators that exert higher forces, operate

  4. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  5. MicroRNA in skeletal muscle development, growth, atrophy, and disease.

    PubMed

    Kovanda, Anja; Režen, Tadeja; Rogelj, Boris

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that are important global- as well as tissue- and cell-type-specific regulators of gene expression. Muscle-specific miRNAs or myomirs have been shown to control various processes in skeletal muscles, from myogenesis and muscle homeostasis to different responses to environmental stimuli, such as exercise. Importantly, myomirs are also involved in the development of muscle atrophy arising from aging, immobility, prolonged exposure to microgravity, or muscular and neuromuscular disorders. Additionally, muscle atrophy is both induced by and exacerbates many important chronic and infectious diseases. As global yet specific muscle regulators, myomirs are also good candidates for therapeutic use. Understanding the dynamics of myomirs expression and their role in the development of disease is necessary to determine their potential for muscle atrophy prevention.

  6. Seismic Protection of an Ancient Aqueduct Using SMA Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysostomou, Christis Z.; Demetriou, Themos; Stassis, Andreas; Hamdaoui, Karim

    2008-07-01

    The effectiveness of the use of Cu-based shape memory alloy (SMA) prestressing devices on an ancient aqueduct is examined in this paper. The dynamic characteristics of the aqueduct were measured within the span of three years and computational models were developed that matched very closely its dynamic behaviour. Using this as a bench mark, SMA prestressing devices were applied on the structure and the effects on its dynamic characteristics were assessed. It was noted that the SMA prestressing devices have a significant effect on the dynamic response of the structure. This is attributed to the stiffening of the structure due to the increase in contact between the masonry units and hence the increase of its stiffness through the increase of the modulus of elasticity of the masonry matrix. It can be concluded that the SMA prestressing devices can provide an inconspicuous means of stiffening masonry structures and increase their resistance to earthquake loads.

  7. An analytical study on the bending of prismatic SMA beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Arghavani, Jamal; Poorasadion, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution is presented for pure bending of shape memory alloy (SMA) beams with symmetric cross section as well as symmetric behavior in tension and compression. To this end, a three-dimensional constitutive equation is reduced to one-dimensional form and employed to study the bending response of SMA beams at high (pseudo-elasticity) and low (shape memory effect) temperatures. An analytical expression for bending stress as well as polynomial approximation for shear stress and deflection are obtained. Derived equations for bending are employed to analyze an SMA beam with rectangular cross section and results are compared with those of the finite element method. The results of this work show good agreement when compared with experimental data and finite element results. Furthermore, the existence of several zero-stress fibers during unloading of SMA beams at low temperature is demonstrated.

  8. Seismic Protection of an Ancient Aqueduct Using SMA Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysostomou, Christis Z.; Demetriou, Themos; Stassis, Andreas; Hamdaoui, Karim

    2008-07-08

    The effectiveness of the use of Cu-based shape memory alloy (SMA) prestressing devices on an ancient aqueduct is examined in this paper. The dynamic characteristics of the aqueduct were measured within the span of three years and computational models were developed that matched very closely its dynamic behaviour. Using this as a bench mark, SMA prestressing devices were applied on the structure and the effects on its dynamic characteristics were assessed. It was noted that the SMA prestressing devices have a significant effect on the dynamic response of the structure. This is attributed to the stiffening of the structure due to the increase in contact between the masonry units and hence the increase of its stiffness through the increase of the modulus of elasticity of the masonry matrix. It can be concluded that the SMA prestressing devices can provide an inconspicuous means of stiffening masonry structures and increase their resistance to earthquake loads.

  9. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  10. a Smart Polymer Composite Actuator with Thin Sma Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol

    The characteristics of SMA to provide a high force and a large strain make them a good candidate for an actuator for controlling the shape of smart structures. Using a mathematical model that captures the thermo-mechanical behaviors and 2-way shape memory effect (TWSME) of SMA, some smart shell structures were analyzed numerically and experimentally. The deflections of morphing shells to that thin SMA strips are attached were investigated depending on various phase transformation temperatures. SMA strips start to transform from the martensitic into the austenitic state upon actuation through resistive heating, simultaneously recover the prestrain, and thus cause the shell structures to deform three dimensionally. The behaviors of composite shells with SMA strips were analyzed using FEM and 3-D constitutive equations of SMA. Several morphing composite shell structures were fabricated and their experimental shape changes depending on temperatures were compared to the numerical results. That two results show good correlations indicates FEA and 3-D constitutive equations are accurate enough to utilize them for the design of smart shell structures for various applications.

  11. Homogenization techniques for the analysis of porous SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepe, V.; Auricchio, F.; Marfia, S.; Sacco, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the mechanical response of porous Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) is modeled. The porous SMA is considered as a composite medium made of a dense SMA matrix with voids treated as inclusions. The overall response of this very special composite is deduced performing a micromechanical and homogenization analysis. In particular, the incremental Mori-Tanaka averaging scheme is provided; then, the Transformation Field Analysis procedure in its uniform and nonuniform approaches, UTFA and NUTFA respectively, are presented. In particular, the extension of the NUTFA technique proposed by Sepe et al. (Int J Solids Struct 50:725-742, 2013) is presented to investigate the response of porous SMA characterized by closed and open porosity. A detailed comparison between the outcomes provided by the Mori-Tanaka, the UTFA and the proposed NUTFA procedures for porous SMA is presented, through numerical examples for two- and three-dimensional problems. In particular, several values of porosity and different loading conditions, inducing pseudoelastic effect in the SMA matrix, are investigated. The predictions assessed by the Mori-Tanaka, the UTFA and the NUTFA techniques are compared with the results obtained by nonlinear finite element analyses. A comparison with experimental data available in literature is also presented.

  12. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: the most recognizable laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Madej-Pilarczyk, A; Kochański, A

    2016-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), a rare inherited disease, is characterized clinically by humero-peroneal muscle atrophy and weakness, multijoint contractures, spine rigidity and cardiac insufficiency with conduction defects. There are at least six types of EDMD known so far, of which five have been associated with mutations in genes encoding nuclear proteins. The majority of the EDMD cases described so far are of the emerinopathy (EDMD1) kind, with a recessive X-linked mode of inheritance, or else laminopathy (EDMD2), with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In the work described here, the authors have sought to describe the history by which EDMD came to be distinguished as a separate entity, as well as the clinical and genetic characteristics of the disease, the pathophysiology of lamin-related muscular diseases and, finally, therapeutic issues, prevention and ethical aspects. PMID:27179216

  13. Genetics Home Reference: multiple system atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... OPCA progressive autonomic failure with multiple system atrophy SDS Shy-Drager syndrome sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy Related Information ... A, Hulot JS, Morrison KE, Renton A, Sussmuth SD, Landwehrmeyer BG, Ludolph A, Agid Y, Brice A, ...

  14. Performance range of SMA actuator wires and SMA-FRP structure in terms of manufacturing, modeling and actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübler, M.; Gurka, M.; Schmeer, S.; Breuer, U. P.

    2013-09-01

    In this contribution we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental description of an active shape memory alloy (SMA) fiber reinforced composite (FRP) hybrid structure. The major influences on actuation performance arising from variations in the design and manufacturing process are discussed, utilizing a new phenomenological model to describe the actuating SMA material. The different material properties for the activated, respective the unactivated, SMA as well as the influence of different loading conditions or pre-treatment of the material are taken into account in this model. To validate our material model we performed new actuation experiments with an exemplary SMA-FRP structure, which we compared to finite element (FE) simulation results. Our FE-model is based on a material model for the actuating SMA elements derived from experiments and data on the actual microscopic geometry of the hybrid composite. Therefore it is able to predict very precisely the actuation behavior of a typical FRP structure for industrial use cases: a thin walled CFRP sheet with SMA wires attached to the top for performing a bending motion with a maximum deflection of approx. 25% of its length.

  15. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; Tawil, Rabi

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHSD) is one of the most common adult muscular dystrophies and is divided into types 1 and 2 based on genetic mutation. Clinically both FSHD types 1 and 2 demonstrate often asymmetric and progressive muscle weakness affecting initially the face, shoulder, and arms, followed by the distal and then proximal lower extremities later in the disease course. Approximately 95% of patients, termed FSHD1, have a deletion of a key number of repetitive elements on chromosome 4q35. The remaining 5%, termed FSHD2, have no deletion on chromosome 4q35. Nevertheless, both FSHD types 1 and 2 share a common downstream mechanism making it possible that future disease-directed therapies will be effective for both FSHD types 1 and 2. PMID:25037087

  16. Becker muscular dystrophy-like myopathy regarded as so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy" in a pig: a case report and its diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Aihara, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kousaka, Shinichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Ochiai, Mariko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Asai, Tetsuo; Oishi, Koji

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy". Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig.

  17. Trunk muscularity in throwers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N I; Komuro, T; Tsunoda, N; Aoyama, T; Okada, M; Kanehisa, H

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine and compare the trunk muscularity of track and field throwers and non-athletes, and its predictive value to the physical performance of the athletes. Using a magnetic resonance imaging method, the skeletal muscle volume (SMV) of the trunk (SMV(trunk)) was determined in 19 strength trained athletes and 18 non-athletes. Also, the SMV of upper, middle and lower regions of the trunk was calculated in every 33% of the trunk length. For the athletes, the maximum weight (1RM) of squat, high clean, and deadlift, and shot forward throwing score were measured. The SMV(trunk) in the athletes was 10% greater than that of non-athletes, with a larger difference in the upper region of the trunk. Step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that the SMV of the lower region was a significant contributor for predicting the 1RM values of the 3 tasks, as well as the shot forward throwing score. The current results indicate that, while the muscularity of the trunk in track and field throwers is characterized by predominant development in the upper region, the muscularity in the lower region is a determinant factor for the 1RM values of the squat, high clean, and deadlift and shot forward throwing score. PMID:22903318

  18. Prosthetic leg powered by MR brake and SMA wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, The; Munguia, Vicente; Calderon, Jose

    2014-04-01

    Current knee designs for prosthetic legs rely on electric motors for both moving and stationary states. The electric motors draw an especially high level of current to sustain a fixed position. The advantage of using magnetorheological (MR) fluid is that it requires less current and can have a variable braking torque. Besides, the proposed prosthetic leg is actuated by NiTinol wire, a popular shape memory alloy (SMA). The incorporation of NiTinol gives the leg more realistic weight distribution with appropriate arrangement of the batteries and wires. The prosthesis in this research was designed with MR brake as stopping component and SMA wire network as actuating component at the knee. The MR brake was designed with novel non-circular shape for the rotor that improved the braking torque while minimizing the power consumption. The design also helped simplify the control of braking process. The SMA wire network was design so that the knee motion was actively rotated in both directions. The SMA wires were arranged and played very similar role as the leg's muscles. The study started with the overall solid design of the knee including both MR and SMA parts. Theoretical models were derived and programmed in Simulink for both components. The simulation was capable of predicting the power required for moving the leg or hold it in a fixed position for a certain amount of time. Subsequently, the design was prototyped and tested to validate the theoretical prediction. The theoretical models were updated accordingly to correlate with the experimental data.

  19. FE Simulation of SMA Seal for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Younse, Paulo; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Several NASA rovers and landers have been on Mars and performed successful in-situ exploration. Returning Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is of great interest to the planetary science community. Current Mars sample return architecture would require leaving the acquired samples on Mars for years before being retrieved by subsequent mission. Each sample would be sealed securely to keep its integrity. A reliable seal technique that does not affect the integrity of the samples and uses a simple low-mass tool is required. The shape memory alloy (SMA) seal technique is a promising candidate. A study of the thermal performances of several primary designs of a SMA seal for sample tubes by finite element (FE) simulation are presented in this paper. The results show sealing the sample tube by SMA plugs and controlling the sample temperature below the allowed temperature level are feasible.

  20. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy presenting with isolated axial myopathy and bent spine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kottlors, Michael; Kress, Wolfram; Meng, Gerhard; Glocker, Franz X

    2010-08-01

    Several subtypes of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with atypical clinical presentation have been described. We report a new, distinct phenotype with progressive bent spine syndrome solely affecting the paraspinal muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging study of the lumbar spine revealed marked atrophy of the paraspinal muscles. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing, which revealed shortened restriction fragments of the D4Z4 repeat on haplotype A in connection with a positive family history. PMID:20658601

  2. Nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Malhotra, Shweta; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy/wasting is a serious complication of a wide range of diseases and conditions such as aging, disuse, AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, space travel, muscular dystrophy, chronic heart failure, sepsis, and cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is one of the most important signaling pathways linked to the loss of skeletal muscle mass in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Activation of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle leads to degradation of specific muscle proteins, induces inflammation and fibrosis, and blocks the regeneration of myofibers after injury/atrophy. Recent studies employing genetic mouse models have provided strong evidence that NF-kappaB can serve as an important molecular target for the prevention of skeletal muscle loss. In this article, we have outlined the current understanding regarding the role of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of muscle wasting and the development of novel therapy.

  3. Micro-Ball-Lens Optical Switch Driven by SMA Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    The figure is a simplified cross section of a microscopic optical switch that was partially developed at the time of reporting the information for this article. In a fully developed version, light would be coupled from an input optical fiber to one of two side-by-side output optical fibers. The optical connection between the input and the selected output fiber would be made via a microscopic ball lens. Switching of the optical connection from one output fiber to another would be effected by using a pair of thin-film shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators to toggle the lens between two resting switch positions. There are many optical switches some made of macroscopic parts by conventional fabrication techniques and some that are microfabricated and, hence, belong to the class of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Conventionally fabricated optical switches tend to be expensive. MEMS switches can be mass-produced at relatively low cost, but their attractiveness has been diminished by the fact that, heretofore, MEMS switches have usually been found to exhibit high insertion losses. The present switch is intended to serve as a prototype of low-loss MEMS switches. In addition, this is the first reported SMA-based optical switch. The optical fibers would be held in V grooves in a silicon frame. The lens would have a diameter of 1 m; it would be held by, and positioned between, the SMA actuators, which would be made of thin films of TiNi alloy. Although the SMA actuators are depicted here as having simple shapes for the sake of clarity of illustration, the real actuators would have complex, partly net-like shapes. With the exception of the lens and the optical fibers, the SMA actuators and other components of the switch would be made by microfabrication techniques. The components would be assembled into a sandwich structure to complete the fabrication of the switch. To effect switching, an electric current would be passed through one of the SMA actuators to heat it above

  4. Development of an artificial urethral valve using SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonan, S.; Jiang, Z. W.; Tani, J.; Orikasa, S.; Tanahashi, Y.; Takagi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Tanikawa, J.

    1997-08-01

    The development of an artificial urethral valve for the treatment of urinary incontinence which occurs frequently in the aged is described. The prototype urethral valve is assembled in hand-drum form with four thin shape memory alloy (SMA) (nickel - titanium alloy) plates of 0.3 mm thickness. The shape memory effect in two directions is used to replace the urinary canal sphincter muscles and to control the canal opening and closing functions. The characteristic of the SMA is to assume the shape of a circular arc at normal temperatures and a flat shape at higher temperatures. Experiments have been conducted using a canine bladder and urinary canal.

  5. Investigation of residual stresses in shape memory alloy (SMA) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Justin Bradley

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) composites are a class of smart materials in which SMA actuators are embedded in a host matrix. The shape memory effect allows for stress induced phase transformations and large recoverable strains that make SMA composites promising candidates for structural shape/vibration control, impact absorption, aircraft deicing or in-flight airfoil shape control systems. However, the difference in thermal expansion between the SMA and the host material leads to residual stresses during processing. In addition, the SMA transformation from martensite to austenite, or the reverse, also generate stresses. These stresses acting in combination can lead to SMA/polymer interfacial debonding or microcracking of the host matrix. The present work was undertaken to study the behavior of nitinol shape memory alloys embedded in epoxy and glass/epoxy matrices and to investigate the development of residual stresses during their manufacture and actuation. A three-phase concentric cylinder micromechanics model and an SMA composite thermoelastic beam theory were developed to analyze the micromechanical and structural-level thermal and transformational stresses for nitinol composites induced by nitinol wires embedded in a host matrix. A series of warpage experiments were conducted on nitinol composite beams during heating cycles to provide experimental validation of model predictions and to assess their thermoelastic structural behavior under non-mechanical loading. Micromechanical model results indicate that excessive residual hoop stresses in nitino/graphite/epoxy composites leads to radial cracking around the embedded nitinol wires. Based on modeling results, the most important factor in reducing residual stresses (and thereby preventing radial cracking) is increasing the level of recovery strain for the nitinol wire. The SMA composite beam model agrees well with experimental data captured for the nitinol/epoxy beam series. Warpage experiments on nitinol

  6. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Erguen, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecting demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  7. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecing demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  9. Cardio-Muscular Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In the mid-sixties, Gary Graham, a Boeing designer, developed a cardiovascular conditioner for a planned Air Force orbiting laboratory. After the project was cancelled, Graham participated in space station conditioning studies for the Skylab program. Twenty years later, he used this expertise to develop the Shuttle 2000-1, a physical therapy and athletic development conditioner, available through Contemporary Designs. The machine is used by football teams, sports clinics and medical rehabilitation centers. Cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength development are promoted through both kinetic and plyometric exercises.

  10. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy.

  11. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  12. Soft and smart modular structures actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as tentacles of soft robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hu; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Min; Liu, Chunshan; Alici, Gursel; Jie, Yang

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces the design and fabrication of a multi-layered smart modular structure (SMS) that has been inspired by the muscular organs and modularity in soft animals. The SMS is capable of planar reciprocal motion of bending in heating process and recovering in cooling process when SMA wires carry out phase transformation. An adaptive regulation heating strategy is applied to avoid overheating and achieve bending range control of the SMS based on the resistance feedback of the SMA wires which as actuator of the SMS. The SMS can modular assemble soft robots with multiple morphologies such as lateral robots, bilateral robots and actinomorphic robots. A five-armed actinomorphic soft robot is conducted to crawling in terrestrial ground (max speed: 140 mm s-1, 0.7 body s-1), swimming in underwater environment (max speed: 67 mm s-1, 2.5 height s-1) and griping fragile objects (max object weight: 0.91 kg, 15 times the weight of itself). Those demonstrate that the performance of the SMS is good enough to be modular units to establish soft robots which possess a high speed of response, good adaptability and a safe interaction with their environments.

  13. Soft and smart modular structures actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as tentacles of soft robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hu; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Min; Liu, Chunshan; Alici, Gursel; Jie, Yang

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces the design and fabrication of a multi-layered smart modular structure (SMS) that has been inspired by the muscular organs and modularity in soft animals. The SMS is capable of planar reciprocal motion of bending in heating process and recovering in cooling process when SMA wires carry out phase transformation. An adaptive regulation heating strategy is applied to avoid overheating and achieve bending range control of the SMS based on the resistance feedback of the SMA wires which as actuator of the SMS. The SMS can modular assemble soft robots with multiple morphologies such as lateral robots, bilateral robots and actinomorphic robots. A five-armed actinomorphic soft robot is conducted to crawling in terrestrial ground (max speed: 140 mm s‑1, 0.7 body s‑1), swimming in underwater environment (max speed: 67 mm s‑1, 2.5 height s‑1) and griping fragile objects (max object weight: 0.91 kg, 15 times the weight of itself). Those demonstrate that the performance of the SMS is good enough to be modular units to establish soft robots which possess a high speed of response, good adaptability and a safe interaction with their environments.

  14. Morphing of composite plate and beam actuated by SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Maenghyo; Kim, Sanghaun

    2004-07-01

    One way Shape Memory Effect (SME) is not suitable mechanism for application to the repeated actuation of an Shape Memory Alloy(SMA) wire because the host structure does not return to its initial shape after it cools down. In the present study, the two-way SME under residual stress is considered. A structure using the two-way effect returns to its initial shape by increasing or decreasing temperature under an initially given residual stress. A thermo-mechanical constitutive equation of SMA proposed by Lagoudas et al. was employed in the present study. Laminated composite beams and plates are considered as simple morphing structural components. The modeling of beams and plates are based on first-order shear deformable laminated composite beam and plate theories with large deflections. Numerical results of fully coupled SMA-composite structures are presented. The proposed actuation mechanism based on the two-way SMA effect and a simulation algorithm can be used as a powerful morphing mechanism and simulation tool for structures.

  15. Transfer bonding technology for batch fabrication of SMA microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, T.; Guerre, R.; Despont, M.; Kohl, M.

    2008-05-01

    Currently, the broad market introduction of shape memory alloy (SMA) microactuators and sensors is hampered by technological barriers, since batch fabrication methods common to electronics industry are not available. The present study intends to overcome these barriers by introducing a wafer scale transfer process that allows the selective transfer of heat-treated and micromachined shape memory alloy (SMA) film or foil microactuators to randomly selected receiving sites on a target substrate. The technology relies on a temporary adhesive bonding layer between SMA film/foil and an auxiliary substrate, which can be removed by laser ablation. The transfer technology was tested for microactuators of a cold-rolled NiTi foil of 20 μm thickness, which were heat-treated in free-standing condition, then micromachined on an auxiliary substrate of glass, and finally selectively transferred to different target substrates of a polymer. For demonstration, the new technology was used for batch-fabrication of SMA-actuated polymer microvalves.

  16. A new SMA shell element based on the corotational formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisegna, P.; Caselli, F.; Marfia, S.; Sacco, E.

    2014-11-01

    Aim of this paper is to develop a new shape memory alloy (SMA) facet-shell finite element accounting for material and geometric nonlinearities. A corotational formulation is exploited, able to filter out large rigid-body motions from the element transformation. Accordingly, a geometrically linear core-element is employed, along with a SMA constitutive model formulated in the small strain framework. In particular, in accordance with the formulation of the classical thin shell theory, a plane-stress SMA model accounting for the pseudo-elastic as well as the shape memory effect is adopted. The time integration of the evolutive equation is performed developing a step-by-step backward-Euler numerical procedure. A highly efficient implementation of the corotational machinery is used, endowed with a fully consistent tangent stiffness. Applications are carried out for assessing the performances of the developed computational procedure and to investigate on some interesting engineering examples. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed shell element, whose simplicity makes it attractive for the design of new advanced SMA-based devices undergoing significant configuration changes during their operation.

  17. Connective tissue growth factor is overexpressed in muscles of human muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guilian; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Wu, Yanling; Chiba, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tohru; Onuma, Akira; Sato, Yuko; Takigawa, Masaharu; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2008-04-15

    The detailed process of how dystrophic muscles are replaced by fibrotic tissues is unknown. In the present study, the immunolocalization and mRNA expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in muscles from normal and dystrophic human muscles were examined with the goal of elucidating the pathophysiological function of CTGF in muscular dystrophy. Biopsies of frozen muscle from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Becker muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, congenital myopathy were analyzed using anti-CTGF polyclonal antibody. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was also performed to evaluate the expression of CTGF mRNA in dystrophic muscles. In normal muscle, neuromuscular junctions and vessels were CTGF-immunopositive, which suggests a physiological role for CTGF in these sites. In dystrophic muscle, CTGF immunoreactivity was localized to muscle fiber basal lamina, regenerating fibers, and the interstitium. Triple immunolabeling revealed that activated fibroblasts were immunopositive for CTGF and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of CTGF mRNA in the muscles of DMD patients. Co-localization of TGF-beta1 and CTGF in activated fibroblasts suggests that CTGF expression is regulated by TGF-beta1 through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism. In conclusion, TGF-beta1-CTGF pathway may play a role in the fibrosis that is commonly observed in muscular dystrophy.

  18. Regulation of a Notch3-Hes1 pathway and protective effect by a tocopherol-omega alkanol chain derivative in muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    von Grabowiecki, Yannick; Licona, Cynthia; Palamiuc, Lavinia; Abreu, Paula; Vidimar, Vania; Coowar, Djalil; Mellitzer, Georg; Gaiddon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Muscular atrophy, a physiopathologic process associated with severe human diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or cancer, has been linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The Notch pathway plays a role in muscle development and in muscle regeneration upon physical injury. In this study, we explored the possibility that the Notch pathway participates in the ROS-related muscular atrophy occurring in cancer-associated cachexia and ALS. We also tested whether hybrid compounds of tocopherol, harboring antioxidant activity, and the omega-alkanol chain, presenting cytoprotective activity, might reduce muscle atrophy and impact the Notch pathway. We identified one tocopherol-omega alkanol chain derivative, AGT251, protecting myoblastic cells against known cytotoxic agents. We showed that this compound presenting antioxidant activity counteracts the induction of the Notch pathway by cytotoxic stress, leading to a decrease of Notch1 and Notch3 expression. At the functional level, these regulations correlated with a repression of the Notch target gene Hes1 and the atrophy/remodeling gene MuRF1. Importantly, we also observed an induction of Notch3 and Hes1 expression in two murine models of muscle atrophy: a doxorubicin-induced cachexia model and an ALS murine model expressing mutated superoxide dismutase 1. In both models, the induction of Notch3 and Hes1 were partially opposed by AGT251, which correlated with ameliorations in body and muscle weight, reduction of muscular atrophy markers, and improved survival. Altogether, we identified a compound of the tocopherol family that protects against muscle atrophy in various models, possibly through the regulation of the Notch pathway.

  19. Regulation of a Notch3-Hes1 pathway and protective effect by a tocopherol-omega alkanol chain derivative in muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    von Grabowiecki, Yannick; Licona, Cynthia; Palamiuc, Lavinia; Abreu, Paula; Vidimar, Vania; Coowar, Djalil; Mellitzer, Georg; Gaiddon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Muscular atrophy, a physiopathologic process associated with severe human diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or cancer, has been linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The Notch pathway plays a role in muscle development and in muscle regeneration upon physical injury. In this study, we explored the possibility that the Notch pathway participates in the ROS-related muscular atrophy occurring in cancer-associated cachexia and ALS. We also tested whether hybrid compounds of tocopherol, harboring antioxidant activity, and the omega-alkanol chain, presenting cytoprotective activity, might reduce muscle atrophy and impact the Notch pathway. We identified one tocopherol-omega alkanol chain derivative, AGT251, protecting myoblastic cells against known cytotoxic agents. We showed that this compound presenting antioxidant activity counteracts the induction of the Notch pathway by cytotoxic stress, leading to a decrease of Notch1 and Notch3 expression. At the functional level, these regulations correlated with a repression of the Notch target gene Hes1 and the atrophy/remodeling gene MuRF1. Importantly, we also observed an induction of Notch3 and Hes1 expression in two murine models of muscle atrophy: a doxorubicin-induced cachexia model and an ALS murine model expressing mutated superoxide dismutase 1. In both models, the induction of Notch3 and Hes1 were partially opposed by AGT251, which correlated with ameliorations in body and muscle weight, reduction of muscular atrophy markers, and improved survival. Altogether, we identified a compound of the tocopherol family that protects against muscle atrophy in various models, possibly through the regulation of the Notch pathway. PMID:25326132

  20. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  1. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and myotonic dystrophy. Each of these disorders represents a different class of genetic disease (monogenic, epigenetic, and repeat expansion disorders), and the approach to therapy addresses the diverse and complex molecular mechanisms involved in these diseases. The large number of novel pharmacologic agents in development with good biologic rationale and strong proof of concept suggests there will be an improved quality of life for individuals with muscular dystrophy. PMID:23939629

  2. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26890413

  3. Vulvar Skin Atrophy Induced by Topical Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Elisabeth; Groben, Pamela; Eanes, Alisa; Iyer, Priya; Ugoeke, Joseph; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2011-01-01

    Steroid induced skin atrophy is the most frequent and perhaps most important cutaneous side effect of topical glucocorticoid therapy. To date, it has not been described in vulvar skin. We describe a patient with significant vulvar skin atrophy following prolonged steroid application to treat vulvar dermatitis. The extensive atrophy in the perineum resulted in secondary ‘webbing’ and partial obstruction of genital hiatus and superimposed dyspareunia. Prolonged topical steroids may result in atrophic changes in vulvar skin. Therefore, further research in clinical correlates of steroid-induced atrophy in the vulvar region is warranted. PMID:22594868

  4. Heredity in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Soma, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Ichiro; Takei, Asako; Fujiki, Naoto; Yanagihara, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2006-01-15

    We investigated the family histories of 157 Japanese patients with probable or possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). A family history of neurodegenerative disorders was only detected in three MSA patients (1.9%). We evaluated these patients by careful neurological examination, neuroimaging studies, and genetic studies to exclude hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia with a similar clinical phenotype to MSA. The results indicated that one of them had a family history of MSA. Although the familial presence of neurodegenerative disorders is rare in MSA patients, the existence of such cases suggests that MSA may have a genetic background.

  5. Pregnancy and Childbirth with Neuromuscular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystrophy type 2 (MMD2, or DM2) paramyotonia congenita (PC) spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) Complication Factors fatigue and ... failure • worsening of respiratory problems • possible worsening of PC symptoms • worsening of weakness and increased fatigue • increased ...

  6. Sarcoglycans in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hack, A A; Groh, M E; McNally, E M

    Muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects skeletal and cardiac muscle. The genetic defects associated with muscular dystrophy include mutations in dystrophin and its associated glycoproteins, the sarcoglycans. Furthermore, defects in dystrophin have been shown to cause a disruption of the normal expression and localization of the sarcoglycan complex. Thus, abnormalities of sarcoglycan are a common molecular feature in a number of dystrophies. By combining biochemistry, molecular cell biology, and human and mouse genetics, a growing understanding of the sarcoglycan complex is emerging. Sarcoglycan appears to be an important, independent mediator of dystrophic pathology in both skeletal muscle and heart. The absence of sarcoglycan leads to alterations of membrane permeability and apoptosis, two shared features of a number of dystrophies. beta-sarcoglycan and delta-sarcoglycan may form the core of the sarcoglycan subcomplex with alpha- and gamma-sarcoglycan less tightly associated to this core. The relationship of epsilon-sarcoglycan to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex remains unclear. Animals lacking alpha-, gamma- and delta-sarcoglycan have been described and provide excellent opportunities for further investigation of the function of sarcoglycan. Dystrophin with dystroglycan and laminin may be a mechanical link between the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. By positioning itself in close proximity to dystrophin and dystroglycan, sarcoglycan may function to couple mechanical and chemical signals in striated muscle. Sarcoglycan may be an independent signaling or regulatory module whose position in the membrane is determined by dystrophin but whose function is carried out independent of the dystrophin-dystroglycan-laminin axis.

  7. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy.

  8. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy. PMID:25037085

  9. Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension (Shy-Drager Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension Information Page Synonym(s): Shy- ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension? Multiple system atrophy with ...

  10. Crustacean muscles: atrophy and regeneration during molting

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural basis of atrophy of claw closer muscle of the land crab and the organization of myofibrils and sacroplasmic reticulum during the hydrolysis of protein that occurs during proecdysis was examined. The changes that occur in contractile proteins during claw muscle atrophy and the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteinases (CDP) in myofilament degradation were investigated. (ACR)

  11. SMA Hybrid Composites for Dynamic Response Abatement Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model and a finite element formulation for predicting the thermomechanical response of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures is briefly described. Attention is focused on constrained recovery behavior in this study, but the constitutive formulation is also capable of modeling restrained or free recovery. Numerical results are shown for glass/epoxy panel specimens with embedded Nitinol actuators subjected to thermal and acoustic loads. Control of thermal buckling, random response, sonic fatigue, and transmission loss are demonstrated and compared to conventional approaches including addition of conventional composite layers and a constrained layer damping treatment. Embedded SMA actuators are shown to be significantly more effective in dynamic response abatement applications than the conventional approaches and are attractive for combination with other passive and/or active approaches.

  12. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy. PMID:27803820

  13. Development of a Simple Structured Artificial Muscle Using SMA Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Ibuki, Ryuta; Maruyama, Shigenao; Komiya, Atsuki

    2006-05-05

    Artificial heart muscle using SMA wire is developed to assist weaken heartbeat. Simple structure design was adopted for large output force, large displacement and rapid cyclic motion of the actuator. The actuator was designed and fabricated from the viewpoint of heat transfer. Moving performance of the actuator was experimentally measured under 10N of loading condition. Under the maximum efficiency condition, the actuator shows cyclic motion with 1mm of displacement and time period of about 2 seconds in one cycle.

  14. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  15. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  16. Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Structures using Commercial Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-01-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  17. Analysis of SMA hybrid composite structures using commercial codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-07-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  18. Passive base isolation with superelastic nitinol SMA helical springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Han; Song, Gangbing

    2014-06-01

    Seismic isolation of structures such as multi-story buildings, nuclear reactors, bridges, and liquid storage tanks should be designed to preserve structural integrity. By implementing seismic isolation technology, the deformation of superstructures can be dramatically reduced, consequently helping to protect their safety as well. In this paper, an innovative type of passive base isolation system, which is mainly composed of superelastic nitinol SMA helical springs, is developed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, a two-story experimental steel frame model is constructed, and two superelastic SMA helical springs are thermo-mechanically built in the laboratory. To describe the nonlinear mechanical properties of the superelastic SMA helical springs under reciprocating load, a phenomenological model is presented in terms of a series of tensile tests. Afterwards, a numerical model of the two-story frame with the suggested isolation system is set up to simulate the response of the isolated frame subjected to an earthquake. Both the experimental and the numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed base isolation system can remarkably suppress structural vibrations and has improved isolation effects when compared with a steel spring isolation system. Due to the capabilities of energy dissipation as well as fully re-centering, it is very applicable to utilize the suggested isolation system in base isolated structures to resist earthquakes.

  19. STUDY OF THE RHIC BPM SMA CONNECTOR FAILURE PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    LIAW,C.; SIKORA, R.; SCHROEDER, R.

    2007-06-25

    About 730 BPMs are mounted on the RHIC CQS and Triplet super-conducting magnets. Semi-rigid coaxial cables are used to bring the electrical signal from the BPM feedthroughs to the outside flanges. at the ambient temperature. Every year around 10 cables will lose their signals during the operation. The connection usually failed at the warm end of the cable. The problems were either the solder joint failed or the center conductor retracted out of the SMA connector. Finite element analyses were performed to understand the failure mechanism of the solder joint. The results showed that (1) The SMA center conductor can separate from the mating connector due to the thermal retraction. (2) The maximum thermal stress at the warm end solder joint can exceed the material strength of the Pb37/Sn63 solder material and (3) The magnet ramping frequency (-10 Hz), during the machine startup, can possibly resonant the coaxial cable and damage the solder joints, especially when a fracture is initiated. Test results confirmed that by using the silver bearing solder material (a higher strength material) and by crimping the cable at the locations close to the SMA connector (to prevent the center conductor from retracting) can effectively resolve the connector failure problem.

  20. Reflex myoclonus in olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M E; Artieda, J; Zubieta, J L; Obeso, J A

    1994-01-01

    The presence of reflex myoclonus in response to touching and pin-pricking the wrist or stretching the fingers and to photic stimulation was assessed in 24 patients with a presumed diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and in 30 age matched control subjects. Reflex myoclonus to soma-esthetic stimulation was found in 23 patients and in none of the controls. Photic myoclonus was present in 12 patients and in none of the controls. Electrophysiological study of the reflex myoclonus showed enhanced (> 10 microV) somatosensory evoked potentials and an associated reflex electromyographic discharge (C-wave) in 15 patients. These findings indicate that reflex myoclonus is common in OPCA and probably of cortical origin. Images PMID:8158179

  1. [Sudeck's atrophy. 3 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, E; Tondini, C; Pizzi, C; Premuda, G

    1994-05-01

    Three patients fulfilling criteria for Sudeck's atrophy (reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome--RSDS) are described and etiological, pathogenetic and clinical features of the disease are reviewed. RSDS is associated with a wide variety of precipitating factors, each of whom, often in concomitance with metabolic diseases and psychiatric disturbances, may cause the same clinical syndrome, which continues in a "vicious circle" of feed-back mechanisms, correlated with sympathetic hyperactivity. The symptoms may begin gradually and the disorder progresses in stages lasting from weeks to months. The management has not yet been established. Generally, the earlier the syndrome is recognized, the better the results of treatment will be. Analgesics, salmon calcitonin and physiokinesitherapy are recommended. Psychological support is advisable. In more severe patients sympathetic blockade and surgical sympathectomy may be necessary. The effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment must still be assessed.

  2. Is hippocampal atrophy a future drug target?

    PubMed

    Dhikav, Vikas; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampus is the brain structure, vital for episodic and declarative memory. Atrophy of the human hippocampus is seen in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders e.g. recurrent depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, epilepsy, head injury, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Importantly, aging hippocampus also undergoes atrophy. In many instances, for example, AD, the atrophy precedes the development of symptoms while in others, there is a temporal relationship between atrophy and symptomatology. The presence of atrophied hippocampus is one of the most consistent features of many common psychiatric disorders. Several factors contribute to this atrophy. Stress is one of the most profound factors implicated and the mechanisms involve glucocorticoids, serotonin, excitatory amino acids etc. Hippocampal formation as a whole can undergo atrophy or its individual structural components e.g. apical dendrities can exhibit atrophy. Several drugs of unrelated classes have been shown to prevent atrophy indicating heterogenous manner in which hippocampal atrophy is produced. These include, tianeptine (affects structural plasticity in hippocampus and is an effective antidepressant); phenytoin (antiseizure and neuroprotective); fluoxetine (downregulates neurodegenerative enzyme and increases neuroprotective hippocampal S100 beta); lithium (neuroprotective and antiapoptotic); tricyclic antidepressants (increase hippocampal neurogenesis); antipsychotics (reduce hippocampal neuronal suppression); sodium valproate (increases neurogenesis) and mifepristone (antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-glucocorticoid). Now the most important question is: to what extent does the hippocampal atrophy play a role in the genesis of symptoms of diseases or their progression? And if it does, can we achieve the same degree of prevention or reversal seen in experimental animals, in humans also. An even more important question is: whether the prevention of

  3. Muscular Dystrophy, incurability, eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Rideau, Y; Rideau, F

    2007-01-01

    Summary The medical entity “muscular dystrophy” has been the object of a recent opinion campaign aimed at promoting a law in favour of euthanasia. This disease has become, in the eyes of the public, a media model of a particularly severe and incurable disease. This very widespread statement does not correspond to reality as far as concerns the life of these patients, to the condition that they have benefited from a very useful and fully provided empirical treatment. As already seen, the hope for life has already doubled, without clear limits. The idea of inducing an interruption when at death’s door, as long as a systematic prevention prior to birth, does not conform with the motivated opinion of the majority of patients consulted. On the contrary, the dogma of incurability may lead to dramatic individual consequences which should be stressed, from a medical viewpoint, on account of the unacceptable risks of social injustice or eugenics that this would imply. PMID:17915566

  4. Biomechanical simulation of atrophy in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano Smith, Andrew D.; Crum, William R.; Hill, Derek L. G.; Thacker, Neil A.; Bromiley, Paul A.

    2003-05-01

    Progressive cerebral atrophy is a physical component of the most common forms of dementia - Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, Lewy-Body disease and fronto-temporal dementia. We propose a phenomenological simulation of atrophy in MR images that provides gold-standard data; the origin and rate of progression of atrophy can be controlled and the resultant remodelling of brain structures is known. We simulate diffuse global atrophic change by generating global volumetric change in a physically realistic biomechanical model of the human brain. Thermal loads are applied to either single, or multiple, tissue types within the brain to drive tissue expansion or contraction. Mechanical readjustment is modelled using finite element methods (FEM). In this preliminary work we apply these techniques to the MNI brainweb phantom to produce new images exhibiting global diffuse atrophy. We compare the applied atrophy with that measured from the images using an established quantitative technique. Early results are encouraging and suggest that the model can be extended and used for validation of atrophy measurement techniques and non-rigid image registration, and for understanding the effect of atrophy on brain shape.

  5. Reducing body myopathy and other FHL1-related muscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Schessl, Joachim; Feldkirchner, Sarah; Kubny, Christiana; Schoser, Benedikt

    2011-12-01

    During the past 2 years, considerable progress in the field of four and a half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1)-related myopathies has led to the identification of a growing number of FHL1 mutations. This genetic progress has uncovered crucial pathophysiological concepts, thus redefining clinical phenotypes. Important new characterizations include 4 distinct human myopathies: reducing body myopathy, X-linked myopathy with postural muscle atrophy, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, and scapuloperoneal myopathy. Additionally, FHL1 mutations have been discovered in rigid spine syndrome and in a single family with contractures, rigid spine, and cardiomyopathy. In this review, we focus on the clinical phenotypes, which we correlate with the novel genetic and histological findings encountered within FHL1-related myopathies. This correlation will frequently lead to a considerably expanded clinical spectrum associated with a given FHL1 mutation.

  6. Gene discovery for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, Félix F; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Gámez-Moreno, María G; Flores-Ríos, Brenda L; Ibarra-Esquer, Jorge E; López-Morteo, Gabriel A

    2016-04-28

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disorder that shows a preference for the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles. FSHD affects about one in 20-400,000 people, and no effective therapeutic strategies are known to halt disease progression or reverse muscle weakness or atrophy. Many genes may be incorrectly regulated in affected muscle tissue, but the mechanisms responsible for the progressive muscle weakness remain largely unknown. Although machine learning (ML) has made significant inroads in biomedical disciplines such as cancer research, no reports have yet addressed FSHD analysis using ML techniques. This study explores a specific FSHD data set from a ML perspective. We report results showing a very promising small group of genes that clearly separates FSHD samples from healthy samples. In addition to numerical prediction figures, we show data visualizations and biological evidence illustrating the potential usefulness of these results. PMID:26960968

  7. Fatigue of NiTi SMA-pulley system using Taguchi and ANOVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Jani, Jaronie; Leary, Martin; Subic, Aleksandar

    2016-05-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators can be integrated with a pulley system to provide mechanical advantage and to reduce packaging space; however, there appears to be no formal investigation of the effect of a pulley system on SMA structural or functional fatigue. In this work, cyclic testing was conducted on nickel-titanium (NiTi) SMA actuators on a pulley system and a control experiment (without pulley). Both structural and functional fatigues were monitored until fracture, or a maximum of 1E5 cycles were achieved for each experimental condition. The Taguchi method and analysis of the variance (ANOVA) were used to optimise the SMA-pulley system configurations. In general, one-way ANOVA at the 95% confidence level showed no significant difference between the structural or functional fatigue of SMA-pulley actuators and SMA actuators without pulley. Within the sample of SMA-pulley actuators, the effect of activation duration had the greatest significance for both structural and functional fatigue, and the pulley configuration (angle of wrap and sheave diameter) had a greater statistical significance than load magnitude for functional fatigue. This work identified that structural and functional fatigue performance of SMA-pulley systems is optimised by maximising sheave diameter and using an intermediate wrap-angle, with minimal load and activation duration. However, these parameters may not be compatible with commercial imperatives. A test was completed for a commercially optimal SMA-pulley configuration. This novel observation will be applicable to many areas of SMA-pulley system applications development.

  8. [Muscular isokinetic dynamometry].

    PubMed

    Svetlize, H D

    1991-01-01

    In the past, muscular strength has primarily been measured using isometric, isotonic or tensiometric techniques. The advent of isokinetic dynamometers has supplied an objective method of measuring peak torque throughout a full range of motion at a predetermined speed of contraction. An isokinetic contraction is a refinement of the controlled motion concept. The isokinetic contraction is dynamic, but the speed of the motion is held constant by a special device. In this way, resistance is in direct ratio to the varying force applied through the full course of a natural movement. The purpose of this study was to determine the peak torque of quadriceps (Q), and hamstrings (H), and their biomechanical angle of production, H to Q ratio and bilateral comparisons of these variables for the first time in a Southamerican population. Twenty healthy and voluntary males (age: 21.9 +/- 3.1 years, height 193.2 +/- 6.5 cm, weight: 84.2 +/- 5.2 kgs.), were tested on the Cybex II Dynamometer and Cybex Data Reduction Computer (CDRC). Quadriceps and hamstrings peak torque (pkTQ), in Newton-meters, were obtained at angular velocities of 60, 180 and 240 degrees. sec-1. Also, the angle of the range of motion at which peak torque occurred in both directions, H and Q peak torque to body weight ratios, H to Q ratio were measured. Finally, CDRC provided the bilateral comparison of the different variables expressed in percentages. All measurements were automatically corrected for the effect of gravity. The absolute maximal pkTQ of dominant (D), and non-dominant (ND), quadriceps at 60 degrees/sec was DQ 297 +/- 25 Nwm and nDQ 303 +/- 13 Nwm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1921692

  9. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man.

  10. NASA Keynote at the 2015 Trilateral SMA Conference, Frascati, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate some new directions within NASA's safety and mission function in response to changes in missions, technology, and practices. The presentation lists last year's highlights from NASA's human and robotic spaceflight missions, and discusses anticipated highlights for the coming year taken from existing Agency presentations. It will highlight changes to NASA's mission and the way NASA does business, as described in the 2014 strategic plan. It will then discuss how these changes pose challenges to trusted SMA practices, and provide some examples of initiatives NASA is taking action to address these challenges.

  11. Models of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lisa; Wenning, Gregor K.; Stefanova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a predominantly sporadic, adult-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of unknown etiology. MSA is characterized by autonomic failure, levodopa-unresponsive parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs in any combination. MSA belongs to a group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies, which also include Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Their common pathological feature is the occurrence of abnormal α-synuclein positive inclusions in neurons or glial cells. In MSA, the main cell type presenting aggregates composed of α-synuclein are oligodendroglial cells. This pathological hallmark, also called glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs), is associated with progressive and profound neuronal loss in various regions of the brain. The development of animal models of MSA is justified by the limited understanding of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and GCIs formation, which is paralleled by a lack of therapeutic strategies. Two main types of rodent models have been generated to replicate different features of MSA neuropathology. On one hand, neurotoxin-based models have been produced to reproduce neuronal loss in substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. On the other hand, transgenic mouse models with overexpression of α-synuclein in oligodendroglia have been used to reproduce GCIs-related pathology. This chapter gives an overview of the atypical Parkinson’s syndrome MSA and summarizes the currently available MSA animal models and their relevance for pre-clinical testing of disease-modifying therapies. PMID:24338664

  12. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy in a Norfolk terrier.

    PubMed

    Beltran, E; Shelton, G D; Guo, L T; Dennis, R; Sanchez-Masian, D; Robinson, D; De Risio, L

    2015-05-01

    A six-month-old male entire Norfolk terrier was presented with a 3-month history of poor development, reluctance to exercise and progressive and diffuse muscle atrophy. Serum creatine kinase concentration was markedly elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the epaxial muscles revealed asymmetrical streaky signal changes aligned within the muscle fibres (hyperintense on T2-weighted images and short-tau inversion recovery with moderate contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images). Electromyography revealed pseudomyotonic discharges and fibrillation potentials localised at the level of the supraspinatus, epaxial muscles and tibial cranialis muscles. Muscle biopsy results were consistent with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy. The dog remained stable 7 months after diagnosis with coenzyme Q10 and l-carnitine; however after that time, there was a marked deterioration and the owners elected euthanasia. This case report describes the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging, electrodiagnostic and histopathological findings with immunohistochemical analysis in a Norfolk terrier with confirmed dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy, which has not been previously described in this breed.

  14. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  15. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  16. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-Based Launch Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2014-01-01

    Most NASA missions require the use of a launch lock for securing moving components during the launch or securing the payload before release. A launch lock is a device used to prevent unwanted motion and secure the controlled components. The current launch locks are based on pyrotechnic, electro mechanically or NiTi driven pin pullers and they are mostly one time use mechanisms that are usually bulky and involve a relatively high mass. Generally, the use of piezoelectric actuation provides high precession nanometer accuracy but it relies on friction to generate displacement. During launch, the generated vibrations can release the normal force between the actuator components allowing shaft's free motion which could result in damage to the actuated structures or instruments. This problem is common to other linear actuators that consist of a ball screw mechanism. The authors are exploring the development of a novel launch lock mechanism that is activated by a shape memory alloy (SMA) material ring, a rigid element and an SMA ring holding flexure. The proposed design and analytical model will be described and discussed in this paper.

  17. Structural design of morphing trailing edge actuated by SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Qian

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the morphing trailing edge is designed to achieve the up and down deflection under the aerodynamic load. After a detailed and accurate computational analysis to determine the SMA specifications and layout programs, a solid model is created in CATIA and the structures of the morphing wing trailing edge are produced by CNC machining. A set of DSP measurement and control system is designed to accomplish the controlling experiment of the morphing wing trailing edge. At last, via the force analysis, the trailing edge is fabricated with four sections of aluminum alloy, and the arrangement scheme of SMA wires is determined. Experiment of precise control integral has been performed to survey the control effect. The experiment consists of deflection angle tests of the third joint and the integral structure. Primarily, the ultimate deflection angle is tested in these two experiments. Therefore, the controlling experiment of different angles could be performed within this range. The results show that the deflection error is less than 4%and response time is less than 6.7 s, the precise controlling of the morphing trailing edge is preliminary realized.

  18. Multi-Scale Dynamics of Twinning in SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, Eilon; Shilo, Doron

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical response of shape memory alloys (SMA) is determined by the dynamics of discrete twin boundaries, and is quantified through constitutive material laws called kinetic relations. Extracting reliable kinetic relations, as well as revealing the physical characteristics of the energy barriers that dictate these relations, are essential for understanding and modeling the overall twinning phenomena. Here, we present a comprehensive, multi-scale study of discrete twin boundary dynamics in a ferromagnetic SMA, NiMnGa. The combination of dynamic-pulsed magnetic field experiments, in conjunction with low-rate uniaxial compression tests, leads to the identification of the dominant energy barriers for twinning. In particular, we show how different mechanisms of motion for overcoming the atomic-scale lattice potential give rise to several kinetic relations that are valid at different ranges of the driving force. In addition, a unique statistical analysis of the low-rate loading curve allows distinguishing between events at different length scales. This analysis leads to the identification of a characteristic length scale (~15 μm) for the distance between barriers that are responsible for the twinning stress property. This characteristic distance is in agreement with the typical thickness of the internal micro-twin structure, which was recently found in these materials.

  19. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based launch lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2014-04-01

    Most NASA missions require the use of a launch lock for securing moving components during the launch or securing the payload before release. A launch lock is a device used to prevent unwanted motion and secure the controlled components. The current launch locks are based on pyrotechnic, electro mechanically or NiTi driven pin pullers and they are mostly one time use mechanisms that are usually bulky and involve a relatively high mass. Generally, the use of piezoelectric actuation provides high precession nanometer accuracy but it relies on friction to generate displacement. During launch, the generated vibrations can release the normal force between the actuator components allowing free motion of the shaft, which could result in damage to the actuated structures or instruments. This problem is common to other linear actuators that consist of a ball screw mechanism. The authors are exploring the development of a novel launch lock mechanism that is activated by a shape memory alloy (SMA) material ring, a rigid element and an SMA ring holding flexure. The proposed design and analytical model will be described and discussed in this paper.

  20. Dystonia in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, S; Wenning, G; Ransmayr, G; Poewe, W

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the frequency and nature of dystonia in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Methods: a cohort of 24 patients with clinically probable MSA over the past 10 years were prospectively followed up. Motor features were either dominated by parkinsonism (MSA-P subtype, n=18) or cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C, n=6). Classification of dystonic features and their changes with time was based on clinical observation during 6–12 monthly follow up visits. Parkinsonian features and complications of drug therapy were assessed. Most patients (22/24) died during the observation period. Neuropathological examination was confirmatory in all of the five necropsied patients. Results: At first neurological visit dystonia was present in 11 (46%) patients all of whom had been levodopa naive at this time point. Six patients (25%) exhibited cervical dystonia (antecollis) (MSA-P n=4, MSA-C n=2), five patients (21%) showed unilateral limb dystonia (MSA-P n=4; MSA-C n=1). A definite initial response to levodopa treatment was seen in 15/18 patients with MSA-P, but in none of the six patients with MSA-C. A subgroup of 12 patients with MSA-P developed levodopa induced dyskinesias 2.3 years (range 0.5–4) after initiation of levodopa therapy. Most patients had peak dose craniocervical dystonia; however, some patients experienced limb or generalised dystonia. Isolated peak dose limb chorea occurred in only one patient. Conclusion: The prospective clinical study suggests that dystonia is common in untreated MSA-P. This finding may reflect younger age at disease onset and putaminal pathology in MSA-P. Levodopa induced dyskinesias were almost exclusively dystonic affecting predominantly craniocervical musculature. Future studies are required to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of dystonia in MSA. PMID:11861684

  1. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... a protein involved in copying (replicating) DNA ; producing RNA, a chemical cousin of DNA; and producing proteins. ... aid in DNA replication and the production of RNA and proteins. These problems particularly affect alpha-motor ...

  2. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell from spinal muscular atrophy patient.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pingyuan; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Du, Juan; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    We established a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line chHES-427 from the abnormal embryo carrying homozygous deletion of exon 7 of survival motor neuron gene (SMN). This cell line maintained a normal karyotype 46, XX during long-term culture. Further characteristic analysis suggested that the cells expressed the pluripotency-related markers and had the capacity to differentiate into the derivatives from the three germ layers in vitro. PMID:27345972

  3. Can endoscopic atrophy predict histological atrophy? Historical study in United Kingdom and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Shin; Gotoda, Takuji; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Oda, Ichiro; Kondo, Hitoshi; Gatta, Luigi; Naylor, Greg; Dixon, Michael; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Axon, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic concordance between endoscopic and histological atrophy in the United Kingdom and Japan. METHODS: Using published data, a total of 252 patients, 126 in the United Kingdom and 126 in Japan, aged 20 to 80 years, were evaluated. The extent of endoscopic atrophy was classified into five subgroups according to a modified Kimura-Takemoto classification system and was compared with histological findings of atrophy at five biopsy sites according to the updated Sydney system. RESULTS: The strength of agreement of the extent of atrophy between histology and visual endoscopic inspection showed good reproducibility, with a weighted kappa value of 0.76 (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that three factors were associated with decreased concordance: Japanese ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11-0.43], older age (OR = 0.32, 95%CI: 0.16-0.66) and endoscopic atrophy (OR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.03-0.36). The strength of agreement between endoscopic and histological atrophy, assessed by cancer risk-oriented grading, was reproducible, with a kappa value of 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.87). Only nine patients (3.6%) were endoscopically underdiagnosed with antral predominant rather than extensive atrophy and were considered false negatives. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic grading can predict histological atrophy with few false negatives, indicating that precancerous conditions can be identified during screening endoscopy, particularly in patients in western countries. PMID:26673849

  4. Glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schakman, O; Kalista, S; Barbé, C; Loumaye, A; Thissen, J P

    2013-10-01

    Many pathological states characterized by muscle atrophy (e.g., sepsis, cachexia, starvation, metabolic acidosis and severe insulinopenia) are associated with an increase in circulating glucocorticoids (GC) levels, suggesting that GC could trigger the muscle atrophy observed in these conditions. GC-induced muscle atrophy is characterized by fast-twitch, glycolytic muscles atrophy illustrated by decreased fiber cross-sectional area and reduced myofibrillar protein content. GC-induced muscle atrophy results from increased protein breakdown and decreased protein synthesis. Increased muscle proteolysis, in particular through the activation of the ubiquitin proteasome and the lysosomal systems, is considered to play a major role in the catabolic action of GC. The stimulation by GC of these two proteolytic systems is mediated through the increased expression of several Atrogenes ("genes involved in atrophy"), such as FOXO, Atrogin-1, and MuRF-1. The inhibitory effect of GC on muscle protein synthesis is thought to result mainly from the inhibition of the mTOR/S6 kinase 1 pathway. These changes in muscle protein turnover could be explained by changes in the muscle production of two growth factors, namely Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-I, a muscle anabolic growth factor and Myostatin, a muscle catabolic growth factor. This review will discuss the recent progress made in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in GC-induced muscle atrophy and consider the implications of these advancements in the development of new therapeutic approaches for treating GC-induced myopathy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  5. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  6. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  7. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Sarkozy, A; Muelas, N; Koehler, K; Huebner, A; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F; Barresi, R; Eagle, M; Polvikoski, T; Bailey, G; Miller, J; Radunovic, A; Hughes, P J; Roberts, R; Krause, S; Walter, M C; Laval, S H; Straub, V; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K

    2011-01-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy. We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised serum creatine kinase values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20 s to 50 s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100,000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high serum creatine kinase and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult limb-girdle muscular

  8. Pregnancy and delivery in Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vavrinkova, Blanka; Binder, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease of unknown aetiology; it is a congenital disorder of protein metabolism primarily affecting proximal muscle groups leading to progressive muscular dystrophy. It later spreads to the muscles of the pelvic floor and lower extremities. The estimated incidence is 1:200,000. This paper describe a case of pregnancy and delivery in woman with progressive Leyden-Moebius muscular dystrophy. Cesarean section was performed due to progression of the underlying disease. First postoperative day DIC occure and surgical revision of abdominal cavity was performed. Although the uterine suture was strong, diffuse bleeding was present. Blood was not coagulating. Supravaginal amputation of the uterus was performed including left-sided adnexectomy due to bleeding from the left ovarium. Due to the severity of the condition and assumed necessity of long-term controlled ventilation, the patient was transferred to the intensive medicine department. She was dismissed home after 91 days of hospitalisation. Gravidity in advanced muscular dystrophy is rare and associated with a high risk. Due to muscle weakness, diaphragm weakness, atrophy of individual muscle groups, spine deformities and often dislocation of thoracic organs, these patients cannot avoid the caesarean section to end their pregnancy, followed by prolonged intubation and controlled ventilation. During pregnancy, the growing uterus elevates the diaphragm and impairs breathing. Therefore, pregnancies in such patients will probably always have to be ended prematurely. PMID:26313391

  9. Genomic characterization and integrative properties of phiSMA6 and phiSMA7, two novel filamentous bacteriophages of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mayya; Shcherbatova, Natalya; Kurakov, Anton; Mindlin, Sofia

    2014-06-01

    Two novel filamentous phages, phiSMA6 and phiSMA7, were isolated from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia environmental strain Khak84. We identified and annotated 11 potential open reading frames in each phage. While the overall layout of the functional gene groups of both phages was similar to that of the known filamentous phages, they differed from them in their molecular structure. The genome of phiSMA6 is a mosaic that evolved by acquiring genes from at least three different filamentous S. maltophilia phages and one Xanthomonas campestris phage related to Cf1. In the phiSMA6 genome, a gene similar to the bacterial gene encoding the mating pair formation protein trbP was also found. We showed that phiSMA6 possesses lysogenic properties and upon induction produces high-titer lysates. The genome of phiSMA7 possesses a unique structure and was found to be closely related to a prophage present in the chromosome of the completely sequenced S. maltophilia clinical strain D457. We suggest that the other three filamentous phages of S. maltophilia described previously also have the capacity to integrate into the genome of their bacterial host. PMID:24327089

  10. Multifunctional SMA-based smart inhaler system for improved aerosol drug delivery: design and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausley, Matthew E.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This paper documents the development of a prototype smart aerosol drug inhaler system using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. Unlike conventional dispersed-release inhalers, the smart inhaler system releases the aerosol drug in a very small area within the mouth inlet. Kleinstreuer and Zhang [1] have found that controlled release in the mouth inlet increases drug efficiency and allows targeting of specific sites within the lung. The methodology has been validated numerically and experimentally using fixed-exit position inhalers. The design presented in this work, however, allows for variation of nozzle exit position using SMA wire actuators in a combined actuator/sensor role. In contrast to other possible mechanisms, SMA wires are lightweight, require low power, and are the least obstructive to the flow of air through the inhaler. The dual actuator/sensor nature of the SMA wires (via resistance measurement) further simplifies the design. Solutions and insights into several SMA actuator design challenges are presented. SMA wire actuator characteristics such as achievable stroke and their effect on the design are highlighted. Consideration of actuator force requirements and the capabilities of SMA wires and studied. The problems posed by the thermal characteristics of SMA wires and innovative solutions are reported.

  11. Genome Sequence of Methanosarcina soligelidi SMA-21, Isolated from Siberian Permafrost-Affected Soil

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Horn, Fabian; Bakermans, Corien; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Here, we announce the genome sequence of Methanosarcina soligelidi SMA-21, an anaerobic methanogenic archaeon that was previously isolated from Siberian permafrost-affected soil. The sequencing of strain SMA-21 yielded a 4.06-Mb genome with 41.5% G+C content, containing a total of 2,647 open reading frames. PMID:25908125

  12. Application of SMA technology to auxiliary functions in appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bart; Brei, Diann E.; Patera, John

    2002-07-01

    Traditionally smart material actuation has been reserved for high technology industries such as space and aerospace; however, as the field matures more and more instances are found in low-cost, high production areas. This paper describes one such instance - the application of shape memory alloys to auxiliary functions in appliances. This investigation focused on lid locks for washing machines because it is representative of several other applications found in appliances including valves, dispensers, locks, brakes, etc. Several competing concepts for SMA actuated lid locks are discussed including simple analytical design models and experimental characterization of proof-of-concept prototypes. A comparison of these designs based on performance (force, response times), energy (power requirements) and economic metrics is given. From this study, a final concept was developed based upon the best attributes of the different concepts. The resulting proof-of-concept prototype demonstrated improved performance over the current state with a potential for cost reduction.

  13. Artificial heart for humanoid robot using coiled SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnuru, Akshay; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we have presented the design and characterization of artificial heart using cylindrical shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for humanoids [1]. The robotic heart was primarily designed to pump a blood-like fluid to parts of the robot such as the face to simulate blushing or anger by the use of elastomeric substrates for the transport of fluids. It can also be used for other applications. In this paper, we present an improved design by using high strain coiled SMAs and a novel pumping mechanism that uses sequential actuation to create peristalsis-like motions, and hence pump the fluid. Various placements of actuators will be investigated with respect to the silicone elastomeric body. This new approach provides a better performance in terms of the fluid volume pumped.

  14. New Pin Puller Based on SMA Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Nestor; Collado, Marcelo; Cabás, Ramiro

    2014-07-01

    Two different versions of the Pin Puller were designed during this activity, such as one with 100 N and other with 500 N of pull force. The design of both versions is based on spheres which support the pin at the initial position and a compression spring driving once the release takes place by means of the SMA. The mechanical design of the Pin Pullers has been conceived in order to optimize the device's weight, reduce the parts complexity, and achieve a suitable stiffness. A qualification test campaign for the Pin Puller with 500 N of pull force has been developed in order to check the success of the proposed mechanism for space applications. The main performed tests have been thermal-vacuum actuation, thermal-vacuum cycling, sine vibration, and random vibration. The Pin Puller has presented successful results of actuation during the test campaign

  15. Nonlinear Thermoelastic Model for SMAs and SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2004-01-01

    A constitutive mathematical model has been developed that predicts the nonlinear thermomechanical behaviors of shape-memory-alloys (SMAs) and of shape-memory-alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, which are composite-material structures that contain embedded SMA actuators. SMAHC structures have been investigated for their potential utility in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for static or dynamic control of the shapes of structures, control of the thermoelastic responses of structures, or control of noise and vibrations. The present model overcomes deficiencies of prior, overly simplistic or qualitative models that have proven ineffective or intractable for engineering of SMAHC structures. The model is sophisticated enough to capture the essential features of the mechanics of SMAHC structures yet simple enough to accommodate input from fundamental engineering measurements and is in a form that is amenable to implementation in general-purpose structural analysis environments.

  16. Experimental Validation of a Thermoelastic Model for SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from experimental validation of a recently developed model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The model captures the material nonlinearity of the material system with temperature and is capable of modeling constrained, restrained, or free recovery behavior from experimental measurement of fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model and analysis procedures is given, followed by an overview of a parallel effort to fabricate and characterize the material system of SMAHC specimens. Static and dynamic experimental configurations for the SMAHC specimens are described and experimental results for thermal post-buckling and random response are presented. Excellent agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted results, fully validating the theoretical model for constrained recovery behavior of SMAHC structures.

  17. Continuous mandibular distraction osteogenesis using superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Idelsohn, S; Peña, J; Lacroix, D; Planell, J A; Gil, F J; Arcas, A

    2004-04-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a well-established method of endogenous tissue engineering. It is a biological process of bone neo-formation between segments subjected to tension. The concept of this study was to investigate the distraction osteogenesis with a device capable of creating a permanent and constant force during the whole process as if a very large number of small elongations were applied constantly. The mechanical testing of the device used to produce the constant force and the in vivo analysis of the bone growth after it was implanted in rabbits are presented on this work. The device consists of a NiTi coil spring, superelastic at body temperature, in order to have a stress plateau during the austenitic retransformation during the unloading. The in vivo analysis was made on six female rabbits of 12 months old. A segmental mandibulectomy at the horizontal arm of the mandible and a corticotomy at 5mm distant from the gap were made. Next, following a latency period of five days, the SMA springs were implanted to induce the bone neo-formation. The displacement at the unloading plateau shows that it is necessary to have longer springs or to use several (available commercially) in series in order to fulfil the requirements of a human distraction. The temperature variations induced changes in the spring force. However, when the temperature returns to 37 degrees C the distraction force recovers near the initial level and does so completely when the distraction process continues. For the in vivo study, all six rabbits successfully completed the distraction. The radiographies showed the gap as distraction advanced. A continuity in the newly formed bone with similar transversal and horizontal dimensions than the original bone can be observed on the histologies. In conclusion, the application of a constant force on distraction osteogenesis, using SMA springs, may be a successful alternative to the conventional gradual distraction.

  18. Study on loss mechanism of SMA tracheal stent subjected to cough excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Li, Xinmiao; Xu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    A kind of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA) hysteretic nonlinear model is developed, and the loss mechanism of a SMA tracheal stent subjected to cough excitation is studied in this paper. Nonlinear differential items are introduced to express the hysteretic phenomena of Ti-Ni SMA, and the fitting effect of the SMA constitutive model on the experimental data is proved by the partial least-square regression method. The nonlinear dynamic model of a Ti-Ni SMA tracheal stent subjected to cough excitation is developed, and the system's dynamic response is obtained. The numerical results show that the system's vibration is little in weak excitation, becomes large with the increase of the stochastic excitation, and finally becomes little again with the further increase of the stochastic excitation; the stochastic resonance phenomenon occurs in the process, which may cause stent fracture or loss. PMID:26406047

  19. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  20. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  1. SMA-SH: Modified Styrene-Maleic Acid Copolymer for Functionalization of Lipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Carvalho, Vanessa; Pronk, Joachim W; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve

    2016-04-11

    Challenges in purification and subsequent functionalization of membrane proteins often complicate their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Purification of membrane proteins generally involves replacing the lipids surrounding the protein with detergent molecules, which can affect protein structure and function. Recently, it was shown that styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMA) can dissolve integral membrane proteins from biological membranes into nanosized discs. Within these nanoparticles, proteins are embedded in a patch of their native lipid bilayer that is stabilized in solution by the amphipathic polymer that wraps the disc like a bracelet. This approach for detergent-free purification of membrane proteins has the potential to greatly simplify purification but does not facilitate conjugation of functional compounds to the membrane proteins. Often, such functionalization involves laborious preparation of protein variants and optimization of labeling procedures to ensure only minimal perturbation of the protein. Here, we present a strategy that circumvents several of these complications through modifying SMA by grafting the polymer with cysteamine. The reaction results in SMA that has solvent-exposed sulfhydrils (SMA-SH) and allows tuning of the coverage with SH groups. Size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that SMA-SH dissolves lipid bilayer membranes into lipid nanodiscs, just like SMA. In addition, we demonstrate that, just like SMA, SMA-SH solubilizes proteoliposomes into protein-loaded nanodiscs. We covalently modify SMA-SH-lipid nanodiscs using thiol-reactive derivatives of Alexa Fluor 488 and biotin. Thus, SMA-SH promises to simultaneously tackle challenges in purification and functionalization of membrane proteins. PMID:26974006

  2. Characterization of a metalloprotease inhibitor protein (SmaPI) of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Kim, T U; Kim, I J; Byun, S M; Shin, Y C

    1995-08-01

    As suggested by Y. Suh and M.J. Benedik (J. Bacteriol. 174: 2361-2366, 1992), Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 produced very small amounts (0.8 U ml-1) of an inhibitor protein (SmaPI) that shows an inhibitory activity against extracellular 50-kDa metalloprotease (SMP) of S. marcescens and that is localized in the periplasm of cells at the optimal growth temperature of 25 degrees C. A recombinant S. marcescens harboring plasmid pSP2 encoding SMP and SmaPI genes produced 20 U of SmaPI ml-1 that is also localized in the periplasm of cells at 25 degrees C. However, a large amount of SmaPI (86 Uml-1) was extracellularly produced at the supraoptimal growth temperature 37 degrees C from the recombinant S. marcescens (pSP2). We purified SmaPI from the culture supernatant of S. marcescens (pSP2) grown at 37 degrees C, and some biochemical properties were characterized. SmaPI had a pI value of about 10.0 and was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 10,000. SmaPI was produced from a precursor SmaPI by cleavage of a signal peptide (26 amino acid residues). The inhibitor was stable in boiling water for up to 30 min. The thermostability of SmaPI can be attributed to its reversible denaturation. SmaPI inhibited SMP by formation of a noncovalent complex with a molar ratio of 1:1 and showed a high protease specificity, which inhibited only SMP among the various proteases we examined.

  3. Redox control of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Powers, Scott K; Morton, Aaron B; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and glucose homeostasis. Skeletal muscle is also an important endocrine organ that contributes to the health of numerous body organs. Therefore, maintaining healthy skeletal muscles is important to support overall health of the body. Prolonged periods of muscle inactivity (e.g., bed rest or limb immobilization) or chronic inflammatory diseases (i.e., cancer, kidney failure, etc.) result in skeletal muscle atrophy. An excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with a poor prognosis in several diseases and significant muscle weakness impairs the quality of life. The skeletal muscle atrophy that occurs in response to inflammatory diseases or prolonged inactivity is often associated with both oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this report, we critically review the experimental evidence that provides support for a causative link between oxidants and muscle atrophy. More specifically, this review will debate the sources of oxidant production in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy as well as provide a detailed discussion on how reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species modulate the signaling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and protein breakdown.

  4. Experimental considerations on fabrication of a smart actuator for vibration control using shape memory alloy (SMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuse, Kaori; Kikushima, Yoshihiro; Xu, Ya

    2002-06-01

    Despite its great potentials, having a large displacement and force compared to traditional electro-hydraulic servo mechanical actuators or to PZT actuators, there are not so many studies on SMA active actuator. The main reasons are considered as following; (1) SMA has transformation only in one direction, (2) the response is quite slow, and (3) vibration control requires punctual thermo control in real time. In the study at our laboratory, the vibration can be clearly separated into different modes by distributed cluster system. SMA actuators are, then, proposed to use with PZT actuators for control of low and high frequency modes, respectively, to realize all-round actuation. The purpose of this paper is to realize SMA active actuator for low frequency modes. First of all, actuators using SMA wires, partly embedded in CFRP, were fabricated in consideration of SMA/FRP interfacial strength. Their thermo-mechanical behavior had been studied with cooling system. These lightweight actuators were placed on beam structure made of CFRP. Recovery force of beam structure itself was used as reactive force against force generated by SMA. As a result, actuator which is favorable for low frequency vibration modes control, i.e. having a large displacement and a large force, was obtained.

  5. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  6. Treadmill step training-induced adaptive muscular plasticity in a chronic paraplegia model.

    PubMed

    Ilha, Jocemar; da Cunha, Núbia B; Jaeger, Mariane; de Souza, Daniela F; Nascimento, Patrícia S do; Marcuzzo, Simone; Figueiró, Micheli; Gottfried, Carmem; Achaval, Matilde

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide evidence that treadmill step training is capable of attenuating muscle atrophy and may regulate brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in soleus muscle after complete spinal cord transection (SCT) at T8-T9 in rats. Five days after SCT, spinal animals started a 9-week step-training program on a treadmill with partial body weight support and manual step help. The muscular trophism was studied by analyzing muscle weight and myofiber cross-sectional area of the soleus, while Western blot analysis was used to detect BDNF expression in the same muscle. Step training, initiated immediately after SCT in rats, may partially impede/revert muscular atrophy in chronic paralyzed soleus muscle. Moreover, treadmill step training promoted upregulation of the BDNF in soleus muscle, which was positively correlated with muscle weight and myofiber cross-sectional size. These findings have important implications for the comprehension of the neurobiological substrate that promotes exercise-induced effects on paralyzed skeletal muscle and suggests treadmill training is a viable therapeutic approach in spinal cord injuries.

  7. The effects of addition of mononucleotides on Sma nuc endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Julia; Filimonova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Examination of the effects of mononucleotides on Sma nuc endonuclease originated from Gram negative bacterium Serratia marcescens displayed that any mononucleotide produced by Sma nuc during hydrolysis of DNA or RNA may regulate the enzyme activity affecting the RNase activity without pronounced influence on the activity towards DNA. The type of carbohydrate residue in mononucleotides does not affect the regulation. In contrast, the effects depend on the type of bases in nucleotides. AMP or dAMP was classified as a competitive inhibitor of partial type. GMP, UMP, and CMP were found to be uncompetitive inhibitors that suggest a specific site(s) for the nucleotide(s) binding in Sma nuc endonuclease.

  8. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection to Complete SMA Pseudoaneurysm Exclusion After Failing of Endograft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Szopinski, Piotr Ciostek, Piotr; Pleban, Eliza; Iwanowski, Jaroslaw; Krol, Malgorzata Serafin-; Marianowska, Agnieszka; Noszczyk, Wojciech

    2005-05-15

    Visceral aneurysms are potentially life-threatening vascular lesions. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysms are a rare but well-recognized complication of chronic pancreatitis. Open surgical repair of such an aneurysm, especially in patients after previous surgical treatment, might be dangerous and risky. Stent graft implantation makes SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion possible and therefore avoids a major abdominal operation. Percutaneous direct thrombin injection is also one of the methods of treating aneurysms in this area. We report a first case of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection to complete SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion after an unsuccessful endograft placement. Six-month follow-up did not demonstrate any signs of aneurysm recurrence.

  9. The influence of exercise on bone atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the skeletal system, the muscular system, and exercise in bed rest studies are described. The regime of exercises performed, the mineral balance data derived, and the bone densitometric data obtained are discussed. A brief review of some of the histological results are also given.

  10. SMA applications in an innovative multishot deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, D.; Pedrazzoli, G.; Secci, G.; Portelli, C.

    1991-01-01

    An innovative Deployment and Retraction hinge Mechanism (DARM) in the frame of a technological program is examined. The mechanism includes two restraint/release devices, which enable it to be stable in its stowed or deployed position while sustaining all associated loads, and to carry its payload by remote command. The main characteristics of the DARM are as follows: deployment and retraction movements are spring actuated; the available amount of functional sequences is almost unlimited; and no use of electrical motors is made. These features were accomplished by: the application of a special kinematic scheme to the mechanical connection between the spring motor and the swivel head arm; and the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators for both release and spring recharge functions. DARM is thus a mechanism which can find many applications in the general space scenario of in-orbit maintenance and servicing. In such a frame, the DARM typical concept, which has a design close to very simple one-shot deployment mechanisms, has a good chance to replace existing analog machines. Potential items that could be moved by DARM are: booms for satellite instruments; antenna reflector tips; entire antenna reflectors; and solar panels.

  11. Seismic Risk Mitigation of Historical Minarets Using SMA Wire Dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Attar, Adel G.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; El-Habbal, Islam R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a research program sponsored by the European Commission through project WIND-CHIME (Wide Range Non-INtrusive Devices toward Conservation of HIstorical Monuments in the MEditerranean Area), in which the possibility of using advanced seismic protection technologies to preserve historical monuments in the Mediterranean area is investigated. In the current research, two outstanding Egyptian Mamluk-Style minarets, are investigated. The first is the southern minaret of Al-Sultaniya (1340 A.D, 739 Hijri Date (H.D.)), the second is the minaret of Qusun minaret (1337 A.D, 736 H.D.), both located within the city of Cairo. Based on previous studies on the minarets by the authors, a seismic retrofit technique is proposed. The technique utilizes shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as dampers for the upper, more flexible, parts of the minarets in addition to vertical pre-stressing of the lower parts found to be prone to tensile cracking under ground excitation. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is numerically evaluated via nonlinear transient dynamic analyses. The results indicate the effectiveness of the technique in mitigating the seismic hazard, demonstrated by the effective reduction in stresses and in dynamic response.

  12. Seismic Risk Mitigation of Historical Minarets Using SMA Wire Dampers

    SciTech Connect

    El-Attar, Adel G.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; El-Habbal, Islam R.

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents the results of a research program sponsored by the European Commission through project WIND-CHIME (Wide Range Non-INtrusive Devices toward Conservation of HIstorical Monuments in the MEditerranean Area), in which the possibility of using advanced seismic protection technologies to preserve historical monuments in the Mediterranean area is investigated. In the current research, two outstanding Egyptian Mamluk-Style minarets, are investigated. The first is the southern minaret of Al-Sultaniya (1340 A.D, 739 Hijri Date (H.D.)), the second is the minaret of Qusun minaret (1337 A.D, 736 H.D.), both located within the city of Cairo. Based on previous studies on the minarets by the authors, a seismic retrofit technique is proposed. The technique utilizes shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as dampers for the upper, more flexible, parts of the minarets in addition to vertical pre-stressing of the lower parts found to be prone to tensile cracking under ground excitation. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is numerically evaluated via nonlinear transient dynamic analyses. The results indicate the effectiveness of the technique in mitigating the seismic hazard, demonstrated by the effective reduction in stresses and in dynamic response.

  13. SMA Observations on a Very Low Luminosity Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Lai, S.; Ohashi, N.; Lee, C.; Karr, J.; Takahashi, S.; Ching, T.

    2010-01-01

    Studying young stellar objects with extremely low luminosity (Very Low Luminosity Objects, VeLLOs) provide us great opportunity for investigating the initial conditions of star formation and the formation of brown dwarfs. We study the dynamical and chemical properties of a VeLLO - DCE 065 using Submillimeter Array (SMA). The most promising result from DCE 065 is that both CO and N2D+ are depleted toward the protostar, confirming that the core is extremely young. We also detect high velocity red and blue shifted components in 12CO, suggesting the possible outflow activities. Although the missing flux prevents us to see the whole picture of the outflows, the proto (or pseudo) disk is clearly detected in the dust continuum and N2D+. The N2D+ line is extremely narrow ( 0.2 km/s) and the line width is comparable to its velocity gradient across the major axis. Assuming the rotation of proto disk is contributed by central protostar, the derived mass of central star is 0.02 solar mass. With the consideration of the sub solar mass envelope, DCE 065 may present a scenario that a brown dwarf can be formed from the collapsing processes of a core. CLH and SPL are supported by National Science Council of Taiwan under grant NSC 96-2112-M-007-019-MY2 and NSC 98-2112-M-007-007-MY3.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  16. Muscular Calf Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Rigby, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Calf pain is a common complaint among runners of all ages but is most frequent in masters athletes. This article focuses on injuries to the triceps surae or true 'calf muscles.' The most common calf injury is a tear of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (Tennis Leg) but other structures including the lateral gastrocnemius, plantaris and soleus also may be the cause of muscular pain. This article looks at the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of these injuries. We also highlight some examples of musculoskeletal ultrasound which is a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of the cause and extent of injury. PMID:27618240

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  19. Finite element analysis of adaptive-stiffening and shape-control SMA hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-05-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS' user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  20. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. PMID:23274153

  1. Oxyntic atrophy, metaplasia and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek

    2015-01-01

    The process of gastric carcinogenesis involves the loss of parietal cells (oxyntic atrophy) and subsequent replacement of the normal gastric lineages with metaplastic lineages. In humans, two metaplastic lineages develop as sequelae of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection: intestinal metaplasia and Spasmolytic Polypeptide-expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Mouse models of both chronic Helicobacter infection and acute pharmacological oxyntic atrophy have led to the recognition that SPEM arises from transdifferentiation of mature chief cells. The presence of inflammation promotes the expansion of SPEM in mice. Furthermore, studies in Mongolian gerbils as well as increasing evidence from human studies indicates that SPEM likely represents a precursor for development of intestinal metaplasia. These findings indicate that loss of parietal cells, augmented by chronic inflammation, leads to a cascade of metaplastic events. Identification of specific biomarkers for SPEM and intestinal metaplasia hold promise for providing both early detection of pre-neoplasia as well as information on prognostic outcome following curative resection. PMID:21075342

  2. Cardiac transplantation in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, R M; Dubowitz, V

    1992-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is associated with abnormal cardiac features in about 75% of cases; up to one-third will develop ventricular dilatation leading to congestive cardiac failure. As this form of muscular dystrophy is relatively benign, failure to respond to medical treatment warrants assessment for cardiac transplantation.

  3. Postinjection vastus lateralis atrophy: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Haber, M; Kovan, E; Andary, M; Honet, J

    2000-09-01

    We report two cases of postsurgical intramuscular meperidine injection with injury to the femoral nerve and subsequent vastus lateralis atrophy. The first case is a patient who had arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; the second, a patient with a C6-C7 anterior fusion. Photographs, radiography, and electrodiagnostic studies clearly depict the nature of the injuries, and their etiology is discussed. These case reports describe a unique neuropathic injection injury that, to our knowledge, has never before been described in the literature.

  4. Angiotensin II: role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Córdova, Gonzalo; Salas, José Diego

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, the main protein reservoir in the body, is a tissue that exhibits high plasticity when exposed to changes. Muscle proteins can be mobilized into free amino acids when skeletal muscle wasting occurs, a process called skeletal muscle atrophy. This wasting is an important systemic or local manifestation under disuse conditions (e.g., bed rest or immobilization), in starvation, in older adults, and in several diseases. The molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting imply the activation of specific signaling pathways which ultimately manage muscle responses to modulate biological events such as increases in protein catabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death by apoptosis. Many factors have been involved in the generation and maintenance of atrophy in skeletal muscle, among them angiotensin II (Ang-II), the main peptide of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Together with Ang-II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT-1 receptor) are expressed in skeletal muscle, forming an important local axis that can regulate its function. In many of the conditions that lead to muscle wasting, there is an impairment of RAS in a global or local fashion. At this point, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest the participation of Ang-II, ACE, and AT-1 receptor in the generation of skeletal muscle atrophy. Interestingly, the Ang-II participation in muscle atrophy is strongly ligated to the regulation of hypertrophic activity of factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this article, we reviewed the current state of Ang-II and RAS function on skeletal muscle wasting and its possible use as a therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle function under atrophic conditions.

  5. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    PubMed

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-01

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  6. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Du, Hua; Li, Ben-Hong; Cui, Bo; Ding, Qing-Yun; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders, such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA), Hirayama disease (HD), and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy. This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders. Methods: We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients, 95 patients with distal-type CSA, 88 HD patients, 43 SBMA patients, and 150 normal controls. Results: The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls. The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P = 0.004). The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P = 0.862). An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (≥4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients. Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders. PMID:26996473

  7. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  8. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  9. Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Gautam

    2002-03-01

    Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina is a rare disorder of autosomal recessive nature. There occurs patchy and progressive atrophy of the choroid and retina at the equatorial region with central area being less affected. Here in this case report, one woman of about 47 years attended at the retina clinic, Tenennt Institute of Ophthalmology, Glasgow University with the history of gradual loss of vision. On fundus examination, sharply defined bizarre shaped atrophic areas of fundus was seen in both the eyes. Velvet like fine granular pigments were present in the macula, the zone of healthy retina and the periphery. The colourless, elongated, glittering crystals were scattered over the dark brown pigments visible through 90 dioptre lens. Bone corpuscles pigments were not found. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperfluorescence in the area of gyrate atrophy. Her plasma ornithine level and plasma tiramine level were 1 90 U mol/l and 357 U mol/l. respectively. A rigid schedule of low protein diet including near total elimination of arginine with supplementation of essential amino acids was advised since the diagnosis was established.

  10. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vandenburgh, H; Chromiak, J; Shansky, J; Del Tatto, M; Lemaire, J

    1999-06-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  11. Energy-dissipating and self-repairing SMA-ECC composite material system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-02-01

    Structural component ductility and energy dissipation capacity are crucial factors for achieving reinforced concrete structures more resistant to dynamic loading such as earthquakes. Furthermore, limiting post-event residual damage and deformation allows for immediate re-operation or minimal repairs. These desirable characteristics for structural ‘resilience’, however, present significant challenges due to the brittle nature of concrete, its deformation incompatibility with ductile steel, and the plastic yielding of steel reinforcement. Here, we developed a new composite material system that integrates the unique ductile feature of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) with superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA). In contrast to steel reinforced concrete (RC) and SMA reinforced concrete (SMA-RC), the SMA-ECC beams studied in this research exhibited extraordinary energy dissipation capacity, minimal residual deformation, and full self-recovery of damage under cyclic flexural loading. We found that the tensile strain capacity of ECC, tailored up to 5.5% in this study, allows it to work compatibly with superelastic SMA. Furthermore, the distributed microcracking damage mechanism in ECC is critical for sufficient and reliable recovery of damage upon unloading. This research demonstrates the potential of SMA-ECC for improving resilience of concrete structures under extreme hazard events.

  12. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  13. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  14. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  15. Local Overexpression of V1a-Vasopressin Receptor Enhances Regeneration in Tumor Necrosis Factor-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alessandra; Toschi, Angelica; Murfuni, Ivana; Pelosi, Laura; Sica, Gigliola; Adamo, Sergio; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs during disuse and aging, or as a consequence of chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes. It is characterized by progressive loss of muscle tissue due to hypotrophic changes, degeneration, and an inability of the regeneration machinery to replace damaged myofibers. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine known to mediate muscle atrophy in many chronic diseases and to inhibit skeletal muscle regeneration. In this study, we investigated the role of Arg-vasopressin-(AVP-)dependent pathways in muscles in which atrophy was induced by local overexpression of TNF. AVP is a potent myogenesis-promoting factor and is able to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration by stimulating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase and calcineurin signaling. We performed morphological and molecular analyses and demonstrated that local over-expression of the AVP receptor V1a enhances regeneration of atrophic muscle. By upregulating the regeneration/differentiation markers, modulating the inflammatory response, and attenuating fibrogenesis, the stimulation of AVP-dependent pathways creates a favourable environment for efficient and sustained muscle regeneration and repair even in the presence of elevated levels of TNF. This study highlights a novel in vivo role for AVP-dependent pathways, which may represent an interesting strategy to counteract muscle decline in aging or in muscular pathologies. PMID:24971321

  16. Muscle phenotypic variability in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2 G.

    PubMed

    Paim, Julia F; Cotta, Ana; Vargas, Antonio P; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha, Antonio L; Plentz, Estevão; Braz, Shelida V; Takata, Reinaldo I; Almeida, Camila F; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-06-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 G (LGMD2G) is caused by mutations in the telethonin gene. Only few families were described presenting this disease, and they are mainly Brazilians. Here, we identified one additional case carrying the same common c.157C > T mutation in the telethonin gene but with an atypical histopathological muscle pattern. In a female patient with a long duration of symptoms (46 years), muscle biopsy showed, in addition to telethonin deficiency, the presence of nemaline rods, type 1 fiber predominance, nuclear internalization, lobulated fibers, and mitochondrial paracrystalline inclusions. Her first clinical signs were identified at 8 years old, which include tiptoe walking, left lower limb deformity, and frequent falls. Ambulation loss occurred at 41 years old, and now, at 54 years old, she presented pelvic girdle atrophy, winging scapula, foot deformity with incapacity to perform ankle dorsiflexion, and absent tendon reflexes. The presence of nemaline bodies could be a secondary phenomenon, possibly associated with focal Z-line abnormalities of a long-standing disease. However, these new histopathological findings, characteristic of congenital myopathies, expand muscle phenotypic variability of telethoninopathy. PMID:23479141

  17. Statistical insights into major human muscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shakti; Kim, Sung-Min; Wang, Yu; Dinasarapu, Ashok Reddy; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-07-15

    Muscular diseases lead to muscle fiber degeneration, impairment of mobility, and in some cases premature death. Many of these muscular diseases are largely idiopathic. The goal of this study was to identify biomarkers based on their functional role and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis, specific to individual muscular disease. We analyzed the muscle transcriptome from five major muscular diseases: acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) using pairwise statistical comparison to identify uniquely regulated genes in each muscular disease. The genome-wide information encoded in the transcriptome provided biomarkers and functional insights into dysregulation in each muscular disease. The analysis showed that the dysregulation of genes in forward membrane pathway, responsible for transmitting action potential from neural excitation, is unique to AQM, while the dysregulation of myofibril genes, determinant of the mechanical properties of muscle, is unique to ALS, dysregulation of ER protein processing, responsible for correct protein folding, is unique to DM, and upregulation of immune response genes is unique to PM. We have identified biomarkers specific to each muscular disease which can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  19. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are found... carcass shall be condemned. (b) If muscular lesions are found to be distributed in such a manner or to...

  20. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are found... carcass shall be condemned. (b) If muscular lesions are found to be distributed in such a manner or to be... carcasses, edible organs, and other parts of carcasses showing such muscular lesions. If the lesions...

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  2. Muscle Atrophy in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koukourikos, Konstantinos; Tsaloglidou, Areti; Kourkouta, Labrini

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The muscle atrophy is one of the most important and frequent problems observed in patients in Intensive Care Units. The term describes the disorder in the structure and in the function of the muscle while incidence rates range from 25-90 % in patients with prolonged hospitalization. Purpose: This is a review containing all data related to the issue of muscle atrophy and is especially referred to its causes and risk factors. The importance of early diagnosis and early mobilization are also highlighted in the study. Material and methods: a literature review was performed on valid databases such as Scopus, PubMed, Cinhal for the period 2000-2013 in English language. The following keywords were used: loss of muscle mass, ICU patients, immobilization, bed rest. Results: From the review is concluded that bed rest and immobilization in order to reduce total energy costs, are the main causes for the appearance of the problem. The results of the reduction of the muscle mass mainly affect the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory system. The administration of the cortisone, the immobility, the sepsis and hyperglycemia are included in the risk factors. The prevention is the primary therapeutic agent and this is achieved due to the early mobilization of the patients, the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and the avoidance of exposure to risk factors. Conclusions: The prevention of muscle atrophy is a primary goal of treatment for the patients in the ICU, because it reduces the incidence of the disease, reduces the time spent in ICU and finally improves the quality of patients’ life. PMID:25684851

  3. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Muelas, Nuria; Köehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Hudson, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Barresi, Rita; Eagle, Michelle; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Bailey, Geraldine; Miller, James; Radunovic, Aleksander; Hughes, Paul J.; Roberts, Richard; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C.; Laval, Steven H.; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, LGMD2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy (MMD3). We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic SNP and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised creatinine kinase (CK) values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20s to 50s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100 000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high CK and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult LGMD patients. PMID:21186264

  4. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. PMID:25672683

  5. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  6. Multiple System Atrophy: Genetic or Epigenetic?

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, late-onset and fatal neurodegenerative disease including multisystem neurodegeneration and the formation of α-synuclein containing oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs), which present the hallmark of the disease. MSA is considered to be a sporadic disease; however certain genetic aspects have been studied during the last years in order to shed light on the largely unknown etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. Epidemiological studies focused on the possible impact of environmental factors on MSA disease development. This article gives an overview on the findings from genetic and epigenetic studies on MSA and discusses the role of genetic or epigenetic factors in disease pathogenesis. PMID:25548529

  7. Stochastic bifurcation characteristics of SMA intravascular stent subjected to radial and axial excitations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wendi; Xu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    A kind of shape memory alloy (SMA) hysteretic nonlinear model is developed, and the stochastic bifurcation characteristics of SMA intravascular stents subjected to radial and axial excitations are studied in this paper. A new nonlinear differential item is introduced to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of SMA strain-stress curves, and the dynamic model of SMA intravascular stent subjected to radial and axial stochastic excitations is established. The conditions of the system's stochastic stability are determined, and the probability density function of the system response is obtained. Finally, the stochastic Hopf bifurcation characteristics of the system are analyzed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the system stability varies with bifurcation parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation occurs in the process; there are two limit cycles in the stationary probability density of the system response in some cases, which means that there are two vibration amplitudes whose probability are both very high; jumping phenomena between the two vibration amplitudes appears with the change of conditions, which may cause stent fracture or loss. The results of this paper are helpful for application of SMA intravascular stent in biomedical engineering fields.

  8. SMA actuators for vibration control and experimental determination of model parameters dependent on ambient airflow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.

    2016-05-01

    This article demonstrates the practical applicability of a method of modelling shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators. For this study, a pair of SMA wires was installed in an antagonistic manner to form an actuator, and a linear differential equation that describes the behaviour of the actuator’s generated force relative to its input voltage was derived for the limited range below the austenite onset temperature. In this range, hysteresis need not be considered, and the proposed SMA actuator can therefore be practically applied in linear control systems, which is significant because large deformations accompanied by hysteresis do not necessarily occur in most vibration control cases. When specific values of the parameters used in the differential equation were identified experimentally, it became clear that one of the parameters was dependent on ambient airflow velocity. The values of this dependent parameter were obtained using an additional SMA wire as a sensor. In these experiments, while the airflow distribution around the SMA wires was varied by changing the rotational speed of the fans in the wind tunnels, an input voltage was conveyed to the SMA actuator circuit, and the generated force was measured. In this way, the parameter dependent on airflow velocity was estimated in real time, and it was validated that the calculated force was consistent with the measured one.

  9. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  11. Reality television and the muscular male ideal.

    PubMed

    Dallesasse, Starla L; Kluck, Annette S

    2013-06-01

    Although researchers have examined the negative effects of viewing reality television (RTV) on women's body image, this research has not been extended to men. Exploring the extent to which RTV depicts men who embody the muscular ideal may enhance our understanding of the potential influence of this media genre. We explored the extent to which RTV depicted men who embodied the muscular ideal using a quantitative content analysis. Based on binomial tests, the primary male cast members of programs airing on networks popular among young adult men during the Fall 2009 broadcast season were more muscular, with lower levels of body fat, than average U.S. men. The chest-to-waist and shoulder-to-waist ratios of these cast members did not differ as a function of program type (i.e., reality drama, endurance, and romance). Young men who view RTV programs included in the present study would be exposed to an unrepresentative muscular ideal. PMID:23523084

  12. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  13. Seismic vulnerability assessment of a steel-girder highway bridge equipped with different SMA wire-based smart elastomeric isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, Farshad; Shahria Alam, M.

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloy wire-based rubber bearings (SMA-RBs) possess enhanced energy dissipation capacity and self-centering property compared to conventional RBs. The performance of different types of SMA-RBs with different wire configurations has been studied in detail. However, their reliability in isolating structures has not been thoroughly investigated. The objective of this study is to analytically explore the effect of SMA-RBs on the seismic fragility of a highway bridge. Steel-reinforced elastomeric isolators are equipped with SMA wires and used to isolate the bridge. Results revealed that SMA wires with a superelastic behavior and re-centering capability can increase the reliability of the bearing and the bridge structure. It was observed that at the collapse level of damage, the bridge isolated by SMA-HDRB has the lowest fragility. Findings also showed that equipping NRB with SMA wires decreases the possibility of damage in the bridge while, replacing HDRB with SMA-HDRB; or LRB with SMA-LRB increases the failure probability of the system at slight, moderate, and extensive limit states.

  14. Prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi SMA fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams. The SMA fibres were mixed with 1.5% volume content in a mortar matrix with the compressive strength of 50 MPa. The SMA fibres had an average length of 34 mm, and they were manufactured with a dog-bone shape: the diameters of the end- and middle-parts were 1.024 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Twenty mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B × H × L) were prepared. Two types of tests were conducted. One was to investigate the prestressing effect of the SMA fibres, and the beams with the SMA fibres were heated at the bottom. The other was to assess the bending behaviour of the beams prestressed by the SMA fibres. The SMA fibres induced upward deflection and cracking at the top surface by heating at the bottom; thus, they achieved an obvious prestressing effect. The beams that were prestressed by the SMA fibres did not show a significant difference in bending behaviour from that of the SMA fibre reinforced beams that were not subjected to heating. Stress analysis of the beams indicated that the prestressing effect decreased in relation to the cooling temperature.

  15. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group. PMID:27757431

  16. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  17. Brain atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Pini, Lorenzo; Pievani, Michela; Bocchetta, Martina; Altomare, Daniele; Bosco, Paolo; Cavedo, Enrica; Galluzzi, Samantha; Marizzoni, Moira; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to its safety and accessibility, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensively used in clinical routine and research field, largely contributing to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the main findings in AD and normal aging over the past twenty years, focusing on the patterns of gray and white matter changes assessed in vivo using MRI. Major progresses in the field concern the segmentation of the hippocampus with novel manual and automatic segmentation approaches, which might soon enable to assess also hippocampal subfields. Advancements in quantification of hippocampal volumetry might pave the way to its broader use as outcome marker in AD clinical trials. Patterns of cortical atrophy have been shown to accurately track disease progression and seem promising in distinguishing among AD subtypes. Disease progression has also been associated with changes in white matter tracts. Recent studies have investigated two areas often overlooked in AD, such as the striatum and basal forebrain, reporting significant atrophy, although the impact of these changes on cognition is still unclear. Future integration of different MRI modalities may further advance the field by providing more powerful biomarkers of disease onset and progression. PMID:26827786

  18. [Multiple system atrophy - synuclein and neuronal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mari

    2011-11-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder that encompasses olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), striatonigral degeneration (SND) and Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS). The histopathological hallmarks are α-synuclein (AS) positive glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) in oligodendroglias. AS aggregation is also found in glial nuclear inclusions (GNIs), neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), neuronal nuclear inclusions (NNIs) and dystrophic neurties. Reviewing the pathological features of 102 MSA cases, OPCA-type was relatively more frequent and SND-type was less frequent in Japanese MSA cases, which suggested different phenotypic pattern of MSA might exist between races, compared to the relatively high frequency of SND-type in western countries. In early stage of MSA, NNIs, NCIs and diffuse homogenous stain of AS in neuronal nuclei and cytoplasm were observed in various vulnerable lesions including the pontine nuclei, putamen, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, inferior olivary nucleus, intermediolateral column of thoracic cord, lower motor neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons, in additions to GCIs. These findings indicated that the primary nonfibrillar and fibrillar AS aggregation also occurred in neurons. Therefore both the direct involvement of neurons themselves and the oligodendroglia-myelin-axon mechanism may synergistically accelerate the degenerative process of MSA. PMID:22277386

  19. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  20. Brain atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Pini, Lorenzo; Pievani, Michela; Bocchetta, Martina; Altomare, Daniele; Bosco, Paolo; Cavedo, Enrica; Galluzzi, Samantha; Marizzoni, Moira; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to its safety and accessibility, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensively used in clinical routine and research field, largely contributing to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the main findings in AD and normal aging over the past twenty years, focusing on the patterns of gray and white matter changes assessed in vivo using MRI. Major progresses in the field concern the segmentation of the hippocampus with novel manual and automatic segmentation approaches, which might soon enable to assess also hippocampal subfields. Advancements in quantification of hippocampal volumetry might pave the way to its broader use as outcome marker in AD clinical trials. Patterns of cortical atrophy have been shown to accurately track disease progression and seem promising in distinguishing among AD subtypes. Disease progression has also been associated with changes in white matter tracts. Recent studies have investigated two areas often overlooked in AD, such as the striatum and basal forebrain, reporting significant atrophy, although the impact of these changes on cognition is still unclear. Future integration of different MRI modalities may further advance the field by providing more powerful biomarkers of disease onset and progression.

  1. Development of a Shape-controlled airfoil by use of SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Matsunaga, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hiroki

    1992-08-01

    A Shape-controlled airfoil was developed by use of shape memory alloys (SMA). Two-way change in the blade shape was realized by use of a differential two-way element in which the two different shapes were memorized. The developed airfoil was tested in the wind tunnel in order to check the effect of the shape change on the characteristics of the airfoil. Flow visualization experiments in a smoke tunnel as well as the traverse of the wake behind the airfoil showed that the shape change by electrically heated SMA gives a marked change in flow around the airfoil near the stall angle of the original shape. As the result of this study, it was found that the developed SMA actuator is effective for the control of flow separation from the blade surface.

  2. Development of shape memory alloy (SMA)-based actuator for remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, M. Hari

    2003-10-01

    While the experimental use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) is widespread in aerospace integrated actuation systems, much of the practical value of SMA technology is realized in linear and rotary actuators. This report will introduce an attempt to develop a full-scaled SMA based actuator to replace electro-mechanical actuator for flap actuation of a Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV). At the heart of this actuator there is thermally sensitive wire that, when heated, contracts and provides useable mechanical energy. This linear actuation is converted into rotary, for the required actuation of flap. The actuator configurations were sized to fit inside the wing of the RPV where presently the electro-mechanical actuator is housed. The torque supplied to the flap is similarly calculated from full-scale requirements. Using common engineering principles, this design will demonstrate how to design a typical SMA actuator. Test of the actuator performance (stroke, force movement) is done on special test fixture.

  3. Semantic memory retrieval circuit: role of pre-SMA, caudate, and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Hart, John; Maguire, Mandy J; Motes, Michael; Mudar, Raksha Anand; Chiang, Hsueh-Sheng; Womack, Kyle B; Kraut, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    We propose that pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA)-thalamic interactions govern processes fundamental to semantic retrieval of an integrated object memory. At the onset of semantic retrieval, pre-SMA initiates electrical interactions between multiple cortical regions associated with semantic memory subsystems encodings as indexed by an increase in theta-band EEG power. This starts between 100-150 ms after stimulus presentation and is sustained throughout the task. We posit that this activity represents initiation of the object memory search, which continues in searching for an object memory. When the correct memory is retrieved, there is a high beta-band EEG power increase, which reflects communication between pre-SMA and thalamus, designates the end of the search process and resultant in object retrieval from multiple semantic memory subsystems. This high beta signal is also detected in cortical regions. This circuit is modulated by the caudate nuclei to facilitate correct and suppress incorrect target memories.

  4. Note: A component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips using SMA beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ding, Xin; Wu, Di; Qi, Junlei; Wang, Ruixin; Lu, Siwei; Yan, Xiaojun

    2016-06-01

    This note presents a component-level frequency tunable isolator for vibration-sensitive chips. The isolator employed 8 U-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) beams to support an isolation island (used for mounting chips). Due to the temperature-induced Young's modulus variation of SMA, the system stiffness of the isolator can be controlled through heating the SMA beams. In such a way, the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned. A prototype was fabricated to evaluate the concept. The test results show that the natural frequency of the isolator can be tuned in the range of 64 Hz-97 Hz by applying different heating strategies. Moreover, resonant vibration can be suppressed significantly (the transmissibility decreases about 65% near the resonant frequency) using a real-time tuning method.

  5. Fatigue behavior of a thermally-activated NiTiNb SMA-FRP patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the details of an experimental study that was conducted to characterize the fatigue behavior of a thermally-activated shape memory alloy (SMA)/carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) patch that can be used to repair cracked steel members. A total of 14 thermally-activated patches were fabricated and tested to evaluate the stability of the prestress under fatigue loading. The parameters considered in this study are the prestress level in the nickel-titanium-niobium SMA wires and the applied force range. An empirical model to predict the degradation of the prestress is also presented. The results indicate that patches for which the maximum applied loads in a fatigue cycle did not cause debonding of the SMA wires from the CFRP sustained two million loading cycles with less than 20% degradation of the prestress.

  6. Testicular atrophy in the spontaneously diabetic BB Wistar rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J. R.; Yates, A. J.; Sharma, H. M.; Shim, C.; Tigner, R. L.; Thibert, P.

    1982-01-01

    Complete gross and microscopic postmortem examinations were performed on 100 BB Wistar diabetic rats, 27 BB Wistar nondiabetic siblings, and 41 Wistar rats, and the incidence of testicular lesions was tabulated. Testicular atrophy was the predominant finding in all three groups of rats, but atrophy occurred at a much younger age in the diabetic rats. There was a strong relationship between the duration of diabetes and the presence of atrophy, which was stronger than the relationship between age and atrophy. The testicular atrophy observed in the diabetic rats was morphologically similar to the senile testicular atrophy in the nondiabetic rats. Histologic findings that were associated with increasing severity of atrophy were multinucleated giant cells in the lumens of seminiferous tubules, increased interstitial connective tissue, Leydig cell hyperplasia, and thickening of the tunica albuginea. Testicular atrophy has also been reported in human diabetics. Therefore, the BB Wistar rat may be a useful model for investigating this aspect of diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7091303

  7. Molecular events in skeletal muscle during disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandarian, Susan C.; Stevenson, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular processes underlying skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse. Because the processes involved with muscle wasting due to illness are similar to disuse, this literature is used for comparison. Areas that are ripe for further study and that will advance our understanding of muscle atrophy are suggested.

  8. Large size superelastic SMA bars: heat treatment strategy, mechanical property and seismic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Cheng; Liu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study on the mechanical performance of large size superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) bars, with the main focus given to their potential applications for seismic-resistant connections. A series of practical issues, including heat treatment, mechanical property assessment, and connection design/evaluation, were discussed aiming to benefit both material and civil engineering communities. The study commenced with a detailed discussion on the heat treatment strategy for SMA bars and the resulting mechanical properties including strength/stiffness, self-centring ability, energy dissipation, and fractural resistance. It was observed that the mechanical performance of the bars were quite sensitive to both annealing temperature and duration, and size effect was also evident, resulting in different appropriate heat treatment procedures for the bars with varying diameters. The optimally heat-treated SMA bars were machined to the bolt form and were then used for two types of practical self-centring connections, namely, connection with all SMA bars and that with combined angles and SMA bars. Through conducting full-scale tests, both connections were shown to have stable and controllable hysteretic responses till 5% loading drift. Up to 3% drift, the self-centring performance was satisfactory for both connection types, but beyond that the presence of the angles could lead to accumulated residual rotation. Importantly, for both connections, the deformation was accommodated by the SMA bolts or angles, whereas no plastic deformation was observed at any other structural members. This confirmed the feasibility of using such connections for highly resilient structures where minimal repair work is required after earthquakes.

  9. Automated measurements of cerebral atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hageleit, U; Will, C H; Seidel, D

    1987-01-01

    An automated method of measuring cerebral atrophy is introduced. Using this method we studied patients with multiple sclerosis and a control group showing premature cerebral atrophy in multiple sclerosis (P = 1,32 x 10(-8) for male and P = 3,6 x 10(-14) for female). There was only a weak correlation between cerebral atrophy and psychological deficits. Multivariate analysis did not show any significant correlation between cerebral atrophy, duration of disease, clinical manifestations and progression of disease. We conclude that our method to measure cerebral atrophy is more accurate and less time-consuming than the use of linear indices. It might be appropriate for further investigations in evaluating atrophic processes in cerebro-vascular, degenerative and exogen-toxic disease of brain.

  10. Indices of Regional Brain Atrophy: Formulae and Nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Manuel; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-08-01

    The pattern of brain atrophy helps to discriminate normal age-related changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Albeit indices of regional brain atrophy have proven to be a parameter useful in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of some neurodegenerative diseases, indices of absolute regional atrophy still have some important limitations. We propose using indices of relative atrophy for representing how the volume of a given region of interest (ROI) changes over time in comparison to changes in global brain measures over the same time. A second problem in morphometric studies is terminology. There is a lack of systematization naming indices and the same measure can be named with different terms by different research groups or imaging softwares. This limits the understanding and discussion of studies. In this technological report, we provide a general description on how to compute indices of absolute and relative regional brain atrophy and propose a standardized nomenclature. PMID:26261753

  11. Indices of Regional Brain Atrophy: Formulae and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of brain atrophy helps to discriminate normal age-related changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Albeit indices of regional brain atrophy have proven to be a parameter useful in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of some neurodegenerative diseases, indices of absolute regional atrophy still have some important limitations. We propose using indices of relative atrophy for representing how the volume of a given region of interest (ROI) changes over time in comparison to changes in global brain measures over the same time. A second problem in morphometric studies is terminology. There is a lack of systematization naming indices and the same measure can be named with different terms by different research groups or imaging softwares. This limits the understanding and discussion of studies. In this technological report, we provide a general description on how to compute indices of absolute and relative regional brain atrophy and propose a standardized nomenclature. PMID:26261753

  12. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  13. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge.

    PubMed

    Cash, David M; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Jack, Clifford R; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Collins, D Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R; Yushkevich, Paul A; Malone, Ian B; Fox, Nick C; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-12-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated "direct" measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  14. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge.

    PubMed

    Cash, David M; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Jack, Clifford R; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Collins, D Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R; Yushkevich, Paul A; Malone, Ian B; Fox, Nick C; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-12-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated "direct" measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  15. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cash, David M.; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O.; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Collins, D. Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K.; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Malone, Ian B.; Fox, Nick C.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated “direct” measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  16. Optic atrophy due to Curvularia lunata mucocoele.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tai; Goldschlager, Tony; Mott, Nigel; Robertson, Tom; Campbell, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on the case of a 57-year-old male who presented with poor vision of his right eye. He had right optic nerve atrophy secondary to neural compression by a mucocoele in the pituitary fossa. The patient underwent transphenoidal resection of the mucocoele. Microbiology revealed Curvularia lunata and Enterobacter aerogenes present in the specimen. He was treated with liposomal Amphotericin B and meropenem. Assessment of vision post-operatively demonstrated improvement in his visual acuity. On reviewing the published literature, this case was found to be the first in which Curvularia had caused optic neuropathy. There have been only five previously documented reports of Curvularia causing CNS infections. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining a tissue diagnosis together with appropriate surgical and medical management in the treatment of invasive fungal disease.

  17. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Y I; Wang, P W; Gado, M H; Csernansky, J G; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal volumes of subjects with a history of major depressive episodes but currently in remission and with no known medical comorbidity were compared to matched normal controls by using volumetric magnetic resonance images. Subjects with a history of major depression had significantly smaller left and right hippocampal volumes with no differences in total cerebral volumes. The degree of hippocampal volume reduction correlated with total duration of major depression. In addition, large (diameter > or = 4.5 mm)-hippocampal low signal foci (LSF) were found within the hippocampus, and their number also correlated with the total number of days depressed. These results suggest that depression is associated with hippocampal atrophy, perhaps due to a progressive process mediated by glucocorticoid neurotoxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8632988

  18. Steroids and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2005-06-15

    In this review, we focus on different pathogenetic mechanisms of corticosteroids that induce short- and long-term brain volume fluctuations in a variety of systemic conditions and disorders, as well as on corticosteroid-induced immunomodulatory, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory mechanisms that contribute to the slowdown of brain atrophy progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It appears that chronic low-dose treatment with corticosteroids may contribute to irreversible loss of brain tissue in a variety of autoimmune diseases. This side effect of steroid therapy is probably mediated by steroid-induced protein catabolism mechanism. Evidence is mounting that high-dose corticosteroids may induce reversible short-term brain volume changes due to loss of intracellular water and reduction of abnormal vascular permeability, without there having been axonal loss. Other apoptotic and selective inhibiting mechanisms have been proposed to explain the nature of corticosteroid-induced brain volume fluctuations. It has been shown that chronic use of high dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) in patients with MS may limit brain atrophy progression over the long-term via different immunological mechanisms, including downregulation of adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, decreased cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion, decreased autoreactive T-cell-mediated inflammation and T-cell apoptosis induction, blood-brain barrier closure, demyelination inhibition and, possibly, remyelination promotion. Studies in nonhuman primates have confirmed that short-term brain volume fluctuations may be induced by corticosteroid treatment, but that they are inconsistent, potentially reversible and probably dependent upon individual susceptibility to the effects of corticosteroids. Further longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms contributing to brain volume fluctuations in autoimmune diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  19. Specific profiles of neurocognitive and reading functions in a sample of 42 Italian boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    A group of 42 Italian boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy was compared with a control group of 10 boys with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Osteogenesis Imperfecta on tests assessing general intellectual ability, language, neuropsychological functions, and reading skills with the aim of describing a comprehensive profile of the various functions and investigating their interrelationships. The influence of general intellectual level on performance was analyzed. Further, correlations between various neuropsychological measures and language performances were computed for the group with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, as well as the correlations between reading scores and other cognitive and linguistic measures. A general lowering in VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ scores was found to characterize the group with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Expressive language skills were within the normal range, while syntactic and grammatical comprehension were significantly impaired. The presence of below-average reading performances was further confirmed. However, unlike previous studies on irregular orthographies, the present results show that (a) the mild reading difficulties found in the sample essentially concern speed rather than accuracy; (b) they concern word rather than nonword reading; (c) lower reading performances are related to lower scores in general IQ; (d) no correlations emerge with phonological abilities, verbal short-term memory, or working memory, but rather with long-term memory and lexical skills. This may suggest that language-specific effects modulate the cognitive expressions of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and raises the possibility that the dysfunctions underlying the reading difficulties observed in affected readers of regular orthographies involve different neurocognitive systems than the cortico-cerebellar circuits usually invoked.

  20. Crack-closing of cement mortar beams using NiTi cold-drawn SMA short fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Hee Sun; Jung, Chungsung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, crack-closing tests of mortar beams reinforced by shape memory alloy (SMA) short fibers were performed. For this purpose, NiTi SMA fibers with a diameter of 0.965 mm and a length of 30 mm were made from SMA wires of 1.0 mm diameter by cold drawing. Four types of SMA fibers were prepared, namely, straight and dog-bone-shaped fiber and the two types of fibers with paper wrapping in the middle of the fibers. The paper provides an unbonded length of 15 mm. For bending tests, six types of mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B×H×L) were prepared. The SMA fibers were placed at the bottom center of the beams along with an artificial crack of 10 mm depth and 1 mm thickness. This study investigated the influence of SMA fibers on the flexural strength of the beams from the measured force- deflection curves. After cracking, the beams were heated at the bottom by fire to activate the SMA fibers. Then, the beams recovered the deflection, and the cracks were closed. This study evaluated crack-closing capacity using the degree of crack recovery and deflection-recovery factor. The first factor is estimated from the crack-width before and after crack-closing, and the second one is obtained from the downward deflection due to loading and the upward deflection due to the closing force of the SMA fibers.