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Sample records for musculoskeletal disorders quality

  1. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    PubMed

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between productivity, quality and musculoskeletal disorder risk among deboning workers in a Chilean salmon industry.

    PubMed

    Ilardi, Juan S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this ergonomic investigation is to establish a relationship between quality, productivity and risk of musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) in manual bone-removal process in the salmon fish industry. The method consists in a follow up study of 14 workers in a lane that processes salmon steak. Time between each steak (work cycle), quality of the steak's meat through inspection of deepness and length of the gapping generated by the manual bone-removal process and risk for musculoskeletal disorders through OCRA method were considered for this study. IMC and musculoskeletal Nordic Questionnaire of Kourinka were applied to the workers evaluated. Fourteen women worker's completed the evaluation, age 37.67 ± 8.1, with 65.27 ± 34.41 months of experience, with an IMC of 27.18 ± 3.87 (1.52 ± 0.057 meters of height) at the time of the evaluation. Time for deboning per steak averaged 38 ± 14 seconds with 68.33 ± 14.79 steaks per hour per worker. In quality terms, 74% of the steaks were qualified as "premium steaks" and 26% as "grade or industrial" (lower category and cheapest price). OCRA index for the right hand average 13.79 ± 4.59 and 3.59 ± 0.41 for the left hand. From Nordic questionnaire 80% of the workers manifested musculoskeletal symptoms in the right hand/wrist, followed up by shoulder with 60% of the workers and arm/elbow with over 50%. There was no statistically significant relationship between productivity and quality of the steak after manual bone removal process and between quality and MSD risk. However, there was a statistically significant relationship between productivity and MSD risk (p<0.05). Discussion around the results allows to see complementary results that did have strong correlation between MSD risk and the presence of lower grade salmon steaks and between areas that present musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and the intensity of the MSS (p<0.05). The results showed that further research is needed to validate these relationships, due to

  3. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Peate, W F

    1994-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders of the workplace include the acute, cumulative and chronic injuries or illnesses of the soft tissues which are caused by mechanical stress, strain, sprain, vibration, inflammation, or irritation. The successful management of occupational musculoskeletal disorders must account for workplace conditions (ergonomics and work practices), psychosocial factors, diagnostic uncertainties, and the need for active modalities (exercises and a progressive increase in activities of daily living), rather than passive (bed rest and traction). Although most occupational musculoskeletal disorders respond to conservative measures such as ice or heat, protective devices such as, neutral splints for carpal tunnel syndrome, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and progressive strengthening, resolution may take months. Prevention is often more important than treatment, and may entail workplace revisions and special worker training. Worker selection programs--strength testing, pre-placement radiographs, and inquiries about prior low back pain--have poor predictive value.

  4. Health-related quality of life and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: after compared to before short-term group-based aqua-exercises

    PubMed Central

    Enblom, Anna; Wicher, Martin; Nordell, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders after participation in group-based aqua-exercising, compared to before participation. Physiotherapists instructed group-based aqua-exercising for 30 min twice a week for 8 weeks in 39 patients (81% women, mean age 55 ± 12 years), with musculoskeletal disorders located in the back (28%), neck (17%), general myalgia (21%), lower extremities (9%), shoulder (7%) and multiple/other regions (18%). Before and after the aqua-exercising, physiotherapists assessed patients’ musculoskeletal function categorized using Goal Attainment Scaling, and HRQoL was measured using EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). The median EQ-5D score was 0.36 (25th–75th percentiles 0.09–0.69) at the start, and after the intervention improved to 0.62 (0.09–0.73) (p = 0.038). The EQ-5D score and musculoskeletal function improved in 49% (EQ-5D) and 34% (physiotherapist assessment), were stable in 33% and 63%, and worsened in 18% and 7% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, comparable with improvements previously seen after more time-consuming exercise periods, patients with musculoskeletal disorders had improved HRQoL after 8 weeks of aqua-exercising compared to before exercising. This uncontrolled feasibility study does not reveal whether this was the result of aqua-exercising. The effects and costs need to be evaluated in randomized controlled studies. PMID:28251037

  5. Health-related quality of life and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: after compared to before short-term group-based aqua-exercises.

    PubMed

    Enblom, Anna; Wicher, Martin; Nordell, Therese

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and musculoskeletal function in patients with musculoskeletal disorders after participation in group-based aqua-exercising, compared to before participation. Physiotherapists instructed group-based aqua-exercising for 30 min twice a week for 8 weeks in 39 patients (81% women, mean age 55 ± 12 years), with musculoskeletal disorders located in the back (28%), neck (17%), general myalgia (21%), lower extremities (9%), shoulder (7%) and multiple/other regions (18%). Before and after the aqua-exercising, physiotherapists assessed patients' musculoskeletal function categorized using Goal Attainment Scaling, and HRQoL was measured using EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). The median EQ-5D score was 0.36 (25th-75th percentiles 0.09-0.69) at the start, and after the intervention improved to 0.62 (0.09-0.73) (p = 0.038). The EQ-5D score and musculoskeletal function improved in 49% (EQ-5D) and 34% (physiotherapist assessment), were stable in 33% and 63%, and worsened in 18% and 7% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, comparable with improvements previously seen after more time-consuming exercise periods, patients with musculoskeletal disorders had improved HRQoL after 8 weeks of aqua-exercising compared to before exercising. This uncontrolled feasibility study does not reveal whether this was the result of aqua-exercising. The effects and costs need to be evaluated in randomized controlled studies.

  6. Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gheno, Ramon; Cepparo, Juan M.; Rosca, Cristina E.; Cotten, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most common problems affecting the elderly. The resulting loss of mobility and physical independence can be particularly devastating in this population. The aim of this article is to present some of the most frequent musculoskeletal disorders of the elderly, such as fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, microcrystal disorders, infections, and tumors. PMID:22919553

  7. Musculoskeletal Disorders among Cosmetologists

    PubMed Central

    Tsigonia, Alexandra; Tanagra, Dimitra; Linos, Athena; Merekoulias, Georgios; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the relationships between physical, psychosocial, and individual characteristics and different endpoints of low back, neck, shoulder, hand/wrist and knee musculoskeletal complaints among cosmetologists in Athens, Greece. The study population consisted of 95 female and seven male beauty therapists (response rate 90%) with a mean age and duration of employment of 38 and 16 years, respectively. Neck pain was the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 58% of the subjects, while hand/wrist and low back complaints resulted more frequently in self-reported consequences (chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism). Significant relationships were found between self-reported physical risk factors like prolonged sitting, use of vibrating tools, reaching far and awkward body postures and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at various body sites. Among psychosocial variables co-worker support and skill discretion seem to be the most important reflecting organizational problems and cognitive-behavioral aspects. The study results also suggest that effective intervention strategies most likely have to take into account both ergonomic improvements and organizational aspects. PMID:20049238

  8. Musculoskeletal disorders: OWAS review

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GALÁN, Marta; PÉREZ-ALONSO, José; CALLEJÓN-FERRE, Ángel-Jesús; LÓPEZ-MARTÍNEZ, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) is very important in the world. Governments and companies are the most interested. The objective of the present work is to review the literature on the applications of the OWAS method in the diverse sectors or fields of knowledge and countries from its publication to March 2017. The use of OWAS method has been classified by categories of knowledge, by country and by year. The search was made by selecting only the main collection of the Web of Science. This was selected by the option “Advanced search” using the term OWAS (ts=OWAS) for the time period of 1900 to 2017. A total of 166 results were found, consisting of conference papers and articles in scientific journals. In conclusion, the OWAS has been applied mainly in two sectors: “Manufacturing industries” and “Healthcare and Social assistance activities”. This method needs to be complemented with other indirect or direct methods. Also, whenever the OWAS has been used, whether individually or together with other methods, musculoskeletal disorders risks have been detected, this perhaps being an indicator to review the evaluation parameters because overestimating the risk. PMID:28484144

  9. [Musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Christophe; Tourne, Mathias

    2007-06-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a major area of concern in the occupational world. The agricultural industry is particularly affected: 93 percent of occupational diseases in agriculture are MSD. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in one third of the cases. Shoulder is the second most common location. The most affected occupational areas are meat production, viticulture, market gardening, horticulture and small animal farming. This MSD phenomenon, of multifactorial origin, which has been amplifying for two decades, has led to some consensus in terms of definition and prevention strategy. The aim is to identify, limit or even suppress risk factors through worker training as well as through actions related to work organization. Regarding occupational health and safety in agriculture, two fronts of progress have been mentioned: the creation of a statistic observatory of MSD (disease, occupational area and cost) and the assessment of prevention activities. Finally, a new issue is being discussed: sustainable prevention of MSD.

  10. Associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders, quality of life, and workplace stress in physical therapists

    PubMed Central

    BAE, Young-Hyeon; MIN, Kyoung Sam

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), quality of life (QoL), and workplace stress among physical therapists (PTs) in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were given to 855 PTs. Variables examined included general characteristics, WMSDs, QoL, and workplace stress. Of the 788 PTs who responded, 745 (94.5%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the shoulder (23.3%), and the most reported number of body sites affected by WMSDs was one (50.9%). QoL was significantly improved (p<0.05) among PTs over 39 years old, who had 10–15 years of professional experience, worked in general/university hospitals, and had only one site affected by WMSDs. Factors influencing QoL included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, presence/absence of WMSDs, working venues, workplace stress, and age. Factors affecting workplace stress included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, QoL, work hours, and gender. The results showed a high prevalence of WMSDs among PTs in South Korea, and this negatively affected both QoL and workplace stress. PMID:26860785

  11. Associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders, quality of life, and workplace stress in physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Min, Kyoung Sam

    2016-08-05

    This study was performed to determine the associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), quality of life (QoL), and workplace stress among physical therapists (PTs) in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were given to 855 PTs. Variables examined included general characteristics, WMSDs, QoL, and workplace stress. Of the 788 PTs who responded, 745 (94.5%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the shoulder (23.3%), and the most reported number of body sites affected by WMSDs was one (50.9%). QoL was significantly improved (p<0.05) among PTs over 39 years old, who had 10-15 years of professional experience, worked in general/university hospitals, and had only one site affected by WMSDs. Factors influencing QoL included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, presence/absence of WMSDs, working venues, workplace stress, and age. Factors affecting workplace stress included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, QoL, work hours, and gender. The results showed a high prevalence of WMSDs among PTs in South Korea, and this negatively affected both QoL and workplace stress.

  12. Musculoskeletal disorders and their influence on the quality of life of the dockworker: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Maitê Peres; Schmidt, Lídia Garcia; Soares, Maria Cristina Flores

    2016-02-15

    Dockworkers are subjected to intense physical labor which leads to frequent occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. This study aims to measure the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) of temporary dockworkers and its influence on their quality of life. This was a cross-sectional study developed with temporary dockworkers in Brazil. Recruitment was done by inviting workers when they presented themselves for work at the trade union. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and the Short-Form Health Survey were used. The association between the outcome and the different investigated factors was analyzed through Poisson Regression with robust variance. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the data from the Short-Form Health Survey scale among the groups both with and without work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The sample was composed of 318 temporary dockworkers with a mean age of 48 years. WMSD prevalence was 37.4%. WMSD was associated with not practicing physical activity (PR = 2.03; p = 0.005), participation in housework (PR = 1.88; p = 0.029), taking care of preschool children (PR = 1.65; p <  0.000) and handling heavy objects (PR = 1.83; p = 0.007). The lumbar spine was the most frequently mentioned area of the body (22.5%) in the WMSD analysis. Workers without WMSD had higher (p <  0.00) quality of life scale scores in relation to functional capacity, physical and social aspects, pain and vitality. The results highlight the relevance of developing action plans regarding the needs of this specific population of workers, especially concerning the reduction of risk factors.

  13. Environmental discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Elovainio, M; De Nardis, I; Heponiemi, T; Bergamaschi, A

    2011-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the most common occupational disease in Europe, with high prevalence among hospital workers. Both environmental and psychosocial work factors may impact significantly on the development and exacerbation of MSDs. To evaluate whether environmental factors at work are associated with MSDs in hospital workers and to investigate potential interactions between environmental and psychosocial risk factors in the workplace that are associated with MSDs. A cross-sectional investigation was performed using the Nordic questionnaire to assess MSDs, the IAQ/MM-040 indoor air questionnaire for environmental factors, the demand-control model for job strain and the Goldberg questionnaire for anxiety and depression. The association between environmental factors and MSDs was studied using logistic regression analysis. In addition, the interactions of environmental factors with strain, anxiety and depression for MSDs were examined. Environmental complaints were associated with MSDs. The strongest associations were found between temperature complaints (OR 2.73), noise and light complaints (OR 2.22), other environmental complaints (OR 3.12) and upper limb disorders. A significant interaction between temperature complaints and strain for upper limb disorders (F = 9.52, P < 0.05) was found. To prevent MSDs, a multi-level approach is needed, including environmental measures and interventions directed to both psychosocial and organizational factors.

  14. Age, physical inactivity, obesity, health conditions, and health-related quality of life among patients receiving conservative management for musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    McPhail, Steven M; Schippers, Mandy; Marshall, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal conditions and insufficient physical activity have substantial personal and economic costs among contemporary aging societies. This study examined the age distribution, comorbid health conditions, body mass index (BMI), self-reported physical activity levels, and health-related quality of life of patients accessing ambulatory hospital clinics for musculoskeletal disorders. The study also investigated whether comorbidity, BMI, and self-reported physical activity were associated with patients’ health-related quality of life after adjusting for age as a potential confounder. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in three ambulatory hospital clinics for musculoskeletal disorders. Participants (n=224) reported their reason for referral, age, comorbid health conditions, BMI, physical activity levels (Active Australia Survey), and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D). Descriptive statistics and linear modeling were used to examine the associations between age, comorbidity, BMI, intensity and duration of physical activity, and health-related quality of life. Results The majority of patients (n=115, 51.3%) reported two or more comorbidities. In addition to other musculoskeletal conditions, common comorbidities included depression (n=41, 18.3%), hypertension (n=40, 17.9%), and diabetes (n=39, 17.4%). Approximately one-half of participants (n=110, 49.1%) self-reported insufficient physical activity to meet minimum recommended guidelines and 150 (67.0%) were overweight (n=56, 23.2%), obese (n=64, 28.6%), severely obese (n=16, 7.1%), or very severely obese (n=14, 6.3%), with a higher proportion of older patients affected. A generalized linear model indicated that, after adjusting for age, self-reported physical activity was positively associated (z=4.22, P<0.001), and comorbidities were negatively associated (z=−2.67, P<0.01) with patients’ health-related quality of life. Conclusion Older patients were more frequently affected by

  15. Musculoskeletal disorders among Irish farmers.

    PubMed

    Osborne, A; Blake, C; McNamara, J; Meredith, D; Phelan, J; Cunningham, C

    2010-12-01

    Farming is an occupation that predisposes individuals to health problems including musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There is limited research regarding MSDs among farmers especially in Ireland. To establish the prevalence of MSDs, identify the most commonly affected body regions and to explore what factors may influence the development of the most common MSDs among farmers in Ireland. A questionnaire survey of Irish farmers was conducted. The study sample comprised 600 farmers (100 farmers from each of the six main farm enterprise systems in Ireland). Of the 600 farmers, 56% had experienced a MSD in the previous year. The most commonly experienced MSDs were back pain (37%) and neck/shoulder pain (25%). Other MSDs experienced in the previous year included knee pain (9%), hand-wrist-elbow pain (9%), ankle/foot pain (9%) and hip pain (8%). Overall, MSDs were more common in farmers working longer hours (P < 0.05). Back pain was more prevalent in full-time farmers (P < 0.05), while prevalence of hip pain was greater in farmers who were older (P < 0.01), full time (P < 0.05), farming for longer (P < 0.01) and working for longer hours (P < 0.01). Farm enterprise was not a factor in influencing the development of MSDs. These findings suggest that the number of hours worked by farmers, rather than enterprise specific tasks render farmers more susceptible to MSDs. Further investigation is needed to explore risk factors in the development of MSDs.

  16. Quality of life assessment in musculo-skeletal health.

    PubMed

    Beaudart, Charlotte; Biver, Emmanuel; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René

    2017-06-29

    Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy. Improvement of quality of life should be one of the priorities of any interventions to prevent and treat musculoskeletal disorders in the ageing population. Two main approaches, namely generic and disease-specific instruments, can be applied to measure health-related quality of life. Among the generic tools available in scientific literature, the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and the Euroqol five item questionnaire (EQ-5D) are two of the most popular questionnaires used to quantify the health related quality of life in people with musculoskeletal disorders. However, because generic tools may not always be able to detect subtle effects of a specific condition on quality of life, a specific tool is highly valuable. Specific tools improve the ability to clinically characterize quality of life in subjects with a specific musculoskeletal disorder, as well as the capacity to assess changes over time in the QoL of these subjects. The recent development of specific tools should help to validate preventive and therapeutic interventions in this field.

  17. [Musculoskeletal disorders in the offshore oil industry].

    PubMed

    Morken, Tone; Tveito, Torill H; Torp, Steffen; Bakke, Ashild

    2004-10-21

    Musculoskeletal disorders are important causes of sick leave and disability among Norwegian offshore petroleum workers. More knowledge and interventions are needed in order to prevent this. In this review we consider prevalence and risk factors among offshore petroleum workers and point to the need for more research. Literature searches on ISI Web of Science and PubMed were supplemented by reports from Norwegian offshore industry companies and the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. Few studies were found on musculoskeletal disorders among offshore petroleum workers. The disorders are widespread, particularly among catering, construction and drilling personnel. It is not clear whether the prevalence is different from that among onshore workers. Risk factors are physical stressors and fast pace of work. Among catering personnel, these disorders are important causes of loss of the required health certificate but we could not identify any review of causes in the offshore industry generally. More scientific studies are needed on musculoskeletal disorders as comparisons of prevalence and risk factors for offshore and onshore workers may point to more effective interventions. Better knowledge of the causes of loss of the health certificate may contribute to preventing early retirement. Interventions to prevent these disorders should be evaluated by controlled intervention studies.

  18. Common Occupational Disorders: Asthma, COPD, Dermatitis, and Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bepko, Jennifer; Mansalis, Katherine

    2016-06-15

    An occupational illness is an event or exposure that occurs in the workplace that causes or contributes to a condition or worsens a preexisting condition. If an occupational disorder is suspected, a directed history should be taken with particular attention to establishing a temporal relationship of symptoms and exposure at work. Occupational asthma is the most prevalent occupational lung disorder in industrialized countries and presents with classic asthma symptoms (cough, difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing). Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been linked with exposure to nonspecific vapors, gases, dusts, fumes, and cigarette smoke. Occupational contact dermatitis is the most common dermal exposure. It can be caused by exposure to a variety of agents, including primary irritants or sensitizers, physical agents, mechanical trauma, and biologic agents. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders include many common repetitive injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome and medial or lateral epicondylitis. Treatment of occupational disorders is generally the same as for nonoccupational disorders. Ideally, the exposure should be controlled to protect the worker. The impact of an occupational injury reaches beyond lost wages and can have a negative impact on quality of life.

  19. Preferred 11 different job rotation types in automotive company and their effects on productivity, quality and musculoskeletal disorders: comparison between subjective and actual scores by workers' age.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In Sik; Jeong, Byung Yong; Jeong, Ji Hyun

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates workers' favoured rotation types by their age and compares means between subjective and actual scores on productivity, quality and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The subjects of research were 422 assembly line units in Hyundai Motor Company. The survey of 422 units focused on the workers' preference for 11 different rotation types and subjective scores for each type's perceived benefits, both by the workers' age. Then, actual scores on production-related indices were traced over a five-year period. The results suggest that different rotation types lead to different results in productivity, product quality and MSDs. Workers tend to perceive job rotation as a helpful method to enhance satisfaction, productivity and product quality more so than the actual production data suggests. Job rotation was especially effective in preventing MSDs for workers aged under 45, while its effects were not clear for the workers aged 45 years or older. Practitioner's Summary: This research presents appropriate rotation type for different age groups. Taking workers' age into account, administrators can use the paper's outcomes to select and implement the suitable rotation type to attain specific goals such as enhancing productivity, improving product quality or reducing MSDs.

  20. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. Methods In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2–6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6–11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Conclusion Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered. PMID:26106512

  1. Role of yoga and physical activity in work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dentists

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain is one of the occupational hazards in dentists. Aims: To find the prevalence and severity of musculoskeletal pain in dentists, to compare musculoskeletal pain among dentists practicing yoga, those practicing physical activities, and those without any physical activity, and also to know the effects of sex, age, and workload on musculoskeletal pain. Materials and Methods: A self-reporting work-related questionnaire and the Nordic questionnaire for analysis of musculoskeletal disorders were given to graduated dentists attending Indian dental conference in Mumbai, to know the musculoskeletal pain experienced in the last 12 months and feedback was obtained from 220 dentists. Results: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dentists was 34.5%. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 10.5%, 21.7%, and 45.6% in dentists with regular yoga practice, other physical activity, and no physical activity, respectively. There was statistically significant difference in the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among dentists who were practicing yoga when compared with those in no regular activity group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there was significant role of physical activity on the quality and quantity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders experienced by dentists. Yoga was found to be more effective than other modes of physical activities. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems in dentists, with an emphasis on larger sample sizes and correlating other factors like age and sex of the dentists, duration of practice, years of practicing yoga, and working hours per week. PMID:26236679

  2. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  3. Upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Occhionero, Vincenzo; Korpinen, Leena; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2014-01-01

    The literature on upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (UL-MSD) in different groups of healthcare workers was reviewed: 65 relevant studies were collected. In dentists, the neck was the most frequently affected segment, with prevalences up to 73% and exceeding 50% in 7 out of 12 studies. In dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, the hand/wrist had the highest prevalence in the majority of the studies. In nurses, the most seriously affected anatomic sites were the neck and shoulders. Physiotherapists had the lowest prevalence of UL-MSD. A high prevalence of upper limb disease, mainly carpal tunnel syndrome, was reported in dentists, dental hygienists, anesthesia nurses and endoscopists. The high prevalence of upper limb disorders/diseases reported in health personnel supports the hypothesis of a significant risk in these workers. However, the possible role of biomechanical overload, as much as that of stress or other personal factors, cannot be currently assessed. Practitioner Summary: Published studies support the hypothesis of a significant risk of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare activities. The neck was the most frequently affected segment in dentists, the hand/wrist in dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, and the neck and shoulders in nurses. Lower prevalence was reported in physiotherapists. A high prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome was also observed in various healthcare activities.

  4. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in union ironworkers.

    PubMed

    Forde, Martin S; Punnett, Laura; Wegman, David H

    2005-04-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) symptoms and doctor-diagnosed musculoskeletal disorders (DDMDs) were estimated among union construction ironworkers by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Of 1996 ironworkers eligible, 1566 were contacted and 981 were interviewed. The prevalence of self-reported MSD symptoms was high for the lower back (56%), wrist/hands/fingers (40%), knees (39%), and shoulders (36%). The most common DDMDs were tendonitis (19%), ruptured disk in the back (18%), bursitis in the shoulder (15%), and carpal tunnel syndrome (12%). Generally, the prevalence of DDMDs and MSD symptoms increased with duration of employment. In age-adjusted logistic regression analyses, those who worked 25 to 35 years were more likely to have tendonitis (odds ratio [OR] 7.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.116.6), shoulder bursitis (OR 13.7, 95% CI 3.160.4), knee bursitis (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.025.1), and ruptured intervertebral back disk (OR 6.7, 95% CI 2.617.5). The effect of prior injury was also consistently high (upper extremities, OR 4.6; lower extremities OR 5.1; lower back, OR 6.0). Among workers without prior injuries, MSD symptoms were more frequent for the lower back in structural ironwork (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.12.6), and for the upper extremity in concrete reinforcement ironwork (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.22.9). These findings suggest that some musculoskeletal morbidity in construction ironworkers may be work related and thus preventable.

  5. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA) first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22433113

  6. Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 4. Musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, D L; Oh, T H; Lim, P A; Brander, V A; Biundo, J J

    2000-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights assessment and therapeutic options in the rehabilitation of patients with orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. It is part of the chapter on rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article discusses new advances in such topics as idiopathic scoliosis, nontraumatic shoulder pain, rotator cuff tendinitis, and Dupuytren's disease.

  7. [A survey on musculoskeletal disorders in physiotherapists].

    PubMed

    Carta, A; Parmigiani, F; Parrinello, G; Porru, S

    2007-01-01

    Only few studies focused on musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists (PT). The study population consisted of 50 PT and 50 clerical workers belonging to the same three rehabilitation hospitals in Northern Italy. The participants filled in a specifically designed questionnaire focused on risk factors, symptoms and diseases related to MSD. Data were self reported. Preliminary data show a significantly higher prevalence of low back symptoms (70%) and upper limb symptoms (36%) in PT than controls (16% and 4% respectively). PT had a higher prevalence of lumbar disk degeneration (20%), shoulder disorders (14%), wrist and hand tendinopathy (10%) than clerical workers (4% and 2% respectively). Both PT and clerical workers attributed their cervical symptoms to work (85% and 95% respectively). Only PT believed that low back and upper limb symptoms were work related (83% and 94% respectively). Our survey supported the findings that PT have e high prevalence of MSD. Specific preventive intervention should be applied to reduce risk of work related MSD.

  8. [Quality of life, acceptance of illness and a sense of health control in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders during the rehabilitation process].

    PubMed

    Denys, Katarzyna; Denys, Paweł; Macander, Marian; Zboralski, Krzysztof

    2015-03-01

    In medical science it is accepted that in order to determine the state of physical, mental as well as the progress of treatment, the concept of quality of life is applicable. However, the most popular use of the term is in the case of chronic diseases and particularly in the lives of those who are sick. Examples of such diseases are diseases of the musculoskeletal system and especially osteoarthritis of the knee and hip. The level of quality of life in chronic disease are also affected by psychological factors that can significantly help people in the healing process as well as acceptance of existing disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the association between quality of life, acceptance of illness and sense of control over own health in patients with chronic motor disability during the rehabilitation course. The study included 105 patients (76 women and 29 men) with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, undergoing rehabilitation at the Municipal Clinic "Lecznica" in Lodz. The study used a questionnaire in the development of their own - specifying the basic socio-demographic data subjects, the SF-36 questionnaire - evaluating the quality of life of patients, Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS BJ Felton, TA Revenson, Hinrichsen GA) in the adaptation of the Z. Juczyński and Multidimensional Scale Health Locus of Control MHLC (KA wallstone, BS wallstone, R. DeVellis) in adaptation of Z. Juczyński. The distribution of respondents by type of disease is as follows: diseases of the knee -63.81%, hip - 23.81% and knee and hip disorders - 12.38%. A similar breakdown occurs in women and men. The average level of quality of life in this population of patients was 88.63, which is not too high. Evaluation of the results of health locus of control scale laid the equal distribution of respondents, taking into account all the studied rocks. Thanks to the use of Pearson's correlation coefficient allowed the conclusion that the level of quality of life correlates positively with

  9. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Iranian Steel Workers.

    PubMed

    Aghilinejad, M; Choobineh, A R; Sadeghi, Z; Nouri, M K; Bahrami Ahmadi, A

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders in developing countries are considered as main cause of occupational disorders and disability and highly associated with socioeconomic burden to individual, organization and society in general view. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and associated risk factors among Iranian steel workers. In a cross-sectional study, 1439 questionnaires were provided from 1984 randomly selected workers of four Iranian steel industries. Data of musculoskeletal disorders was gathered by means of standardized Nordic self-reporting questionnaire. Demographic and work related data were collected into the check list. Out of 1984 individuals, 1439 questionnaires returned and mean age of study workers was 37.23±8.74 years old. Among workers, 46.3% in the past week and 61% in the last year claimed one of musculoskeletal disorders in their bodies. Lumbar, knee(s) and neck areas had the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders had significant association with the job time of work and BMI. Musculoskeletal disorders in Iranian steel industries happened in high rate. Ergonomic interventions strategies into the workplaces must be focused to eliminate environmental hazards such as apposition on the time of work and manual handling of heavy loads.

  10. An integrative approach for evaluating work related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Wricha; Amitabha, De; Iqbal, R; Gangopadhyay, S; Chandra, A M

    2012-01-01

    To develop a framework for evaluating the work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs). The proposed framework was tested on 15~jewellery manufacturing workers working at Chinchpokhli region in Mumbai, India and on 15 students studying in a management institute of Mumbai, India. The framework has been broken into three phases. Phase 1--Ergonomic-risk evaluation; Phase 2--Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation and Phase 3--Clinical examination. Ergonomic-risk evaluation determines the relationship between work relatedness and musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation tries to assess the presence of discomforts/disabilities in different body regions, through subjective evaluation tools. Ergonomic-risk evaluation involved QEC, PLIBEL and posture analysis by RULA. Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation involved administration of self reported questionnaires. Clinical examination involved muscle grading by a physiotherapist and back strength measurement. The framework suggested that ergonomic risk evaluation techniques, self reported body part questionnaires and physical measurement of physiological/biomechanical transients may have a relationship and can be used for the evaluation of work related musculoskeletal disorders. The proposed integrative approach will help in developing stage wise intervention strategies for work related musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. [Aging at work and musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, E; Colombini, D

    2000-01-01

    By means of a critical review of the international literature and of their own published experiences, the Authors discuss the influence of the "age" factor on work related musculoskeletal disorders of the spine and upper limbs. Regarding the spine, the lumbosacral spine in particular, there is evidence (both in relation to pathways and from epidemiological data) of the influence of age in determining a progressive increase in the occurrence of spondyloarthropathy with clear radiological signs. For upper limb disorders the influence of the "age" factor is still under debate and in any case does not seem of great importance. As far prevention is concerned for elderly workers subject to fixed postures and repetitive movements of the upper limbs it seems sufficient, to adopt the general measures used for the whole working population. However, specific measures should be adopted for elderly workers exposed to manual material handling (MMH). These consist in using reference values for the recommended weight that are lower than those adopted for younger workers (aged 18-45 years) and in implementing specific programs of active health surveillance.

  12. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders among apprentice construction workers.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Linda A; Rosecrance, John C; Anton, Dan; Cook, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major cause of work-related disability and lost-time illnesses for many occupational groups. This study determined the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among young construction workers. A symptom and job factors survey was self-administered to 996 construction apprentices. Prevalence was determined by the percent of positive responses to musculoskeletal symptom questions. Odds ratios and 95 percent confidence intervals were the measures of association between prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms and demographic, leisure, and job factors and were determined by logistic regression. The low back was the site most commonly reported for job-related musculoskeletal symptoms (54.4%), which was also the most common reason for seeking care from a physician (16.8%) and missing work (7.3%). Number of years worked in the construction trade was significantly associated with knee (p-trend = 0.0009) and wrist/hand (p-trend < 0.04) MSD symptoms and was suggestive of an association with low back pain (p-trend = 0.05). "Working in the same position for long periods" was the job factor identified as most problematic, with 49.7 percent of all construction apprentices rating it as a moderate/major problem contributing to musculoskeletal symptoms. Musculoskeletal symptoms are a significant problem among young construction workers at the beginning of their careers. Prevention strategies are needed early in the apprentice training program to reduce the potential disability associated with work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders.

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders in hotel restaurant workers.

    PubMed

    Chyuan, Jong-Yu Adol; Du, Chung-Li; Yeh, Wen-Yu; Li, Chung-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A variety of occupational groups have been shown to experience elevated risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). Little information on WMSD is available in hotel restaurant workers. To document the profile of WMSD in a sample of hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information regarding body site specific WMSD, pain intensity and strategies for pain relief amongst a sample of hotel restaurant workers. Among 905 restaurant workers, 785 (84%) reported experience of WMSD in the previous month, with the highest prevalence rate found for the shoulder (58%). The highest mean score for perceived pain intensity was found for the lower back/waist (2.50 points). Despite a high prevalence rate, only a small portion of those reporting WMSD (12%) considered their work capacity or activities of daily living to be affected by WMSD, and only <5% of workers with WMSD sought medical treatment. WMSD related pain is common among hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan, but it does not appear to interfere with job performance or daily living. Self-treatment and alternative therapies that have not been evaluated for effectiveness are commonly employed by hotel restaurant workers.

  14. Prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Vivian S; Decarvalho, Vivielle B F; Machado, Luciana A C; Dias, João Marcos D

    2012-05-29

    Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon that has recently challenged public healthcare systems. The knowledge of the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elders is still limited, particularly in the developing world. This systematic review aimed to investigate the prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians. A comprehensive literature search was performed in five electronic databases (from inception to January 2012) and completed by additional searches in reference lists. Two review authors independently selected the eligible studies and extracted data on participants' characteristics and rates of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. One review author extracted methodological quality data. We performed a critical synthesis of the results, which were grouped into the diagnoses "chronic musculoskeletal pain" or "specific musculoskeletal diagnoses". Twenty five studies reporting on a total of 116,091 elderly Brazilians were included. Eight studies (32%) were of high methodological quality. There was a large variation in the measure of prevalence used by individual studies and in their definition of chronic pain. Prevalence estimates reached 86% for chronic musculoskeletal pain in any location. Studies investigating multiple pain sites found the lower limb and the spine to be the most prevalent complaints (50% each). Arthritis and rheumatism (including osteoarthritis) were the most prevalent specific musculoskeletal diagnoses (9% to 40%), followed by herniated disc (6% to 27%). Despite the growth of the elderly population worldwide, high-quality research on the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in the elderly is still scarce. Future healthcare research focusing on this age group should be a priority in developing countries since their public healthcare systems are not yet fully prepared to accommodate the needs of an aging population.

  15. Prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon that has recently challenged public healthcare systems. The knowledge of the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elders is still limited, particularly in the developing world. This systematic review aimed to investigate the prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed in five electronic databases (from inception to January 2012) and completed by additional searches in reference lists. Two review authors independently selected the eligible studies and extracted data on participants’ characteristics and rates of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. One review author extracted methodological quality data. We performed a critical synthesis of the results, which were grouped into the diagnoses “chronic musculoskeletal pain” or “specific musculoskeletal diagnoses”. Results Twenty five studies reporting on a total of 116,091 elderly Brazilians were included. Eight studies (32%) were of high methodological quality. There was a large variation in the measure of prevalence used by individual studies and in their definition of chronic pain. Prevalence estimates reached 86% for chronic musculoskeletal pain in any location. Studies investigating multiple pain sites found the lower limb and the spine to be the most prevalent complaints (50% each). Arthritis and rheumatism (including osteoarthritis) were the most prevalent specific musculoskeletal diagnoses (9% to 40%), followed by herniated disc (6% to 27%). Conclusions Despite the growth of the elderly population worldwide, high-quality research on the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in the elderly is still scarce. Future healthcare research focusing on this age group should be a priority in developing countries since their public healthcare systems are not yet fully prepared to accommodate the needs of an aging population. PMID:22642899

  16. Health care utilization for musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Crystal; Canizares, Mayilee; Davis, Aileen M; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2010-02-01

    To examine patterns of ambulatory care and hospital utilization for people with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including arthritis and related conditions, bone and spinal conditions, trauma and related conditions, and unspecified MSDs. Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database for ambulatory care physician visits, the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System database for day (outpatient) surgeries and emergency department visits, and the Discharge Abstract Database for hospital discharges were used to examine health care utilization for MSDs in fiscal year 2006-2007. Person visit rates (number of people with physician visits or hospital encounters per population) were calculated. Overall, 22.3% of Ontario's population (2.8 million persons) saw a physician for an MSD in ambulatory settings. Person visit rates were highest for arthritis and related conditions (107.7 per 1,000 population), followed by trauma and related conditions (89.6 per 1,000 population), unspecified MSDs (71.0 per 1,000 population), and bone and spinal conditions (62.4 per 1,000 population). The majority of visits were to primary care physicians, with 83.2% of those with visits for all MSDs seeing a primary care physician at least once. Overall, 33.0% of people with a physician visit for an MSD saw a specialist, with orthopedic surgeons being the most commonly consulted type of specialist. In hospital settings, person visit rates for MSDs were highest in the emergency department, followed by day surgeries and inpatient hospitalizations. The findings of our study highlight the magnitude of health care utilization for MSDs and the central role of primary care physicians in the management of these conditions.

  17. Best practices for preventing musculoskeletal disorders in masonry: stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Entzel, Pamela; Albers, Jim; Welch, Laura

    2007-09-01

    Brick masons and mason tenders report a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), many of which can be prevented with changes in materials, work equipment or work practices. To explore the use of "best practices" in the masonry industry, NIOSH organized a 2-day meeting of masonry stakeholders. Attendees included 30 industry representatives, 5 health and safety researchers, 4 health/safety specialists, 2 ergonomic consultants, and 2 representatives of state workers' compensation programs. Small groups discussed ergonomic interventions currently utilized in the masonry industry, including factors affecting intervention implementation and ways to promote diffusion of interventions. Meeting participants also identified various barriers to intervention implementation, including business considerations, quality concerns, design issues, supply problems, jobsite conditions and management practices that can slow or limit intervention diffusion. To be successful, future diffusion efforts must not only raise awareness of available solutions but also address these practical concerns.

  18. Reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire for patients with musculoskeletal disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Jung, Jin-Hwa; In, Tae-Sung; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire, which was translated into Korean, for patients with musculoskeletal disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five subjects (26 males and 29 females) with musculoskeletal diseases participated in the study. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire focuses on a limited range of physical functions and includes a dysfunction index and a bother index. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, and validity was examined by correlating short musculoskeletal function assessment scores with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) score. [Results] The reliability was 0.97 for the dysfunction index and 0.94 for the bother index. Validity was established by comparison with Korean version of the SF-36. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:27799696

  19. Reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire for patients with musculoskeletal disorder.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Jung, Jin-Hwa; In, Tae-Sung; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire, which was translated into Korean, for patients with musculoskeletal disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five subjects (26 males and 29 females) with musculoskeletal diseases participated in the study. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire focuses on a limited range of physical functions and includes a dysfunction index and a bother index. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, and validity was examined by correlating short musculoskeletal function assessment scores with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) score. [Results] The reliability was 0.97 for the dysfunction index and 0.94 for the bother index. Validity was established by comparison with Korean version of the SF-36. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of musculoskeletal disorders.

  20. Prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders in active union carpenters

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, G. K.; Atterbury, M. R.; Booth-Jones, A. D.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ollila-Glenn, N.; Forrester, C.; Forst, L.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for work related musculoskeletal disorders among union carpenters. METHODS: A detailed questionnaire on musculoskeletal symptoms and work history was administered to 522 carpenters. The symptom questions assessed if carpenters experienced pain, numbness, or tingling in a particular body region. A subset of this group then received a physical examination of the upper extremities and knees. RESULTS: The study group was primarily white (94.9%) and male (97.8%) with a mean age of 42.3 years. The highest prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders cases by carpentry specialty ranged from 20%-24% for those doing drywall or ceiling, finishing or framing, and the building of concrete forms. Generally, as duration of employment increased, the prevalence of symptoms increased. An adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that the group with the longest (> or = 20 years) duration of employment in carpentry was significantly associated with work related musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulders (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 8.9), hands or wrists (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 8.4), and knees (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 9.2). Also, analyses showed that carpenters who reported that they had little or no influence over their work schedule had significant increases of work related musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulders, hips, and knees with ORs of 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2), 2.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 7.2), and 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.1), respectively. Feeling exhausted at the end of day was also a significant risk factor for work related musculoskeletal disorders of the knee (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1). Upper extremity disorders were the most prevalent work related musculoskeletal disorders reported among all carpenters. Drywall or ceiling activities involve a considerable amount of repetitive motion and awkward postures often with arms raised holding heavy dry walls in place, whereas form work is

  1. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in music students-associated musculoskeletal signs.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, A; Möller, H; Seidel, W; Rigotti, T

    2012-12-01

    Pain and overuse are common problems for musicians. Up to 80% of professional musicians suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). The prevalence rate in music students is very high as well. Sufficient data on the underlying musculoskeletal dysfunctions however is scarce. Additionally, the self-assessment of health in musicians seems to differ compared to non-musicians, which might influence their attitudes concerning preventive strategies. Evaluation of frequency of PRMD in music students, investigation of signs and symptoms in music students compared to non-music controls, comparison of self-reported health and well-being between the two groups. Prospective, cross-sectional, case control, non-randomized. Other (University volunteers). Music students in comparison to a non-music control group. Musculoskeletal examination and questionnaire of 36 volunteers of a music university and 19 volunteer students of an university of education were analyzed. The total number of musculoskeletal dysfunctions and differences between the student groups were examined. The personal pain and health self-rating were compared between music and non-music students. Eighty one percent of musicians experienced PRMD. Musicians experienced 6.19 pain regions on average compared to 4.31 of non-musicians. Musicians experiencing PRMD reported significantly (P<0.05) more pain locations than musicians without. Music students presented with nearly the double amount (8.39 versus 4.37) of musculoskeletal dysfunctions per person compared to the non-music control group. Nevertheless, musicians significantly (P<0.05) rated their health more positively than the controls. Musicians presented with more pain regions and a higher amount of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Further studies evaluating the clinical relevance and their role in the development of PRMD are warranted. Screening of musicians for musculoskeletal dysfunction may identify those musicians at increased risk. Early

  2. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic aid in bovine musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann

    2009-11-01

    In the last 15 years, ultrasonography of the bovine musculoskeletal system has become an established diagnostic method used routinely in many veterinary teaching hospitals worldwide. Ultrasonography is ideal for the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders because they are often associated with extensive soft tissue swelling and inflammatory exudation. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. Not only does ultrasonography improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis, added use of the machine helps recoup expenses.

  3. Health resort medicine in non-musculoskeletal disorders: is there evidence of its effectiveness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier-Jarmer, Marita; Kus, Sandra; Frisch, Dieter; Sabariego, Carla; Schuh, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Health resort medicine (HRM; in German: Kurortmedizin) is a field of medicine with long-lasting tradition in several European countries. A number of systematic reviews have shown the effectiveness of HRM in musculoskeletal conditions. Reviews focusing on the effectiveness of HRM in non-musculoskeletal disorders are rare. This systematic review aims to provide an overview about all types of health resort treatments applied in non-musculoskeletal conditions, to summarize evidence for its effectiveness and to assess the quality of published studies. MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge and Embase were searched for articles published between January 2002 and December 2013. We used a broad search strategy in order to find studies investigating the effects of HRM in non-musculoskeletal disorders. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed quality using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies (EPHPP-QAT). Forty-one studies (19 of them with control group) from eight countries examining the efficacy of various forms of spa treatment for 12 disease groups were included. The studies are markedly heterogeneous regarding study design, population and treatment. HRM treatment is associated with clinical improvement in diseases of the skin, respiratory, circulatory, digestive and nervous system among others. However, small samples, the lack of control groups and an insufficient follow-up often limit the generated evidence. The scientific literature of the last decade has shown that a number of non-musculoskeletal disorders are treated with different kinds of HRM. The challenge for the future will be to carry out thoroughly designed studies in larger patient populations to corroborate the impact of HRM treatment on non-musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Lysosomal storage disorders: A review of the musculoskeletal features.

    PubMed

    James, Rebecca A; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Lee, Senq-J; McGill, Jim; Adib, Navid

    2016-03-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders are a collection of progressive, multisystem disorders that frequently present in childhood. Their timely diagnosis is paramount as they are becoming increasingly treatable. Musculoskeletal manifestations often occur early in the disease course, hence are useful as diagnostics clues. Non-inflammatory joint stiffness or pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger fingers, unexplained pain crises and short stature should all prompt consideration of a lysosomal storage disorder. Recurrent ENT infections, hepatosplenomegaly, recurrent hernias and visual/hearing impairment - especially when clustered together - are important extra-skeletal features. As diagnostic and therapeutic options continue to evolve, children with lysosomal storage disorders and their families are facing more sophisticated options for screening and treatment. The aim of this article is to highlight the paediatric presentations of lysosomal storage disorders, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal features.

  5. Musculoskeletal Disorders: Addressing Disparities in Prevalence, Severity, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lisa C

    2017-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in musculoskeletal disorders have been consistently documented in research conducted both nationally and in North Carolina. These disparities represent a higher clinical need that must be met with increased access to safe and effective interventions across medical, pharmacological, and psychosocial/behavioral modalities. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  6. Musculoskeletal disorders among Thai women in construction-related work.

    PubMed

    Hanklang, Suda; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Mungarndee, Suriyaphun S

    2014-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder symptoms and its risk factors among women rebar workers. A simple random sampling method was used and data were collected by face-to-face interview and ergonomic assessment from February to March 2011. A total of 272 women rebar workers with at least 6 months' job experience participated in this study. The findings revealed that 57.7% of workers reported musculoskeletal disorder symptoms with low back and shoulders as the most common body parts affected (46.0%). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated 2 variables that are significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders: prolonged working hours (adjusted odds ratio = 7.63; 95% confidence interval = 2.06-28.31) and awkward posture (adjusted odds ratio = 43.79; 95% confidence interval = 17.09-112.20). The high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among women rebar workers suggests that an appropriate ergonomic workstation design and ergonomic training for women rebar workers are necessary.

  7. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Associated With Job Contentment in Dental Professionals: Indian Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD Method Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. Result A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Conclusion Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:24795512

  8. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (P<0.001). Of those with work-related musculoskeletal disorders, 35.5% (n=172) considered a career change for once, and 4.0% (n=19) reported having left dentistry. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  9. Risks of musculoskeletal disorders among betel quid preparers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Chen, Chih-Yong; Sumd, Shih-Bin; Yin, Hsin-I; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Betel quid chewing is common in Taiwan. The work of betel quid preparers is characterized by long hours of static work, awkward working posture and highly repetitive hand/wrist motion. However, the musculoskeletal health of betel quid preparers receives very little attention. The Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was administered, and electrogoniometers and electromyography were used in this cross-sectional study to characterize the hand/wrist motion of the subjects. Physical examinations on the thumbs and wrists of the subjects were conducted by means of Phalen's test and Finkelstein's test, respectively. Among the 225 participants, more than 95% attributed their musculoskeletal complaints to their work, and shoulder, neck, hand/wrist, and lower back discomfort were most frequently reported. More than 70% of the preparers did not seek medical treatment for their musculoskeletal problems. Based on the physical examination, 24% of the participants had suspected symptom of either carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or DeQuervain's tenosynovitis. The instrumental measurements indicated that betel quid preparation is characterized by extreme angle ranges and moderate repetition of wrist motion as well as low forceful exertion. This study concludes that betel quid preparers are a high risk group of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Future studies by electrogoniometers and detailed physical examination on betel quid preparers are needed to determine the predisposing factors for CTS. Some intervention measures to prevent MSDs and to lessen psychological stress for this group of workers are strongly suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Korean Police Personnel.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hak Young; Cho, Jae Hwan; Seok, Jong Min; Cho, Taek Sang; Jeon, Woo Jin; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate efficient, systematic management of the Korean police and to examine the status and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in Korean police officers. For police officers in special working environments, the importance of basic data is emphasized for human resources (HR) management and the prevention of industrial hazards from an industrial health care perspective. This study was conducted on police officers who visited the national police hospital and who underwent x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. The results revealed that examinations for the lower extremities and spine were most frequently conducted using x-ray, CT, and MRI. In particular, knee and lumbar examinations were most frequently conducted among all lower extremity and spine examinations, respectively.

  11. Exercise Prescriptions to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-01-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises – concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  12. Observational stress factors and musculoskeletal disorders in urban transit operators.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit A; Krause, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    Associations and pathways between observed (rather than self-reported) job stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in 66 transit operators were investigated to determine specific stressors and vulnerable body regions affected, while adjusting for physical workload. Job stressors, defined as barriers to progress with work, comprised 7 categories and the sum of stressors. Outcomes included back and neck pain, low back pain, neck pain, pain of the upper extremities and the lower extremities, and any combination of these. Stressors were significantly associated with the combined musculoskeletal disorders category (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55), back and neck pain (OR = 1.41), low back pain (OR = 1.46), and pain in the lower extremities (OR = 1.44) after controlling for confounders. Five barrier categories had at least 1 significant association with outcomes. Results provide specific intervention targets by avoiding common method variance bias.

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders among male sewing machine operators in shoemaking.

    PubMed

    Serratos-Perez, J N; Mendiola-Anda, C

    1993-07-01

    Research on the relationship between the operation of sewing machines and the appearance of musculoskeletal disorders has been conducted mainly among women working in garment or textile production, in developed countries; little is known about male sewing machine operators in other industries, in less developed countries. This study involved 143 Mexican men operating sewing machines in eight shoe factories; 132 of them operated flat-type machines, 11 column-type machines. When studied, the operators had been in this task for at least one year. The study aimed to identify the body regions more liable to develop musculoskeletal disorders and the rates both of appearance of such troubles and of sick leave resulting from them. A questionnaire was given to each worker, asking for their work history, the presence of musculoskeletal disorders at the time of the inquiry, and the frequency of sick leave during the previous 12 months; additionally, a number of workers were filmed on video and this material was then used to identify the body regions undergoing the major work demands. 47.5% of the subjects declared current musculoskeletal disorders; a statistical difference was found when the two groups were considered separately. Low back pain was the most frequent at a rate of 18.2% for both groups; the shoulder was a site of complaint for 14% of the subjects, being three times more frequent among column-machine operators; the back as a whole was mentioned also by 14% of the subjects, all of them flat-machine operators; 4.9% of the subjects complained of neck pain and again none of the column-machine operators was affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Epidemiological aspects of studying work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Tim

    2011-02-01

    There are many challenges to conducting valid epidemiological research of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and interpreting reports describing the results. In particular, these concern the basic study design, selection of subjects, measurement of exposure and outcome, control of confounding and the limitations of workers' compensation data systems. Researchers and people interested in the research results need to be aware of the major potential problems and pay careful attention to them when designing, conducting and using the results of such research.

  15. Resistance Training as a Tool for Preventing and Treating Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes; Rodrigues-da-Silva, José Messias

    2016-09-01

    The aging process is characterized by several physiological, morphological, and psychological alterations that result in a decreased functional and health status throughout the life span. Among these alterations, the loss of muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is receiving increased attention because of its association with innumerous age-related disorders, including (but not limited to) osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, low back pain, risk of fall, and disability. Regular participation in resistance training programs can minimize the musculoskeletal alterations that occur during aging, and may contribute to the health and well-being of the older population. Compelling evidence suggest that regular practice of resistance exercise may prevent and control the development of several musculoskeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, resistance training may also improve physical fitness, function, and independence in older people with musculoskeletal disorders, which may result in improved quality of the years lived. In summary, regular participation in resistance training programs plays an important role in aging and may be a preventive and therapeutic tool for several musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Regional musculoskeletal conditions: foot and ankle disorders.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Géza P; Korda, Judit; Hangody, László; Bálint, Péter V

    2003-02-01

    Foot pain is very common, especially in women, owing to inappropriate footwear. Overuse, repetitive strain and minor, easily forgettable injuries may result in chronic foot and ankle pain. Rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies and gout frequently affect the foot, often as a first presentation. Charcot's joints and foot infections are not rare in diabetes. The rheumatologist should be familiar with foot disorders, either localized or as manifestations of generalized disease. History taking, physical examination, identification of the source of pain by intra-articularly given local anaesthetics and imaging methods should be used to reveal the underlying disorder. Correct diagnosis and efficient therapy-including local steroid injections, physiotherapy, orthoses, surgery-are necessary not only for treatment but also for preventing biomechanical chain reactions. This chapter gives an overview of the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of foot pain and foot disorders caused by both local and generalized diseases.

  17. Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders among Secondary School Saudi Female Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Zuhair, Shatha Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to estimate prevalence and pattern of musculoskeletal pain disorders among secondary school Saudi female teachers in Al-Khobar area and the psychodemographic and psychosocial factors that may affect them. Material and Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted using sample of secondary schools teachers (governmental and private school) in Al-Khobar area, Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Result. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders was 79.17%. Main sites of pain were lower back (63.8%) followed by shoulder (45.4%), neck (42.1%), leg (40.0%), wrist (16.2%), and elbow joint (10.0%). Factors that showed significant relationship were type of school (p value 0.038), age (p value 0.002), weight (p value 0.007), number of children (p value 0.006), shoe type (p value 0.000), teaching years (p value 0.003), and working daily hours (p value 0.027). Conclusion. Secondary school female teachers showed high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders in most anatomic sites, namely, the back, shoulder, neck, legs, wrist, and elbow joint. Risk factors associated with significant pain were type of school, age, weight, number of children, and number of teaching years. PMID:23970968

  18. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic assessments of cleaners.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Liu, Chia-Yi; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Professional cleaning has emerged as a new industry in Taiwan in the past few years. However, information about the workload and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among these workers is still limited. This study investigated the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts and the characteristics of musculoskeletal activities of cleaning workers in Taiwan. Face-to-face interviews to collect basic information and to administer the Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire were conducted on 180 cleaners. Biaxial electrogoniometers and electromyography were used to characterize the motion and forceful exertion of 56 cleaners during work. Nearly 90% of the participants reported musculoskeletal discomfort in at least one body part due to work. Of the nine body parts examined, hand/wrist (41.7%), shoulder (41.1%), low back (37.8%), and elbow (33.3%) were most frequently reported to exhibit discomfort. Additionally, time pressure as a psychosocial risk factor was found to be associated with discomfort in several body parts. Measurements of electrogoniometry showed that wrists of many cleaners were frequently held in extreme angles of ulnar/radial deviation, leading to an increased risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Motion repetitiveness and force output during mopping and sweeping tasks were considered less influential in developing hand/wrist discomfort. Cleaners in Taiwan are a high-risk group for developing MSDs, and solutions are needed to avoid extreme motion angles of the wrists when performing cleaning tasks. Moreover, both psychosocial stress and the welfare of this group of workers deserve immediate attention from management and the government. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean string instrument players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yong; Kim, Mi-Sook; Min, Seung-Nam; Cho, Young-Jin; Choi, Junhyeok

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in players of a variety of traditional Korean classical instruments: gayageum, geomungo, ajaeng, and haegeum. A large percentage of these musicians suffer from musculoskeletal pain of various body parts. However, there has been no research regarding the extent of musculoskeletal disorders in players of these instruments. Through a focus group interview, a questionnaire was developed to investigate musculoskeletal disorders. The questionnaire consisted of four parts: demographic factors, performance factors, musculoskeletal disorder symptoms, and musculoskeletal disorder experiences. Eighty-six expert players participated in this survey. The data from the survey were analyzed by correlation analysis and chi-squared analysis. Musculoskeletal disorders symptoms and severe pain were reported in the neck, shoulder, back and knee. These problems were statistically related to height for players of the gayageum and geomungo. In addition, the musculoskeletal disorder experience of geomungo players was correlated with age and career length. The symptoms of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean music players were reported as being mostly observed in the neck, shoulder, back, and knee. In addition, these symptoms were related to various demographic factors such as age, height, career length, and hobby styles. The results of this study can be used as preliminary data for developing guidelines to prevent traditional Korean musical instrument players from developing musculoskeletal injuries.

  20. Cluster Analysis of Symptoms Among Patients with Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piligian, George; Glutting, Joseph J.; Hanlon, Alexandra; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Some musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity are not readily classified. The study objective was to determine if there were symptom patterns in self-identified repetitive strain injury (RSI) patients. Methods Members (n = 700) of the Dutch RSI Patients Association filled out a detailed symptom questionnaire. Factor analysis followed by cluster analysis grouped correlated symptoms. Results Eight clusters, based largely on symptom severity and quality were formulated. All but one cluster showed diffuse symptoms; the exception was characterized by bilateral symptoms of stiffness and aching pain in the shoulder/neck. Conclusions Case definitions which localize upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders to a specific anatomical area may be incomplete. Future clustering studies should rely on both signs and symptoms. Data could be collected from health care providers prospectively to determine the possible prognostic value of the identified clusters with respect to natural history, chronicity, and return to work. PMID:20414797

  1. Musculoskeletal Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cielen, Nele; Maes, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by airway obstruction and inflammation but also accompanied by several extrapulmonary consequences, such as skeletal muscle weakness and osteoporosis. Skeletal muscle weakness is of major concern, since it leads to poor functional capacity, impaired health status, increased healthcare utilization, and even mortality, independently of lung function. Osteoporosis leads to fractures and is associated with increased mortality, functional decline, loss of quality of life, and need for institutionalization. Therefore, the presence of the combination of these comorbidities will have a negative impact on daily life in patients with COPD. In this review, we will focus on these two comorbidities, their prevalence in COPD, combined risk factors, and pathogenesis. We will try to prove the clustering of these comorbidities and discuss possible preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24783225

  2. Job experience, work load, and risk of musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hakkanen, M; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the effects of physical work load and job experience on morbidity from musculoskeletal disorders among trailer assembly workers.
METHODS—A longitudinal study was carried out in a trailer assembly factory with many new workers employed during the follow up. The sickness absence of 532 workers (160 experienced and 372 new (separately for the first year of employment and from the second year on)) was followed up. Exposure was assessed by job titles, visits, task descriptions, and some direct measurements. The associations between the explanatory variables and sick leave were assessed by log linear models.
RESULTS—A higher rate of sick leave due to disorders of the upper limbs was found for new workers compared with experienced ones, especially in the high work load group. Women had a higher rate than men. New male workers in physically strenuous tasks had a high rate of sick leave due to neck and shoulder disorders.
CONCLUSIONS—As being unaccustomed to work seems to increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders, special attention should be paid to newly employed workers.


Keywords: new workers; physical work load; assembly work PMID:11160992

  3. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Aweto, Happiness Anulika; Tella, Bosede Abidemi; Johnson, Omobolanle Yewande

    2015-01-01

    This study has investigated the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the most commonly affected body parts, the risk factors of WMSDs and the coping strategies adopted by hairdressers. The study design was a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. Two hundred and ninety-nine hairdressers (242 females and 57 males) from salons in Surulere and Mushin Local Government Areas of Lagos State completed a 27-item questionnaire. They were selected using a non-probability consecutive sampling technique. The inferential analysis was conducted using the Chi2 test. The level of significance stood at p < 0.05. The 12-month prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders stood at 75.6%. Two hundred and twenty-one (91.3%) participants reported gradual onset of musculoskeletal disorders. One hundred and sixteen (47.9%) participants had the onset of the WMSDs at the age range of 26-35 years. The most commonly affected body parts included the low back (76.3%), shoulder (62.5%) and neck (46.3%). Some of the major job risk factors of the WMSDs that were identified included: working in the same position for long periods and attending to a large number of customers in 1 day. Taking sufficient rest breaks by participants was one of the coping strategies adopted by the participants. The mean number of years of working experience was 7.85±0.4 years. One hundred and twenty-four (41.5%) participants had worked for 1-5 years. The Chi2 analysis showed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders were significantly associated with the age of a participant (Chi2 = 78.78, p = 0.001), years of working experience (Chi2 = 78.03, p = 0.001) and hours spent working in a standing position (Chi2 = 8.77, p = 0.01), respectively. The age of hairdressers, their years of working and the long hours they spent working in a standing position may be significant factors that contribute to the high prevalence of the WMSDs among them. The most commonly affected body parts included the low

  4. Economic impact of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) on work in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the leading cause of work disability, sickness absence from work, 'presenteeism' and loss of productivity across all the European Union (EU) member states. It is estimated that the total cost of lost productivity attributable to MSDs among people of working age in the EU could be as high as 2% of gross domestic product (GDP). This paper examines the available evidence on the economic burden of MSDs on work across Europe and highlights areas of policy, clinical and employment practice which might improve work outcomes for individuals and families and reduce the economic and social costs of MSDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of Complementary Health Approaches for Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders Among Adults: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Tainya C; Nahin, Richard L; Barnes, Patricia M; Stussman, Barbara J

    2016-10-01

    This report examines the use of complementary health approaches among U.S. adults aged 18 and over who had a musculoskeletal pain disorder. Prevalence of use among this population subgroup is compared with use by persons without a musculoskeletal disorder. Use for any reason, as well as specifically to treat musculoskeletal pain disorders, is examined. Using the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, estimates of the use of complementary health approaches for any reason, as well as use to treat musculoskeletal pain disorders, are presented. Statistical tests were performed to assess the significance of differences between groups of complementary health approaches used among persons with specific musculoskeletal pain disorders. Musculoskeletal pain disorders included lower back pain, sciatica, neck pain, joint pain or related conditions, arthritic conditions, and other musculoskeletal pain disorders not included in any of the previous categories. Respondents could report having more than one disorder. In 2012, 54.5% of U.S. adults had a musculoskeletal pain disorder. The use of any complementary health approach for any reason among persons with a musculoskeletal pain disorder (41.6%) was significantly higher than use among persons without a musculoskeletal pain disorder (24.1%). Among adults with any musculoskeletal pain disorder, the use of natural products for any reason (24.7%) was significantly higher than the use of mind and body approaches (15.3%), practitioner-based approaches (18.2%), or whole medical system approaches (5.3%). The pattern of use of the above-mentioned groups of complementary health approaches was similar for persons without a musculoskeletal disorder. However, prevalence of use among these persons was significantly lower compared with persons with a musculoskeletal disorder. For treatment, the use of practitioner-based approaches among persons with any musculoskeletal pain disorder (9.7%) was more than three times as high as the use of any

  6. Naproxen sodium and piroxicam in acute musculo-skeletal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchier-Hayes, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    Of one hundred patients originally entered for this trial eighty-three with acute musculo-skeletal disorders were treated with either naproxen sodium (SYNFLEX, Syntex), 550 mg initially followed by 275 mg four times daily, or piroxicam (FELDENE, Pfizer), 20 mg twice daily for two days then 20 mg once daily. Patients were assessed at admission, on day 4 and on day 8. Pain on passive movement, tenderness, swelling and limitation of function were evaluated and patients also completed a daily self-assessment form. Pain relief was recorded by the patient for 4 hours following the first dose. No statistically significant differences were detected between the treatment groups for any of the efficacy measurements. Of the eighty-three patients analysed, twenty-four patients withdrew from treatment twenty of whom did not need further analgesia (13 in the naproxen sodium group and 7 in the piroxicam group). Three patients experienced side-effects; all were in the piroxicam group, and one patient withdrew from the study because of epigastric pain. Both naproxen sodium and piroxicam proved effective in the treatment of musculo-skeletal disorders. Naproxen sodium did not give rise to any side-effects. Images p80-a PMID:6466934

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders and stress among footwear industry workers.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Larissa Brentini; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Zaia, José Eduardo; de Oliveira Santos, Branca Maria; Lourenço, Américo Riccardi Vaccari; Quemelo, Paulo Roberto Veiga

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing footwear requires intense manual labor and high repetitions with low variability in function that may lead to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) symptoms and psychological stress. To evaluate a potential association between musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and perceived stress among footwear industry workers. The Nordic General Questionnaire (NGQ) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) were completed by 357 footwear industry workers. The association between MSD and perceived stress was evaluated using the Chi-Square test and Odds Ratios along with their 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were calculated. The twelve-month prevalence of MSD symptoms among the respondents was 66% (n = 236) and the symptoms were significantly associated with perceived stress (p = 0.002, OR: 10, 95% CI: 1.7 to 60.6). The seven-day prevalence of MSD symptoms was 33% and the symptoms were also significantly associated with perceived stress (p = 0.001, OR: 2.7, 95% CI:0.8 to 9.3). The association between perceived stress and MSD symptoms indicates a strong association between MSD symptoms and perceived stress levels. Considering that these problems are important determinants of worker's health, a combined approach to reduce both stress and MSD symptoms is necessary for prevention and health promotion in the footwear industry.

  8. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zaheen; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Health professions like dentistry, nursing and physical therapy have been reported at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Results of studies conducted in these occupational groups may help formulate prevention strategies. However, no such data among physical therapists has been reported in India. We conducted an online survey among 100 physiotherapists in Delhi. The response rate was 75%. The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders is found to be high since 92% of them reported to feel some pain after joining physical therapy which affects daily activities and even sometimes forces them to change their work. Physical therapists specialty, gender, furniture used in clinic and duration of patient contact are found to be related to the pain development (p<0.05). We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics and techniques of patient handling in development of work-related pain symptoms. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  9. Workplace Accommodations for Persons with Musculoskeletal Disorders. Implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morosky, Frank N.

    This brief paper summarizes requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 related to workplace accommodations for persons with musculo-skeletal disorders. The following topics are addressed: (1) the relevance of the ADA to people with musculo-skeletal disorders; (2) employment provisions of the ADA to protect individuals with…

  10. Direct access to physical therapy for the patient with musculoskeletal disorders, a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Leonardo; Maselli, Filippo; Viceconti, Antonello; Gianola, Silvia; Ciuro, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To present legislation comparing direct and referred access—or other measures—to physical therapy. The focus is on the management of the most burdensome musculoskeletal disorders in terms of regulations, costs, effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness. [Methods] Main biomedical databases and gray literature were searched ranging from a global scenario to the analysis of targeted geographical areas and specifically Italy and the Region Piedmont. [Results] legislation on Direct Access highlights inconsistencies among the countries belonging to World Confederation for Physical Therapy. Direct Access could be an effective, safe and efficient organization model for the management of patients with musculoskeletal diseases and seems to be more effective safer and cost effective. [Conclusion] Direct Access is a virtuous model which can help improve the global quality of physical therapy services. Further studies are required to confirm this approach and determine whether the findings of the present overview can be replicated in different countries and healthcare systems. PMID:28878484

  11. Direct access to physical therapy for the patient with musculoskeletal disorders, a literature review.

    PubMed

    Piano, Leonardo; Maselli, Filippo; Viceconti, Antonello; Gianola, Silvia; Ciuro, Aldo

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] To present legislation comparing direct and referred access-or other measures-to physical therapy. The focus is on the management of the most burdensome musculoskeletal disorders in terms of regulations, costs, effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness. [Methods] Main biomedical databases and gray literature were searched ranging from a global scenario to the analysis of targeted geographical areas and specifically Italy and the Region Piedmont. [Results] legislation on Direct Access highlights inconsistencies among the countries belonging to World Confederation for Physical Therapy. Direct Access could be an effective, safe and efficient organization model for the management of patients with musculoskeletal diseases and seems to be more effective safer and cost effective. [Conclusion] Direct Access is a virtuous model which can help improve the global quality of physical therapy services. Further studies are required to confirm this approach and determine whether the findings of the present overview can be replicated in different countries and healthcare systems.

  12. A Survey of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Dabholkar, Twinkle; Yardi, Sujata; Dabholkar, Yogesh G; Velankar, Haritosh K; Ghuge, Gaurav

    2017-06-01

    There are increased reports of prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) in surgeons performing minimal access surgeries. Due to the nature of the speciality, otolaryngologists spend their work days in performing markedly precise procedures in small workspaces i.e. the patients' ear, nose and throat. Due to this, they frequently adopt awkward neck, back and shoulder postures while using devices like otoscope, endoscope and microscope. The field of otolaryngology has barely received any attention with respect to ergonomic assessment. Thus, the aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of WRMSDs in otolaryngologists in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai. A pre-validated, structured questionnaire was distributed to 150 otolaryngologists. Seventy-three otolaryngologists responded to the questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised of demographic and workload data, report of musculoskeletal symptoms and otolaryngologists' interpretation of casual and preventive factors of symptoms at workplace. Response rate of the survey was 48.6%. The total prevalence of WRMSDs in the otolaryngologists was 87.67%. Majority of those surveyed reported that they suffered from musculoskeletal problems which they attributed to the ergonomic flaws encountered during surgery (60.27%) and OPD (69.86%) respectively. Pain and discomfort during surgery experienced by the surgeons were most frequently attributed to the awkward and sustained postures adopted during surgery. Effective time management, ergonomically apt postures, intermittent change of posture, using back rest and availing skilled assistance during OPD and surgery, were the self-assessed corrective measures suggested by the respondents. The otolaryngologists' job profile puts them at high risk for WRMSDs.

  13. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among Indian tabla players.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Wricha; De, Amitabha; Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chandra, Ananga M

    2013-06-01

    Playing a percussion instrument demands great force and effort, which may make percussionists prone to playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). Of all of the percussion instruments in India, tabla is the most popular. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of discomforts among professional tabla players. Eighty-five professional tabla players voluntarily participated in the study. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and visual analog scale were administered to all the participants. Demographic details, music-related activities, and symptoms of discomfort were also recorded. It was found that prone anatomical areas were the low back, right shoulder, neck, left shoulder, upper back, and knees. The frequency of discomfort was found to be mostly weekly for the shoulders and monthly for neck, low back, and knees. There was an association between visual analog scale and prevalence of self-reported discomforts in some body parts. It can be said that the prolonged, unsupported, folded-knee sitting posture may be the cause of discomforts.

  14. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among cashew factory workers.

    PubMed

    Girish, N; Ramachandra, Kamath; Arun G, Maiya; Asha, Kamath

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) are impairments of the bodily structures, such as muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments, nerves, or the localized blood circulation system, which are caused or aggravated primarily by the performance of work and by the effects of the immediate environment in which work is carried out. Types of work in the cashew factory include cutting, peeling, grading, packing, and boiling. All these activities have risk factors for the musculoskeletal disorders, which include repetition, contact stress, forceful contraction, awkward postures, as well as sustained positions. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to find out the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among cashew factory workers. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 246 cashew factory workers, working in a randomly selected factory of a selected locality in Karkala taluk of Udupi district, Karnataka. Participants' name, age, gender, literacy level, income, type of work, duration of employment, hours of work per day, hand dominance, pain and discomfort status were obtained by structured interview. A total of 246 cashew factory workers participated in the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 14. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the data. Around 28.5% (n = 70) reported pain, whereas 71.5% (n = 176) of workers did not report pain. The largest number of workers (n = 22; 32.4%) complained of pain in the knee, followed by back (n = 21; 30.9%) and then shoulder (n = 8; 11.8%). Seventy percent of the workers who reported pain were having more than 5 years of work experience. A 68.6% (n = 48) of the workers who reported pain were in the cutting category, followed by the grading (17%; n = 12), boiling (8.6%; n = 6), and peeling (5.7%; n = 4) categories. Prevalence of pain and discomfort among workers was 28.5%, which is a not ignorable and has to be addressed. Self-reported pain and discomfort were more prevalent in knee, followed by

  15. Advanced practice physiotherapy in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desmeules, François; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; MacDermid, Joy C; Champagne, François; Hinse, Odette; Woodhouse, Linda June

    2012-06-21

    The convergence of rising health care costs and physician shortages have made health care transformation a priority in many countries resulting in the emergence of new models of care that often involve the extension of the scope of practice for allied health professionals. Physiotherapists in advanced practice/extended scope roles have emerged as key providers in such new models, especially in settings providing services to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence of the systematic evaluation of advance physiotherapy practice (APP) models of care is scarce. A systematic review was done to update the evaluation of physiotherapists in APP roles in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Structured literature search was conducted in 3 databases (Medline, Cinahl and Embase) for articles published between 1980 and 2011. Included studies needed to present original quantitative data that addressed the impact or the effect of APP care. A total of 16 studies met all inclusion criteria and were included. Pairs of raters used four structured quality appraisal methodological tools depending on design of studies to analyse included studies. Included studies varied in designs and objectives and could be categorized in four areas: diagnostic agreement or accuracy compared to medical providers, treatment effectiveness, economic efficiency or patient satisfaction. There was a wide range in the quality of studies (from 25% to 93%), with only 43% of papers reaching or exceeding a score of 70% on the methodological quality rating scales. Their findings are however consistent and suggest that APP care may be as (or more) beneficial than usual care by physicians for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, use of healthcare resources, economic costs and patient satisfaction. The emerging evidence suggests that physiotherapists in APP roles provide equal or better usual care in comparison to

  16. Musculoskeletal disorder risk during automotive assembly: current vs. seated

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sue A.; Marras, William S.; Allread, W. Gary; Knapik, Gregory G.; Splittstoesser, Riley E.

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorder risk was assessed during automotive assembly processes. The risk associated with current assembly processes was compared to using a cantilever chair intervention. Spine loads and normalized shoulder muscle activity were evaluated during assembly in eight regions of the vehicle. Eight interior cabin regions of the vehicle were classified by reach distance, height from vehicle floor and front to back. The cantilever chair intervention tool was most effective in the far reach regions regardless of the height. In the front far reach regions both spine loads and normalized shoulder muscle activity levels were reduced. In the middle and close reach regions spine loads were reduced, however, shoulder muscle activity was not, thus an additional intervention would be necessary to reduce shoulder risk. In the back far reach region, spine loads were not significantly different between the current and cantilever chair conditions. Thus, the effectiveness of the cantilever chair was dependent on the region of the vehicle. PMID:22036450

  17. Exercise, sports participation, and musculoskeletal disorders of pregnancy and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne P; Fogelman, David J; Ackerman, Kathryn E

    2011-09-01

    The benefits of rigorous physical activity have long been proclaimed by the medical community. However, consensus regarding exercise duration and intensity in pregnancy has been more difficult to achieve. Conservative exercise guidelines for pregnant women were issued broadly in the 1980s due to limited evidence regarding safety. More recent evidence has failed to demonstrate ill effects of physical activity during pregnancy, as any effects on the mother and the fetus have thus far shown to be positive. The physical discomfort experienced by virtually all women during pregnancy, nearly 25% of whom experience at least temporarily disabling symptoms, is often a barrier to participation in an exercise program. An approach to developing an exercise program during pregnancy will be discussed in this article, as well as the potential benefits of such a program for the maternal-fetal unit, and common pregnancy-related musculoskeletal conditions, including a discussion of the anatomy, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of such disorders. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. Communication accommodation and managing musculoskeletal disorders: doctors' and patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baker, Susan C; Gallois, Cindy; Driedger, S Michelle; Santesso, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the ways in which health care providers (general practitioners and specialists) and patients communicate with each other about managing musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders, a major cause of long-term pain and physical disability. In managing their illness, patients must interact closely with health care providers, who play a large role in transferring knowledge to them. In-depth interviews with patients, general practitioners, and specialist rheumatologists in Australia and Canada were analyzed using Leximancer (a text-mining tool). Results indicated that, in their communication, doctors subtly emphasized accepting and adjusting to the illness ("new normal"), whereas patients emphasized pain relief and getting "back to normal." These results suggest that doctors and patients should accommodate in their communication across subtle and often unexpressed differences in the priorities of provider and patient, or they are likely to be at cross purposes and thus less effective.

  19. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders among ammunition factory workers in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Pinar, Tevfik; Cakmak, Z Aytul; Saygun, Meral; Akdur, Recep; Ulu, Nuriye; Keles, Isik; Saylam, Hamdi Saim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and to determine the risk factors among ammunition factory workers in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was performed on 955 ammunition factory workers. Potential risk factors were investigated with a questionnaire and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. During the previous year, 39.3% of ammunition workers experienced symptoms of work-related MSDs. Logistic regression analysis showed smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.372), chronic diseases (OR = 1.795), body mass index (BMI; overweight) (OR = 1.631), working year (OR = 1.509), cold temperature (OR = 1.838), and work load (OR = 2.210) were significant independent risk factors for the development of symptoms of MSDs. It was found that both work-related conditions and personal and environmental factors are important for the development of occupational MSDs.

  20. Models of return to work for musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Izabela Z; Stowell, Anna W; Feuerstein, Michael; Gatchel, Robert J

    2007-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pain disorders are the most prevalent, costly, disabling, and commonly researched conditions in the workplace, yet the development of overarching conceptual models of return to work (RTW) in these conditions has been lagging. A critical review of the literature was performed using multiple medical and health search engines in order to provide an evaluation of the evolution and the state of the art of health and disability models with a focus on specific models of RTW. The main tenets, implications for diagnosis, treatment, and disability compensation, are the key perspectives analyzed for the following specific models of RTW: biomedical, psychosocial, forensic, ecological/case management, biopsychosocial, and two more recent models developed by the Institute of Medicine and the World Health Organization, respectively. Future development of models that are truly transdisciplinary, and address temporal and multidimensional aspects of occupational disability, remains a goal.

  1. Study on musculoskeletal disorders in a machinery manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guo-Bing; Dempsey, Patrick G; Lei, Ling; Ma, Zao-Hua; Liang, You-Xin

    2004-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders and related risk factors in machinery manufacturing were investigated using interviews, postural analysis, and the revised National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health lifting equation. Sixty-nine workers involved in manual materials handling (Job A) and 51 machinery workers less involved with manual material-handling tasks (Job B) were studied. Low back pain (LBP) (at least one episode lasting for 24 hours or more in past 12 months) prevalence rates were 63.8% and 37.3% for Jobs A and B, respectively. Prevalence rates of LBP every day for a week or more attributed to lifting were 26.09% and 5.88% for Jobs A and B, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed that lifting repetitiveness and work age contributed to the occurrence of LBP. The "composite load" (object weight x activity repetitiveness) had a significant adverse effect on LBP.

  2. Musculoskeletal disorders among a group of Iranian general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Tirgar, Aram; Javanshir, Khodabakhsh; Talebian, Arash; Amini, Fatemeh; Parhiz, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Dentists have to remain in a fixed position during dental practices for the accuracy required, therefore they are susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Considering the infrequency of ergonomics studies in general dental practitioners (GDPs), especially in cervical region, this study aimed to reviews MSDs in the neck region among GDPs. An analytic cross-sectional study was carried out among the GDPs in 2011. A total of 60 dentists (40 males and 20 females) were examined through a combination of questionnaires (concerning their demographic information) such as the Nordic standardized musculoskeletal disorder questionnaire (NMQ) and Body Discomfort Assessment questionnaire (BDA). Each dentist's working posture was assessed using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) and deep cervical flexor muscle endurance through a Craniocervical Flexion test (CCFT). Descriptive statistical indexes and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis, while considering p< 0.05. The mean dental practice experience was 16.9 ± 5.6 years with average 41.2 ± 13.4 working hours per week. About 45% of dentists took regular exercises weekly. Some 83.3% of these dentists expressed to be suffering from the cervical pain, whereas, 56.7% complained about back pains and 41% shoulder problems. Female dentists were found more at risk of neckache, discomfort and pain in shoulder and hand than males. Greater pain frequency in knee was found in more experienced and older age dentists (P= 0.07). Results from the CCF test showed that the deep cervical flexor muscles endurance increased with regular exercise and decreased with aging. Many dentists experience the MSDs, especially in cervical region, as a consequence of occupational stresses. Therefore, detecting occupational risk factors, standards of work position, regular exercise and following ergonomic policy are intensely recommended.

  3. Job rotation designed to prevent musculoskeletal disorders and control risk in manufacturing industries: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Comper, Maria Luiza Caires; Sparer, Emily H; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-01-01

    To better understand job rotation in the manufacturing industry, we completed a systematic review asking the following questions: 1) How do job-rotation programs impact work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and related risk control for these MSDs, as well as psychosocial factors? and 2) How best should the job rotation programs be designed? We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Business Source Premier, ISI Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, PsyINFO, Scopus, and SciELO databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Eligible studies were examined by two independent reviewers for relevance (population of manufacturing workers, outcomes of musculoskeletal disorders, physical factors, psychosocial factors, and strategies used in job-rotation implantation) and methodological quality rating. From 10,809 potential articles, 71 were read for full text analysis. Of the 14 studies included for data extraction, two were non-randomized control trial studies, one was a case-control study, and 11 were cross-sectional comparisons. Only one, with a case-control design, was scored with good methodological quality. Currently, weak evidence exists supporting job rotation as a strategy for the prevention and control of musculoskeletal disorders. Job rotation did not appear to reduce the exposure of physical risk factors; yet, there are positive correlations between job rotation and higher job satisfaction. Worker training has been described as a crucial component of a successful job-rotation program. The studies reported a range of parameters used to implement and measure job-rotation programs. More rigorous studies are needed to better understand the full impact of job rotation on production and health. CRD42014013319. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammation and the pathophysiology of work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Mary F.; Barr, Ann E.

    2006-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) have accounted for a significant proportion of work injuries and workers' compensation claims in industrialized nations since the late 1980s. Despite epidemiological evidence for the role of repetition and force in the onset and progression of work-related MSDs, complete understanding of these important occupational health problems requires further elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms of the tissue response, particularly in the early stage of these disorders. Results from several clinical and experimental studies indicate that tissue microtraumas occur as a consequence of performing repetitive and/or forceful tasks, and that this mechanical tissue injury leads to local and perhaps even systemic inflammation, followed by fibrotic and structural tissue changes. Here we review work linking inflammation and the development of work-related MSDs. We also propose a conceptual framework suggesting the potential roles that inflammation may play in these disorders, and how inflammation may contribute to pain, motor dysfunction, and to puzzling psychological symptoms that are often characteristic of patients with work-related MSDs. PMID:16647245

  5. Examining the Interaction of Force and Repetition on Musculoskeletal Disorder Risk: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Sean; Heberger, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aims were (a) to perform a systematic literature review of epidemiological studies that examined the interaction of force and repetition with respect to musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk, (b) to assess the relationship of force and repetition in fatigue failure studies of musculoskeletal tissues, and (c) to synthesize these findings. Background Many epidemiological studies have examined the effects of force and repetition on MSD risk; however, relatively few have examined the interaction between these risk factors. Method In a literature search, we identified 12 studies that allowed evaluation of a force−repetition interaction with respect to MSD risk. Identified studies were subjected to a methodological quality assessment and critical review. We evaluated laboratory studies of fatigue failure to examine tissue failure responses to force and repetition. Results Of the 12 epidemiological studies that tested a Force × Repetition interaction, 10 reported evidence of interaction. Based on these results, the suggestion is made that force and repetition may be interdependent in terms of their influence on MSD risk. Fatigue failure studies of musculoskeletal tissues show a pattern of failure that mirrors the MSD risk observed in epidemiological studies. Conclusions Evidence suggests that there may be interdependence between force and repetition with respect to MSD risk. Repetition seems to result in modest increases in risk for low−force tasks but rapid increases in risk for high−force tasks. This interaction may be representative of a fatigue failure process in affected tissues. PMID:23516797

  6. Radiologic manifestations in the musculoskeletal system of miscellaneous endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Chew, F S

    1991-01-01

    The manifestations of endocrine derangements in the musculoskeletal system in infancy and childhood are disturbances in growth and maturation and in adulthood are disturbances in maintenance and metabolism. Hypercortisolism during skeletal immaturity suppresses growth. In the adult, hypercortisolism leads to osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, and muscle wasting. Deficiency of growth hormone during skeletal development results in short stature. An excess of growth hormone in a skeletally immature individual results in gigantism, an excess in a skeletally mature individual results in acromegaly. Patients with gigantism have extreme height with normal body proportions. Musculoskeletal manifestations of acromegaly include soft-tissue thickening, vertebral body enlargement, characteristic hand and foot changes, and enthesal bony proliferation. Hyperthyroidism causes catabolism of protein and loss of connective tissue, which manifest as muscle wasting. Deficient levels of thyroid hormone cause defects in growth and development. Severe growth retardation from congenital hypothyroidism is rare because neonatal screening recognizes the disorder and leads to early treatment. The skeletal manifestation of hypergonadism in children is precocious growth and early skeletal maturation. Although the initial precocious growth spurt results in a tall child, early closure of the growth plates results in a short adult. Hypogonadism in the prepubertal child results in delayed adolescence and delayed skeletal maturation. Diabetes mellitus in childhood results in decreased growth, a phenomenon presumed to be secondary to nutritional abnormalities. Generalized osteoporosis and short stature are common. In the adult, generalized osteoporosis may accompany insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus if obesity is absent. Calcification of interdigital arteries of the foot is common in diabetics and uncommon in other conditions. Additional skeletal manifestations relate to complications of diabetes such as

  7. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Brazilian hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Mussi, Gisele; Gouveia, Nelson

    2008-08-01

    There are occupational risks inherent to the activities of professional hairdressers, which are not frequently studied, and therefore not considered in the formulation of health policies for this group. To verify the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) in hairdressers through symptom reports, to characterize the most frequently affected anatomical parts and to identify and analyse risk factors of WRMDs in hairdressing. A cross-sectional epidemiological study of 220 hairdressers from beauty parlours in São Paulo (Brazil) was carried out. Each hairdresser completed a self-administered questionnaire which included information on socio-demographic characteristics, working conditions and health-related musculoskeletal system complaints. Ergonomic analyses were also performed in six parlours. The prevalence of WRMDs was 71%. Risk factors were associated with psychosocial factors and factors related to discomfort and work fatigue such as lack of acknowledgement of work and uncomfortable posture at work [odds ratio (OR) = 3.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51-8.30], not feeling comfortable with body/neck/shoulders while working (OR = 2.78; 95% CI 1.40-5.54) and having >15 years of professional activity (OR = 3.04; 95% CI 1.17-7.91). Occupational risk factors associated with the development of WRMDs in hairdressers are related to biomechanical, organizational and psychosocial work factors. The high prevalence of WRMDs found highlights the importance of disseminating recommendations for prevention of symptoms with regards to the provision of suitable furniture, equipment and work tools, environmental conditions, size of workplace, work organization and psychosocial work factors.

  8. Identification of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Mining

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Eric; Pollard, Jonisha P.

    2016-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) prevention measures have been studied in great depth throughout various industries. While the nature and causes of these disorders have been characterized in many industries, WMSDs occurring in the U.S. mining sector have not been characterized for several years. In this report, MSHA accident/injury/illness data from 2009 to 2013 were characterized to determine the most frequently reported WMSDs in the U.S. mining sector. WMSDs were most frequently reported in workers with less than 5 years or more than 20 years of mining experience. The number of days lost from work was the highest for shoulder and knee injuries and was found to increase with worker age. Underground and surface coal, surface stone and stone processing plants experienced the greatest number of WMSDs over the period studied. WMSDs were most commonly caused by an employee suffering from an overexertion, falls or being struck by an object while performing materials handling, maintenance and repair tasks, getting on or off equipment or machines, and walking or running. The injury trends presented should be used to help determine the focus of future WMSD prevention research in mining. PMID:27294012

  9. Validity and reliability of Internet-based physiotherapy assessment for musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mani, Suresh; Sharma, Shobha; Omar, Baharudin; Paungmali, Aatit; Joseph, Leonard

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to systematically explore and summarise the validity and reliability of telerehabilitation (TR)-based physiotherapy assessment for musculoskeletal disorders. Method A comprehensive systematic literature review was conducted using a number of electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and CINAHL, published between January 2000 and May 2015. The studies examined the validity, inter- and intra-rater reliabilities of TR-based physiotherapy assessment for musculoskeletal conditions were included. Two independent reviewers used the Quality Appraisal Tool for studies of diagnostic Reliability (QAREL) and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool to assess the methodological quality of reliability and validity studies respectively. Results A total of 898 hits were achieved, of which 11 articles based on inclusion criteria were reviewed. Nine studies explored the concurrent validity, inter- and intra-rater reliabilities, while two studies examined only the concurrent validity. Reviewed studies were moderate to good in methodological quality. The physiotherapy assessments such as pain, swelling, range of motion, muscle strength, balance, gait and functional assessment demonstrated good concurrent validity. However, the reported concurrent validity of lumbar spine posture, special orthopaedic tests, neurodynamic tests and scar assessments ranged from low to moderate. Conclusion TR-based physiotherapy assessment was technically feasible with overall good concurrent validity and excellent reliability, except for lumbar spine posture, orthopaedic special tests, neurodynamic testa and scar assessment.

  10. Job Rotation Designed to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders and Control Risk in Manufacturing Industries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Comper, Maria Luiza Caires; Sparer, Emily H.; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-01-01

    To better understand job rotation in the manufacturing industry, we completed a systematic review asking the following questions: 1) How do job-rotation programs impact work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and related risk control for these MSDs, as well as psychosocial factors? and 2) How best should the job rotation programs be designed? We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Business Source Premier, ISI Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, PsyINFO, Scopus, and SciELO databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Eligible studies were examined by two independent reviewers for relevance (population of manufacturing workers, outcomes of musculoskeletal disease, physical factors, psychosocial factors, and strategies used in job-rotation implantation) and methodological quality rating. From 10,809 potential articles, 71 were read for full text analysis. Of the 14 studies included for data extraction, two were non-randomized control trial studies, one was a case-control study, and 11 were cross-sectional comparisons. Only one, with a case-control design, was scored with good methodological quality. Currently, weak evidence exists supporting job rotation as a strategy for the prevention and control of musculoskeletal disorders. Job rotation did not appear to reduce the exposure of physical risk factors; yet, there are positive correlations between job rotation and higher job satisfaction. Worker training has been described as a crucial component of a successful job-rotation program. The studies reported a range of parameters used to implement and measure job-rotation programs. More rigorous studies are needed to better understand the full impact of job rotation on production and health. PMID:27633235

  11. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in ultrasound: Can you reduce risk?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Gill; Harris, Allison

    2015-11-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of pain and sickness absence for ultrasound practitioners. This article aims to provide background information about factors increasing the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and potential ways to reduce risk. Factors influencing ultrasound professionals' likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders include poor posture, repetitive movements, transducer pressure and poor grip, stress, workload, limited support or sense of control and other psychosocial factors. The impact of these risk factors on the health and well being of ultrasound practitioners can be reduced by following recommendations published by professional bodies and the Health and Safety Executive. Ultrasound practitioners should remember that optimising the examination should not be at the detriment of their health. Some hints and tips to reduce the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders are provided.

  12. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in ultrasound: Can you reduce risk?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of pain and sickness absence for ultrasound practitioners. This article aims to provide background information about factors increasing the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and potential ways to reduce risk. Factors influencing ultrasound professionals’ likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders include poor posture, repetitive movements, transducer pressure and poor grip, stress, workload, limited support or sense of control and other psychosocial factors. The impact of these risk factors on the health and well being of ultrasound practitioners can be reduced by following recommendations published by professional bodies and the Health and Safety Executive. Ultrasound practitioners should remember that optimising the examination should not be at the detriment of their health. Some hints and tips to reduce the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders are provided. PMID:27433262

  13. The effect of a multifaceted ergonomic intervention program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Naser; Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Nassiri-Kashani, Mohammad Hassan; Amiri, Ziba; Talebi, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are the most common occupational injuries in dentists. These disorders occur due to the specific characteristics of dentistry occupation such as the use of tools and instruments and awkward posture. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of multifaceted ergonomic program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. Methods: One hundred-two male dentists who worked in dentistry clinics of Tehran's hospitals participated in this interventional study. Participants were randomly divided into control (n=50) and intervention (n=52) groups. Dentists in the intervention group (n=52) underwent multifaceted ergonomic intervention program for 8 weeks and dentists in the control group (n=50) only received the measurements. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated in each of the 2 groups at 3 time points before the intervention, 3, and 6 months after the intervention using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Paired t-test was used to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders before and after the ergonomic intervention program at the end of 3 and 6 months. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was reduced after the intervention in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, back, thigh, knees, and feet (p<0.05). On the other hand, the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders increased in the control group in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, thigh, and knee, respectively. The survey results revealed that 98% of the participants agreed with this intervention program. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the multifaceted ergonomic intervention program, which included improving working conditions, identifying ergonomic risk factors, regular exercise, and discussion group meetings, could decrease the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists.

  14. Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Registered Nurses: Evidence from the Thai Nurse Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thinkhamrop, W; Laohasiriwong, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Health, safety, and well being have been known to be influenced by occupational characteristics. Nurses constantly encounter musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) from work demands worldwide. Nevertheless, there is insufficient of knowledge regarding causes of musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Thailand. Objective To investigate factors associated with musculoskeletal disorder among registered nurses in Thailand. Method This study is part of the 2009 Thai Nurse Cohort Study which consisted of 18,756 nationally representative sample of registered nurses. Data collection was performed via postal self-administered questionnaires. Manifesting musculoskeletal disorders was self-reported by registered nurses, 1,070 nurses were excluded since they were unemployed during previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. Result Of 17,686 registered nurses, the overall 12 months prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 47.8%. It was found that workplace violence was the strongest factor which statistically significant associated with musculoskeletal disorders (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.42 to 2.83; P < 0.001), anxiety/depression (OR = 1.96: 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.15; P < 0.001), perceiving job required a lot of physical effort (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.52 to 1.87; P < 0.001), every 10 years increased of age (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62; P < 0.001), overweight (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.52; P = 0.015). Conclusion Registered nurses were most vulnerable of musculoskeletal disorders especially those who experienced workplace violence, anxiety/depression, strenuous work, older age, and overweight. Consequently, recommending safety practices to nurses should be considered for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) prevention by ergonomics and workplace design.

  15. The effect of a multifaceted ergonomic intervention program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Naser; Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Nassiri-Kashani, Mohammad Hassan; Amiri, Ziba; Talebi, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are the most common occupational injuries in dentists. These disorders occur due to the specific characteristics of dentistry occupation such as the use of tools and instruments and awkward posture. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of multifaceted ergonomic program on reducing musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. Methods: One hundred-two male dentists who worked in dentistry clinics of Tehran's hospitals participated in this interventional study. Participants were randomly divided into control (n=50) and intervention (n=52) groups. Dentists in the intervention group (n=52) underwent multifaceted ergonomic intervention program for 8 weeks and dentists in the control group (n=50) only received the measurements. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated in each of the 2 groups at 3 time points before the intervention, 3, and 6 months after the intervention using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Paired t-test was used to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders before and after the ergonomic intervention program at the end of 3 and 6 months. Results: The results revealed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was reduced after the intervention in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, back, thigh, knees, and feet (p<0.05). On the other hand, the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders increased in the control group in the neck, shoulder, arm, wrist, thigh, and knee, respectively. The survey results revealed that 98% of the participants agreed with this intervention program. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the multifaceted ergonomic intervention program, which included improving working conditions, identifying ergonomic risk factors, regular exercise, and discussion group meetings, could decrease the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. PMID:28491847

  16. A system for predicting musculoskeletal disorders among dental students.

    PubMed

    Thanathornwong, Bhornsawan; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Ouivirach, Kan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a system for predicting work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) among dental students. The system comprised 2 accelerometer sensors to register neck and upper back postures and movements, and software developed to collect and process the data. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) were used to predict the likelihood of WMSD in dental students by comparing their neck and upper back movement patterns with WMSD and non-WMSD HMMs learned from previous data. To evaluate the performance of the system, 16 participants were randomly assigned into a 2 × 2 crossover trial scheduled for each sequence of working: receiving feedback or no-feedback from the system. The primary outcome measure was the extension of the neck and upper back, before (pre-test) and after (posttest) receiving feedback or no-feedback from the system. The secondary outcome measure was the log likelihood of classifying the movements as WMSD. The results showed that in the group that received feedback, the extension of the neck in the y axis and of the upper back in the y axis decreased significantly (t test, p < .05) on the post-test. The system for predicting and preventing WMSD aids the correction of the extension of the neck and upper back in the y axis.

  17. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Agricultural Risk Factors Among Korean Farmers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Lee, Myeong-Jun; Chung, HweeMin; Shin, Dong-Hee; Youn, Kan-Woo; Im, Sang-Hyuk; Chae, Hye Seon; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Farming is a strenuous occupation with various health risks, with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) being some of the most common. The risk factors for MSDs among Korean farmers are not well understood. Data were obtained from the Korean Farmers' Occupational Disease and Injury Survey (2012), which interviewed 16,113 participants regarding their demographic profiles, self-reported MSDs, and agricultural characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for MSDs. Subjects reported MSDs in the neck or upper extremities (5.89%), lower extremities (19.62%), and back (26.9%). Working in animal husbandry significantly increased the risk of MSDs in the neck/upper extremities, compared with irrigation farming (odds ratio: 1.837, 95% confidence interval: 1.130-2.987). The risk of MSDs increased significantly with number of years of farming, after adjusting for age and sex (neck/upper extremities, P for trend = .0002; lower extremities, <.001; back, <.001). Agriculture type, years of farming, and ergonomic factors increased the risk of MSDs among Korean farmers.

  18. [Work ability of subjects with chronic musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Walsh, I A P; Corral, S; Franco, R N; Canetti, E E F; Alem, M E R; Coury, H J C G

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of personal, clinical, and occupational aspects on work ability of workers with and without work-related musculoskeletal disorders using the Work Ability Index. There were participating 127 workers of industrial production lines of a medium-size multinational company. An approved version of the Work Ability Index, a questionnaire developed by Finland's Institute of Occupational Health, was used. Pain scale was also applied. A descriptive analysis was carried out using the Chi-square test and it was also performed a logistic regression analysis. A significant association was identified between the Work Ability Index and all personal, clinical and occupational aspects. Regression analysis showed that pain and sick leave together accounted for 59% of poor work ability. Different levels of pain severity were associated with distinct as well as equivalent levels of work ability loss. The results suggest that either pain reports were consistent or being both pain and work ability self-reported they therefore reflect the same perception mechanisms. Future studies might contribute to further understanding the trends found.

  19. Social partners cooperation for reduction of musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Veerle; O'Neill, David; Motmans, Roeland; Lundqvist, Peter; Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    The European social partners in agriculture recognize the considerable frequency of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the sector which has negative consequences for workers, employers, social security systems and hence for the whole society. They made an agreement in 2005 to tackle this problem and their main interest was finding good practices 'on the floor', with the involvement of the farmers and farming industries. A partnership with researchers from 4 different organisations across Europe, was created, taking into account both academic partners and/or partners experienced with the agricultural sector. GEOPA-COPA acted as a network partner with all the EU agriculture organisations. The project partners proposed a methodology how to collect the good practices. In total, 103 company visits were organised and 55 additional reports were collected. More than 140 good practices were defined going from easy, low-cost solutions to highly technological, more expensive solutions. All this information is disseminated via the project website (www.agri-ergonomics.eu) and summarised in 6 brochures. This paper focuses on the methodology to set up the ergonomic project with social partners.

  20. Musculoskeletal problems and quality of life of elementary school teachers.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, İlkim Çıtak; Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Tunç, Emsal; Kıhtır, Merve

    2015-01-01

    To investigate prevalence and anatomical distribution of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) and its impact on quality of life (QoL) in elementary school teachers working in Muğla town center. Physical, sociodemographic and occupational characteristics of 104 teachers were recorded. Onset, prevalence and consequences of MSP (Extended Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) and QoL (Short Form-36 Health Survey) of teachers with (n = 37) and without (n = 67) MSP during the last 12 months were compared. The prevalence of MSP was 77% for the lifelong period and 36% for the last 12 months. Physical and sociodemographic characteristics, daily employment period and length of standing and sitting were similar between groups (p > 0.05). The most common painful regions were the neck (39%) and the lower back (38%). MSP of these regions was the common reason for seeking healthcare, prevention from activities and taking sick leave. MSP had negative impact, especially on the physical components of QoL (p < 0.05). The results reveal high prevalence of MSP among teachers, as well as its negative impacts on QoL. Especially neck and lower back seem to be the most frequently affected regions of the body. These findings draw attention toward the need for developing strategies to prevent MSP among teachers.

  1. Responsibility for managing musculoskeletal disorders--a cross-sectional postal survey of attitudes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Maria E H; Nordholm, Lena A

    2008-08-05

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a major burden on individuals, health systems and social care systems and rehabilitation efforts in these disorders are considerable. Self-care is often considered a cost effective treatment alternative owing to limited health care resources. But what are the expectations and attitudes in this question in the general population? The purpose of this study was to describe general attitudes to responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and to explore associations between attitudes and background variables. A cross-sectional, postal questionnaire survey was carried out with a random sample of a general adult Swedish population of 1770 persons. Sixty-one percent (n = 1082) responded to the questionnaire and was included for the description of general attitudes towards responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders. For the further analyses of associations to background variables 683-693 individuals could be included. Attitudes were measured by the "Attitudes regarding Responsibility for Musculoskeletal disorders" (ARM) instrument, where responsibility is attributed on four dimensions; to myself, as being out of my hands, to employers or to (medical) professionals. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore associations between attitudes to musculoskeletal disorders and the background variables age, sex, education, physical activity, presence of musculoskeletal disorders, sick leave and whether the person had visited a care provider. A majority of participants had internal views, i.e. showed an attitude of taking personal responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders, and did not place responsibility for the management out of their own hands or to employers. However, attributing shared responsibility between self and medical professionals was also found. The main associations found between attitude towards responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders and investigated background variables were that

  2. The risk of musculoskeletal disorders for workers due to repetitive movements during tomato harvesting.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, M; Colantoni, A; Massantini, R; Monarca, D

    2010-04-01

    Tomatoes are the most common crop in Italy. The production cycle requires operations in the field and factory that can cause musculoskeletal disorders due to the repetitive movements of the upper limbs of the workers employed in the sorting phase. This research aims to evaluate these risks using the OCRA (occupational repetitive actions) index method This method is based firstly on the calculation of a maximum number of recommended actions, related to the way the operation is performed, and secondly on a comparison of the number of actions effectively carried out by the upper limb with the recommended calculated value. The results of the risk evaluation for workers who manually sort tomatoes during harvest showed a risk for the workers, with an exposure index greater than 20; the OCRA index defines an index higher than 3.5 as unacceptable. The present trend of replacing manual sorting onboard a vehicle with optical sorters seems to be appropriate to reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) and is supported from both a financial point of view and as a quality control measure.

  3. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among Iranian dentists.

    PubMed

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Badakhsh, Samaneh; Khosroshahi, Shadab Safarzadeh; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), associated factors and treatment among dentists over a one year period. A total of 272 questionnaires were returned complete providing demographic information, details of the physical workload, location of pain in the body, and the treatment and prevention of MSDs. All data was coded for each of the parameters. The association between pain and each of the parameters was determined by parametric and non-parametric statistical tests (P < 0.05). General and specialist dentists participated in the study. The sample set of dentists consisted of 205 (75.4%) generalists and 67 (24.6%) specialists. Seventy-five percent of the total cohort experienced MSDs. Female dentists complained of pain significantly more frequently than their male counterparts (p=0.018). Significantly higher rates of pain and MSDs are related to increased years of work (r=0.168, p =0.017) and less regular ergonomic exercise (p=0.002). Reported pain was most common in the shoulder (44.2%), neck (31.8%) and lower back (29.9%). Dentists who worked inclined had significantly more pain disorder than those who did not (p=0.013). In total 23.5% of dentists reduced working hours and 16.5% sought medical help. Pain was most commonly reported in the shoulder, neck and back. Physical workload is an important factor in MSDs. The impact of MSDs on the work and life of dentists demonstrates the need for increased knowledge of MSDs and the instigation of preventive strategies.

  4. Prevalence of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists: Symptoms and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Rafie, Forouzan; Zamani Jam, Azadeh; Shahravan, Arash; Raoof, Maryam; Eskandarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine the factors that lead to musculoskeletal disorders in dentists by assessing their posture using RULA method. In this cross-sectional study, 130 dentists (84 male and 46 female) participated. The posture of the subjects during their normal workload was recorded by using the RULA method, and the range of musculoskeletal pains by using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), and individual and professional data was assessed by a demographics questionnaire. All tests were performed at the P < 0.05 level. Assessment of the physical status of the subjects showed that 82.8% of subjects were at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The majority of musculoskeletal pains were in the neck (55.9%) and the shoulder (43.8%). Moreover, 68.9% of the subjects had experienced pain at least once over the last year. Significant relationships were observed between musculoskeletal pain and daily work hours (P = 0.07) and number of patients (P = 0.02), but the pain was not significantly associated with BMI and experience. The present findings showed that unsuitable posture of dentists during work has a considerable effect on musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, further investigation is required to avoid the detrimental effects of wrong posture.

  5. Prevalence of Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists: Symptoms and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rafie, Forouzan; Zamani Jam, Azadeh; Shahravan, Arash; Raoof, Maryam; Eskandarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present research was to examine the factors that lead to musculoskeletal disorders in dentists by assessing their posture using RULA method. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 130 dentists (84 male and 46 female) participated. The posture of the subjects during their normal workload was recorded by using the RULA method, and the range of musculoskeletal pains by using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), and individual and professional data was assessed by a demographics questionnaire. All tests were performed at the P < 0.05 level. Results. Assessment of the physical status of the subjects showed that 82.8% of subjects were at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The majority of musculoskeletal pains were in the neck (55.9%) and the shoulder (43.8%). Moreover, 68.9% of the subjects had experienced pain at least once over the last year. Significant relationships were observed between musculoskeletal pain and daily work hours (P = 0.07) and number of patients (P = 0.02), but the pain was not significantly associated with BMI and experience. Conclusion. The present findings showed that unsuitable posture of dentists during work has a considerable effect on musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, further investigation is required to avoid the detrimental effects of wrong posture. PMID:26064141

  6. [The epidemiological study of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and related factors among automobile assembly workers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xu; Qin, Ru-Li; Li, Yu-Zhen; Zhang, Xue-Yan; Jia, Ning; Zhang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Gang; Zhao, Jie; Li, Huan-Huan; Jiang, Hai-Qiang

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among automobile assembly workers, to discusses the related risk factors and their relationship. The selected 1508 automobile assembly workers from a north car manufacturing company were regarded as the study object. The hazard zone jobs checklist, Nordic musculoskeletal symptom questionnaire (NMQ) and pain questionnaire were used to perform the epidemiological cross-sectional and retrospective survey and study for the General status, awkward ergonomics factors and related influencing factors, and musculoskeletal disorders of workers. The predominant body sites of occurring WMSDs among automobile assembly workers were mainly low back, wrist, neck and shoulders, the predominant workshop section of occurring WMSDs were mostly concentrated in engine compartment, interior ornament, door cover, chassis and debugging section. The predominant body site of WMSDs among engine compartment and chassis section workers was low back, interior ornament workers were low back and wrist, door cover workers was wrist, chassis workers was low back, debugging workers were neck and low back. Neck musculoskeletal disorders had the trend with the increase of a body height; Smoking may increase the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. The WMSDs appears to be a serious ergonomic proble assem among automobile assembly workers, predominant occurring site of WMSDs is with different workshop section, its characteristics is quite obvious, probably related to its existing awkward work position or activities. The worker height and smoking habits may be important factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders happen.

  7. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders and Risk Factors among Chinese Medical Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Cui, Ya; He, Lihua; Xu, Xiangrong; Yuan, Zhiwei; Jin, Xianning; Li, Zhimin

    2017-05-26

    Medical staff in the department of obstetrics and gynecology are a group of professionals reportedly at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), however, little is known about the current status of this problem in China. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among this population in China. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed to 1017 obstetrics and gynecology practitioners to collect information on musculoskeletal symptoms and relevant factors. Prevalence and severity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in different parts of the body were calculated and the relationship between personal and ergonomic factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders was analyzed using Chi-square test and unconditional logistic regression models. The results indicated a high prevalence of 85.5% among the subjects, with the shoulder (n = 575, 62.0%), neck (n = 560, 60.3%) and lower back (n = 504, 54.3%) being the three most affected regions. Individual, postural, work-environmental as well as psychosocial factors were recognized to be associated with WMSDs in different body parts. Therefore, attention must be given to the problem of musculoskeletal disorders among Chinese obstetrics and gynecology staff. It is recommended to develop good life habits, improve work environment, adjust work organization as well as train on proper postures in their daily operation.

  8. Addressing Neuroplastic Changes in Distributed Areas of the Nervous System Associated With Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, René; Higgins, Johanne; Bourbonnais, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Present interventions utilized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation are guided, in large part, by a biomedical model where peripheral structural injury is believed to be the sole driver of the disorder. There are, however, neurophysiological changes across different areas of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including peripheral receptors, dorsal horn of the spinal cord, brain stem, sensorimotor cortical areas, and the mesolimbic and prefrontal areas associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and tendon injuries. These neurophysiological changes appear not only to be a consequence of peripheral structural injury but also to play a part in the pathophysiology of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Neurophysiological changes are consistent with a biopsychosocial formulation reflecting the underlying mechanisms associated with sensory and motor findings, psychological traits, and perceptual changes associated with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. These changes, therefore, have important implications in the clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal rehabilitation professionals have at their disposal tools to address these neuroplastic changes, including top-down cognitive-based interventions (eg, education, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness meditation, motor imagery) and bottom-up physical interventions (eg, motor learning, peripheral sensory stimulation, manual therapy) that induce neuroplastic changes across distributed areas of the nervous system and affect outcomes in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, novel approaches such as the use of transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be utilized to help renormalize neurological function. Comprehensive treatment addressing peripheral structural injury as well as neurophysiological changes occurring across

  9. Further Trends in Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders-A Comparison of Risk factors for Symptoms Using Quality of Work Life Data From the 2002, 2006 and 2010 General Social Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert B.; Lowe, Brian; Ming-Lun, Lu; Krieg, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Report trends for risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Methods Three QWL surveys examine the risk factors for MSDs. Results Findings similar for several risk factors, but differences across the reporting years may reflect economic conditions. 2010 respondent numbers were reduced, some risk factors had pattern changes and there were gender and age differences. Trend analysis showed most significant changes were for the “Work Fast” risk factor. New 2010 “Physical Effort” item showed gender differences and items reflective of total worker health showed strong associations with “Back Pain” and “Pain in Arms.” Conclusions Intervention strategies should focus on physical exposures and psychosocial risk factors (work stress, safety climate, job satisfaction, supervisor support, work fast, work freedom, work time) that have been consistently related to reports of MSDs. Economic conditions will influence some psychosocial risk factors. PMID:26247646

  10. Efficacy of musculoskeletal manual approach in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wagner Rodrigues; Blasczyk, Juscelino Castro; Aparecida Furlan de Oliveira, Micaele; Lagôa Gonçalves, Karina Ferreira; Bonini-Rocha, Ana Clara; Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2016-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) requires a complex diagnostic and therapeutic approach, which usually involves a multidisciplinary management. Among these treatments, musculoskeletal manual techniques are used to improve health and healing. To assess the effectiveness of musculoskeletal manual approach in temporomandibular joint disorder patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis. During August 2014 a systematic review of relevant databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, PEDro and ISI web of knowledge) was performed to identify controlled clinical trials without date restriction and restricted to the English language. Clinical outcomes were pain and range of motion focalized in temporomandibular joint. The mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and overall effect size were calculated at every post treatment. The PEDro scale was used to demonstrate the quality of the included studies. From the 308 articles identified by the search strategy, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed a significant difference (p < 0.0001) and large effect on active mouth opening (SMD, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.42 to 1.25) and on pain during active mouth opening (MD, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.30) in favor of musculoskeletal manual techniques when compared to other conservative treatments for TMD. Musculoskeletal manual approaches are effective for treating TMD. In the short term, there is a larger effect regarding the latter when compared to other conservative treatments for TMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Advanced practice physiotherapy in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The convergence of rising health care costs and physician shortages have made health care transformation a priority in many countries resulting in the emergence of new models of care that often involve the extension of the scope of practice for allied health professionals. Physiotherapists in advanced practice/extended scope roles have emerged as key providers in such new models, especially in settings providing services to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence of the systematic evaluation of advance physiotherapy practice (APP) models of care is scarce. A systematic review was done to update the evaluation of physiotherapists in APP roles in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Methods Structured literature search was conducted in 3 databases (Medline, Cinahl and Embase) for articles published between 1980 and 2011. Included studies needed to present original quantitative data that addressed the impact or the effect of APP care. A total of 16 studies met all inclusion criteria and were included. Pairs of raters used four structured quality appraisal methodological tools depending on design of studies to analyse included studies. Results Included studies varied in designs and objectives and could be categorized in four areas: diagnostic agreement or accuracy compared to medical providers, treatment effectiveness, economic efficiency or patient satisfaction. There was a wide range in the quality of studies (from 25% to 93%), with only 43% of papers reaching or exceeding a score of 70% on the methodological quality rating scales. Their findings are however consistent and suggest that APP care may be as (or more) beneficial than usual care by physicians for patients with musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, use of healthcare resources, economic costs and patient satisfaction. Conclusions The emerging evidence suggests that physiotherapists in APP roles provide equal

  12. The costs of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in automotive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Punnett, L

    1999-01-01

    Inadequate application of ergonomic principles to the design of workplaces and individual jobs has adverse consequences for worker health and safety, especially in terms of strains, sprains, and other musculoskeletal disorders. In addition to the human pain and suffering, other losses are externalized to workers, with adverse financial and psychosocial impacts. There are also costs to employers through workers' compensation claims, scrap, and decreased production quality, medical insurance premiums, labor turnover, and adverse impacts on labor relations, although many of these are not linked by traditional accounting methods to ergonomic problems per se. Data collected in five plants of two major U.S. automotive manufacturing companies in the last decade have been used to estimate some of the costs associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), only some of which resulted in workers compensation claims. In one plant in 1984-85, the payroll cost of all back and shoulder disorders was at least $320 per year per worker, not including workers' compensation premiums or claims paid. A large proportion of these costs were accrued by "unreported" cases, that is, cases that either had never been reported to the plant clinic or had been reported in the past and were considered administratively to have recovered. In the other four plants, annual costs associated with in-plant medical visits for MSDs in 1989-93 were almost as high as those resulting from compensation claims. At least one-half of these disorders were estimated to be attributable to physical ergonomic exposures in the workplace and thus preventable. These data are consistent with estimates by others that the real costs to employers are at least two to three times the amount paid in workers' compensation cases, and that at least 50 percent of all work-related musculoskeletal disorders among the working population could be prevented by appropriate ergonomic job design. Furthermore, recent

  13. Active epidemiological surveillance of musculoskeletal disorders in a shoe factory

    PubMed Central

    Roquelaure, Y; Mariel, J; Fanello, S; Boissiere, J; Chiron, H; Dano, C; Bureau, D; Penneau-Fontbonne, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: (1) To evaluate an active method of surveillance of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). (2) To compare different criteria for deciding whether or not a work situation could be considered at high risk of MSDs in a large, modern shoe factory. Methods: A total of 253 blue collar workers were interviewed and examined by the same physician in 1996; 191 of them were re-examined in 1997. Risk factors of MSDs were assessed for each worker by standardised job site work analysis. Prevalence and incidence rates of carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff syndrome, and tension neck syndrome were calculated for each of the nine main types of work situation. Different criteria used to assess situations with high risk of MSDs were compared. Results: On the basis of prevalence data, three types of work situation were detected to be at high risk of MSDs: cutting, sewing, and assembly preparation. The three types of work situations identified on the basis of incidence data (sewing preparation, mechanised assembling, and finishing) were different from those identified by prevalence data. At least one recognised risk factor for MSDs was identified for all groups of work situations. The ergonomic risk could be considered as serious for the four types of work situation having the highest ergonomic scores (sewing, assembly preparation, pasting, and cutting). Conclusion: The results of the health surveillance method depend largely on the definition of the criteria used to define the risk of MSDs. The criteria based on incidence data are more valid than those based on prevalence data. Health and risk factor surveillance must be combined to predict the risk of MSDs in the company. However, exposure assessment plays a greater role in determining the priorities for ergonomic intervention. PMID:12107293

  14. Assessing musculoskeletal disorders among municipal waste loaders of Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Salve, Pradeep; Chokhandre, Praveen; Bansod, Dhananjay

    2017-07-14

    The study aims to assess the impact of municipal waste loading occupation upon developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and thereby disabilities among waste loaders. Additionally, the study has identified the potential risk factors raising MSDs and disabilities. A cross-sectional case-control design survey was conducted in 6 out of 24 municipal wards of Mumbai during March-September 2015. The study population consisted of municipal waste loaders (N = 180) and a control group (N = 180). The Standardized Modified Nordic questionnaire was adopted to measures the MSDs and thereby disabilities in the past 12 months. A Propensity Score Matching (PSM) method was applied to assess the impact of waste loading occupation on developing MSDs and disabilities. Waste loaders had a significantly higher risk of developing MSDs as well as disabilities than the control group particularly for low back, hip/ thigh upper back and shoulder. Propensity Score Matching results revealed that the MSDs were significantly higher among waste loaders for hip/thigh (22%), low back (19%), shoulder (18%), and upper back (15%) than matched control group. Likewise, MSDs-related disabilities were found to be significantly higher among waste loaders for low back (20%), hip/ thigh (18%) upper back (13%) and shoulder (8%) than the control group. Duration of work, substance use and mental health were found to be the potential psychosocial factors for developing the risk of MSDs and disabilities. The municipal waste loading occupation raised the risk of MSDs and related disabilities among waste loaders compared to the control group. The preventive and curative measures are strongly recommended to minimize the burden of MSDs and disabilities. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(6).

  15. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among farmers: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Aoife; Blake, Catherine; Fullen, Brona M; Meredith, David; Phelan, James; McNamara, John; Cunningham, Caitriona

    2012-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among farmers and to establish the most common regional MSDs reported. Comprehensive electronic searches of Pubmed, Web of Science, CINAHL, SCOPUS, EMBASE, Agris Database, and Cochrane Library were carried out using keywords for MSDs and farmers. Pooled estimates of prevalence with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for overall MSD prevalence and the most common regional MSDs reported. Twenty-four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into this review. From these studies, life-time prevalence of any form of MSD among farmers was 90.6% while 1-year MSD prevalence was 76.9% (95% CI 69.8-82.7). The majority of studies focused on spinal MSDs with low back pain (LBP) the most frequently investigated. Life-time LBP prevalence was 75% (95% CI 67-81.5) while 1-year LBP prevalence was 47.8% (95% CI 40.2-55.5). The next most common regional MSDs reported were upper (range 3.6-71.4%) and lower extremities (range 10.4-41%). The systematic review identified the prevalence of MSDs by body region in farmers and established that LBP was the most common MSD, followed by upper and then lower extremity MSDs. Reported trends suggest that the prevalence of MSDs in farmers is greater than in non-farmer populations. Case-definition uniformity among MSD researchers is warranted. More studies are needed regarding upper and lower extremity MSDs, gender, workplace, and task context of MSDs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders among nurses compared with two other occupational groups.

    PubMed

    Harcombe, H; Herbison, G P; McBride, D; Derrett, S

    2014-12-01

    There is a high incidence of low back pain (LBP) among nurses. However, few longitudinal studies have investigated musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) at other anatomical sites in nurses. To describe the cumulative incidence and persistence/recurrence of MSDs of the low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand and knee among New Zealand nurses, to investigate the impact of MSDs on work and functional tasks and to compare findings for nurses with those in postal workers and office workers. Participants completed a postal survey at baseline and again 1 year later. Information was collected about MSDs in the previous 1 month and 12 months and about the ability to attend work, undertake work duties and perform functional tasks. Among nurses, the low back was the site with the highest cumulative incidence and highest prevalence of persistent/recurrent, work-disabling and functional-task-disabling pain. Work-disabling LBP was more prevalent among nurses and postal workers than office workers (P < 0.001). Nurses had a substantial prevalence of work-disabling shoulder pain (10%) and functional-task-disabling knee (19%) and wrist/hand pain (16%). With the exception of the elbow, each occupational group had a high prevalence of persistent/recurrent MSDs at all anatomical sites. LBP continues to have a substantial impact among nurses. Other less commonly considered MSDs, such as shoulder, wrist/hand and knee pain, also made work or functional tasks difficult, suggesting that primary and secondary prevention efforts should consider MSDs at other anatomical sites as well as the low back. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Gender differences, work stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in weaving industries.

    PubMed

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, H; Nag, P K

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the work stressors among male and female weavers (N=516) in powerloom and handloom and examine the association of work stressors with the prevalence of work related musculo-skeletal disorders (MSDs). Physical and psychosocial stresses of work, job diagnostics, hazards of workplace, working environment and MSDs prevalence were assessed. There is high prevalence of MSDs among weavers. Female weavers in powerloom and handloom were more prone to developing MSDs in upper back (OR 1.8; p<0.05 and OR 2.1; p<0.01) and lower back (OR 1.9; p<0.05 and OR 1.8; p<0.05). Male weavers were more prone to developing pain in the knee (OR 2.9; p<0.001), and hand (OR 2.2; p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that job duration >10 yr (OR 3.7, p<0.05), manual material handling (OR 3, p<0.05), and poor machinery safety (OR 11, p<0.05), contributed to occurrence of MSDs amongst powerloom weavers. Among the handloom weavers, age >25 yr (OR 3.2, p<0.05), poor machinery design (OR 2.2, p<0.01), mental overload (OR 5.7, p<0.001), skill requirement to perform jobs (OR 20.7, p<0.05) had significant influence in the occurrence of pain. Gender differences exist in the prevalence of MSDs and the perception of work and psycho-social stresses among the weavers.

  18. A systematic review of musculoskeletal disorders among school teachers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) represent one of the most common and most expensive occupational health problems in both developed and developing countries. School teachers represent an occupational group among which there appears to be a high prevalence of MSD. Given that causes of MSD have been described as multi-factorial and prevalence rates vary between body sites and location of study, the objective of this systematic review was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for MSD among teaching staff. Methods The study involved an extensive search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases in 2011. All studies which reported on the prevalence and/or risk factors for MSD in the teaching profession were initially selected for inclusion. Reference lists of articles identified in the original search were then examined for additional publications. Of the 80 articles initially located, a final group of 33 met the inclusion criteria and were examined in detail. Results This review suggests that the prevalence of self-reported MSD among school teachers ranges between 39% and 95%. The most prevalent body sites appear to be the back, neck and upper limbs. Nursery school teachers appear to be more likely to report suffering from low back pain. Factors such as gender, age, length of employment and awkward posture have been associated with higher MSD prevalence rates. Conclusion Overall, this study suggests that school teachers are at a high risk of MSD. Further research, preferably longitudinal, is required to more thoroughly investigate the issue of MSD among teachers, with a greater emphasis on the possible wider use of ergonomic principles. This would represent a major step forward in the prevention of MSD among teachers, especially if easy to implement control measures could be recommended. PMID:22087739

  19. Patterns of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among workers in palm plantation occupation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Leonard Joseph; Jafarzadeh Esfehani, Ali; Ramli, Ayiesah; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Justine, Maria; Mohan, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the patterns of ongoing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) and exposure risk to musculoskeletal injuries for various body regions among palm plantation workers. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (SNMQ) was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders symptoms. The Quick Exposure check (QEC) was used to assess the exposure risk of farmers to WRMDs. The common pattern of WRMDs was back pain (40%), followed by shoulder pain (19%). The QEC revealed high exposure risk for neck (56%), followed by back (45.6%). The results from the SNMQ showed that 58% reported pain in 1 region, followed by 2 regions (10.7%) and 3 regions (3.6%). Back pain and shoulder pain were found to be common among workers in palm plantation occupation. Nevertheless, the neck region appeared to have the highest risk of exposure to injuries. © 2013 APJPH.

  20. [Analysis of musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures among manufacturing workers].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan-fa; Gu, Gui-zhen; Sun, Shi-yi; Wang, Hai-sheng; Cui, Shou-ming; Yang, Xiao-fa; Yang, Shu-le; He, Li-hua; Wang, Sheng

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the distribution of the musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures in different factories, gender, education levels, age and working years among manufacturing workers. In a cross-sectional study of 5134 manufacturing workers in 12 factories, the morbidities for musculoskeletal disorders in one year period were measured with questionnaires. The morbidities for musculoskeletal disorders in body sites: waist, neck, shoulder, wrist, ankle/feet, knee, hip/buttocks and elbows were 59.7%, 47.9%, 38.1%, 33.7%, 26.9%, 25.4%, 15.2%, and 14.9%, respectively in one year period. There were significant differences of morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in body sites of workers among different factories (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The morbidities of musculoskeletal symptoms in elbows, waist, wrists and ankle/feet of the workers in refractory material and chemical fiber factories were higher than those in other factories, the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms of workers in garments and diamond factories were lower than those in other factories. The morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in neck, shoulders and wrists of female workers were significantly higher than those of male workers (P < 0.01). There were significant differences of the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in body sites among workers with different educational levels (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). There were significant differences of the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in neck, shoulders, wrists, hip/buttocks and knee among groups with different age or different working years (P < 0.01), and the morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms increased with age and working years. The proportions of unhealthy working postures and high working load among workers in refractory material and chemical fiber factories were higher; but those in garments and diamond factories were lower. The morbidities for musculoskeletal symptoms in waist, neck, shoulder and wrists of workers in

  1. Psychosocial Factors and Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Southeastern Asian Female Workers Living in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyunmi; Park, Chang Gi; Kim, Sun Jung; Moon, Sun Hye

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A rapid increase in the population of migrant workers in Korea has brought new challenges regarding the possible effects of acculturation on health. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of acculturation- and work-related psychosocial factors on work-related musculoskeletal disorders among migrant female workers living in Korea. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used. A translated, structured questionnaire was administrated to 156 southeastern Asian female full-time workers living in Korea. Results About 35% of the participants experienced some type(s) of work-related musculoskeletal disorder(s), which were more prevalent in Vietnamese women than in Thai and Filipino women. Women who preferred to maintain their own heritage and to reject the host country heritage were at risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion Acculturation strategy and nationality were found to be significant factors associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Health professionals need to accommodate acculturation contexts into risk assessment and intervention development for work-related musculoskeletal disorders separately for different nationalities. PMID:22953201

  2. Ergonomic Training Reduces Musculoskeletal Disorders among Office Workers: Results from the 6-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Norashikin; Kenny, Dianna Theadora; Md Zein, Raemy; Hassan, Siti Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly reported among computer users. This study explored whether these disorders can be reduced by the provision of ergonomics education. Methods: A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in which 3 units were randomised for intervention and received training, and 3 units were given a leaflet. The effect of intervention on workstation habits, musculoskeletal disorders, days and episodes of sick leave, and psychological well-being were assessed. Results: A significant improvement in workstation habits was found, and the differences remained significant at the follow-up time point for keyboard, mouse, chair, and desk use. The largest reduction in the percentage of musculoskeletal disorders was in the neck region (−42.2%, 95% CI −60.0 to −24.4). After adjusting for baseline values, significant differences were found at the follow-up time point in the neck, right shoulder, right and left upper limbs, lower back, and right and left lower limbs. No significant differences were found for the days and episodes of sick leave or the psychological well-being among workers after the intervention. Conclusion: Consistent reductions were observed for all musculoskeletal disorders at the follow-up time point, although the difference was not statistically significant for the upper back. The improvements in the musculoskeletal disorders did not translate into fewer days lost from work or improved psychological well-being. PMID:22135582

  3. Musicians, postural quality and musculoskeletal health: A literature's review.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Piñeiro, Patricia; Díaz-Pereira, M Pino; Martínez, Aurora

    2017-01-01

    An analysis of the salient characteristics of research papers published between 1989 and 2015 that evaluate the relationship between postural quality during musical performance and various performance quality and health factors, with emphasis on musculoskeletal health variables. Searches of Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar for papers that analysed the subject of the study objective. The following MeSH descriptors were used: posture; postural balance; muscle, skeletal; task performance and analysis; back; and spine and music. A descriptive statistical analysis of their methodology (sample types, temporal design, and postural, health and other variables analysed) and findings has been made. The inclusion criterion was that the body postural quality of the musicians during performance was included among the target study variables. Forty-one relevant empirical studies were found, written in English. Comparison and analysis of their results was hampered by great disparities in measuring instruments and operationalization of variables. Despite the growing interest in the relationships among these variables, the empirical knowledge base still has many limitations, making rigorous comparative analysis difficult. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The nature of work-related neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Buckle, Peter W; Devereux, J Jason

    2002-05-01

    The nature of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper limbs is reviewed using both scientific data and the consensus view of experts, union bodies and government agencies across the European Union. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders describe a wide range of inflammatory and degenerative diseases and disorders. These conditions result in pain and functional impairment and may affect, besides others, the neck, shoulders, elbows, forearms, wrists and hands. They are work-related when the work activities and work conditions significantly contribute to their development or exacerbation but are not necessarily the sole determinant of causation. The classification and the need for standardised diagnostic methods for assessment of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders are reviewed. These disorders are a significant problem within the European Union with respect to ill health, productivity and associated costs. The pathomechanisms of musculoskeletal disorders affecting tendons, ligaments, nerves, muscle, circulation and pain perception are reviewed and conceptual models for the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and upper limbs are presented. The epidemiological evidence on the work-relatedness of these disorders is discussed. A relationship between the performance of work and the occurrence of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders is evident. Intervention strategies in the workplace for the reduction of both exposure and effect should focus upon factors within the work organisation as well as actively involving the individual worker. The current knowledge is sufficient to enable informed decisions to be made on future research needs and prevention strategies at the societal, organisational and individual level.

  5. Role of Curcumin in Common Musculoskeletal Disorders: a Review of Current Laboratory, Translational, and Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Peddada, Krishi V; Peddada, Kranti Venkata; Shukla, Surendra K; Mishra, Anusha; Verma, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The Indian spice turmeric, in which the active and dominant biomolecule is curcumin, has been demonstrated to have significant medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. This promise is potentially very applicable to musculoskeletal disorders, which are common causes of physician visits worldwide. Research at the laboratory, translational and clinical levels that supports the use of curcumin for various musculoskeletal disorders, such as osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, musculocartilaginous disorders, and sarcoma is here in comprehensively summarized. Though more phase I-III trials are clearly needed, thus far the existing data show that curcumin can indeed potentially be useful in treatment of the hundreds of millions worldwide who are afflicted by these musculoskeletal disorders. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. [How do physical fitness and heavy physical work interact in the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders?].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Adauto Luis Moreira; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira

    2014-10-01

    A cross-sectional study investigated the association between self-reported physical fitness and musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder, or upper back among workers in 14 plastics factories in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Physical fitness was assessed on a scale from 0 to 5. Cases were defined as self-reported pain in the previous 12 months, lasting more than a week or having monthly minimum frequency, with restrictions at work or seeking medical care, or where respondents' severity was greater than 2 (on a scale from 0 to 5). Logistic regression was performed to investigate statistical interaction between physical fitness and physical demands from work in the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. Precarious physical fitness resulted in 3.19 times greater odds of musculoskeletal disorders among workers exposed to light physical demands on the job. Among workers exposed to heavy physical demands, physical fitness failed to protect against musculoskeletal disorders. Heavy physical work was always associated with high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Despite the importance of physical fitness, physical exercise programs should not be used to replace improvements in working conditions.

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders in Norway: prevalence of chronicity and use of primary and specialist health care services.

    PubMed

    Kinge, Jonas Minet; Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Skirbekk, Vegard; Vollset, Stein Emil

    2015-04-02

    Uncertainty exists with regards to the extent of prevalence and health care use for musculoskeletal disorders in Norway. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders and to estimate the prevalence of persons receiving primary and specialist health services for these disorders. We used three data-sources. First, four discrete years of the nationally representative cross-sectional Survey of Health and Living Conditions (SHLC) conducted in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2012 by Statistics Norway. Second, we used the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR) to estimate the proportion of the population who used specialist health services in 2012. Third, we used the national register dataset for reimbursement of primary care physicians, chiropractors and physiotherapists (KUHR) to estimate the proportion of the population attending primary care physicians, chiropractors or physiotherapists in 2012. Age- and sex-specific prevalence/utilization estimates for musculoskeletal disorders were calculated. In 2012, 18% of men and 27% of women reported musculoskeletal disorders lasting for six months or more in the SHLC. Primary health care services reimbursed for musculoskeletal disorders were used by 37% of women and 30% of men. Of these 32% (women) and 26% (men) were physician contacts and between 5 and 9% physiotherapist or chiropractor or combined contact types. Corresponding numbers for specialist services were 5% in men and 7% in women, where the majority was out-patient consultations. Low back and neck pain were the most common diagnoses both in the general population and as reason for health care utilization. We found that musculoskeletal disorders increased with age, however our results showed no variation in prevalence of chronic disorders between 2002 and 2012. Chronic musculoskeletal disorders were common in the general population, with higher prevalence among women compared to men, and increasing prevalence with age. Musculoskeletal

  8. [Functions of participatory ergonomics programs in reducing work-related musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Guo, M J; Liu, J J; Yao, H Y

    2016-08-10

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are most commonly seen in all the occupational non-fatal injuries and illnesses for workers, especially those who are involved in labor-intensive industries. Participatory ergonomics is frequently used to prevent musculoskeletal disorders. This paper gives an overview of a historical perspective on the use of participatory ergonomics approach in reducing the health effects of labor-intensive industries. Progress, barriers and facilitators on the organization, implementation and evaluation of participatory ergonomics programs are studied. Participatory ergonomics seems a successful method to develop, prioritize measures to prevent MSDs. Participatory ergonomics can help industries reduce musculoskeletal injuries and disorders, improve workplace condition and promote health conditions of the workers.

  9. Design and Evaluation of Ergonomic Interventions for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders in India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improper workstation, work procedures and tools are found to be the risk factors for the development of musculoskeletal disorders among the informal sector workers of the developing countries. Low cost ergonomic interventions can effectively improve such adverse conditions. Case presentation In the present article some studies related to design interventions in different informal and agricultural sectors were discussed and their efficacies were analyzed. It was observed that with the help of appropriate interventions musculoskeletal disorders were reduced, adverse physiological conditions were improved when awkward postures were corrected and ultimately the organisational productivity was increased. Conclusion Proper implementation of ergonomic interventions can ultimately improve the economy of the nation. PMID:25009740

  10. Design and evaluation of ergonomic interventions for the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in India.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Dev, Samrat

    2014-01-01

    Improper workstation, work procedures and tools are found to be the risk factors for the development of musculoskeletal disorders among the informal sector workers of the developing countries. Low cost ergonomic interventions can effectively improve such adverse conditions. In the present article some studies related to design interventions in different informal and agricultural sectors were discussed and their efficacies were analyzed. It was observed that with the help of appropriate interventions musculoskeletal disorders were reduced, adverse physiological conditions were improved when awkward postures were corrected and ultimately the organisational productivity was increased. Proper implementation of ergonomic interventions can ultimately improve the economy of the nation.

  11. Preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Cuba, an industrially developing country.

    PubMed

    Torres, Yaniel; Rodríguez, Yordán; Viña, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the history of ergonomics in Cuba and also presents some ergonomic interventions carried out in major economic sectors, focused on reducing musculoskeletal risk factors. Five studies concerning musculoskeletal risk factors were reviewed comparing the results of various ergonomic tools. Cuban legislation related to occupational health as well as statistics available on musculoskeletal disorders were examined. The reviewed studies were carried out using such universally recognized assessment tools as RULA, Strain Index, OWAS and NIOSH equations as well as human movement analysis software. The interventions presented are examples of a proactive approach to the improvement of workers' health. Musculoskeletal disorders are responsible for the second highest rate of total permanent disability in the Cuban work force. The prevailing approach to workers' health in terms of musculoskeletal disorders is basically reactive rather than proactive despite the commitment of the Cuban Government to the subject and a set of rules established to accomplish this goal. Simple tools for conducting a systematic evaluation of working conditions are needed in our context.

  12. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in truck drivers and official workers.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Abolfazl; Vahedian, Mostafa; Mohebi, Siamak; Najafi, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are common among drivers and official workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are frequent causes of absenteeism in many countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and risk factors associated with these symptoms. A total of 346 workers and truck drivers were participated in this case-control study. All the participants were interviewed using a self- administered questionnaire containing demographic data and a Nordic questionnaire about presence site and characteristics of pain. Then the data were gathered, and the prevalence of the mentioned parameters and the relationship between variables in the questionnaire were analyzed statistically. The results of this study revealed that 78.6% out of truck drivers and 55.5% out of official workers had musculoskeletal disorders in on-year and there was a significant difference between two groups in this regard (P<0.001). On the whole, the most common symptoms were neck 47 (27.2%), followed by lumbar pain 42 (24.3%) in truck drivers and knee 63 (36.4%) and lumbar symptom 21 (12.1%) in one-year in official workers. In this study, musculoskeletal disorders showed statistically significant association with work duration, age and BMI (P<0.001). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the musculoskeletal troubles have a high frequency among the drivers and official workers. Both groups usually remain on a prolonged uncomfortable postures and high static muscle load which may imply a risk for development of the troubles.

  13. Education of garment workers: prevention of work related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Pun, Jane Chao; Burgel, Barbara J; Chan, Jackie; Lashuay, Nan

    2004-08-01

    This educational intervention was designed as part of a garment worker occupational health and safety initiative, with the goal to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in this monolingual Cantonese speaking population. Using risk communication and the Chinese concepts of yin and yang, the class curriculum was designed to be participatory. It focused on linking symptoms to high risk work activities; explaining the nature of musculoskeletal injury; and encouraging compliance with self care measures of ice, stretching, and early symptom reporting. A total of 21 women completed the Healthy Work Classes, with an increase in perceived levels of energy measured after each class. Additionally, contingency contracting for both individual and workplace change was piloted. This curriculum was revised to become a "train the trainer" program, with training of garment worker leaders and the goal to disseminate this prevention based curriculum to garment workers in the Oakland, California community.

  14. Timing of Physical Therapy Initiation for Nonsurgical Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders and Effects on Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Heidi A; Wyrsta, Nadia J; Davenport, Todd E; Egan, William E; Gellhorn, Alfred C

    2016-02-01

    Systematic review. Current US practice guidelines suggest an initial "wait-and-see" approach following onset of musculoskeletal pain, particularly for spinal pain. Several studies suggest that early, compared with delayed, initiation of physical therapy for musculoskeletal conditions may decrease health costs and improve outcomes. To compare early and delayed initiation of physical therapy for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions and to assess effects on patient-important outcomes and cost. MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), Web of Science, and PEDro were the data sources. We included studies that compared early and delayed initiation of physical therapy for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Studies in which early and delayed interventions differed were excluded. Two independent reviewers extracted study characteristics and outcomes, and determined eligibility and quality through consensus with a third reviewer. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used in summary conclusions. Standardized effect sizes (d) and odds ratios were calculated to assess the effect strength of early versus delayed physical therapy for each included study. Of the 3855 articles initially screened, 14 studies were included. The majority of articles studied low back pain (only 2 articles studied cervical pain). For spinal pain, there was low-quality evidence that early versus delayed physical therapy was associated with decreased cost and decreased frequency of opioid prescriptions, advanced imaging, and surgeries without compromising patient-important outcomes. One subgroup analyzed showed improved function/disability with early physical therapy in an occupational health setting. Although there were consistent results across studies favoring early physical therapy for decreased cost and medical utilization, quality was limited. Preliminary evidence suggests that early physical therapy may decrease cost without compromising

  15. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: PART I.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    The shock wave has been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; therefore we carried out a review on the activity performed by shock waves on the bone-myofascial tissue system. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65 to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge. Given the abundance of the argument, it seems appropriate to subdivide the review into two parts, the first concerning the evidence of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) on bone disorders, the second concerning findings on tendon and muscle treatment.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders caused by gas cylinder handling tasks: A case study report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Yu, Chiao-Ying; Lin, Da-Yung

    2017-01-01

    This case study used the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) to explore work that involves handling gas cylinders and to determine risk factors that may cause related injuries. The NMQ survey was distributed to 100 gas cylinder handlers in Taiwan, and their handling tasks were analyzed. The results showed that the overall prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 91% within 1 year. More than half of the respondents (62%) experienced shoulder discomfort, followed by lower back/waist (57%) and neck (47%) discomfort. Daily work hours (>10 h) were primary factors influencing the development of discomfort when handling gas cylinders, whereas the daily delivery frequency (>30 deliveries) was relevant to the prevalence of lower limb discomfort. Individual factors also substantially influenced upper body, lower back/waist, and knee discomfort (i.e., age, job tenure, and exercise). The findings of this study can serve as references in the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders caused by performing gas cylinder handling tasks.

  17. Musculoskeletal disorders as a fatigue failure process: evidence, implications and research needs.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Sean; Schall, Mark C

    2017-02-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) may be the result of a fatigue failure process in musculoskeletal tissues. Evaluations of MSD risk in epidemiological studies and current MSD risk assessment tools, however, have not yet incorporated important principles of fatigue failure analysis in their appraisals of MSD risk. This article examines the evidence suggesting that fatigue failure may play an important role in the aetiology of MSDs, assesses important implications with respect to MSD risk assessment and discusses research needs that may be required to advance the scientific community's ability to more effectively prevent the development of MSDs. Practitioner Summary: Evidence suggests that musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) may result from a fatigue failure process. This article proposes a unifying framework that aims to explain why exposure to physical risk factors contributes to the development of work-related MSDs. Implications of that framework are discussed.

  18. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Young Dentists in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Phedy, P; Gatam, L

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Musculoskeletal problems are often work related. Dentists have been reported to have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. Dentists have to perform repetitive tasks, often in awkward and nonergonomic positions in their practice. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Five-hundred copies of Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire were distributed to dentists who participated in a congress of a regional branch of the Indonesian Dentist Association. Data such as sex, length of practice, the presence of assistance, smoking, occupational stress, body mass index, hand dominance, and exercise were collected. Dentist who had practised for more than five years were excluded. Results: Two hundred and forty-one respondents fulfilled the research criteria. Musculoskeletal symptoms occurred in 63.5% respondents. Fatigue and pain were the most common manifestations of musculoskeletal symptoms among dentists (36.5 and 24.9% respectively). Prolonged sitting was the most common aggravating factor (26.6%) while exercise successfully relieved symptoms in 35.3% of respondents. Neck, upper back and lower back were the most common sites involved with prevalence of 25.7, 22.4, and 20.7% respectively. Neck was also the most common site of the symptoms preventing normal work during the preceding 12 months (8.3%). Exercise and stress are associated with the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms (p=0.01 and p<0.01 respectively). Exercise is associated with fatigue (p<0.01) and click (p<0.01), stress is associated with pain (p=0.00), stiffness (p=0.00), fatigue (p<0.01), and discomfort (p<0.01). Conclusions: The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in young dentists is 63.5%. Neck is the most common affected region. Stress and exercise are the main associated factor for musculoskeletal problems in dentists.

  19. The prevalence, impact and management of musculoskeletal disorders in older people living in care homes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Purdy, Rachel; Latham, Sarah K; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Mulley, Graham; Conaghan, Philip G

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to systematically review the literature describing the prevalence, impact and current management of musculoskeletal pain in older people living in care homes. Published literature (AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, psycINFO, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library) and unpublished literature (OpenGrey, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials, UK National Research Register Archive) were searched on 1 March 2015. All studies assessing the prevalence, impact and management of musculoskeletal disorders in older people living in care homes were included. Literature was appraised using the CASP cohort and qualitative critical appraisal tools. Data were analysed using descriptive statistical approaches, meta-analysis and meta-ethnography techniques. Twenty-four papers reporting the results of 263,775 care home residents in 12 countries were identified. The evidence base was moderate in quality. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain for people in care homes was 30.2 % (95 % confidence intervals 29.9-30.5 %; n = 105,463). Care home residents reported that musculoskeletal pain had a significant impact on their perceived independence and overall ability to participate in everyday activities of daily living. Three papers which presented data on interventions demonstrated that whilst multi-component assessment and management packages did not significantly change clinical outcomes, these empowered care home staff to feel more confident in managing these patients. Musculoskeletal pain is a common problem in care homes worldwide, and residents report significant impact on their lives. However, there is uncertainty regarding how to assess and manage such pain. PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42014009824.

  20. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A prospective cohort study of

  1. Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Hallman, David M; Hellström, Fredrik; Björklund, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G; Djupsjobacka, Mats; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Piligian, George; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-03-01

    This study systematically summarizes biochemical biomarker research in non-traumatic musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Two research questions guided the review: (i) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper-extremity MSD? and (ii) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper-extremity MSD? A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS, and 87 studies met primary inclusion criteria. Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 articles of sufficient quality. Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies. Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis. Most sufficient-quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group >50 years). In sufficient-quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD and biomarker(s) studied. Evidence suggested that: (i) the collagen-repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibro proliferative disorders, (ii) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and (iii) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSD. Only 5 studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity. While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration), and insufficient attention to comorbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

  2. The interaction of force and repetition on musculoskeletal and neural tissue responses and sensorimotor behavior in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the relationship of musculoskeletal risk factors underlying force and repetition on tissue responses in an operant rat model of repetitive reaching and pulling, and if force x repetition interactions were present, indicative of a fatigue failure process. We examined exposure-dependent changes in biochemical, morphological and sensorimotor responses occurring with repeated performance of a handle-pulling task for 12 weeks at one of four repetition and force levels: 1) low repetition with low force, 2) high repetition with low force, 3) low repetition with high force, and 4) high repetition with high force (HRHF). Methods Rats underwent initial training for 4–6 weeks, and then performed one of the tasks for 12 weeks, 2 hours/day, 3 days/week. Reflexive grip strength and sensitivity to touch were assayed as functional outcomes. Flexor digitorum muscles and tendons, forelimb bones, and serum were assayed using ELISA for indicators of inflammation, tissue stress and repair, and bone turnover. Histomorphometry was used to assay macrophage infiltration of tissues, spinal cord substance P changes, and tissue adaptative or degradative changes. MicroCT was used to assay bones for changes in bone quality. Results Several force x repetition interactions were observed for: muscle IL-1alpha and bone IL-1beta; serum TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, and IL-1beta; muscle HSP72, a tissue stress and repair protein; histomorphological evidence of tendon and cartilage degradation; serum biomarkers of bone degradation (CTXI) and bone formation (osteocalcin); and morphological evidence of bone adaptation versus resorption. In most cases, performance of the HRHF task induced the greatest tissue degenerative changes, while performance of moderate level tasks induced bone adaptation and a suggestion of muscle adaptation. Both high force tasks induced median nerve macrophage infiltration, spinal cord sensitization (increased substance P), grip strength declines and forepaw

  3. The interaction of force and repetition on musculoskeletal and neural tissue responses and sensorimotor behavior in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Mary F; Gallagher, Sean; Massicotte, Vicky S; Tytell, Michael; Popoff, Steven N; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E

    2013-10-25

    We examined the relationship of musculoskeletal risk factors underlying force and repetition on tissue responses in an operant rat model of repetitive reaching and pulling, and if force x repetition interactions were present, indicative of a fatigue failure process. We examined exposure-dependent changes in biochemical, morphological and sensorimotor responses occurring with repeated performance of a handle-pulling task for 12 weeks at one of four repetition and force levels: 1) low repetition with low force, 2) high repetition with low force, 3) low repetition with high force, and 4) high repetition with high force (HRHF). Rats underwent initial training for 4-6 weeks, and then performed one of the tasks for 12 weeks, 2 hours/day, 3 days/week. Reflexive grip strength and sensitivity to touch were assayed as functional outcomes. Flexor digitorum muscles and tendons, forelimb bones, and serum were assayed using ELISA for indicators of inflammation, tissue stress and repair, and bone turnover. Histomorphometry was used to assay macrophage infiltration of tissues, spinal cord substance P changes, and tissue adaptative or degradative changes. MicroCT was used to assay bones for changes in bone quality. Several force x repetition interactions were observed for: muscle IL-1alpha and bone IL-1beta; serum TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, and IL-1beta; muscle HSP72, a tissue stress and repair protein; histomorphological evidence of tendon and cartilage degradation; serum biomarkers of bone degradation (CTXI) and bone formation (osteocalcin); and morphological evidence of bone adaptation versus resorption. In most cases, performance of the HRHF task induced the greatest tissue degenerative changes, while performance of moderate level tasks induced bone adaptation and a suggestion of muscle adaptation. Both high force tasks induced median nerve macrophage infiltration, spinal cord sensitization (increased substance P), grip strength declines and forepaw mechanical allodynia by task week

  4. Effect of work with visual display units on musculo-skeletal disorders in the office environment.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, J; Huikko, S; Nyberg, M; Kivi, P; Laippala, P; Uitti, J

    2003-10-01

    The increase in computer and mouse use has been associated with an increased prevalence of disorders in the neck and upper extremities. Furthermore, poor workstation design has been associated with an increased risk of developing these symptoms. Aim The aims of this study were (i) to estimate the prevalence of musculo-skeletal disorders among full-time visual display unit (VDU) users; (ii) to examine how the prevalence varies by work environment; and (iii) to explore the association with work factors. A survey was carried out on the effect of work with VDUs on musculo-skeletal disorders in workers in the office environment of 56 workplaces. Office workers (n = 298), customer service workers (n = 238) and designers (n = 247) were studied. For all the occupations combined, the 12 month prevalences of musculo-skeletal symptoms in the neck, shoulders, elbows, lower arms and wrists, and fingers were 63, 24, 18, 35 and 16%, respectively. The study indicated that musculo-skeletal pain is common among computer workers in offices. There was no strong association between the duration of computer work and pain or between the duration of mouse use and pain, but workers' perception of their workstation as being poor ergonomically was strongly associated with an increased prevalence of pain. Musculo-skeletal symptoms are common, but the duration of daily keyboard and mouse use had no connection with musculo-skeletal symptoms. Instead, more consideration should be paid to the ergonomics of workstations, the placing of the mouse, the postures of the upper extremities and the handling of the mouse.

  5. National efforts to identify research issues related to prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas R

    2004-02-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including low back and upper extremity disorders, represent one of the greatest work-related health concerns facing industrialized nations. Recently, two national groups were charged with developing research agendas aimed at increasing our knowledge of the prevention of these disorders. The first agenda, developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH) National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) MSD team, was based on input from several hundred practitioners and safety and health experts representing industry, labor, and academia. The second agenda, developed by the National Research Council (NRC) and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) National Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace, was based on input from leading researchers in the fields of medicine, information science, and ergonomics. This paper summarizes the findings of the two groups and compares the two research agendas.

  6. Analysis of Risk Factors for Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Radiological Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehyung; Roh, Hyolyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze, through ergonomic analyses, those motions most used by radiological technologists that can cause musculoskeletal disorders. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 7 radiological technologists with work experience in hospitals for more than 5 years. For the analysis of working postures, we simulated the work posture of radiological technologists when moving patients, when pushing or pulling an apparatus, when conducting ultrasonography, and when handling a mouse for MRI were analyzed. [Results] In this study, the burdens on the radiological technologists’ waists were shown to be high when they were moving patients for a CT scan. During mouse handling for an MRI scan, large burdens were imposed on the neck. In the case of ultrasonography working postures, larger burdens on the leg and neck were found when the patient’s examination sites were located further away. The assessment of working postures when pushing a portable radiation apparatus showed that burdens on the musculoskeletal system increased as the weight of the apparatus increased. [Conclusion] The musculoskeletal disorders of radiological technologists occur in various regions of their bodies but occur most frequently in the shoulder and the lumbar region. Therefore, hospitals need to be educated regarding the concept of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:25276028

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial risk factors among workers of the aircraft maintenance industry.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Helen Cristina; Diniz, Ana Carolina Parise; Barbieri, Dechristian França; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    During the recent decades Brazil has experienced an exponential growth in the aviation sector resulting in an increasing workforce. The aircraft maintenance industry stands out, where the workers have to handle different kind of objects. The aim of this study was to evaluate psychosocial indicators as well as musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders among aircraft maintenance workers. One hundred and one employees were evaluated (32.69 ± 8.25 yr, 79.8 ± 13.4 kg, and 1.75 ± 0.07 m). Musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders were assessed through the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and a standardized physical examination. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) were applied to evaluate psychosocial indicators. Results of the NMQ indicate the lower back as the most affected body region. On the other hand, the physical examination has shown clinical diagnosis of shoulder disorders. Neck, upper back and ankle/foot were also reported as painful sites. Most of workers have active work-demand profile and high work engagement levels. We suggest that musculoskeletal symptoms may be related to high biomechanical demand of the tasks performed by workers, what must be further investigated.

  8. Work-organisational and personal factors associated with upper body musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P-C; Rempel, D M; Harrison, R J; Chan, J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the contribution of work-organisational and personal factors to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among garment workers in Los Angeles. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 520 sewing machine operators from 13 garment industry sewing shops. Detailed information on work-organisational factors, personal factors, and musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. The outcome of interest, upper body WMSD, was defined as a worker experiencing moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain. Unconditional logistic regression models were adopted to assess the association between both work-organisational factors and personal factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. Results The prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in the neck/shoulder region was 24% and for distal upper extremity it was 16%. Elevated prevalence of upper body pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis of a MSD or a systemic illness, working more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work–rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction. Conclusion Work-organisational and personal factors were associated with increased prevalence of moderate or severe upper body musculoskeletal pain among garment workers. Owners of sewing companies may be able to reduce or prevent WMSDs among employees by adopting rotations between different types of workstations thus increasing task variety; by either shortening work periods or increasing rest periods to reduce the work–rest ratio; and by improving the work-organisation to control psychosocial stressors. The findings may guide prevention efforts in the garment sector and have important public health implications for this workforce of

  9. Work-organisational and personal factors associated with upper body musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-C; Rempel, D M; Harrison, R J; Chan, J; Ritz, B R

    2007-12-01

    To assess the contribution of work-organisational and personal factors to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among garment workers in Los Angeles. This is a cross-sectional study of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 520 sewing machine operators from 13 garment industry sewing shops. Detailed information on work-organisational factors, personal factors, and musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. The outcome of interest, upper body WMSD, was defined as a worker experiencing moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain. Unconditional logistic regression models were adopted to assess the association between both work-organisational factors and personal factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in the neck/shoulder region was 24% and for distal upper extremity it was 16%. Elevated prevalence of upper body pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis of a MSD or a systemic illness, working more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work-rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction. Work-organisational and personal factors were associated with increased prevalence of moderate or severe upper body musculoskeletal pain among garment workers. Owners of sewing companies may be able to reduce or prevent WMSDs among employees by adopting rotations between different types of workstations thus increasing task variety; by either shortening work periods or increasing rest periods to reduce the work-rest ratio; and by improving the work-organisation to control psychosocial stressors. The findings may guide prevention efforts in the garment sector and have important public health implications for this workforce of largely immigrant labourers.

  10. Musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste collectors in Mansoura, Egypt: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Bestar, Sohair Fouad; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Awad, Ehab El-Sayed

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the percentage of musculoskeletal complaints and their possible risk factors among municipal solid waste (MSW) collectors. Design A descriptive cross-sectional study with a comparison group. Setting Primary level of care, at the Western Municipality of Mansoura City, Egypt. Participants A total of 160 male MSW collectors fulfilled the eligibility criteria and 120 of them participated in the study (response rate of 75%). The inclusion criteria were permanent or temporary solid waste collectors employed for 1 year or more. A comparison group of 110 male service workers at the Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, comparable to MSW collectors in most of the variables. Outcome The percentage of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among collectors, their risk factors (socio-demographic, psychosocial, physical), and the independent risk factors for having the disorders. Results The percentage of musculoskeletal complaints during the past 12 months was higher among MSW collectors (60.8%) than the comparison group (43.6%). Low back was the most frequently affected body region among MSW collectors. The differences in the distribution of musculoskeletal complaints between the two groups were statistically significant for the neck and hip/thigh regions. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among MSW collectors were the longer duration of employment (OR=0.4, 95% CI=0.1 to 0.9); low decision latitude (OR=0.3, 95% CI=0.1 to 0.7); lifting, pulling; pushing/carrying loads >20 kg (OR=5.5, 95% CI=1.8 to 17.0) and walking for long periods of time (OR=2.6, 95% CI=1.1 to 6.6). Conclusions Musculoskeletal complaints are highly prevalent among MSW collectors which require engineering, medical and legislative measures. We suggest further research in the interventions that could reduce the high percentage among collectors. PMID:22977187

  11. A team approach to musculo-skeletal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Rymaszewski, L. A.; Sharma, S.; McGill, P. E.; Murdoch, A.; Freeman, S.; Loh, T.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The majority of patients with musculo-skeletal problems referred to hospitals in the UK have to wait for months, if not over a year, before finally seeing an orthopaedic surgeon. In Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow, the waiting time for an out-patient appointment was 182 days in 1995, with only 20% of the referrals requiring surgery. The aim of this paper was to reduce the out-patient waiting times based on a co-ordinated team approach. METHODS: An outpatient musculo-skeletal service was developed over a 7-year period at Stobhill Hospital. The traditional consultant-based model, in which the consultant and a trainee saw all new patients referred to the hospital, was gradually replaced with a team approach, based on continuous reconfiguration of the roles of the orthopaedic surgeon and rheumatologist and extending the roles of nurses, physiotherapists and podiatrists. This was achieved by: (i) protocol-based daily triage for all referrals to the most appropriate health professional in the team, by the senior out-patient nursing staff; (ii) allocation of appointments based on clinical priority, with a fast-track for urgent cases; and (iii) improvement of inter-disciplinary communication, facilitating the retraction as well as the extension of traditional roles. RESULTS: Despite the number of GP referrals to the orthopaedic out-patient department at Stobhill nearly doubling in a period of 5 years, the out-patient waiting time decreased by about 50% (90 days from 182 days). This reduction in waiting times improved patient and GP satisfaction levels. We also noticed an improved morale and personal development of the health professionals as they saw patients appropriate to their skills and expertise. CONCLUSION: The team's experience demonstrates the effectiveness of a team approach in tackling what is often seen as the insoluble problem of orthopaedic waiting times. This is based on excellent communication and collaboration, with a clear aim of improving patient

  12. Factors Associated With Musculoskeletal Injuries in Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jeffrey A.; Knight, Lisa M.; Wang, Yinding; Jerrell, Jeanette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal injuries may be associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom severity, comorbid psychiatric or medical conditions, and the prescribed psychostimulant. Methods: A population-based, retrospective cohort design was employed using South Carolina’s Medicaid claims data set covering outpatient and inpatient medical services and medication prescriptions over an 11-year period (January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2006) for patients ≤ 17 years of age with ≥ 2 visits for ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes for ADHD. A cohort of 7,725 cases was identified and analyzed using logistic regression to compare risk factors for those who sustained focal musculoskeletal injuries and those who did not. Results: The risk of sustaining sprains, arthropathy and connective tissue disorders, or muscle and joint disorders was significantly related to being diagnosed with comorbid hypertension (adjusted odds ratios [aORs] = 1.60, 2.09, and 1.46, respectively) and a substance use disorder (aORs = 1.58, 1.38, and 1.28). Having a substance use disorder was also related to incident fractures and dorso/spinal injuries (aORs = 1.42 and 1.21). Diagnosed hypertension was related to incident concussions (aOR = 2.00), a diagnosed thyroid disorder was related to an increased risk of sprain and concussion (aORs = 1.44 and 2.05), a diagnosed anxiety disorder was related to an increased risk of dorso/spinal disorders (aOR = 1.71), and diagnosed diabetes was related to incident bone and cartilage disorders (aOR = 1.61). Conclusions: Comorbid hypertension, substance use disorders, and thyroid disorders deserve increased clinical surveillance in children and adolescents with ADHD because they may be associated with an increased risk of more than one musculoskeletal injury. PMID:27733957

  13. [Musculoskeletal disorders and work-related injuries among hospital day- and shift workers].

    PubMed

    D'Agostin, Flavia; Negro, Corrado

    2014-07-16

    Most research findings show that shift-and night work are associated with cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders as well as work-related injuries among health care workers. This sample based study on 246 hospital workers was performed to determine whether shift work may affect musculoskeletal disorders and injury risk. During the health surveillance program, data were collected by means of the Nordic questionnaire and the risk evaluation document. A sample of 134 shift workers was compared to a sample of 112 day workers. Hospital day workers were found  to be at greater risk of musculoskeletal symptoms in single or multiple body sites than shift workers. The prevalence of symptoms in the low back (63% vs 50%), neck (54% vs 42%) and upper extremities (26% vs 12%) was significantly higher in day workers than shift workers. In particular, among day nurses the prevalence of complaints in the upper extremities was more elevated (p<0,01) than nurses working in shifts; whereas, technicians working during the day reported more frequently symptoms in the neck (p<0,05) than technicians working in shifts. However, the average age and work experience were significantly higher in day workers than shift workers. Furthermore, the study showed that nursing personnel  was at great risk of sustaining an occupational musculoskeletal injury, especially for nurses working in shifts on medical and surgical wards. Data suggest that, concerning shift work planning, it is important to consider the workload according to activity.

  14. Effects of exercise on pain of musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elisângela Valevein; Gomes, Anna Raquel Silveira; Tanhoffer, Aldre Izabel Pchevozniki; Leite, Neiva

    2014-01-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders are a major concern for public health and pain is the most important symptom. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of workplace exercises to control musculoskeletal pain and its frequency, intensity, duration and type of exercises used. The search was conducted systematically in Medline, Pubmed, Embase, Bireme, Web of Knowledge and Pedro databases. The keywords "workplace", "exercise" and "musculoskeletal disorders" were used combined. Randomized control trials which performed worksite exercises were selected and the studies were assessed by their methodological soundness. Ten articles were selected which investigated the resistance training, cardio respiratory exercises, Pilates, stretching, postural orientation and exercises for relaxation. Workplace resistance training performed at 70-85% RM, three times a week for 20 minutes promotes reduction of the pain in shoulders, wrists, cervical, dorsal and lumbar spine. However, there is no consensus regarding the total duration of the intervention for the decrease of musculoskeletal pain in these regions. Level of Evidence I, Therapeutic Studies Investigating the Results of Treatment, Systematic Review of RCTs (Randomized and Controlled Clinical Studies). PMID:25538482

  15. [Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors and Presence of Musculoskeletal disorders in Nursing Staff: A review of Studies and Meta-Analysis].

    PubMed

    Ballester Arias, Antonio Ramón; García, Ana María

    2017-04-07

    There is scientific evidence that psychosocial factors are significantly associated with discomfort and / or pain musculoskeletal complaints in nursing staff. The objective of the research was to analyze the association between occupational exposure to psychosocial factors at work and musculoskeletal damage in nursing staff. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies published up to 2015 in English, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish evaluating the association between musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial factors in the work of nursing staff. A search was made using the same strategies in the bibliographic databases Web of Science, MEDLINE (Pubmed), NIOSHIC and CINAHL. We assessed the quality of eligible studies, heterogeneity, and sensitivity analyzes. 64 studies were reviewed and quality criteria were accepted, accepting those of medium and high quality (n = 47). In a second screening, those that did not meet inclusion criteria were eliminated, with 36 studies being included in the meta-analysis. Statistically significant associations were found between high demands with discomfort and / or pain neck (OR 1.55, IC95%: 1.39-1.72). And between the effort-reward imbalance with discomfort and / or pain in any body region (OR 2.56, IC95%: 1.59-4.11). Heterogeneity was generally average and low for most subsets of the meta-analysis. Occupational exposure to psychosocial factors is associated with discomfort and / or pain in different body areas. Therefore, the improvement of the psychosocial environment has an impact on the reduction and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. "It was really nice to have someone"--lay people with musculoskeletal disorders request supportive relationships in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, G; Cedersund, E; Alexanderson, K; Hensing, G

    2001-12-01

    To explore the lay person's perspective on the rehabilitation process. A total of 20 interviews were conducted with women and men who had recent or more distant experience of sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses. Grounded theory was used, which includes an inductive approach and theoretical sampling. The interviews focused on the individuals' own stories and experiences of factors that promoted or hindered the rehabilitation process. The interviewees emphasized how and by whom they had been treated rather than what type of rehabilitation programmes they had attended. They focused on the importance of supportive relationships from the private. occupational, and health care arenas. The relationship with rehabilitation agents (professionals who implemented rehabilitation) was described as having either supportive or non-supportive qualities. Based on the interviewees' descriptions, a model was developed on the socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agent. The most promoting factor in the rehabilitation process was to have a professional mentor that is a rehabilitation agent who combines a supportive approach with individually chosen rehabilitation measures and goals. The lay person's perspective gave additional knowledge regarding rehabilitation and recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. The socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agents were emphasized by the interviewees and a model regarding these qualities was developed. This model needs to be tested further. A clinical implication of the present study is the need for rehabilitation agents to develop their communication skills further.

  17. Lean production and work-related musculoskeletal disorders: overviews of international and Swedish studies.

    PubMed

    Brännmark, Mikael; Håkansson, Malin

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed at summarizing the knowledge of the relationship between Lean and work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), and WMSD risk factors, in manufacturing companies. Literature search processes identified 23 publications studying this, in scientific journals. Eight included measurements of WMSD; three were mostly negative, two showed mixed results, one showed no results and two were mostly positive. Eighteen publications included measurements of WMSD risk factors; seven showed mostly negative results, eight showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one was inconclusive. Three literature reviews were identified, which studied this question; two were mostly negative, while the third was inconclusive. Also, 12 publications of grey literature studying Lean and WMSD risk factors in Swedish organizations were identified; nine showed mixed results, two showed mostly positive results and one showed mostly negative results. Due to the varying quality and study design of the publications, together with the few identified studies, it is difficult to compare them. The context and the implementation also likely affect the results. The general conclusion was that a Lean implementation may increase the risk of WMSD and risk factors for WMSD, if it is not accompanied with an ergonomic intervention.

  18. Factors affecting the musculoskeletal disorders of workers in the frozen food manufacturing factories in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Meepradit, Parvena; Jaidee, Wanlop

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study factors affecting musculoskeletal disorders. The sample population of the study was 528 factory workers from the frozen food industry, as well as a controlled group of 255 office workers. The samples were collected during interviews using the Nordic questionnaire to assess musculoskeletal disorders, and to assess the risk by the rapid upper limb assessment and rapid entire body assessment techniques. The findings of the study were that most symptoms were found in the dissecting department, higher than in the controlled group. The details of the symptoms were, accordingly: elbow pain (adjusted odds ratio, 35.1; 95% CI [17.4, 70.9]). Regarding the risk of alcohol drinking, workers were exposed to more risks when alcohol was consumed. It is suggested that workers' health should be monitored regularly. People who work in a cold environment should be encouraged to wear body protection and to avoid drinking.

  19. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently.

  20. Comparative reliability of different instruments used to measure the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Ardalan; Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri Mohd; Arumugam, Manohar; Danaee, Mahmoud; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-06-08

    The accuracy of instruments such as questionnaires and the goniometer are critical for measuring the severity of musculoskeletal disorders among office workers. To determine the reliability of the Cornell questionnaire, goniometer and Borg questionnaire, which are commonly used instruments to assess the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers. One hundred twenty healthy office workers, body mass: 87.1 ± 10.3 (kg), age: 27 ± 5.1 (years), height: 1.78 ± 0.16 (m), (mean ± SD), who had at least 1 year of experience in office working, were chosen randomly. A plastic goniometer (30" height) was used three times to measure the range of motion in the neck, hip, knee and shoulder area, with a period of one hour between measurements to evaluate the test-retest accuracy. The Cornell questionnaire was used to measure the severity of musculoskeletal disorders and the Borg scale was used to measure perceived exertion. The questionnaires were filled out twice with a gap of 2 weeks between measurements. The Inter-class Correlation Co-efficient (ICC) indicated that all instrument sub-scales showed high levels of repeatability. The ICC coefficient was (0.805-0.954, p <0.001) for the Borg scale, (0.785-0.978, p <0.001) for the goniometer and (0.883-0.975, p <0.001) for the Cornell questionnaire. The Cornell questionnaire, goniometer and Borg questionnaire all exhibit high reliability when used for the evaluation of the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

  1. Civil engineering airman at increased risk for injuries and injury-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Webb, Timothy S; Wells, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    With the advent of electronic records, the opportunity to conduct research on workplace-related injuries and musculoskeletal disorders has increased dramatically. The purpose of this study was to examine the United States Air Force Civil Engineering career field to determine if they are negatively impacted by their work environment. Specifically, the objective of this study was to determine if enlisted Civil Engineering Airmen (n = 25,385) were at increased risk for injury or injury-related musculoskeletal disorders compared to enlisted Information Management/Communications Airmen (n = 28,947). Using an historical prospective design, electronic data were assembled and analyzed using Cox's proportional hazards modeling. Models were stratified by gender and adjusted for race/ethnicity, marital status, birth year, and deployment status. Male Civil Engineers were observed to be at greater risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.54-2.26) and injuries (HR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.48-2.11), while female Civil Engineers were more than double the risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.28-3.73) and injuries (HR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.27-3.88) compared to Information Management/Communications Airmen. Although analyses do not allow exploration of specific causes, they highlight the utility of using electronic data to identify occupations for further evaluation. Based on these results, additional resources were allocated to survey Civil Engineers on their physical work demands and job requirements to identify key problem areas for further study and mitigation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Effects of drop out in a longitudinal study of musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bildt, C; Alfredsson, L; Punnett, L; Theobald, H; Torgen, M; Wikman, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The drop out rates in different longitudinal studies of musculoskeletal disorders range between 7% and 57%, and little is known about the characteristics of the subjects who dropped out. The aim was to analyse various consequences of drop out in a longitudinal study of musculoskeletal disorders and occupational risk factors during 1969-97.
METHOD—Data about occupational conditions and health in 1969 and in 1993 were analysed. Differences between those who participated throughout (participants) and drop out subjects in these analyses formed the basis for recalculations of earlier reported analyses of associations between occupational conditions and low back pain. In the recalculation the data were weighted to compensate for the differences.
RESULTS—More female and male drop out subjects than participants in 1993 had monotonous work, fewer women and more male drop out subjects had heavy lifting in 1969. In 1997, more female and male drop out subjects had had heavy lifting and low stimulation at work in 1993. At both occasions, there were differences between the drop out subjects and participants in occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. The weighted analyses resulted in changes in risk ratio of 0.1-0.2.
CONCLUSIONS—Differences in occupational conditions and health among participants and drop out subjects in a longitudinal study of musculoskeletal disorders and occupational risk factors during 1969-97 did not markedly influence the risk ratios.


Keywords: panel study; non-response; survey method; methodological study PMID:11171933

  3. The Influence of Smoking on Disability Following Hospitalization for Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    of return to work for relatively minor disabilities. Specific musculoskeletal diagnoses (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, back or neck sprain...off work, and greater levels of pain and disability among patients with low back pain, lower extremity fracture, and upper extremity disorders (Coste...exposure to nicotine; - smoking may reduce calcium absorption; - smoking results in greater risk of falls among the elderly (see Slade, 1995) Frymoyer

  4. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently. PMID:25995567

  5. Effects of an adapted mattress in musculoskeletal pain and sleep quality in institutionalized elders

    PubMed Central

    Ancuelle, Victor; Zamudio, Rodrigo; Mendiola, Andrea; Guillen, Daniel; Ortiz, Pedro J; Tello, Tania; Vizcarra, Darwin

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact in sleep quality and musculoskeletal pain of a Medium-Firm Mattress (MFM), and their relationship with objective sleep parameters in a group of institutionalized elders. The sample size included forty older adults with musculoskeletal pain. We did a clinical assessment at baseline and weekly trough the study period of four weeks. We employed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Pain Visual Analog Scale (P-VAS). Additionally a sub-group of good sleepers, selected from PSQI baseline evaluation, were studied with actigraphy and randomized to MFM or High Firm Mattress (HFM), in two consecutive nights. We found a significant reduction of cervical, dorsal and lumbar pain. PSQI results did not change. The actigraphy evaluation found a significant shorter sleep onset latency with MFM, and a slightly better, but not statistically significant, sleep efficiency. The medium firmness mattress improved musculoskeletal pain and modified the sleep latency. PMID:26779317

  6. An international review of musculoskeletal disorders in the dental hygiene profession.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Melanie J; Smith, Derek R; Cockrell, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    This review of the current literature is aimed at examining musculoskeletal disorders in dental hygienists, and investigates the complex nature of this significant occupational health issue. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) have been identified as a significant issue for the profession of dental hygiene. The purpose of this review is to examine and assemble the best evidence on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, interventions, prevention, impact and consequences of MSD among the dental hygiene profession. The prevalence of MSD is alarming, with up to 96% reporting pain, and a number of occupational risk factors have been identified by the literature. Studies investigating interventions are generally limited in their study design, which is concerning given the huge impact MSD can have on the practising dental hygienist. Overall, it is evident from the literature that MSD is a complex and multifactorial problem. However, a complete understanding of the progression of musculoskeletal disorders is still far from being realised, due to the lack of longitudinal studies and standardised research techniques. Future research should implement triangulation methods in longitudinal studies, a strategy which will go a long way in the understanding of this complex occupational health issue.

  7. Gender differences in prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among the rice farmers of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Banibrata

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorder is one of the major health hazards among the rice farmers. Both men and women rice farmers have been shown to experience elevated risks of prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). To estimate the different ergonomic risk factors associated with rice farming identify potential gender differences and the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among the rice farmers. Rice farmers - 110 men and 110 women were selected from the villages of West Bengal, India. Modified Nordic Questionnaires were administered to assess the prevalence of MSDs. Detailed posture analysis was performed along with the administration of the Body-part Discomfort Scale. Objective measurements of physiological parameters and lung function values were also recorded. From this study it was revealed that the most subjects (99%) suffered discomfort at different parts of the body especially at low back (93.8%), shoulder (60.9%), hand (53.6%) and knee (80.9%) due to awkward posture (99%) and excessive repetitive task (95%) for a prolonged period of time. Both group of rice farmers suffered maximum discomfort feeling during digging (87.7%), showing seeds (82.7%), harvesting (90.9%) and carrying crops (99%) activities. The farmers also suffered from severe physiological and thermal stress which hampered their other daily activities. The study conclude that women farmers felt significantly (p< 0.001) higher discomfort feeling than men rice farmers due to perform numerous household activities which further enhanced their discomfort feeling in their different body parts.

  8. Evaluation of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation as a Treatment of Neck Pain due to Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maayah, Mikhled; Al-Jarrah, Mohammed

    2010-05-19

    This study was designed to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders within the context of a physiotherapy treatment. Thirty subjects with neck pain were randomly allocated to two groups, treated with either TENS (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Each subject received one session for one hour. All subjects were evaluated before, during treatment, after switch off and again a week after by using Myometer machine. All subjects completed the follow-up assessment. Subjects referred for out-subjects' physiotherapy department, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria, took part in the study. The assessments were compared and used to measure outcome treatment. Improvement in their condition was measured in terms of a reduction in the individual's level of pain during the week after the end of the first session. At the end of the first session, the study showed that 11 subjects (73%) in the treatment and 7 subjects (43%) in the control groups had gained marked improvement. These results are statistically highly significant, (P = 0.01) at the end of the follow-up assessment. A conclusion could be drawn that a single intense TENS treatment is an effective treatment for neck pain due to musculoskeletal disorders. On the other hand, TENS showed an effective pain relief with subjects who have a mild neck pain rather than those with severe symptoms. Musculoskeletal disorders; Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; Neck pain.

  9. Health status, work limitations, and return-to-work trajectories in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Côté, Pierre; Lee, Hyunmi; Severin, Colette; Vidmar, Marjan; Carnide, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the health status and work limitations in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders at 1 month post-injury, stratified by return-to-work status, and to document their return-to-work trajectories 6 months post-injury. Methods A sample of 632 workers with a back or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder, who filed a Workplace Safety and Insurance Board lost-time claim injury, participated in this prospective study. Participants were assessed at baseline (1 month post-injury) and at 6 months follow-up. Results One month post-injury, poor physical health, high levels of depressive symptoms and high work limitations are prevalent in workers, including in those with a sustained first return to work. Workers with a sustained first return to work report a better health status and fewer work limitations than those who experienced a recurrence of work absence or who never returned to work. Six months post-injury, the rate of recurrence of work absence in the trajectories of injured workers who have made at least one return to work attempt is high (38%), including the rate for workers with an initial sustained first return to work (27%). Conclusions There are return-to-work status specific health outcomes in injured workers. A sustained first return to work is not equivalent to a complete recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:17616838

  10. Risk Factors of Work-related Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders in Male Shipyard Workers: Structural Equation Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung-Chan; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Soo Geun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to develop a model describing the interaction between lifestyle, job, and postural factors and parts of the upper extremities in shipyard workers. Methods A questionnaire survey was given to 2,140 workers at a shipyard in Ulsan City. The questionnaire consisted of questions regarding the subjects' general characteristics, lifestyle, tenure, physical burden, job control, posture and musculoskeletal symptoms. The overall relationship between variables was analyzed by a structural equation model (SEM). Results The positive rate of upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms increased in employees who worked longer hours, had severe physical burden, and did not have any control over their job. Work with a more frequent unstable posture and for longer hours was also associated with an increased positive rate of musculoskeletal symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that unstable posture and physical burden were closely related to the positive rate of musculoskeletal symptoms after controlling for age, smoking, drinking, exercise, tenure, and job control. In SEM analysis, work-related musculoskeletal disease was influenced directly and indirectly by physical and job stress factors, lifestyle, age, and tenure (p < 0.05). The strongest correlations were found between physical factors and work-related musculoskeletal disease. Conclusion The model in this study provides a better approximation of the complexity of the actual relationship between risk factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Among the variables evaluated in this study, physical factors (work posture) had the strongest association with musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22953172

  11. Change in Musculoskeletal Pain in Patients With Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder After Tailored Rehabilitation Education: A One-Year Follow-Up Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hun; Kang, Boram; Choi, Seungyoung; Kim, Taikon; Jang, Seong Ho; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-Bog

    2015-01-01

    Objective To apply tailored rehabilitation education to video display terminal (VDT) workers with musculoskeletal pain and to assess changes in musculoskeletal pain after rehabilitation education. Methods A total of 8,828 VDT workers were screened for musculoskeletal disorders using a self-report questionnaire. Six hundred twenty-six VDT workers selected based on their questionnaires were enrolled in musculoskeletal rehabilitation education, which consisted of education on VDT syndrome and confirmed diseases, exercise therapy including self-stretching and strengthening, and posture correction. One year later, a follow-up screening survey was performed on 316 VDT workers, and the results were compared with the previous data. Results Compared with the initial survey, pain intensity was significantly decreased in the neck area; pain duration and frequency were significantly decreased in the low back area; and pain duration, intensity, and frequency were significantly decreased in the shoulder and wrist after tailored rehabilitation education. In addition, pain duration, intensity, and frequency showed a greater significant decrease after tailored rehabilitation education in the mild pain group than in the severe pain group. Conclusions This study found that work-related musculoskeletal pain was reduced after tailored rehabilitation education, especially in the shoulder, wrist, and low back. PMID:26605170

  12. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among brick kiln workers in rural Southern India.

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, Leeberk Raja; Haebar, Obed John; Saj, Fenn; Dawson, Samantha; Paul, Peter; Prabhakar, Abhilash Kundavaram Paul; Mohan, Venkata Raghava; Alex, Reginald George

    2013-05-01

    A variety of musculoskeletal disorders and discomfort are seen among brick kiln workers, where heavy physical work is associated with awkward working postures and manual handling of materials, leading to significant morbidity. This cross-sectional study was conducted in unorganized brick kiln industries in villages of Vellore district of Tamil Nadu and included 310 brick kiln workers. Modified Nordic Questionnaire was used to survey the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and the intensity of pain was assessed by the body pain discomfort scale. The mean age of the workers was 37 ± 13.2 years with a range of 18-85 years. 62% (n = 192) had normal body mass index, whereas 27% (n = 85) were undernourished. The commonest posture adopted at work was squatting (67%) followed by standing (14%). Majority of workers (87%, n = 269) reported to having symptoms of pain currently of which 51% (n = 158) had pain during work. Chronic low back ache (LBA) (1 year prevalence -59%) and acute LBA (1 week prevalence-33%) were the commonest followed by chronic knee pain. More than 10 years of work was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with acute LBA and acute and chronic knee pain. Severity of the pain was also significantly (t statistic 2.476, P < 0.05) associated with job dissatisfaction. Long-term brick kiln workers, who adopt a specific posture for prolonged periods, have severe musculoskeletal pain that interferes with activities of daily living and reduces job satisfaction. Health education on frequent postural change, implementation and monitoring of laws among unorganized industries are recommended to bring down morbidity due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD).

  13. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among brick kiln workers in rural Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Inbaraj, Leeberk Raja; Haebar, Obed John; Saj, Fenn; Dawson, Samantha; Paul, Peter; Prabhakar, Abhilash Kundavaram Paul; Mohan, Venkata Raghava; Alex, Reginald George

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of musculoskeletal disorders and discomfort are seen among brick kiln workers, where heavy physical work is associated with awkward working postures and manual handling of materials, leading to significant morbidity. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in unorganized brick kiln industries in villages of Vellore district of Tamil Nadu and included 310 brick kiln workers. Modified Nordic Questionnaire was used to survey the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and the intensity of pain was assessed by the body pain discomfort scale. Results: The mean age of the workers was 37 ± 13.2 years with a range of 18-85 years. 62% (n = 192) had normal body mass index, whereas 27% (n = 85) were undernourished. The commonest posture adopted at work was squatting (67%) followed by standing (14%). Majority of workers (87%, n = 269) reported to having symptoms of pain currently of which 51% (n = 158) had pain during work. Chronic low back ache (LBA) (1 year prevalence -59%) and acute LBA (1 week prevalence-33%) were the commonest followed by chronic knee pain. More than 10 years of work was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with acute LBA and acute and chronic knee pain. Severity of the pain was also significantly (t statistic 2.476, P < 0.05) associated with job dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Long-term brick kiln workers, who adopt a specific posture for prolonged periods, have severe musculoskeletal pain that interferes with activities of daily living and reduces job satisfaction. Health education on frequent postural change, implementation and monitoring of laws among unorganized industries are recommended to bring down morbidity due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). PMID:24421594

  14. Whiplash-associated disorder: musculoskeletal pain and related clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the physical and psychological processes associated with whiplash-associated disorders. There is now much scientific data available to indicate the presence of disturbed nociceptive processing, stress system responses, muscle and motor changes as well as psychological factors in both acute and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Some of these factors seem to be associated with the transition from acute to chronic pain and have demonstrated prognostic capacity. Further investigation is required to determine if these processes can be modified and if modification will lead to improved outcomes for this condition. The burden of whiplash injuries, the high rate of transition to chronicity, and evidence of limited effects of current management on transition rates demand new directions in evaluation and management. The understanding of processes underlying this condition is improving and this lays the foundation for the development of more effective management approaches. PMID:23115472

  15. Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Hallman, David M; Hellström, Fredrik; Björklund, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Barbe, Mary F; Ali, Sayed

    2017-09-12

    This study systematically summarizes quantitative imaging biomarker research in non-traumatic neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There were two research questions: 1) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the presence of neck and shoulder MSDs?, 2) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the severity of neck and shoulder MSDs? PubMed and SCOPUS were used for the literature search. One hundred and twenty-five studies met primary inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from 49 sufficient quality studies. Most of the 125 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. Only half controlled for potential confounders via exclusion or in the analysis. Approximately one-third reported response rates. In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. The literature synthesis suggested that neck muscle size may be decreased in neck pain, and trapezius myalgia and neck/shoulder pain may be associated with reduced vascularity in the trapezius and reduced trapezius oxygen saturation at rest and in response to upper extremity tasks. Reduced vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon may also be a feature in rotator cuff tears. Five of eight studies showed an association between a quantitative imaging marker and MSD severity. Although research on quantitative imaging biomarkers is still in a nascent stage, some MSD biomarkers were identified. There are limitations in the articles examined, including possible selection bias and inattention to potentially confounding factors. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

  16. Prevalence and Perceptions of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Hospital Nurses in Pakistan: A Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Attique, Rayan; Asmaa, Yumna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Nursing is a professionally demanding job, and nurses are prone to develop musculoskeletal disorders. However, no data is available regarding its prevalence among Pakistani nurses. This study was conducted to document the pattern of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) in Pakistani nurses and their perceptions about contributing factors and management of WRMDs. Methods A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted in six hospitals in Lahore and Rawalpindi, which were selected using a convenient sampling technique. A four-part questionnaire comprised of demographic data, experience of musculoskeletal disorders, and perception of management and contributing factors of WRMDs was distributed among 150 nurses. One hundred and seventeen nurses returned completed forms. Data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics v20 (IBM, Armonk, New York, USA). Ethics review committee approval was obtained by CMH Lahore Medical College and the Institute of Dentistry, and informed consent was obtained. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders over a 12-month period was 31.6%, with the most common site being the low back (32%) followed by the shoulder (20%), upper back, and knees (10%). Among those affected, 60.6% sought professional help. Married nurses were more prone to WRMDs (p=0.0001). Regarding management, most (94%) agreed that rest is required to get better, neglecting problems of this kind can cause permanent health problems (89.7%), and physical activity should be avoided (38.7%). Working in the same positions for long periods (93.1%), attending an excessive number of patients in one day (81.2%), and working in awkward and cramped positions (78.6%) were the most commonly perceived risk factors for WRMDs. Conclusion About one-third of Pakistani nurses in this cohort reported work-related musculoskeletal disorders with the low back most commonly affected. There is a need to increase awareness regarding ergonomics and posture

  17. Prevalence and Perceptions of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Hospital Nurses in Pakistan: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Farooq A; Attique, Rayan; Asmaa, Yumna

    2017-01-26

    Nursing is a professionally demanding job, and nurses are prone to develop musculoskeletal disorders. However, no data is available regarding its prevalence among Pakistani nurses. This study was conducted to document the pattern of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) in Pakistani nurses and their perceptions about contributing factors and management of WRMDs. A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted in six hospitals in Lahore and Rawalpindi, which were selected using a convenient sampling technique. A four-part questionnaire comprised of demographic data, experience of musculoskeletal disorders, and perception of management and contributing factors of WRMDs was distributed among 150 nurses. One hundred and seventeen nurses returned completed forms. Data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics v20 (IBM, Armonk, New York, USA). Ethics review committee approval was obtained by CMH Lahore Medical College and the Institute of Dentistry, and informed consent was obtained. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders over a 12-month period was 31.6%, with the most common site being the low back (32%) followed by the shoulder (20%), upper back, and knees (10%). Among those affected, 60.6% sought professional help. Married nurses were more prone to WRMDs (p=0.0001). Regarding management, most (94%) agreed that rest is required to get better, neglecting problems of this kind can cause permanent health problems (89.7%), and physical activity should be avoided (38.7%). Working in the same positions for long periods (93.1%), attending an excessive number of patients in one day (81.2%), and working in awkward and cramped positions (78.6%) were the most commonly perceived risk factors for WRMDs. About one-third of Pakistani nurses in this cohort reported work-related musculoskeletal disorders with the low back most commonly affected. There is a need to increase awareness regarding ergonomics and posture maintenance to reduce WRMDs and improve patient

  18. The effectiveness of job rotation to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders: protocol of a cluster randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Comper, Maria Luiza Caires; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    2014-05-22

    Job rotation has often been used in situations where the level of exposure cannot be reduced due to the characteristics of the job or through physical measures. However, the effectiveness of the job rotation strategy at preventing musculoskeletal complaints lacks adequate scientific data. A cluster randomized controlled trial will be used to investigate the effectiveness of job rotation to prevent musculoskeletal disorders in industrial workers. The randomized cluster was based in characteristics of production sectors. A total cluster will be 4 sectors, and 957 workers will be recruited from a textile industry and randomly allocated into intervention or control groups. Both groups will receive training on ergonomics guidelines. In addition, the intervention group will perform job rotation, switching between tasks with low, moderate, and high risk for musculoskeletal complaints. The primary outcome will be the number of working hours lost due to sick leave by musculoskeletal injuries recorded in employee administrative data bases. Secondary outcomes measured via survey include: body parts with musculoskeletal pain, the intensity of this pain, physical workload, fatigue, general health status, physical activity level, and work productivity. Secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from the societal and company perspective. Prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders is beneficial for workers, employers, and society. The results of this study will provide new information about the effectiveness of job rotation as a strategy to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders. NCT01979731, November 3, 2013.

  19. Evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders in sewing machine operators of a shoe manufacturing factory in Iran.

    PubMed

    Aghili, Mir Masih Moslemi; Asilian, Hasan; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2012-03-01

    A 15-year research conducted in USA showed that compensation expenses paid to workers for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of back exceeded 128 million Dollars calculated on the basis of 0.97 Dollars per hour of work. In addition, according to the latest studies carried out in relation with disease burdens with risk factors in Iran, DALYs indices for low back pain, knee arthrosis and other musculoskeletal disorders have been reported to be 307772, 291305 and 872633 respectively, which have caused the work related diseases to occupy the second position in the country, after cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, in accordance with occupational health indices of Iranian health ministry, 37% of all working population had had poor work postures with 15% of all working population had been working with inappropriate working tools in the year 2009. This was a case study comparing exposed workers with control group using Standard Nordic Questionnair in sewing machine operators of a shoe manufacturing factory in Iran. In this study, the mentioned questionnaires were filled out for the exposed group (25 sewing machine operators with average age of 43.5 years with work records of 16.8 years) and control group (15 employees from administrative department with average age of 39.8 years with work records of 13.4 years) which both were selected through simple random method. There were statistically significant differences in age between musculoskeletal disorders of right elbow (p = 0.033), thigh (p = 0.044), both knees (p = 0.019) and ankles (p = 0.039). There were also statistically significant association between gender and musculoskeletal disorders of right elbow (p = 0.028), thigh (p = 0.026) both knees (p = 0.011); right shoulder disorders (p = 0.018) and work records; disorders of both knees (p = 0.031) and number of cigarettes smoked. In general, prevalence of disorders of cervical area, shoulders with hands, vertebral column, back, knees, thigh with feet were higher

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste workers in India: A cross-sectional risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Endreddy Manikanta; Yasobant, Sandul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Waste management is a necessary activity around the world, but involves a variety of health hazards. In a developing country like India, municipal solid waste is collected manually requiring heavy physical activity. Among all occupational health issues, musculoskeletal problems are common among waste collectors in the form of nonfatal injuries because of the presence of such risk factors (lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing). We have thus conducted this study to evaluate musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among municipal solid waste (MSW) workers. Methodology: A cross-sectional study using probability proportionate to size sampling, recruited 220 MSW workers from the Chennai Municipal Corporation, India for this study. A pretested validated questionnaire has been used to collect data on demographic and occupational history and information on musculoskeletal pain. Data analysis was performed using R software (3.0.1 version). Results: 70% of the participants reported that they had been troubled with musculoskeletal pain in one or more of the 9 defined body regions during the last 12 months, whereas 91.8% had pain during the last 7 days. Higher prevalence of symptoms in knees, shoulders, and lower back was found to be 84.5%, 74.5%, and 50.9% respectively. Female illiterate workers with lower socioeconomic status were found to have higher odds for MSDs. Similarly, higher body mass index having no physical activity increases the chance of odds having MSDs. Conclusion: The higher percentage of musculoskeletal symptoms among MSW workers could be attributed to the long duration of employment, the low job control, and the nature of their job, which is physically demanding. A workplace of health promotion model integration can minimize the reported high prevalence, and a prospective cohort study could be recommended further. PMID:26985409

  1. Effectiveness of workplace interventions in the prevention of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and symptoms: an update of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Van Eerd, D; Munhall, C; Irvin, E; Rempel, D; Brewer, S; van der Beek, A J; Dennerlein, J T; Tullar, J; Skivington, K; Pinion, C; Amick, B

    2016-01-01

    The burden of disabling musculoskeletal pain and injuries (musculoskeletal disorders, MSDs) arising from work-related causes in many workplaces remains substantial. There is little consensus on the most appropriate interventions for MSDs. Our objective was to update a systematic review of workplace-based interventions for preventing and managing upper extremity MSD (UEMSD). We followed a systematic review process developed by the Institute for Work & Health and an adapted best evidence synthesis. 6 electronic databases were searched (January 2008 until April 2013 inclusive) yielding 9909 non-duplicate references. 26 high-quality and medium-quality studies relevant to our research question were combined with 35 from the original review to synthesise the evidence on 30 different intervention categories. There was strong evidence for one intervention category, resistance training, leading to the recommendation: Implementing a workplace-based resistance training exercise programme can help prevent and manage UEMSD and symptoms. The synthesis also revealed moderate evidence for stretching programmes, mouse use feedback and forearm supports in preventing UEMSD or symptoms. There was also moderate evidence for no benefit for EMG biofeedback, job stress management training, and office workstation adjustment for UEMSD and symptoms. Messages are proposed for both these and other intervention categories.

  2. Effectiveness of workplace interventions in the prevention of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and symptoms: an update of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Van Eerd, D; Munhall, C; Irvin, E; Rempel, D; Brewer, S; van der Beek, A J; Dennerlein, J T; Tullar, J; Skivington, K; Pinion, C; Amick, B

    2016-01-01

    The burden of disabling musculoskeletal pain and injuries (musculoskeletal disorders, MSDs) arising from work-related causes in many workplaces remains substantial. There is little consensus on the most appropriate interventions for MSDs. Our objective was to update a systematic review of workplace-based interventions for preventing and managing upper extremity MSD (UEMSD). We followed a systematic review process developed by the Institute for Work & Health and an adapted best evidence synthesis. 6 electronic databases were searched (January 2008 until April 2013 inclusive) yielding 9909 non-duplicate references. 26 high-quality and medium-quality studies relevant to our research question were combined with 35 from the original review to synthesise the evidence on 30 different intervention categories. There was strong evidence for one intervention category, resistance training, leading to the recommendation: Implementing a workplace-based resistance training exercise programme can help prevent and manage UEMSD and symptoms. The synthesis also revealed moderate evidence for stretching programmes, mouse use feedback and forearm supports in preventing UEMSD or symptoms. There was also moderate evidence for no benefit for EMG biofeedback, job stress management training, and office workstation adjustment for UEMSD and symptoms. Messages are proposed for both these and other intervention categories. PMID:26552695

  3. Risk factors for visiting a medical department because of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Werner, Robert A; Franzblau, Alfred; Gell, Nancy; Hartigan, Anne G; Ebersole, Marissa; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-04-01

    This study followed 279 auto assembly workers over 1 year to identify which factors influenced whether a worker would visit the plant medical department because of an upper-extremity musculoskeletal problem. Incident cases were defined as involving workers who had not gone to the plant medical department in the preceding 6 months and then subsequently visited the medical department with a work-related musculoskeletal disorder that was potentially due to repetitive work activity (acute fractures or lacerations were excluded). There were 45 cases identified during the study period. Based on Cox regression analysis, significant predictors for visiting a medical department included exceeding the threshold limit value for hand activity and peak force, a history of diabetes, a current diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, elbow tendonitis, and age under 40 years. The results of this study are consistent with those of other prospective studies that showed that both ergonomic and past medical history are risk factors for an upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder and suggests that there is a healthy worker or survivor effect among older workers.

  4. Relationship between construction workers' musculoskeletal disorders and occupational health service activities.

    PubMed

    Minna, Savinainen; Mika, Nyberg

    2012-01-01

    Construction work consists of numerous factors that influence workers' occupational health and that load the musculoskeletal system in particular. Musculoskeletal disorders are responsible for over a third of all sick leaves lasting over nine days in the construction industry. Occupational health services (OHS) were organized for 85% of the construction workers in our study. The proportion of construction workers who had suffered from chronic or repetitive neck and shoulder, shoulder or arm, or low-back disorders was 55.6%, 44.8% and 42.1%, respectively. Those who felt that they had received enough information, advice or guidance from OHS concerning work posture, work performance or work tools were more often those who had not suffered from shoulder or arm disorders (60.9% vs. 39.1%, p=.024, respectively) or low-back disorders (63.6% vs. 36.4%, p=.034, respectively) during the last month than those who had. Those who had received enough support from OHS concerning maintenance of work ability were more often workers who had not suffered from low-back disorders during the last month than those who had (63.3% vs. 36.7%, p=.004, respectively). OHS should focus more on workers who would really benefit from their activities at a particular time and in a particular situation (primary, secondary or tertiary prevention) and who are themselves devoted to improving their health.

  5. Association between psychosocial, organizational and personal factors and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.

    PubMed

    Piranveyseh, Peyman; Motamedzade, Majid; Osatuke, Katerine; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational and personal (individual) factors with the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in office workers of the Iranian Gas Transmission Company. The participants rated two questionnaires - the standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to measure the prevalence of MSDs, and the Veterans Healthcare Administration All Employee Survey questionnaire (2004 version) - to measure psychosocial, organizational and individual aspects of job satisfaction and workplace climate. The highest prevalence of MSDs was found in the lower back (49.7%) and neck (49.0%) regions. Results of the logistic regression models showed that some psychosocial and organizational factors and also some individual factors were associated with prevalence of MSDs (p < 0.05).These findings illustrate the need to consider all elements of the work system as a whole in future studies and in organizational planning.

  6. Subjective Mental Workload and Its Correlation With Musculoskeletal Disorders in Bank Staff.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Ebrahim; Maleki, Afshin; Giahi, Omid; Akbarzadeh, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of subjective mental workload (SMWL) and its correlation with musculoskeletal disorders among bank staff members in Kurdistan Province located in western Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 bank staff members in Kurdistan Province, Iran. The mental workload was assessed using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) computerized version. NASA-TLX is a multidimensional rating procedure that derives an overall workload score based on a weighted average of ratings on 6 subscales. These subscales include Mental Demands, Physical Demands, Temporal Demands, Performance, Effort, Effectiveness, and Frustration. The musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) were documented with the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and generic body diagram. Of the staff members, 78.5% experienced pain at least once during the past year in 1 of their 9 musculoskeletal body regions. The highest frequencies of pain were in the neck and lower back. The NASA-TLX estimated the Effort and Performance scales with mean ± SD of 72.8 ± 25.2 and 36 ± 22.6, respectively, as the maximal and minimal scores among the 6 subscales of SMWL. The statistical analysis of the data revealed that there was a significant correlation between the overall mental workload score and also among the 6 subscales of SMWL separately with MSDs (P < .05). SMWL appears to be a risk factor in the incidence of MSDs, so that the odds of MSDs increased by 11% with each additional 1-point increase in SMWL score. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Subjective quality of life according to work status following interdisciplinary work rehabilitation consequent to musculoskeletal disability.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Carmen E; Durand, Marie-José; Desrosiers, Johanne; Coutu, Marie-France

    2007-12-01

    Individualized subjective quality of life (ISQoL) is the appraisal of quality of life according to personal values, desired goal attainment and life priorities. "Gap" is a way to operationalize ISQoL. ISQoL is rarely measured by interdisciplinary work rehabilitation (IWR) programs attended by the musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) population. These programs commonly measure pain intensity, physical capacity, perceived disability, distress and return to work. The aims of this study were to compare ISQoL according to work status and reference values and to explore the relationships between ISQoL and common IWR measures. Six months after completing an IWR program, 40 working and 31 not-working participants completed questionnaires documenting work status, pain, ISQoL gap, health-related quality of life (SF-36, PCS and MCS), perceived disability and distress. No significant difference in global ISQoL gap was found between working and not-working participants. When compared to reference values considerable variability exists but globally, for both groups, ISQoL gap scores were below average. The following clinical variables were related to global ISQoL (P < 0.05): pain (r = -0.42), PCS (r = -0.37), MCS (r = -0.56), perceived disability (r = 0.37) and distress (r = 0.61). High distress, present in both groups, explains 38% of the global ISQoL gap variance and PCS adds 4%. Following IWR programs for the chronic MSD population, global ISQoL gap is not related to work status. The use of a client-centered interactive computerized measure of ISQoL reveals that domains related to emotional well-being are likely the most problematic for the persistently disabled MSD population.

  8. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic risk factors in special education teachers and teacher's aides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Wong, Man-Ting; Yu, Yu-Chung; Ju, Yan-Ying

    2016-02-10

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) have become increasingly common among health-related professionals. Special education personnel who serve students with disabilities often experience physical strains; however, WMSDs have been overlooked in this population. The objectives of this study were to investigate the work-related ergonomics-associated factors in this population and to evaluate their correlation with the WMSDs prevalence. A questionnaire with three domains, namely demographics, prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and ergonomic factors, designed by our research team was delivered to educators who work in special education schools. Approximately 86 % of the 388 special education school teachers and teacher's aides in this study experienced musculoskeletal disorders. The lower back, shoulder, and wrist were the three most affected regions. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the participants' background factors, namely >5.5 years of experience (odds ratio [OR] = 4.090, 95 % CI: 1.350-12.390), students with multiple disorders (OR = 2.412, 95 % CI: 1.100-5.287), and other work-related ergonomic factors (assistance in diaper changing and others duties), were strongly associated with the prevalence of WMSD. Nap habit (OR = 0.442, 95 % CI: 0.230-0.851) and having teaching partners in the same class (OR = 0.486, 95 % CI: 0.250-0.945) resulted in low possibility of acquiring WMSDs. The use of supportive devices was associated with a low WMSD prevalence. The present study revealed an association between WMSDs and specific job features among teachers and teacher's aides in special education schools. Future efforts should emphasize examining safe student-handling ergonomics, formulating policies regarding student-teacher ratio, incorporating mandatory break times at the workplaces, and promoting personal health for preventing work-related injuries.

  9. Does the economy affect functional restoration outcomes for patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorders?

    PubMed

    Hartzell, Meredith M; Mayer, Tom G; Neblett, Randy; Marquardt, Dennis J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    To determine how the economy affects psychosocial and socioeconomic treatment outcomes in a cohort of chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorder (CDOMD) patients who completed a functional restoration program (FRP). A cohort of 969 CDOMD patients with active workers' compensation claims completed an FRP (a medically-supervised, quantitatively-directed exercise progression program, with multi-modal disability management). A good economy (GE) group (n = 532) was released to work during a low unemployment period (2005-2007), and a poor economy (PE) group (n = 437) was released during a higher unemployment period (2008-2010). Patients were evaluated upon admission for demographic and psychosocial variables, and were reassessed at discharge. Socioeconomic outcomes, including work return and work retention 1 year post-discharge, were collected. Some significant differences in psychosocial self-report data were found, but most of the effect sizes were small, so caution should be made when interpreting the data. Compared to the PE group, the GE group reported more depressive symptoms and disability at admission, but demonstrated a larger decrease in depressive symptoms and disability and increase in self-reported quality of life at discharge. The PE group had lower rates of work return and retention 1-year after discharge, even after controlling for other factors such as length of disability and admission work status. CDOMD patients who completed an FRP in a PE year were less likely to return to, or retain, work 1-year after discharge, demonstrating that a PE can be an additional barrier to post-discharge work outcomes. A difference in State unemployment rates of <3% (7 vs. 5%) had a disproportionate effect on patients' failure to return to (19 vs. 6%) or retain (28 vs. 15%) work.

  10. Relationship between musculoskeletal disorders, job demands, and burnout among emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Amany Sobhy; El-Maksoud, Mona M Abd

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) represent one of the most common occupational problems in nursing. MSDs can negatively impact one's quality of life. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between MSDs, job demands, and burnout among emergency nurses. The researchers hypothesized that increased job demands were associated with more MSDs and consequently higher levels of burnout. The study was conducted on a convenience sample of 58 nurses working in the emergency departments of Zagazig University Hospital and Al-Ahrar, Hospital Egypt from October to December 2010, using a cross-sectional analytic design. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire that included the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire, the Job Content Questionnaire, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results revealed that 32.8% of the nurses were overweight and 17.2% were obese. The most common sites of pain were the neck (67.2%), shoulder (65.5%), and lower back (63.8%). Lower back pain was the most common site affected (72.4%) with a mean 5.1 on a scale ranging from 0 to 13. A positive correlation existed between the scores of job demand and burnout (r = 0.340, p < 0.01), and the number of reported MSDs with the score of job demand (r = 0.33, p < 0.05). Multiple linear stepwise regression analysis identified the score of job demand and the severity of lower back pain as positive independent predictors of the burnout whereas the job demand score was the independent predictor of the number of MSDs. This study documents an increased prevalence of MSDs among emergency nurses, as predicted by increased job demand and associated with a higher level of burnout. Hence, it is important for hospital and nursing administrators to address the factors contributing to job stress and burnout, with emphasis on job satisfaction and work organization to alleviate the burden of psychosocial factors in this setting.

  11. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons: an OTA survey

    PubMed Central

    AlQahtani, Saad M.; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Harvey, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational injuries and hazards have gained increased attention in the surgical community in general and in the orthopedic literature specifically. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons and the impact of these injuries on the surgeons’ practices. Methods We sent a modified version of the physical discomfort survey to surgeon members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) via email. Data were collected and descriptive statistics were analyzed. Results A total of 86 surgeons completed the survey during the period of data collection; 84.9% were men, more than half were 45 years or older and 40.6% were in practice for 10 years or more. More than 66% of respondents reported a musculoskeletal disorder that was related to work; the most common was low back pain (29.3%). The number of body regions involved and disorders diagnosed was associated with increasing age and number of years in practice (p = 0.033). Time off work owing to these disorders was associated with working in a private setting (p = 0.045) and working in more than 1 institute (p = 0.009). Conclusion To our knowledge, our study is the first to report a high percentage of orthopedic trauma surgeons sustaining occupational injuries some time in their careers. The high cost of management and rehabilitation of these injuries in addition to the related number of missed work days indicate the need for increased awareness and implementation of preventive measures. PMID:26812408

  12. NIOSH research efforts to prevent musculoskeletal disorders in the healthcare industry.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas; Collins, James; Galinsky, Traci; Caruso, Claire

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare workers, including orthopaedic nurses, face a number of risk factors in the workplace for musculoskeletal disorders such as back and shoulder injuries. These disorders are associated with excessive back and shoulder loading due to manual patient handling, applying excessive forces during pushing and/or pulling of objects, required use of awkward postures during patient care, and working long hours and shiftwork. No healthcare workers are immune from injury because workers in all clinical areas are exposed to occupational risk factors, including hospitals, nursing homes, emergency services, critical care, operating rooms, orthopaedic units, and home healthcare environments. This article includes a summary of the scientific efforts of the researchers and their partners at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in evaluating and developing the best practice recommendations for reducing risk of these disorders for exposed workers. The studies conducted by NIOSH researchers and their partners approach the problem from a variety of perspectives, ranging from comprehensive epidemiological studies examining the effectiveness of implementation of a safe patient handling and movement program to laboratory studies evaluating the biomechanical stress associated with using patient handling equipment, and education training programs for use in schools of nursing to educate new workers about safe work practices. Results of these studies have provided scientific evidence that significant occupational risks for musculoskeletal disorders exist and that effective interventions are available to reduce the risk for these workers.

  13. Advanced quantitative imaging of musculoskeletal disorders (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rajeev; Halanski, Matthew; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone growth acceleration can occur in many animal species after periosteal resection (removal of a strip of periosteum) with minimum morbidity. This has numerous clinical applications, including treatment of limb length differences. Here we use Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to evaluate changes in collagen architecture reflective of the different strains the periosteum may encounter during bone growth. Specifically, we image rabbit tibial periosteum strips at -20%, 0%, 5%, and 10% strains. We first quantify these changes using the SHG creation ratio (Forward/Backward) or the initially emitted SHG directionality to provide information on the fibril level of assembly. The in situ (i.e. physiological) strain had the highest creation ratio compared to the non-in situ strains of -20%, 5%, and 10%, which were shown to be significantly different via RCBD statistical analysis. These trends are consistent with SHG phasematching considerations, where more organized fibrils/fibers result in primarily forward emitted components, which here is the physiological strain. We further use the relative SHG conversion efficiency to assess the tissue structure under strain, where this results from the combination of collagen concentration and organization. The 0% strain SHG conversion efficiency was significantly higher than all other strains, where this is expected as the fibers have the highest local density and organization, and is consistent with the emission directionality results. Importantly, due to the underlying physical process, the label-free SHG imaging modality can non-invasively monitor the effect of treatments for bone growth and other orthopedic disorders.

  14. Quality indicators for musculoskeletal injury management in the emergency department: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Kirsten; Nelson, Mark; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Bourke, Michael; Bell, Anthony; Russell, Trevor

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing importance placed on quality of health care for musculoskeletal injuries in emergency departments (EDs). This systematic review aimed to identify existing musculoskeletal quality indicators (QIs) developed for ED use and to critically evaluate their methodological quality. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the gray literature, including relevant organizational websites, were searched in 2013. English-language articles were included that described the development of at least one QI related to the ED care of musculoskeletal injuries. Data extraction of each included article was conducted. A quality assessment was then performed by rating each relevant QI against the Appraisal of Indicators through Research and Evaluation (AIRE) Instrument. QIs with similar definitions were grouped together and categorized according to the health care quality frameworks of Donabedian and the Institute of Medicine. The search revealed 1,805 potentially relevant articles, of which 15 were finally included in the review. The number of relevant QIs per article ranged from one to 11, resulting in a total of 71 QIs overall. Pain (n = 17) and fracture management (n = 13) QIs were predominant. Ten QIs scored at least 50% across all AIRE Instrument domains, and these related to pain management and appropriate imaging of the spine. Methodological quality of the development of most QIs is poor. Recommendations for a core set of QIs that address the complete spectrum of musculoskeletal injury management in emergency medicine is not possible, and more work is needed. Currently, QIs with highest methodological quality are in the areas of pain management and medical imaging. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. Physiotherapy assessment and diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders of the knee via telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Bradley R; Truter, Piers; Blumke, Robert; Russell, Trevor G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Lower limb musculoskeletal disorders place a heavy burden on healthcare systems. Appropriate management of these conditions is critical, however access to appropriate physiotherapy services is difficult for those in geographically remote areas or those with mobility or transport difficulties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of an online musculoskeletal physiotherapy assessment of the knee complex using telerehabilitation compared to traditional face-to-face assessment. Methods In a repeated-measures design, 18 subjects who sought treatment for knee pain underwent a traditional face-to-face assessment and a remote telerehabilitation assessment. Telerehabilitation assessments were conducted with participants performing facilitated self-palpation, self-applied modified orthopaedic tests, active movements and functional tasks. Results Primary pathoanatomical diagnoses were in exact agreement in 67% of cases and were similar in 89% of cases. The system of pathology was found to be in agreement in 17 out of 18 cases (94%). Comparisons of objective findings from the two physical assessments demonstrated substantial agreement (kappa = 0.635) for categorical data and binary data (chi-squared = 400.36; p < 0.001). A high level of intra-rater (89%) and moderate level of inter-rater (67%) reliability was evident for telerehabilitation assessments. Discussion Telerehabilitation assessment of the knee complex appears to be feasible and reliable. This study has implications for clinical practice and the development of physiotherapy services to address the burden of lower limb musculoskeletal pain and disability.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders among clerical workers in Los Angeles: a labor management approach.

    PubMed

    Delp, Linda; Wang, Pin-Chieh

    2013-09-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) persist among clerical workers despite ergonomic advances. A cross-sectional survey among 2,310 clerical workers investigated MSD cases, defined as musculoskeletal discomfort and seeking treatment for that discomfort in the past 12 months. A modified Poisson regression model was adopted to assess the association between work and individual factors and the risk of MSDs. Over half of respondents reported musculoskeletal discomfort. The prevalence of MSD cases was: 37.2% neck/shoulders, 21.7% upper extremities, 18% lower extremities, and 34.3% back region. Elevated risk of MSDs was associated with less workstation adjustability; work schedule, gender, age, and BMI were also significant. Positive trends were observed between computer use and MSDs for the neck/shoulder region and the effect was amplified among those reporting insufficient workstation adjustability and lacking computer ergonomics training. Results demonstrate the need to limit continuous computer use and to improve the human-machine interface through adjustable workstations and worker training to enhance use of adjustable features. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Study of Visual and Musculoskeletal Health Disorders among Computer Professionals in NCR Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Richa; Kapoor, Rohit; Puri, Karan; Bansal, Kapil; Singh, Saudan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence of health disorders among computer professionals and its association with working environment conditions. Study design: Cross sectional. Materials and Methods: A sample size of 200 computer professionals, from Delhi and NCR which included software developers, call centre workers, and data entry workers. Result: The prevalence of visual problems in the study group was 76% (152/200), and musculoskeletal problems were reported by 76.5% (153/200). It was found that there was a gradual increase in visual complaints as the number of hours spent for working on computers daily increased and the same relation was found to be true for musculoskeletal problems as well. Visual problems were less in persons using antiglare screen, and those with adequate lighting in the room. Musculoskeletal problems were found to be significantly lesser among those using cushioned chairs and soft keypad. Conclusion: A significant proportion of the computer professionals were found to be having health problems and this denotes that the occupational health of the people working in the computer field needs to be emphasized as a field of concern in occupational health. PMID:20165627

  18. Prevalence of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Physicians, Surgeons and Dentists: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rambabu, T; Suneetha, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the common occupational hazards among health care providers. Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate MSDs in terms of perception of pain experienced by physicians, surgeons and dental surgeons during professional work. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted with 100 physicians practicing either modern or alternative medicine, 100 surgeons of various specialties and 100 dental surgeons. Self-reporting work related questionnaire on MSDs were distributed, including information on the location of MSD symptoms in the past 12 months and the pain experienced. Results: Musculoskeletal pain was most prevalent among dentists 61% (61/100), followed by surgeons 37% (37/100) and physicians 20% (20/100). Nearly 15% of physicians (3/20), 40% (15/37) of Surgeons and 60% (35/61) of Dentists had MSD problems in more than one site. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there is a higher prevalence of MSDs experienced by dental surgeons than physicians and surgeons. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems with dental surgeons and other specialty doctors with an emphasis on a larger sample sizes and correlating other factors such as age and sex of the doctor, duration of practice, working hours per week, physical activity and working environment. PMID:25221708

  19. Musculoskeletal disorders of female workers and ergonomics problems in five different industries of a developing country.

    PubMed

    Chavalitsakulchai, P; Shahnavaz, H

    1993-06-01

    An ergonomics survey was carried out using interviews based on Standardized Nordic Questionnaires for evaluating musculoskeletal disorders of 1,000 female workers in five different industries in Thailand, viz. garment, fertilizer, pharmaceutical, textile, and cigarette. A checklist used in an ILO study for examining ergonomics problems was used for identifying ergonomics problems. The results show that about 50% of the female workers experienced a high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in their lower backs, particularly the textile workers. The musculoskeletal symptoms of each body region were significant in each industry during the last year and the preceding 7 days (p < 0.05). Other ergonomics problems in the survey industries included heavy manual handling, prolonged sitting and standing, awkward work postures, poor machine design and operation, high repetitive and monotonous movements, poor work organization, and unsatisfactory working environments. Based on the results of this survey, it became obvious that ergonomics problems related to occupational health and safety of female workers seem to fall into three categories: (i) poor working practices and workplace programmes without sufficient knowledge of ergonomics principles, (ii) lack of adjustment to local population of imported machinery and equipment and their use, and (iii) lack of appropriate work organization. The findings demonstrate the need and the importance for ergonomics intervention in industrially developing country using low-cost improvements and appropriate training methods. It also indicates that research in ergonomics applications is needed, considering the specific characteristics of the industrially developing country.

  20. Psychological factors at work and musculoskeletal disorders: a one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Zołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; Jędryka-Góral, Anna; Gasik, Robert; Hildt-Ciupińska, Katarzyna; Malińska, Marzena; Bedyńska, Sylwia

    2013-12-01

    The etiology of musculoskeletal disorders is complex, with physical and psychosocial working conditions playing an important role. This study aimed to determine the relationship between psychosocial work conditions, such as psychological job demands, decision latitude, social support and job insecurity and musculoskeletal complains (MSCs) and (repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) in a 1-year prospective study. The job content questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and provocation tests were used to study 725 employees aged 20-70 years. Pain in the lower back (58 % of subjects), neck (57 %), wrists/hands (47 %) and upper back (44 %) was most frequent. The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (33.6 %), rotator cuff tendinitis (15.4 %), Guyon's canal syndrome (13.4 %), lateral epicondylitis (7.6 %), medial epicondylitis (5.3 %), tendinitis of forearm-wrist extensors (7.8 %) and tendinitis of forearm-wrist flexors (7.3 %) were the most frequent RSIs. Logistic analysis showed that increased psychological job demands statistically significantly increased the probability of lateral and medial epicondylitis, and increased control (decision latitude) statistically significantly decreased the risk of CTS. There was no relationship between job insecurity, social support and the studied RSIs. Psychosocial factors at work predict prevalence of MSCs and RSIs, irrespectively of demographic factors, e.g., age or gender, and organizational and physical factors.

  1. Ergonomic stressors and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders in automobile manufacturing: a one year follow up study.

    PubMed

    Punnett, L; Gold, J; Katz, J N; Gore, R; Wegman, D H

    2004-08-01

    To estimate the one year cumulative incidence and persistence of upper extremity (UE) soft tissue disorders, in a fixed cohort of automotive manufacturing workers, and to quantify their associations with ergonomic exposures. At baseline and at follow up, cases of UE musculoskeletal disorders were determined by interviewer administered questionnaire and standardised physical examination of the upper extremities. The interview obtained new data on psychosocial strain and updated the medical and work histories. An index of exposure to ergonomic stressors, obtained at baseline interview, was the primary independent variable. Cumulative incidence and persistence of UE disorders (defined both by symptoms and by physical examination plus symptoms) were analysed in relation to baseline ergonomic exposures, adjusting for other covariates. The incidence of new disorders was modelled using multivariate proportional hazards regression among workers who were not cases in the first year and the prevalence on both occasions was modelled by repeated measures analysis. A total of 820 workers (69% of eligible cohort members) was examined. Follow up varied slightly by department group but not by baseline exposure level or other characteristics. Among the non-cases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of UE disorders was 14% by symptoms and 12% by symptoms plus examination findings. These rates increased with index of physical exposures primarily among subjects who had the same jobs at follow up as at baseline. Increased exposure during follow up increased risk of incidence. The persistence of UE disorders from baseline to follow up examination was nearly 60% and somewhat associated with baseline exposure score. These longitudinal results confirm the previous cross sectional associations of UE musculoskeletal disorders with exposure to combined ergonomic stressors. The exposure-response relation was similar for incident cases defined by symptoms alone and those confirmed by physical

  2. Ergonomic stressors and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders in automobile manufacturing: a one year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Punnett, L; Gold, J; Katz, J; Gore, R; Wegman, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the one year cumulative incidence and persistence of upper extremity (UE) soft tissue disorders, in a fixed cohort of automotive manufacturing workers, and to quantify their associations with ergonomic exposures. Methods: At baseline and at follow up, cases of UE musculoskeletal disorders were determined by interviewer administered questionnaire and standardised physical examination of the upper extremities. The interview obtained new data on psychosocial strain and updated the medical and work histories. An index of exposure to ergonomic stressors, obtained at baseline interview, was the primary independent variable. Cumulative incidence and persistence of UE disorders (defined both by symptoms and by physical examination plus symptoms) were analysed in relation to baseline ergonomic exposures, adjusting for other covariates. The incidence of new disorders was modelled using multivariate proportional hazards regression among workers who were not cases in the first year and the prevalence on both occasions was modelled by repeated measures analysis. Results: A total of 820 workers (69% of eligible cohort members) was examined. Follow up varied slightly by department group but not by baseline exposure level or other characteristics. Among the non-cases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of UE disorders was 14% by symptoms and 12% by symptoms plus examination findings. These rates increased with index of physical exposures primarily among subjects who had the same jobs at follow up as at baseline. Increased exposure during follow up increased risk of incidence. The persistence of UE disorders from baseline to follow up examination was nearly 60% and somewhat associated with baseline exposure score. Conclusions: These longitudinal results confirm the previous cross sectional associations of UE musculoskeletal disorders with exposure to combined ergonomic stressors. The exposure-response relation was similar for incident cases defined by symptoms

  3. Effect of working characteristics and taught ergonomics on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders amongst dental students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are one of the main occupational health hazards affecting dental practitioners. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder (WMSD) amongst dental students. Possible correlations with the working environment and ergonomics taught in Malaysian dental schools were also sought. Methods Five dental schools in Malaysia participated in this cross-sectional study. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to establish the point prevalence of WMSD in the dental students based on various body regions. The questionnaire also collected data regarding the working environment, clinical practice and the taught ergonomics of the students during their training years. Results Out of five hundred and sixty eight dental students who participated in the study, 410 were in their clinical years whilst 158 were students in their non- clinical years. Ninety three percent of the clinical year students reported symptoms of WMSD in one or more body regions. Female students reported a significantly higher numbers of symptoms compared to male students. The neck (82%) and lower back (64%) were reported to have the highest prevalence of WMSD. Discomfort in the neck region was found to be associated with self-reported frequency of bending of the neck. A majority of students (92%) reported minimum participation in workshops related to ergonomics in dentistry and 77% were unfamiliar with treatment and remedies available in the case of WMSD. Conclusions There was more WMSD seen in dental students who had started their clinical years. Neck and lower back are more injury prone areas and are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Theory and practice of ergonomics should be incorporated into the dental undergraduate curriculum. PMID:23547959

  4. Well, I'm healthy, but…--lay perspectives on health among people with musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Wiitavaara, Birgitta; Bengs, Carita; Brulin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate lay perspectives on health among people with musculoskeletal disorders. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 39 women and 30 men, (aged 22-63 years) with long-term, non-specific musculoskeletal disorders in the neck, shoulder and/or low back. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. These people experienced health as "having resources and opportunities to lead the life one wants". Three categories, "a good enough physical and psychological functioning, freedom of action, and a positive state of emotion and an enriching life", illustrate the different resources and opportunities that the informants described as important for them to perceive themselves as healthy. The informants also reflected on "being ill" and "being well" and what makes the difference. Five aspects influenced the dynamics of their health experiences: "body and soul, prognosis, character of symptoms, physical and social activity, and emotional state". Consequently, the informants expressed a holistic view of health, where the focus lies on the opportunity and the ability to lead their lives the way they want. This study points at the value of taking lay perspectives on health into account, as it might increase the opportunity to design effective, personalized rehabilitation strategies. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are difficult to cure and actions to alleviate suffering are of most importance to increase wellbeing and thereby work ability. Research on lay perspectives can contribute towards a deepened understanding of the health experiences of the affected, and thereby the development of the goals and activities of rehabilitation. Our models, that present the view of health and aspects important for achieving wellness among people with MSDs, can contribute in the development of multimodal rehabilitation. The results can also be useful as a base in the evaluation of clinical practice.

  5. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians: a systematic review of incidence and prevalence.

    PubMed

    Zaza, C

    1998-04-21

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders cause pain, disability and loss of employment for many workers, including musicians. Although performing arts medicine is a growing field, the health problems of musicians remain under-recognized and under-researched. Therefore, the author undertook a systematic review of published information on the incidence and prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) in classical musicians. Seven databases were searched for the period 1980 to 1996. The main textbook and performing arts medicine journals were searched manually, as were reference lists of all relevant papers. The author also contacted individuals familiar with the literature of performing arts medicine. Studies were included for review if they reported PRMD incidence or prevalence in classical musicians. Of the 24 studies identified, 18 cross-sectional surveys and cohort studies were reviewed. The author subjectively assessed the studies using criteria modified from an existing evaluation scale and used 4 criteria for data combination. On the basis of prevalence values from the eligible studies, chi 2 tests for heterogeneity were performed. Only one study estimated PRMD incidence. Ten of the 17 prevalence studies were ineligible for data combination, because of low response rates and other methodological problems. In the 7 eligible studies, PRMD point prevalence ranged from 39% to 87% in adult musicians and from 34% to 62% in secondary school music students. The best estimates of PRMD prevalence were derived from the 3 studies that excluded mild complaints; these studies indicated that PRMD prevalence was 39% and 47% in adults and 17% in secondary school music students respectively. Statistical combination of data across studies within each demographic category was not possible. Available data indicate that the prevalence of PRMD in adult classical musicians is comparable to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders reported for other

  6. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians: a systematic review of incidence and prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Zaza, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders cause pain, disability and loss of employment for many workers, including musicians. Although performing arts medicine is a growing field, the health problems of musicians remain under-recognized and under-researched. Therefore, the author undertook a systematic review of published information on the incidence and prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) in classical musicians. METHODS: Seven databases were searched for the period 1980 to 1996. The main textbook and performing arts medicine journals were searched manually, as were reference lists of all relevant papers. The author also contacted individuals familiar with the literature of performing arts medicine. Studies were included for review if they reported PRMD incidence or prevalence in classical musicians. Of the 24 studies identified, 18 cross-sectional surveys and cohort studies were reviewed. The author subjectively assessed the studies using criteria modified from an existing evaluation scale and used 4 criteria for data combination. On the basis of prevalence values from the eligible studies, chi 2 tests for heterogeneity were performed. RESULTS: Only one study estimated PRMD incidence. Ten of the 17 prevalence studies were ineligible for data combination, because of low response rates and other methodological problems. In the 7 eligible studies, PRMD point prevalence ranged from 39% to 87% in adult musicians and from 34% to 62% in secondary school music students. The best estimates of PRMD prevalence were derived from the 3 studies that excluded mild complaints; these studies indicated that PRMD prevalence was 39% and 47% in adults and 17% in secondary school music students respectively. Statistical combination of data across studies within each demographic category was not possible. INTERPRETATION: Available data indicate that the prevalence of PRMD in adult classical musicians is comparable to the prevalence of work

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders of the upper cervical spine in women with episodic or chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Ferracini, Gabriela N; Florencio, Lidiane L; Dach, Fabíola; Bevilaqua Grossi, Débora; Palacios-Ceña, María; Ordás-Bandera, Carlos; Chaves, Thais C; Speciali, José G; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-06-01

    The role of musculoskeletal disorders of the cervical spine in migraine is under debate. To investigate differences in musculoskeletal impairments of the neck including active global and upper cervical spine mobility, the presence of symptomatic upper cervical spine joints, cervicocephalic kinesthesia and head/neck posture between women with episodic migraine, chronic migraine, and controls. A cross-sectional study. Tertiary university-based hospital. Fifty-five women with episodic migraine, 16 with chronic migraine, and 22 matched healthy women. Active cervical range of motion, upper cervical spine mobility (i.e., flexion-rotation test), referred pain from upper cervical joints, cervicocephalic kinesthesia (joint position sense error test, JPSE), and head/neck posture (i.e. the cranio-vertebral and cervical lordosis angles) were assessed by an assessor blinded to the subject's condition. Women with migraine showed reduced cervical rotation than healthy women (P=0.012). No differences between episodic and chronic migraine were found in cervical mobility. Significant differences for flexion-rotation test were also reported, suggesting that upper cervical spine mobility was restricted in both migraine groups (P<0.001). Referred pain elicited on manual examination of the upper cervical spine mimicking pain symptoms was present in 50% of migraineurs. No differences were observed on the frequency of symptomatic upper cervical joints between episodic and chronic migraine. No differences on JPSE or posture were found among groups (P>0.121). Women with migraine exhibit musculoskeletal impairments of the upper cervical spine expressed as restricted cervical rotation, decreased upper cervical rotation, and the presence of symptomatic upper cervical joints. No differences were found between episodic or chronic migraine. Identification treatment of the musculoskeletal impairments of the cervical spine may help to clinician for better management of patients with migraine.

  8. Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders of Professional Orchestra Musicians from the North of Portugal: Comparing String and Wind Musicians.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cláudia Maria; Machado, Jorge Pereira; Greten, Henry Johannes; Coimbra, Daniela

    2017-04-28

    It is well known that musicians are a group prone to suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders. Professional orchestra musicians play for several hours a week and have to fight against pain caused by their profession. The aim of this study was to explore and describe self-reported complaints among professional orchestra musicians and to compare its intensity and the prevalence between string and wind instruments. Hundred and twelve professional orchestra musicians from the three main professional orchestras from the North of Portugal were individually interviewed about the prevalence and the intensity (measured by verbal numerical scale for pain) of their playing-related musculoskeletal disorders. About two third (62.5%) of the interviewed musicians presented playing-related musculoskeletal disorders during the time of the interview. Despite there are no significant statistic values between groups, results suggested that playing-related musculoskeletal disorders are more common in string players and more intense in wind players. Referring to the prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders, our data is in line with other studies from different countries. More than half of professional orchestra musicians in the North of Portugal are playing with a mild to moderate pain. Future studies focusing on working-related problems among professional orchestra musicians in Portugal would be useful to better describe the problem of occupational diseases among performing artist.

  9. Risk of musculoskeletal disorders among females and males in repetitive/constrained work.

    PubMed

    Nordander, Catarina; Ohlsson, Kerstina; Akesson, Ingrid; Arvidsson, Inger; Balogh, Istvan; Hansson, Gert-Ake; Strömberg, Ulf; Rittner, Ralf; Skerfving, Staffan

    2009-10-01

    This paper combines epidemiological data on musculoskeletal morbidity in 40 female and 15 male occupational groups (questionnaire data 3720 females, 1241 males, physical examination data 1762 females, 915 males) in order to calculate risk for neck and upper limb disorders in repetitive/constrained vs. varied/mobile work and further to compare prevalence among office, industrial and non-office/non-industrial settings, as well as among jobs within these. Further, the paper aims to compare the risk of musculoskeletal disorders from repetitive/constrained work between females and males. Prevalence ratios (PR) for repetitive/constrained vs. varied/mobile work were in neck/shoulders: 12-month complaints females 1.2, males 1.1, diagnoses at the physical examination 2.3 and 2.3. In elbows/hands PRs for complaints were 1.7 and 1.6, for diagnoses 3.0 and 3.4. Tension neck syndrome, cervicalgia, shoulder tendonitis, acromioclavicular syndrome, medial epicondylitis and carpal tunnel syndrome showed PRs > 2. In neck/shoulders PRs were similar across office, industrial and non-office/non-industrial settings, in elbows/hands, especially among males, somewhat higher in industrial work. There was a heterogeneity within the different settings (estimated by bootstrapping), indicating higher PRs for some groups. As in most studies, musculoskeletal disorders were more prevalent among females than among males. Interestingly, though, the PRs for repetitive/constrained work vs. varied/mobile were for most measures approximately the same for both genders. In conclusion, repetitive/constrained work showed elevated risks when compared to varied/mobile work in all settings. Females and males showed similar risk elevations. This article enables comparison of risk of musculoskeletal disorders among many different occupations in industrial, office and other settings, when using standardised case definitions. It confirms that repetitive/constrained work is harmful not only in industrial but also

  10. Looking forward by looking back: Helping to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    Over my career I have been involved in research covering three different strategies to reduce workplace injuries, namely: (a) developing bona fide occupational requirements for physically demanding jobs, (b) conducting training programs and a case-control study of low back pain in industry, and (c) developing ergonomically-designed equipment and tools. The purpose of this paper is to identify some areas where I believe research is needed to reduce the risks of musculoskeletal disorders. Hopefully, new researchers will pick up the torch on some of these topics and continue to enhance the impact of occupational biomechanics and ergonomics on improving jobs for workers.

  11. Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waersted, Morten; Hanvold, Therese N; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2010-04-29

    This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome). A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed. A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work. There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation.

  12. Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome). Methods A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed. Results A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work. Conclusions There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation. PMID:20429925

  13. Specific and non-specific upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder syndromes in automobile manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; d'Errico, Angelo; Katz, Jeffrey N; Gore, Rebecca; Punnett, Laura

    2009-02-01

    A longitudinal cohort of automobile manufacturing workers (n = 1,214) was examined for: (1) prevalence and persistence of specific upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs) such as lateral epicondylitis and de Quervain's disease, and non-specific disorders (NSDs) defined in symptomatic individuals without any specific disorder, and (2) disorder prognoses based on symptom characteristics and other factors. Eight specific disorders were identified through case definitions based on upper extremity physical examinations and symptom surveys administered on three occasions over 6 years. At baseline, 41% of the cohort reported upper extremity symptoms; 18% (n = 214) of these had NSDs. In each survey, tendon-related conditions accounted for over half of the specific morbidity. Twenty-five percent had UEMSDs in multiple anatomical sites, and most with hand/wrist disorders had two or more hand/wrist UEMSDs. Persistence for all specific disorders decreased with length of follow-up. Specific UEMSDs were characterized by greater pain severity and functional impairment, and more lost work days than NSDs. Upper extremity symptoms and diagnoses vary over time. NSDs may be the early stages of conditions that will eventually become more specific. NSDs and overlapping specific UEMSDs should be taken into account in UEMSD classification. Am. J. Ind. Med. 52:124-132, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Specific and non-specific upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder syndromes in automobile manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    d'Errico, Angelo; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Gore, Rebecca; Punnett, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Objective A longitudinal cohort of automobile manufacturing workers (n = 1214) was examined for: 1) prevalence and persistence of specific upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs) such as lateral epicondylitis and de Quervain's disease, and non-specific disorders (NSDs) defined in symptomatic individuals without any specific disorder, and 2) disorder prognoses based on symptom characteristics and other factors. Methods Eight specific disorders were identified through case definitions based on upper extremity physical examinations and symptom surveys administered on three occasions over six years. Results At baseline, 41% of the cohort reported upper extremity symptoms; 18% (n = 214) of these had NSDs. In each survey, tendon-related conditions accounted for over half of the specific morbidity. Twenty-five percent had UEMSDs in multiple anatomical sites, and most with hand/wrist disorders had two or more hand/wrist UEMSDs. Persistence for all specific disorders decreased with length of follow-up. Specific UEMSDs were characterized by greater pain severity and functional impairment, and more lost work days than NSDs. Conclusions Upper extremity symptoms and diagnoses vary over time. NSDs may be the early stages of conditions that will eventually become more specific. NSDs and overlapping specific UEMSDs should be taken into account in UEMSD classification. PMID:19016265

  15. Rehabilitation-Oriented Serious Game Development and Evaluation Guidelines for Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Idriss, Mohamad; Tannous, Halim; Istrate, Dan; Perrochon, Anaick; Salle, Jean-Yves; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Dao, Tien-Tuan

    2017-07-04

    The progress in information and communication technology (ICT) led to the development of a new rehabilitation technique called "serious game for functional rehabilitation." Previous works have shown that serious games can be used for general health and specific disease management. However, there is still lack of consensus on development and evaluation guidelines. It is important to note that the game performance depends on the designed scenario. The objective of this work was to develop specific game scenarios and evaluate them with a panel of musculoskeletal patients to propose game development and evaluation guidelines. A two-stage workflow was proposed using determinant framework. The development guideline includes the selection of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics technologies and tools, the modeling of physical aspects, the design of rehabilitation scenarios, and the implementation of the proposed scenarios. The evaluation guideline consists of the definition of evaluation metrics, the execution of the evaluation campaign, the analysis of user results and feedbacks, and the improvement of the designed game. The case study for musculoskeletal disorders on the healthy control and patient groups showed the usefulness of these guidelines and associated games. All participants enjoyed the 2 developed games (football and object manipulation), and found them challenging and amusing. In particular, some healthy subjects increased their score when enhancing the level of difficulty. Furthermore, there were no risks and accidents associated with the execution of these games. It is expected that with the proven effectiveness of the proposed guidelines and associated games, this new rehabilitation game may be translated into clinical routine practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Rehabilitation-Oriented Serious Game Development and Evaluation Guidelines for Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Dan; Perrochon, Anaick; Salle, Jean-Yves; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    Background The progress in information and communication technology (ICT) led to the development of a new rehabilitation technique called “serious game for functional rehabilitation.” Previous works have shown that serious games can be used for general health and specific disease management. However, there is still lack of consensus on development and evaluation guidelines. It is important to note that the game performance depends on the designed scenario. Objective The objective of this work was to develop specific game scenarios and evaluate them with a panel of musculoskeletal patients to propose game development and evaluation guidelines. Methods A two-stage workflow was proposed using determinant framework. The development guideline includes the selection of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics technologies and tools, the modeling of physical aspects, the design of rehabilitation scenarios, and the implementation of the proposed scenarios. The evaluation guideline consists of the definition of evaluation metrics, the execution of the evaluation campaign, the analysis of user results and feedbacks, and the improvement of the designed game. Results The case study for musculoskeletal disorders on the healthy control and patient groups showed the usefulness of these guidelines and associated games. All participants enjoyed the 2 developed games (football and object manipulation), and found them challenging and amusing. In particular, some healthy subjects increased their score when enhancing the level of difficulty. Furthermore, there were no risks and accidents associated with the execution of these games. Conclusions It is expected that with the proven effectiveness of the proposed guidelines and associated games, this new rehabilitation game may be translated into clinical routine practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:28676468

  17. Association of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache with mental and sleep disorders among adults with disabilities, Spain, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Alejandro; Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007-2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%-67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%-24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments.

  18. Association of Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions and Migraine Headache With Mental and Sleep Disorders Among Adults With Disabilities, Spain, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007–2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. Results The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%–67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%–24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. Conclusion The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments. PMID:24576397

  19. Occupational and Personal Determinants of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Urban Taxi Drivers in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Abledu, J K; Offei, E B; Abledu, G K

    2014-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of epidemiological data on musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among occupational drivers in Ghana. The present study seeks to estimate the prevalence, body distribution, and occupational and personal determinants of MSDs in a sample of taxi drivers in the Accra Metropolis of Ghana. Methods. A total of 210 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All the participants were evaluated by using a semistructured questionnaire and the standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorder Questionnaire. Results. The estimated prevalence of MSDs was 70.5%. The prevalence of the various MSD domains was as follows: lower back pain (34.3%), upper back pain (16.7%), neck pain (15.2%), shoulder pain (11.0%), knee pain (10.0%), hip/thigh pain (2.9%), elbow pain (4.8%), ankle/feet pain (2.4%), and wrist/hand pain (1.9%). Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that participants who were employee drivers, drove taxi more than 12 hours per day or at least 5 days per week, perceived their job as stressful, and were dissatisfied with their job were at a greater risk of developing MSDs. Conclusions. These findings call for preventive strategies and safety guidelines in order to reduce the incidence of MSDs among urban taxi drivers in Ghana.

  20. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and occupational health problems among groundnut farmers of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Banibrata; Ghosh, Tirthankar; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the nature and extent of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and physiological and thermal working stress among the groundnut farmers. In the present investigation, eighty-five groundnut farmers were recruited from the villages of Tarakeswar of West Bengal, India. Eighty-five control office workers were also selected as a control group. The modified Nordic questionnaire and a posture analysis using the OWAS method were applied in the case of groundnut farmers. The working environment and physiological stress of the groundnut cultivators were also assessed. The analysis of working posture indicated that most of the groundnut cultivation activities needed corrective measures as soon as possible. Most of the groundnut farmers suffered from discomfort at different parts of the body, especially at the lower back (99%), knee (92%), ankle (66%), shoulder (61%) and hand (60%) regions. This study also showed that groundnut farmers suffered from excessive thermal (33.4 degrees C) and physiological stress (heart rate rose up to 121.5 beats/min, systolic and diastolic blood pressure up to 132 and 80 mm/Hg, respectively, PEFR values are 403 lit/min) which affects their health. From the observation and analysis of the results, it was concluded that the health of the groundnut farmers was highly affected by improper body postures and work-load. Twisting, bending, and awkward postures during work could lead to musculoskeletal disorders among them.

  1. Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Disorders of Workers: Role of Physical Therapists in Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Asada, Fuminari; Takano, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders in workers decrease the productivity of companies and result in socioeconomic losses. Low back pain accounted for approximately 60% of occupational diseases in the past and this is still true at present, making it a major occupational health problem in Japan. Herein, the findings about low back pain are explained as follows: the correlation between imaging examination findings and low back pain is low; psychosocial factors are involved in the onset of low back pain and how it becomes chronic; and improvement of activity is more useful than rest. Furthermore, the advantages of employing physical therapists for improving occupational health are as follows: they can 1) evaluate and intervene ergonomically; 2) provide instructions using a behavioral modification technique based on psychosocial factors; and 3) provide instructions regarding exercise programs considering obstacles to the development of a good exercise habit (painful diseases including osteoarthritis and other diseases such as hypertension and diabetes). In addition, falling, whose incidence has recently been increasing and is an important issue in occupational health, is examined from the aspect of musculoskeletal disorders. The following activities of physical therapists are introduced: the items to be checked during a tour of inspection of a workplace and detailed descriptions of work management and working environment management measures. Physical therapists are rarely involved in studies of low back pain and falling, but their knowledge and skills have been demonstrated to contribute to improving occupational health.

  2. Texting on mobile phones and musculoskeletal disorders in young adults: A five-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ewa; Thomée, Sara; Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Hagberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to examine whether texting on a mobile phone is a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities in a population of young adults. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study with Swedish young adults (aged 20-24 years) data were collected via a web-based questionnaire at baseline (n = 7092) and after one and five years. Cross-sectional associations were found between text messaging and reported ongoing symptoms in neck and upper extremities (odds ratios, ORs 1.3-2.0). Among symptom-free at baseline prospective associations were only found between text messaging and new cases of reported symptoms in the hand/fingers (OR 2.0) at one year follow up. Among those with symptoms at baseline prospective associations were found between text messaging and maintained pain in neck/upper back (OR 1.6). The results imply mostly short-term effects, and to a lesser extent, long-term effects on musculoskeletal disorders in neck and upper extremities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. [Socioeconomic position and duration of disability benefit due to work-related musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2012-02-01

    This study estimated the effect of socioeconomic position on the duration of disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs. A cohort study including 563 insured workers from the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, registered in the General Social Security System and who received temporary disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs, was performed in 2008 using data from the National Social Security Institute. The results show that among union member workers with high psychosocial demands at work, those with low socioeconomic status are almost twice as likely to receive benefit for a shorter period of time compared to those with a higher socioeconomic position (RR = 1.89; 95%CI: 1.25-2.87). These results reveal an inequitable situation or unnecessary use of insurance for workers with a higher socioeconomic position. Future research aimed at elucidating the differences in the use of benefits are needed so that social insurance system managers may take the appropriate steps to resolve this issue.

  4. Reducing musculoskeletal disorders among computer operators: comparison between ergonomics interventions at the workplace.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Yafa; Gefen, Amit; Lerman, Yehuda; Givon, Uri; Ratzon, Navah Z

    2012-01-01

    Typing is associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused by multiple risk factors. This control study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a workplace intervention for reducing MSDs among computer workers. Sixty-six subjects with and without MSD were assigned consecutively to one of three groups: ergonomics intervention (work site and body posture adjustments, muscle activity training and exercises) accompanied with biofeedback training, the same ergonomics intervention without biofeedback and a control group. Evaluation of MSDs, body posture, psychosocial status, upper extremity (UE) kinematics and muscle surface electromyography were carried out before and after the intervention in the workplace and the motion lab. Our main hypothesis that significant differences in the reduction of MSDs will exist between subjects in the study groups and controls was confirmed (χ(2) = 13.3; p = 0.001). Significant changes were found in UE kinematics and posture as well. Both ergonomics interventions effectively reduced MSD and improved body posture. This study aimed to test the efficacy of an individual workplace intervention programme among computer workers by evaluating musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), body posture, upper extremity kinematics, muscle activity and psychosocial factors were tested. The proposed ergonomics interventions effectively reduced MSDs and improved body posture.

  5. Occupational and Personal Determinants of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Urban Taxi Drivers in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Abledu, J. K.; Offei, E. B.; Abledu, G. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of epidemiological data on musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among occupational drivers in Ghana. The present study seeks to estimate the prevalence, body distribution, and occupational and personal determinants of MSDs in a sample of taxi drivers in the Accra Metropolis of Ghana. Methods. A total of 210 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All the participants were evaluated by using a semistructured questionnaire and the standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorder Questionnaire. Results. The estimated prevalence of MSDs was 70.5%. The prevalence of the various MSD domains was as follows: lower back pain (34.3%), upper back pain (16.7%), neck pain (15.2%), shoulder pain (11.0%), knee pain (10.0%), hip/thigh pain (2.9%), elbow pain (4.8%), ankle/feet pain (2.4%), and wrist/hand pain (1.9%). Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that participants who were employee drivers, drove taxi more than 12 hours per day or at least 5 days per week, perceived their job as stressful, and were dissatisfied with their job were at a greater risk of developing MSDs. Conclusions. These findings call for preventive strategies and safety guidelines in order to reduce the incidence of MSDs among urban taxi drivers in Ghana. PMID:27379297

  6. Effects of physical and personal risk factors on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Motamedzade, Majid; Faghih, Mohammad Amin; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Faradmal, Javad; Mohammadi, Heidar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical and personal risk factors on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders in an Iranian car company. In this cross-sectional study, 234 workers participated and all of them had sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders in the past year. A physical risk factor checklist and personal information questionnaire were used as data-gathering tools. There was no significant relationship between physical risk factors and sick leave (p > .05). Cigarette smoking (p = .045), body mass index >30 (p = .046) and age (p = .044) showed a significant relationship with sick leave. Workers with lumbar deviation of 20°-60° (OR 1.10) and >60° (OR 1.11) were at greater risk. The ratios for workers with repetitive work (OR 1.30) and workers with force exertion (OR 1.36) were greater than for other workers. Taking preventive actions to improve the ergonomic working conditions of assembly workers and their lifestyle seems crucial.

  7. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the automotive industry due to repetitive work - implications for rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) due to repetitive work are common in manufacturing industries, such as the automotive industry. However, it's still unclear which MSDs of the upper limb are to be expected in the automotive industry in a first aid unit as well as in occupational precaution examinations. It is also unclear which examination method could be performed effectively for practical reasons and under rehabilitation aspects. Additionally, it was to discuss whether the conception of unspecific description for MSDs has advantages or disadvantages in contrast to a precise medical diagnosis. Methods We investigated the health status of two study populations working at two automotive plants in Germany. The first part included 67 consecutive patients who were seen for acute or chronic MSDs at the forearm over a 4-month period at the plants' medical services. Information about patients' working conditions and musculoskeletal symptoms was obtained during a standardized interview, which was followed by a standardized orthopedic-chiropractic physical examination. In the second part, 209 workers with daily exposure to video display terminals (VDT) completed a standardized questionnaire and were examined with function-oriented muscular tests on the occasion of their routine occupational precaution medical check-up. Results The majority of the 67 patients seen by the company's medical services were blue-collar works from the assembly lines and trainees rather than white-collar workers from offices. Rates of musculoskeletal complaints were disproportionately higher among experienced people performing new tasks and younger trainees. The most common MSD in this group were disorders of flexor tendons of the forearm. By contrast, among the 209 employees working at VDT disorders of the neck and shoulders were more common than discomfort in the forearm. A positive tendency between restricted rotation of the cervical vertebrae and years worked at VDT was observed. In

  8. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the automotive industry due to repetitive work - implications for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Michael; Kuhn, Walter; Uibel, Stefanie; van Mark, Anke; Quarcoo, David

    2010-04-07

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) due to repetitive work are common in manufacturing industries, such as the automotive industry. However, it's still unclear which MSDs of the upper limb are to be expected in the automotive industry in a first aid unit as well as in occupational precaution examinations. It is also unclear which examination method could be performed effectively for practical reasons and under rehabilitation aspects. Additionally, it was to discuss whether the conception of unspecific description for MSDs has advantages or disadvantages in contrast to a precise medical diagnosis. We investigated the health status of two study populations working at two automotive plants in Germany. The first part included 67 consecutive patients who were seen for acute or chronic MSDs at the forearm over a 4-month period at the plants' medical services. Information about patients' working conditions and musculoskeletal symptoms was obtained during a standardized interview, which was followed by a standardized orthopedic-chiropractic physical examination. In the second part, 209 workers with daily exposure to video display terminals (VDT) completed a standardized questionnaire and were examined with function-oriented muscular tests on the occasion of their routine occupational precaution medical check-up. The majority of the 67 patients seen by the company's medical services were blue-collar works from the assembly lines and trainees rather than white-collar workers from offices. Rates of musculoskeletal complaints were disproportionately higher among experienced people performing new tasks and younger trainees. The most common MSD in this group were disorders of flexor tendons of the forearm. By contrast, among the 209 employees working at VDT disorders of the neck and shoulders were more common than discomfort in the forearm. A positive tendency between restricted rotation of the cervical vertebrae and years worked at VDT was observed. In addition, only less than 8

  9. Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant burden; however, no consensus has been reached on how to maximize occupational rehabilitation programs for people with these disorders, and the impact of simulating work tasks as a mode of intervention has not been well examined. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used logistic regression to identify client and program factors predicting success for 95 clients in a general occupational rehabilitation program and 71 clients in a comprehensive occupational rehabilitation program. The final predictive model for general rehabilitation included gender, number of sessions completed, and performance of work simulation activities. Maximum hours per session was the only significant predictor of success in the comprehensive rehabilitation program. This study identifies new factors associated with success in occupational rehabilitation, specifically highlighting the importance of intensity (i.e., session length and number of sessions) of therapy and occupation-based activities for this population. PMID:28027046

  10. [Cumulative annual incidence of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders in an urban area of Brazil].

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the annual cumulative incidence (ACI) of disabling work-related musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck and/or upper limbs (ULMSD) among workers covered by the National Social Insurance System in the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Cases were workers who received disability compensation benefits when unable to work due to ULMSD, during the year 2008. The data were obtained from the administrative systems of the National Social Insurance Institute and Ministry of Labor and Employment. ACI was 15 per 10,000 workers. Increased ACI of ULMSD was associated with female gender, lower income, and work in financial activities or manufacturing. Women earning the minimum wage (US$ 64.00 per month) or less had the highest ACI of ULMSD (123 per 10,000), suggesting inequalities in the occurrence of these disorders. The study indicates the need to prioritize preventive actions focusing on ergonomics and work organization, early diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.

  11. Factors Associated With Success in an Occupational Rehabilitation Program for Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Mark E; Roll, Shawn C

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant burden; however, no consensus has been reached on how to maximize occupational rehabilitation programs for people with these disorders, and the impact of simulating work tasks as a mode of intervention has not been well examined. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used logistic regression to identify client and program factors predicting success for 95 clients in a general occupational rehabilitation program and 71 clients in a comprehensive occupational rehabilitation program. The final predictive model for general rehabilitation included gender, number of sessions completed, and performance of work simulation activities. Maximum hours per session was the only significant predictor of success in the comprehensive rehabilitation program. This study identifies new factors associated with success in occupational rehabilitation, specifically highlighting the importance of intensity (i.e., session length and number of sessions) of therapy and occupation-based activities for this population.

  12. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the indigenous Qom population of Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Rosana; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Goñi, Mario; García, Vanina; Mathern, Nora; Jorfen, Marisa; Miljevic, Julio; Dhair, Daniel; Laithe, Matias; Conti, Silvana; Midauar, Fadua; Martin, Maria Celeste; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Nieto, Romina; Prigione, Cristina; Sanabria, Alvaro; Gervasoni, Viviana; Grabbe, Emilio; Gontero, Romina; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases among the indigenous Qom (Toba) population in the city of Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. An analytical cross-sectional study using methodology of the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) was performed. Subjects ≥18 years of age were interviewed by advanced students of medicine and nursing, bilingual translator-facilitators, and coordinators. Individuals with musculoskeletal pain (positive cases) were evaluated sequentially for 7 days by internists and rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 1656 individuals (77 % of the census population). Of these, 1020 (61.5 %) were female, with mean age of 35.3 (SD 13.9) years, and 1028 (62.0 %) were bilingual. The public health care system covers 87.1 % of the population. Musculoskeletal pain in the previous 7 days and/or at some time during their life was present in 890 subjects (53.7 %). Of those with pain in the last 7 days, 302 (64.1 %) subjects had an Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score ≥0.8. The most frequent pain sites were lumbar spine (19.3 %), knees (13.0 %), and hands (12.0 %). The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was as follows: mechanical back pain (20.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndrome (2.9 %), osteoarthritis (4.0 %) rheumatoid arthritis (2.4 %), inflammatory back pain (0.2 %), systemic sclerosis (0.1 %), Sjögren syndrome (0.1 %), fibromyalgia (0.1 %), mixed connective tissue disease (0.06 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.06 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 53.7 % and rheumatic diseases 29.6 %. Rheumatoid arthritis prevalence was 2.4 % using COPCORD methodology, one of the highest reported at present.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA.

    PubMed

    Azabagic, Selma; Spahic, Razija; Pranjic, Nurka; Mulic, Maida

    2016-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant problem of modern society which are more pronounced in young people and school children. Etiology of these disorders is found in inadequate ergonomic conditions, too heavy school bag, school furniture inadequate to age, poor posture, sedentary lifestyle, reduction of physical activity and lack of exercise. This cross-sectional study included 1315 pupils aged 8- 12 years. As a method was used "cluster sample" in the selection of subjects. The survey was conducted by questionnaire containing information on the demographic and individual characteristics of participants (age, gender, class), the manner and style of life and the performance of school tasks, followed by standardized Nordic questionnaire. The following parameters were measured: body height and weight for each student, and the weight of full and empty school bag that students that day brought to class. The incidence of musculoskeletal pain regardless of localization was 48%. There is a statistically significant correlation between acute pain in the right shoulder and total weight of school bags, duration of caring the bag in school and time of wearing bag from school to home but not with the manner in which school bag was carried. Acute pain in the right shoulder and acute neck pain were significantly associated with the duration of sitting in school or in front of a computer at home. Acute pain in the shoulder negatively correlated with BMI percentile value of the respondents. Acute pain in the neck is also significantly associated with the weight of a full school bags, as well as time spent sitting at home doing homework. Acute back pain is statistically significantly correlated with the weight of school bags and duration of sitting periods in school. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, particularly chronic pain in school children aged 8-12 years is high. Weight of school bags, manner in which the bag is carried to and from school, duration of

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    PubMed Central

    Azabagic, Selma; Spahic, Razija; Pranjic, Nurka; Mulic, Maida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant problem of modern society which are more pronounced in young people and school children. Etiology of these disorders is found in inadequate ergonomic conditions, too heavy school bag, school furniture inadequate to age, poor posture, sedentary lifestyle, reduction of physical activity and lack of exercise. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study included 1315 pupils aged 8- 12 years. As a method was used “cluster sample” in the selection of subjects. The survey was conducted by questionnaire containing information on the demographic and individual characteristics of participants (age, gender, class), the manner and style of life and the performance of school tasks, followed by standardized Nordic questionnaire. The following parameters were measured: body height and weight for each student, and the weight of full and empty school bag that students that day brought to class. Results: The incidence of musculoskeletal pain regardless of localization was 48%. There is a statistically significant correlation between acute pain in the right shoulder and total weight of school bags, duration of caring the bag in school and time of wearing bag from school to home but not with the manner in which school bag was carried. Acute pain in the right shoulder and acute neck pain were significantly associated with the duration of sitting in school or in front of a computer at home. Acute pain in the shoulder negatively correlated with BMI percentile value of the respondents. Acute pain in the neck is also significantly associated with the weight of a full school bags, as well as time spent sitting at home doing homework. Acute back pain is statistically significantly correlated with the weight of school bags and duration of sitting periods in school. Conclusion: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, particularly chronic pain in school children aged 8-12 years is high. Weight of school bags, manner in

  15. The effectiveness of job rotation to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders: protocol of a cluster randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Job rotation has often been used in situations where the level of exposure cannot be reduced due to the characteristics of the job or through physical measures. However, the effectiveness of the job rotation strategy at preventing musculoskeletal complaints lacks adequate scientific data. Methods/Design A cluster randomized controlled trial will be used to investigate the effectiveness of job rotation to prevent musculoskeletal disorders in industrial workers. The randomized cluster was based in characteristics of production sectors. A total cluster will be 4 sectors, and 957 workers will be recruited from a textile industry and randomly allocated into intervention or control groups. Both groups will receive training on ergonomics guidelines. In addition, the intervention group will perform job rotation, switching between tasks with low, moderate, and high risk for musculoskeletal complaints. The primary outcome will be the number of working hours lost due to sick leave by musculoskeletal injuries recorded in employee administrative data bases. Secondary outcomes measured via survey include: body parts with musculoskeletal pain, the intensity of this pain, physical workload, fatigue, general health status, physical activity level, and work productivity. Secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from the societal and company perspective. Discussion Prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders is beneficial for workers, employers, and society. The results of this study will provide new information about the effectiveness of job rotation as a strategy to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Trial registration NCT01979731, November 3, 2013 PMID:24885958

  16. Effects of ergonomic intervention on work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among computer workers: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Sina; Ozcan, Emel; Capan, Nalan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine effects of ergonomic intervention on work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (WUEMSDs) among computer workers. Four hundred computer workers answered a questionnaire on work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms (WUEMSS). Ninety-four subjects with WUEMSS using computers at least 3 h a day participated in a prospective, randomized controlled 6-month intervention. Body posture and workstation layouts were assessed by the Ergonomic Questionnaire. We used the Visual Analogue Scale to assess the intensity of WUEMSS. The Upper Extremity Function Scale was used to evaluate functional limitations at the neck and upper extremities. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. After baseline assessment, those in the intervention group participated in a multicomponent ergonomic intervention program including a comprehensive ergonomic training consisting of two interactive sessions, an ergonomic training brochure, and workplace visits with workstation adjustments. Follow-up assessment was conducted after 6 months. In the intervention group, body posture (p < 0.001) and workstation layout (p = 0.002) improved over 6 months; furthermore, intensity (p < 0.001), duration (p < 0.001), and frequency (p = 0.009) of WUEMSS decreased significantly in the intervention group compared with the control group. Additionally, the functional status (p = 0.001), and physical (p < 0.001), and mental (p = 0.035) health-related quality of life improved significantly compared with the controls. There was no improvement of work day loss due to WUEMSS (p > 0.05). Ergonomic intervention programs may be effective in reducing ergonomic risk factors among computer workers and consequently in the secondary prevention of WUEMSDs.

  17. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in urban bus drivers of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Grace P Y; Lam, Peggo

    2007-06-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) affect workers in many occupations including drivers of large vehicles. Urban bus drivers have been found to have high prevalence rates of back problems in overseas studies. Hong Kong is a densely populated city and has a large number of double-deck buses that constitute a major means of public transportation. The present study aimed at investigating the prevalence and characteristics of WMSD in male and female bus drivers who operate double-deck buses in Hong Kong. Altogether 481 bus drivers (404 males, 77 females) participated in the study that consisted of a questionnaire survey as well as physical assessment. The questionnaire included questions on work, musculoskeletal complaints and perceived occupational risk factors associated with each discomfort. Physical assessment consisted of measurement of lumbar spine mobility, hand grip strength, sit-and-reach test, and observation of standing and sitting postures. The results showed generally the male drivers had longer years of work experience but their daily workloads were similar to the females. On the average drivers worked 9-10 h per day, with 5 days on and 1 day off. Neck, back, shoulder and knee/thigh areas had the highest 12-month prevalence rates ranging from 35% to 60%, and about 90% of the discomfort was related to bus-driving. Occupational factors of prolonged sitting and anthropometric mismatch were perceived to be most related to musculoskeletal discomfort. On physical examination, grip strength was significantly related to neck and shoulder discomfort. The present results showed high prevalence rates of WMSD among bus drivers in Hong Kong which warrants further investigation.

  18. [Prevalence and medical and social importance of disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal systems in children and adolescents (review of literature)].

    PubMed

    Mirskaia, N B; Kolomenskaia, A N; Siniakina, A D

    2015-01-01

    The urgency of the problem of the excess incidence of disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) in contemporary children and adolescents is determined by its high medical and social significance. However, the poor quality of diagnosis of MSS disorders in children at the polyclinics level, especially at the initial stages, when timely commenced recreational and corrective-measures are most effective, do not allow to carry out remedial work timely, and this in turn is the cause of the high prevalence of violations of the MSS later With the aim of the improvement of the quality of diagnosis of early forms of musculoskeletal pathology in children and adolescents, as well as for the performance of the prevention during learning them in school there is developed an information system for health care workers "Identification, correction and prevention of disorders of the locomotor apparatus in students of educational institutions". The core of the system is formed by developed by authors a classification of functional disorders and initial forms of diseases of the MSS in students, as well as the organization of this work.

  19. Association between upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and mental health status in office workers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Seyedeh Shohreh; Makarem, Jalil; Abbasi, Mahya; Rahimi, Azin; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-09-27

    Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) can lead to potential adverse consequences for individuals and their organizations, and in various research, its relationship to physical and mental health of workforce has been studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs of upper extremities among office workers and its association with mental health status. In this cross sectional study, 1488 out of 1630 office workers completed the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Ques-tionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) (response rate = 91.3%). Upper extremity MSDs were reported in 410 (27.5%) office workers, including 269 (18.1%) shoulder, 79 (5.3%) elbow and 207 (13.9%) hand/wrist symptoms. Based on GHQ-28, 254 (17.1%) participants were found to be at risk of developing a psychiatric disorder that were observed in 26.7% of workers with MSDs symptoms. Shoulder (p < 0.001), elbow (p < 0.001) and hand/wrist (p < 0.001) MSDs were associated with poor mental health. Among the four GHQ-28 subscales (somatic symptoms, anxiety/insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression), anxiety/insomnia was strongly correlated with shoulders (P < 0.001), elbows (P = 0.002), and hands/wrists (P < 0.001) symptoms. Office workers with upper extremity MSDs were more likely to be experiencing mental distress. This indicates a need for greater emphasis on preventive programs at workplace to support their psychological well-being.

  20. Job stress dimension and work-related musculoskeletal disorders among southeast Nigerian physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Abaraogu, Ukachukwu Okoroafor; Ezema, Charles Ikechukwu; Nwosu, Chinenye Kosisochukwu

    2017-09-01

    Although publications describe physical demands of the job in the physiotherapy profession, there is a dearth of literature on job stress dimensions (JSDs), and their relationship to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). To investigate JSDs and their relationship to WMSDs among physiotherapists currently practicing in southeast Nigeria. A cross-sectional study using items related to the Job Content Questionnaire and the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics, and the relationship between WMSDs and JSDs was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test. A total of 126 physiotherapists responded. There were high levels of stress in most of the job dimensions investigated: 82.1% and 22.8% of the physiotherapists had WMSDs in at least one body region in the last 12 months and the last 7 days respectively. The lower back was the most commonly affected in both periods. No specific domain was related to development of WMSDs. Over 80% of physiotherapists in southeast Nigeria have WMSDs. However, despite high levels of physical demands on the job, physiotherapists have job control and good social support. Intervention programs aimed at reducing WMSDs in physiotherapists should focus on risk factors that target the physical demands of the job.

  1. Immediate effects of Tuina techniques on working-related musculoskeletal disorder of professional orchestra musicians.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cláudia Maria; Moreira, Luis; Coimbra, Daniela; Machado, Jorge; Greten, Henry J

    2015-07-01

    Musicians are a prone group to suffer from working-related musculoskeletal disorder (WRMD). Conventional solutions to control musculoskeletal pain include pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation programs but their efficiency is sometimes disappointing. The aim of this research is to study the immediate effects of Tuina techniques on WRMD of professional orchestra musicians from the north of Portugal. We performed a prospective, controlled, single-blinded, randomized study. Professional orchestra musicians with a diagnosis of WRMD were randomly distributed into the experimental group (n=39) and the control group (n=30). During an individual interview, Chinese diagnosis took place and treatment points were chosen. Real acupoints were treated by Tuina techniques into the experimental group and non-specific skin points were treated into the control group. Pain was measured by verbal numerical scale before and immediately after intervention. After one treatment session, pain was reduced in 91.8% of the cases for the experimental group and 7.9% for the control group. Although results showed that Tuina techniques are effectively reducing WRMD in professional orchestra musicians of the north of Portugal, further investigations with stronger measurements, double-blinding designs and bigger simple sizes are needed.

  2. Musculoskeletal disorder risk as a function of vehicle rotation angle during assembly tasks.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sue A; Marras, Williams S; Gary Allread, W; Knapik, Gregory G; Vandlen, Kimberly A; Splittstoesser, Riley E; Yang, Gang

    2011-07-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are costly and common problem in automotive manufacturing. The research goal was to quantify MSD exposure as a function of vehicle rotation angle and region during assembly tasks. The study was conducted at the Center for Occupational Health in Automotive Manufacturing (COHAM) Laboratory. Twelve subjects participated in the study. The vehicle was divided into seven regions, (3 interior, 2 underbody and 2 engine regions) representative of work areas during assembly. Three vehicle rotation angles were examined for each region. The standard horizontal assembly condition (0° rotation) was the reference frame. Exposure was assessed on the spine loads and posture, shoulder posture and muscle activity, neck posture and muscle activity as well as wrist posture. In all regions, rotating the vehicle reduced musculoskeletal exposure. In five of the seven regions 45° of vehicle rotation represented the position that reduced MSD exposure most. Two of the seven regions indicated 90° of vehicle rotation had the greatest impact for reducing MSD exposure. This study demonstrated that vehicle rotation shows promise for reducing exposure to risk factors for MDS during automobile assembly tasks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. [Relationships between psychosocial factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders in coal miners].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-xing; Li, Li-ping; Liu, Feng-ying; Wang, Sheng

    2012-06-01

    To estimate the associations of psychosocial factors with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), providing scientific evidence for targeted strategies for the prevention of WMSDs in Chinese coal miners. A total of 500 coal miners were consecutively enrolled to this cross-sectional study. The prevalence of WMSDs was assessed using the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the associations between psychosocial factors and WMSDs. Among coal miners, of 277 coal miners, 61% self-reported WMSDs in a 12-month period. Especially, back pain was the most frequent musculoskeletal symptom. WMSDs were statistically correlated with high job demands (OR = 1.3, 95%CI: 1.3 ∼ 3.5), low job control (OR = 1.6, 95%CI: 1.0 ∼ 2.4), low level of interpersonal relations (OR = 1.9, 95%CI: 1.2 ∼ 3.0) and low job satisfaction (OR = 1.6, 95%CI: 1.0 ∼ 2.4). The results of this study demonstrate psychosocial factors were associated with WMSDs among coal miners, and psychosocial factors be considered for the prevention of WMSDs.

  4. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among instrumental musicians at a center for performing arts in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ajidahun, Adedayo T; Phillips, Julie

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD) is high in various countries of the world, but there is a paucity of literature in Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of PRMDs among instrumentalists in South Africa, with specific objectives in determining the distribution, symptoms, and pain severity. The self-administered Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to collect information from the participants regarding the lifetime and current prevalence and the distribution of PRMD symptoms. A visual analog scale was used to collect information on the severity of pain, while the questionnaire designed by Blackie, Stone, and Tiernan (1999) was used to collect information on the symptoms of the PRMDs. Twenty participants took part in this study, and the respondents reported a lifetime prevalence (over a period of 12 months) of PRMDs as 14 out of 17 and the current prevalence (in the last 7 days) as 4. Pain severity was mostly mild, and the most affected region was in the upper extremities, with the shoulders being the most affected. Tightening and soreness were the most reported symptom of PRMDs. The prevalence of PRMDs among this population was high, although severity was mild, with the upper extremities being the most affected area.

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists in the Hail Region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aljanakh, Mohammad; Shaikh, Sameer; Siddiqui, Ammar Ahmed; Al-Mansour, Moazzy; Hassan, Syed Sirajul

    2015-01-01

    Dentists suffer a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) but studies are quite limited. The present study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of MSDs among dentists in the Ha'il Region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional, questionnaire study was conducted among 80 licensed dentists af.filiated with the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ha'il Region, Saudi Arabia from January 2014-January 2015. A self-administered questionnaire, based on the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was sent to participants after translation to Arabic. The questionnaire was delivered by mail with a prepaid return envelope. Sixty-eight questionnaires (85%) were returned. The prevalence of MSDs among respondents was 77.9% (n=53) with the most commonly affected areas the lower back (73.5%) (39/53) followed by the neck (66%) (35/53) and the shoulders (43.3%) (23/53). Twenty-four (45.2%) of 53 respondents had experienced MSDs in the neck and lower back at the same time throughout the past twelve months. Nearly 85% (45/53) of respondents were found to have MSDs affecting two or more sites. Prevalence of MSDs was high among dentists in the Ha'il region. Lower back, neck and shoul.ders were the most commonly affected body sites.

  6. Relationship between mental workload and musculoskeletal disorders among Alzahra Hospital nurses

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Taheri, Mohamad Reza; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a serious problem among the nursing staff. Mental workload is the major cause of MSDs among nursing staff. The aim of this study was to investigate the mental workload dimensions and their association with MSDs among nurses of Alzahra Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 247 randomly selected nurses who worked in the Alzahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran in the summer of 2013. The Persian version of National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) (measuring mental load) specialized questionnaire and Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ) was used for data collection. Data were collected and analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman correlation coefficient tests in SPSS 20. Results: Pearson and Spearman correlation tests showed a significant association between the nurses’ MSDs and the dimensions of workload frustration, total workload, temporal demand, effort, and physical demand (r = 0.304, 0.277, 0.277, 0.216, and 0.211, respectively). However, there was no significant association between the nurses’ MSDs and the dimensions of workload performance and mental demand (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The nurses’ frustration had a direct correlation with MSDs. This shows that stress is an inseparable component in hospital workplace. Thus, reduction of stress in nursing workplace should be one of the main priorities of hospital managers. PMID:25709683

  7. Relationship between mental workload and musculoskeletal disorders among Alzahra Hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Taheri, Mohamad Reza; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a serious problem among the nursing staff. Mental workload is the major cause of MSDs among nursing staff. The aim of this study was to investigate the mental workload dimensions and their association with MSDs among nurses of Alzahra Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 247 randomly selected nurses who worked in the Alzahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran in the summer of 2013. The Persian version of National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) (measuring mental load) specialized questionnaire and Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ) was used for data collection. Data were collected and analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman correlation coefficient tests in SPSS 20. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests showed a significant association between the nurses' MSDs and the dimensions of workload frustration, total workload, temporal demand, effort, and physical demand (r = 0.304, 0.277, 0.277, 0.216, and 0.211, respectively). However, there was no significant association between the nurses' MSDs and the dimensions of workload performance and mental demand (P > 0.05). The nurses' frustration had a direct correlation with MSDs. This shows that stress is an inseparable component in hospital workplace. Thus, reduction of stress in nursing workplace should be one of the main priorities of hospital managers.

  8. Associations between academic stressors, reaction to stress, coping strategies and musculoskeletal disorders among college students.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Christopher E; Daniel, Nyebuk E; Aribo, Ekpe O

    2013-07-01

    The adverse health effects of stress are enormous, and vary among people, probably because of differences in how stress is appraised and the strategies individuals use to cope with it. This study assessed the association between academic stress and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among 1365 undergraduates. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a Nigerian university at the beginning of the 2010/2011 academic session with the same group of participants. The Life Stress Assessment Inventory, Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment were administered as tools of data gathering. Students' stress level and associated MSDs were higher during the examination period than the pre-examination periods. Stressors were significantly associated with increased risk of MSDs in both sexes were those related to changes (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7, p = 0.002) and pressures (OR = 2.09, p = 0.001). Emotional and physiological reactions to stress were significantly associated with MSDs in both sexes, with higher odds for MSDs in females, whereas cognitive and behavioral reactions showed higher odds (though non-significant) in males. The risk of MSDs was higher in respondents who adopted avoidance and religious coping strategies compared with those who adopted active practical and distracting coping strategies. Stress among students could be significantly associated with MSDs depending on individuals' demographics, stressors, reactions to stress, and coping methods. Interventions to reduce stress-induced MSDs among students should consider these factors among others.

  9. Associations Between Academic Stressors, Reaction to Stress, Coping Strategies and Musculoskeletal Disorders Among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Ekpenyong, Christopher E; Daniel, Nyebuk E; Aribo, Ekpe O

    2013-01-01

    Background The adverse health effects of stress are enormous, and vary among people, probably because of differences in how stress is appraised and the strategies individuals use to cope with it. This study assessed the association between academic stress and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among 1365 undergraduates. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a Nigerian university at the beginning of the 2010/2011 academic session with the same group of participants. The Life Stress Assessment Inventory, Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment were administered as tools of data gathering. Results Students' stress level and associated MSDs were higher during the examination period than the pre-examination periods. Stressors were significantly associated with increased risk of MSDs in both sexes were those related to changes (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7, p = 0.002) and pressures (OR = 2.09, p = 0.001). Emotional and physiological reactions to stress were significantly associated with MSDs in both sexes, with higher odds for MSDs in females, whereas cognitive and behavioral reactions showed higher odds (though non-significant) in males. The risk of MSDs was higher in respondents who adopted avoidance and religious coping strategies compared with those who adopted active practical and distracting coping strategies. Conclusions Stress among students could be significantly associated with MSDs depending on individuals' demographics, stressors, reactions to stress, and coping methods. Interventions to reduce stress-induced MSDs among students should consider these factors among others. PMID:23950626

  10. Characteristics of occupational musculoskeletal disorders of five sectors in service industry between 2004 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Young-Ki; Kang, Dong-Mug; Kim, Jong-Eun; Jang, Bo-Young

    2017-01-01

    'Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs)' have been mostly reported in the manufacturing industry but recently the occurrence of industrial injuries has been constantly increasing in the service industry. This research is going to analyze the data about workers' compensation for WRMSDs in five different service sectors and identify characteristics of occupations with the highest approved occupations. According to the data released from the Korea Worker's Compensation & Welfare Service, the overview of 12,730 cases of workers' compensation for WRMSDs in five service sectors from 2004 to 2013 is going to be analyzed and the source data is going to be classified by the Korean Standard Classification of Occupations to select the top five occupations that have the highest number of approval. After selecting each five occupations from the service sector that have work related musculoskeletal disorders, the result showed that the occupation with the highest number of approval in the health and social care sector were the early childhood educators, cooks in the school canteens in education services sector, garbage collectors in the sanitation and similar services sector, deliverymen in wholesale and retail, consumer goods repair and building cleaners in general management businesses such as those in building maintenance. The major event observed in the top five occupations was the overexertion and reaction as a cause of WRMSDs. The day when the WRMSDs mostly occurred was on Monday and the most likely time was 10 am. The median days away from work and lost working days are 29-90 days and 0-50 days respectively. The difference in each occupation was observed in year of service, age, and gender. 83.21% of the approved cases of workers' compensation for WRMSDs occurred in the top 25 occupations in all of the five service sectors, which meant that the approval of workers' compensation is concentrated in specific occupations. This research is going to suggest

  11. Are performance-based measures predictive of work participation in patients with musculoskeletal disorders? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kuijer, P P F M; Gouttebarge, V; Brouwer, S; Reneman, M F; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2012-02-01

    Assessments of whether patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can participate in work mainly consist of case history, physical examinations, and self-reports. Performance-based measures might add value in these assessments. This study answers the question: how well do performance-based measures predict work participation in patients with MSDs? A systematic literature search was performed to obtain longitudinal studies that used reliable performance-based measures to predict work participation in patients with MSDs. The following five sources of information were used to retrieve relevant studies: PubMed, Embase, AMA Guide to the Evaluation of Functional Ability, references of the included papers, and the expertise and personal file of the authors. A quality assessment specific for prognostic studies and an evidence synthesis were performed. Of the 1,230 retrieved studies, eighteen fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The studies included 4,113 patients, and the median follow-up period was 12 months. Twelve studies took possible confounders into account. Five studies were of good quality and thirteen of moderate quality. Two good-quality and all thirteen moderate-quality studies (83%) reported that performance-based measures were predictive of work participation. Two good-quality studies (11%) reported both an association and no association between performance-based measures and work participation. One good-quality study (6%) found no effect. A performance-based lifting test was used in fourteen studies and appeared to be predictive of work participation in thirteen studies. Strong evidence exists that a number of performance-based measures are predictive of work participation in patients with MSDs, especially lifting tests. Overall, the explained variance was modest.

  12. Sleep, stress, neurocognitive profile and health-related quality of life in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Juliana; Dos Santos, Flávia Heloísa; Terreri, Maria Teresa R. A.; Fraga, Melissa Mariti; Silva, Simone Guerra; Hilário, Maria Odete E.; Len, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to measure levels of sleep, stress, and depression, as well as health-related quality of life, and to assess the neurocognitive profiles in a sample of adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Nineteen adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain and 20 age-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated regarding their levels of sleep and stress, as well as quality of life, and underwent neurocognitive testing. RESULTS: The sample groups consisted predominantly of females (84%), and the socioeconomic status did not differ between the two groups. In addition, the occurrence of depressive symptoms was similar between the two groups; specifically, 26% of the idiopathic musculoskeletal pain patients and 30% of the control subjects had scores indicative of depression. Teenagers in the group with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain reported poorer quality of life and sleep scores than those in the control group. Regarding stress, patients had worse scores than the control group; whereas 79% of the adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain met the criteria for a diagnosis of stress, only 35% of the adolescents in the control group met the criteria. In both groups, we observed scores that classified adolescents as being in the resistance phase (intermediate) and exhaustion phase (pathological) of distress. However, the idiopathic musculoskeletal pain group more frequently reported symptomatic complaints of physical and emotional distress. The neurocognitive assessment showed no significant impairments in either group. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain did not exhibit cognitive impairments. However, adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain did experience intermediate to advanced psychological distress and lower health-related quality of life, which may increase their risk of cognitive dysfunction in the future. PMID:23070339

  13. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Lower-Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Julie; Bradshaw, Michelle

    Lower-extremity (LE) musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can have a major impact on the ability to carry out daily activities. The effectiveness of interventions must be examined to enable occupational therapy practitioners to deliver the most appropriate services. This systematic review examined the literature published between 1995 and July 2014 that investigated the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for LE MSDs. Forty-three articles met the criteria and were reviewed. Occupational therapy interventions varied on the basis of population subgroup: hip fracture, LE joint replacement, LE amputation or limb loss, and nonsurgical osteoarthritis and pain. The results indicate an overall strong role for occupational therapy in treating clients with LE MSDs. Activity pacing is an effective intervention for nonsurgical LE MSDs, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation is effective for LE joint replacement and amputation. Further research on specific occupational therapy interventions in this important area is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry professionals. 2. Prevention, ergonomic strategies and therapeutic programs].

    PubMed

    Sartorio, F; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Vercelli, S; Odescalchi, L; Augusti, D; Migliario, M

    2005-01-01

    In dental professionals the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) can be minimized through a combination of prevention, ergonomic strategies, and specific therapeutic programs. Prevention includes early identification of symptoms, analysis of working posture and activity, and the evaluation of equipment (such as dental instruments, position of the dental unit, patient and operator chairs, and lighting). The ergonomic strategies are based on identifying the best daily timetable (including periodic pauses) and most efficient team organization, as well as establishing the correct position that should be held at the patient chair. Finally specific therapeutic programs are very important in preventing or treating WMSD. In fact, fitness exercises such as mobilization, stretching or muscular and cardiovascular training are recognized as fundamental for dental professionals, and when WMSD occurs physiatric care and physical therapy are recommended.

  15. Upper limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders among newspaper employees: cross-sectional survey results.

    PubMed

    Polanyi, M F; Cole, D C; Beaton, D E; Chung, J; Wells, R; Abdolell, M; Beech-Hawley, L; Ferrier, S E; Mondloch, M V; Shields, S A; Smith, J M; Shannon, H S

    1997-12-01

    At a metropolitan newspaper office in Canada with extensive video display terminal (VDT) use, researchers carried out a survey (n = 1,007, 84% response) to establish baseline prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) and to identify demographic, postural, task, and psychosocial factors associated with WMSD symptoms. One-fifth of the respondents reported moderate or worse upper limb pain recurring at least monthly or lasting more than a week over the previous year. Logistic regression showed that employees who faced frequent deadlines and high psychological demands (fast work pace and conflicting demands), had low skill discretion and social support, spent more time keyboarding, or who had their screen in a non-optimal position were more likely to report moderate to severe symptoms. Women reported significantly higher levels of symptoms than men.

  16. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and physiological stress among adult, male potato cultivators of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Banibrata; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2015-03-01

    A total of 70 male potato cultivators were selected randomly from the villages of West Bengal, India, to evaluate musculoskeletal disorder (MSD), thermal stress, and physiological stress and were compared with 70 controls from the urban sector of West Bengal. Modified Nordic questionnaire studies and a posture analysis were performed in for the male potato cultivators by the Rapid Entire Body Assessment method. Most of the participants suffered discomfort at different parts of the body, especially in the lower back, knee, ankle, and feet regions. Potato cultivators suffered maximum discomfort during spading, planting seeds, weeding, picking crops, and sprinkling water. Therefore, it can be concluded that prolonged work activity, high repetitiveness, and remaining constantly in an awkward posture for a prolonged period of time may lead to MSDs. This study also revealed that a significant physiological load is exerted on the potato cultivators, as shown by increased heart rates.

  17. Association among Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders, Job Stress, and Job Attitude of Occupational Therapists.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the associations among work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), job stress, and job attitude of occupational therapists in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were distributed to 150 occupational therapists. Of the 128 occupational therapists who responded, 110 (85.9%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the low back (26.8%), and the most reported number of body site affected by WMSDs was one (53.9%). As a result, there were significant differences in job stress and job attitude depending on the age, work experience, working hour, presence or absence of WMSDs, and number of site of pain. Factors influencing job attitude included job stress, the presence or absence of WMSDs and duration of pain. The results showed that the occurrence of WMSDs in occupational therapists was associated with increased job stress and negative job attitude.

  18. Ergonomic interventions for prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in a small manufacturing assembly line.

    PubMed

    Shin, Wonkyoung; Park, Minyong

    2017-10-03

    This study involves performing improvements in workstation specification using a three-dimensional human modeling tool and proposing well-balanced work scheduling (WBWS) to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in a small manufacturing plant. To analyze risk factors of WMSDs, various tasks at 10 different types of workstation were evaluated with detailed motion analysis using a customized checklist. Questionnaires were administered to 27 workers to evaluate symptoms related to WMSDs. Revised workstation specifications were suggested based on anthropometric characteristics of workers using before-after analyses as an engineering control. Additionally, WBWS was proposed as an administrative control to avoid continuous physical stress on specific body parts in repetitive tasks. A software tool for WBWS was developed for convenient and easy application. The results of the study may aid managers in applying ergonomic interventions with time and cost savings, and enhance worker satisfaction and motivation due to improvements in working conditions to prevent WMSDs.

  19. Effects of presenteeism in chronic occupational musculoskeletal disorders: stay at work is validated.

    PubMed

    Howard, Krista J; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2009-06-01

    The present study takes a new approach to understanding how presenteeism relates to chronic pain or disability patient outcomes. The sample consisted of 2191 consecutive chronic disabling musculoskeletal disorder patients, classified as either presentees (N = 704), or absentees (N = 1487), who were admitted to a functional restoration program. The measures included medical evaluations, demographic data, psychiatric diagnoses at admission, an 1 year follow-up socioeconomic outcome assessment and validated questionnaires evaluating pain, depression, and function. The findings revealed that patients classified as presentees were significantly more likely to complete the prescribed functional restoration treatment program, to return to work (full-duty or full-time), to retain work 1-year posttreatment, and not to have a decrease in job demand from preinjury to posttreatment. Both employees and employers will benefit if the ill or injured employee stays at work postinjury in lieu of short- or long-term disability.

  20. Employer differences in upper-body musculoskeletal disorders and pain among immigrant Latino poultry processing workers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Mora, Dana C; Arcury, Thomas A; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    Between-employer differences in working conditions may lead to variable injury rates. The objective of this paper is to assess the difference in the prevalence of epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, and low back pain among immigrant Latino poultry workers at plants of three different employers. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study among 286 poultry processing workers. Community-based sampling was used to recruit participants in western North Carolina. Rotator cuff syndrome (26.7%) and low back pain (27.9%) were more prevalent among employees of one specific employer. Multivariate analysis showed significant associations of low back pain and rotator cuff syndrome with age, task performed in the processing line, and employer. Employer is a major predictor of musculoskeletal disorders and pain. Line speed and work pace may account for these differences and provide an opportunity for regulation and intervention to protect the health of workers.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among Sri Lankan rubber tappers

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Vijitha; Tharindra, Hemajith; Ostbye, Truls

    2016-01-01

    Background Rubber tapping exposes workers to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Objectives This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and factors associated with MSDs among Sri Lankan rubber tappers. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 300 rubber tappers to measure MSDs and potential associated factors. Ergonomic exposure levels were measured for 90 tappers using the Quick Exposure Check instrument. MSD prevalence and prevalence ratios were calculated using log-binomial regression. Results In the past 12 months, 66% of rubber tappers in our sample experienced an MSD. Ergonomic exposure levels were high or very high in the back (94.4%), shoulders (96.7%), and neck (83.3%). Being female, older, Tamil, working two jobs, alternating tapping hands, and depression were significantly associated with increased risk of MSDs. Conclusions MSDs are common among rubber tappers in Sri Lanka. These results suggest a need for work process modifications to prevent MSDs. PMID:27092589

  2. Association of risk factors with musculoskeletal disorders in manual-working farmers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Meena, M L; Dangayach, G S; Bhardwaj, A K

    2017-02-02

    The current study is aimed at recognizing the risk factors for major work-related issues (ie, musculoskeletal disorders [MSDs]) among 138 manual-working farmers. Data were collected using modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire and the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment score sheet. Different factors influencing MSDs were detected using logistic regression methods. The highest occurrence rate for MSDs was observed in the lower back (71.4%), followed by fingers (62.1%), shoulders (56.4%), and hands/wrists (55%). Factors such as age, gender, daily working hours, hand dominance, perceived fatigue, and work experience were found to be associated with MSDs in one or more upper body regions. The outcome of multinomial regression showed that gender is the most influencing factor for MSDs in all upper body regions except the shoulders. The outcomes of study indicate high occurrence of MSDs among manual-working farmers and highlight the significance of individual and work-related factors.

  3. Hospital For Special Surgery/Immune System REgulation In Musculoskeletal Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Meffre; Lionel Ivashkiv

    2007-08-20

    Inflammation on musculoskeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the result of dysregulation of the immune system. When the immune system, which maintains the integrity of the organism in an environment rich in infectious microbes, becomes misdirected toward components of one’s own tissue, autoimmune disease can result with autoantibodies contributing to the inflammation and tissue damage. RA is a chronic autoimmune disease marked by severe inflammation that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in the joints, which is estimated to affect 1 percent of the US adult population. Furthermore, autoimmune diseases, which affect women at a higher rate, are the fourth largest cause of disability among women in the US and among the top ten causes of death. The long range goal of this study is to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate the generation of autoantibodies by B cells in normal individuals and in patients with autoimmune diseases and provide insights into potential therapeutic interventions.

  4. [Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of musculoskeletal disorders on the sports medicine. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Drobnic, Franchek; Turmo, Antonio

    2010-03-13

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (OHB) is a therapeutic modality based on the properties of partial pressure of oxygen, when breathing pure oxygen under hyperbaric conditions in a chamber designed for that purpose. Its indications in medicine are considered as primary, complementary or experimental depending on the evidence based effects. From different sectors of medicine, OHB has been recently proposed as a new tool for other pathologies, primarily in musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, the state of the art of the influence from experimental studies is reviewed. Some considerations based on these studies are hypothesized as the minimum required to obtain good results when this therapy is decided to be used as co adjuvant to standard treatment.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among Sri Lankan rubber tappers.

    PubMed

    Stankevitz, Kayla; Schoenfisch, Ashley; de Silva, Vijitha; Tharindra, Hemajith; Stroo, Marissa; Ostbye, Truls

    2016-04-01

    Rubber tapping exposes workers to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and factors associated with MSDs among Sri Lankan rubber tappers. Questionnaires were administered to 300 rubber tappers to measure MSDs and potential associated factors. Ergonomic exposure levels were measured for 90 tappers using the Quick Exposure Check instrument. MSD prevalence and prevalence ratios were calculated using log-binomial regression. In the past 12 months, 66% of rubber tappers in our sample experienced an MSD. Ergonomic exposure levels were high or very high in the back (94.4%), shoulders (96.7%), and neck (83.3%). Being female, older, Tamil, working two jobs, alternating tapping hands, and depression were significantly associated with increased risk of MSDs. MSDs are common among rubber tappers in Sri Lanka. These results suggest a need for work process modifications to prevent MSDs.

  6. [Evidence based prevention and upper limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, R; Farioli, A; Mattioli, S; Violante, F S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate interventions for primary prevention of Upper limb Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (UWMSD) we conducted a literature search from the biomedical database Medline and the Cochrane Collaboration Occupational Health Field. A total of 41 studies were selected: the majority investigated the effect of interventions among office workers, few involved industrial workplaces. Studies were characterized by a wide range of interventions (engineering, administrative, ergonomic training) and methodological heterogeneity (in the study design and outcome measures). Only four studies examine interventions for the prevention of specific outcomes (Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome). At present, the multidimensional approach of interventions and the poor outcome definitions hamper the isolation of the potentially effective component of the intervention. Future intervention studies should be based on well defined risk assessment and outcome measures, rigorous and long-term study design. Only strong levels of evidence could be the base of policy recommendations.

  7. Constant negotiating: managing work-related musculoskeletal disorders while remaining at the workplace.

    PubMed

    Smith-Young, Joanne; Solberg, Shirley; Gaudine, Alice

    2014-02-01

    We used grounded theory to explore processes and strategies used by workers affected by work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) while they remained in the workplace, and we developed a theory to describe the overall process. Participants included 25 workers affected by WMSDs who were currently employed in various workplaces in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The theoretical model has five main phases: (a) becoming concerned, (b) getting medical help, (c) dealing with the workplace, (d) making adjustments to lifestyle, and (e) taking charge, each with separate subphases. Constant negotiating was the core variable that explained the overall process, with workers engaged in negotiations with others in occupational, health, and social contexts. Using a two-dimensional figure, we illustrate the negotiation strategies workers used. We discuss implications for health care, workplaces, education, and research for creating a culture of understanding and respect for injured workers who wish to remain working after developing WMSDs.

  8. Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) Study: Study Design, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics of Enrolled Subjects.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannae; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) study was developed to evaluate health status and related factors in farmers. Farmers in Kangwon Province, South Korea, were recruited. Baseline characteristics were determined using questionnaires about sociodemographic and health characteristics and agricultural work-related factors. In addition, laboratory examinations (lumbar spinal radiography and serologic testing) were conducted. The FARM study covers eight rural areas and recruited 1013 subjects (534 women; mean [standard deviation {SD}] age, 57.2 [7.5] years). Musculoskeletal pain in multiple areas was reported by 925 subjects (91.3%), and low back pain (63.8%) was the most frequent site of pain. Farmer's Stress Inventory (mean [SD], 77.7 [10.2]; range, 28-112] and subjective stress index (mean [SD], 5.3 [2.4]; range, 0-10) were above median scale values, reflecting a stressful condition, while the EuroQol-5D-3L index and the EuroQol-Visual Analog Scale scores were high (mean [SD], 0.9 [0.1]; range -0.171-1 and mean [SD], 67.7 [18.7]; range 0-100, respectively), reflecting good life quality. In total, 53% of participants had worked in farming for more than 30 years, and workers involved in dry-field farming comprised the largest subgroup (41.5%). Most participants (94.3%) had no more than a high school education, and families with annual income below 20 million won constituted the largest subgroup (36.3%). The FARM study may provide data on the current health status and related sociodemographic and agricultural work-related risk factors in Korean farmers, with the goal of providing a scientific basis for developing coping interventions and preventive strategies.

  9. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders for Nurses in Hospitals, Long-Term Care Facilities, and Home Health Care: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kermit G; Kotowski, Susan E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and reported injuries for nurses and nursing aides. Nurses and nursing aides suffer from work-related pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Although there have been a plethora of studies on MSDs, an overall understanding of the prevalence of MSDs and pain can lead to better prioritization of research needs with respect to the health care industry. A total of 132 articles on prevalence of MSD pain and injuries were included in the review. All articles were published in peer-reviewed English-speaking journals and subjected to a quality review. Reported prevalence of MSD pain for nurses and nursing aides was highest in the low back, followed by shoulders and neck. However, the majority of the studies have been concentrated on 12-month pain in the low back and predominantly in hospitals. Few researchers have investigated pain in the upper and lower extremities (less than 27% of the studies). Even fewer researchers have evaluated reported injuries or even subjective lost-time injuries (less than 15% of the studies). MSD pain in the nursing profession has been widely investigated worldwide, with a major focus on low-back pain. Given new directions in health care, such as patients who live longer with more chronic diseases, bariatric patients, early mobility requirements, and those who want to be at home during sickness, higher prevalence levels may shift to different populations--home health care workers, long-term care workers, and physical therapists--as well as shift to different body regions, such as shoulders and upper extremities. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  10. Farmers’ Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) Study: Study Design, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics of Enrolled Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hannae; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E.; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background The ongoing Farmers’ Cohort for Agricultural Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) study was developed to evaluate health status and related factors in farmers. Methods Farmers in Kangwon Province, South Korea, were recruited. Baseline characteristics were determined using questionnaires about sociodemographic and health characteristics and agricultural work-related factors. In addition, laboratory examinations (lumbar spinal radiography and serologic testing) were conducted. Results The FARM study covers eight rural areas and recruited 1013 subjects (534 women; mean [standard deviation {SD}] age, 57.2 [7.5] years). Musculoskeletal pain in multiple areas was reported by 925 subjects (91.3%), and low back pain (63.8%) was the most frequent site of pain. Farmer’s Stress Inventory (mean [SD], 77.7 [10.2]; range, 28–112] and subjective stress index (mean [SD], 5.3 [2.4]; range, 0–10) were above median scale values, reflecting a stressful condition, while the EuroQol-5D-3L index and the EuroQol-Visual Analog Scale scores were high (mean [SD], 0.9 [0.1]; range −0.171–1 and mean [SD], 67.7 [18.7]; range 0–100, respectively), reflecting good life quality. In total, 53% of participants had worked in farming for more than 30 years, and workers involved in dry-field farming comprised the largest subgroup (41.5%). Most participants (94.3%) had no more than a high school education, and families with annual income below 20 million won constituted the largest subgroup (36.3%). Conclusions The FARM study may provide data on the current health status and related sociodemographic and agricultural work-related risk factors in Korean farmers, with the goal of providing a scientific basis for developing coping interventions and preventive strategies. PMID:26235456

  11. [Association between musculoskeletal disorders in the lower limbs and occupational stress in bus drivers].

    PubMed

    Liao, X Q; Li, J; Zhang, Q; Lan, Y J

    2016-08-20

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the lower limbs and occupational stress in bus drivers, as well as the association between occupational stress and MSDs in the lower limbs, and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of MSDs in the lower limbs in bus drivers. Methods: Cluster sampling was used to collect 598 bus drivers from those who underwent physical examination in a hospital in Chengdu, China, from June to July, 2015. The data on demographic features and living habits were collected, and the Chinese version of effort-reward imbalance questionnaire and Nordic Standardized Questionnaires for Musculoskeletal Disorders were used to investigate occupational stress and the development of MSDs. Results: In these bus drivers, the prevalence of MSDs in the lower limbs was 51.2%, and that in the thigh/hip, ankle/foot, and knee was 36.8%, 32.2%, and 31.4%, respectively. The multivariate regression analysis showed that effort-reward imbalance was the risk factor for MSDs in the lower limbs, and the OR values for the lower limbs, thigh/hip, knee, and ankle/foot were 3.96 (95% CI: 2.19~7.18) , 3.86 (95% CI: 2.05~7.28) , 2.47 (95% CI: 1.30~4.70) , and 2.45 (95% CI: 1.32~4.56) , respectively. Conclusion: Occupational stress is associated with an increased risk of MSDs in the lower limbs in bus drivers.

  12. Associations between disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal injury among high school athletes.

    PubMed

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M; Rauh, Mitchell J; Carr, Kathleen E; Loud, Keith J; McGuine, Timothy A

    2011-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine the prevalence of, and association between, disordered eating (DE), menstrual dysfunction (MD), and musculoskeletal injury (MI) among high school female athletes. Female athlete triad (Triad) syndrome is the interrelatedness of DE, MD, and low bone mass. Few studies have examined 2 or more Triad components simultaneously, or their relationship to injury, among female high school athletes. The subject sample consisted of 311 female high school athletes competing on 33 interscholastic high school teams during the 2006-2007 school year. Athletes completed the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and Healthy Wisconsin High School Female Athletes Survey (HWHSFAS). Athletes were classified by sport type as aesthetic (AES), endurance (END), or team/anaerobic (T/A). Of those surveyed, 35.4% reported DE, 18.8% reported MD, and 65.6% reported sustaining a sports-related musculoskeletal injury during the current sports season. Athletes reporting DE were twice as likely to be injured compared to those reporting normal eating behaviors (odds ratio [OR], 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 4.0). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that athletes who reported a history of DE (OR, 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9) or prior injury (OR, 5.1; 95% CI: 2.9, 8.9) were more likely to be injured during the sports season. A high prevalence of DE and MD exists among high school female athletes. Additionally, athletes with DE were over 2 times more likely to sustain a sports-related injury during a sports season. Screening and intervention programs designed to identify and decrease the prevalence of DE should be implemented with high school females. Prognosis, level 2b.

  13. Comparison of musculoskeletal disorder health claims between construction floor layers and a general working population.

    PubMed

    Dale, Ann Marie; Ryan, Daniel; Welch, Laura; Olsen, Margaret A; Buchholz, Bryan; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Compare rates of medical insurance claims for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) between workers in a construction trade and a general worker population to determine if higher physical exposures in construction lead to higher rates of claims on personal medical insurance. Health insurance claims between 2006 and 2010 from floor layers were frequency matched by age, gender, eligibility time and geographic location to claims from insured workers in general industry obtained from MarketScan. We extracted MSD claims and dates of service from six regions of the body: neck, low back, knee, lower extremity, shoulder and distal arm, and evaluated differences in claim rates. Fifty-one per cent of floor layers (n=1475) experienced musculoskeletal claims compared with 39% of MarketScan members (p<0.001). Claim rates were higher for floor layers across all body regions with nearly double the rate ratios for the knee and neck regions (RR 2.10 and 2.07). The excess risk was greatest for the neck and low back regions; younger workers had disproportionately higher rates in the knee, neck, low back and distal arm. A larger proportion of floor layers (22%) filed MSD claims in more than one body region compared with general workers (10%; p<0.001). Floor layers have markedly higher rates of MSD claims compared with a general worker population, suggesting a shifting of medical costs for work-related MSD to personal health insurance. The occurrence of disorders in multiple body regions and among the youngest workers highlights the need for improved work methods and tools for construction workers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. An Analysis of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Butchers in Kano Metropolis, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kaka, Bashir; Idowu, Opeyemi A; Fawole, Henrietta O; Adeniyi, Ade F; Ogwumike, Omoyemi O; Toryila, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Butchering is often associated with high rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs). However, published work on the prevalence of WRMSDs among butchers in Nigeria is scarce. This is important because meat processing practices differ across geographical and cultural locations. This study was therefore aimed at analyzing WRMSDs among butchers in Kano metropolis. Sociodemographic and work-settings information was obtained from 102 male cattle butchers (age, 37.49 ± 11.68 years) through survey. Information on the prevalence and pattern of musculoskeletal disorders was obtained from the respondents using the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. Additional information on health seeking practices was also obtained using a pro forma. Associations between the prevalence of WRMSDs and each of the sociodemographic data and work settings were explored using Chi-square analysis. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The 12-month and point prevalence rates of WRMSDs among butchers in this study were 88.2% and 74.5%, respectively. Whereas lower back complaints (66.7%) were the overall and lower body quadrant's most commonly reported WRMSDs among the butchers surveyed, wrist/hand complaints were the leading upper quadrant's (45.1%) most commonly reported WRMSDs among the respondents. There were significant associations between age and majority of WRMSDs in the body regions. Only 23.3% of the 90 individuals who had WRMSD visited the hospital to seek redress for their WRMSD. The prevalence of WRMSDs is high among butchers in Kano Metropolis. Few individuals with WRMSD utilize healthcare facilities. Age is a major risk factor in this setting.

  15. Playing-related disabling musculoskeletal disorders in young and adult classical piano students.

    PubMed

    Bruno, S; Lorusso, A; L'Abbate, N

    2008-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of instrument-related musculoskeletal problems in classical piano students and investigate piano-specific risk factors. A specially developed four parts questionnaire was administered to classical piano students of two Apulian conservatories, in southern Italy. A cross-sectional design was used. Prevalences of playing related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) were calculated and cases were compared with non-cases. A total of 195 out of the 224 piano students responded (87%). Among 195 responders, 75 (38.4%) were considered affected according to the pre-established criteria. Disabling MSDs showed similar prevalence rates for neck (29.3%), thoracic spine (21.3%) and upper limbs (from 20.0 to 30.4%) in the affected group. Univariate analyses showed statistical differences concerning mean age, number of hours per week spent playing, more than 60 min of continuative playing without breaks, lack of sport practice and acceptability of "No pain, no gain" criterion in students with music-related pain compared with pianists not affected. Statistical correlation was found only between upper limbs diseases in pianists and hand sizes. No correlation with the model of piano played was found in the affected group. The multivariate analyses performed by logistic regression confirmed the independent correlation of the risk factors age, lack of sport practice and acceptability of "No pain, no gain" criterion. Our study showed MSDs to be a common problem among classical piano students. With variance in several studies reported, older students appeared to be more frequently affected by disabling MSDs and no difference in the prevalence rate of the disorders was found in females.

  16. Work with visual display units and musculoskeletal disorders: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Riccò, Matteo; Cattani, Silvia; Gualerzi, Giovanni; Signorelli, Carlo

    2016-12-22

    Epidemiological studies have shown that employees working with visual display units (VDU) are more likely to complain about musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The aim of this study has been to evaluate associations among MSDs and individuals and work-related factors. A total of 1032 VDU workers were assessed about their personal (i.e., age, working history, smoking history, physical activity) and work-related factors (i.e., predominant job tasks performed, work posture). Work environment was evaluated regarding fulfillment of the standard ISO 9241-5:1998. The investigation required a direct observation of participants (in order to accurately assess the prevalence of MSDs) and workstations. Adjusted odds ratios (ORa) were calculated by means of the logistic regression model. Prevalence of MSDs was relatively high (53%). In general, MSDs were significantly associated with female sex (OR = 2.832, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.178-3.683), age ≥ 50 years old (OR = 2.231, 95% CI: 1.236-4.026), longer exposure to VDU, both as working history (10-14 years: OR = 1.934, 95% CI: 1.301-2.875; ≥ 15 years: OR = 2.223, 95% CI: 1.510-3.271) and working time (30-39 h/week: OR = 1.537, 95% CI: 1.087-2.273). Inappropriate workstation design was confirmed by the multivariate analysis as a risk factor for MSDs (ORa = 2.375, 95% CI: 1.124-5.018). Musculoskeletal disorders were significantly associated with individual factors as well as characteristics of work environment. An appropriate design of workstations may significantly reduce their prevalence amongst VDU workers. Med Pr 2016;67(6):707-719.

  17. Disordered Eating, Menstrual Irregularity, and Musculoskeletal Injury in High School Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M.; Carr, Kathleen E.; Hetzel, Scott; Dennison, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Background: The female athlete triad is the interrelatedness of energy availability, menstrual function, and bone density. Currently, limited information about triad components and their relationship to musculoskeletal injury in the high school population exists. In addition, no study has specifically examined triad components and injury rate in high school oral contraceptive pill (OCP) users. Hypothesis: To compare the prevalence of disordered eating (DE), menstrual irregularity (MI), and musculoskeletal injury (INJ) among high school female athletes in OCP users and non-OCP users. Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Methods: The subject sample completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and Healthy Wisconsin High School Female Athletes Survey (HWHSFAS). Athletes were classified by OCP use and sport type. Results: Of the participants, 14.8% reported OCP use. There was no difference in MI and INJ among groups. The prevalence of DE was significantly higher among OCP users as compared with non-OCP users; OCP users were twice as likely to meet the criteria for DE (odds ratio [OR], 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-5.09). OCP users were over 5 times more likely to have a global score that met criteria for DE as compared with non-OCP users (OR, 5.36; 95% CI, 1.92-14.89). Conclusion: Although MI and INJ rates are similar among groups, there is a higher prevalence of DE among high school female athletes using OCPs as compared with non-OCP users. Clinical Relevance: Because OCP users may be menstruating, clinicians may fail to recognize the other triad components. However, DE exists in the menstruating OCP user. As such, clinicians should be vigilant when screening for triad components in high school OCP users, particularly DE. PMID:24982703

  18. Comparison of Musculoskeletal Disorder Health Claims Between Construction Floor Layers and a General Working Population

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ann Marie; Ryan, Daniel; Welch, Laura; Olsen, Margaret A.; Buchholz, Bryan; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compare rates of medical insurance claims for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) between workers in a construction trade and a general worker population to determine if higher physical exposures in construction lead to higher rates of claims on personal medical insurance. Methods Health insurance claims between 2006 and 2010 from floor layers were frequency matched by age, gender, eligibility time, and geographic location to claims from insured workers in general industry obtained from MarketScan. We extracted MSD claims and dates of service from six regions of the body: neck, low back, knee, lower extremity, shoulder, and distal arm, and evaluated differences in claim rates. Results Fifty-one percent of floor layers (n=1,475) experienced musculoskeletal claims compared to 39% of MarketScan members (p<0.001). Claim rates were higher for floor layers across all body regions with nearly double the rate ratios for the knee and neck regions (RR: 2.10 and 2.07). The excess risk was greatest for the neck and low back regions; younger workers had disproportionately higher rates in the knee, neck, low back, and distal arm. A larger proportion of floor layers (22%) filed MSD claims in more than one body region compared to general workers (10%; p<0.001). Conclusions Floor layers have markedly higher rates of MSD claims compared to a general worker population, suggesting shifting of medical costs for work-related MSD to personal health insurance. The occurrence of disorders in multiple body regions and among the youngest workers highlights the need for improved work methods and tools for construction workers. PMID:25224720

  19. Evidence-informed physical therapy management of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cliffton; Ackermann, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Playing a musical instrument at an elite level is a highly complex motor skill. The regular daily training loads resulting from practice, rehearsals and performances place great demands on the neuromusculoskeletal systems of the body. As a consequence, performance-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) are globally recognized as common phenomena amongst professional orchestral musicians. These disorders create a significant financial burden to individuals and orchestras as well as lead to serious consequences to the musicians’ performance and ultimately their career. Physical therapists are experts in treating musculoskeletal injuries and are ideally placed to apply their skills to manage PRMDs in this hyper-functioning population, but there is little available evidence to guide specific injury management approaches. An Australia-wide survey of professional orchestral musicians revealed that the musicians attributed excessively high or sudden increase in playing-load as major contributors to their PRMDs. Therefore, facilitating musicians to better manage these loads should be a cornerstone of physical therapy management. The Sound Practice orchestral musicians work health and safety project used formative and process evaluation approaches to develop evidence-informed and clinically applicable physical therapy interventions, ultimately resulting in favorable outcomes. After these methodologies were employed, the intervention studies were conducted with a national cohort of professional musicians including: health education, onsite injury management, cross-training exercise regimes, performance postural analysis, and music performance biomechanics feedback. The outcomes of all these interventions will be discussed alongside a focussed review on the existing literature of these management strategies. Finally, a framework for best-practice physical therapy management of PRMDs in musicians will be provided. PMID:25071671

  20. Ergonomic risks and musculoskeletal disorders in production agriculture: recommendations for effective research to practice.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, Steven R; Earle-Richardson, Giulia; Banks, R J

    2010-07-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are increasingly recognized as a significant hazard of agricultural occupation. In agricultural jobs with significant physical labor, MSDs are typically the most frequently reported injury. Although not as lethal as tractor roll-overs, MSDs can result in disability, lost work time, and increased production costs. MSDs increase production costs as a result of worker absence, medical and insurance costs, decreased work capacity, and loss of employees to turnover and competition from other less physically demanding industries. This paper will provide an overview of what is currently known about MSDs in agriculture, including high-risk commodities, tasks and work practices, and the related regulatory factors and workers' compensation costs. As agricultural production practices evolve, the types of MSDs also change, as do ergonomic risk factors. One example is the previous higher rates of knee and hip arthritis identified in farmers in stanchion dairies evolving into upper extremity tendonitis, arthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome now found in milking technicians in dairy milking parlors. This paper summarizes the presentation, "Musculoskeletal Disorders in Labor-Intensive Operations," at the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conference, "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture," January 27-28, 2010, Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The primary focus of the paper is to address current research on ergonomic solutions for MSDs in agriculture. These include improved tools, carts or equipment, as well as work practices. One of the key challenges in this area pertains to measurement, due to the fact that musculoskeletal strain is a chronic condition that can come and go, with self-reported pain as its only indicator. Alternative measurement methods will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of research into practice is reviewed, with an emphasis on best

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders among construction workers: a one-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are an important cause of functional impairments and disability among construction workers. An improved understanding of MSDs in different construction occupations is likely to be of value for selecting preventive measures. This study aimed to survey the prevalence of symptoms of MSDs, the work-relatedness of the symptoms and the problems experienced during work among two construction occupations: bricklayers and supervisors. Methods We randomly selected 750 bricklayers and 750 supervisors resident in the Netherlands in December 2009. This sample was surveyed by means of a baseline questionnaire and a follow-up questionnaire one year later. The participants were asked about complaints of the musculoskeletal system during the last six months, the perceived work-relatedness of the symptoms, the problems that occurred during work and the occupational tasks that were perceived as causes or aggravating factors of the MSD. Results Baseline response rate was 37%, follow-up response was 80%. The prevalence of MSDs among 267 bricklayers and 232 supervisors was 67% and 57%, respectively. Complaints of the back, knee and shoulder/upper arm were the most prevalent among both occupations. Irrespective of the body region, most of the bricklayers and supervisors reported that their complaints were work-related. Complaints of the back and elbow were the most often reported among the bricklayers during work, whereas lower arm/wrist and upper leg complaints were the most often reported among the supervisors. In both occupations, a majority of the participants perceived several occupational physical tasks and activities as causes or aggravating factors for their MSD. Recurrent complaints at follow-up were reported by both bricklayers (47% of the complaints) and supervisors (31% of the complaints). Participants in both occupations report that mainly back and knee complaints result in additional problems during work, at the time

  2. Physician practicing preferences for conventional or homeopathic medicines in elderly subjects with musculoskeletal disorders in the EPI3-MSD cohort

    PubMed Central

    Danno, Karine; Joubert, Clementine; Duru, Gerard; Vetel, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is common in elderly persons. Analgesic use is high in the elderly and may involve unacceptable risk in individuals with chronic pain. Our aim was to compare the socio-demographic characteristics of elderly subjects with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and to assess medication use and clinical evolution of musculoskeletal pain according to physician prescribing preference: homeopathy (Ho) group, conventional medicine (CM) group, or mixed prescription (MX) group. Methods The EPI3 study was a 1 year observational survey carried out among general practitioners in France between March 2007 and July 2008. This sub-analysis was carried out on elderly subjects aged ≥70 years from the original EPI3 cohort. Socio-demographic data were collected at inclusion using a self-administered patient questionnaire and medical data were recorded for each patient. Quality of life was measured using the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Patients completed a structured telephone interview on their functional status (evaluated with the QuickDash questionnaire, EIFEL scale or Lequesne index) within 72 hours of inclusion. This telephone interview was repeated at 1, 3, and 12 months. Drug exposure was also assessed during these interviews. Results 146 patients (mean age ± standard deviation: 75.8±4.8 years) were analyzed (80.1% female, 74.7% MSD of the spine or lower limbs, 64.4% chronic MSD). Patients in the CM and MX groups were 3.7 times or 2.5 times more likely (odds ratio [OR] =3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–12.30; OR =2.52, 95% CI: 1.05–6.05; respectively) to have used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) than those in the Ho group. In contrast, analgesic use was comparable in the three groups (OR =1.06 [CM versus Ho], 95% CI: 0.09–12.11; OR =0.34 [MX versus Ho], 95% CI: 0.07–1.57). Overall functional score evolution was similar in the three groups over time (P=0.16). Conclusion NSAID use was significantly higher in elderly MSD

  3. Neck-upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders among workers in the telecommunications company at Mansoura City.

    PubMed

    El-Bestar, Sohair Fouad; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf Abdel-Moniem; Khashaba, Eman Omar

    2011-01-01

    This study was to determine the prevalence and work-related risk factors of neck-upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among video display terminal (VDT) users. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted; there were 60 VDT users and 35 controls. The participants filled in a structured questionnaire, had electrophysiological tests and an X-ray of the neck. The prevalence of MSDs was higher (28.3%) among VDTs users compared to controls (14.3%) with no statistically significant difference. The prevalence of cervical disorders with or without radiculopathy (18.3%) was the most common disorder followed by carpal tunnel syndrome (6.6%). The mean (SD) age of MSD cases (51 ± 7.2 years) was statistically significantly higher than of the controls (42.8 ± 9). Physical exposure to prolonged static posture (OR: 6.9; 95% CI: 0.83-57.9), awkward posture (OR: 5.5; 95% CI: 0.6-46.4) and repetitive movements (OR: 5.5; 95% CI: 0.65-46.4) increased risk of MSDs with a statistically significant difference for static posture only (p < .05). VDT users experienced more job dissatisfaction, work-overload and limited social support from supervisors and colleagues. VDT use did not increase the risk of neck-upper extremity MSDs. The risk increased with older age and static posture.

  4. Rheumatic complaints and musculoskeletal disorders in workers of a meat processing industry.

    PubMed

    Krapac, L; Sladoljev, M; Saćer, D; Sakić, D

    1997-06-01

    The effects of unsatisfactory microclimatic conditions and forced body position on the occurrence of fatigue and pain at work and disorders of the musculoskeletal system were evaluated in 90 female workers employed in the meat processing industry. The control group consisted of 95 workers whose work did not involve repetitive operation patterns and took place in a satisfactory microclimate. The mean age of both groups was 35 years. The data on symptoms were collected through a questionnaire. Further medical and functional examination of the locomotor system was carried out in both groups. Compared to the control, a significantly higher percentage of the exposed workers complained of fatigue and pain during work and manifested marked disorders. Most of degenerative rheumatic diseases of the spine were diagnosed in both groups. Other disorders found in the exposed workers in higher prevalence than in the control were: extraarticular rheumatic diseases as fibromyalgia, humeroscapular periarthritis, and epicondylitis. This paper proposes primary and secondary prevention of rheumatic diseases for workers in the meat processing industry.

  5. [Analyzing the factors of influencing the musculoskeletal disorders of greenhouse vegetable farmers].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-yun; Li, Hong-jun; Yu, Su-fang

    2012-03-01

    To study the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among greenhouse vegetable farmers and to explore the risk factors of MSDs. A household questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate 203 greenhouse vegetable farmers and 127 non-greenhouse vegetable farmers in February, 2011. The one-year prevalence rates of MSDs were 70.0% and 33.9% among greenhouse vegetable farmers and non-greenhouse vegetable farmers, respectively. The three main positions of MSDs in greenhouse farmers were low back, knee (s) and shoulder (s). Age, working years, body weight and usage of rolling machine were statistically associated with MSDs of greenhouse farmers, ORadj values were 1.17, 1.82, 1.08 and 0.07, respectively. The prevalence of MSDs is high in greenhouse workers. Low back pain, knee (s), and shoulder (s) disorders are the main disorders. Age, working years, body weight and usage of rolling machine are main risk factors for the development of MSDs in greenhouse farmers.

  6. Health related quality of life in multiple musculoskeletal diseases: SF-36 and EQ-5D in the DMC3 study

    PubMed Central

    Picavet, H; Hoeymans, N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the health related quality of life of persons with one or more self reported musculoskeletal diseases, as measured by the short form 36 item health status survey (SF-36) and the Euroqol questionnaire (EQ-5D). Methods: A sample of Dutch inhabitants aged 25 years or more (n = 3664) participated in a questionnaire survey. Twelve lay descriptions of common musculoskeletal diseases were presented and the subjects were asked whether they had ever been told by a physician that they had any of these. Their responses were used to assess the prevalence of these conditions. Commonly used scores of SF-36 and descriptive scores from EQ-5D are presented, along with standardised differences between disease groups and the general population. Results: Subjects with musculoskeletal diseases had significantly lower scores on all SF-36 dimensions than those without musculoskeletal disease, especially for physical functioning (SF-36 score (SE), 75.2 (0.5) v 87.8 (0.5)); role limitations caused by physical problems (67.1 (0.9) v 85.8 (0.8)); and bodily pain (68.5 (0.5) v 84.1 (0.5)). The worst health related quality of life patterns were found for osteoarthritis of the hip, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. Those with multiple musculoskeletal diseases had the poorest health related quality of life. Similar results were found for EQ-5D. Conclusions: All musculoskeletal diseases involve pain and reduced physical function. The coexistence of musculoskeletal diseases should be taken into account in research and clinical practice because of its high prevalence and its substantial impact on health related quality of life. PMID:15140781

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulders in female sewing machine operators: prevalence, incidence, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kaergaard, A; Andersen, J H

    2000-08-01

    To assess the occurrence and persistence of two restrictively defined neck-shoulder disorders among sewing machine operators. To assess factors associated with the development of neck-shoulder disorder and prognostic factors for remaining a case, when disorders were already present. In an initial group of 243 sewing machine operators, 178 were followed up for 2 years. At baseline and at 1 and 2 years follow up the participants underwent a clinical examination of the neck and arms and filled in a questionnaire about current musculoskeletal complaints. Clinical criteria for two main neck-shoulder disorders were defined: rotator cuff tendinitis and myofascial pain syndrome. A baseline control group consisted of 357 women with varied non-repetitive work. At baseline the overall prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome and rotator cuff tendinitis was 15.2% and 5.8% among sewing machine operators compared with 9.0% and 2.2%, respectively, among controls. The presence of the disorders was strongly associated with a self perception of poor general health. Although myofascial pain syndrome showed a U shaped association with years as a sewing machine operator, rotator cuff tendinitis was absent among the newest recruits and present among 15% of the women with more than 20 years as a sewing machine operator. Besides years as a sewing machine operator, the risk of having a neck-shoulder disorder at baseline was significantly associated with high stress (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.54; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.28 to 5.05) when adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, living alone with children, job strain, and social support from colleagues and supervisors. Only one of 13 participants with rotator cuff tendinitis at baseline recovered during follow up. Myofascial pain syndrome showed a much more fluctuating tendency. Low social support (RR 3.72; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.30) and smoking (RR 3.93; 95% CI 1.33 to 11.58) were associated with the development of neck

  8. Physically demanding workloads and the risks of musculoskeletal disorders in homecare workers in the USA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Ho; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Trinkoff, Alison; Muntaner, Carles

    2010-09-01

    Although musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are prevalent among homecare workers, little is known about the MSD risk factors. This study investigated whether physically demanding workloads among homecare workers are related to MSDs, especially in neck, shoulder and back pain. Data were taken from two waves of a random sample (June to December 2003 and December 2003 to February 2004). The sample included 1643 homecare workers at Wave 1 and 1198 homecare workers at Wave 2, respectively. A basic telephone interview and 30 minutes computer-assisted interview were performed for homecare workers in Wave 1 and Wave 2. The prevalence of neck, shoulder and back MSDs was assessed at Wave 1 and Wave 2 using the Nordic questionnaire of musculoskeletal symptoms. The incidence of MSDs at 6 months was estimated at Wave 2 using only those who were in the asymptomatic reference group at Wave 1 as the denominator. At Wave 1, back MSDs were the most prevalent (10.2%), followed by neck (9.6%) and shoulder (7.1%) MSDs. After 6 months, the incidence of neck MSDs was the highest (7.0%), followed by back (6.4%) and shoulder (4.8%) MSDs. Physical demands of work were assessed using items developed from focus groups of workers. When compared with asymptomatic workers, those with MSDs showed a dose-response effect for physical job demands. After controlling for age, psychosocial demands and social support on-the-job, physical demands among homecare workers were significantly associated with an excessive odds of neck, shoulder and back MSDs incident at 6 months (odds ratios of 1.14-1.17 for each unit increase on a physical demand scale). Our study shows that the physical demands of work are a significant risk factor for MSDs among homecare workers. Considering the high physical demands among homecare workers, the finding in this study clearly indicates that practical intervention strategies should be implemented to protect homecare workers from exposure to MSD risk factors.

  9. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bervoets, Diederik C; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Alessie, Jeroen J N; Buijs, Martijn J; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-07-01

    Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. People with musculoskeletal disorders. Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues) as a stand-alone intervention. The primary outcomes were pain and function. The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579) per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of three ergonomics interventions on body posture and musculoskeletal disorders among stuff of Isfahan Province Gas Company

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Soury, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) is high among computer users. The study investigates the effect of three ergonomic interventions on the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff of Isfahan Province Gas Company, including training, sport, and installation of software. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in the summer of 2013 on 75 (52 men, 23 women) Isfahan Province Gas Company employees in three phases (phase 1: Evaluation of present situation, phase 2: Performing interventions, and phase 3: Re-evaluation). Participants were divided into three groups (training, exercise, and software). The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) were used. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software and McNemar test, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: Based on the evaluations, there was a decrease in musculoskeletal symptoms among the trained group participants after they received the training. McNemar test showed that the lower rate of pain in low back, neck, knee, and wrist was significant (P < 0.05). The results obtained from the RULA method for evaluation of posture showed an average 25 points decrease in the right side of the body and 20 points decrease in the left side of the body in the group subjected to training. Based on t-test, the decrease was significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that majority of the participants accepted interventions, which indicates that most of the people were unsatisfied with the work settings and seeking improvement at the workplace. Overall, the findings show that training, chair adjustment, and arrangement in workplace could decrease musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:26430692

  11. The effect of three ergonomics interventions on body posture and musculoskeletal disorders among stuff of Isfahan Province Gas Company.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Soury, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) is high among computer users. The study investigates the effect of three ergonomic interventions on the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff of Isfahan Province Gas Company, including training, sport, and installation of software. The study was performed in the summer of 2013 on 75 (52 men, 23 women) Isfahan Province Gas Company employees in three phases (phase 1: Evaluation of present situation, phase 2: Performing interventions, and phase 3: Re-evaluation). Participants were divided into three groups (training, exercise, and software). The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) were used. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software and McNemar test, t-test, and Chi-square test. Based on the evaluations, there was a decrease in musculoskeletal symptoms among the trained group participants after they received the training. McNemar test showed that the lower rate of pain in low back, neck, knee, and wrist was significant (P < 0.05). The results obtained from the RULA method for evaluation of posture showed an average 25 points decrease in the right side of the body and 20 points decrease in the left side of the body in the group subjected to training. Based on t-test, the decrease was significant. The study demonstrated that majority of the participants accepted interventions, which indicates that most of the people were unsatisfied with the work settings and seeking improvement at the workplace. Overall, the findings show that training, chair adjustment, and arrangement in workplace could decrease musculoskeletal disorders.

  12. Risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among oil palm fruit harvesters during early harvesting stage.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Guan; Mohd Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri; Mohd Yusoff, Irwan Syah; Hashim, Zailina; Deros, Baba M D; Abu Bakar, Shahriman; How, Vivien

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study intends to investigate the associations of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among foreign labourers on a socio-economic background, occupational exposure, social lifestyle, and postures adopted during harvesting tasks. A total of 446 male respondents (263 FFB cutters; 183 FFB collectors) were studied using an interview-assisted questionnaire. OWAS was used to determine the severity of awkward posture based on videos of harvesting tasks recorded for each respondent. Analysis found that increasingly educated respondents had higher risk of developing MSDs. Shorter daily work duration and longer resting duration appear to increase the risk of neck and shoulder disorders among harvesters, which may be attributable to organizational work design. Awkward posture was a particularly significant risk factor of MSDs among FFB collectors. Among the results of the study, occupational exposure, postures and certain socio-demographic backgrounds explained some, but not all, the risk factor of MSDs among harvesters. An in-depth investigation, preferably a longitudinal study investigating the dynamic of work activities and other risk factors, such as psychosocial risk factors, are recommended.

  13. Miniscalpel-Needle Treatment Is Effective for Work-Related Neck and Shoulder Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a group of painful disorders of muscles, tendons, and nerves, such as neck and shoulder MSD. This study was designed to use miniscalpel-needle (MSN) technique as an intervention for work-related MSDs. Methods. Thirty-one patients with work-related MSDs and 28 healthy subjects were enrolled as controls in this study. The MSD symptoms of each patient were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). Blood samples were collected from control subjects and MSD patients before and after treatment. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were measured using ELISA. Results. Prior to MSN treatment, serum levels of CRP and TNF were significantly higher in the MSD patients than the healthy controls. Serum CRP levels correlated with VAS and NDI scores, and serum TNF levels correlated with NDI scores. Compared to pretreatment, VAS and NDI scores were significantly lower in MSD patients after MSN treatment, while serum CRP and TNF levels were significantly lower compared with the healthy control levels. Conclusions. Our results indicate that MSN may be an effective intervention for work-related MSDs and be associated with lower serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers.

  14. Occupational health and safety management practices and musculoskeletal disorders in aged care.

    PubMed

    Oakman, Jodi; Bartram, Timothy

    2017-05-15

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine whether occupational health and safety (OHS) management used to manage musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the aged care sector reflects contemporary research evidence of best practice to reduce the incidence of these disorders. Design/methodology/approach In total, 58 interviews were conducted with managers and supervisors in the aged care sector across four organisations in Australia. Policies and procedures relating to MSDs were reviewed for each organisation. Findings Policies and procedures for managing MSDs do not reflect contemporary evidence, which supports a complex aetiology, related to a range of physical and psychosocial workplace factors. Despite strong evidence that psychosocial factors contribute to MSD development, these were not included in the policies and procedures reviewed. Findings from the interviews management practices including leadership and various components of HRM were functioning well but fragmentation was evident due to the challenging nature of the aged care sector. Practical implications To address the significant burden of MSDs in the aged care sector, policies and procedures need to include coverage of psychosocial and physical workplace factors. The development of systematic and integrated OHS management at the workplace level may play an important role in the effective management of MSDs. Originality/value This study offers insights into the previously unexplored area of MSD risk management and the role of management practices such as HRM in the aged care sector.

  15. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea and Japan: A Comparative Description

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Work related Musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) is one of the most important problem in occupational health system of Korea and Japan, where the OHS system developed in similar socio-cultural environment. This study compared WMSD in Korea and Japan to review similarities and differences in their historical background, and development of prevention policies. Methods Scientific articles, government reports, and related official and non-official statistics on WMSD since the 1960s in Japan and Korea were reviewed. Results The historical background and basic structure of the compensation system in Korea and Japan largely overlapped. The issuing of WMSD in both countries appeared as upper limb disorder (ULD), named occupational cervicobrachial diseases (OCD) in Japan, and neck-shoulder-arm syndrome (NSA) 30 years later in Korea, following the change from an industrial structure to automated office work. Both countries developed manuals for diagnosis, guidelines for workplace management, and prevention policies. At present, compensation cases per covered insurers for WMSD are higher in Korea than in Japan, due to the social welfare system and cultural environment. Prevention policies in Korea are enforced more strongly with punitive measures than in Japan. In contrast, the Japanese system requires autonomous effort toward risk control and management, focusing on specific risky processes. Conclusions WMSD in Korea and Japan have a similar history of identification and compensation structure, yet different compensation proportions per covered insurer and prevention policies. Follow-up study with international cooperation is necessary to improve both systems. PMID:25024844

  16. Predictive factors of sustained return to work for persons with musculoskeletal disorders who participated in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lydell, Marie; Grahn, Birgitta; Månsson, Jörgen; Baigi, Amir; Marklund, Bertil

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) account for the majority of total morbidity cases in the working-age Swedish population. These disorders are thought to be the reason given for one-third of total certified sick leave requests. In addition to the high cost to society, MSD involve both physical and emotional suffering, pain and financial and social problems for the injured persons. The aim of this study was to identify predictive multidimensional factors for sustainable return to work (RTW) in a long-term follow-up persons with MSD. During the period 1992-1999, 385 persons participated in a rehabilitation program. Ten years later, 354 of these took part in a prospective follow-up study. The average post-rehabilitation time was ten years (range=7-13 years) and 243 persons (69%) completed a questionnaire. The "working full-time" group (n=110) and the "sick-listed" group (n=73) were included in the study. The two groups were compared in terms of predictors for RTW. Multiple stepwise logistic regression and bivariate analysis, as well as parametric and non-parametric tests, were used to identify predictive factors. The number of sick-listed days before rehabilitation, age, self-rated pain, life events, gender, physical capacity, self-rated functional capacity, educational level and light physical labor were predictors of long-term RTW. Return to work an be facilitated by planning at an early stage of the certified sick leave period using instrument that take these predictors into account.

  17. Miniscalpel-Needle Treatment Is Effective for Work-Related Neck and Shoulder Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Bai, Bo; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a group of painful disorders of muscles, tendons, and nerves, such as neck and shoulder MSD. This study was designed to use miniscalpel-needle (MSN) technique as an intervention for work-related MSDs. Methods. Thirty-one patients with work-related MSDs and 28 healthy subjects were enrolled as controls in this study. The MSD symptoms of each patient were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). Blood samples were collected from control subjects and MSD patients before and after treatment. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were measured using ELISA. Results. Prior to MSN treatment, serum levels of CRP and TNF were significantly higher in the MSD patients than the healthy controls. Serum CRP levels correlated with VAS and NDI scores, and serum TNF levels correlated with NDI scores. Compared to pretreatment, VAS and NDI scores were significantly lower in MSD patients after MSN treatment, while serum CRP and TNF levels were significantly lower compared with the healthy control levels. Conclusions. Our results indicate that MSN may be an effective intervention for work-related MSDs and be associated with lower serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:27382406

  18. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea and Japan: A Comparative Description.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Nakata, Minori

    2014-01-01

    Work related Musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) is one of the most important problem in occupational health system of Korea and Japan, where the OHS system developed in similar socio-cultural environment. This study compared WMSD in Korea and Japan to review similarities and differences in their historical background, and development of prevention policies. Scientific articles, government reports, and related official and non-official statistics on WMSD since the 1960s in Japan and Korea were reviewed. The historical background and basic structure of the compensation system in Korea and Japan largely overlapped. The issuing of WMSD in both countries appeared as upper limb disorder (ULD), named occupational cervicobrachial diseases (OCD) in Japan, and neck-shoulder-arm syndrome (NSA) 30 years later in Korea, following the change from an industrial structure to automated office work. Both countries developed manuals for diagnosis, guidelines for workplace management, and prevention policies. At present, compensation cases per covered insurers for WMSD are higher in Korea than in Japan, due to the social welfare system and cultural environment. Prevention policies in Korea are enforced more strongly with punitive measures than in Japan. In contrast, the Japanese system requires autonomous effort toward risk control and management, focusing on specific risky processes. WMSD in Korea and Japan have a similar history of identification and compensation structure, yet different compensation proportions per covered insurer and prevention policies. Follow-up study with international cooperation is necessary to improve both systems.

  19. Relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and anthropometric indices among bus drivers in Zahedan city.

    PubMed

    Laal, Fereydoon; Madvari, Rohollah Fallah; Balarak, Davoud; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Dortaj, Elahe; Khammar, Abdolali; Adineh, Hossein Ali

    2017-08-04

    Most work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are associated with improper postures and poorly designed workstations. This study is an attempt to examine the prevalence and severity of MSDs as well as anthropometric dimensions among city bus drivers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 60 male bus drivers. A body discomfort chart was used to evaluate MSDs. Spearman correlation was employed to examine the relationship between body size and the severity of discomfort. Data analysis showed that discomfort reported in the lower back (33.3%), upper back (18.3%) and knee (15%) was severe and there was a direct and significant correlation between the body mass index and the severity of discomfort in the shoulder, arm and hip (p < 0.05). However, the results showed that eye sitting height and sitting height had significant inverse relationships with discomfort in the ankle and elbow (p < 0.05). The results of the study can be used to address ergonomic risk factors and reduce their associated disorders. The findings of the study can be used in training programs to educate drivers how to decrease the risk associated with work-related MSDs by adopting appropriate behavior strategies.

  20. [Symptoms and upper limb work-related musculo-skeletal disorders among 173 supermarket cashiers].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G; Pizzoni, Tiziana; Scolari, Luisa; Lucchini, R

    2013-01-01

    Cashiers in supermarket chains have long been considered at risk for the development of work related musculo-skeletal disorders of the upper limbs (UL-WMSDs). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of UL-WMSDs among workers operating supermarket cash tills and, after clinical tests, their frequency. A standardized questionnaire was given to a random group of 173 workers in order to collect information regarding symptoms in the upper limbs (pain and parasthesia). Among the 111 workers who reached a "positive clinical history threshold" we selected a random sample of subjects to undergo clinical tests (professional medical care, ultrasound examination, electro-neurographic examination). 64% of the workers had a positive clinical history for UL-WMSDs. The most frequently reported disorder was pain, especially in the shoulder, while 37% of workers suffered from one or more disorders of the upper limbs. Clinical tests were performed on 51 workers (47 women) whose average length of service was 20 years and 2/3 were part-time workers; a total of 43 UL-WMSDs (59%) were diagnosed in 30 workers, including 13 (30.2%) cases of compressive neuropathies, 13 cases of hand/elbow tendinitis (30.2%) and 17 cases of shoulder tendinitis (39.5%). The average age of these 30 subjects was 47 years, with a length of service of 23 years, mostly part-time workers. We found a high prevalence of general disorders and cases of UL-WMSDs among the workers investigated, including part-time workers and workers who were not working exclusively as cashiers. The study also revealed a poor health surveillance programme to identify/ UL-WMSDs that should be the responsibility of the occupational physician and a consequent underestimation of risk and lack of the information needed to adopt preventive measures.

  1. The incidence and prevalence of comorbid gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, ocular, pulmonary, and renal disorders in multiple sclerosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reider, Nadia; Stuve, Olaf; Trojano, Maria; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Cutter, Gary R; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Background: As new disease-modifying therapies emerge a better knowledge of the risk of comorbid disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) is needed. Objective: To estimate the incidence and prevalence of comorbid gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, ocular, pulmonary, and renal disorders in MS. Methods: We systematically reviewed the world literature by searching PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Knowledge, and reference lists of retrieved articles. For selected articles, one reviewer abstracted data using a standardized form. The abstraction was verified by a second reviewer. The quality of all selected studies was assessed. For population-based studies we quantitatively assessed studies using the I2 statistic, and conducted random effects meta-analyses. Results: Study designs were heterogeneous with respect to populations, case definitions, and methods of ascertainment. Incidence of the studied comorbidities was rarely reported. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic lung disease had a prevalence of more than 10% in the MS population. Irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, cataracts and glaucoma were more common than expected in the MS population. Conclusion: Although they have been the subject of less study than other comorbidities, irritable bowel syndrome, arthritis, and chronic lung disease are common in the MS population and occur more often than expected when compared to the general population. PMID:25538150

  2. Factors that might give rise to musculoskeletal disorders when mothers lift children in the home.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Renee; Hocking, Clare

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this research was to identify the risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders present when mothers lift normally developing children weighing between 20 and 31 lbs (9-14 kg) in the home. Twenty five mothers aged 28-40 years completed Sanders and Morse's (2005) self-report survey of pain and high-risk practices. In addition, the OMLITH, a structured checklist for observing mothers lifting children in the home, was developed. Criteria to rate variables relating to the load (child), environment, person (mother) and task as low, moderate or high risk were developed, on the basis of published manual handling assessments. The mothers were observed performing 87 lifts, and risk factors were rated. The majority of participants reported low back pain (64%). They self-rated bending while carrying a child as most stressful, and various other tasks involving carrying; prolonged bending, squatting or stooping; and lifting a child as physically stressful. At least one risk factor related to the load was recorded in all 87 observations, with moderate to high risk most frequently related to the child's weight (73.6%) or the mother's grip on the child (93.1%). Common environmental factors presenting a moderate to high risk related to space constraints (59.7% of tasks) and equipment (58.6%). Factors related to the mothers' strength and fitness (57.5% of tasks) commonly posed moderate to high risk, as did horizontal reach distances (82.8%), vertical lift distances (78.2%) and reaches above shoulder height or below mid thigh level (88.5%). Trunk rotation greater than 45° or combining rotation and side bending while lifting resulted in a moderate to high risk rating in 72.4% of tasks. The developmental age of the child interacted with weight to increase or decrease the requirement for lifting. Risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders are present to a significant degree, and further research in this area is warranted. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effectiveness of physical training for self-employed persons with musculoskeletal disorders: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Judith; Anema, Johannes R; de Vroome, Ernest MM; Blatter, Birgitte M

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the population of self-employed persons is still growing and at risk for long term disability due to a number of risk factors, there is still a lack of information on the effectiveness of interventions for this specific group. Methods To determine the effectiveness of physical training without a cognitive behavioral component and workplace specific exercises (PT) and physical training with a cognitive behavioral component and workplace specific exercises (PTCBWE), we conducted a pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial, stratified into two groups. Self-employed persons with a new work disability claim because of musculoskeletal disorders were randomized to PT (n = 53) or PTCBWE (n = 76), or to a corresponding usual care group (n = 50 and n = 75 respectively). Both types of training consisted of cardiovascular training, strengthening, relaxation and posture exercises and took place two or three times a week, for 1–1.5 hours, during three months, also if someone had already returned to work full-time. The primary outcome measure was claim duration (in days) during 12 months follow-up. Pain severity and functional status were secondary outcome measures. All data were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. The data with regard to claim duration were analyzed by survival analysis and Cox regression analysis. Secondary outcome measures were analyzed by means of linear regression analysis. Results After 12 months of follow-up there was no difference in claim duration between PT and usual care (Hazard Ratio 0.7; 95%CI, 0.4–1.1; p = 0.12) or PTCBWE and usual care (Hazard Ratio 0.9; 95%CI, 0.6–1.4; p = 0.72). Both types of physical training and usual care improved in pain and functional status over time, but there was only a statistically significant difference in favor of PT on pain improvement at 6 months. Conclusion In this study, physical training with and without a cognitive behavioral component and workplace specific

  4. The global burden of other musculoskeletal disorders: estimates from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emma; Hoy, Damian G; Cross, Marita; Vos, Theo; Naghavi, Mohsen; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Woolf, Anthony D; March, Lyn

    2014-08-01

    To estimate disability from the remainder of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders (categorised as other MSK) not covered by the estimates made specifically for osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), gout, low back pain and neck pain, as part of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 study. Systematic reviews were conducted to gather the age-sex-specific epidemiological data for other MSK. The focus was on finding health surveys and published studies that measured the overall amount of MSK disorders and complaints, and classified the remainder of MSK disorders that was not RA, OA, gout, low back or neck pain. Six levels of severity were defined to derive disability weights (DWs) and severity distribution. The data, DWs and severity distribution were used to calculate years of life lived with disability (YLDs). Mortality was estimated for MSK-related deaths classified under other MSK. YLDs were added to years of life lost (YLLs) from the mortality estimates to derive overall burden in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Global prevalence of other MSK was 8.4% (95% uncertainty interval (UI) 8.1% to 8.6%). DALYs increased from 20.6 million (95% UI 17.0 to 23.3 million) in 1990 to 30.9 million (95% UI 25.8 to 34.6 million) in 2010. The burden of other MSK increased with age. Globally, other MSK disability burden (YLD) ranked sixth. Ageing of the global population will further increase the burden of other MSK. Specific MSK conditions within this large category should be considered separately to enable more explicit estimates of their burden in future iterations of GBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Musculoskeletal injury, functional disability, and health-related quality of life in aging Mexican immigrant farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Weigel, M M; Armijos, R X; Beltran, O

    2014-10-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are at high risk for musculoskeletal and other occupational injuries. Although persons aged 40-80 years account for 40 % of all US farmworkers and as many as 50 % in certain regions, little is known about their occupational health issues. The current study examined work-related persistent musculoskeletal injuries (PMIs) and their association with clinical and functional indicators of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in 177 middle-aged and elderly US-Mexico border farmworkers. At interview, 68 % reported current PMI pain; 51 % had pain at multiple sites. PMI pain was associated with increased shoulder, knee, and lower extremity dysfunction and reduced HRQOL scores. However, fewer than 25 % of injured participants received any conventional medical treatment. The study results indicated that work-related PMIs, especially multiple PMIs, caused significant functional impairment, disability, and poorer HRQOL, adversely affecting the ability of the aging farmworkers to perform work, self-care, and other daily activities.

  6. Development and evaluation of RAMP I - a practitioner's tool for screening of musculoskeletal disorder risk factors in manual handling.

    PubMed

    Lind, Carl Mikael; Forsman, Mikael; Rose, Linda Maria

    2017-08-10

    RAMP I is a screening tool developed to support practitioners in screening for work-related musculoskeletal disorder risk factors related to manual handling. RAMP I, which is part of the RAMP tool, is based on research based studies combined with expert group judgments. More than 80 practitioners participated in the development of RAMP I. The tool consists of dichotomous assessment items grouped in seven categories. Acceptable reliability was found for a majority of the assessment items for 15 practitioners who were given 1 h training. The usability evaluation points to RAMP I being usable for screening for musculoskeletal disorder risk factors, i.e., usable for assessing risks, usable as a decision base, has clear results, and the time needed for an assessment is acceptable. It is concluded that RAMP I is a usable tool for practitioners.

  7. Health-related effects of early part-time sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Kausto, Johanna; Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2013-01-01

    Previously we reported that early part-time sick leave enhances return to work (RTW) among employees with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). This paper assesses the health-related effects of this intervention. Patients aged 18-60 years who were unable to perform their regular work due to MSD were randomized to part- or full-time sick leave groups. In the former, workload was reduced by halving working time. Using validated questionnaires, we assessed pain intensity and interference with work and sleep, region-specific disability due to MSD, self-rated general health, health-related quality of life (measured via EuroQol), productivity loss, depression, and sleep disturbance at baseline, 1, 3, 8, 12, and 52 weeks. We analyzed the repeated measures data (171-356 observations) with the generalized estimating equation approach. The intervention (part-time sick leave) and control (full-time sick leave) groups did not differ with regard to pain intensity, pain interference with work and sleep, region-specific disability, productivity loss, depression, or sleep disturbance. The intervention group reported better self-rated general health (adjusted P=0.07) and health-related quality of life (adjusted P=0.02) than the control group. In subgroup analyses, the intervention was more effective among the patients whose current problem began occurring <6 weeks before baseline and those with ≤30% productivity loss at baseline. Our findings showed that part-time sick leave did not exacerbate pain-related symptoms and functional disability, but improved self-rated general health and health-related quality of life in the early stage of work disability due to MSD.

  8. Sick leave patterns in common musculoskeletal disorders – a study of doctor prescribed sick leave

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparative data on sick leave within musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is limited. Our objective was to give a descriptive overview of sick leave patterns in different MSDs. Methods Using electronic medical records, we collected information on dates and diagnostic codes for all available sick leave certificates, during 2 years (2009–2010), in the North Western part of the Skåne region in Sweden (22 public primary health care centres and two general hospitals). Using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes on the certificates we studied duration, age and sex distribution and recurrent periods of sick leave for six strategically chosen MSDs; low back pain (M54) disc disorders (M51), knee osteoarthritis (M17) hip osteoarthritis (M16) rheumatoid arthritis (M05-M06) and myalgia (M79). Results All together 20 251 sick leave periods were issued for 16 673 individuals 16–64 years of age (53% women). Out of the selected disorders, low back pain and myalgia had the shortest sick leave periods, with a mean of 26 and 27 days, respectively, while disc disorders and rheumatoid arthritis had the longest periods with a mean of 150 and 147 days. For low back pain and myalgia 27% and 26% of all sick leave was short (8–14 days) and only 11% and 13%, were long (≥90 days). For the other selected MSDs, less than 5% of the periods were short. For disc disorders, hip osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, more than 60% of the periods were long (p > 0.001). For back disorders and myalgia most periods were issued in the age groups between 40–49, with similar patterns for women and men. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis had most periods in the age groups of 50–64, and patterns for women and men differed. Low back pain, rheumatoid arthritis and myalgia had the greatest share of recurrent sick leave (31%, 34% and 32% respectively). Conclusion Duration, age and sex distribution and numbers of recurrent sick leave varies considerably

  9. Assessing the effects of an educational program for the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among school teachers.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Jian; Yue, Pengying; Li, Liping; Liu, Fengying; Wang, Sheng

    2014-11-24

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent one of the most common and most costly occupational health problems in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of occupational health education and ergonomic training on awareness, attitude and behavior of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among teachers. A self-controlled longitudinal study with pre/post design was used to evaluate the effects of intervention among school teachers from the 21st of June, 2010 to the 21st of August, 2011. Choosing a cluster random sampling method, 350 (70.0% response rate (350/500)) teachers from four schools were assigned to receive eight weeks of intervention (participatory ergonomic training and occupational health education). Evaluations focused on teachers who participated in both pre- and post-questionnaires. Two post-tests were then administered to the participants to identify changes at six and 12 months after intervention. The follow-up rate was 93.7% (328/350) at six months after intervention, and 90.9% (319/350) at 12 months after intervention. After the intervention, the awareness rate, attitude and health behavior improved. The self-reported prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders for neck, shoulder, upper and lower back pain, or discomfort were lower than before intervention (P < 0.05). Interventions based on occupational health education lectures, on-site ergonomics training, publicity brochures and posters showed a positive effect on prevention and control of the occurrence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in teachers. Improvement in awareness, behavior and attitude changes, and prevalence were found at both six and 12 months post-intervention, confirming that the effectiveness of the program can be sustained.

  10. Associations between Wage System and Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Disorders among Construction Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ajslev, Jeppe Zielinski Nguyen; Persson, Roger; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-01-01

    Piece rate and performance based wage systems are common in the construction industry. Construction workers are known to have an increased risk of pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). In this cross-sectional questionnaire study, we examined the association between wage system and (1) physical exertion, (2) time pressure, (3) pain, and (4) fatigue. The participants comprised 456 male Danish construction workers working on one of three different wage systems: group based performance wage, individually based performance wage, and time based wage system. The statistical analyses indicated differences between the wage systems in relation to physical exertion (ηp = 0.05) and time pressure (ηp = 0.03) but not to pain or fatigue. Workers on group based performance wage scored higher (i.e., worse) than workers on individual performance based wage and workers with an hourly/monthly wage. In conclusion, group performance based wage was associated with higher levels of physical exertion and time pressure. Accordingly, group performance based wage can be viewed as a factor that has the potential to complicate prevention of MSD among construction workers. Since performance based wage systems are common in many countries across the world, more attention should be paid to the health effects of these types of payment. PMID:26605083

  11. [Musculoskeletal disorders: Role of medical advisers and inter-professional relations].

    PubMed

    Begue, Cyril; Delaborde, Antoine; Huez, Jean-François; Tessier-Cazeneuve, Christine; Mener, Éric; Roquelaure, Yves; Huge, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) were responsible for 9.7 million days of sick leave in 2010 in France. They are also a leading cause of occupational exclusion. The objective was to study the role of medical advisers (Mas) in the care of patients with MSD and their interactions with general practitioners (GPs) and occupational health physicians (OPs). We performed a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews with medical advisers from the Brittany region. Semistructured interviews were double-coded and were submitted to thematic analysis. Nine interviews were conducted with MAs from the general regime, agricultural regime, and independent workers regime. MAs described an increase in MSD, especially with complex forms. They explained that their activity was not limited to control, but that they also had an important role in limiting occupational exclusion. It is important to anticipate difficulties related to return to work in this setting. They reported contrasted but necessary relations with GPs who are at the centre of care. Return to work may require negotiation with OPs. Relations between MAs and GPs are partly based on control of prescriptions, which can create a climate of suspicion. Emphasizing the fight against occupational exclusion can provide new light on the role of MAs. Improving relations between MAs and GPs can be achieved by a better understanding of their respective roles.

  12. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Working Posture among Dental and Oral Health Students

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Andrew; Hayes, Melanie J.; Polster, Anu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the dental professions has been well established, and can have detrimental effects on the industry, including lower productivity and early retirement. There is increasing evidence that these problems commence during undergraduate training; however, there are still very few studies that investigate the prevalence of MSD or postural risk in these student groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSD and conduct postural assessments of students studying oral health and dentistry. A previously validated self-reporting questionnaire measuring MSD prevalence, derived from the Standardised Nordic Questionnaire, was distributed to students. Posture assessments were also conducted using a validated Posture Assessment Instrument. MSD was highly prevalent in all student groups, with 85% reporting MSD in at least one body region. The neck and lower back were the most commonly reported. The final year dental students had the highest percentage with poor posture (68%), while the majority of students from other cohorts had acceptable posture. This study supports the increasing evidence that MSD could be developing in students, before the beginning of a professional career. The prevalence of poor posture further highlights the need to place further emphasis on ergonomic education. PMID:27417601

  13. Characteristics of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea and Their Work-relatedness Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Kim, Day Sung; Jang, Sun Je; Hong, Ki Hun; Yoo, Seung-Won

    2010-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) can be compensated through the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Act. We looked at the characteristics of WMSDs in worker's compensation records and the epidemiological investigation reports from the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI). Based on the records of compensation, the number of cases for WMSDs decreased from 4,532 in 2003 to 1,954 in 2007. However the proportion of WMSDs among the total approved occupational diseases increased from 49.6% in 2003 to 76.5% in 2007, and the total cost of WMSDs increased from 105.3 billion won in 2004 to 163.3 billion won in 2007. The approval rate of WMSDs by the OSHRI accounted for 65.6%. Ergonomic and clinical characteristics were associated with the approval rate; however, the degenerative changes had a minimal affect. This result was in discordance between OSHRI and the Korea Workers' Compensation & Welfare Service. We presumed that there were perceptional gaps in work-relatedness interpretation that resulted from the inequality of information in ergonomic analyses. We propose to introduce ergonomic analysis to unapproved WMSDs cases and discuss those results among experts that will be helpful to form a consensus among diverse groups. PMID:21258595

  14. Examination of postures and frequency of musculoskeletal disorders among manual workers in Calcutta, India

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Background Manual material handling (MMH) activities require workers to adopt various awkward postures leading to the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Objectives To investigate the postures adopted during heavy load handling and the frequency of MSDs among MMH workers in Calcutta, India. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with 100 MMH workers. MSD frequency was assessed via the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. The Ovako Working Posture Assessment System (OWAS) was used to analyze working posture. We used logistic regression to predict MSD risk factors. Results Ninety five percent of workers reported a MSD in at least one body part in the past 12 months. According to OWAS results, 83% of the analysed work postures require immediate corrective measures for worker safety. The most harmful posture was carrying a heavy load overhead. Carrying more than 120 kg increased the odds of low back and neck pain by 4.527 and 4.555, respectively. Conclusions This sample had a high frequency of reported MSDs, likely attributed to physiologically strenuous occupational activities repeated on average of 30–40 times daily. Ergonomic interventions, such as the use of handcarts, and occupational training are urgently needed. PMID:27362732

  15. The role of contextual factors for musculoskeletal disorders in the New Zealand meat processing industry.

    PubMed

    Tappin, D C; Bentley, T A; Vitalis, A

    2008-10-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are the leading cause of occupational injury internationally. In New Zealand, the highest incidence of MSD is in meat processing, accounting for over half the injury compensation costs for the sector. MSD in meat processing have proven highly resistant to physical, micro-level interventions, suggesting a new approach is required. This paper reports on part of a 2-year study looking at MSD in the New Zealand meat processing industry. The qualitative study involved interviews with 237 workers, management, union and safety personnel in 28 processing sites. These data were summarised into a list of contextual factors, which, it is postulated, may create conditions under which greater exposure to physical and psychosocial factors can occur in meat processing. Some of the contextual factors are recognised as problematic by the industry, but have not previously been associated with MSD risk. The paper concludes by reflecting on conducting MSD research with a focus on contextual factors and how this may influence MSD prevention. The manuscript provides industry-based data on MSD risk and outlines the approach used in its collection. Identifying contextual factors and understanding their role in creating MSD risk may help improve the acceptance and effectiveness of MSD interventions in industry.

  16. Computer-telephone interactive tasks: predictors of musculoskeletal disorders according to work analysis and workers' perception.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mario; Saldiva, Paulo H N

    2002-03-01

    Sixty-two workers engaged in computer-telephone interactive tasks in an active telemarketing center and a telephone call center of an international bank subsidiary in São Paulo. Brazil, were assessed by means of a work analysis and a self-administered questionnaire aiming to determine the statistical relationship of ergonomic, organizational and psychosocial characteristics of their jobs with the report of symptoms in neck-shoulder and hand-wrist for more than 7 consecutive days and any time away from work during the current job due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). According to chi-square univariate tests and multiple logistic regression models, active telemarketing operations, duration in the job and the low level of satisfaction with the physical arrangement of the workstation emerged as the factors most related to neck-shoulder and hand-wrist MSD and MSD-induced time away from work. This study emphasizes the role of psychosocial factors and duration in the job in MSD occurrence and induced absenteeism among workers engaged in computer-telephone interactive tasks.

  17. Prospective research on musculoskeletal disorders in office workers (PROMO): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    IJmker, Stefan; Blatter, Birgitte M; van der Beek, Allard J; van Mechelen, Willem; Bongers, Paulien M

    2006-01-01

    Background This article describes the background and study design of the PROMO study (Prospective Research on Musculoskeletal disorders in Office workers). Few longitudinal studies have been performed to investigate the risk factors responsible for the incidence of hand, arm, shoulder and neck symptoms among office workers, given the observation that a large group of office workers might be at risk worldwide. Therefore, the PROMO study was designed. The main aim is to quantify the contribution of exposure to occupational computer use to the incidence of hand, arm, shoulder and neck symptoms. The results of this study might lead to more effective and/or cost-efficient preventive interventions among office workers. Methods/Design A prospective cohort study is conducted, with a follow-up of 24 months. In total, 1821 participants filled out the first questionnaire (response rate of 74%). Data on exposure and outcome is collected using web-based self-reports. Outcome assessment takes place every three months during the follow-up period. Data on computer use are collected at baseline and continuously during follow-up using a software program. Discussion The advantages of the PROMO study include the long follow-up period, the repeated measurement of both exposure and outcome, and the objective measurement of the duration of computer use. In the PROMO study, hypotheses stemming from lab-based and field-based research will be investigated. PMID:16822300

  18. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Perceived Work Demands among Female Nurses at a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are common among nurses and can affect patient outcomes. There is a dearth of literature on MSD among Indian nurses. The study objective was to measure prevalence of MSD and their association with perceived work demands and sociodemographic variables among female nurses at a tertiary care hospital in rural India. Methods. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 2013 through interviewer administered questionnaires which comprised three parts: sociodemographic data, modified Nordic questionnaire, and perceived physical and psychological work demands. Results. 296 nurses with a mean age of 30.4 years participated. Prevalence of any MSD in the last seven days was 60.5% with low back pain being the most common and elbow pain the least common. Occurrence of any MSD was associated with age, number of children, working hours at home, BMI, and total work experience. High perceived physical demands score was associated with lower back (OR: 3.06) and knee pain (OR: 7.73). Conclusion. Prevalence of MSD was high and occurrence of lower back and knee MSD was associated with perceived physical demands. This information should be used as a benchmark and guiding tool for designing work place interventions to improve working conditions and health of nurses. PMID:27493990

  19. Correlation of awareness and practice of working postures with prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Kanteshwari, K; Sridhar, Raja; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Shirahatti, Ravi; Maru, Rahul; Bhusari, Prashant

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a great many innovations have been introduced that are designed to reduce laborious activities; however, an unexpected consequence of these developments is a trend toward a sedentary lifestyle and prolonged static postures that are accompanied by musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). MSDs have become a major issue of concern because the afflictions can be severe enough to disable professional careers. Although clinical dentistry is a field with immense potential for MSDs, only a few studies have investigated this issue. The present study was carried out addressing prevalence and awareness level of MSDs among 500 dental professionals from Central India. Also, the interrelationship between practices of working postures with occurrence of pain in different body parts were assessed using a structured questionnaire format. The results were statistically significant, and indicated that the prevalence of MSDs is high and that there is a dire need to enhance awareness regarding correct working postures. This study encompassed all factors that can be addressed as causes for MSDs among dentists.

  20. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Hand and Wrist: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Sensorimotor Changes

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Ann E.; Barbe, Mary F.; Clark, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present recent epidemiological findings regarding work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) of the hand and wrist, and to summarize experimental evidence of underlying tissue pathophysiology and sensorimotor changes in WMSDs. Sixty-five percent of the 333 800 newly reported cases of occupational illness in 2001 were attributed to repeated trauma. WMSDs of the hand and wrist are associated with the longest absences from work and are, therefore, associated with greater lost productivity and wages than those of other anatomical regions. Selected epidemiological studies of hand/wrist WMSDs published since 1998 are reviewed and summarized. Results from selected animal studies concerning underlying tissue pathophysiology in response to repetitive movement or tissue loading are reviewed and summarized. To the extent possible, corroborating evidence in human studies for various tissue pathomechanisms suggested in animal models is presented. Repetitive, hand-intensive movements, alone or in combination with other physical, nonphysical, and nonoccupational risk factors, contribute to the development of hand/wrist WMSDs. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of tissue injury include inflammation followed by repair and/or fibrotic scarring, peripheral nerve injury, and central nervous system reorganization. Clinicians should consider all of these pathomechanisms when examining and treating patients with hand/wrist WMSDs. PMID:15552707

  1. Knowledge of Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Classical Piano Students at Tertiary Institutions in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chia-Ying; Loo, Fung-Chiat; Hamedon, Titi Rahmawati

    2016-12-01

    Performance injuries among musicians have been widely discussed for decades. However, despite the growing number of classical pianists, this is still a new issue in Malaysia. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the level of knowledge of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) among tertiary music students in Malaysia. A survey was conducted among classical piano students at tertiary institutions of Kuala Lumpur and Selangor. Out of 192 respondents, 76% knew that piano playing can cause PRMDs. Slightly over three-quarters of respondents (77.1%) learned about PRMDs from music educators. The survey revealed that the belief in "no pain, no gain" was still ingrained in their minds, as 50.5% respondents believed that pain experienced while playing the piano was normal and 51.6% of them considered that pain must be experienced to improve their piano skill. The respondents were also scored on questions on terminologies of pianist injury and specific PRMD examples: 7.8% of respondents scored high in the questions on the general terminology, while 99.5% of them scored low in the questions on the specific examples of PRMDs. This finding indicated a lack of knowledge of specific musicians' injuries among classical piano students. The attitudes to pain and the level of understanding of the significance of potential injuries indicate that increasing PRMD awareness and introducing courses on PRMD prevention at tertiary institutions are warranted.

  2. Musculoskeletal disorders, personality traits, psychological distress, and accident proneness of Chinese coal miners.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingming; Wu, Feng; Wang, Jun; Sun, Linyan

    2017-01-01

    Human factors comprise one of the important reasons leading to the casualty accidents in coal mines. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), personality traits, psychological distress, and accident proneness of coal miners. There were 1500 Chinese coal miners surveyed in this study. Among these miners, 992 valid samples were obtained. The study surveyed the MSDs, personality traits, psychological distress, and accident proneness of coal miners with MSDs Likert scale, Eysenck personality questionnaire, Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) scale, and accident proneness questionnaire, respectively. The highest MSDs level was found in the waist. The increasing working age of the miners was connected with increased MSDs and psychological distress. Significant differences in MSDs and psychological distress of miners from different types of work were observed. Coal miners with higher MSDs had higher accident proneness. Coal miners with higher neuroticism dimension of Eysenck personality and more serious psychological distress had higher accident proneness. Phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation and psychoticism dimension of psychological distress were the three most important indicators that had significant positive relationships with accident proneness. The MSDs, neuroticism dimension, and psychological distress of the coal mine workers are important to work safety and require serious attention. Some implications concerning coal mine safety management in China were provided.

  3. Relationship between Occupational Stress and Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korean Male Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Gi; Kim, Kyoo-Sang; Ryoo, Jae-Hong; Yoo, Seung-Won

    2013-07-04

    A growing body of literature has documented that job stress is associated with the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). However, the association of WMSDs with job stress has not yet been fully studied in Korean male firefighters. The purpose of this study was to determine the status of WMSDs in almost all Korean male firefighters and to clarify the effect of job stress on the occurrence of WMSDs. The study design was cross-sectional, and 21,466 firefighters were recruited. The study design included a structured questionnaire to assess general characteristics, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (optional KOSS-26), Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and WMSDs. The chi-square test, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to look for a correlation between general characteristics and job stress, and the occurrence of WMSD. Back pain is the most common WMSD. Among the job stress subgroup, physical environment, job demands, organizational system, occupational climate, lack of reward and job insecurity were related to the occurrence of WMSDs. However, insufficient job control and interpersonal conflict were not related to the occurrence of WMSDs. Job stress was related to the occurrence of WMSDs in Korean male firefighters. To reduce the occurrence of WMSDs, a job stress management program may be required.

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Musculoskeletal Disorders: Does Medical Skepticism Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Wiley-Exley, Elizabeth K; Mielenz, Thelma J; Norton, Edward C; Callahan, Leigh F

    2007-01-01

    Medical skepticism is the reservation about the ability of conventional medical care to significantly improve health. Individuals with musculoskeletal disorders seeing specialists usually experience higher levels of disability; therefore it is expected they might be more skeptical of current treatment and thus more likely to try Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). The goal of this study was to define these relationships. These data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey from two cohorts: those seeing specialists (n=1,344) and non-specialists (n=724). Site-level fixed effects logistic regression models were used to test associations between medical skepticism and 10 CAM use categories. Some form of CAM was used by 88% of the sample. Increased skepticism was associated with one CAM category for the non-specialist group and six categories for the specialist group. Increased medical skepticism is associated with CAM use, but medical skepticism is more often associated with CAM use for those seeing specialists. PMID:19088894

  5. Evaluation of Related Risk Factors in Number of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Carpet Weavers in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Nasim; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Motamedzade, Majid; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2016-12-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a common problem among carpet weavers. This study was undertaken to introduce affecting personal and occupational factors in developing the number of MSDs among carpet weavers. A cross-sectional study was performed among 862 weavers in seven towns with regard to workhouse location in urban or rural regions. Data were collected by using questionnaires that contain personal, workplace, and information tools and the modified Nordic MSDs questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed by applying Poisson and negative binomial mixed models using a full Bayesian hierarchical approach. The deviance information criterion was used for comparison between models and model selection. The majority of weavers (72%) were female and carpet weaving was the main job of 85.2% of workers. The negative binomial mixed model with lowest deviance information criterion was selected as the best model. The criteria showed the convergence of chains. Based on 95% Bayesian credible interval, the main job and weaving type variables statistically affected the number of MSDs, but variables age, sex, weaving comb, work experience, and carpet weaving looms were not significant. According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that occupational factors are associated with the number of MSDs developing among carpet weavers. Thus, using standard tools and decreasing hours of work per day can reduce frequency of MSDs among carpet weavers.

  6. Factors affecting the risk of developing lower back musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in experienced and inexperienced rodworkers.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elizabeth A; Vi, Peter; Reider, Vanesa L; Moore, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Injury and dropout rates during rodwork training appear to reflect difficulties encountered by apprentices adapting to increased physical demands of tying on slab, one of the rodworking tasks with the highest injury risk. Because experience influences work strategies, and consequently the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), this study aimed to identify differences in work practices associated with tying rebar on slab, potentially relevant to back MSD development, in experienced and inexperienced rodworkers. Fourteen male rodworkers were recruited from either experienced (>2 years experience post apprenticeship), or inexperienced (<6 months experience) groups. Both tied an area with rebar laid on the ground. Trunk flexion/extension angles were measured. L4/L5 moments were estimated from T9 Erector Spinae EMG. Experienced workers were found to spend longer periods of time in trunk flexed postures, with lower peak L4/L5 moments. Our findings revealed practices associated with each group might have different implications on back health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) through design: Views of ergonomics and design practitioners.

    PubMed

    Punchihewa, Himan K G; Gyi, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) affect the well-being of workers. Unfortunately, user requirements for design to reduce workplace risk factors for MSDs are not always effectively communicated to designers creating a mismatch between the user requirements and what is ultimately produced. To understand the views of practitioners of design and ergonomics regarding tools for participatory design and features they would like to see in such tools. An online questionnaire survey was conducted with a cohort of practitioners of ergonomics and design (n = 32). In-depth interviews were then conducted with a subset of these practitioners (n = 8). To facilitate discussion, a prototype integrated design tool was developed and demonstrated to practitioners using a verbalized walkthrough approach. According to the results of the questionnaire survey, the majority (70%) believed an integrated approach to participatory design would help reduce work-related MSDs and suggested ways to achieve this, for example, through sharing design information. The interviews showed the majority (n = 7) valued being provided with guidance on design activities and ways to manage and present information. It is believed that an integrated approach to design in order to help reduce work-related MSDs is highly important and a provision to evaluate design solutions would be desirable for practitioners of design and ergonomics.

  8. Risk Factors for Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Office Workers in Qom Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyedeh Shohreh; Abbasi, Mahya; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of the risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is the first step in designing effective preventive interventions. Objectives To investigate the association between individual, organizational, physical, and psychological factors and upper extremity MSDs (i.e., shoulder, elbow and hand/wrist). Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the study population was comprised of office workers from Qom Province, Iran. Of the 1630 Iranian office workers who were selected via a random multistage cluster sampling method, 1488 completed a comprehensive data collection form designed to investigate the individual, organizational, physical, and psychological factors related to MSDs (response rate: 91.3%). Results The predictors of shoulder MSDs in the past 12 months were uncomfortable sitting posture (β = 0.42, P = 0.04), limited rest breaks (β=0.73, P = 0.012), and no access to adjustable desks (β = 0.43, P = 0.018). Working on a computer for more than five hours (β = 0.61, P = 0.004) and an uncomfortable sitting posture (β = 0.79, P = 0.001) predicted hand/wrist symptoms. Conclusions Various risk factors in the workplace may contribute to MSDs in different upper extremities. Preventive interventions should hence include ergonomic and office equipment modifications. PMID:28182176

  9. A study of the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Diez, Maria C; Benito-Gonzalez, Maria A; Sancibrian, Ramon; Gandarillas-Gonzalez, Marco A; Redondo-Figuero, Carlos; Manuel-Palazuelos, Jose C

    2017-09-15

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has shown significant benefits for patients and healthcare systems. However, due to the poor ergonomic adaptation of operating rooms and surgical instruments, most surgeons suffer from pain caused by musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). A descriptive survey on MIS surgeons working in different surgical specialties has been carried out in Hospital Valdecilla (Spain). The aim is to determine the prevalence of MSDs using a personal interview and the standardized Nordic questionnaire. The study determines the prevalence of MSDs in different parts of the body and their relationship with epidemiological and labor variables. A questionnaire was filled out by 129 surgeons. 90% of surgeons reported MSDs. The higher prevalence appears in the most experienced surgeons. The most affected zones are the lower back (54%), neck (51%), upper back (44%), lower extremities (42%), right shoulder (29%) and right hand (28%). The prevalence of MSDs is higher in MIS surgeons than in any other occupational group. The most vulnerable group is experienced surgeons and there is a potential risk that symptoms will be increased in the future. Muscle strength is revealed as a protective factor against MSDs.

  10. Job stress dimensions and their relationship to musculoskeletal disorders in Iranian nurses.

    PubMed

    Barzideh, M; Choobineh, A R; Tabatabaee, H R

    2014-01-01

    There is little data available on job stress dimensions and their relationship to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Iranian nurses. The objectives of this study were to investigate job stress dimensions and examine their relationship to MSDs among nurses of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) hospitals. In this cross-sectional study, 385~randomly selected nurses of SUMS participated. The Persian version of Job Content Questionnaire (P-JCQ) and Nordic MSDs questionnaire were used for data collection. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U test were applied for data analysis. Decision latitude and social support dimensions had low levels, but psychological and physical job demands as well as job insecurity dimensions had high levels among the nurses. 89.9% of the subjects experienced some form of MSDs during the last 12 months. Lower back symptoms were the most prevalent problem reported (61.8%). Physical isometric loads was the only sub-scale that had significant relationship with MSDs. In the majority of cases, subjects were exposed to high levels of job stress. MSDs prevalence was high. Based on the results, any interventional program for MSDs prevention should focus on reducing physical and psychological job demands as well as increasing decision latitudes.

  11. Costs of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in developing countries: Colombia case.

    PubMed

    Piedrahita, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    The real burden of occupational diseases, specifically work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), and its impact on workers' productivity is not known. The situation is critical in developing countries where only cases that cause workers' disability are recorded. In this study, the incidence of MSDs in Colombia was estimated by using the age and gender specific double incidence rate of repetitive strain injuries diseases in Finland for 2002. The results showed that the estimated number of MSDs recorded in Colombia during 2005 was 23,477 cases at the rate of 11.6 cases per 10,000 workers. The estimated total cost of these MSD cases relative to workers' productivity was 171.7 million US Dollars, representing around 0.2% of Colombia's Gross Domestic Product for 2005. The systematic appraisal of the incidence of MSDs and their associated cost on workers' productivity are necessary in developing countries to reduce the costly impact on productivity and to increase workers' well-being.

  12. Musculoskeletal disorders and occupational exposures: how should we judge the evidence concerning the causal association?

    PubMed

    Punnett, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affecting the back, upper and lower extremities are widespread in the general population, implying a variety of causal factors. Multiple causes are not mutually exclusive, and a high background rate does not preclude associations with specific factors that are uncommon in the general population. MSDs have well-documented associations with occupational ergonomic stressors such as repetitive motion, heavy lifting, non-neutral postures, and vibration. Organizational features of the work environment, such as time pressure and low decision latitude, may also play a role, at least by potentiating the effects of physical loading. Numerous systematic reviews have mostly concurred with these overall findings. Nevertheless, some continue to debate whether MSDs are sometimes work-related, even for those performing jobs with repetitive and routinized tasks, heavy lifting, and/or pronounced postural strain. This article discusses (1) some epidemiologic features of MSDs that underlie that debate; and (2) the question of what should appropriately be considered a gold standard for scientific evidence on an etiological question such as the health effects of a non-voluntary exposure, such as an occupational or environmental agent. In particular, randomized clinical trials have little relevance for determining the health effects of non-therapeutic risk factors.

  13. Prevalence and impact of musculoskeletal disorders in New Zealand nurses, postal workers and office workers.

    PubMed

    Harcombe, Helen; McBride, David; Derrett, Sarah; Gray, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    To describe the prevalence, characteristics and impact of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in New Zealand nurses, postal workers and office workers. A postal survey asked participants about MSDs, (low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand or knee pain lasting longer than one day), and demographic, physical and psychosocial factors. Nurses were randomly selected from the Nursing Council database, postal workers from their employer's database and office workers from the 2005 electoral roll. The response rate of potentially eligible participants was 58% (n=443). Participants were aged 20-59 years; 86% were female. Over the 12 months prior to the survey 88% of respondents had at least one MSD lasting longer than a day and 72% reported an MSD present for at least seven days. Of the 1,003 MSDs reported, 18% required time off work and 24% required modified work duties. In the month prior to the survey 17% of MSDs made functional tasks difficult or impossible. Low back, neck and shoulder pain prevalence did not differ by occupation. Postal workers had the highest prevalence of elbow and wrist/hand pain; nurses of knee pain. The high prevalence of MSDs among these workers indicates that they are indeed in 'at risk' occupations. In each occupational group MSDs encompass a range of anatomical sites, however the overall pattern of MSDs differs by occupation. MSDs have a significant impact on activities at work and home. Primary and secondary prevention strategies should encompass a range of anatomical sites and specifically target different occupational groups.

  14. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among workers in an MDF furniture factory in eastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Meepradit, Parvena

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among 439 workers in an MDF furniture factory using questionnaires and the risk assessment form of the Ergonomic Assessment Tool for Arthritis technique to assess aspects of the workstations and working postures of jobs. With regard to factors that affected MSDs, it was found that workers older than 50 years were having knee symptoms: their adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 18.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.51, 226.40]. Those who had been working for 1-2 years were having neck pain symptoms: aOR 12.01, 95% CI [1.82, 79.43]. The recommendation of this study is that health monitoring should be provided for workers who have pain in various parts of their bodies, especially those who have been working for 6-10 years, and those who are over 50 years old with knee pain.

  15. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea Provoked by Workers’ Collective Compensation Claims against Work Intensification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the process of workers’ problems with work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the introduction of risk assessments (RA) for their prevention, and the consequences of this process in Korea. In 1997, economic crisis caused a rapid increase of massive layoffs, worker dispatch system introduction, job insecurity, and use of irregular workers resulting in work intensification. Work intensification increased WMSDs, which created massive workers’ compensation collective claims. Workers argued for the reduction of work intensity. The RAs introduced as a consequence of the workers’ struggle is unique in the world. Whereas these RAs were expected to play a pivotal role in WMSDs prevention, they dis not due to workers’ lack of engagement after the compensation struggle. In fact, changes in the compensation judgment system and criteria have resulted in lower compensation approval rates leading to lower workers’ compensation claims. The Korean experience provides insight into WMSDs causes in a globalized world. In such a the globalized world, work intensification as the result of work flexibility could be an international trend. PMID:25089205

  16. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea Provoked by Workers' Collective Compensation Claims against Work Intensification.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongmug; Kim, Youngki; Lee, Young-Il; Koh, Sangbaek; Kim, Inah; Lee, Hoonkoo

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the process of workers' problems with work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the introduction of risk assessments (RA) for their prevention, and the consequences of this process in Korea. In 1997, economic crisis caused a rapid increase of massive layoffs, worker dispatch system introduction, job insecurity, and use of irregular workers resulting in work intensification. Work intensification increased WMSDs, which created massive workers' compensation collective claims. Workers argued for the reduction of work intensity. The RAs introduced as a consequence of the workers' struggle is unique in the world. Whereas these RAs were expected to play a pivotal role in WMSDs prevention, they dis not due to workers' lack of engagement after the compensation struggle. In fact, changes in the compensation judgment system and criteria have resulted in lower compensation approval rates leading to lower workers' compensation claims. The Korean experience provides insight into WMSDs causes in a globalized world. In such a the globalized world, work intensification as the result of work flexibility could be an international trend.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and ankle musculoskeletal disorders experienced by nurses.

    PubMed

    Reed, Lloyd F; Battistutta, Diana; Young, Jeanine; Newman, Beth

    2014-06-05

    Nurses are at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Although the prevalence of MSDs of the lower back, upper limbs, neck and shoulders have been reported previously in nursing, few studies have evaluated MSDs of the foot and ankle. This study evaluated the prevalence of foot and ankle MSDs in nurses and their relation to individual and workplace risk factors. A self-administered survey incorporating the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was distributed, over a nine-week period, to all eligible nurses (n = 416) working in a paediatric hospital in Brisbane, Australia. The prevalence of MSDs for each of the NMQ body regions was determined. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between activity-limiting foot/ankle MSDs and risk factors related to the individual (age, body mass index, number of existing foot conditions, smoking history, general physical health [SF36 Physical Component Scale], footwear features) or the workplace (level of nursing position, work location, average hours worked, hours worked in previous week, time since last break from work). A 73% response rate was achieved with 304 nurses completing surveys, of whom 276 were females (91%). Mean age of the nurses was 37 years (±10), younger than the state average of 43 years. Foot/ankle MSDs were the most prevalent conditions experienced by nurses during the preceding seven days (43.8%, 95% CI 38.2-49.4%), the second most prevalent MSDs to impair physical activity (16.7%, 95% CI 13.0-21.3%), and the third most prevalent MSD, after lower-back and neck problems, during the preceding 12 months (55.3%, 95% CI 49.6-60.7%). Of the nurse and work characteristics investigated, obesity, poor general physical health, existing foot conditions and working in the intensive care unit emerged as statistically significant (p < 0.05) independent risk factors for activity-limiting foot/ankle MSDs. Foot/ankle MSDs are common in paediatric

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and ankle musculoskeletal disorders experienced by nurses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses are at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Although the prevalence of MSDs of the lower back, upper limbs, neck and shoulders have been reported previously in nursing, few studies have evaluated MSDs of the foot and ankle. This study evaluated the prevalence of foot and ankle MSDs in nurses and their relation to individual and workplace risk factors. Methods A self-administered survey incorporating the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was distributed, over a nine-week period, to all eligible nurses (n = 416) working in a paediatric hospital in Brisbane, Australia. The prevalence of MSDs for each of the NMQ body regions was determined. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between activity-limiting foot/ankle MSDs and risk factors related to the individual (age, body mass index, number of existing foot conditions, smoking history, general physical health [SF36 Physical Component Scale], footwear features) or the workplace (level of nursing position, work location, average hours worked, hours worked in previous week, time since last break from work). Results A 73% response rate was achieved with 304 nurses completing surveys, of whom 276 were females (91%). Mean age of the nurses was 37 years (±10), younger than the state average of 43 years. Foot/ankle MSDs were the most prevalent conditions experienced by nurses during the preceding seven days (43.8%, 95% CI 38.2-49.4%), the second most prevalent MSDs to impair physical activity (16.7%, 95% CI 13.0-21.3%), and the third most prevalent MSD, after lower-back and neck problems, during the preceding 12 months (55.3%, 95% CI 49.6-60.7%). Of the nurse and work characteristics investigated, obesity, poor general physical health, existing foot conditions and working in the intensive care unit emerged as statistically significant (p < 0.05) independent risk factors for activity-limiting foot/ankle MSDs. Conclusions Foot

  19. Effectiveness of early part-time sick leave in musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Kausto, Johanna; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Ketola, Ritva; Riihimäki, Hilkka; Luukkonen, Ritva; Karppinen, Jaro; Miranda, Helena; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2008-01-01

    Background The importance of staying active instead of bed rest has been acknowledged in the management of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). This emphasizes the potential benefits of adjusting work to fit the employee's remaining work ability. Despite part-time sick leave being an official option in many countries, its effectiveness has not been studied yet. We have designed a randomized controlled study to assess the health effects of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-day sick leave. Our hypothesis is that if work time is temporarily reduced and work load adjusted at the early stages of disability, employees with MSDs will have less disability days and faster return to regular work duties than employees on a conventional sick leave. Methods/Design The study population will consist of 600 employees, who seek medical advice from an occupational physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The inclusion requires that they have not been on a sick leave for longer than 14 days prior to the visit. Based on the physician's judgement, the severity of the symptoms must indicate a need for conventional sick leave, but the employee is considered to be able to work part-time without any additional risk. Half of the employees are randomly allocated to part-time sick leave group and their work time is reduced by 40–60%, whereas in the control group work load is totally eliminated with conventional sick leave. The main outcomes are the number of days from the initial visit to return to regular work activities, and the total number of sick leave days during 12 and 24 months of follow-up. The costs and benefits as well as the feasibility of early part-time sick leave will also be evaluated. Conclusion This is the first randomised trial to our knowledge on the effectiveness of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-time sick leave in the management of MSDs. The data collection continues until 2011, but preliminary results on the feasibility of

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulders in female sewing machine operators: prevalence, incidence, and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaergaard, A.; Andersen, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the occurrence and persistence of two restrictively defined neck-shoulder disorders among sewing machine operators. To assess factors associated with the development of neck-shoulder disorder and prognostic factors for remaining a case, when disorders were already present.
METHODS—In an initial group of 243 sewing machine operators, 178 were followed up for 2 years. At baseline and at 1 and 2 years follow up the participants underwent a clinical examination of the neck and arms and filled in a questionnaire about current musculoskeletal complaints. Clinical criteria for two main neck-shoulder disorders were defined: rotator cuff tendinitis and myofascial pain syndrome. A baseline control group consisted of 357 women with varied non-repetitive work.
RESULTS—At baseline the overall prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome and rotator cuff tendinitis was 15.2% and 5.8% among sewing machine operators compared with 9.0% and 2.2%, respectively, among controls. The presence of the disorders was strongly associated with a self perception of poor general health. Although myofascial pain syndrome showed a U shaped association with years as a sewing machine operator, rotator cuff tendinitis was absent among the newest recruits and present among 15% of the women with more than 20 years as a sewing machine operator. Besides years as a sewing machine operator, the risk of having a neck-shoulder disorder at baseline was significantly associated with high stress (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.54; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.28 to 5.05) when adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, living alone with children, job strain, and social support from colleagues and supervisors. Only one of 13 participants with rotator cuff tendinitis at baseline recovered during follow up. Myofascial pain syndrome showed a much more fluctuating tendency. Low social support (RR 3.72; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.30) and smoking (RR 3.93; 95% CI 1.33 to 11.58) were

  1. The prevalence of work-related neck, shoulder, and upper back musculoskeletal disorders among midwives, nurses, and physicians: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Long, Maryann H; Bogossian, Fiona E; Johnston, Venerina

    2013-05-01

    With the global shortage of health care workers predicted to worsen, attrition from the work force must be minimized. This review examined the incidence or prevalence of neck, shoulder, and upper back musculoskeletal disorders, a possible source of attrition, among midwives, nurses, and physicians. Four electronic databases were systematically searched for publications meeting inclusion criteria. Reference lists of retrieved articles were hand searched for additional articles. After eliminating articles that did not meet inclusion criteria, the remaining articles were assessed for quality and prevalence or incidence data were extracted. Twenty-nine articles published between 1990 and 2012 were included and assessed for quality. Median annual prevalence rates were 45% (neck), 40% (shoulder), and 35% (upper back). Methodological concerns included small sample size, inconsistency of outcome measures, likelihood of non-response bias, and low response rates. Midwives, who have not been well studied, demonstrated prevalence somewhat lower than that of nurses and physicians. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. The effect of manual handling training on achieving training transfer, employee's behaviour change and subsequent reduction of work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dervla A M; Greiner, Birgit A; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review investigated the effectiveness of manual handling training on achieving training transfer, leading to a positive change in employee's manual handling behaviour and a reduction of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) following training. Six electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials or cohort studies with a control and/or comparison group that investigated the effectiveness of manual handling training. Thirteen articles met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Following quality assessment, nine of the included articles were found to be of high quality. This systematic review suggests that there has been very little research focusing on the effectiveness of manual handling training on training transfer to employees and the associated behavioural change. This review indicates that whilst employees report understanding and awareness following training, this does not always lead to the expected behavioural change. This review also suggests it cannot be demonstrated that training transfer will lead to a reduction of WRMSDs.

  3. The mediating role of work-related musculoskeletal disorders on the link between psychosocial factors and absenteeism among administrative workers.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohd Zulkifli; Othman, Abdul Kadir; Ahmad, Mohamad Fahimi; Justine, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between psychosocial factors (i.e., job demand, decision latitude, social support, physical environment, and personal risk factors), work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs), and productivity as measured by workers' perceived absenteeism. Data were collected from the selected administrative workers (administrative assistant) and analyzed using cross tabulation. The results indicate that all psychological factors are not significantly associated with WRMDs, except for the association between personal risk factors and hip/thigh disorders. Subsequently, WRMDs do not significantly contribute to explaining absenteeism. The managerial and research implications of this study are deliberately discussed.

  4. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls and young women employees of textile industries in Tamil Nadu, India - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Angeline, Gnanaselvam Nancy; Bobby, Joseph

    2017-05-24

    Musculoskeletal disorders are common in those employed in the textile industry. The aim of the study is to assess musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls who are current employees of textile industries in comparison with the adolescent girls and young women who are past employees of textile industries and adolescent girls who have never been employed in the textile industry. Methodology This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 321 subjects, 107 in each study group were sampled. Standardized nordic questionnaires (SNQ) was used to assess musculoskeletal symptoms. Results More than half of the current employees (67.28%) and past employees (67.28%) reported musculoskeletal pain. Among the never been employed, 18.69% reported musculoskeletal pain. Neck and shoulder were the most common sites of musculoskeletal pain among the current employees (49.5% and 50.5%, respectively) and the past employees (45.8% and 49.5%, respectively). In the regression model, having ever been diagnosed for anemia (AOR 6.57, 95% CI 1.4 to 30.76), working for more than 48 h in a week (AOR 3.37, 95% CI 1.53 to 7.41) and the presence of depression (AOR 6.6, 95% CI 1.48 to 29.36) were significantly associated with the presence of musculoskeletal pain in the study participants. Conclusion Musculoskeletal disorders are a major occupational health problem among the adolescent and young women employees of textile industries. Working hours should be fixed at 48 h per week and anemia and depression should be treated to avert the work related musculoskeletal disorders in the study population.

  5. Office Exercise Training to Reduce and Prevent the Occurrence of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Office Workers: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Ardalan; Mohd Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri; Arumugam, Manohar; Danaee, Mahmoud; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pain in specific areas of the body (including the lower back, neck, and shoulders) due to extended periods of sitting and inactivity is the most widespread musculoskeletal disorder worldwide and has consequences that are both socio-economic and personal. This condition is particularly prevalent in industrialised countries, affecting roughly 70% to 80% of adults at some point in their lives; approximately 1% of the U.S. population is chronically disabled by this type of pain disorder. A practical way to reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among office workers would have a significant positive impact. More work is required to develop a package of exercises designed to prevent and treat musculoskeletal pain in office workers. Such a package would be preferable to pharmacological treatments, which can have undesirable side effects. The main objective of this package would be to increase the flexibility and strength of trunk muscles in order to decrease the soreness, pain, and degree of discomfort. In this article, we introduce our proposed package of exercises, which are based on guidelines issued bythe American College of Sports Medicine. PMID:27660545

  6. The ergonomic evaluation of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among construction labourers working in unorganized sectors in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Subhashis; Chattopadhyay, Soumen; Basu, Kumkum; Paul, Goutam

    2010-12-01

    The present study aimed at ergonomic evaluation of the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among construction labourers working in unorganized sectors in West Bengal, India. A modified Nordic questionnaire was applied to one hundred forty male and ninety female construction labourers to acquire information about musculoskeletal symptoms like pain in different body parts. Work-rest schedules of the labourers in different work activities were studied. Working postures were analyzed by means of the Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) tool. Body part discomfort (BPD) scale was used to assess the intensity of feeling of discomforts in the different body parts. It was revealed that the labourers performed repetitive, stressful work for a long period of time in a single work-rest cycle and the load lifted and carried by them were more than the NIOSH recommended weight limit. The analyses of working postures revealed that most of their working postures were unsafe and ranked under REBA action level 3 and 4. The results obtained by applying the Nordic questionnaire and BPD scale revealed that the prevalence of pain in various regions of the body, especially low-back pain, was alarmingly high in both male and female labourers. Training for safe lifting of materials, proper work-rest schedule, modifications of some working procedures and the use of ergonomically designed equipment may certainly reduce the work-related musculoskeletal disorders and improve the health status of construction labourers working in unorganized sectors.

  7. Incidence of tinnitus, impaired hearing and musculoskeletal disorders among students enrolled in academic music education--a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Mats; Thiringer, Gunnar; Brandström, Lars

    2005-08-01

    The aim was to determine the incidence of tinnitus, impaired hearing and musculoskeletal disorders among musicians and the relation to the number of practicing hours and/or the instrument type before the onset of symptoms. The study base consisted of students enrolled in the School of Music and Music Education at Göteborg University between the years 1980 and 1995. There were 407 of the 602 original students that answered a questionnaire (response rate of 68%). The questionnaire concerned exposure before and after the enrollment in the Music Academy, as well as onset of symptoms. The highest incidence of symptoms was found for reported tinnitus with a rate of 10.6 per 1000 years of instrumental practice. There was a relationship between exposure to the number of hours of instrumental practice and incidence of impaired hearing. Among the musculoskeletal symptoms the highest incidences per 1000 years of instrumental practice were pain in the neck and in the left shoulder with a rate of 4.4 and 4.6 disorders per 1000 years of instrumental practice, respectively. There was 2.4 times higher incidence for musculoskeletal disorders in the right hand/wrist and a 2.2 times higher incidence in the left elbow/forearm for musicians who practiced for 20 h or more per week before the onset of disorders compared to those who practiced fewer than 20 h per week when controlling for age and gender. Musicians with a violin or a viola as the main instrument had four times the incidence for right elbow/forearm disorder and twice the incidence of neck pain, pain in the right shoulder and the left elbow/forearm compared to those who had piano as the main instrument.

  8. [Occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders in working populations not exposed to repetitive tasks of the upper arms].

    PubMed

    De Marco, F; Menoni, O; Colombini, D; Occhipinti, E; Vimercati, C

    1996-01-01

    A total of 749 workers (males: 139 aged between 15 and 35 years, and 171 aged over 35 years; females: 176 aged between 15 and 35 years, and 263 aged over 35 years) performing tasks not at risk for work-related musculo-skeletal disorders of the upper limbs (WMSDs) underwent a clinical examination using a standardised method. The "anamnetics cases" were defined on the basis of pain or paraesthesia present for at least one week during the previous 12 months, or appearing at least once a month, and not subsequent to acute trauma. The anamnestic cases among the males amounted to 4.4% (age 15 divided by 35 years) and 12.3% (age > 35); among the females 4.6% (age 15 divided by 35 years) and 14.2% (age > 35). Of the 1498 limbs examined, the prevalent pathologies reported were: suspect narrow chest syndrome: 0.3% among the males > 35 years, 0.6% among the females aged 15 divided by 35 years, 1% among the females > 35 years; scapulo-humeral periarthritis: 0.3% among the males aged > 35 years, 0.3% among the females aged 15 divided by 35 years, 1.3% among the females aged > 35 years; lateral epicondylitis: 0.3% among the males aged > 35 years, 0.2% among the females aged > 35 years; trapezio-metacarpal arthrosis: 0.8% among the females aged > 35 years; wrist-hand tendinitis: 0.9% among the males aged > 35 years, 0.9% among the females aged 15 divided by 35 years; carpal tunnel syndrome: 2.5% among the females aged > 35 years. No disorders were detected outside of the age ranges indicated. Several workers reported more than one disorder. The number of workers with at least one WMSD was: males 0% in the 15 divided by 35 years age range, 3.5% in the > 35 year age range; females 2.3% in the 15 divided by 35 year age range, 7.2% in the > 35 year age range; 3.9% of the total sample population. The prevalences were on average quite low, particularly among the older workers, hence the authors recommend that even minimal prevalences detected in particular work environments should not

  9. Psychosocial Work Stressors, Work Fatigue, and Musculoskeletal Disorders: Comparison between Emergency and Critical Care Nurses in Brunei Public Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Hanif; Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah; Naing, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Little evidence estimated the exposure of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders for nurses working in South-East Asian region, and research on this subject is almost nonexistent in Brunei. The main aim of our study was to provide a comprehensive exploration and estimate exposure of the study variables amongst emergency (ER) and critical care (CC) nurses in Brunei. The study also aims to compare whether experiences of ER nurses differ from those of CC nurses. This cross-sectional study was implemented in the ER and CC departments across Brunei public hospitals from February to April 2016 by using Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II, Occupational Fatigue Exhaustion Recovery scale, and Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. In total, 201 ER and CC nurses (82.0% response rate) participated in the study. Quantitative demands of CC nurses were significantly higher than ER nurses. Even so, ER nurses were 4.0 times more likely [95% confidence interval (2.21, 7.35)] to experience threats of violence, and 2.8 times more likely [95% confidence interval: (1.50, 5.29)] to experience chronic fatigue. The results revealed that nurses experienced high quantitative demands, work pace, stress, and burnout. High prevalence of chronic and persistent fatigue, threats of violence and bullying, and musculoskeletal pain at the neck, shoulder, upper and lower back, and foot region, was also reported. This study has provided good estimates for the exposure rate of psychosocial work stressors, work-related fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Brunei. It provided important initial insight for nursing management and policymakers to make informed decisions on current and future planning to provide nurses with a conducive work environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Words that describe chronic musculoskeletal pain: implications for assessing pain quality across cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Saurab; Pathak, Anupa; Jensen, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Background People from different cultures who speak different languages may experience pain differently. This possible variability has important implications for evaluating the validity of pain quality measures that are directly translated into different languages without cultural adaptations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of language and culture on the validity of pain quality measures by comparing the words that individuals with chronic pain from Nepal use to describe their pain with those used by patients from the USA. Methods A total of 101 individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain in Nepal were asked to describe their pain. The rates of the different pain descriptor domains and phrases used by the Nepali sample were then compared to the published rates of descriptors used by patients from the USA. The content validity of commonly used measures for assessing pain quality was then evaluated. Results While there was some similarity between patients from Nepal and the USA in how they describe pain, there were also important differences, especially in how pain quality was described. For example, many patients from Nepal used metaphors to describe their pain. Also, the patients from Nepal often used a category of pain descriptor – which describes a physical state – not used by patients from the USA. Only the original McGill Pain Questionnaire was found to have content validity for assessing pain quality in patients from Nepal, although other existing pain quality measures could be adapted to be content valid by adding one or two additional descriptors, depending on the measure in question. Conclusion The findings indicate that direct translations of measures that are developed using samples of patients from one country or culture are not necessarily content valid for use in other countries or cultures; some adaptations may be required in order for such measures to be most useful in new language and culture. PMID:27895511

  11. Relationship of Musculoskeletal Disorder Pain to Patterns of Clinical Care in California Dental Hygienists.

    PubMed

    Humann, Pamela; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2015-10-01

    To relate self-reported levels of musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) pain and patterns of clinical care among members of the California Dental Hygienists' Association (CDHA), using a web-based survey. The 24-item survey consisted of questions on patterns of clinical care, health habits, experience with MSD pain and demographic information. Recruitment information, including survey link and consent form, was emailed to the CDHA for distribution to its members. Descriptive analysis and cross tabulations were conducted using the online software program Qualtrics™. A Chi-square test determined statistical significant differences between the responses of the no/mild pain and moderate/severe pain groups. The response rate was 19% (500/2,700). Ninety-six percent of all respondents reported some level of MSD pain, causing nearly 25% of the respondents to miss work. Respondents, who reported moderate/severe pain, treated more patients per day (p=0.007) and on average treated greater numbers of moderate to heavy calculus patients (p=0.017) than those respondents reporting no/mild pain. Forty percent of the respondents in the moderate/severe group treated more than 8 patients per day. A higher percentage of respondents (p=0.000) in the moderate/severe pain group than in the no/mild group reported using proper posture less than 50% of treatment time. Using proper posture more than 50% of treatment time was more frequent in respondents who had practiced more than (p=0.012), compared with less than, 5 years. Workload and ergonomics are related to MSD pain. Educational programs need to emphasize the importance of these factors in the development and reduction of MSD pain. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  12. Stress responses in low-status jobs and their relationship to health risks: musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, U

    1999-01-01

    Conditions typical of many low-status jobs are known to induce elevated stress. In keeping with this, blue-collar workers show elevated psychophysiological stress levels both during and after work compared with workers in more stimulating and flexible jobs. Health-related behaviors, such as cigarette smoking and drug abuse, that are known to contribute to the social gradient in health, can be seen as ways of coping with a stressful work situation in order to get short-term relief. Negative emotional states associated with low-status jobs, combined with a lack of economic resources, are also likely to reduce the individual's motivation to seek proper medical treatment and, thus, increase the risk that transient symptoms develop into chronic illness. With regard to musculoskeletal disorders, it is well documented that physically monotonous or repetitive work is associated with an increase in neck, shoulder, and low back pain problems. However, recent studies also report an association between psychosocial factors and muscle pain syndromes. Possible mechanisms explaining these findings involve the assumption that psychological stress may induce sustained activation of small, low-threshold motor units that may lead to degenerative processes, damage, and pain. Analysis of short periods of very low muscular electrical activity (EMG gaps) shows that female workers with a high frequency of EMG gaps seem to have less risk of developing myalgia problems than do workers with fewer gaps. Stress induced by psychosocial conditions at work, which is usually more lasting than that resulting from physical demands, may prevent the individual from shutting off their physiological activation and reduces the time for rest and recovery. In the modern work environment, with strong emphasis on a high work pace, competitiveness, and efficiency, it is possible that lack of relaxation is an even more important health problem than is the absolute level of contraction or the frequency of

  13. A longitudinal study of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and alternative measures of vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Bovenzi, Massimo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the exposure-response relationships between alternative frequency weightings of hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) and neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in a cohort of HTV workers. In a three-year longitudinal study, the occurrence of neck and upper limb MSDs was investigated in 249 HTV workers and 138 control men. In the HTV workers, MSDs were related to measures of daily vibration exposure expressed in terms of 8-h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration magnitude [A(8)]. To calculate A(8), the acceleration magnitudes of vibration were weighted by means of four alternative frequency weightings of HTV. The associations between MSDs, individual characteristics, physical work load other than vibration, and psychological strain were also investigated. The occurrence of upper limb MSDs was greater in the HTV workers than in the controls. After adjustment for potential confounders, the occurrence of elbow/forearm and wrist/hand MSDs increased with the increase in vibration exposure. A measure of model selection did not reveal any substantial difference in the performance of the alternative frequency weightings of HTV for the prediction of neck and upper limb MSDs. In the study population, age, hard physical work load, and poor psychological well-being were associated with both neck and upper limb MSDs. In this study, there was evidence for significant exposure-response relationships between HTV exposure and MSDs in the distal sites of the upper limbs. There were no differences in the prediction of neck and upper limb MSDs between measures of daily vibration exposure calculated with alternative frequency weightings of acceleration magnitude.

  14. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among physical therapists: an online survey.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar R; Svoboda, Stephanie; Belniak, Alexandra; Brunt, Denis; Rose-St Prix, Colleen; Roberts, Lisa; da Costa, Bruno R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the rates and characteristics of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in physical therapists (PTs) according to their specialty and setting. Participants completed an online questionnaire including 15 demographic questions, 7 work-related and 8 injury-related questions for 9 different body parts. Complete responses were obtained from 121 PTs; 96% reported MSD symptoms during the previous 12 months, 64% affecting at least 3 body parts. The body parts with the highest prevalence of symptoms were the low back (66%) and the neck (61%). For PTs specialized in acute care, geriatrics and pediatrics, the body part most commonly affected was the low back, while for PTs specialized in orthopedics and neurology, the body part most commonly affected was the neck. Regarding work settings, the low back was the most commonly affected for PTs working in skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics and hospitals, and the neck in PTs working in academic and home health settings. MSDs are common among PTs; the body parts most often affected were the low back and neck. The prevalence and body parts affected varied by practice setting and specialty area. The findings can help informing the design of evidence-based rehabilitation, prevention, training and educational programs. Rehabilitation of injured physical therapists needs to address the symptoms of the multiple body parts that are usually affected (e.g. back, wrists and hands). Rehabilitation of injured physical therapists needs to take into consideration their job demands, practice setting and specialty area. The findings can inform the design of rehabilitation, prevention, training and educational programs for physical therapists.

  15. Selected questions on biomechanical exposures for surveillance of upper-limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Descatha, Alexis; Roquelaure, Yves; Evanoff, Bradley; Niedhammer, Isabelle; Chastang, Jean François; Mariot, Camille; Ha, Catherine; Imbernon, Ellen; Goldberg, Marcel; Leclerc, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Objective Questionnaires for assessment of biomechanical exposure are frequently used in surveillance programs, though few studies have evaluated which key questions are needed. We sought to reduce the number of variables on a surveillance questionnaire by identifying which variables best summarized biomechanical exposure in a survey of the French working population. Methods We used data from the 2002–2003 French experimental network of Upper-limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders (UWMSD), performed on 2685 subjects in which 37 variables assessing biomechanical exposures were available (divided into four ordinal categories, according to the task frequency or duration). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with orthogonal rotation was performed on these variables. Variables closely associated with factors issued from PCA were retained, except those highly correlated to another variable (rho>0.70). In order to study the relevance of the final list of variables, correlations between a score based on retained variables (PCA score) and the exposure score suggested by the SALTSA group were calculated. The associations between the PCA score and the prevalence of UWMSD were also studied. In a final step, we added back to the list a few variables not retained by PCA, because of their established recognition as risk factors. Results According to the results of the PCA, seven interpretable factors were identified: posture exposures, repetitiveness, handling of heavy loads, distal biomechanical exposures, computer use, forklift operator specific task, and recovery time. Twenty variables strongly correlated with the factors obtained from PCA were retained. The PCA score was strongly correlated both with the SALTSA score and with UWMSD prevalence (p<0.0001). In the final step, six variables were reintegrated. Conclusion Twenty-six variables out of 37 were efficiently selected according to their ability to summarize major biomechanical constraints in a working population

  16. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and related occupational causative factors among electricity linemen: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Padmanathan, Vinothini; Joseph, Leonard; Omar, Baharudin; Nawawi, Roslizawati

    2016-01-01

    Occupational tasks of linemen are highly associated with the development of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs). Although linemen are prone to develop WRMDs, there is paucity of information on the prevalence of WRMDs and related occupational causative factors. Therefore, the present review was conducted to report on the prevalence of WRMDs and to outline causative risk factors within occupational tasks in the lineman profession. Literature search was conducted in various databases such as Scopus, PubMed and ScienceDirect for articles published between 1996-2013. The articles were analyzed, selected and retrieved based on predetermined objectives, inclusion criteria and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). In the review process only articles published in English were considered. The review identified moderate to high prevalence of WRMDs among the linemen population. Back and shoulder regions were highly affected compared to the other body regions. The review also reported occupational tasks such as bar installation, insulator fixation and manual handling of tools as high risk tasks that lead to the development of WRMDs. In addition, occupational tools such as ladders, manual cutters and manual presses were also identified as a potential ergonomic hazard. In conclusion, the current review identified that WRMDs are common in the back and shoulder regions among linemen. Also, a number of occupational risk factors were identified to be associated with WRMDs among the linemen. Hence, future research on prevention and intervention studies concerning lineman profession population in order to develop a good job practice are recommended. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):725-734. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  17. The French Musculoskeletal Disorders Surveillance Program: Pays de la Loire network

    PubMed Central

    Ha, C; Roquelaure, Y; Leclerc, A; Touranchet, A; Goldberg, M; Imbernon, E

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: An epidemiological surveillance system for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) was implemented in 2002 in France’s Pays de la Loire region to assess the incidence and prevalence of MSDs in the general and working populations, identify levels of exposure to occupational risk factors and investigate the proportion of cases attributable to work exposure. Methods: The program combines (1) surveillance of sentinel health events in the general population (carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) was the sentinel event for upper limb MSDs), (2) assessment of the prevalence of the main upper limb MSDs and their risk factors in the workplace based on a network of occupational physicians and (3) registration of the notification of work-related diseases (WRDs). Results: 1168 incident cases of CTS were included over a 3 year period. The estimated incidence of CTS was 1.00 per 1000 person-years in those aged 20–59 years (0.60 in men and 1.40 in women). The incidence rate was higher in employed than unemployed persons in the year of diagnosis (0.6 per 1000 vs 0.3 in men and 1.7 vs 0.8 in women). The occupational physician network noted high prevalence rates: 11% of men and 15% of women had at least one of the six main upper limb clinically-diagnosed MSDs. The WRD survey showed that MSDs represented 65% of notified WRDs. Conclusion: The Pays de la Loire program plays a significant role in informing the authorities and the public about the state of current MSDs. It is planned to extend it to a routine national surveillance program. PMID:19269944

  18. Effect of systematic ergonomic hazard identification and control implementation on musculoskeletal disorder and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Linda F; Taiwo, Oyebode A; Galusha, Deron; Barbour, Russell; Slade, Martin D; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Cullen, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the effect of an ergonomic hazard control (HC) initiative, undertaken as part of a company ergonomics standard, on worker injury risk. Methods Using the company's ergonomic hazards database to identify jobs with and without ergonomic HC implementation and linking to individual job and injury histories, injury risk among person-jobs with HC implementation (the HC group) was compared to those without HC (NoHC group) using random coefficient models. Further analysis of the HC group was conducted to determine the effect of additional ergonomic hazards controlled on injury risk. Results Among 123jobs at 17 plant locations, 347 ergonomic hazards were quantitatively identified during the study period. HC were implemented for 204 quantified ergonomic hazards in 84 jobs, impacting 10 385 persons (12 967 person-jobs). No HC were implemented for quantified ergonomic hazards in the remaining 39 jobs affecting 4155 persons (5046 person-jobs). Adjusting for age, sex, plant origin, and year to control for any temporal trend in injury risk, the relative risk (RR) for musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) was 0.85 and the RR for any injury or MSD was 0.92 in the HC compared to NoHC group. Among the HC group, each ergonomic hazard controlled was associated with risk reduction for MSD and acute injury outcomes (RR 0.93). Conclusion Systematic ergonomic HC through participatory ergonomics, as part of a mandatory company ergonomics standard, is associated with MSD and injury risk reduction among workers in jobs with HC implemented. PMID:24142048

  19. [Study on lifting-related musculoskeletal disorders among workers in metal processing].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guo-bing; Lei, Ling; Dempsey, Patrick; Ma, Zao-hua; Liang, You-xin

    2004-04-01

    To investigate lifting-related musculoskeletal disorders in metal processing, to analyze the risk factors, and to study the validity and feasibility of using NIOSH lifting equation in China. The questionnaires of semi-structured interview, the Ovako Working Posture Analysing System (OWAS) postural analysis and variables of the NIOSH equation were applied to the study. The study population consisted of 69 workers mainly involved in manual materials handling (MMH), categorized as Job A; and 51 machinery workers, served as controls, that were less MMH task involved, as Job B. The prevalence of low back pain (LBP), which was defined at least one episode lasting for more than 24 hours in the past 12 months, were 63.8% and 37.3% for Job A and Job B, respectively. However, the prevalence of LBP lasting for more than a week due to lifting were 26.09% and 5.88% for Job A and B, respectively. The proportion of awkward back postures were found higher in Job A than that of Job B (66% vs 63%, P < 0.05). The NIOSH Lifting Index (LI) was estimated to be 2.4 for Job A, and 0 < LI < 1 for Job B. The analysis of multiple regressions revealed that the repetitiveness of lifting and length of service had greatly attributed to the occurrence of LBP. The "composite load" (object weight x activity repetitiveness) had a significant adverse effect on lower back meaning that the objective weight remains an ingredient part of the risk. The occurrence of LBP is not only related to the force load, but the repetitiveness of lifting and awkward postures. The method of OWAS observation and US-NIOSH equation are important tools in assessing characteristics and risk factors of LBP for MMH tasks. Further study aimed at developing an integral scheme for the assessment system is needed.

  20. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among construction workers in the United States from 1992 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanwen; Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Choi, Sang D; Dement, John

    2017-05-01

    Examine trends and patterns of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among construction workers in the USA, with an emphasis on older workers. WMSDs were identified from the 1992-2014 Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), and employment was estimated from the Current Population Survey (CPS). Risk of WMSDs was measured by number of WMSDs per 10 000 full-time equivalent workers and stratified by major demographic and employment subgroups. Time series analysis was performed to examine the trend of WMSDs in construction. The number of WMSDs significantly dropped in the US construction industry, following the overall injury trends. However, the rate of WMSDs in construction remained higher than in all industries combined; the median days away from work increased from 8 days in 1992 to 13 days in 2014, and the proportion of WMSDs for construction workers aged 55 to 64 years almost doubled. By occupation, construction labourers had the largest number of WMSD cases, while helpers, heating and air-conditioning mechanics, cement masons and sheet metal workers had the highest rates of WMSDs. The major cause of WMSDs in construction was overexertion, and back injuries accounted for more than 40% of WMSDs among construction workers. The estimated wage loss for private wage-and-salary construction workers was $46 million in 2014. Construction workers continue to face a higher risk of WMSDs. Ergonomic solutions that reduce overexertion-the primary exposure for WMSDs-should be adopted extensively at construction sites, particularly for workers with a higher risk of WMSDs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. The French Musculoskeletal Disorders Surveillance Program: Pays de la Loire network.

    PubMed

    Ha, C; Roquelaure, Y; Leclerc, A; Touranchet, A; Goldberg, M; Imbernon, E

    2009-07-01

    An epidemiological surveillance system for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) was implemented in 2002 in France's Pays de la Loire region to assess the incidence and prevalence of MSDs in the general and working populations, identify levels of exposure to occupational risk factors and investigate the proportion of cases attributable to work exposure. The program combines (1) surveillance of sentinel health events in the general population (carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) was the sentinel event for upper limb MSDs), (2) assessment of the prevalence of the main upper limb MSDs and their risk factors in the workplace based on a network of occupational physicians and (3) registration of the notification of work-related diseases (WRDs). 1168 incident cases of CTS were included over a 3 year period. The estimated incidence of CTS was 1.00 per 1000 person-years in those aged 20-59 years (0.60 in men and 1.40 in women). The incidence rate was higher in employed than unemployed persons in the year of diagnosis (0.6 per 1000 vs 0.3 in men and 1.7 vs 0.8 in women). The occupational physician network noted high prevalence rates: 11% of men and 15% of women had at least one of the six main upper limb clinically-diagnosed MSDs. The WRD survey showed that MSDs represented 65% of notified WRDs. The Pays de la Loire program plays a significant role in informing the authorities and the public about the state of current MSDs. It is planned to extend it to a routine national surveillance program.

  2. Risk of musculoskeletal disorder among Taiwanese nurses cohort: a nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) represent the leading causes of occupational injuries among nursing staff. This population-based study was designed to assess the incidence and age-specific incidence of MSDs among a Taiwanese nurse cohort compared with non-nurses. Description Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used to identify MSDs in the study population. A total of 3914 nurses with a diagnosis of MSD were included, together with 11,744 non-nurses as a comparison group. The comparison subjects were randomly selected at a ratio of 3:1 relative to the nurse population and were matched by gender and age. The incidence of MSDs was calculated for the study group, with nurse-to-reference risk ratios presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During the period 2004–2010, 3004 MSDs occurred among the nurses (76.24%) and 7779 (65.79%) in the non-nurses. The annual incidence of MSDs for the nurses increased from 28.35% in 2006 to 33.65% in 2010. The nurse-to-reference risk ratio was 1.27 (95% CI 1.19–1.35) in 2004 and 1.46 (1.37–1.55) in 2010. Herniation of intervertebral disc, lumbago, rotator cuff syndrome, medial epicondylitis, trigger finger and carpal tunnel syndrome were the most common problems. Conclusions Nurses are at higher risk of MSDs and the trend is increasing. Incorrect work-related posture/movement, psychological issues and the rolling shift system may be the major causes of MSDs among nurses in Taiwan. PMID:23617330

  3. High and specialty-related musculoskeletal disorders afflict dental professionals even since early training years.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianru; Hu, Xiangxiang; Yan, Boxi; Zheng, Wei; Li, Yu; Zhao, Zhihe

    2013-01-01

    To determine how early musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) develop in dental professionals and to explore the potential differences among distinct dental specialties. 271 dental postgraduates majoring in five dental specialties were recruited, i.e., orthodontics, prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics and alveolar surgery. 254 age-matched non-dental postgraduates served as the control. The standardized Nordic questionnaire on MSDs and a self-report questionnaire regarding correlative factors (only for dental postgraduates) were answered through emails. Reliability of responses was assessed applying test-retest method. The intraclass correlation coefficient of participants' answers ranged from 0.89 to 0.96. Dental postgraduates had significantly higher prevalence of MSDs than the control group, especially at neck, upper back and lower back. In all dental specialties included, high prevalence of MSDs was reported at neck (47.5%-69.8%), shoulders (50.8%-65.1%), lower back (27.1%-51.2%) and upper back (25.6%-46.5%), with lower prevalence at elbows (5.1%-18.6%), hips (3.4%-16.3%) and ankles (5.1%-11.6%). Periodontics students reported the worst MSDs in most body regions except wrists and knees, which were more prevalent for prosthodontic and alveolar surgery students, respectively. Furthermore, year of clinical work, clinical hours per week and desk hours per week were found as risk factors for MSDs, whereas physical exercise and rest between patients as protective factors. High and specialty-related MSDs afflict dental professionals even since very early stage of careers. Prevention aimed at the specialty-related characteristics and the risk/protective factors revealed in this study should be introduced to dental personnel as early as possible.

  4. [Co-occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders and influence factors among Chinese auto workers].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-bing; Ling, Rui-jie; Wang, Zheng-lun; Qi, Cheng; Wu, Kun; Yao, Dao-hua; Liu, Fu-ying; Zhao, Tong-qiang; Zheng, Yu-yu; Wang, Sheng; Yang, Lei

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the prevalence and risk factors of multiple musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in auto workers and the associations between MSDs at different sites. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3998 workers, who were selected from a Chinese auto corporation by cluster random sampling, using the revised Nordic MSDs standard questionnaire; 3800 completed questionnaires were returned. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for multiple MSDs. The logbinomial model was used to calculate the prevalence ratios (PRs) of MSDs at different sites and evaluate the associations between MSDs at different sites. Of the 3800 subjects, 2452 (64.5%) had MSDs at two or more sites, and 469 (12.3%) had MSDs at one site. The PRs varied from 1.5 to 6.7, with significant differences among different sites (P < 0.01). Relatively close associations were found between the MSDs at neck and shoulders, back and shoulders/waist, elbows and wrists/hands, waist and neck, wrists/hands and waist, hip and waist, knees and waist, and ankles/feet and elbows. The multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that the highest risk factor for MSDs was poor posture, including often working in an uncomfortable posture, neck bending forward, and neck twisting (ORs = 3.39, 1.93, and 1.38), followed by labor organization, in which break between tasks could decrease the risk of MSDs at three or more sites to 31%, staff shortage, which could increase the risk of MSDs by 75%, and pushing and pulling heavy objects (> 20 kg) (OR = 1.76). Most auto workers with MSDs have multiple sites affected, and there are high associations between the MSDs at different sites. The major risk factors for multiple MSDs in auto workers include poor posture, labor organization, and heavy physical labor.

  5. Risk of musculoskeletal disorder among Taiwanese nurses cohort: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yueh-Chin; Hung, Chin-Tun; Li, Shu-Fen; Lee, Horng-Mo; Wang, Shyang-Guang; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Pai, Lee-Wen; Huang, Chien-Ning; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-04-23

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) represent the leading causes of occupational injuries among nursing staff. This population-based study was designed to assess the incidence and age-specific incidence of MSDs among a Taiwanese nurse cohort compared with non-nurses. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used to identify MSDs in the study population. A total of 3914 nurses with a diagnosis of MSD were included, together with 11,744 non-nurses as a comparison group. The comparison subjects were randomly selected at a ratio of 3:1 relative to the nurse population and were matched by gender and age. The incidence of MSDs was calculated for the study group, with nurse-to-reference risk ratios presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During the period 2004-2010, 3004 MSDs occurred among the nurses (76.24%) and 7779 (65.79%) in the non-nurses. The annual incidence of MSDs for the nurses increased from 28.35% in 2006 to 33.65% in 2010. The nurse-to-reference risk ratio was 1.27 (95% CI 1.19-1.35) in 2004 and 1.46 (1.37-1.55) in 2010. Herniation of intervertebral disc, lumbago, rotator cuff syndrome, medial epicondylitis, trigger finger and carpal tunnel syndrome were the most common problems. Nurses are at higher risk of MSDs and the trend is increasing. Incorrect work-related posture/movement, psychological issues and the rolling shift system may be the major causes of MSDs among nurses in Taiwan.

  6. High and specialty-related musculoskeletal disorders afflict dental professionals even since early training years

    PubMed Central

    YI, Jianru; HU, Xiangxiang; YAN, Boxi; ZHENG, Wei; LI, Yu; ZHAO, Zhihe

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how early musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) develop in dental professionals and to explore the potential differences among distinct dental specialties. Material and Methods 271 dental postgraduates majoring in five dental specialties were recruited, i.e., orthodontics, prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics and alveolar surgery. 254 age-matched non-dental postgraduates served as the control. The standardized Nordic questionnaire on MSDs and a self-report questionnaire regarding correlative factors (only for dental postgraduates) were answered through emails. Reliability of responses was assessed applying test-retest method. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient of participants' answers ranged from 0.89 to 0.96. Dental postgraduates had significantly higher prevalence of MSDs than the control group, especially at neck, upper back and lower back. In all dental specialties included, high prevalence of MSDs was reported at neck (47.5%-69.8%), shoulders (50.8%-65.1%), lower back (27.1%-51.2%) and upper back (25.6%-46.5%), with lower prevalence at elbows (5.1%-18.6%), hips (3.4%-16.3%) and ankles (5.1%-11.6%). Periodontics students reported the worst MSDs in most body regions except wrists and knees, which were more prevalent for prosthodontic and alveolar surgery students, respectively. Furthermore, year of clinical work, clinical hours per week and desk hours per week were found as risk factors for MSDs, whereas physical exercise and rest between patients as protective factors. Conclusions High and specialty-related MSDs afflict dental professionals even since very early stage of careers. Prevention aimed at the specialty-related characteristics and the risk/protective factors revealed in this study should be introduced to dental personnel as early as possible. PMID:24037079

  7. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Mathur, Amit; Patil, Gaurav I.; Tippanawar, Harshad K.; Jain, Ankita; Jaggi, Namita; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar; Garg, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598) were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879) was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015) of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:26692749

  8. A detailed analysis of musculoskeletal disorder risk factors among Japanese nurses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Mihashi, Mutsuko; Adachi, Yasuko; Koga, Hatsuyo; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2006-01-01

    Although Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) represent a common occupational problem, few epidemiological studies have investigated MSD risk factors among Asian nurses, particularly those in Japan. We administered a modified Japanese-language version of the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire to 1,162 nurses from a large teaching hospital. MSD categories focused on the neck, shoulder, upper back, and lower back regions. A total of 844 completed questionnaires were analyzed (response rate: 72.6%). The 12-month period-prevalence of MSD at any body site was 85.5%. MSD was most commonly reported at the shoulder (71.9%), followed by the lower back (71.3%), neck (54.7%), and upper back (33.9%). Alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, and having children were shown to be significant risk factors, with adjusted Odds Ratios of 1.87 (95%CI: 1.17-2.96), 2.45 (95%CI: 1.43-4.35), and 2.53 (95%CI: 1.32-4.91), respectively. Workplace risk factors included manually handling patients (OR: 2.07 to 11.97) and undertaking physically laborious work (OR: 2.09 to 2.76). Nurses reporting pre-menstrual tension were 1.66 and 1.94 times more likely to suffer from lower back and upper back MSD, respectively. High mental pressure was also identified as a significant risk factor for MSD of the neck (OR: 1.53) and shoulder (OR: 2.07). The complex nature of MSD risk factors identified during this study suggests that remediation strategies which focus only on manual handling tasks would probably be suboptimal in reducing MSD among nurses. Therefore, to help alleviate their considerable MSD burden, a greater emphasis will need to be placed on job satisfaction, work organization, and occupational stress, as well as the more traditional hazard reduction strategies such as manual handling, work tasks, and other occupational factors.

  9. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in Azar cohort population in Northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, Sousan; Khabbazi, Alireza; Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Ghasembaglou, Amid; Ghasembaglou, Arezoo; Aminisani, Nayyereh; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Heidari, Fariba

    2017-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are considered as major public health problems. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs in Azar cohort population in northwest of Iran. Azar cohort study is a state level of a national cohort project (PERSIAN) which began in 2014. All adults over 35 years old in Khamene city in East Azarbaijan province were recruited for the pilot phase of the Azar cohort. For the purpose of the current study, a total of 952 subjects age range of 35-70 who completed the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Disease (COPCORD) questionnaire as supplementary were included. 299 subjects had MSDs and were introduced to the rheumatologist, only 237 of them referred for further assessment. 33.4% of subjects had MSDs within the past 7 days. The most frequent complaint was pain and the most common sites of complaints were knee, lumbar spine, and shoulder, respectively. Osteoarthritis was the most common rheumatic disease (53.2%) and the knee was the most common region affected (47.7%) followed by low back pain (28.2%). Osteoarthritis and knee osteoarthritis were present in 56.1 and 51.8% of females and 46.6 and 38.4% of males, respectively. Furthermore, low back pain was present in 32.9% of males and 26.2% of females. Peri-arthritis was more prevalent in males (12.3%), whilst fibromyalgia, psychologic pain, and heel spur were prevalent among females (9.1, 5.1, and 1.2%, respectively). Rheumatoid arthritis was observed in 1.4% of males and 1.8% of females, respectively. Prevalence of MSDs is very high in this area. Therefore, it calls for action by heath officials and professionals to plan for appropriate programs of prevention and management of MSDs in society.

  10. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cho, KiHun; Cho, Hwi-Young; Han, Gyeong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psychosocial stress, occupational stress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners. [Subjects and Methods] Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to 401 dental practitioners in Korea. To assess the risk factors related to musculoskeletal disorders, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale, and Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form were used. General and work-related characteristics of the subjects consisted of seven items, including age, career, height, weight, working days/week, working hours/day, and physical strain levels. [Results] In this study, 86.8% of the practitioners experienced musculoskeletal symptoms (shoulders, 72.8%; neck, 69.3%; waist, 68.3%; wrist, 58.4%; back, 44.1%; ankle, 38.7%; knee, 36.9%; hip, 20.4%; and elbows, 9.2%). Moreover, psychosocial and occupational stress can affect the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, we found that psychosocial stress has significant influence on the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] To increase the quality of life and provide high-quality medical service for dental practitioners, risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders must be managed. Accordingly, dental practitioners must maintain good posture, get an appropriate amount of rest, and perform regular stretching exercise to reduce psychological stress and improve the work environment.

  11. Musculoskeletal disorder risk factors among nursing professionals in low resource settings: a cross-sectional study in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) constitute one of the main occupational hazards among health care workers. However, few epidemiological studies on work related MSD among nursing professionals have been carried out in Africa. The purpose of this study was to assess the work related musculoskeletal disorders and associated risk factors among nursing professionals in Uganda. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of MSD among 880 nursing professionals from five selected hospitals in Uganda. Data was collected using a questionnaire adapted from the Dutch Musculoskeletal and Nordic Musculoskeletal questionnaires. Descriptive (mean, standard deviation and percentages) and inferential (Chi square test and logistic regression analysis) statistics were used to analyse data. Alpha level was set at p < 0.05. Results A total of 741 completed questionnaires were analysed (response rate 85.4%). The average age of the respondents was 35.4 (SD 10.7) years and a majority were female (85.7%). The average working hours per week was 43.7 (SD 18.9 hours). The 12-month period-prevalence of MSD at anybody site was 80.8%. The most common site of MSD was the lower back (61.9%). Significant risk factors for reported MSD included often working in a slightly bent posture (adjOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.20-4.26), often working in a slightly twisted posture for long (adjOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.03-3.77), mental exhaustion (adjOR 2.05, 95% CI 1.17-3.5), being absent from the work station for more than 6 months due to illness or an accident (adjO|R, 4.35, 95% CI 1.44-13.08) and feeling rested after a break (adjOR 2.09, 95% CI 1.16-3.76). Conclusions Musculoskeletal disorders affect more than 80% of nursing professionals in Uganda with the most commonly, affected site being the lower back. Significant risk factors for MSD include; being absent from the work station for more than 6 months due to illness or an accident, working in awkward postures, pushing/pulling of heavy loads and mental

  12. Quantitative Sensory Testing in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, several published articles have demonstrated that quantitative sensory testing (QST) is useful in the analysis of musculoskeletal pain disorders. Based on the evidence from these studies, it is assumed that QST might be a useful tool in the analysis of the pathogenesis, classification, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The objective of this paper is to discuss measurement properties of QST and potentials research and clinical applications in musculoskeletal pain. This is a review of the current knowledge base on QST as it relates to musculoskeletal pain disorders. We based our summary on articles retrieved from Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to present) including EMBASE, AMED, and PsycINFO databases to search for all published literature focused on QST and musculoskeletal pain. QST has been shown to be related to neural sensitivity in musculoskeletal pain. QST measurement properties have been evaluated for multiple sensory evaluation modalities and protocols with no clear superior instrument or test protocol. The research evidence is incomplete, but suggests potential clinical benefits for predicting outcomes and subtyping pain. Threshold detection testing is commonly used to quantify sensory loss or gain, in current practice and has shown moderate reliability. Intensity/magnitude rating can be assessed on a wide range of rating scales and may be more useful for pain rating in a clinical context. Threshold detection-based testing and intensity/magnitude rating-based testing can be combined to determine pain threshold in clinical evaluation. Musculoskeletal pain management may benefit from treatment algorithms that consider mechanism, pain quality, or neurophysiological correlates. Non-invasive QST may be helpful to find sensory array of altered nociceptive process. Due to the diverse etiopathogenetic basis of musculoskeletal pain disorders, a broad range of reliable and valid QST tests may be needed to analyze the various

  13. Multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence and later mental health disorders: a population-based registry study of Norwegian youth: the NAAHS cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Christian; Straume, Bjørn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence and mental health disorders in young adulthood. Design and setting Data were obtained from a linkage between the Norwegian Patient Registry (2008–2012) and the Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study, a school-based survey conducted among 10th grade students in North Norway (2003–2005). Participants In total, 3987 (68%) of all 5877 invited participants consented to the registry linkage. Outcome measures Mental healthcare use and disorders from age 18–20 to 23–25 years (5 years). Methods Musculoskeletal pain was measured by the number of musculoskeletal pain sites. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association with later mental healthcare use and disorders. Results Multisite adolescent musculoskeletal pain was significantly associated with an increase in mental healthcare use and mental health disorders in young adulthood. The relationship was stronger for anxiety and mood disorders, in both genders. Overall, the association between musculoskeletal pain and later mental health problems was attenuated after controlling for adolescent psychosocial and mental health problems, not by physical or sedentary activity. This could be due to confounding or mediation. However, when examining different mental health disorders, we found musculoskeletal pain to be significantly associated with anxiety disorders, and showing a strong trend in mood disorders, when adjusted for the adolescent factors. Conclusions Physicians should be aware that multisite adolescent pain is associated with mental health problems in adolescence, and that these adolescents are at increased risk of mental health disorders in young adulthood. As youth troubled by mental health problems commonly present physical symptoms it is important to examine for psychosocial problems in order to offer early interventions. PMID:28188150

  14. Comparative Evaluation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy and Conventional Therapy Use for Musculoskeletal Disorders Management and Its Association with Job Satisfaction among Dentists of West India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; Batra, Renu; Mahajan, Shveta; Bhaskar, Dara John; Jain, Ankita; Shiju, Mohammed; Yadav, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Gill, Shruti; Verma, Renuka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal problems have become a significant issue in the profession of dentistry. There are currently no recommended effective disease-preventing and modifying remedies. High prevalence rates for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists have been reported in the literature. Complementary and alternative medicine can be helpful in managing and preventing the MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine if dentists in the western part of India are using complementary and alternative medicine therapies for MSDs, and also to find if those who use complementary and alternative medicine therapies have greater job/career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. Dentists of western India registered under the Dental Council of India (N = 2166) were recruited for the study. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 73% (n = 1581) was obtained, of which 79% (n = 1249) was suffering from MSDs. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or CT was reported by 90% (n = 1124) of dentists with MSDs. Dentists using complementary and alternative medicine reported greater health (P < 0.001) and carrier satisfaction (P < 0.001) and were able to work as many hours they wanted (P < 0.001) compared to CT users. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve the quality of life and enhance job satisfaction for a dentist who suffers from MSDs.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy and Conventional Therapy Use for Musculoskeletal Disorders Management and Its Association with Job Satisfaction among Dentists of West India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Batra, Renu; Mahajan, Shveta; Bhaskar, Dara John; Jain, Ankita; Shiju, Mohammed; Yadav, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Gill, Shruti; Verma, Renuka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems have become a significant issue in the profession of dentistry. There are currently no recommended effective disease-preventing and modifying remedies. High prevalence rates for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists have been reported in the literature. Complementary and alternative medicine can be helpful in managing and preventing the MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine if dentists in the western part of India are using complementary and alternative medicine therapies for MSDs, and also to find if those who use complementary and alternative medicine therapies have greater job/career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. Dentists of western India registered under the Dental Council of India (N = 2166) were recruited for the study. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 73% (n = 1581) was obtained, of which 79% (n = 1249) was suffering from MSDs. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or CT was reported by 90% (n = 1124) of dentists with MSDs. Dentists using complementary and alternative medicine reported greater health (P < 0.001) and carrier satisfaction (P < 0.001) and were able to work as many hours they wanted (P < 0.001) compared to CT users. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve the quality of life and enhance job satisfaction for a dentist who suffers from MSDs. PMID:25379469

  16. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among icelandic music students: differences between students playing classical vs rhythmic music.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Kári; Arnason, Arni; Briem, Kristín

    2014-06-01

    Most research studies investigating the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders affecting musicians and music students have focused on classical music, while less is known about their prevalence in other music genres. The purpose of this study was to document cumulative and point prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD) among music students in Iceland and, specifically, to identify differences between those studying classical vs rhythmic music. We hypothesized that students of classical music would report more frequent and more severe musculoskeletal disorders than students involved in rhythmic music, as classical instruments and composition typically require more demanding, sustained postures during practice and performance. A total of 74 students from two classical music schools (schools A and B) and 1 rhythmic school (school C) participated in the study by answering a questionnaire assessing PRMDs. The results showed that 62% of participants had, at some point in their musical career, suffered a PRMD. The cumulative prevalence was highest in music school A (71.4%) and lowest in music school C (38.9%). A statistically significant difference was identified between the cumulative prevalence of PRMD from schools A and B combined compared to music school C (p=0.019). Over 40% of participants reported a "current PRMD," and a significant difference was identified between the three schools (p=0.011), with the highest point prevalence being registered in music school A (66.6%) and the lowest in music school C (22.2%). The prevalence of PRMDs among Icelandic music students was high. The difference found between students who play classical vs rhythmic music may be explained by different demands of the instruments and composition on playing posture.

  17. Setting the research agenda for improving health care in musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Maher, Chris; Harris, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    Despite a substantial contribution to the global burden of disease, musculoskeletal conditions are under-represented in clinical research, and that which is performed is often wasteful and lacking clinical relevance. Even clinically relevant musculoskeletal research might not lead to timely or adequate changes in clinical practice and associated improvements in patient outcomes. The formulation of clinical recommendations alone is usually insufficient to bring about changes in practice patterns. Research exploring how to improve the translation of evidence-based recommendations into practice, as well as the identification and removal of barriers to practice change, is necessary in order for the promise of musculoskeletal research to be realized in improved health outcomes. These goals can be achieved by improvements in the coordination of research activities, the resourcing and allocation of funding, and the involvement of clinicians and patients.

  18. Optimization of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Musculoskeletal CT: Emphasis on Iterative Reconstruction Techniques (Part 1).

    PubMed

    Omoumi, Patrick; Becce, Fabio; Ott, Julien G; Racine, Damien; Verdun, Francis R

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a modality of choice for the study of the musculoskeletal system for various indications including the study of bone, calcifications, internal derangements of joints (with CT arthrography), as well as periprosthetic complications. However, CT remains intrinsically limited by the fact that it exposes patients to ionizing radiation. Scanning protocols need to be optimized to achieve diagnostic image quality at the lowest radiation dose possible. In this optimization process, the radiologist needs to be familiar with the parameters used to quantify radiation dose and image quality. CT imaging of the musculoskeletal system has certain specificities including the focus on high-contrast objects (i.e., in CT of bone or CT arthrography). These characteristics need to be taken into account when defining a strategy to optimize dose and when choosing the best combination of scanning parameters. In the first part of this review, we present the parameters used for the evaluation and quantification of radiation dose and image quality. In the second part, we discuss different strategies to optimize radiation dose and image quality at CT, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system and the use of novel iterative reconstruction techniques. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Optimization of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Musculoskeletal CT: Emphasis on Iterative Reconstruction Techniques (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Omoumi, Patrick; Verdun, Francis R; Becce, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a modality of choice for the study of the musculoskeletal system for various indications including the study of bone, calcifications, internal derangements of joints (with CT arthrography), as well as periprosthetic complications. However, CT remains intrinsically limited by the fact that it exposes patients to ionizing radiation. Scanning protocols need to be optimized to achieve diagnostic image quality at the lowest radiation dose possible. In this optimization process, the radiologist needs to be familiar with the parameters used to quantify radiation dose and image quality. CT imaging of the musculoskeletal system has certain specificities including the focus on high-contrast objects (i.e., in CT of bone or CT arthrography). These characteristics need to be taken into account when defining a strategy to optimize dose and when choosing the best combination of scanning parameters. In the first part of this review, we present the parameters used for the evaluation and quantification of radiation dose and image quality. In the second part, we discuss different strategies to optimize radiation dose and image quality of CT, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system and the use of novel iterative reconstruction techniques. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Madadizadeh, Farzan; Vali, Leila; Rafiei, Sima; Akbarnejad, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulder are the most common and most influential factors causing disorder in the performance and absenteeism of work in administrative personnel. Aim To identify risk factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders of neck and shoulder areas in headquarters staff of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Methods The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 282 headquarters personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (Kerman, Iran). The desired headquarters staff were selected from seven Deputy Vice-Chancellors of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, including Deputy of Health; Deputy of Treatment; Deputy of Education; Deputy of Students and Cultural Affairs; Deputy of Food and Drugs; Deputy of Management Development and Resource Planning; Deputy of Research and Technology, and data were gathered by using a standard Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire NMQ (Nordic) and were analyzed by using SPSS version 16. The impact of various factors on the most common complications (neck and shoulder pains) was analyzed separately through logistic regression analysis and detailed Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated for each individual. Results The occurrence of neck and shoulder pains in headquarters staff were 42.14% and 40.71%, respectively. In the prevalence of neck pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.01, OR=0.24), work experience (p=0.03, OR=1.07 ), education (bachelor’s degree and lower than master’s degree and higher p=0.003, OR=2.69), right / left-handedness (left than right p=0.03, OR=0.33), weight (p=0.04, OR=1.04), place of work (p<0.05); as well as in the prevalence of shoulder pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.04, OR=0.48), work experience (p=0.01, OR=1.20), education (bachelor and lower than master and higher p=0.04, OR=1.97), right / left handedness (left than right p=0.01, OR=0.42), age (p=0.02, OR=1.05), and gender (male than

  1. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Farzan; Vali, Leila; Rafiei, Sima; Akbarnejad, Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulder are the most common and most influential factors causing disorder in the performance and absenteeism of work in administrative personnel. To identify risk factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders of neck and shoulder areas in headquarters staff of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 282 headquarters personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (Kerman, Iran). The desired headquarters staff were selected from seven Deputy Vice-Chancellors of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, including Deputy of Health; Deputy of Treatment; Deputy of Education; Deputy of Students and Cultural Affairs; Deputy of Food and Drugs; Deputy of Management Development and Resource Planning; Deputy of Research and Technology, and data were gathered by using a standard Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire NMQ (Nordic) and were analyzed by using SPSS version 16. The impact of various factors on the most common complications (neck and shoulder pains) was analyzed separately through logistic regression analysis and detailed Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated for each individual. The occurrence of neck and shoulder pains in headquarters staff were 42.14% and 40.71%, respectively. In the prevalence of neck pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.01, OR=0.24), work experience (p=0.03, OR=1.07 ), education (bachelor's degree and lower than master's degree and higher p=0.003, OR=2.69), right / left-handedness (left than right p=0.03, OR=0.33), weight (p=0.04, OR=1.04), place of work (p<0.05); as well as in the prevalence of shoulder pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.04, OR=0.48), work experience (p=0.01, OR=1.20), education (bachelor and lower than master and higher p=0.04, OR=1.97), right / left handedness (left than right p=0.01, OR=0.42), age (p=0.02, OR=1.05), and gender (male than female p=0.03, OR=0.65) affected

  2. Suggestions for preventing musculoskeletal disorders in home healthcare workers. Part 1: lift and transfer assistance for partially weight-bearing home care patients.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Kelley S; Galinsky, Traci L; Waters, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Home healthcare is one of the fastest-growing professions, currently employing more than 1 million workers in the United States. Unfortunately, these workers sustain an exceptionally high rate of musculoskeletal disorders. This is the first article in a two-part series providing information and suggestions for preventing overexertion that can lead to such disorders.

  3. Referring to multimodal rehabilitation for patients with musculoskeletal disorders - a register study in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Sennehed, Charlotte Post; Holmberg, Sara; Stigmar, Kjerstin; Forsbrand, Malin; Petersson, Ingemar F; Nyberg, Anja; Grahn, Birgitta

    2017-01-07

    In 2008, the Swedish government introduced a National Rehabilitation Program, in which the government financially reimburses the county councils for evidence-based multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) interventions. The target group is patients of working age with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), expected to return to work or remain at work after rehabilitation. Much attention in the evaluations has been on patient outcomes and on processes. We lack knowledge about how factors related to health care providers and community can have an impact on how patients have access to MMR. The aim of this study was therefore to study the impact of health care provider and community related factors on referrals to MMR in patients with MSD applying for health care in primary health care. This was a primary health care-based cohort study based on prospectively ascertained register data. All primary health care centres (PHCC) contracted in Region Skåne in 2010-2012, referring to MMR were included (n = 153). The health care provider factors studied were: community size, PHCC size, public or private PHCC, whether or not the PHCCs provided their own MMR, burden of illness and the community socioeconomic status among the registered population at the PHCCs. The results are presented with descriptive statistics and for the analysis, non-parametric and multiple linear regression analyses were applied. PHCCs located in larger communities sent more referrals/1000 registered population (p = 0.020). Private PHCCs sent more referrals/1000 registered population compared to public units (p = 0.035). Factors related to more MMR referrals/1000 registered population in the multiple regression analyses were PHCCs located in medium and large communities and with above average socioeconomic status among the registered population at the PHCCs, private PHCC and PHCCs providing their own MMR. The explanation degree for the final model was 24.5%. We found that referral rates to MMR were positively

  4. Safety of Acupuncture and Pharmacopuncture in 80,523 Musculoskeletal Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Me-Riong; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Ahn, Yong-Jun; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Hwa Dong; Lee, Yoonmi; Kim, Sung Geun; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the range and frequency of significant adverse events (AEs) in use of pharmacopuncture and acupuncture using large-scale, single-center safety data as evidence supporting safety of acupuncture with pharmacopuncture, used extensively in Asia, is scarce. Status reports (nurse records in ambulatory and inpatient care units, and administrative event records) as a part of an internal audit at a Korean Medicine hospital specializing in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, patient complaints filed through the hospital website, and medical records of patients visiting from December, 2010 (inception of internal audit) to October, 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. A total 80,523 patients (5966 inpatients and 74,557 outpatients) visited during this period. Inpatients received an average 31.9 ± 20.7 acupuncture, 23.0 ± 15.6 pharmacopuncture, and 15.4 ± 11.3 bee venom pharmacopuncture sessions, and outpatients were administered 8.2 ± 12.2 acupuncture, 7.8 ± 11.5 pharmacopuncture, and 10.0 ± 12.3 bee venom sessions, respectively. AEs associated with acupuncture/pharmacopuncture were forgotten needle (n = 47), hypersensitivity to bee venom (n = 37), presyncopic episode (n = 4), pneumothorax (n = 4), and infection (n = 2). Most cases were mild requiring little or no additional intervention and leaving no sequelae. Although serious AEs including infection (n = 2) and anaphylaxis associated with bee venom treatment (n = 3) were also reported, incidence was rare at 0.002% in infection and 0.019% in anaphylaxis. Incidence of AEs associated with acupuncture/pharmacopuncture treatment was low, and most cases were not serious. Still, however rare, avoidable AEs can and should be prevented through education and corrective action. Further prospective studies on the effect of error reduction strategies on incidence of adverse effects are warranted. PMID:27149503

  5. Prediction of chronic disability in work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a prospective, population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Judith A; Franklin, Gary; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Egan, Kathleen; Wickizer, Thomas M; Lymp, James F; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D

    2004-01-01

    Background Disability associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders is an increasingly serious societal problem. Although most injured workers return quickly to work, a substantial number do not. The costs of chronic disability to the injured worker, his or her family, employers, and society are enormous. A means of accurate early identification of injured workers at risk for chronic disability could enable these individuals to be targeted for early intervention to promote return to work and normal functioning. The purpose of this study is to develop statistical models that accurately predict chronic work disability from data obtained from administrative databases and worker interviews soon after a work injury. Based on these models, we will develop a brief instrument that could be administered in medical or workers' compensation settings to screen injured workers for chronic disability risk. Methods This is a population-based, prospective study. The study population consists of workers who file claims for work-related back injuries or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in Washington State. The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries claims database is reviewed weekly to identify workers with new claims for work-related back injuries and CTS, and these workers are telephoned and invited to participate. Workers who enroll complete a computer-assisted telephone interview at baseline and one year later. The baseline interview assesses sociodemographic, employment-related, biomedical/health care, legal, and psychosocial risk factors. The follow-up interview assesses pain, disability, and work status. The primary outcome is duration of work disability over the year after claim submission, as assessed by administrative data. Secondary outcomes include work disability status at one year, as assessed by both self-report and work disability compensation status (administrative records). A sample size of 1,800 workers with back injuries and 1,200 with CTS will

  6. A health system program to reduce work disability related to musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Abásolo, Lydia; Blanco, Margarita; Bachiller, Javier; Candelas, Gloria; Collado, Paz; Lajas, Cristina; Revenga, Marcelino; Ricci, Patricia; Lázaro, Pablo; Aguilar, Maria Dolores; Vargas, Emilio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Hernández-García, César; Carmona, Loreto; Jover, Juan A

    2005-09-20

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a frequent cause of work disability, accounting for productivity losses in industrialized societies equivalent to 1.3% of the U.S. gross national product. To evaluate whether a population-based clinical program offered to patients with recent-onset work disability caused by MSDs is cost-effective. Randomized, controlled intervention study. The inclusion and follow-up periods each lasted 12 months. Three health districts in Madrid, Spain. All patients with MSD-related temporary work disability in 1998 and 1999. The control group received standard primary care management, with referral to specialized care if needed. The intervention group received a specific program, administered by rheumatologists, in which care was delivered during regular visits and included 3 main elements: education, protocol-based clinical management, and administrative duties. Efficacy variables were 1) days of temporary work disability and 2) number of patients with permanent work disability. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. 1,077 patients were included in the study, 7805 in the control group and 5272 in the intervention group, generating 16,297 episodes of MSD-related temporary work disability. These episodes were shorter in the intervention group than in the control group (mean, 26 days compared with 41 days; P < 0.001), and the groups had similar numbers of episodes per patient. Fewer patients received long-term disability compensation in the intervention group (n = 38 [0.7%]) than in the control group (n = 99 [1.3%]) (P < 0.005). Direct and indirect costs were lower in the intervention group than in the control group. To save 1 day of temporary work disability, 6.00 dollars had to be invested in the program. Each dollar invested generated a benefit of 11.00 dollars. The program's net benefit was in excess of 5 million dollars. The study was unblinded. Implementation of the program, offered to the general population, improves short

  7. Hypermobility in Adolescent Athletes: Pain, Functional Ability, Quality of Life, and Musculoskeletal Injuries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Heidi; Pedersen, Trine Lykke; Junge, Tina; Engelbert, Raoul; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2017-09-15

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Background Generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) may increase pain and likelihood of injuries and also decrease function and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in elite level adolescent athletes. Objectives To assess the prevalence of GJH in elite level adolescent athletes, and to study the association of GJH with pain, function, HRQoL, and musculoskeletal injuries. Methods A total of 132 elite level adolescent athletes (36 males; 96 females), mean (SD) age 14.0 (0.9) years, participated (n=22 ballet dancers, n=57 teamgym gymnasts, n=53 team handball players). GJH was classified using the Beighton scores (BS) (GJH4: BS ≥ 4/9, GJH5: BS ≥ 5/9, GJH6: BS ≥ 6/9). Function of lower extremity, musculoskeletal injuries, and HRQoL were assessed with self-reported questionnaires, and part of physical performance was assessed by 4 postural sway tests and 2 one-legged hop for distance tests. Results Overall prevalence for GJH4, GJH5 and GJH6 was 27.3%, 15.9%, and 6.8%, respectively, with a higher prevalence in ballet dancers and team gymnasts than in team handball players (GJH4: 68.2%, 24.6%, and 13.2 %). There was no significant difference in lower extremity function, injury prevalence and related factors (exacerbation, recurrence, and absence from training) HRQoL, or lengths of hop tests for those with and without GJH. However, the GJH group had significantly larger centre of pressure path length across sway tests. Conclusion For ballet dancers and teamgym gymnasts the prevalence of GJH4 was higher than for team handball players. For ballet dancers, the prevalence of GJH5 and GJH6 was higher than for team handball players and the general adolescent population. The GJH group demonstrated larger sway in the balance tests, which, in the current cross-sectional study did not have an association with injuries or HRQoL. However, the risk of having (ankle) injuries due to larger sway for the GJH group must be studied in future longitudinal

  8. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in stage rally drivers and co-drivers.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, N J; Marshall, J M

    2001-10-01

    During stage rallying, musculoskeletal injuries may be provoked by the high magnitude of vibration and shock to which the driver and co-driver are exposed. Drivers and co-drivers experience similar exposure to whole body mechanical shocks and vibration but different exposure to hand/wrist stressors. To investigate by a questionnaire study the prevalence of symptoms of musculoskeletal injuries after rallying in 13 professional and 105 amateur stage rally competitors. The self administered questionnaire investigated whole body and hand/wrist symptoms of musculoskeletal injury. It was loosely based on the Nordic design. 91% of participants who competed or tested for more than 10 days a year (n=90) reported discomfort in at least one body area after rallying. Problems in the lumbar spine (70%), cervical spine (54%), shoulders (47%), and thoracic spine (36%) were the most common. There was a higher prevalence of cervical spine discomfort for co-drivers (62%) than for drivers (46%). Conversely, there was higher prevalence of discomfort in the hands and wrists for drivers (32%) than co-drivers (9%). The prevalence of low back pain in rally participants is higher than that generally reported for workers exposed to whole body vibration. The prevalence of discomfort in the hand and wrist for rally drivers is similar to that previously reported for Formula 1 drivers. Most stage rally drivers and co-drivers report symptoms of musculoskeletal injury. It is logical to relate the high prevalence of symptoms of injury to the extreme environment of the rally car.

  9. The diagnostic accuracy of telerehabilitation for nonarticular lower-limb musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Russell, Trevor; Truter, Piers; Blumke, Robert; Richardson, Bradley

    2010-06-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are highly prevalent and disabling, particularly in rural and remote areas. In these areas, access to rehabilitation services is limited by the availability of physical therapists. Telerehabilitation may be a feasible solution to the issue of rural physical therapy service access; however, there is little existing evidence for clinical efficacy. The aim of this study was to establish the criterion validity and reliability of remote physical assessment and diagnosis of nonarticular lower limb musculoskeletal conditions via telerehabilitation. Nineteen participants with existing nonarticular lower limb musculoskeletal conditions were assessed by a face-to-face therapist and a remote therapist to establish criterion validity of telerehabilitation. Video recordings from the telerehabilitation session were reviewed after 1 month by the remote therapist to establish intrarater reliability and by a second remote therapist to establish interrater reliability. Patho-anatomical diagnoses, system diagnoses, and the findings of the physical examination were compared statistically. There was 79% or higher primary diagnosis agreement (same or similar diagnoses) and 79% or higher exact system diagnosis agreement for validity, intrarater reliability, and interrater reliability studies. The physical examination findings showed substantial agreement (0.61 < kappa < 0.80) in the validity study and almost perfect agreement (0.81 < kappa < 1.00) in the intrarater and interrater reliability studies. Using telerehabilitation for musculoskeletal physical therapy assessment of nonarticular lower limb conditions was found to be valid and reliable. Existing diagnostic reasoning can be applied; however, new methods of patient self-examination are needed to enable differential diagnosis.

  10. Comparative Study of Upper Limb Load Assessment and Occurrence of Musculoskeletal Disorders at Repetitive Task Workstations

    PubMed Central

    ROMAN-LIU, Danuta; BUGAJSKA, Joanna; TOKARSKI, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between subjectively assessed complaints of pain in the arm, forearm and hand, and musculoskeletal load caused by repetitive tasks. Workers (n=942) were divided into 22 subgroups, according to the type of their workstations. They answered questions on perceived musculoskeletal pain of upper limbs. Basic and aggregate indices from a questionnaire on the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain were compared with an upper limb load indicator (repetitive task index, RTI) calculated with the recently developed Upper Limb Risk Assessment (ULRA). There was relatively strong correlation of RTI and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm, and general intensity and frequency of pain in the arm and forearm or prevalence of pain in the arm. Frequency and intensity of pain in the arm were weakly correlated. An aggregate indicator of evaluation of MSDs, which was calculated on the basis of the prevalence, intensity and frequency of pain, was to a higher degree associated with the musculoskeletal load of a task than basic evaluative parameters. Thus, such an aggregate indicator can be an alternative in comparing subjectively assessed MSDs with task-related musculoskeletal load and in establishing limit levels for that load. PMID:24975106

  11. Ergonomic design and training for preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limb and neck in adults.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Kelsall, Helen L; Sim, Malcolm R

    2012-08-15

    Work-related upper limb and neck musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most common occupational disorders around the world. Although ergonomic design and training are likely to reduce the risk of workers developing work-related upper limb and neck MSDs, the evidence is unclear. To assess the effects of workplace ergonomic design or training interventions, or both, for the prevention of work-related upper limb and neck MSDs in adults. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science (Science Citation Index), SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group Database and Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register to July 2010, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health database, and International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre database to November 2010. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of ergonomic workplace interventions for preventing work-related upper limb and neck MSDs. We included only studies with a baseline prevalence of MSDs of the upper limb or neck, or both, of less than 25%. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We included studies with relevant data that we judged to be sufficiently homogeneous regarding the intervention and outcome in the meta-analysis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence for each comparison using the GRADE approach. We included 13 RCTs (2397 workers). Eleven studies were conducted in an office environment and two in a healthcare setting. We judged one study to have a low risk of bias. The 13 studies evaluated effectiveness of ergonomic equipment, supplementary breaks or reduced work hours, ergonomic training, a combination of ergonomic training and equipment, and patient lifting interventions for preventing work-related MSDs of the upper

  12. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Nurses in Ibadan, South-west Nigeria: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant occupational problem among nurses; however, data on musculoskeletal health of nurses in Sub-Sahara Africa are sparse. This study sought to determine the lifetime, 12-months period and point prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs); the associated job risk factors and the coping strategies toward reducing the risk among nurses from selected hospitals in Ibadan, South-west Nigeria Methods A previously validated self administered questionnaire which sought information on demographics, prevalence and pattern of WMSDs, associated job risk factors and coping strategies was employed as the survey instrument. A total of 160 questionnaires were distributed to nurses in the different hospitals but 128 questionnaires were returned yielding an 80% response rate. 10 of the returned questionnaires were excluded because of incomplete data. Results Eighty-four point four percent of the nurses have had WMSDs once or more in their occupational lives. The 12-months period and point prevalence rate of WMSDs at any body region was 78% and 66.1% respectively. WMSDs occurred mostly in low back (44.1%), neck (28.0%), and knees (22.4%). 30.3% treated themselves or had visited other health practitioners for care. Nurses with > 20 years of clinical experience are about 4 times more likely to develop WMSDs (OR 3.81; CI 1.08-13.4) than those with 11-20 years experience. Working in the same positions for long periods (55.1%), lifting or transferring dependent patients (50.8%) and treating an excessive number of patients in one day (44.9%) were the most perceived job risk factors for WMSDs. Getting help in handling heavy patients (50.4%), modification of nursing procedures in order to avoid re-injury (45.4%), and modifying patient's/nurse position (40.3%) were the top three coping strategies. Conclusions A high proportion of Nigerian nurses reported WMSDs at some body site in their occupational lives with the low

  13. Transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ and mtDNA mutator mice, but not aged mice, share the same spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Hikari; Suzuki, Michiko; Morishima, Hitomi; Ota, Azusa; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Maeno, Akiteru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-24

    The spectra of phenotypes associated with aging and mitochondrial diseases sometimes appear to overlap with each other. We used aged mice and a mouse model of mitochondrial diseases (transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ with deleted mtDNA) to study whether premature aging phenotypes observed in mtDNA mutator mice are associated with aging or mitochondrial diseases. Here, we provide convincing evidence that all the mice examined had musculoskeletal disorders of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy, which correspond to phenotypes prevalently observed in the elderly. However, precise investigation of musculoskeletal disorders revealed that the spectra of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice were very close to those in mito-miceΔ, but different from those of aged mice. Therefore, mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, but not aged mice, share the spectra of musculoskeletal disorders.

  14. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in stage rally drivers and co-drivers

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, N; Marshall, J

    2001-01-01

    Background—During stage rallying, musculoskeletal injuries may be provoked by the high magnitude of vibration and shock to which the driver and co-driver are exposed. Drivers and co-drivers experience similar exposure to whole body mechanical shocks and vibration but different exposure to hand/wrist stressors. Objectives—To investigate by a questionnaire study the prevalence of symptoms of musculoskeletal injuries after rallying in 13 professional and 105 amateur stage rally competitors. Methods—The self administered questionnaire investigated whole body and hand/wrist symptoms of musculoskeletal injury. It was loosely based on the Nordic design. Results—91% of participants who competed or tested for more than 10 days a year (n=90) reported discomfort in at least one body area after rallying. Problems in the lumbar spine (70%), cervical spine (54%), shoulders (47%), and thoracic spine (36%) were the most common. There was a higher prevalence of cervical spine discomfort for co-drivers (62%) than for drivers (46%). Conversely, there was higher prevalence of discomfort in the hands and wrists for drivers (32%) than co-drivers (9%). The prevalence of low back pain in rally participants is higher than that generally reported for workers exposed to whole body vibration. The prevalence of discomfort in the hand and wrist for rally drivers is similar to that previously reported for Formula 1 drivers. Conclusions—Most stage rally drivers and co-drivers report symptoms of musculoskeletal injury. It is logical to relate the high prevalence of symptoms of injury to the extreme environment of the rally car. Key Words: musculoskeletal injury; vibration; rally car; motor sport PMID:11579063

  15. Prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal disorders causing unfitness for military service among young adult men: An epidemiologic study

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Şafak; Kocak, Necmettin; Aydin, Ibrahim; Koca, Kenan; Akyildiz, Ramazan; Ersen, Omer; Kilic, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this cross-sectional epidemiologic study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal disorders causing unfitness to Turkish Military Service. Methods: This study has been carried out by examining the medical reports of 1.777.500 people who applied to the Turkish Armed Forces for military service between 2009-2011. Age and geographic region of individuals were compiled and organized in groups. Musculoskeletal disorders were classified mainly as fracture sequel, spine disorders, absence of phalanges, extremity amputation, aggressive or multiple benign tumors of bones and pes planus. Results: Unfitness to military service caused by musculoskeletal disorders was found to be 6.53‰ in 2009, 7.10‰ in 2010 and 7.28‰ in 2011. The prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases has increased by years. The prevalence of fracture squeal by years was found to be 2.83‰ in 2009, 3.10‰ in 2010 and 3.03‰ in 2011. In this study, the most common musculoskeletal disorders were: limitation of joint mobility (0.89‰), degeneration of joint surface (0.69‰), lower and upper limb discrepancies (0.60‰), posterior fusion surgery (0.59‰) and the absence of the phalanges in hand (0.51‰). We found an increase in both the prevalence of posterior fusion surgery and the absence of the phalanges in study group. Conclusion: These results has given information about severe musculoskeletal disorders among young adult male in Turkey. New studies including young adult female will add important information to our knowledge about musculuskelatal problems in our community. PMID:25878612

  16. Development of a Protocol for Epidemiologal Studies of Whole-Body Vibration and Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Lower Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, M. L.; Pope, M. H.; Hulshof, C. T. J.; Bovenzi, M.

    1998-08-01

    It seems evident from a large number of studies that there is a positive relationship between exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) and the occurrence of low back pain. There are existing standards for evaluating the human exposure to WBV, which are based on other factors than the effect of musculoskeletal disorders. Several national and international standards also exist for evaluating human exposure to WBV. The exposure limit values or health guidance caution zones included in some of these standards are not or only to a limited extent based on systematic epidemiological investigations. It has not yet been possible to establish a clear exposure-response relationship. There are many confounding or contributing factors which influence the hazards to workers caused by exposure to WBV. Reliable methods for the detection and prevention of injury due to vibration exposure at work, alone or in combination with other risk factors, need to be implemented. The aim of this paper was to design a protocol and a questionnaire for conducting collaborative studies of WBV and musculoskeletal back disorders. The protocol will be tested in a pilot study before it will be used in multi-center studies.

  17. Effect of personal risk factors on the prevalence rate of musculoskeletal disorders among workers of an Iranian rubber factory.

    PubMed

    Samaei, S E; Tirgar, A; Khanjani, N; Mostafaee, M; Bagheri Hosseinabadi, M

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) are among the most common occupational disorders in many countries and have an increasing trend. The present study was conducted in order to determine the prevalence rate of MSDs in different body regions and the effect of personal factors on the prevalence rate of MSDs among rubber industry workers. This analytical and cross-sectional study was performed on 206 workers of an Iranian rubber factory in 2014. The samples were randomly selected. Data were gathered by means of personal information form, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and the Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA). The results were analyzed using SPSS16; by descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean age and work history of subjects were 34.54±6.36 and 12.34±6.28 years, respectively. The highest prevalence rate of MSDs in the last twelve-months was related to the lower back region with a prevalence rate of 62.1%. Based on logistic regression, a significant correlation was found between MSDs and the final REBA score so that for a one-unit increase in score, the risk or complaint of neck and low back pain increased by 48.5% and 37.1%, respectively. Many rubber factory workers experience MSDs especially in the lower back region as a consequence of occupational risk factors. Therefore, detecting the occupational risk factors, work position standards and following ergonomic interventions are highly recommended.

  18. Work activity in food service: The significance of customer relations, tipping practices and gender for preventing musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Laperrière, Ève; Messing, Karen; Bourbonnais, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Some evidence shows that food servers are exposed to an elevated risk of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and that their work activity varies by gender. Interviews of servers and observations of food service in Québec, Canada, were carried out in three restaurants and a questionnaire was administered to 64 workers from 44 other restaurants. The relationship with the customer has specific effects on work activity and transforms the physical, emotional and cognitive work. Strategies intended to speed service or otherwise related to the customer relationship can involve health risks. Women reported more direct food service (p < 0.01), a tendency to do more "housekeeping" tasks (p < 0.07) and fewer hours of work per week (p < 0.01). Women workers reported experiencing more sites of pain (p < 0.003). This exploratory study suggests that managing the server-customer relationship could be important in preventing musculoskeletal disorders in this population and that women are at particular risk.

  19. Health and illness representations of workers with a musculoskeletal disorder-related work disability during work rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Marie-France; Baril, Raymond; Durand, Marie-José; Côté, Daniel; Cadieux, Geneviève

    2011-12-01

    Distinctions between disease and illness have been criticized for being too theoretical. In practice, however, it may help explain gaps in understanding and miscommunication between health care professionals and patients/injured workers, since each has their own perception of reality. To reduce the gap between health care professionals and patients in understanding the definition of disease, this paper documents general representations of health, illness and work-related musculoskeletal disorders and their influence on the work rehabilitation program. A qualitative methodology was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants (male, female) recruited when they were starting an intensive interdisciplinary work rehabilitation program for chronic pain due to a musculoskeletal disorder. Interviews were performed at three points during the program and 1 month after discharge. First, participants described health and illness in terms of: (1) illness prototype; (2) the absence or presence of symptoms; (3) physical health and capacities; (4) engaging in a healthy lifestyle; (5) maintaining independence; (6) preserving mental well-being; and (7) healing from accidents or injuries. A second observation was that rehabilitation success depended on workers transitioning from a less mechanistic to a more functional view of health. This study highlights the importance of identifying and acknowledging workers' health, illness and WRMSD representations to facilitate their return to work.

  20. Agreement between a self-administered questionnaire on musculoskeletal disorders of the neck-shoulder region and a physical examination.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nathalie; Brisson, Chantal; Dionne, Clermont E; Montreuil, Sylvie; Punnett, Laura

    2008-03-17

    In epidemiological studies on neck-shoulder disorders, physical examination by health professionals, although more expensive, is usually considered a better method of data collection than self-administered questionnaires on symptoms. However, little is known on the comparison of these two methods of data collection. The agreement between self-administered questionnaires and the physical examination on the presence of neck-shoulders disorders was assessed in the present study. This study was conducted among clerical workers using video display units. Prevalent cases were workers for whom neck-shoulder symptoms were present for at least 3 days during the previous 7 days and for whom pain intensity was greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. All 85 workers meeting this definition and a random sample of 102 workers who did not meet this definition were selected. Physical examination included measures of active range of motion and musculoskeletal strength. Cohen's kappa and global percent agreement were calculated to compare the two methods of data collection. The effect on the agreement of different question and physical examination definitions and the importance of the time interval elapsed between the administrations of the tests were also evaluated. Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.54 depending on the definitions used to ascertain disorders. The agreement was highest when the two instruments were administered 21 days apart or less (Kappa = 0.54, global agreement = 77%). It was not substantially improved by the addition of criteria related to functional limitations or when comparisons were made with alternative physical examination definitions. Pain intensity recorded during physical examination maneuvers was an important element of the agreement between questionnaire and physical examination findings. These results suggest a fair to good agreement between the presence of musculoskeletal disorders ascertained by self-administered questionnaire

  1. Agreement between a self-administered questionnaire on musculoskeletal disorders of the neck-shoulder region and a physical examination

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Nathalie; Brisson, Chantal; Dionne, Clermont E; Montreuil, Sylvie; Punnett, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background In epidemiological studies on neck-shoulder disorders, physical examination by health professionals, although more expensive, is usually considered a better method of data collection than self-administered questionnaires on symptoms. However, little is known on the comparison of these two methods of data collection. The agreement between self-administered questionnaires and the physical examination on the presence of neck-shoulders disorders was assessed in the present study. Methods This study was conducted among clerical workers using video display units. Prevalent cases were workers for whom neck-shoulder symptoms were present for at least 3 days during the previous 7 days and for whom pain intensity was greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. All 85 workers meeting this definition and a random sample of 102 workers who did not meet this definition were selected. Physical examination included measures of active range of motion and musculoskeletal strength. Cohen's kappa and global percent agreement were calculated to compare the two methods of data collection. The effect on the agreement of different question and physical examination definitions and the importance of the time interval elapsed between the administrations of the tests were also evaluated. Results Kappa coefficients ranged from 0.19 to 0.54 depending on the definitions used to ascertain disorders. The agreement was highest when the two instruments were administered 21 days apart or less (Kappa = 0.54, global agreement = 77%). It was not substantially improved by the addition of criteria related to functional limitations or when comparisons were made with alternative physical examination definitions. Pain intensity recorded during physical examination maneuvers was an important element of the agreement between questionnaire and physical examination findings. Conclusion These results suggest a fair to good agreement between the presence of musculoskeletal disorders

  2. Risk factors associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Sinem; Demirsoy, Nesrin; Günendi, Zafer

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal system-related complaints; identify regions at risk in dentists by observing and inquiring the dentists at work; and find out the associations with age, sex, working years, academic position and departments, positions during work and daily working hours. Modified Nordic Questionnaire (m-nMQ) was used to evaluate pain, hospital admissions and absenteeism. Quick Exposure Check (QEC) form was utilized to assess risk exposure levels related with low-back, neck, hand-wrist and shoulder-arm. 163 dentists were included the most painful regions were found to be back (66.9%), neck (65%) and low back (64.4%). Musculoskeletal symptoms were more prevalent in women and research assistants. QEC scores were found to be lower in those who performed regular exercises. Dentists should be educated about ergonomics at the beginning of their professional life.

  3. Investigation of musculoskeletal symptoms in a manufacturing company in Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hembecker, Paula K; C Reis, Diogo; Konrath, Andréa C; A Gontijo, Leila; D Merino, Eugenio A

    Musculoskeletal disorders are prevalent and represent the most common health problem among the working population in industrially-developing countries, with considerable costs and impact on quality of life. Despite the high incidence of disability insurance claims among Brazilian manufacturing-sector workers, only a few studies assessed musculoskeletal disorders prevalence. To provide information on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among manufacturing-sector workers and to explore the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and sociodemographic and occupational characteristics in a medium metallurgical company located in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Data was collected through the use of a specifically-designed questionnaire and the items used to collect musculoskeletal disorders data were based on the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used and multivariate logistic regression analysis (p<0.02) was performed to explore the associations between musculoskeletal disorders and potential risk factors. The upper limb was the most frequently affected body region among manufacturing-sector workers: shoulder (24.8%), elbow and/or forearm (15.5%), wrist and/or hand (19.0%). Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that company experience (p=0.02), presence of sleep disorders (p=0.00), self-reported general health state (p=0.00) and perform work pause (p=0.00) were significant risk factors for development of musculoskeletal disorders. Sociodemographic and work-related aspects are influential risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders. These results add comprehension about musculoskeletal disorders prevalence and suggest a need for greater emphasis on prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Work related musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic stressors in the South African workforce.

    PubMed Central

    Schierhout, G H; Meyers, J E; Bridger, R S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The main objective of this study was to investigate exposure-response relations between adverse musculoskeletal outcomes and ergonomic exposure variables. METHODS--A cross sectional analytical study was conducted in 11 factories from seven sectors of manufacturing industry in South Africa. Exposure to workplace ergonomic stressors was assessed in factory floor jobs (n = 46) with a simple low technology observational model. Repetition, force, static posture, dynamic movement, and other job exposures were measured. Data of adverse musculoskeletal outcome and data on potential confounders and effect modifiers were obtained from subjects (n = 401) randomly sampled from each job category with a questionnaire given by interviewers. RESULTS--High prevalences of regional musculoskeletal pain were found with substantial variability between industries. Sex was the only individual risk factor (after adjustment for potential confounders and effect modifiers) that was significantly associated with regional pain. Ergonomic exposures in the workplace were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain of the neck and shoulders odds ratio (OR) 5.38 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.16 to 25.0) for repetition, and OR 3.91 (95% CI 1.11 to 13.7) for seated compared with standing work; pain of the wrists and hands OR 10.2 (95% CI 1.39 to 75.6) for high summed score of dynamic postures of the wrist). CONCLUSIONS--This study indicates good predictive ability to reduce ergonomic stress with the exposure model, simple surveillance methods, and educational programmes in the workplace. Further study on sampling strategies and refinement of dimensions of ergonomic stressors are needed. PMID:7697140

  5. Physical functioning, pain and quality of life after amputation for musculoskeletal tumours: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Furtado, S; Grimer, R J; Cool, P; Murray, S A; Briggs, T; Fulton, J; Grant, K; Gerrand, C H

    2015-09-01

    Patients who have limb amputation for musculoskeletal tumours are a rare group of cancer survivors. This was a prospective cross-sectional survey of patients from five specialist centres for sarcoma surgery in England. Physical function, pain and quality of life (QOL) outcomes were collected after lower extremity amputation for bone or soft-tissue tumours to evaluate the survivorship experience and inform service provision. Of 250 patients, 105 (42%) responded between September 2012 and June 2013. From these, completed questionnaires were received from 100 patients with a mean age of 53.6 years (19 to 91). In total 60 (62%) were male and 37 (38%) were female (three not specified). The diagnosis was primary bone sarcoma in 63 and soft-tissue tumour in 37. A total of 20 tumours were located in the hip or pelvis, 31 above the knee, 32 between the knee and ankle and 17 in the ankle or foot. In total 22 had hemipelvectomy, nine hip disarticulation, 35 transfemoral amputation, one knee disarticulation, 30 transtibial amputation, two toe amputations and one rotationplasty. The Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) differed by amputation level, with poorer scores at higher levels (p < 0.001). Many reported significant pain. In addition, TESS was negatively associated with increasing age, and pain interference scores. QOL for Cancer Survivors was significantly correlated with TESS (p < 0.001). This relationship appeared driven by pain interference scores. This unprecedented national survey confirms amputation level is linked to physical function, but not QOL or pain measures. Pain and physical function significantly impact on QOL. These results are helpful in managing the expectations of patients about treatment and addressing their complex needs.

  6. Musculo-skeletal Disorders among Video Display Terminal Users: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Software Company, Kolkata

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Aparajita; Ghosal, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: IT has revolutionized economies throughout the world, more so in India. West Bengal has also got its share of IT boom. But with this, it has brought in the class of human resource of Video Display Terminal workers operators that and along with that can cause a host of occupational problems in them namely musculoskeletal, ocular and psychological systems. The current study had assessed some of the musculoskeletal disorders occurring due to VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL use. Materials and Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was done in a Software Company of Sector V, Kolkata, the IT hub of West Bengal. Of all the employees, required sample size of 206 was selected by Simple Random Sampling. After proper permissions and consent, socio-demographic variables were collected by standardized instruments, musculoskeletal morbidity was collected by Nordic questionnaire, and ergonomic practices were obtained by checklists. Results: 90.78% of population showed some form of musculo skeletal symptoms. They were highest in fingers, elbows, wrist, shoulder, upper, while legs and lower back showed low morbidities. Increasing age, female sex, increasing years of work, repetition of work, poorer ergonomic scores all showed to have increased the symptoms. The regionwise ergonomic scores revealed how the poorer scores affected the musculo skeletal systems adversely. Several individual adverse ergonomic practices were also elicited. Discussion: The study goes hand to hand with many other studies throughout the world and also in India. However, a much higher morbidity has been found in this study probably due to a symptom based questionnaire. The adverse practices obtained here goes well with other relevant studies. Conclusion: This study puts occupational health problems of VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL users, and upholds the need of future multicentric cohort studies along with implementation of proper measures to ameliorate the effects of this occupational hazard. PMID

  7. Musculo-skeletal Disorders among Video Display Terminal Users: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Software Company, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rivu; Dasgupta, Aparajita; Ghosal, Gautam

    2014-12-01

    IT has revolutionized economies throughout the world, more so in India. West Bengal has also got its share of IT boom. But with this, it has brought in the class of human resource of Video Display Terminal workers operators that and along with that can cause a host of occupational problems in them namely musculoskeletal, ocular and psychological systems. The current study had assessed some of the musculoskeletal disorders occurring due to VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL use. An analytical cross-sectional study was done in a Software Company of Sector V, Kolkata, the IT hub of West Bengal. Of all the employees, required sample size of 206 was selected by Simple Random Sampling. After proper permissions and consent, socio-demographic variables were collected by standardized instruments, musculoskeletal morbidity was collected by Nordic questionnaire, and ergonomic practices were obtained by checklists. 90.78% of population showed some form of musculo skeletal symptoms. They were highest in fingers, elbows, wrist, shoulder, upper, while legs and lower back showed low morbidities. Increasing age, female sex, increasing years of work, repetition of work, poorer ergonomic scores all showed to have increased the symptoms. The regionwise ergonomic scores revealed how the poorer scores affected the musculo skeletal systems adversely. Several individual adverse ergonomic practices were also elicited. The study goes hand to hand with many other studies throughout the world and also in India. However, a much higher morbidity has been found in this study probably due to a symptom based questionnaire. The adverse practices obtained here goes well with other relevant studies. This study puts occupational health problems of VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL users, and upholds the need of future multicentric cohort studies along with implementation of proper measures to ameliorate the effects of this occupational hazard.

  8. Role of Occupational Stress and Burnout in Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Embassy Personnel of Foreign Countries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghilinejad, Mashaallah; Sadeghi, Zargham; Abdullah, Amer; Sarebanha, Shima; Bahrami-Ahmadi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupation is one of the major parts of our daily lives that might cause a great amount of stress. Stress and job burnout are linked together. The association between musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and burnout syndrome as a psychosocial factor was investigated previously. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the role of occupational stress and burnout in musculoskeletal complaint among diplomatic employees of different embassies in Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed 200 employees of the foreign countries embassies in Iran. The participants were selected randomly from all the embassy personnel. Study questionnaires were delivered to the participants and finally 161 questionnaires were returned to the researchers (response rate: 80.5%). An assessment of burnout and MSD were made using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Nordic questionnaires. The work place stress was measured by the work place stress questionnaire. Results: Mean occupational stress was significantly higher among embassy personnel with MSD than among the personnel without this syndrome during the preceding week (17.18 ± 3.42 and 16.06 ± 2.19, respectively; P = 0.02) and the preceding year (17.17 ± 3.11 and 16.74 ± 3.03, respectively; P < 0.01) to the study. Only smoking and occupational stress were identified as independent predictors of MSD among embassy personnel. Conclusions: It seems that association between musculoskeletal complaints and burnout syndrome was more complex than being attributed to only occupation stress. Further studies are recommended to determine other related factors to this association. PMID:25031868

  9. The Prevalence of and Risk Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Sonographers in Central China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qingmin; Liu, Shenglin; Yang, Lei; Xie, Mingxing; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Studies from industrialized countries show that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) occur commonly in sonographers. However, little is known about sonographers in China, where the awareness of ergonomics and MSD, workload, and available equipment/facilities may differ. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of MSD and associated risk factors in sonographers in central China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 381 sonographers from 14 randomly selected tertiary hospitals in Hubei province, central China. Musculoskeletal symptoms (using the Nordic Questionnaire) and risk factors (mostly derived from the Health Benefit Trust survey instrument and the Dutch Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was used to quantify associations between risk factors and MSD. The 12-month period prevalence of MSD was 98.3%, being highest in the neck (93.5%) and shoulder (92.2%), followed by the lower back (83.2%), wrist/hand, upper back, and elbow. Factors contributing to neck pain were psychological fatigue, shoulder abduction and trunk bend-and-twist posture. Height-adjustable tables and chairs were protective factors. Shoulder pain was associated with female sex, health status, mental stress, shoulder abduction, and trunk bend-and-twist posture. Height-adjustable chairs and the awareness of adjusting the workstation before scanning were protective factors. Elbow pain was associated with health status and height-adjustable tables. Wrist/hand pain was associated with female sex, bending the wrist, and working with obese patients. Upper back pain was associated with shoulder abduction, height-adjustable chairs, and device location. Lower back pain was associated with the number of scans performed per day, awkward postures, bending the trunk, twisting or bending the neck forward, and using a footrest. This study suggests a high prevalence of MSD in sonographers in central China. Hence, it is necessary to improve the awareness of MSD by

  10. The relationship between the development of musculoskeletal disorders, body mass index, and academic stress in Bahraini University students.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Sayed A; Abdul Rahman, Asma; Abdul Ameer, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    There are many mechanisms in which stress can lead to weight gain thus high a BMI. The endocrine and inflammatory pathway can directly increase abdominal adiposity. Another way in which stress leads to weight gain is through changes in health behaviors. The study aimed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among healthy students of Ahlia University, and to determine the relationship between the development of MSDs and academic stressors and body mass index. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 94 students aged 18-26 years who were enrolled at various Ahlia University colleges and met other inclusion criteria. The students responded to the standardized Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and the modified College Student Stress Inventory regarding musculoskeletal symptoms and academic stressors. Height and weight measurements were also obtained to determine body mass index. A total of 77.66% reported MSDs in one or more body part, with the prevalence being higher among women than among men. The 7-day prevalence of MSDs severe enough to interfere with activities of daily living was 60.64%, and 44.68% by female and male students, respectively. There was a significant relationship between academic stress and MSDs in the neck, shoulders, lower back, and hips, while the relationship between MSDs, and body mass index, academic stress, and grade point average was not significant. The prevalence of MSDs among Ahlia University students was found to be high. Apart from the positive correlation between academic stress and MSDs in certain body parts, other correlations were not significant.

  11. The relationship between the development of musculoskeletal disorders, body mass index, and academic stress in Bahraini University students

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahman, Asma; Abdul Ameer, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background There are many mechanisms in which stress can lead to weight gain thus high a BMI. The endocrine and inflammatory pathway can directly increase abdominal adiposity. Another way in which stress leads to weight gain is through changes in health behaviors. The study aimed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among healthy students of Ahlia University, and to determine the relationship between the development of MSDs and academic stressors and body mass index. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 94 students aged 18-26 years who were enrolled at various Ahlia University colleges and met other inclusion criteria. The students responded to the standardized Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and the modified College Student Stress Inventory regarding musculoskeletal symptoms and academic stressors. Height and weight measurements were also obtained to determine body mass index. Results A total of 77.66% reported MSDs in one or more body part, with the prevalence being higher among women than among men. The 7-day prevalence of MSDs severe enough to interfere with activities of daily living was 60.64%, and 44.68% by female and male students, respectively. There was a significant relationship between academic stress and MSDs in the neck, shoulders, lower back, and hips, while the relationship between MSDs, and body mass index, academic stress, and grade point average was not significant. Conclusions The prevalence of MSDs among Ahlia University students was found to be high. Apart from the positive correlation between academic stress and MSDs in certain body parts, other correlations were not significant. PMID:28416996

  12. Spectrum of musculo-skeletal disorders in sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease in Nigeria. Past studies from West Africa focused on isolated aspects of its medical and surgical presentations. To the best of our knowledge, the musculo-skeletal presentations amongst Nigerians with SCA have not been documented in a single all encompassing study. This work aims to prospectively document the musculo-skeletal disease burden among SCA patients. Methods In a prospective study of 318 consecutive patients with genotype-confirmed SCA at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), the musculo-skeletal pathologies, anatomic sites, grade of disease, age at presentation and management outcome were recorded over a one-year period. Data obtained were analyzed using Epi-Info software version 6.0. Data are presented as frequencies (%) and mean values (SD) as appropriate. Results The HbSS genotype occurred in 296 (93.0%), while 22 (7.0%) were HbSC. 100 (31.4%) patients with average presenting haemoglobin concentration of 8.2 g/100 ml in the study group, presented with 131 musculo-skeletal pathologies in 118 anatomic sites. Osteomyelitis 31 (31%) and septic arthritis 19 (19%) were most commonly observed in children less than 10 years. Skin ulcers and avascular necrosis (AVN) occurred predominantly in the older age groups, with frequencies of 13 (13.0%) and 26 (26.0%) respectively. 20 (71.5%) of diagnosed cases of AVN presented with radiological grade 4 disease. The lower limbs were involved in 84 (71.1%) of sites affected. Lesions involving the spine were rare 11 (0.9%). Multiple presentations occurred in 89 (28.0%) of patients; 62 (69.7%) of which were children below 10 years. Conclusions Musculo-skeletal complications are common features of sickle cell anaemia seen in 31.4%. Infectious aetiologies predominate with long bones and joints of lower limbs more commonly affected by osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Healthcare providers managing SCA should be aware of the potential morbidity and

  13. Spectrum of musculo-skeletal disorders in sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Rufai A; Obalum, Dike C; Giwa, Suleiman O; Adekoya-Cole, Thomas O; Ogo, Chidiebere N; Enweluzo, George O

    2010-01-18

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease in Nigeria. Past studies from West Africa focused on isolated aspects of its medical and surgical presentations. To the best of our knowledge, the musculo-skeletal presentations amongst Nigerians with SCA have not been documented in a single all encompassing study. This work aims to prospectively document the musculo-skeletal disease burden among SCA patients. In a prospective study of 318 consecutive patients with genotype-confirmed SCA at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), the musculo-skeletal pathologies, anatomic sites, grade of disease, age at presentation and management outcome were recorded over a one-year period. Data obtained were analyzed using Epi-Info software version 6.0. Data are presented as frequencies (%) and mean values (SD) as appropriate. The HbSS genotype occurred in 296 (93.0%), while 22 (7.0%) were HbSC. 100 (31.4%) patients with average presenting haemoglobin concentration of 8.2 g/100 ml in the study group, presented with 131 musculo-skeletal pathologies in 118 anatomic sites. Osteomyelitis 31 (31%) and septic arthritis 19 (19%) were most commonly observed in children less than 10 years. Skin ulcers and avascular necrosis (AVN) occurred predominantly in the older age groups, with frequencies of 13 (13.0%) and 26 (26.0%) respectively. 20 (71.5%) of diagnosed cases of AVN presented with radiological grade 4 disease. The lower limbs were involved in 84 (71.1%) of sites affected. Lesions involving the spine were rare 11 (0.9%). Multiple presentations occurred in 89 (28.0%) of patients; 62 (69.7%) of which were children below 10 years. Musculo-skeletal complications are common features of sickle cell anaemia seen in 31.4%. Infectious aetiologies predominate with long bones and joints of lower limbs more commonly affected by osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Healthcare providers managing SCA should be aware of the potential morbidity and mortality of these conditions to ensure

  14. Prevalence of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in artisan fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers in Saubara, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Ila Rocha; Couto, Maria Carolina Barreto Moreira; Lima, Verônica Maria Cadena; Pena, Paulo Gilvane Lopes; Andrade, Lílian Lessa; Müller, Juliana dos Santos; Alves, Ivone Batista; Viana, Wendel da Silva; Rêgo, Rita de Cássia Franco

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted in an artisanal fishing community. The main health complaints included musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) attributable to working conditions. The present work found a prevalence of neck and distal upper limb MSD among the artisan fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers in Saubara, Bahia, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort epidemiological study involving 209 artisanal fisherwomen/shellfish gatherers. The Brazilian version of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and a survey listing physical demands adapted to shellfish gathering were used for the study. The MSD values obtained in some part of the body, neck or shoulder, and distal upper limb were 94.7%, 71.3% and 70.3%, respectively. The shellfish gatherers were found to work long shifts despite the high prevalence of MSD. The factors that cause these women to keep performing such activities include the need to make a living and provide food for their families through the sale and consumption of seafood.

  15. A review of mind/body therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders with implications for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Luskin, F M; Newell, K A; Griffith, M; Holmes, M; Telles, S; DiNucci, E; Marvasti, F F; Hill, M; Pelletier, K R; Haskell, W L

    2000-03-01

    A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly. Mind/body practices evaluated were: social support, cognitive-behavioral therapy, meditation, the placebo effect, imagery, visualization, spiritual/energy healing, music therapy, hypnosis, yoga, tai chi, and qigong. Studies published after 1990 were the priority, but when more recent literature was scarce, other controlled studies were included. Mind/body techniques were found to be efficacious primarily as complementary treatments for musculoskeletal disease and related disorders. Studies provided evidence for treatment efficacy but most apparent was the need for further controlled research. Reviewers found a dearth of randomized controlled research conducted in the US. There is a lack of studies with which to determine appropriate dosage and understand the mechanisms by which many of the practices work. Anecdotal evidence, some controlled research, clinical observation, as well as the cost effectiveness and lack of side effects of the mind/body treatments make further investigation a high priority.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders and perception of working conditions: A survey of Brazilian dentists in São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Ísper Garbin, Artênio José; Barreto Soares, Gabriella; Moreira Arcieri, Renato; Adas Saliba Garbin, Cléa; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-05-08

    To investigate the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders amongst dentists who work in public clinics in São Paulo, Brazil, to investigate their awareness of the presence of risk factors in the workplace, disability due to pain, and the influence of pain on this awareness and disability. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 204 dentists who work in public health clinics in the northwest of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected through interviews, using the Nordic Questionnaire and the Work-Related Activities that May Contribute to Job-Related Pain Questionnaire. In the case of workers who reported pain, the Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ) and the Numeric Pain Scale were also administered. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0. Most dentists (81.4%) had musculoskeletal disorders, especially in the neck, shoulders and lower back. We found that the presence of symptoms in the neck (15.7%), shoulders (12.7%) and lower back (15.7%) were the major causes of absenteeism over the past 12 months. Occupational risk factors perceived as the most problematic ones were: bending or twisting the back in an awkward way, continuing to work when injured or hurt and working in the same position for long periods. Comparison between the symptomatic and asymptomatic dentists showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the perception of occupational risk factors. The analysis of the intensity of pain and disability with PDQ in the symptomatic dentists showed an average pain intensity of 3.8. Mean scores of the PDQ total (11.46) and its dimensions - functional condition (7.1) and psychosocial condition (4.4) - suggest a moderate disability in the dental surgeons. There was a strong t correlation (r = 0.697) between pain intensity and the total score of disability caused by pain. Pain and work-related musculoskeletal disorders interfere significantly with the dentists' lives. In the case of dental surgeons there is a significant

  17. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Monagas State, Venezuela: a COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Granados, Ysabel; Cedeño, Ligia; Rosillo, Celenia; Berbin, Sol; Azocar, Miriam; Molina, María Elena; Lara, Onelia; Sanchez, Gloris; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Venezuela. We conducted a cross-sectional, community-based study using the COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology in subjects older than 18 years. Positive cases were evaluated by rheumatologists. We surveyed 3,973 individuals (1,606 males and 2,367 females), with a mean age of 43.7 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.6). Mean duration of education was 8.9 years (SD 3.7), 79.2 % had a monthly income of < US$569, and 46.4 % were working. Excluding trauma, the prevalence of pain in the 7 days prior to interview was 19.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 18.7-21.2 %). Mean pain intensity on a visual analog scale was 6.3 (SD 2.2), and 30.1 % (95 % CI 28.7-31.6 %) had a history of pain. Respondents reported pain in the knees, back, hands, shoulders, and ankles in the last 7 days; 4.7 % described current functional limitation, with 16.5 % reporting limitations in the past. Regarding treatment, 23.9 % received medication, 6.4 % received physical therapy, and 2.6 % received alternative treatment. The main diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 15.0 % (95 % CI 13.9-16.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 6.3 % (95 % CI 5.5-7.1 %), back pain in 2.8 % (95 % CI 2.3-3.4 %), rheumatoid arthritis in 0.4 % (95 % CI 0.2-0.6 %), crystal arthropathy in 0.3 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.5 %), fibromyalgia in 0.2 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.4 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus in 0.07 % (95 % CI 0.01-0.2 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 22.4 %, and the most prevalent disease was osteoarthritis. Pain, in which a patient is receiving treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, and physical disability were associated with the presence of a rheumatic disease.

  18. [Trends in research and prevention policies for work-related musculoskeletal disorders at the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA)].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Minori

    2002-03-01

    The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) has been working on matters related to occupational health problems in 15 European Union (EU) member states. EU-OSHA established 10 topic centers on work and health research in 1998. One of the topic centers is assigned for research and information on work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The present report is written because such activities of EU-OSHA are scarcely known in Japan. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders have become a very serious problem in EU member states, i.e., 30% of workers complain of backache, and 17% complain of muscular pains in their arms and legs. The affected workers not only suffer at work but also in their home life. The economic costs of all work-related ill health range from 2.6 to 3.8% of the gross national product, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders constitute 40-50% of this. Therefore EU member states consider that prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in itself is an extremely good economic policy. EU-OSHA published "Work-related neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders" in 1999, and "Research on work-related low back disorders" in 2000. These publications suggest various preventive methods which can be introduced in practice at work. One of the most remarkable things in EU-OSHA's activities for work-related musculoskeletal disorders is that EU-OSHA has been trying hard to introduce the results of its research into real policies for EU member states by several means, i.e., held a seminar participated in by policy makers, representatives of trade unions, and researchers from EU member states, and sent seminar resolutions to politicians who are responsible for employment and social affairs. Finally the resolution has been adopted in a new social affairs policy by the EU parliament and will be put into force during 2002. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders will remain one of the most serious occupational problems in EU member states, and EU

  19. A randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of two workstation interventions on upper body pain and incident musculoskeletal disorders among computer operators

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, D M; Krause, N; Goldberg, R; Benner, D; Hudes, M; Goldner, G U

    2006-01-01

    Background Call centre work with computers is associated with increased rates of upper body pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Methods This one year, randomised controlled intervention trial evaluated the effects of a wide forearm support surface and a trackball on upper body pain severity and incident musculoskeletal disorders among 182 call centre operators at a large healthcare company. Participants were randomised to receive (1) ergonomics training only, (2) training plus a trackball, (3) training plus a forearm support, or (4) training plus a trackball and forearm support. Outcome measures were weekly pain severity scores and diagnosis of incident musculoskeletal disorder in the upper extremities or the neck/shoulder region based on physical examination performed by a physician blinded to intervention. Analyses using Cox proportional hazard models and linear regression models adjusted for demographic factors, baseline pain levels, and psychosocial job factors. Results Post‐intervention, 63 participants were diagnosed with one or more incident musculoskeletal disorders. Hazard rate ratios showed a protective effect of the armboard for neck/shoulder disorders (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.97) after adjusting for baseline pain levels and demographic and psychosocial factors. The armboard also significantly reduced neck/shoulder pain (p = 0.01) and right upper extremity pain (p = 0.002) in comparison to the control group. A return‐on‐investment model predicted a full return of armboard and installation costs within 10.6 months. Conclusion Providing a large forearm support combined with ergonomic training is an effective intervention to prevent upper body musculoskeletal disorders and reduce upper body pain associated with computer work among call centre employees. PMID:16621849

  20. ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT imaging of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Withofs, Nadia; Charlier, Edith; Simoni, Paolo; Alvarez-Miezentseva, Victoria; Mievis, Frédéric; Giacomelli, Fabrice; Mella, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Malaise, Olivier; de Seny, Dominique; Malaise, Michel; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-12-01

    This work reports on musculoskeletal uptake of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂, targeting the integrin αvβ3, in patients who had undergone ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) for oncologic purposes. Whole-body ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ PET/CT images of 62 cancer patients were retrospectively reviewed to detect foci of musculoskeletal ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake. For 37 patients, a FDG PET/CT performed in clinical settings was available. In each joint with an abnormal uptake, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was estimated. A total of 260 musculoskeletal foci of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake were detected. Most common sites of uptake were joints and discs (n = 160; 61.5%), entheses (osteotendinous and osteoligamentous junctions; n = 55; 21.2%) and recent fractures (n = 18; 6.9%). In addition, 27 (10.4%) miscellaneous foci were detected. Out of the 146 lesions for which a FDG PET was available, 63% showed both ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG uptake, 33.6% did not show FDG avidity and 3.4% showed only FDG uptake. The uptake intensity of the 92 lesions positive with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ and FDG was similar with both radiopharmaceuticals, but the target-to-background (blood pool or muscle) ratios were significantly higher with ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ than with FDG (p < 0.0001). The ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ uptake in joints, spine degenerative diseases and tendons was highly prevalent in our population. Up to one-third of ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ foci showed no FDG uptake suggesting that ¹⁸F-FPRGD₂ signal may not be related to inflammatory angiogenesis only.

  1. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in professional symphony orchestra musicians in Greece: a pilot study concerning age, gender, and instrument-specific results.

    PubMed

    Fotiadis, Dimosthenis G; Fotiadou, Eleni G; Kokaridas, Dimitrios G; Mylonas, Argyrios C

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the frequency of musculoskeletal disorders among musicians in a professional-level symphony orchestra in Greece. The sample consisted of 147 musicians (97 men, 50 women) of the Athens and Thessaloniki State Symphony Orchestra. The mean age of the musicians was 38.97 years (range 24 to 67, SD 9.68), while the years of experience in the orchestra ranged from 1 to 35 (mean 14.2, SD 8.47). The data were collected with the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire, which records the frequency of musculoskeletal disorders. Our results showed a very high percentage (81.6%) of the musicians had suffered at least once, during their professional career, some kind of musculoskeletal disorder that was associated with pain or discomfort and was directly related to their profession. More than two-thirds of the musicians had also suffered a problem in the hand and neck areas during the last 12 months. Musculoskeletal disorders appeared to be related to gender, age, kind of instrument played, and duration of rehearsing/performing, along with previous experience. In summary, there is a high frequency of injury among professional-level musicians in Greece reported in our study, highlighting the obvious need to develop prevention programs.

  2. Pain and Prejudice: Does Collecting Information From the Standpoint of Exposed Workers Improve Scientific Examination of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders?

    PubMed

    Messing, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The meaning, feasibility, and importance of scientific objectivity have been debated among public health scientists. The debate is particularly relevant to occupational health, because of frequent opposition between employer and worker interests. This article suggests that the concept of standpoint (J. Eakin) may be more useful than that of objectivity in framing discussion of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Studies done from a "worker" standpoint can, for example, investigate and characterize environmental risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders, while studies from an "employer" standpoint may concentra