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Sample records for musculoskeletal system-a prospective

  1. A Prospective Study of Factors Affecting Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    for musculoskeletal disorders . J Occup Rehabil. 2005;15:377–92. 18. Crook J, Milner R, Schultz IZ, Stringer B. Determinants of occupational disability...Spine. 1996;21:2900–7. 61. Hansson T, Jensen I. Sickness absence due to back and neck disorders . Scan J Public Health. 2004;32:109–51. 62. Lincoln AE...Naval Health Research Center A Prospective Study of Factors Affecting Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injuries Stephanie Booth-Kewley Emily

  2. Organisational downsizing and musculoskeletal problems in employees: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kivimaki, M; Vahtera, J; Ferrie, J; Hemingway, H; Pentti, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study the association between organisational downsizing and subsequent musculoskeletal problems in employees and to determine the association with changes in psychosocial and behavioural risk factors.
METHODS—Participants were 764 municipal employees working in Raisio, Finland before and after an organisational downsizing carried out between 1991 and 1993. The outcome measures were self reports of severity and sites of musculoskeletal pain at the end of 1993 and medically certified musculoskeletal sickness absence for 1993-5. The contribution of changes in psychosocial work characteristics and health related behaviour between the 1990 and 1993 surveys was assessed by adjustment.
RESULTS—After adjustment for age, sex, and income, the odds ratio (OR) for severe musculoskeletal pain between major and minor downsizing and the corresponding rate ratios for musculoskeletal sickness absence were 2.59 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5 to 4.5) and 5.50 (3.6 to 7.6), respectively. Differences between the mean number of sites of pain after major and minor downsizing was 0.99 (0.4 to 1.6). The largest contribution from changes in work characteristics and health related behaviour to the association between downsizing and musculoskeletal problems was from increases in physical demands, particularly in women and low income employees. Additional contributory factors were reduction of skill discretion (relative to musculoskeletal pain) and job insecurity. The results were little different when analyses were confined to initially healthy participants.
CONCLUSIONS—Downsizing is a risk factor for musculoskeletal problems among those who remain in employment. Much of this risk is attributable to increased physical demands, but adverse changes in other psychosocial factors may also play a part.


Keywords: ocupational health; musculoskeletal disorders; downsizing PMID:11706148

  3. Genetics of the Musculoskeletal System: A Pleiotropic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P

    2012-01-01

    The risk of osteoporotic fracture can be viewed as a function of loading conditions and the ability of the bone to withstand the load. Skeletal loads are dominated by muscle action. Recently, it has become clear that bone and muscle share genetic determinants. Involution of the musculoskeletal system manifests as bone loss (osteoporosis) and muscle wasting (sarcopenia). Therefore, the consideration of pleiotropy is an important aspect in the study of the genetics of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. This Perspective will provide the evidence for a shared genetic influence on bone and muscle. We will start with an overview of accumulating evidence that physical exercise produces effects on the adult skeleton, seeking to unravel some of the contradictory findings published thus far. We will provide indications that there are pleiotropic relationships between bone structure/mass and muscle mass/function. Finally, we will offer some insights and practical recommendations as to the value of studying shared genetic factors and will explore possible directions for future research. We consider several related questions that together comprise the general paradigm of bone responses to mechanical loading and the relationship between muscle strength and bone parameters, including the genetic factors that modulate these responses. We believe that further progress in understanding the common genetic etiology of osteoporosis and sarcopenia will provide valuable insight into important biological underpinnings for both conditions and may translate into new approaches to reduce the burdens of both conditions through improved diagnosis, prevention, and early targeted treatment. PMID:18269309

  4. What Risk Factors Are Associated With Musculoskeletal Injury in US Army Rangers? A Prospective Prognostic Study.

    PubMed

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Shaffer, Scott W; Butler, Robert J; Goffar, Stephen L; Kiesel, Kyle B; Rhon, Daniel I; Williamson, Jared N; Plisky, Phillip J

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal injury is the most common reason that soldiers are medically not ready to deploy. Understanding intrinsic risk factors that may place an elite soldier at risk of musculoskeletal injury may be beneficial in preventing musculoskeletal injury and maintaining operational military readiness. Findings from this population may also be useful as hypothesis-generating work for particular civilian settings such as law enforcement officers (SWAT teams), firefighters (smoke jumpers), or others in physically demanding professions. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether using baseline measures of self-report and physical performance can identify musculoskeletal injury risk; and (2) to determine whether a combination of predictors would enhance the accuracy for determining future musculoskeletal injury risk in US Army Rangers. Our study was a planned secondary analysis from a prospective cohort examining how baseline factors predict musculoskeletal injury. Baseline predictors associated with musculoskeletal injury were collected using surveys and physical performance measures. Survey data included demographic variables, injury history, and biopsychosocial questions. Physical performance measures included ankle dorsiflexion, Functional Movement Screen, lower and upper quarter Y-balance test, hop testing, pain provocation, and the Army Physical Fitness Test (consisting of a 2-mile run and 2 minutes of sit-ups and push-ups). A total of 320 Rangers were invited to enroll and 211 participated (66%). Occurrence of musculoskeletal injury was tracked for 1 year using monthly injury surveillance surveys, medical record reviews, and a query of the Department of Defense healthcare utilization database. Injury surveillance data were available on 100% of the subjects. Receiver operator characteristic curves and accuracy statistics were calculated to identify predictors of interest. A logistic regression equation was then calculated to find the most pertinent

  5. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A prospective cohort study of

  6. Musculoskeletal pain and reported workplace assault: a prospective study of clinical staff in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Helena; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca J

    2014-02-01

    This study examined prospectively the effect of workplace violence on musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing home workers. Previously we reported a cross-sectional relationship between physical assaults at work and musculoskeletal pain. This follow-up provides stronger evidence of the effect of workplace violence on musculoskeletal outcomes within the same workforce over two years. Nursing home workers who responded to three consecutive annual surveys formed the study cohort (n = 344). The outcomes were any musculoskeletal pain, widespread pain, pain intensity, pain interference with work and sleep, and co-occurring pain with depression. The main predictor was self-reported physical assault at work during the 3 months preceding each survey. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were assessed with log-binomial regression, adjusting for other workplace and individual factors. Every fourth nursing home worker, and 34% of nursing aides, reported persistent workplace assault over the 2 years. Among respondents assaulted frequently, two thirds experienced moderate to extreme musculoskeletal pain, and more than 50% had pain interfering with work and/or sleep. Baseline exposure to assault predicted pain outcomes 1 year later. Repeated exposure was associated with a linear increase over 2 years in the risks of pain intensity, interference with work, and interference with sleep; co-occurring pain and depression had an adjusted PR of 3.6 (95% CI = 1.7-7.9). Workplace assault, especially when repeated over time, increases the risk of pain that may jeopardize workers' ability to remain employed. More effective assault prevention would protect and support the workforce needed to care for our increasing elderly and disabled population.

  7. Musculoskeletal ultrasound for preoperative imaging of the plantar plate: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Erin E; Weil, Lowell; Weil, Lowell Scott; Knight, Jessica

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare preoperative findings on musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation to observed intraoperative findings for patients undergoing surgical correction of plantar plate tears. Fifty consecutive patients with forefoot pain and a suspected unilateral plantar plate tear at the second metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint were identified. The same examiner performed a 2-plane (longitudinal and transverse) musculoskeletal ultrasound on the painful second MTP joint. The contralateral second MTP joint was used for comparison. Longitudinal ultrasound images were graded as "torn" or "intact." Transverse ultrasound images were used to localize the suspected pathology. Results of the ultrasound were compared with observed intraoperative pathology. Forty-five plantar plate tears were identified intraoperatively. Longitudinal ultrasound images correctly identified 40 plantar plate tears. The longitudinal ultrasound had a sensitivity of 91.1%, a specificity of 25%, a positive predictive value of 91.1%, and a negative predictive value of 25%. Transverse ultrasound images identified 36 plantar plate tears correctly localizing only 19 tears. Musculoskeletal ultrasound has been widely used to identify and localize pathology in many soft tissue structures. Whereas the longitudinal ultrasound images were useful in identifying plantar plate tears, the same cannot be said about the ability to localize the tear on the transverse ultrasound images. Therefore, ultrasound may not be as good an imaging modality as magnetic resonance imaging for identification and localization of plantar plate pathology.

  8. Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Lennert; Vercruysse, Sien; Cardon, Greet; Haerens, Leen; Witvrouw, Erik; De Clercq, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Physical education (PE) teachers have a physically demanding job, putting them at a considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries. To structurally develop tailored injury prevention programmes for PE teachers, a clear understanding of the extent, characteristics and underlying factors of their musculoskeletal injuries compared to referents is necessary. Therefore, the current study prospectively followed 103 PE teachers and 58 non-PE teachers, who registered musculoskeletal injuries and time of exposure to sports participation during one school year. Pearson χ(2)-tests and independent samples t-tests determined significant differences between PE and non-PE teachers regarding demographics and variables possibly related to injury occurrence. PE teachers had 1.23 and non-PE teachers 0.78 injuries/teacher/school year. This difference was significantly different after adjustment for hours spent weekly on intracurricular teaching during the career and for injury history during the preceding six months (P = 0.009; OR = 0.511; 95% CI = 0.308-0.846). PE teachers' most affected body parts were the knee and the back. PE teachers had a more extensive injury history (P < 0.001), a higher work- (P < 0.001) and sport index (P < 0.001), practiced more sports (P < 0.002) and taught more extracurricular sports (P = 0.001). Future injury prevention programmes should take account for the great injury history and heavy physical load in PE teachers.

  9. Psychological factors at work and musculoskeletal disorders: a one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Zołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; Jędryka-Góral, Anna; Gasik, Robert; Hildt-Ciupińska, Katarzyna; Malińska, Marzena; Bedyńska, Sylwia

    2013-12-01

    The etiology of musculoskeletal disorders is complex, with physical and psychosocial working conditions playing an important role. This study aimed to determine the relationship between psychosocial work conditions, such as psychological job demands, decision latitude, social support and job insecurity and musculoskeletal complains (MSCs) and (repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) in a 1-year prospective study. The job content questionnaire, the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire and provocation tests were used to study 725 employees aged 20-70 years. Pain in the lower back (58 % of subjects), neck (57 %), wrists/hands (47 %) and upper back (44 %) was most frequent. The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (33.6 %), rotator cuff tendinitis (15.4 %), Guyon's canal syndrome (13.4 %), lateral epicondylitis (7.6 %), medial epicondylitis (5.3 %), tendinitis of forearm-wrist extensors (7.8 %) and tendinitis of forearm-wrist flexors (7.3 %) were the most frequent RSIs. Logistic analysis showed that increased psychological job demands statistically significantly increased the probability of lateral and medial epicondylitis, and increased control (decision latitude) statistically significantly decreased the risk of CTS. There was no relationship between job insecurity, social support and the studied RSIs. Psychosocial factors at work predict prevalence of MSCs and RSIs, irrespectively of demographic factors, e.g., age or gender, and organizational and physical factors.

  10. Musculoskeletal trauma and all-cause mortality in India: a multicentre prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Foote, Clary Jefferson; Mundi, Raman; Sancheti, Parag; Gopalan, Hitesh; Kotwal, Prakash; Shetty, Vijay; Dhillon, Mandeep; Devereaux, Philip; Thabane, Lehana; Aleem, Ilyas; Ivers, Rebecca Q; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-04-27

    There is little data in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) quantifying the burden of fractures and describing current practices. The aim of the study was describe the severity of musculoskeletal injuries in LMICS and identify modifiable factors that predict subsequent early all-cause mortality. We did a multicentre, prospective, observational study of patients who presented to 14 hospitals across India for musculoskeletal trauma (fractures or dislocations). Patients were recruited during an 8-week period, between November, 2011, and June, 2012, and were followed for 30-days or hospital discharge, whichever occurred first. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality with secondary outcomes of reoperation and infection. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with all-cause mortality. We enrolled 4822 patients, but restricted analyses to 4612 (96%) patients who had complete follow-up. The majority (56·2% younger than 40 years old) of trauma patients were young (mean age 40·9 years [SD 16·9]) and 3148 (68%) were men. 2344 (518%) patients sustained trauma as a result of a road traffic accident. The most common musculoskeletal injury was a fracture (4514 [98%]) and 707 patients (15%) incurred an open fracture. Less than a third of musculoskeletal trauma patients (1374 [29%]) were transported to hospital by ambulance, and one in six patients (18%) arrived at the hospital later than 24 h after sustaining their injury. Over a third (239 [35%] of 707) of open fractures were definitively stabilised later than 24 h. 30-day mortality was 1·7% (95% CI 1·4-2·2) for all patients and 2·1% (95% CI 1·5-2·7) among road traffic victims (p=0·005). Musculoskeletal trauma severity including the number of fractures (3·1 [95% CI 2·4-3·9]) and presence of an open fracture (2·1 [95% CI 1·2-3·4]) significantly increased the odds of all-cause mortality. Musculoskeletal trauma severity, particularly road related, is a key predictor of

  11. Job strain and risk of musculoskeletal symptoms among a prospective cohort of occupational computer users.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Lindsay M; Monteilh, Carolyn P; Gerr, Fred; Kleinbaum, David G; Marcus, Michele

    2005-10-01

    Most previous studies of the association between psychosocial stress and musculoskeletal illness among computer users have been cross-sectional and have yielded inconsistent results. The association between a measure of psychosocial stress, "job strain", and incident neck-shoulder and arm-hand musculoskeletal symptoms was investigated among recently hired computer users. The participants worked for one of several large employers and were followed prospectively for 6 months. The "job demands" and "decision latitude" subscales of the Job Content Questionnaire were used to estimate the job-strain quadrants and a ratio measure of job strain which was subsequently categorized. Incident musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained with weekly diaries. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate associations between job strain and incident musculoskeletal symptoms. Those in the high-strain quadrant were at increased risk of neck-shoulder symptoms [hazard ratio (HR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.91-2.99] when compared with those in the low-strain quadrant. Those in the highest strain-ratio category were also at increased risk of neck-shoulder symptoms when compared with those in the lowest strain-ratio category (HR 1.52, 95% CI 0.88-2.62). Modification by previous years of computer use was observed, with an elevated risk observed for those in the highest job-strain ratio category who also had low previous computer use (HR 3.16, 95% CI 1.25-8.00). There did not appear to be an association between either measure of job strain and incident arm-hand symptoms. In this cohort, workers who reported high job strain were more likely to develop neck-shoulder symptoms.

  12. Effect of job rotation on need for recovery, musculoskeletal complaints, and sick leave due to musculoskeletal complaints: a prospective study among refuse collectors.

    PubMed

    Kuijer, P Paul F M; van der Beek, Allard J; van Dieën, Jaap H; Visser, Bart; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2005-05-01

    Job rotation might be an effective preventive measure to reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, although its effect has not been yet established. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of job rotation in refuse collecting on need for recovery, prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, and sick leave due to musculoskeletal complaints. A 1-year prospective study among refuse collectors was performed, using standardized questionnaires. Job rotation was performed between collecting two-wheeled containers and driving a refuse truck. The experimental groups of rotating refuse collectors at t(0) and t(1) (group R-R) and non-rotating refuse collectors at t(0) and rotating refuse collectors at t(1) (group NR-R) were compared with a reference group of non-rotating refuse collectors at t(0) and t(1) (group NR-NR). The adjusted need for recovery of group R-R was marginally significantly lower than need for recovery of the reference group. Groups R-R and NR-R had a more than two times higher risk for complaints of the low back than the reference group. No other significant results were found. Job rotation seemed to coincide with a reduced need for recovery and was associated with an increased risk of low back complaints. No effects were found on sick leave due to musculoskeletal complaints. The results might be influenced by the healthy worker selection effect in the reference group and its inverse in the rotating groups. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Prospective research on musculoskeletal disorders in office workers (PROMO): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    IJmker, Stefan; Blatter, Birgitte M; van der Beek, Allard J; van Mechelen, Willem; Bongers, Paulien M

    2006-01-01

    Background This article describes the background and study design of the PROMO study (Prospective Research on Musculoskeletal disorders in Office workers). Few longitudinal studies have been performed to investigate the risk factors responsible for the incidence of hand, arm, shoulder and neck symptoms among office workers, given the observation that a large group of office workers might be at risk worldwide. Therefore, the PROMO study was designed. The main aim is to quantify the contribution of exposure to occupational computer use to the incidence of hand, arm, shoulder and neck symptoms. The results of this study might lead to more effective and/or cost-efficient preventive interventions among office workers. Methods/Design A prospective cohort study is conducted, with a follow-up of 24 months. In total, 1821 participants filled out the first questionnaire (response rate of 74%). Data on exposure and outcome is collected using web-based self-reports. Outcome assessment takes place every three months during the follow-up period. Data on computer use are collected at baseline and continuously during follow-up using a software program. Discussion The advantages of the PROMO study include the long follow-up period, the repeated measurement of both exposure and outcome, and the objective measurement of the duration of computer use. In the PROMO study, hypotheses stemming from lab-based and field-based research will be investigated. PMID:16822300

  14. Pain and discomfort in the musculoskeletal system among dentists. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rundcrantz, B L; Johnsson, B; Moritz, U

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to follow the pain and discomfort among dentists in the Public Dental Service in Malmöhus District and the Municipality of Malmö. In this investigation 311 dentists, who had answered questionnaires in 1987 and in 1990, took part. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and discomfort had increased, except the lower back pain and headache. However, the only significant difference was found with respect to the shoulders. As in 1987, female dentists had also in 1990 a higher prevalence of pain and discomfort in the neck and shoulders than their male colleagues. Of the 311 dentists, 262 had symptoms both in 1987 and in 1990. In 1987 forty-nine dentists were free of symptoms, while 24 of them reported symptoms in the locomotor system in 1990. Of the 262 dentists with symptoms in 1987 twenty-four were without symptoms at the follow-up in 1990. The aim of the investigation was also to study the influence of some ergonomic factors on the course of symptoms. However, these ergonomic variables showed a low predictive value for recovery or for the development of pain and discomfort in the locomotor system.

  15. A prospective series of musculoskeletal system rehabilitation of arthropathic joints in young male hemophilic patients.

    PubMed

    Gurcay, Eda; Eksioglu, Emel; Ezer, Ustun; Cakir, Banu; Cakci, Aytul

    2008-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate prospective results of physical therapy interventions and rehabilitation of arthropathic joints in young male hemophilic patients. Given that the effectiveness of the therapy would be higher if therapy is provided at early ages, a series of males aged 18 years or younger were included in the study. The study is a descriptive case series of 31 hemophilic children who consecutively referred to the physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic from the pediatric hematology clinic of the same hospital over a period of 12 months. After getting their oral informed consent, all the patients underwent an intensive, 4-week clinical rehabilitation program, concomitant with factor replacement treatment. A total of 65 arthropathic joints were evaluated in the study and physical therapy interventions were applied 5 days a week for 1 h daily. The range of motion (ROM), pain, clinical evaluation and disability scores were compared and contrasted before and after the 4-week physiotherapy program. The ROM of all involved joints improved (at knee, ankle and elbow) and the scores of pain, clinical evaluation and disability revealed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.001). A multidisciplinary approach is important in the management of hemophilic arthropathy and appropriate physiotherapy combined with adequate replacement factor therapy promotes maintenance of the musculoskeletal function in male hemophilic patients.

  16. Exploring the associations between sleep problems and chronic musculoskeletal pain in adolescents: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lee; Wilson, Sue; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in adolescents is estimated to be approximately 4% to 40%. The development of musculoskeletal pain during teenage years could have a marked impact on physical, psychological and social well-being. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether sleep problems during adolescence are associated with musculoskeletal pain, particularly chronic regional pain and chronic widespread pain. METHODS: Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Children, the relationship between sleep problems at 15 years of age and the presence of chronic regional and widespread pain at 17 years of age was explored. Pain data were not available at 15 years of age. A total of 2493 participants with complete data were identified. Relationships among sleep problems and musculoskeletal pain were examined using logistic regression. ORs were calculated after adjusting for sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic position and depression (15 years of age). RESULTS: Sleep disturbance (usually wakes up more than two or three times), difficulties with hypersomnolence and poor subjective sleep perception were associated with the presence of both musculoskeletal regional and widespread pain. Finally, using ordered logistic regression, poor subjective sleep perception was also found to be associated with greater pain severity in participants with chronic musculoskeletal regional and widespread pain. DISCUSSION: The results of the present study suggest an association between sleep problems during adolescence and the presence of musculoskeletal pain at a later stage. These findings are consistent with adult literature suggesting a link between sleep problems and musculoskeletal pain. Given these associations, sleep problems in adolescence may be an important risk factor for musculoskeletal pain. PMID:25299477

  17. Medicare's prospective payment system: A critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Coulam, Robert F.; Gaumer, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Implementation of the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for hospital payment has produced major changes in the hospital industry and in the way hospital services are used by physicians and their patients. The substantial published literature that examines these changes is reviewed in this article. This literature suggests that most of the intended effects of PPS on costs and intensity of care have been realized. But the literature fails to answer fundamental questions about the effectiveness and equity of administered pricing as a policy tool for cost containment. The literature offers some hope that the worst fears about the effects of PPS on quality of care and the health of the hospital industry have not materialized. But because of data lags, the studies done to date seem to tell us more about the effects of the early, more generous period of PPS than about the opportunity costs of reducing hospital cost inflation. PMID:25372306

  18. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995-97 and in 2006-08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents.

  19. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995–97 and in 2006–08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents. PMID:27082110

  20. Prediction of chronic disability in work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a prospective, population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Judith A; Franklin, Gary; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Egan, Kathleen; Wickizer, Thomas M; Lymp, James F; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D

    2004-01-01

    Background Disability associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders is an increasingly serious societal problem. Although most injured workers return quickly to work, a substantial number do not. The costs of chronic disability to the injured worker, his or her family, employers, and society are enormous. A means of accurate early identification of injured workers at risk for chronic disability could enable these individuals to be targeted for early intervention to promote return to work and normal functioning. The purpose of this study is to develop statistical models that accurately predict chronic work disability from data obtained from administrative databases and worker interviews soon after a work injury. Based on these models, we will develop a brief instrument that could be administered in medical or workers' compensation settings to screen injured workers for chronic disability risk. Methods This is a population-based, prospective study. The study population consists of workers who file claims for work-related back injuries or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in Washington State. The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries claims database is reviewed weekly to identify workers with new claims for work-related back injuries and CTS, and these workers are telephoned and invited to participate. Workers who enroll complete a computer-assisted telephone interview at baseline and one year later. The baseline interview assesses sociodemographic, employment-related, biomedical/health care, legal, and psychosocial risk factors. The follow-up interview assesses pain, disability, and work status. The primary outcome is duration of work disability over the year after claim submission, as assessed by administrative data. Secondary outcomes include work disability status at one year, as assessed by both self-report and work disability compensation status (administrative records). A sample size of 1,800 workers with back injuries and 1,200 with CTS will

  1. Neoplasm seeding in biopsy tract of the musculoskeletal system. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcelo Parente; Lima, Pablo Moura de Andrade; da Silva, Hilton Justino; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira

    2014-01-01

    To identify, through a systematic literature review, the characteristics of neoplasm seeding in biopsy performed on the musculoskeletal system. We performed a search on PubMed, MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO from August to October 2010. We included articles that addressed the neoplasm seeding in biopsy performed on the musculoskeletal system. The search was limited to English, Spanish and Portuguese as publication languages, but it was not limited by year of publication. We retrieved 2858 articles, but only seven were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Other four papers were found in the references of selected articles, totalizing 11 articles that were used to perform this systematic review. Issues may be raised in the literature: age and gender don't seem to influence the occurrence of neoplasm seeding; without resection of the biopsy tract, the possibility of local recurrence is very real; the influence of the type of tumor in the occurrence of neoplasm seeding is uncertain; it is impossible to conclude whether the closed biopsy technique has a lower chance of neoplasm seeding; it is likely that adjuvant chemotherapy has a protective effect against neoplasm seeding; an unfavorable prognosis is expected according to neoplasm seeding results. PMID:24899866

  2. Predictive risk factors for chronic regional and multisite musculoskeletal pain: a 5-year prospective study in a working population.

    PubMed

    Herin, Fabrice; Vézina, Michel; Thaon, Isabelle; Soulat, Jean-Marc; Paris, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The role of psychosocial and physical factors in the development of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) has now been clearly demonstrated. However, it is unclear whether these factors contribute to specific regional MSP or to multisite pain. The main goal of this study was to assess the impact of work-related factors according to gender on the development of regional and multisite MSP. A total of 12,591 subjects (65% men and 35% women) who were born in 1938, 1943, 1948, and 1953 and were participating in a French longitudinal prospective epidemiological survey (ESTEV) in 1990 to 1995 were eligible. Personal factors and work exposure were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Statistical associations between chronic MSP (regional body site or multisite), personal factors, and occupational factors were analyzed using logistic regression modeling. The incidence of regional MSP and multisite pain in 1995 were, respectively, 17% and 25.6%. For women, highly repetitive movements predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and vibrations predicted arm and low back pain; and effort with tools predicted arm pain. For men, forceful effort and vibrations predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and forceful effort predicted lower limb and low back pain; and forceful effort and effort with tools predicted arm pain. Physical constraints (ie, forceful effort or vibrations) were associated with multisite pain in both genders. Only for women, psychological factors were risk factors predictive of upper limb pain and in 3 or 4 painful anatomical sites. These results support the hypothesis that some physical and psychological work-related factors are predictive of regional or multisite MSP but differ according to gender. Gender differences and risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal pain should be also taken into account to more effectively target preventive measures.

  3. Musculoskeletal health and work ability in physically demanding occupations: study protocol for a prospective field study on construction and health care workers.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Koch, Markus; Knardahl, Stein; Wærsted, Morten; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Forsman, Mikael; Holtermann, Andreas; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2014-10-16

    Musculoskeletal disorders have a profound impact on individual health, sickness absence and early retirement, particularly in physically demanding occupations. Demographics are changing in the developed countries, towards increasing proportions of senior workers. These senior workers may have particular difficulties coping with physically demanding occupations while maintaining good health. Previous studies investigating the relationship between physical work demands and musculoskeletal disorders are mainly based on self-reported exposures and lack a prospective design. The aim of this paper is to describe the background and methods and discuss challenges for a field study examining physical demands in construction and health care work and their prospective associations with musculoskeletal disorders, work ability and sickness absence. This protocol describes a prospective cohort study on 1200 construction and health care workers. Participants will answer a baseline questionnaire concerning musculoskeletal complaints, general health, psychosocial and organizational factors at work, work demands, work ability and physical activity during leisure. A shorter questionnaire will be answered every 6th months for a total of two years, together with continuous sickness absence monitoring during this period. Analysis will prospectively consider associations between self-reported physical demands and musculoskeletal disorders, work ability and sickness absence. To obtain objective data on physical exposures, technical measurements will be collected from two subgroups of N = 300 (Group A) and N = 160 (Group B) during work and leisure. Both group A and B will be given a physical health examination, be tested for physical capacity and physical activity will be measured for four days. Additionally, muscle activity, ground reaction force, body positions and physical activity will be examined during one workday for Group B. Analysis of associations between objectively measured

  4. A Prospective Evaluation of Shared Decision-making Regarding Analgesics Selection for Older Emergency Department Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Holland, Wesley C; Hunold, Katherine M; Mangipudi, Sowmya A; Rittenberg, Alison M; Yosipovitch, Natalie; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2016-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visit by older adults. Outpatient pain management following ED visits in this population is challenging as a result of contraindications to, and side effects from, available therapies. Shared decision-making (SDM) between patients and emergency physicians may improve patient experiences and health outcomes. Among older ED patients with acute musculoskeletal pain, we sought to characterize their desire for involvement in the selection of outpatient analgesics. We also sought to assess the impact of SDM on change in pain at 1 week, patient satisfaction, and side effects. This was a prospective study of adults aged 60 years and older presenting to the ED with acute musculoskeletal pain. Participants' desire to contribute to outpatient analgesic selection was assessed by phone within 24 hours of ED discharge using the Control Preferences Scale and categorized as active, collaborative, or passive. The extent to which SDM occurred in the ED was also assessed within 24 hours of discharge using the 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, and scores were subsequently grouped into tertiles of low, middle, and high SDM. The primary outcome was change in pain severity between the ED visit and 1 week. Secondary outcomes included satisfaction regarding the decision about how to treat pain at home, satisfaction with the pain medication itself, and side effects. Desire of participants (N = 94) to contribute to the decision regarding selection of outpatient analgesics varied: 16% active (i.e., make the final decision themselves), 37% collaborative (i.e., share decision with provider), and 47% passive (i.e., let the doctor make the final decision). The percentage of patients who desired an active role in the decision was higher for patients who were college educated versus those who were not college educated (28% vs. 11%; difference 17%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0% to 35%), received care from a nurse

  5. A Prospective Evaluation of Shared Decision-making Regarding Analgesics Selection for Older Emergency Department Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Wesley C.; Hunold, Katherine M.; Mangipudi, Sowmya A.; Rittenberg, Alison M.; Yosipovitch, Natalie; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for emergency department (ED) visit by older adults. Outpatient pain management following ED visits in this population is challenging as a result of contraindications to, and side effects from, available therapies. Shared decision-making (SDM) between patients and emergency physicians may improve patient experiences and health outcomes. Among older ED patients with acute musculoskeletal pain, we sought to characterize their desire for involvement in the selection of outpatient analgesics. We also sought to assess the impact of SDM on change in pain at 1 week, patient satisfaction, and side effects. Methods This was a prospective study of adults aged 60 years and older presenting to the ED with acute musculoskeletal pain. Participants’ desire to contribute to outpatient analgesic selection was assessed by phone within 24 hours of ED discharge using the Control Preferences Scale and categorized as active, collaborative, or passive. The extent to which SDM occurred in the ED was also assessed within 24 hours of discharge using the 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, and scores were subsequently grouped into tertiles of low, middle, and high SDM. The primary outcome was change in pain severity between the ED visit and 1 week. Secondary outcomes included satisfaction regarding the decision about how to treat pain at home, satisfaction with the pain medication itself, and side effects. Results Desire of participants (N = 94) to contribute to the decision regarding selection of outpatient analgesics varied: 16% active (i.e., make the final decision themselves), 37% collaborative (i.e., share decision with provider), and 47% passive (i.e., let the doctor make the final decision). The percentage of patients who desired an active role in the decision was higher for patients who were college educated versus those who were not college educated (28% vs. 11%; difference 17%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0% to 35

  6. Current and Prospective Use of Musculoskeletal Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging at Chiropractic Teaching Institutions: A Worldwide Survey of Diagnostic Imaging Staff.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rogan E A; Walker, Bruce F; Young, Kenneth J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the use of musculoskeletal diagnostic ultrasound imaging (MSK-DUSI) at chiropractic educational programs worldwide and to elicit opinions of academic diagnostic imaging staff of its prospective use at their teaching institutions. An electronic questionnaire was delivered in 2014 using SurveyMonkey and notifications were disseminated by e-mail to 127 diagnostic imaging staff at chiropractic programs worldwide. The questionnaire consisted of 27 items using multiple-choice, Likert-type, and open-ended questions. Descriptive statistics were used for basic demographic data and the results of the numerical scales used in each item. Fifty-nine respondents (46.5%) from 24 (24/41) chiropractic programs returned questionnaires. The reported use of MSK-DUSI at chiropractic programs is low (n = 5/24); however, respondents from 9 institutions stated that it is planned to be implemented. Few respondents stated they had formal MSK-DUSI qualifications (4/59); however, 7 respondents stated they were in the process of becoming certified. Most respondents expressed an interest in the prospect of incorporating MSK-DUSI at their chiropractic program. Sixty-five percent stated that chiropractic programs should provide MSK-DUSI training to chiropractic students, and 75% of respondents stated that chiropractic programs should be providing accredited postgraduate MSK-DUSI courses. The current use of MSK-DUSI among chiropractic programs that responded to this survey is low. The opinions of diagnostic imaging staff who responded suggest a positive attitude to its use and possible growth in its use if foundational work, including gaining funding, accreditation, and acceptance of within the scope of chiropractic practice, is undertaken.

  7. A prospective assessment of musculoskeletal toxicity and loss of grip strength in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen, and relation with BMI.

    PubMed

    Lintermans, A; Van Asten, K; Wildiers, H; Laenen, A; Paridaens, R; Weltens, C; Verhaeghe, J; Vanderschueren, D; Smeets, A; Van Limbergen, E; Leunen, K; Christiaens, M R; Neven, P

    2014-07-01

    Aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer is known to induce or enhance musculoskeletal problems. We have previously reported that loss of grip strength is more pronounced in AI-users with extremes in BMI. We here report results from a larger prospective study. Postmenopausal early breast cancer patients scheduled to start AI or tamoxifen therapy were recruited. A functional assessment grip strength test was performed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months of therapy. BMI was assessed, and a rheumatologic questionnaire was completed at each visit. 188 patients on an AI and 104 patients on tamoxifen were enrolled. 74 % of AI-users reported new/worsened musculoskeletal complaints compared with 37 % in the tamoxifen group. This was translated in a larger grip strength decrease in patients experiencing AI-induced pain opposed to patients without new/worsened complaints (p = 0.0002). 15 % of AI-users discontinued therapy due to musculoskeletal symptoms, who were characterized by a larger grip strength reduction versus adherent patients (p = 0.0107). Young age (p = 0.0135), taxane-based chemotherapy (p = 0.0223), and baseline VAS score >4 (p = 0.0155) were predictors for AI-related musculoskeletal pain. In addition, a quadratic trend of BMI with grip strength change (p = 0.0090) and probability of discontinuation was observed (p = 0.0424). Musculoskeletal events were a substantial problem in AI-treated patients and an important reason for treatment discontinuation. The decrease in grip strength was larger in AI- than in tamoxifen-users, with a more pronounced change in symptomatic patients. The inverse relationship between BMI extremes and grip strength change was confirmed in this large group of AI-patients.

  8. Examination and treatment of patients with unilateral vestibular damage, with focus on the musculoskeletal system: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kjersti; Kvåle, Alice

    2014-07-01

    Persistent dizziness and balance problems have been reported in some patients with unilateral vestibular pathology. The purpose of this case series was to address the examination and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunction in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. The musculoskeletal system was evaluated with the Global Physiotherapy Examination, dynamic balance was measured during walking with triaxial accelerometers positioned on the lower and upper trunk, and symptoms and functional limitations were assessed with standardized self-report measures. The 4 included patients had symptoms of severe dizziness that had lasted more than 1 year after the onset of vestibular dysfunction and a moderate level of perceived disability. Musculoskeletal abnormalities typically included postural misalignment, restricted abdominal respiration, restricted trunk movements, and tense muscles of the upper trunk and neck. The patients attended a modified vestibular rehabilitation program consisting of body awareness exercises addressing posture, movements, and respiration. After the intervention, self-reported symptoms and perceived disability improved. Improvements in mobility and positive physical changes were found in the upper trunk and respiratory movements. The attenuation of mediolateral accelerations (ie, body oscillations) in the upper trunk changed; a relatively more stable upper trunk and a concomitantly more flexible lower trunk were identified during walking in 3 patients. The recovery process may be influenced by self-inflicted rigid body movements and behavior strategies that prevent compensation. Addressing physical dysfunction and enhancing body awareness directly and dizziness indirectly may help patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction break a self-sustaining cycle of dizziness and musculoskeletal problems. Considering the body as a functional unit and including both musculoskeletal and vestibular systems in examination and treatment may be

  9. Short- and long-term changes in perceived work ability after interdisciplinary rehabilitation of chronic musculoskeletal disorders: prospective cohort study among 854 rehabilitants.

    PubMed

    Saltychev, Mikhail; Laimi, Katri; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the changes in rehabilitants' perceived work ability after rehabilitation for chronic musculoskeletal disorders with respect to the baseline characteristics. Prospective cohort study based on register and repeated survey data. Public sector employees in ten towns and five hospital districts. A total of 854 employees who participated in the rehabilitation programme owing to common chronic musculoskeletal disorders between 1997 and 2009. Interdisciplinary, biopsychosocial, inpatient rehabilitation programme targeting people of working age with common chronic musculoskeletal disorders. The programme was executed in different rehabilitation centres across the country and funded by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Differences in perceived work ability level before and after rehabilitation. Data were derived from repeated surveys on average 2.1 years before rehabilitation, and 1.5 years (short-term follow-up) and 6.0 years (long-term follow-up) after rehabilitation. Before the rehabilitation, perceived work ability was 7.13 (SD 1.84) among the rehabilitants and 7.27 (SD 1.72) in the matched reference population. Among rehabilitants, this figure decreased by 0.82 (95% confidence interval -0.98 to -0.67) in the short-term and by 1.26 (95% confidence interval -1.45 to -1.07) in the long-term follow-up. Only slight differences in steepness of this deterioration were observed between subgroups, created based on the participants' baseline characteristics. Perceived work ability of participants, in an interdisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation programme for common musculoskeletal disorders, deteriorated regardless of any studied pretreatment characteristics. The improvement of work ability may be an unrealistic goal for participants in this type of rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Do ergonomically designed school workstations decrease musculoskeletal symptoms in children? A 26-month prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Saarni, Lea A; Rimpelä, Arja H; Nummi, Tapio H; Kaukiainen, Anneli; Salminen, Jouko J; Nygård, Clas-Håkan

    2009-05-01

    Workstations at school are among several factors that contribute to musculoskeletal symptoms among school-aged children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ergonomically designed workstations on schoolchildren's musculoskeletal symptoms as compared to conventional workstations. In the first 14-month phase of the study (2002-2003, two schools), 42 from the intervention and 46 from the control school participated. In the total follow-up of 26 months (2002-2004), 23 in the intervention group and 20 in the control group participated. Anthropometrics and musculoskeletal symptoms were measured. In general, the ergonomically designed school workstations did not decrease present neck-shoulder, upper back, low back and lower limbs strain and pain, compared to conventional ones during follow-ups.

  11. The Role of Long Non-coding RNA H19 in Musculoskeletal System: a new player in an old game.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jin-Fang

    2017-09-07

    The long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained much attention due to its essential roles in molecular regulation. As one of the classic lncRNAs, H19 is strongly expressed during embryogenesis and plays a crucial biological function during development. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an ideal cell source for tissue engineering in musculoskeletal system as they own the multi-differentiation ability towards osteogenesis, adipogenesis, tenogenesis or chondrogenesis. In recent years, many studies have been found in the field of H19 mediated cellular differentiation of MSCs. Here, we summarized the current understanding of H19 during multi-differentiation of MSCs and its application in tissue regeneration of musculoskeletal system. Particularly, its molecular regulation and biological function during the multi-differentiation were also discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Efficacy of a checklist as part of a physical medicine and rehabilitation clerkship to teach medical students musculoskeletal physical examination skills: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Cruz, Eduardo; Salim, Sara Z; Jani, Jay B; Stitik, Todd P; Foye, Patrick M; DeLisa, Joel A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a checklist as part of a physical medicine clerkship to teach medical students physical examination maneuvers. This is a prospective study performed on fourth year medical students enrolled in a 2-wk mandatory clerkship of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. At the start and end of the rotation, the participating students were tested by performing 20 physical examination maneuvers on an investigator who was both the standardized patient and the evaluator. At the end of the rotation, the students also completed a survey. Data were analyzed using the Bernoulli trial model, with the percentage of students who performed the maneuver correctly on the pretest as the a priori probability. A full Bonferroni correction was applied. The authors enrolled 141 of the 176 fourth year medical students; 121 completed testing. At prerotation, approximately 35% of the physical examination maneuvers were performed correctly; at postrotation, 82%. For 19 of 20 maneuvers, the improvement was statistically significant at P < 0.01. The survey results indicated that the students felt that they had limited exposure to musculoskeletal examination skills at prerotation, that this rotation helped them achieve competency in performing the maneuvers, and that this would improve their future patient care irrespective of field of choice. Considering the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and the anticipated rise in the future, the authors strongly recommend teaching musculoskeletal physical examination maneuvers in medical school, which can be accomplished via a mandatory physical medicine and rehabilitation rotation. The authors conclude that checklists as part of this rotation can effectively help in teaching physical examination skills to medical students.

  13. Comparison of indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging with sequential technetium-gallium scanning in the diagnosis of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    We prospectively compared sequential technetium-gallium imaging with indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging in fifty patients with suspected low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. Adequate images and follow-up examinations were obtained for forty-two patients. The presence or absence of low-grade sepsis was confirmed by histological and bacteriological examinations of tissue specimens taken at surgery in thirty of the forty-two patients. In these thirty patients, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 48 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 57 per cent, whereas the sensitivity of the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was 83 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 83 per cent. When the additional twelve patients for whom surgery was deemed unnecessary were considered, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 50 per cent, the specificity was 78 per cent, and the accuracy was 62 per cent, as compared with a sensitivity of 83 per cent, a specificity of 94 per cent, and an accuracy of 88 per cent with the indium-labeled-leukocyte method. In patients with a prosthesis the indium-labeled-leukocyte image was 94 per cent accurate, compared with 75 per cent accuracy for sequential Tc-Ga imaging. Statistical analysis of these data demonstrated that the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was superior to sequential Tc-Ga imaging in detecting areas of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis.

  14. Safety, tolerability and effectiveness of an ergonomic intervention with chiropractic care for knowledge workers with upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders: a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Chuck; Johnson, Dale; Chester, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and sixty million office workers (knowledge workers) in the U.S. and 2/3 of the developed countries use computers on a daily basis. Investigate the effectiveness of ergonomic and diversified chiropractic care for the reduction of pain, discomfort and impaired productivity in knowledge workers presenting with neck and upper extremity musculoskeletal complaints. A one-year prospective case series (n=5 applying ergonomic job task analyses and ongoing surveillance at baseline, 8 weeks, 16 weeks and one-year for musculoskeletal discomfort (CMDQ and VAS, quality of life (Rand SF-36, productivity and forward head posture (FHP). CMDQ and VAS scores decreased by 45% (neck) and 80% (upper extremities); productivity increased from 65% to 100%; physical functioning, role physical and role emotional improved for 4 of 5 subjects; body pain and general health improved for 3 of 5. Average FHP changed from 1-inch (baseline) to 1/4-inch (16-weeks) to 1/2-inch (one year). Effectiveness of this intervention for the reduction of risks depended upon the subject's adoption of safe workstyle behaviors and postures. A transtheoretical model (TTM) for behavior change is discussed as a possible methodology to enhance the adoption of safer work habits.

  15. Reconsultation, self-reported health status and costs following treatment at a musculoskeletal Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service (CATS): a 12-month prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Edward; Jordan, Kelvin P; Oppong, Raymond; Chen, Ying; Jowett, Sue; Dawes, Peter; Hider, Samantha L; Packham, Jon; Stevenson, Kay; Zwierska, Irena; Hay, Elaine M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine (1) reconsultation frequency, (2) change in self-reported health status, (3) baseline factors associated with reconsultation and change in health status and (4) associated healthcare costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), following assessment at a musculoskeletal Clinical and Assessment Treatment Service (CATS). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Single musculoskeletal CATS at the primary–secondary care interface. Participants 2166 CATS attenders followed-up by postal questionnaires at 6 and 12 months and review of medical records. Outcome measures Primary outcome was consultation in primary care with the same musculoskeletal problem within 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were consultation at the CATS with the same musculoskeletal problem within 12 months, physical function and pain (Short Form-36), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), time off work, healthcare costs and QALYs. Results Over 12 months, 507 (38%) reconsulted for the same problem in primary care and 345 (26%) at the CATS. Primary care reconsultation in the first 3 months was associated with baseline pain interference (relative risk ratio 5.33; 95% CI 3.23 to 8.80) and spinal pain (1.75; 1.09 to 2.82), and after 3–6 months with baseline assessment by a hospital specialist (2.06; 1.13 to 3.75). Small mean improvements were seen in physical function (1.88; 95% CI 1.44 to 2.32) and body pain (3.86; 3.38 to 4.34) at 6 months. Poor physical function at 6 months was associated with obesity, chronic pain and poor baseline physical function. Mean (SD) 6-month cost and QALYs per patient were £422.40 (660.11) and 0.257 (0.144), respectively. Conclusions While most patients are appropriate for a ‘one-stop shop’ model, those with troublesome, disabling pain and spinal pain commonly reconsult and have ongoing problems. Services should be configured to identify and address such clinical complexity. PMID:27733409

  16. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  17. A prospective study of primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain: the identification of predictive factors for chronicity.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, R G; Jones, J M; Boardman, A P

    2000-01-01

    Primary care faces the challenge of reducing the proportion of patients continuing with musculoskeletal pain beyond the acute phase. This study assessed patients presenting in general practice with a four- to 12-week history of pain and re-assessed them 12 weeks later. Patients whose pain was described as 'none' or 'slight' were allocated to the 'acute group', and those whose pain continued to be 'moderate' or 'severe' were allocated to the 'chronic group'. Comparative analysis of the two groups' responses at initial assessment identified pain intensity, active coping score, and previous pain episode to be factors independently predictive of chronicity. PMID:10750237

  18. Musculoskeletal Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael K; Blumberg, Henry M

    2017-04-01

    Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB) accounts for approximately 10% of all extrapulmonary TB cases in the United States and is the third most common site of extrapulmonary TB after pleural and lymphatic disease. Vertebral involvement (tuberculous spondylitis, or Pott's disease) is the most common type of skeletal TB, accounting for about half of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. The presentation of musculoskeletal TB may be insidious over a long period and the diagnosis may be elusive and delayed, as TB may not be the initial consideration in the differential diagnosis. Concomitant pulmonary involvement may not be present, thus confusing the diagnosis even further. Early diagnosis of bone and joint disease is important to minimize the risk of deformity and enhance outcome. The introduction of newer imaging modalities, including MRI (imaging procedure of choice) and CT, has enhanced the diagnostic evaluation of patients with musculoskeletal TB and for directed biopsies of affected areas of the musculoskeletal system. Obtaining appropriate specimens for culture and other diagnostic tests is essential to establish a definitive diagnosis and recover M. tuberculosis for susceptibility testing. A total of 6 to 9 months of a rifampin-based regimen, like treatment of pulmonary TB, is recommended for the treatment of drug susceptible musculoskeletal disease. Randomized trials of tuberculous spondylitis have demonstrated that such regimens are efficacious. These data and those from the treatment of pulmonary TB have been extrapolated to form the basis of treatment regimen recommendations for other forms of musculoskeletal TB.

  19. Occupational musculoskeletal and mental health: Significance of rationalization and opportunities to create sustainable production systems - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Westgaard, R H; Winkel, J

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aims to identify occupational musculoskeletal and mental health effects of production system rationalization as well as organizational-level measures that may improve health outcome ("modifiers" in this review). A short review of the effect of ergonomic interventions is included as background and rationalization is discussed as a theoretical concept. Indicator variables for occupational musculoskeletal and mental health and related risk factors are presented. Variables with a generalized format were allowed in the literature searches (e.g., job satisfaction and absenteeism were accepted as risk factor and health indicator, respectively), suitable for the research fields of work sociology, organization science, human resource management (HRM) and economics research. One hundred and sixty-two studies of rationalization effects on health and risk factors and 72 organization-level modifier results were accepted into the final database. Entries were sorted by rationalization strategy and work life sector, and trends in outcome (positive, mixed, no effect, or negative effect on health and risk factors) were determined. Rationalizations have a dominant negative effect on health and risk factors (57% negative, 19% positive); the most negative effects were found for downsizing and restructuring rationalizations in general (71 studies negative, 13 positive) and for the health care sector in particular (36 studies negative, 2 positive). The rationalization strategy High Performance Work System (HPWS) was associated with the highest fraction positive outcome studies (6 of 10 studies). Other rationalization strategies (lean practices, parallel vs. serial production and mechanization level) reported intermediate results, in part dependent on work life sector, but also on the year when studies were carried out. Worker participation, resonant management style, information, support, group autonomy and procedural justice were modifiers with favourable

  20. USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    6 Nutrition ...identifying suboptimal biomechanical, musculoskeletal, physiological, and nutritional characteristics that are task and demand-specific to the...To prospectively identify biomechanical, musculoskeletal, physiological, and nutritional risk factors for injury in USASOC Operators Methods: A

  1. Seasonal variation in musculoskeletal extremity injuries in school children aged 6–12 followed prospectively over 2.5 years: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Eva; Holst, René; Franz, Claudia; Rexen, Christina T; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The type and level of physical activity in children vary over seasons and might thus influence the injury patterns. However, very little information is available on the distribution of injuries over the calendar year. This study aims to describe and analyse the seasonal variation in extremity injuries in children. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 10 public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Participants A total of 1259 school children aged 6–12 years participating in the Childhood Health, Activity, and Motor Performance School Study Denmark. Methods School children were surveyed each week during 2.5 school-years. Musculoskeletal injuries were reported by parents answering automated mobile phone text questions (SMS-Track) on a weekly basis and diagnosed by clinicians. Data were analysed for prevalence and incidence rates over time with adjustments for gender and age. Results Injuries in the lower extremities were reported most frequently (n=1049). There was a significant seasonal variation in incidence and prevalence for lower extremity injuries and for lower and upper extremity injuries combined (n=1229). For the upper extremities (n=180), seasonal variation had a significant effect on the risk of prevalence. Analysis showed a 46% increase in injury incidence and a 32% increase in injury prevalence during summer relative to winter for lower and upper extremity injuries combined. Conclusions There are clear seasonal differences in the occurrence of musculoskeletal extremity injuries among children with almost twice as high injury incidence and prevalence estimates during autumn, summer and spring compared with winter. This suggests further research into the underlying causes for seasonal variation and calls for preventive strategies to be implemented in order to actively prepare and supervise children before and during high-risk periods. PMID:24401728

  2. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  4. Physical workload, leisure-time physical activity, obesity and smoking as predictors of multisite musculoskeletal pain. A 2-year prospective study of kitchen workers.

    PubMed

    Haukka, Eija; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Leino-Arjas, Päivi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to examine the role of physical workload, leisure-time physical activity, obesity and smoking in predicting the occurrence and course of multisite musculoskeletal pain (MSP). Data on physical and psychosocial workload, lifestyle factors and MSP were based on questionnaire surveys of 385 Finnish female kitchen workers. MSP (defined as pain at three or more of seven sites) during the past 3 months was measured repeatedly at 3-month intervals over 2 years. Four different patterns (trajectories) in the course of MSP were identified. The authors analysed whether the determinants at baseline predicted the occurrence of MSP (1) at the 2-year follow-up and (2) over the total of nine measurements during the 2 years by exploiting the MSP trajectories. Logistic regression was used. High physical workload at baseline was an independent predictor of MSP at the 2-year follow-up (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.7 to 8.5) in a model allowing for age, psychosocial factors at work and lifestyle. High physical workload (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.0) and moderate (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.9) or low (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.7) physical activity predicted persistent MSP. Obesity (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.8) predicted an increased, and not being obese (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.7) a decreased, prevalence of MSP in models similarly including all covariates. Smoking had no effect. The results emphasise the importance of high physical workload, low to moderate physical activity and obesity as potential modifiable risk factors for the occurrence and course of MSP over time.

  5. The relationship between sitting posture and seated-related upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain in computing South African adolescents: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Brink, Yolandi; Louw, Quinette; Grimmer, Karen; Jordaan, Esmè

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that consistent sitting for prolonged periods is associated with upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain (UQMP). It is unclear whether postural alignment is a significant risk factor. The aim of the prospective study (2010-2011) was to ascertain if three-dimensional sitting postural angles, measured in a real-life school computer classroom setting, predict seated-related UQMP. Asymptomatic Grade 10 high-school students, aged 15-17 years, undertaking Computer Application Technology, were eligible to participate. Using the 3D Posture Analysis Tool, sitting posture was measured while students used desk-top computers. Posture was reported as five upper quadrant angles (Head flexion, Neck flexion; Craniocervical angle, Trunk flexion and Head lateral bending). The Computer Usage Questionnaire measured seated-related UQMP and hours of computer use. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children assessed psychosocial factors. Sitting posture, computer use and psychosocial factors were measured at baseline. UQMP was measured at six months and one-year follow-up. 211, 190 and 153 students participated at baseline, six months and one-year follow-up respectively. 34.2% students complained of seated-related UQMP during the follow-up period. Increased head flexion (HF) predicted seated-related UQMP developing over time for a small group of students with pain scores greater than the 90th pain percentile, adjusted for age, gender, BMI, computer use and psychosocial factors (p = 0.003). The pain score increased 0.22 points per 1° increase in HF. Classroom ergonomics and postural hygiene should therefore focus on reducing large HF angles among computing adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A prospective study of the impact of musculoskeletal pain and radiographic osteoarthritis on health related quality of life in community dwelling older people

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain and radiographic changes are common in persons with osteoarthritis, but their relative contributions to quality of life are unknown. Methods Prospective cohort study of 1098 men and women aged 50–80 years, randomly selected from the electoral roll. Participants were interviewed at baseline and approximately 2.6 and five years later. Participants self-reported prior diagnosis of arthritis and presence of joint pain. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes at the hip and knee were assessed by X-ray. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the Assessment of QoL (AQoL) instrument. Data was analysed using linear regression and mixed modelling. Results The median AQoL score at baseline was 7.0, indicating very good QoL. Prevalence of pain ranged from 38-62%. Over five years of observation, pain in the neck, shoulders, back, hips, hands, knees and feet were all independently and negatively associated with QoL, in a dose–response relationship. Diagnosed osteoarthritis at all sites was associated with poorer QoL but after adjustment for pain, this only remained significant at the back. Radiographic OA was not associated with QoL. While AQoL scores declined over five years, there was no evidence of an interaction between pain and time. Conclusions Pain is common in older adults, is stable over time, and the strongest musculoskeletal correlate of QoL. It also mediates the association between diagnosed OA and QoL. Since the same factors were associated with quality of life over time as at baseline, this suggests that quality of life tracks over a five year period. PMID:22954354

  7. Risk factors for development of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preteens and early adolescents: a prospective 1-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    El-Metwally, Ashraf; Salminen, Jouko J; Auvinen, Anssi; Macfarlane, Gary; Mikkelsson, Marja

    2007-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common in children and adolescents. These symptoms have a negative impact on children's physical and emotional well-being, but their underlying aetiology and risk factors are still poorly understood. Most of the previous cohort studies were conducted among mid and/or late adolescents and were mainly focused on a specific pain location (e.g. low back pain or neck pain). The purpose of this study is to estimate occurrence of new-onset pain symptoms, in all musculoskeletal locations, in preteens and early adolescents and investigate risk factors for development of these symptoms. Methods 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8) were recruited from schools in southern Finland. Information was extracted as to whether they experienced musculoskeletal pain and a total of 1192 children were identified as free of musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Information was collected on factors which could potentially predict the development of musculoskeletal pain: headache, abdominal pain, sadness/feeling down, day-time tiredness, difficulty in falling asleep, waking up during nights, level of physical activity and hypermobility. These children were followed-up 1-year later and those with new episodes of non-traumatic and traumatic musculoskeletal pain symptoms were identified. Results A total of 1113 schoolchildren (93% of baseline pain-free children) were found at one-year follow-up. New episodes of musculoskeletal pain were reported by 21.5% of these children. Of them 19.4% reported non-traumatic pain and 4.0% reported traumatic pain. The neck was the most commonly reported site with non-traumatic pain, while the lower limb was the most common site for traumatic pain. The independent risk factors for non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain were headache (OR = 1.68, [95% CI 1.16–2.44]) and day-time tiredness (OR = 1.53, [95% CI 1.03–2.26]). The risk factors for traumatic musculoskeletal pain were vigorous exercise (OR = 3.40 [95% CI 1.39–8

  8. Risk factors for development of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preteens and early adolescents: a prospective 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    El-Metwally, Ashraf; Salminen, Jouko J; Auvinen, Anssi; Macfarlane, Gary; Mikkelsson, Marja

    2007-05-23

    Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common in children and adolescents. These symptoms have a negative impact on children's physical and emotional well-being, but their underlying aetiology and risk factors are still poorly understood. Most of the previous cohort studies were conducted among mid and/or late adolescents and were mainly focused on a specific pain location (e.g. low back pain or neck pain). The purpose of this study is to estimate occurrence of new-onset pain symptoms, in all musculoskeletal locations, in preteens and early adolescents and investigate risk factors for development of these symptoms. 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8) were recruited from schools in southern Finland. Information was extracted as to whether they experienced musculoskeletal pain and a total of 1192 children were identified as free of musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Information was collected on factors which could potentially predict the development of musculoskeletal pain: headache, abdominal pain, sadness/feeling down, day-time tiredness, difficulty in falling asleep, waking up during nights, level of physical activity and hypermobility. These children were followed-up 1-year later and those with new episodes of non-traumatic and traumatic musculoskeletal pain symptoms were identified. A total of 1113 schoolchildren (93% of baseline pain-free children) were found at one-year follow-up. New episodes of musculoskeletal pain were reported by 21.5% of these children. Of them 19.4% reported non-traumatic pain and 4.0% reported traumatic pain. The neck was the most commonly reported site with non-traumatic pain, while the lower limb was the most common site for traumatic pain. The independent risk factors for non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain were headache (OR = 1.68, [95% CI 1.16-2.44]) and day-time tiredness (OR = 1.53, [95% CI 1.03-2.26]). The risk factors for traumatic musculoskeletal pain were vigorous exercise (OR = 3.40 [95% CI 1.39-8.31]) and day-time tiredness (OR = 2

  9. Promoting work ability in a structured national rehabilitation program in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: outcomes and predictors in a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major reason for impaired work productivity and sick leave. In 2009, a national rehabilitation program was introduced in Sweden to promote work ability, and patients with MSDs were offered multimodal rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of this program on health related quality of life, function, sick leave and work ability. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study including 406 patients with MSDs attending multimodal rehabilitation. Changes over time and differences between groups were analysed concerning function, health related quality of life, work ability and sick leave. Regression analyses were used to study the outcome variables health related quality of life (measured with EQ-5D), and sick leave. Results Functional ability and health related quality of life improved after rehabilitation. Patients with no sick leave/disability pension the year before rehabilitation, improved health related quality of life more than patients with sick leave/disability pension the year before rehabilitation (p = 0.044). During a period of −/+ four months from rehabilitation start, patients with EQ-5D ≥ 0.5 at rehabilitation start, reduced their net sick leave days with 0.5 days and patients with EQ-5D <0.5 at rehabilitation start, increased net sick leave days with 1.5 days (p = 0.019). Factors negatively associated with sick leave at follow-up were earlier episodes of sick leave/disability pension, problems with exercise tolerance functions and mobility after rehabilitation. Higher age was associated with not being on sick leave at follow-up and reaching an EQ-5D ≥ 0.5 at follow-up. Severe pain after rehabilitation, problems with exercise tolerance functions, born outside of Sweden and full-time sick leave/disability pension the year before rehabilitation were all associated with an EQ-5D level < 0.5 at follow-up. Conclusions Patients with MSDs

  10. Health-related quality of life 24 months after sustaining a minor musculoskeletal injury in a road traffic crash: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Maher, Christopher G; Cameron, Ian D

    2017-04-03

    A better understanding of the long-term factors that independently predict poorer quality of life following mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries is needed. We aimed to establish the predictors of quality of life (including sociodemographic, health, psychosocial, and pre-injury factors) 24 months after a noncatastrophic road traffic injury. In a prospective cohort study of 252 participants with mild/moderate injury sustained in a road traffic crash, quality of life was measured 24 months following the baseline survey. A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on various potential explanatory variables. Health-related quality of life was measured using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-12 (SF-12). Multivariable linear regression analyses determined the associations between explanatory variables and quality of life measures. Mean SF-12 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores increased by 7.3 and 2.5 units, respectively, from baseline to 24-month follow-up. Each 10-year increase in baseline age was independently associated with 3.1-unit (P < .001) and 1.5-unit (P = .001) decrease in EQ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and SF-12 PCS scores at follow-up, respectively. Poor/fair compared to excellent pre-injury health was associated with a 0.16-, 21.3-, and 11.5-unit decrease in EQ-5D summary (P = .03), VAS scores (P = .001), and SF-12 PCS scores (P < .001), respectively. Baseline pain severity ratings and pain catastrophizing scores were inversely associated with 24-month EQ VAS scores (both P < .001). Each unit increase in baseline pain score (P = .001) and pain catastrophizing score (P = .02) was associated with a 1.0- and 4.6-unit decrease in SF-12 MCS scores at 24 months, respectively. Other observed predictors of quality of life measures (EQ-5D summary and/or VAS scores and/ or SF-12 MCS) included marital status, smoking, hospital admission, pre

  11. Musculoskeletal problems of performing artists.

    PubMed

    Greer, J M; Panush, R S

    1994-02-01

    We have reviewed the frequency and variety of rheumatic problems among performing artists. For instrumentalists, injuries are related to the type of instrument played, the technique used and the effort expended in the quest for excellence. For dancers, musculoskeletal problems too reflect technique and effort. We should not be surprised at the frequency of these problems. Rheumatologists, as well as orthopaedic surgeons, physiotherapists, neurologists and other physicians, encounter performing artists as patients. We should be familiar with their problems and be able to knowledgeably diagnose and manage them. This may include observing the artist during actual performances. How is the instrument being held? What is the posture of the artist? What are the comments of the coach or teacher. What type of shoes does the ballerina wear? What movements in particular cause discomfort? These and similar observations will have direct bearing on the musculoskeletal problems of these artists. Published studies have related the variety, frequency and disabling nature of performance-related musculoskeletal problems. Unfortunately few if any of these are controlled, blinded or prospective. We need more and better information. We will want clear information about prevalence of problems, better definition of the musculoskeletal ailments, classification of the relationship of problems with performance and individual biomechanical features, information about response of specific problems to interventions, and data about the long-term consequences, if any, of these rheumatic problems to the musculoskeletal system. Artists as patients are unique. Minor problems can become potentially career-ending disabilities. Making music or performing dance may provide us with delightful entertainment but represents a source of livelihood to artists. Understanding their medical needs and enabling them to continue to perform is the challenge before us.

  12. Occupational medical prophylaxis for the musculoskeletal system: A function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system in occupational medicine (fokus(C))

    PubMed Central

    Spallek, Michael; Kuhn, Walter; Schwarze, Sieglinde; Hartmann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Occupational physicians are very often confronted with questions as to the fitness of the postural and locomotor systems, especially the spinal column. Occupational medical assessment and advice can be required by patients with acute symptoms, at routine check-ups, by persons who have problems doing certain jobs, and for expert medical reports as to the fitness of persons with chronic disorders or after operations. Therefore, for occupational medical purposes a physical examination must aim primarily to investigate functions and not structures or radiologic evidence. The physical examination should be structured systematically and according to regions of the body and, together with a specific (pain) anamnesis should provide a basis for the medical assessment. This paper presents a function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system, named fokus(C) (Funktionsorientierte Koerperliche Untersuchungssystematik, also available on DVD). fokus(C) has been developed with a view to its relevance for occupational medical practice and does not aim primarily to provide a precise diagnosis. Decisive for an occupational medical assessment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system is rather information about functional disorders and any impairment of performance or mobility which they can cause. The division of the physical examination into a rapid screening phase and a subsequent more intensive functional diagnostic phase has proved its practicability in many years of day-to-day use. Here, in contrast to the very extensive measures recommended for orthopaedic and manual diagnosis, for reasons of efficiency and usability of the system in routine occupational medical examinations the examination is structured according to the findings. So it is reduced to that which is most necessary and feasible. PMID:17967167

  13. Occupational medical prophylaxis for the musculoskeletal system: A function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system in occupational medicine (fokus(C)).

    PubMed

    Spallek, Michael; Kuhn, Walter; Schwarze, Sieglinde; Hartmann, Bernd

    2007-10-29

    Occupational physicians are very often confronted with questions as to the fitness of the postural and locomotor systems, especially the spinal column. Occupational medical assessment and advice can be required by patients with acute symptoms, at routine check-ups, by persons who have problems doing certain jobs, and for expert medical reports as to the fitness of persons with chronic disorders or after operations. Therefore, for occupational medical purposes a physical examination must aim primarily to investigate functions and not structures or radiologic evidence. The physical examination should be structured systematically and according to regions of the body and, together with a specific (pain) anamnesis should provide a basis for the medical assessment.This paper presents a function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system, named fokus(C) (Funktionsorientierte Koerperliche Untersuchungssystematik, also available on DVD). fokus(C) has been developed with a view to its relevance for occupational medical practice and does not aim primarily to provide a precise diagnosis. Decisive for an occupational medical assessment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system is rather information about functional disorders and any impairment of performance or mobility which they can cause. The division of the physical examination into a rapid screening phase and a subsequent more intensive functional diagnostic phase has proved its practicability in many years of day-to-day use. Here, in contrast to the very extensive measures recommended for orthopaedic and manual diagnosis, for reasons of efficiency and usability of the system in routine occupational medical examinations the examination is structured according to the findings. So it is reduced to that which is most necessary and feasible.

  14. Prehospital venous access in an urban paramedic system--a prospective on-scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Pons, P T; Moore, E E; Cusick, J M; Brunko, M; Antuna, B; Owens, L

    1988-10-01

    Prehospital intravenous access has been central to the debate of paramedic intervention during management of trauma in the field. Some have suggested that excessive time requirements for IV access are detrimental to patient salvage. This prospective study objectively quantified the time required to place a peripheral IV line in our urban paramedic system. A third-party observer, nonparamedic, timed the procedure on scene with a stopwatch. Total intravenous time, including obtaining a 30-cc blood sample, was defined as the period from removal of the catheter cover until the catheter was taped. The study group included 125 patients (51 trauma and 74 nontrauma). The average total time to obtain IV access and sample blood was 2.20 +/- 0.20 and 2.71 +/- 0.18 minutes in trauma and nontrauma patients, respectively. In a subset of 63 patients in whom blood sampling time was determined separately, subtracting that from total IV time provided a net of 0.58 +/- 0.09 minutes to obtain access. Fourteen patients had a second IV line started (without blood sampling), requiring 1.25 +/- 0.38 and 0.70 +/- 0.24 minutes, respectively, for trauma and nontrauma patients. Paramedics were successful on their first IV attempt in 90% of trauma and 84% of nontrauma patients; ultimate success was 100%. This on scene study documents the time required for prehospital IV access, performed by a well-trained paramedic in an E.M.S. system with strong medical control, is less than 90 seconds.

  15. Artifacts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Lorenz, Eileen J; Witte, Russell S

    2014-02-01

    During the past 2 decades, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) has been increasingly utilized in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal trauma and diseases with results comparable with MR imaging. US has an advantage over other cross-sectional modalities in many circumstances due to its superior spatial resolution and ability to allow dynamic assessment. When performing musculoskeletal US, the examiner has to be knowledgeable in the complex anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and US imaging technique. Additionally, he or she must be familiar with several common imaging artifacts in musculoskeletal US that may be mistaken for pathology, as well as several artifacts that frequently accompany pathologic conditions. These artifacts may occur with both B-mode gray-scale and Doppler imaging. In this article, we discuss common artifacts seen in musculoskeletal US and techniques to avoid or minimize these artifacts during clinical US examinations. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  17. Musculoskeletal discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the musculoskeletal discipline must identify possible consequences of weightlessness on this system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers. The musculoskeletal system is highly plastic in that is possesses the inherent capability to adapt its structural and functional properties in accordance with the type and degree of stimuli imposed on it. Prolonged space travel is essentially a period of significant unloading of the musculoskeletal system. This results in adaptive responses in the structure and function of this system, placing it on the low end of a continuum from one of complete disuse to one of maximal use. There is a high probability that the musculoskeletal system is functionally impaired with increasing duration of weightlessness. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences division research and development activities in the area of musculoskeletal function. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines research opportunities, which encompass critical questions in the subdiscipline areas (e.g., muscle, bone, and other musculoskeletal connective tissues). These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  18. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in music students-associated musculoskeletal signs.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, A; Möller, H; Seidel, W; Rigotti, T

    2012-12-01

    Pain and overuse are common problems for musicians. Up to 80% of professional musicians suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). The prevalence rate in music students is very high as well. Sufficient data on the underlying musculoskeletal dysfunctions however is scarce. Additionally, the self-assessment of health in musicians seems to differ compared to non-musicians, which might influence their attitudes concerning preventive strategies. Evaluation of frequency of PRMD in music students, investigation of signs and symptoms in music students compared to non-music controls, comparison of self-reported health and well-being between the two groups. Prospective, cross-sectional, case control, non-randomized. Other (University volunteers). Music students in comparison to a non-music control group. Musculoskeletal examination and questionnaire of 36 volunteers of a music university and 19 volunteer students of an university of education were analyzed. The total number of musculoskeletal dysfunctions and differences between the student groups were examined. The personal pain and health self-rating were compared between music and non-music students. Eighty one percent of musicians experienced PRMD. Musicians experienced 6.19 pain regions on average compared to 4.31 of non-musicians. Musicians experiencing PRMD reported significantly (P<0.05) more pain locations than musicians without. Music students presented with nearly the double amount (8.39 versus 4.37) of musculoskeletal dysfunctions per person compared to the non-music control group. Nevertheless, musicians significantly (P<0.05) rated their health more positively than the controls. Musicians presented with more pain regions and a higher amount of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Further studies evaluating the clinical relevance and their role in the development of PRMD are warranted. Screening of musicians for musculoskeletal dysfunction may identify those musicians at increased risk. Early

  19. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Peate, W F

    1994-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders of the workplace include the acute, cumulative and chronic injuries or illnesses of the soft tissues which are caused by mechanical stress, strain, sprain, vibration, inflammation, or irritation. The successful management of occupational musculoskeletal disorders must account for workplace conditions (ergonomics and work practices), psychosocial factors, diagnostic uncertainties, and the need for active modalities (exercises and a progressive increase in activities of daily living), rather than passive (bed rest and traction). Although most occupational musculoskeletal disorders respond to conservative measures such as ice or heat, protective devices such as, neutral splints for carpal tunnel syndrome, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and progressive strengthening, resolution may take months. Prevention is often more important than treatment, and may entail workplace revisions and special worker training. Worker selection programs--strength testing, pre-placement radiographs, and inquiries about prior low back pain--have poor predictive value.

  20. Overtraining and immune system: a prospective longitudinal study in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, H H; Urhausen, A; Valet, G; Heidelbach, U; Kindermann, W

    1998-07-01

    A prospective longitudinal study investigated for 19 +/- 3) months whether immunophenotypes of peripheral leukocytes were altered in periods of severe training. Leukocyte membrane antigens (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD19, CD45, CD45RO, and CD56) of endurance athletes were immunophenotyped (dual-color flow cytometry) and list mode data analyzed by a self-learning classification system in a state of an overtraining syndrome (OT; N = 15) and several occasions without symptoms of staleness (NS; N = 70). Neither at physical rest nor after a short-term highly intensive cycle ergometer exercise session at 110% of the individual anaerobic threshold did cell counts of neutrophils, T, B, and natural killer cells differ between OT and NS. Eosinophils were lower during OT, activated T cells (CD3+HLA/DR+) showed slight increases (NS: 5.5 +/- 2.7; OT 7.3 +/- 2.4% CD3+ of cells; means +/- SD; P < 0.01) during OT without reaching pathological ranges. The cell-surface expression of CD45RO (P < 0.001) on T cells, but not cell concentrations of CD45RO+ T cells, were higher during OT. OT could be classified with high specificities (92%) and sensitivities (93%). It is concluded that OT does not lead to clinically relevant alterations of immunophenotypes in peripheral blood and especially that an immunosuppressive effect cannot be detected. Immunophenotyping may provide help with the diagnosis of OT in future, but the diagnostic approach presented here requires improvements before use in sports medicine practice is enabled.

  1. Rigid internal fixation and the effects on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory system: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Williams, B; Stapleford, R

    1992-12-01

    A prospective study of 22 patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal osteotomy to advance the mandible and subsequent rigid internal fixation, were examined for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and masticatory dysfunction. A modified Helkimo index was used to analyze the anamnestic, clinical, and occlusal data. In addition, 12 of the cases chosen at random were mounted on a semiadjustable (SAM2) articulator and analyzed with the mandibular position indicator (MPI) to determine the amount and the direction of condylar displacement postoperatively. Anamnestic dysfunction decreased because of a reported decrease in muscular pain, joint noise, headache frequency, and parafunctional habits postoperatively. Clinical dysfunction remained unchanged, with a decrease in muscular soreness but with an increased incidence of joint clicking of 7%. The increased incidence of temporomandibular joint pain postoperatively was 4%. Increase in clinical dysfunction was most often seen in women and older patients. Occlusal dysfunction decreased, with the majority of interferences remaining after surgery as a result of insufficient lingual crown torque of the maxillary buccal segments. Occlusion is thought to have played only a minor role in temporomandibular joint and masticatory dysfunction. Reduction in range of motion was 10%, indicating the added benefit of early mobilization with rigid internal fixation procedures. The MPI study found the condyles inferiorly or inferoposteriorly displaced less than 1 mm from their preoperative position. These findings suggest that rigid internal fixation had no adverse effects on the temporomandibular and masticatory system. The variable responses and results can be attributed, at least in part, to the heterogenous population of patients studied and the variations in surgical techniques employed.

  2. Multimodal Therapy for Stage III Retinoblastoma (International Retinoblastoma Staging System): A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Bhavna; Hasan, Fahmi; Seth, Rachna; Pathy, Sushmita; Pattebahadur, Rajesh; Sharma, Sanjay; Upadhyaya, Ashish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of 2 chemotherapeutic drug combinations as part of multimodal therapy for orbital retinoblastoma. Prospective, comparative, study. Patients with stage III retinoblastoma (International Retinoblastoma Staging System). Demographic and clinical features were recorded at presentation. Treatment consisted of a multimodal protocol with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, enucleation, orbital external-beam radiotherapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy. For chemotherapy, patients were randomized into 2 groups: group A patients were treated with vincristine, etoposide, and carboplatin (VEC) and group B patients were treated with carboplatin and etoposide, alternating with cyclophosphamide, idarubicin, and vincristine. Treatment outcomes and adverse effects were recorded. Efficacy parameters were compared between the groups. Survival probability, cause of death, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. A total of 54 children were recruited (27 in each group). The mean ± SD follow-up was 21.3±11.34 months. The overall Kaplan-Meier survival probability was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.89) and 42% (95% CI, 0.24-0.59) at 1 year and 4 years, respectively. There were 9 deaths in group A and 15 deaths in group B. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability at 1 year was similar between the groups: 81% (95% CI, 0.60-0.91) and 79% (95% CI, 0.58-0.9) for groups A and B, respectively. At 4 years, the survival probability for group A was higher (63% [95% CI, 0.41-0.79] vs. 25% [95% CI, 0.08-0.46] for groups A and B, respectively), with a strong trend of better survival in group A over time (P = 0.05). The major cause of death was central nervous system relapse (8 patients in group A and 7 patients in group B). Two patients in group B died of sepsis after febrile neutropenia. Grade 3 and grade 4 hematologic toxicities were more common in group B, with a significant difference in grade 4 neutropenia (P = 0.002). This study compared the outcomes of VEC chemotherapy with a 5

  3. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  4. Musculoskeletal Aspiration Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2012-01-01

    With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections. PMID:24293800

  5. Musculoskeletal Disorders among Cosmetologists

    PubMed Central

    Tsigonia, Alexandra; Tanagra, Dimitra; Linos, Athena; Merekoulias, Georgios; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the relationships between physical, psychosocial, and individual characteristics and different endpoints of low back, neck, shoulder, hand/wrist and knee musculoskeletal complaints among cosmetologists in Athens, Greece. The study population consisted of 95 female and seven male beauty therapists (response rate 90%) with a mean age and duration of employment of 38 and 16 years, respectively. Neck pain was the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 58% of the subjects, while hand/wrist and low back complaints resulted more frequently in self-reported consequences (chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism). Significant relationships were found between self-reported physical risk factors like prolonged sitting, use of vibrating tools, reaching far and awkward body postures and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at various body sites. Among psychosocial variables co-worker support and skill discretion seem to be the most important reflecting organizational problems and cognitive-behavioral aspects. The study results also suggest that effective intervention strategies most likely have to take into account both ergonomic improvements and organizational aspects. PMID:20049238

  6. The Influence of Arthritis in Other Major Joints and the Spine on the One-Year Outcome of Total Hip Replacement: A Prospective, Multicenter Cohort Study (EUROHIP) Measuring the Influence of Musculoskeletal Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Huber, Joerg; Dieppe, Paul; Dreinhoefer, Karsten; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Judge, Andrew

    2017-09-06

    Although arthritis in other affected major joints and back pain are known to lead to worse outcomes following total hip replacement, to our knowledge, these risk factors have not previously been operationalized as a musculoskeletal morbidity profile. The aim of this study was to measure the influence of other major joints and the spine (as grades of musculoskeletal morbidity) on the 1-year outcome of primary total hip replacement. The EUROHIP study consists of 1,327 patients undergoing primary total hip replacement for arthritis across 20 European orthopaedic centers. The primary outcome was the responder rate at 12 months calculated with the relative effect per patient for total hip replacement using the total Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score. The primary predictor of interest was different combinations of arthritis of major joints and the spine grouped into 4 musculoskeletal morbidity grades: 1 (single major joint), 2 (multiple major joints), 3 (single major joint and spine), and 4 (multiple major joints and spine). The confounders adjusted for were age, sex, body mass index, living situation, years of hip pain, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, anxiety or depression, and preoperative WOMAC subscales. For this analysis, 845 patients were included with complete 12-month follow-up WOMAC scores. The mean patient age was 65.7 years, and 55.2% of patients were female. The involvement of other major joints and the spine assessed as 1 of 4 musculoskeletal morbidity grades had a strong influence on the 1-year outcome after total hip replacement. The effect size was large compared with other risk factors. Even so, the majority of patients in musculoskeletal morbidity grade 4 had favorable outcomes from the surgical procedure (>74% response to surgical procedures). Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Update in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Research

    PubMed Central

    Nwawka, O. Kenechi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) research is expanding due to increased clinical utility of sonography. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Ultrasound is widely applied in musculoskeletal imaging and sports medicine. The real-time capabilities and favorable cost profile of US make it ideal for use in diagnosis of musculoskeletal conditions. The enthusiasm for the use of US in musculoskeletal imaging has led to an increase in US research to broaden its applications. Conclusion: Several recent advances have been made in conventional and novel US imaging techniques, quantitative US imaging, and US-guided interventions. Strength of Recommendations Taxonomy (SORT): C PMID:27528698

  8. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    PubMed

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  9. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Genomic medicine of bone and joint diseases : present and future].

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    Susceptibility genes for various kinds of common diseases have been identified by the genome-wide association study (GWAS) and the outcome is changing the clinical medicine significantly. Musculoskeletal disease is no exception. In this paper, I review the current status and prospect of GWAS in musculoskeletal diseases in Japan by focusing on representative common musculoskeletal diseases : disc herniation, adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine.

  10. [Focused musculoskeletal sonography].

    PubMed

    Horn, Rudolf

    2015-09-16

    Even in emergent situations, focused musculoskeletal sonography must not be overlooked. It has a place in traumatology no less valuable than its place in internal medicine. It can be used to identify traumatic joint effusions, occult fractures and fissures, joint inflammation, muscle and tendon rupture; it can differentiate soft tissue swelling, locate a foreign body, or identify the location of fractures. Focused ultrasound should be performed by the attending physician directly at the patient’s bedside, in order to answer these specific questions.

  11. Register-based data of psychosocial working conditions and occupational groups as predictors of disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses: a prospective cohort study of 24 543 Swedish twins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupations and psychosocial working conditions have rarely been investigated as predictors of disability pension in population-based samples. This study investigated how occupational groups and psychosocial working conditions are associated with future disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses, accounting for familial factors in the associations. Methods A sample of 24 543 same-sex Swedish twin individuals was followed from 1993 to 2008 using nationwide registries. Baseline data on occupations were categorized into eight sector-defined occupational groups. These were further used to reflect psychosocial working conditions by applying the job strain scores of a Job Exposure Matrix. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) were estimated. Results During the 12-year (average) follow-up, 7% of the sample was granted disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. Workers in health care and social work; agriculture, forestry and fishing; transportation; production and mining; and the service and military work sectors were two to three times more likely to receive a disability pension than those in the administration and management sector. Each single unit decrease in job demands and each single unit increase in job control and social support significantly predicted disability pension. Individuals with high work strain or an active job had a lower hazard ratio of disability pension, whereas a passive job predicted a significantly higher hazard ratio. Accounting for familial confounding did not alter these results. Conclusion Occupational groups and psychosocial working conditions seem to be independent of familial confounding, and hence represent risk factors for disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. This means that preventive measures in these sector-defined occupational groups and specific psychosocial working conditions might prevent disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. PMID:24040914

  12. Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gheno, Ramon; Cepparo, Juan M.; Rosca, Cristina E.; Cotten, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most common problems affecting the elderly. The resulting loss of mobility and physical independence can be particularly devastating in this population. The aim of this article is to present some of the most frequent musculoskeletal disorders of the elderly, such as fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, microcrystal disorders, infections, and tumors. PMID:22919553

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders: OWAS review

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GALÁN, Marta; PÉREZ-ALONSO, José; CALLEJÓN-FERRE, Ángel-Jesús; LÓPEZ-MARTÍNEZ, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) is very important in the world. Governments and companies are the most interested. The objective of the present work is to review the literature on the applications of the OWAS method in the diverse sectors or fields of knowledge and countries from its publication to March 2017. The use of OWAS method has been classified by categories of knowledge, by country and by year. The search was made by selecting only the main collection of the Web of Science. This was selected by the option “Advanced search” using the term OWAS (ts=OWAS) for the time period of 1900 to 2017. A total of 166 results were found, consisting of conference papers and articles in scientific journals. In conclusion, the OWAS has been applied mainly in two sectors: “Manufacturing industries” and “Healthcare and Social assistance activities”. This method needs to be complemented with other indirect or direct methods. Also, whenever the OWAS has been used, whether individually or together with other methods, musculoskeletal disorders risks have been detected, this perhaps being an indicator to review the evaluation parameters because overestimating the risk. PMID:28484144

  14. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  15. Musculoskeletal adaptations and injuries due to overtraining.

    PubMed

    Kibler, W B; Chandler, T J; Stracener, E S

    1992-01-01

    Overtraining places a demand on the musculoskeletal system that may lead to damage to the musculoskeletal system, as well as to clinical, functional, and biomechanical adaptations that may be detrimental to sport performance. The types of injuries identified range from overt, which are obvious injuries that will usually prevent athletic performance for some period of time, to the subclinical, which decrease performance, but may be seldom recognized. These injuries apparently may be avoided or lessened in severity by a combination of several methods. A thorough preparticipation evaluation is important to detect subtle adaptations in strength and flexibility that can result from overtraining and may increase the athlete's chances of injury. A good sport-specific conditioning program is necessary to give the athlete a strong musculoskeletal base on which to build athletic skills and to decrease the risk of overtraining adaptation. In many sports, prehabilitation exercises can be performed for those musculoskeletal areas that are under high stress in a particular sport. Also, a maintenance conditioning program that extends through the season may be important to maintain fitness throughout the season. Following proper principles of conditioning, including specificity, recovery, and progression, are important. A complete and accurate diagnosis of the injuries that do occur is necessary so that proper treatment may follow. This can be facilitated by understanding the types of clinical presentations of injuries, and the different anatomical and functional alterations that may be acting to cause or to continue the clinical presentation. By following these general guidelines, safe participation in sporting activities as well as performance will be enhanced. The exact point where "training" becomes "overtraining" is difficult to define, especially prospectively. An exciting area of sports medicine research will be to define the anatomic parameters and exercise doses that will

  16. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  17. [Musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Christophe; Tourne, Mathias

    2007-06-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a major area of concern in the occupational world. The agricultural industry is particularly affected: 93 percent of occupational diseases in agriculture are MSD. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in one third of the cases. Shoulder is the second most common location. The most affected occupational areas are meat production, viticulture, market gardening, horticulture and small animal farming. This MSD phenomenon, of multifactorial origin, which has been amplifying for two decades, has led to some consensus in terms of definition and prevention strategy. The aim is to identify, limit or even suppress risk factors through worker training as well as through actions related to work organization. Regarding occupational health and safety in agriculture, two fronts of progress have been mentioned: the creation of a statistic observatory of MSD (disease, occupational area and cost) and the assessment of prevention activities. Finally, a new issue is being discussed: sustainable prevention of MSD.

  18. Computed tomography of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.W. Magid, D. Fishman, E.K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 10 chapters. The chapter titles are: Soft Tissue Masses; Primary Bone Tumors; The Role of CT in the Therapeutic Management of Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Inflammation; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Trauma; The Foot and Ankle; The Shoulder; Measurement of Bone Mineral for Early Detection of Osteoporosis; MRI of the Musculoskeletal System; and Advances in CT Imaging of Musculoskeletal Pathology.

  19. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    PubMed

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  20. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  1. Rheumatology and musculoskeletal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Graham

    2004-01-01

    MUSCULOSKELETAL disease accounts for a large proportion of a general practitioner's (GP's) workload. Proper management can not only improve quality of care, but also increase job satisfaction and reap rewards under the new contract. Osteoporosis creates a huge socioeconomic burden of disease and disability. Identifying high-risk groups in primary care and using preventative treatment can result in a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality. GPs can help by presenting a unified lifestyle message, advising on fall prevention, and providing effective treatment; in particular, calcium and vitamin D for female nursing home residents. Osteoarthritis is eminently treatable in primary care with a number of management options for GPs, in addition to drug therapy. Glucosamine and chondroitin have few side effects and are worth recommending to patients with mild knee osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause significant disability, which can be limited by early diagnosis, referral, and treatment. Severe refractory rheumatoid arthritis may warrant referral for consideration of biologic therapy. Assessment of the cardiovascular risk and possible use of statins in rheumatoid patients may reduce their cardiovascular mortality. GPs should aim to help patients to achieve optimum quality of life by using a holistic approach and by allowing maximum choice and control over their disease. PMID:15186570

  2. Angelman syndrome: A review highlighting musculoskeletal and anatomical aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Rohit; Donkers, Sarah J; Kim, Soo Y

    2016-07-01

    Angelman's syndrome (AS) is a genetic neurodevelopment disorder. The cause is a known abnormality involving the maternal inherited ubiquitin-protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. Clinical characteristics universal to the disorder are well documented in the literature and include developmental delay, seizures, ataxia, altered tone, severely impaired speech and intellect, as well as an overall happy demeanor, frequent bouts of laughter, and hypermotoric behavior. Associated with this disorder are several musculoskeletal aberrations. To date, a review of case studies reporting on these musculoskeletal changes has not been carried out. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to provide an overview of the musculoskeletal changes present in individuals with AS. In our review of 21 case reports from 1965-2013, the most consistently reported anatomical changes were of the craniofacial region. These include microcephaly, brachycephaly, a palpable occipital groove, prognathism, and wide spaced teeth. Other musculoskeletal abnormalities less frequently reported in the literature include scoliosis, excessive lumbar lordosis, and pes planus. Given that the majority of the case reports reviewed was of young children, the possibility of underreporting musculoskeletal changes which may manifest in the later years of life may be present. Early diagnosis and interventions to minimize secondary complications are crucial to maintain quality of life. An overall multidisciplinary approach is emphasized to maximize developmental potential for these individuals. Future prospective studies that follow patients into adulthood are needed to better understand the prevalence and development of secondary musculoskeletal changes, which in turn can inform intervention techniques and preventative measures. Clin. Anat. 29:561-567, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  4. Musculoskeletal ageing and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Anders; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A; Christiansen, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Loss of musculoskeletal mass and function is a natural ageing trait, reinforced by an unhealthy life style. Loss of bone (osteoporosis) and muscle (sarcopaenia) are conditions whose prevalence are increasing because of the change in population distribution in the western world towards an older mean age. Improvements in lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking and exercise, are the most powerful tools to combat this decline efficiently; however, public health interventions aimed at tackling these problems have shown abysmal success at the population level, mostly due to failure in compliance. With these issues in mind, we believe that the primary prevention modality in coming decades will be pharmacological. We review the basic biology of musculoskeletal ageing and what measures can be taken to prevent ageing-associated loss of musculoskeletal mass and function, with particular emphasis on pharmacological means.

  5. Ageing in the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sally; Colombier, Pauline; Sowman, Aneka; Mennan, Claire; Rölfing, Jan H D; Guicheux, Jérôme; Edwards, James R

    2016-01-01

    The extent of ageing in the musculoskeletal system during the life course affects the quality and length of life. Loss of bone, degraded articular cartilage, and degenerate, narrowed intervertebral discs are primary features of an ageing skeleton, and together they contribute to pain and loss of mobility. This review covers the cellular constituents that make up some key components of the musculoskeletal system and summarizes discussion from the 2015 Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedic Symposium (AROS) (Regeneration in the Ageing Population) about how each particular cell type alters within the ageing skeletal microenvironment. PMID:27748151

  6. Ageing in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sally; Colombier, Pauline; Sowman, Aneka; Mennan, Claire; Rölfing, Jan H D; Guicheux, Jérôme; Edwards, James R

    2016-12-01

    The extent of ageing in the musculoskeletal system during the life course affects the quality and length of life. Loss of bone, degraded articular cartilage, and degenerate, narrowed intervertebral discs are primary features of an ageing skeleton, and together they contribute to pain and loss of mobility. This review covers the cellular constituents that make up some key components of the musculoskeletal system and summarizes discussion from the 2015 Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedic Symposium (AROS) (Regeneration in the Ageing Population) about how each particular cell type alters within the ageing skeletal microenvironment.

  7. Musculoskeletal ultrasound for sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Tok, F; Özçakar, L; De Muynck, M; Kara, M; Vanderstraeten, G

    2012-12-01

    Each day, the role of musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) in the management of sports injuries is being consolidated. Yet, there is no doubt that the probe of US is (should be) the stethoscope of musculoskeletal physicians dealing with sports medicine. Not only for the diagnosis, but also for the close follow-up of the athletes and during likely onward interventions for their treatment, would US be of paramount importance. Accordingly, in this review paper on common sports injuries, we tried to shed light into the actual role of US in the clinical practice of sports medicine.

  8. Musculoskeletal etiologies of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    Several musculoskeletal diagnoses are frequently concomitant with pelvic floor pathology and pain. The definition of pelvic pain itself often depends on the medical specialist evaluating the patient. Because there is variability among disorders associated with pelvic pain, patients may seek treatment for extended periods as various treatment options are attempted. Further, health care providers should recognize that there may not be a single source of dysfunction. This article discusses the musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic girdle (structures within the bony pelvis) and their association with lumbar spine and hip disorders.

  9. Musculoskeletal Fitness and Risk of Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Craig, Cora L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantified the relationship between musculoskeletal fitness and all-cause mortality in Canada, using measures of musculoskeletal fitness (situps, pushups, grip strength, and sit- and-reach trunk flexibility) from adult male and female participants in the Canadian Fitness Survey. Results indicated that some components of musculoskeletal fitness,…

  10. 12-month Healing Rates after Endodontic Therapy Using the Novel GentleWave System: A Prospective Multicenter Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Garland, Randy W; Le, Khang T; Woo, Stacey M

    2016-07-01

    This multicenter, prospective, nonsignificant risk clinical study evaluated healing rates for molars 12 months after endodontic therapy using the GentleWave System (Sonendo, Inc, Laguna Hills, CA). Eighty-nine patients needing endodontic therapy who met the inclusion criteria consented for this clinical study. All enrolled patients were treated with a standardized protocol consisting of conservative access, shaping of canals to #20/.07, GentleWave treatment, and warm vertical obturation. Six endodontists performed the clinical procedures and follow-up evaluations. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected from the consented patients. Each patient was evaluated for clinical signs and symptoms. Two trained, blinded, and independent evaluators scored the subject's radiographs for signs of apical periodontitis using a periapical index. The teeth classified as healing or healed were considered as a success and accounted for the cumulative success rate of healing. Statistical analysis was performed by using the Fisher exact test, Pearson correlation, and multivariate logistic regression analyses of the preoperative prognostic factors at P = .05. Seventy-five teeth in 75 patients were evaluated at 12 months with a follow-up rate of 84.3%. The cumulative success of endodontic therapy was 97.3%. The success rates of necrotic and irreversible pulpitis were 92.9% and 98.4%, respectively; 3.8% of the patients experienced moderate postoperative pain within 2 days and no incidence of pain at 14 days, 6 months, and 12 months of initial therapy. Ten prognostic factors were identified using bivariate analyses. Using logistic analyses, the prognostic significant variable that was directly correlated to healing was the preoperative presence of lesions (P = .026). In this 12-month prospective multicenter clinical study, the GentleWave System showed a high level of success after a 12-month follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists

  11. Common injections in musculoskeletal medicine.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Nizran, Parminder Singh

    2013-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injections are a common procedure in primary care and sports medicine but can be intimidating for some clinicians. This article addresses current evidence for corticosteroid injections, and common injection indications and techniques, namely knee, subacromial bursa, glenohumeral joint, lateral epicondyle, de Quervain tenosynovitis, and greater trochanteric bursa injections. Preparation for injections and some evidence for ultrasound guidance are also reviewed.

  12. Epidemiology of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Marco A; Ferrone, Carmela; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) due to musculoskeletal conditions is a major social burden. The case definition of CWP relies on pain, chronicity (more than 3 months' duration) and widespread distribution (both sides of the body including the axial skeleton). Health Interview Survey (HIS) and Health Examination Survey (HES) have been used to assess the frequency of CWP in the general population. Unfortunately, both techniques are poorly standardised, which hampers comparison of data pertaining to different populations and countries. A major effort in the European Union (EU) is the development of common strategies to investigate musculoskeletal pain through HIS. Issues to be addressed include: (1) loss of daily life functions due to pain; (2) pain duration and rhythm; (3) affected sites; and (4) type of pain. We know that musculoskeletal pain affects between 13.5% and 47% of the general population, with CWP prevalence varying between 11.4% and 24%. Risk factors for musculoskeletal pain include age, gender, smoking, low education, low physical activity, poor social interaction, low family income, depression, anxiety and sleep disorders, as well as performing manual work, being a recent immigrant, non-Caucasian and widowed, separated or divorced. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Musculoskeletal pain in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jannini, Suely Nóbrega; Dória-Filho, Ulysses; Damiani, Durval; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain, musculoskeletal syndromes, orthopedic disorders and using computers and playing videogames among obese adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study that investigated 100 consecutive obese adolescents and 100 healthy-weight controls using a confidential, self-report questionnaire covering demographic data, sports participation, painful musculoskeletal system symptoms and using computers and playing videogames. The questionnaire's test-retest reliability was tested. Physical examination covered six musculoskeletal syndromes and seven orthopedic disorders. The kappa index for test-retest was 0.724. Pain and musculoskeletal syndromes were equally prevalent in both groups (44 vs. 56%, p = 0.09; 12 vs. 16%, p = 0.541; respectively). Notwithstanding, orthopedic disorders (98 vs. 76%, p = 0.0001), tight quadriceps (89 vs. 44%, p = 0.0001) and genu valgum (87 vs. 24%, p = 0.0001) were significantly more prevalent in obese adolescents than in controls. Median time spent using a computer the day before, on Saturdays and on Sundays were all lower among the obese subjects (30 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.0001; 1 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.001; and 0 vs. 30 minutes, p = 0.02; respectively). Obese adolescents were less likely to play handheld videogames (2 vs. 11%, p = 0.003) and there was no difference in the two groups' use of full-sized videogames (p > 0.05). Comparing obese adolescents with pain to those free from pain revealed that pain was more frequent among females (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.048) and was associated with greater median time spent playing on Sundays [0 (0-720) vs. 0 (0-240) minutes, p = 0.028]. Obesity can cause osteoarticular system damage at the start of adolescence, particularly to the lower limbs. Programs developed specifically for obese female adolescents with musculoskeletal pain are needed.

  14. Impact of a physician-staffed helicopter on a regional trauma system: a prospective, controlled, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J; Jans, H; Jacobsson, M-L B; Andersen, D L; Buggeskov, K; Kowalski, M; Præst, M; Øllgaard, L; Höiby, P; Rasmussen, L S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to compare the trauma system before and after implementing a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (PS-HEMS). Our hypothesis was that PS-HEMS would reduce time from injury to definitive care for severely injured patients. Methods This was a prospective, controlled, observational study, involving seven local hospitals and one level I trauma centre using a before and after design. All patients treated by a trauma team within a 5-month period (1 December 2009–30 April 2010) prior to and a 12-month period (1 May 2010–30 April 2011) after implementing a PS-HEMS were included. We compared time from dispatch of the first ground ambulance to arrival in the trauma centre for patients with Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Secondary end points were the proportion of secondary transfers and 30-day mortality. Results We included 1788 patients, of which 204 had an ISS > 15. The PS-HEMS transported 44 severely injured directly to the trauma centre resulting in a reduction of secondary transfers from 50% before to 34% after implementation (P = 0.04). Median delay for definitive care for severely injured patients was 218 min before and 90 min after implementation (P < 0.01). The 30-day mortality was reduced from 29% (16/56) before to 14% (21/147) after PS-HEMS (P = 0.02). Logistic regression showed PS-HEMS had an odds ratio (OR) for survival of 6.9 compared with ground transport. Conclusions Implementation of a PS-HEMS was associated with significant reduction in time to the trauma centre for severely injured patients. We also observed significantly reduced proportions of secondary transfers and 30-day mortality. PMID:23289798

  15. Reducing radiation exposure during kyphoplasty with the use of a remote control injection system: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianru; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Kuibo; Li, Bingxue; Yang, Hao; Wang, Hua; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-01-15

    A prospective study. To compare surgeons' radiation exposure during kyphoplasty with and without the use of a remote control injection system. Distance from radiation sources is a critical factor for reducing radiation exposure during spine surgery. A newly designed device was used to minimize operators' radiation exposure during kyphoplasty. Forty-four patients admitted for single-level osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture were randomly divided into 2 groups (groups A and B) and treated with kyphoplasty. The remote control injection system was used only in group B. The radiation doses to the surgeon's eyes, thyroid, chest, and right wrist were recorded with 4 unprotected radiometers simultaneously. Operation time, fluoroscopic time, cement amount, patient-reported pre- and postoperative visual analogue scale scores for pain, and complications were recorded. For group A, the radiation doses at the eyes, thyroid, and right wrist were 1.132 ± 0.104 mSv, 0.647 ± 0.049 mSv, 0.578 ± 0.056 mSv, and 1.877 ± 0.214 mSv, respectively; for Group B, these doses were 0.257 ± 0.067 mSv, 0.201 ± 0.049 mSv, 0.145 ± 0.033 mSv, and 0.353 ± 0.046 mSv, respectively (P < 0.05). Comparisons of the radiation doses the chief surgeon and the resident surgeon received showed that the resident surgeon received more radiation during group A procedures; during group B procedures, the surgeons received similar doses. The proportion of average fluoroscopic time devoted to the bone cement injection step for groups A and B was 64% and 63%, respectively, and the average proportion of the radiation doses that were received during the bone cement injection step was 66% for group A and 36% for group B. Compared with the preoperative visual analogue scale score, the postoperative visual analogue scale score was significantly reduced in both groups. During kyphoplasty, the use of the remote control injection system can significantly reduce surgeons' radiation exposure without affecting

  16. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith; Goodson, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses, and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered. PMID:26612237

  17. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity) and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined. PMID:21910870

  18. Musculoskeletal colloquialisms based on weapons.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    Eponyms and colloquialisms are commonly used in orthopaedic literature and convey a great deal of information in a concise fashion. Several orthopaedic conditions have characteristic clinical or radiologic appearances, mimicking the appearance of certain arms or weapons. Most of these are easy to memorise and recognise, provided the orthopaedic surgeon is aware of the colloquialism and familiar with the appearance of the weapon on which it is based. Unfortunately, many such colloquialisms are based on traditional weapons no longer in current use, and their appearances are not familiar to most orthopaedists, creating confusion and difficulty in understanding them. In this paper, we have reviewed the musculoskeletal colloquialisms based on weapons, including a brief description of the weapon with illustrations, highlighting the importance of the colloquialism in diagnosis or treatment of musculoskeletal conditions.

  19. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Goodson, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter, we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered.

  20. Radiologic management of musculoskeletal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Springfield, D.S.; Enneking, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The present book is written by a radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons with long experience in musculoskeletal tumors. It is based on modern pathologic and surgical principles, and from those principles the radiologic approach is discussed. The main questions ask what information can be gained by the different modalities, and which combination of modalities is the most profitable to determine the local behaviour of the tumor, diagnosis and local extent.

  1. MRI of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Seeger, L L

    1992-04-01

    MRI is rapidly altering the presurgical evaluation for many forms of musculoskeletal pathology, and the indications for MRI will undoubtedly continue to grow. Because of the complexity of this modality and the ability to totally "miss" pathology by the inappropriate choice of imaging plane or pulse sequence, cooperation between the orthopedic surgeon and the radiologist is essential. A close working relationship is required for maximum diagnostic information to be obtained with each examination and for optimal patient care.

  2. Musculoskeletal Health and Injury Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    and vegetables: 4 - 5 of each/day; • Eat cold water fish ( salmon , halibut, scallops,tuna, mackerel,cod, shrimp, snapper, and sardines) ≥ 2x...Oats • Soy • Brown rice • Wheat • Cold-water fish Dietary Supplements • Glucosamine/Chondroitin sulfate • Vitamins C and E • Selenium...Omega-3 Fatty Acids • Calcium and Vitamin D • Coenzyme Q10 • Capsaicin Cream (chili peppers) Summary Musculoskeletal health requires: • A

  3. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  4. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes of the Simpliciti Canal-Sparing Shoulder Arthroplasty System: A Prospective Two-Year Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Churchill, R Sean; Chuinard, Christopher; Wiater, J Michael; Friedman, Richard; Freehill, Michael; Jacobson, Scott; Spencer, Edwin; Holloway, G Brian; Wittstein, Jocelyn; Lassiter, Tally; Smith, Matthew; Blaine, Theodore; Nicholson, Gregory P

    2016-04-06

    Stemmed humeral components have been used since the 1950s; canal-sparing (also known as stemless) humeral components became commercially available in Europe in 2004. The Simpliciti total shoulder system (Wright Medical, formerly Tornier) is a press-fit, porous-coated, canal-sparing humeral implant that relies on metaphyseal fixation only. This prospective, single-arm, multicenter study was performed to evaluate the two-year clinical and radiographic results of the Simpliciti prosthesis in the U.S. One hundred and fifty-seven patients with glenohumeral arthritis were enrolled at fourteen U.S. sites between July 2011 and November 2012 in a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Investigational Device Exemption (IDE)-approved protocol. Their range of motion, strength, pain level, Constant score, Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score were compared between the preoperative and two-year postoperative evaluations. Statistical analyses were performed with the Student t test with 95% confidence intervals. Radiographic evaluation was performed at two weeks and one and two years postoperatively. One hundred and forty-nine of the 157 patients were followed for a minimum of two years. The mean age and sex-adjusted Constant, SST, and ASES scores improved from 56% preoperatively to 104% at two years (p < 0.0001), from 4 points preoperatively to 11 points at two years (p < 0.0001), and from 38 points preoperatively to 92 points at two years (p < 0.0001), respectively. The mean forward elevation improved from 103° ± 27° to 147° ± 24° (p < 0.0001) and the mean external rotation, from 31° ± 20° to 56° ± 15° (p < 0.0001). The mean strength in elevation, as recorded with a dynamometer, improved from 12.5 to 15.7 lb (5.7 to 7.1 kg) (p < 0.0001), and the mean pain level, as measured with a visual analog scale, decreased from 5.9 to 0.5 (p < 0.0001). There were three postoperative complications that resulted in revision

  5. Musculoskeletal pain and effort-reward imbalance- a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain may be triggered by physical strains and psychosocial risk factors. The effort-reward imbalance model (ERI model) is a stress model which measures psychosocial factors in the working world. The question is whether workers with an effort-reward imbalance report musculoskeletal pain more frequently than those with no effort-reward imbalance. A systematic review using a best evidence synthesis approach was conducted to answer this question. Methods A literature search was conducted for the period from 1996 to 2012, using three databases (Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO). The research criteria related to psychosocial, work-related stress as per the ERI model and to musculoskeletal pain. A quality score was developed using various quality criteria to assess the standard of the studies. The level of evidence was graded as in (Am J Ind Med 39:180–193, 2001). Results After applying the inclusion criteria, a total of 19 studies were included in the review: 15 cross-sectional studies, three prospective studies and one case–control study. 74% of all studies exhibited good methodological quality, 53% collected data using the original ERI questionnaire, and in 42% of the studies, there was adequate control for physical working conditions. Furthermore, different cut-off points were used to classify exposed and non-exposed individuals. On the basis of 13 studies with a positive, statistically significant association, a moderate level of evidence was inferred for the association between effort-reward imbalance and musculoskeletal pain. The evidence for a role of over-commitment and for its interaction with effort-reward imbalance was rated as inconclusive - on the basis of eight and five studies, respectively. Conclusions On the basis of the available evidence, no reliable conclusion may be drawn about any association between the psychosocial factors ascertained using the ERI model and musculoskeletal pain. Before a reliable statement can be made on

  6. Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Cook, Cristi R

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a rapidly growing field within veterinary medicine. Ultrasound for musculoskeletal disorders has been commonly used in equine and human medicine and is becoming more commonly performed in small animal patients due to the increase in the recognition of soft tissue injuries. Ultrasound is widely available, cost-effective, but technically difficult to learn. Advantages of musculoskeletal ultrasound are the opposite limb is commonly used for comparison to evaluate symmetry of the tendinous structures and the ease of repeat examinations to assess healing. The article discusses the major areas of shoulder, stifle, iliopsoas, gastrocnemius, and musculoskeletal basics.

  7. Characterisation of musculoskeletal tumours by multivoxel proton MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patni, Ruchi S; Boruah, Deb K; Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Gogoi, Bidyut B; Patni, Maninder; Khandelia, Rosy; Gogoi, Nripen

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy in differentiating benign and malignant musculoskeletal tumours in a more objective way and to correlate the MRS data parameters with histopathology. A hospital-based prospective study was carried out comprising 42 patients who underwent MRI examinations from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014. After routine sequences, single-slice multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy was included at TE-135 using the PRESS sequence. The voxel with the maximum choline/Cr ratio was used for analysis of data in 32 patients. The strength of association between the MR spectroscopy findings and the nature of tumour and histopathological grading were assessed. Of the 42 patients, the MR spectra were not of diagnostic quality in 10. In the remaining 32 patients, 12 (37.5%) had benign and 20 (62.5%) malignant tumours. The mean choline/Cr ratio was 6.97 ± 5.95 (SD) for benign tumours and 25.39 ± 17.72 (SD) for malignant tumours. In our study statistical significance was noted between the choline/Cr ratio and the histological nature of musculoskeletal tumours (p = 0.002) assessed by unpaired t-test. The choline/Cr ratio and histological grading were also found to be significant (p = 0.001) when assessed by one-way ANOVA test. Multi-voxel MR spectroscopy showed a higher choline/Cr ratio in malignant musculoskeletal tumours than in benign ones (p = 0.002). The choline/Cr ratio and histological grading of musculoskeletal tumours also showed statistical significance (p = 0.001).

  8. USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    TITLE: USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Abt, PhD, ATC...8 Musculoskeletal , Physiological, and Biomechanical Profiles...47 Introduction Unintentional musculoskeletal injuries limit tactical readiness, shorten the

  9. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Anthony D.; Pfleger, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are a major burden on individuals, health systems, and social care systems, with indirect costs being predominant. This burden has been recognized by the United Nations and WHO, by endorsing the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010. This paper describes the burden of four major musculoskeletal conditions: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and low back pain. Osteoarthritis, which is characterized by loss of joint cartilage that leads to pain and loss of function primarily in the knees and hips, affects 9.6% of men and 18% of women aged > 60 years. Increases in life expectancy and ageing populations are expected to make osteoarthritis the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. Joint replacement surgery, where available, provides effective relief. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that usually affects multiple joints. It affects 0.3-1.0% of the general population and is more prevalent among women and in developed countries. Persistent inflammation leads to joint destruction, but the disease can be controlled with drugs. The incidence may be on the decline, but the increase in the number of older people in some regions makes it difficult to estimate future prevalence. Osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration, is a major risk factor for fractures of the hip, vertebrae, and distal forearm. Hip fracture is the most detrimental fracture, being associated with 20% mortality and 50% permanent loss in function. Low back pain is the most prevalent of musculoskeletal conditions; it affects nearly everyone at some point in time and about 4-33% of the population at any given point. Cultural factors greatly influence the prevalence and prognosis of low back pain. PMID:14710506

  10. Surgical Management of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Edwards, Dafydd

    2017-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries cause a significant burden to society and can have a considerable impact on patient morbidity and mortality. It was initially thought that these patients were too sick to undergo surgery and later believed that they were too sick not to undergo surgery. The pendulum has subsequently swung back and forth between damage control orthopedics and early total care for polytrauma patients with extremity injuries and has settled on providing early appropriate care (EAC). The decision-making process in providing EAC is reviewed in an effort to optimize patient outcomes following severe extremity trauma. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coculture in musculoskeletal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2014-10-01

    Most tissues in the body are made up of more than one cell type. For successful tissue regeneration, it is essential to simulate the natural conditions of the cellular environment as much as possible. In a coculture system, two or more cell types are brought together, interact, and communicate in the same culture environment. The coculture system provides a powerful in vitro tool in research on cell-to-cell communications, repair, and regeneration. This review provides an overview on recent studies on general platforms and applications of coculture systems to enhance musculoskeletal regeneration, with a particular focus on osteogenesis, chondrogensis, and angiogenesis.

  12. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. Methods In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2–6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6–11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Conclusion Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered. PMID:26106512

  13. Musculoskeletal trauma services in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Naddumba, E K

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 2000 lives are lost in Uganda annually through road traffic accidents. In Kampala, they account for 39% of all injuries, primarily in males aged 16-44 years. They are a result of rapid motorization and urbanization in a country with a poor economy. Uganda's population is an estimated 28 million with a growth rate of 3.4% per year. Motorcycles and omnibuses, the main taxi vehicles, are the primary contributors to the accidents. Poor roads and drivers compound the situation. Twenty-three orthopaedic surgeons (one for every 1,300,000 people) provide specialist services that are available only at three regional hospitals and the National Referral Hospital in Kampala. The majority of musculoskeletal injuries are managed nonoperatively by 200 orthopaedic officers distributed at the district, regional and national referral hospitals. Because of the poor economy, 9% of the national budget is allocated to the health sector. Patients with musculoskeletal injuries in Uganda frequently fail to receive immediate care due to inadequate resources and most are treated by traditional bonesetters. Neglected injuries typically result in poor outcomes. Possible solutions include a public health approach for prevention of road traffic injuries, training of adequate human resources, and infrastructure development.

  14. Advancing musculoskeletal research with nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cameron P

    2013-10-01

    Nanoscience has arrived. Biological applications of nanoscience are particularly prominent and can be useful in a range of disciplines. Advances in nanoscience are underpinning breakthroughs in biomedical research and are beginning to be adopted by the rheumatology and musculoskeletal science communities. Within these fields, nanoscience can be applied to imaging, drug delivery, implant development, regenerative medicine, and the characterization of nanoscale features of cells, matrices and biomaterials. Nanoscience and nanotechnology also provide means by which the interaction of cells with their environment can be studied, thereby increasing the understanding of disease and regenerative processes. Although its potential is clear, nanoscience research tends to be highly technical, generally targeting an audience of physicists, chemists, materials scientists and engineers, and is difficult for a general audience to follow. This Review aims to step back from the most technical aspects of nanoscience and provide a widely accessible view of how it can be applied to advance the field of rheumatology, with an emphasis on technologies that can have an immediate impact on rheumatology and musculoskeletal research.

  15. Combat musculoskeletal wounds in a US Army Brigade Combat Team during operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    Belmont, Philip J; Thomas, Dimitri; Goodman, Gens P; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Zacchilli, Michael; Burks, Rob; Owens, Brett D

    2011-07-01

    A prospective, longitudinal analysis of musculoskeletal combat injuries sustained by a large combat-deployed maneuver unit has not previously been performed. A detailed description of the musculoskeletal combat casualty care statistics, distribution of wounds, and mechanisms of injury incurred by a US Army Brigade Combat Team during "The Surge" phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom was performed using a centralized casualty database and an electronic medical record system. Among the 4,122 soldiers deployed, there were 242 musculoskeletal combat wounds in 176 combat casualties. The musculoskeletal combat casualty rate for the Brigade Combat Team was 34.2 per 1,000 soldier combat-years. Spine, pelvis, and long bone fractures comprised 55.9% (33 of 59) of the total fractures sustained in combat. Explosions accounted for 80.7% (142 of 176) of all musculoskeletal combat casualties. Musculoskeletal combat casualty wound incidence rates per 1,000 combat-years were as follows: major amputation, 2.1; minor amputation, 0.6; open fracture, 5.0; closed fracture, 6.4; and soft-tissue/neurovascular injury, 32.8. Among musculoskeletal combat casualties, the likelihood of a gunshot wound causing an open fracture was significantly greater (45.8% [11 of 24]) when compared with explosions (10.6% [15 of 142]) (p = 0.0006). Long bone amputations were more often caused by explosive mechanisms than gunshot wounds. A large burden of complex orthopedic injuries has resulted from the combat experience in Operation Iraqi Freedom. This is because of increased enemy reliance on explosive devices, the use of individual and vehicular body armor, and improved survivability of combat-injured soldiers.

  16. Graphic-based musculoskeletal model for biomechanical analyses and animation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-04-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the 'Virtual Human' reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. This paper details the design, capabilities, and features of the VIMS development at Johns Hopkins University, an effort possible only through academic and commercial collaborations. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of this unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system will impact on medical education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal diseases, trauma, and rehabilitation.

  17. Musculoskeletal trauma: the baseball bat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, D. D.; Greenfield, R.; Martin, E.

    1992-01-01

    Between July 1987 and December 1990 in Washington, DC, 116 patients sustained 146 fractures and seven dislocations due to an assault with a baseball bat. The ulna was the most common site of trauma (61 fractures), followed by the hand (27 injuries) and the radius (14 injuries). Forty-two of the 146 fractures were significantly displaced and required open reduction and internal fixation to restore satisfactory alignment. Twenty-nine of the 146 fractures were open fractures. Treatment protocol for open fractures consisted of irrigation and debridement, antibiotic therapy, and bone stabilization with either internal or external fixation, or casting. Recognition of the severity of the soft tissue and bone damage is important in the management of musculoskeletal trauma secondary to the baseball bat. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1460683

  18. Musculoskeletal manifestations of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Imad; Lally, Edward V

    2008-07-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms in Lyme disease are very common at all stages of the disease. Lyme arthritis, whether intermittent or chronic, is a hallmark of late Lyme disease. This may cause severe joint pain and swelling especially confined to one or a few joints, most notably the knee. Antibiotic therapy is very effective in treating Lyme arthritis in the majority of cases. However, a small proportion of individuals will develop persistent chronic arthritis which is likely mediated through immunologic mechanisms. In these patients treatment strategies should include anti-inflammatory medications and possibly immunosuppressive treatments. Arthroscopic synovectomy ma ybe very helpful in some of these patients. Post Lyme disease syndrome and Lyme myositis are two other sequelae that are associated with Lyme disease.

  19. Musculoskeletal imaging in preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    Kainberger, Franz; Falkowski, Anna L; Hirtler, Lena; Riegler, Georg; Schlegl, Thomas; Thaker, Siddharth; Patsch, Janina; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The aim is to review the modalities in musculoskeletal imaging with view on the prognostic impact for the patient's and for social outcome and with view on three major fields of preventive medicine: nutrition and metabolism, sports, and patient education. The added value provided by preventive imaging is (1) to monitor bone health and body composition with a broad spectrum of biomarkers, (2) to detect and quantify variants or abnormalities of nerves, muscles, tendons, bones, and joints with a risk of overuse, rupture, or fracture, and (3) to develop radiology reports from the widely used narrative format to structured text and multimedia datasets. The awareness problem is a term for describing the underreporting and the underdiagnosis of fragility fractures in osteoporosis.

  20. Musculoskeletal problems in Parkinson's disease: neglected issues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Lee, Woong-Woo; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui June; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S

    2013-07-01

    To identify the prevalence and clinical features of musculoskeletal problems in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared to controls. 400 PD patients and 138 age- and sex-matched controls were interviewed by physicians about their musculoskeletal problems. The prevalence of musculoskeletal problems was significantly higher in the PD group than in the control group (66.3% vs. 45.7%, P < 0.001). Commonly involved body sites were the low back, knee, and shoulder in that order. The low back was more frequently involved in the PD group than in the control group (44.3% vs. 24.6%, P < 0.001), and the shoulder tended to be more involved in the PD group than in the control group (15.0% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.061). However, the knee was similarly involved in both group (12.3% vs. 18.0%, P = 0.121). Among the past diagnoses associated with musculoskeletal problems, frozen shoulder, low back pain, osteoporosis and fracture were more common in the PD group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Older age, female, and a higher score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale I & II were associated with musculoskeletal problems in the PD group. Only 26.8% of the PD patients and 52.5% of the controls with musculoskeletal problems answered that their musculoskeletal problems were recovering. Furthermore, musculoskeletal problems in the PD group tended to receive less treatment than that of the control group (P = 0.052). Musculoskeletal problems were more common in the PD group than in the controls. Furthermore, despite PD patients having a higher prevalence, they did not receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implicit methods for efficient musculoskeletal simulation and optimal control

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogert, Antonie J.; Blana, Dimitra; Heinrich, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary differential equations for musculoskeletal dynamics are often numerically stiff and highly nonlinear. Consequently, simulations require small time steps, and optimal control problems are slow to solve and have poor convergence. In this paper, we present an implicit formulation of musculoskeletal dynamics, which leads to new numerical methods for simulation and optimal control, with the expectation that we can mitigate some of these problems. A first order Rosenbrock method was developed for solving forward dynamic problems using the implicit formulation. It was used to perform real-time dynamic simulation of a complex shoulder arm system with extreme dynamic stiffness. Simulations had an RMS error of only 0.11 degrees in joint angles when running at real-time speed. For optimal control of musculoskeletal systems, a direct collocation method was developed for implicitly formulated models. The method was applied to predict gait with a prosthetic foot and ankle. Solutions were obtained in well under one hour of computation time and demonstrated how patients may adapt their gait to compensate for limitations of a specific prosthetic limb design. The optimal control method was also applied to a state estimation problem in sports biomechanics, where forces during skiing were estimated from noisy and incomplete kinematic data. Using a full musculoskeletal dynamics model for state estimation had the additional advantage that forward dynamic simulations, could be done with the same implicitly formulated model to simulate injuries and perturbation responses. While these methods are powerful and allow solution of previously intractable problems, there are still considerable numerical challenges, especially related to the convergence of gradient-based solvers. PMID:22102983

  2. Implicit methods for efficient musculoskeletal simulation and optimal control.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Antonie J; Blana, Dimitra; Heinrich, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary differential equations for musculoskeletal dynamics are often numerically stiff and highly nonlinear. Consequently, simulations require small time steps, and optimal control problems are slow to solve and have poor convergence. In this paper, we present an implicit formulation of musculoskeletal dynamics, which leads to new numerical methods for simulation and optimal control, with the expectation that we can mitigate some of these problems. A first order Rosenbrock method was developed for solving forward dynamic problems using the implicit formulation. It was used to perform real-time dynamic simulation of a complex shoulder arm system with extreme dynamic stiffness. Simulations had an RMS error of only 0.11 degrees in joint angles when running at real-time speed. For optimal control of musculoskeletal systems, a direct collocation method was developed for implicitly formulated models. The method was applied to predict gait with a prosthetic foot and ankle. Solutions were obtained in well under one hour of computation time and demonstrated how patients may adapt their gait to compensate for limitations of a specific prosthetic limb design. The optimal control method was also applied to a state estimation problem in sports biomechanics, where forces during skiing were estimated from noisy and incomplete kinematic data. Using a full musculoskeletal dynamics model for state estimation had the additional advantage that forward dynamic simulations, could be done with the same implicitly formulated model to simulate injuries and perturbation responses. While these methods are powerful and allow solution of previously intractable problems, there are still considerable numerical challenges, especially related to the convergence of gradient-based solvers.

  3. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Aditya Ravindra; Karnik, Alpana Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26288519

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Seeger, L L; Hall, T R

    1990-12-01

    MRI is an important tool for evaluating acute and chronic injuries to the musculoskeletal system. It is effective in demonstrating abnormalities in the knee and hips and in detecting bone and ligamentous trauma that is not evident radiographically.

  5. Computed Tomography of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has specific uses in veterinary species' appendicular musculoskeletal system. Parameters for acquisition of images, interpretation limitations, as well as published information regarding its use in small animals is reviewed.

  6. Quantitative Sensory Testing in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, several published articles have demonstrated that quantitative sensory testing (QST) is useful in the analysis of musculoskeletal pain disorders. Based on the evidence from these studies, it is assumed that QST might be a useful tool in the analysis of the pathogenesis, classification, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The objective of this paper is to discuss measurement properties of QST and potentials research and clinical applications in musculoskeletal pain. This is a review of the current knowledge base on QST as it relates to musculoskeletal pain disorders. We based our summary on articles retrieved from Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to present) including EMBASE, AMED, and PsycINFO databases to search for all published literature focused on QST and musculoskeletal pain. QST has been shown to be related to neural sensitivity in musculoskeletal pain. QST measurement properties have been evaluated for multiple sensory evaluation modalities and protocols with no clear superior instrument or test protocol. The research evidence is incomplete, but suggests potential clinical benefits for predicting outcomes and subtyping pain. Threshold detection testing is commonly used to quantify sensory loss or gain, in current practice and has shown moderate reliability. Intensity/magnitude rating can be assessed on a wide range of rating scales and may be more useful for pain rating in a clinical context. Threshold detection-based testing and intensity/magnitude rating-based testing can be combined to determine pain threshold in clinical evaluation. Musculoskeletal pain management may benefit from treatment algorithms that consider mechanism, pain quality, or neurophysiological correlates. Non-invasive QST may be helpful to find sensory array of altered nociceptive process. Due to the diverse etiopathogenetic basis of musculoskeletal pain disorders, a broad range of reliable and valid QST tests may be needed to analyze the various

  7. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  8. Neurologic and musculoskeletal complications of burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffery C; Qu, Huaguang David

    2011-05-01

    As more people survive burn injuries, there is an increasing focus on managing the complications of burn injuries with the ultimate goal of improving survivors' quality of life. Musculoskeletal and neurologic sequelae are significant complications of burn injury. Electrical injury is a subcategory of burns with multiple musculoskeletal and neurologic complications. Knowledge of these complications helps clinicians provide optimal long-term care for burn survivors and enables survivors to attain maximal recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hox genes and limb musculoskeletal development.

    PubMed

    Pineault, Kyriel M; Wellik, Deneen M

    2014-12-01

    In the musculoskeletal system, muscle, tendon, and bone tissues develop in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner, and integrate into a cohesive functional unit by forming specific connections unique to each region of the musculoskeletal system. The mechanisms of these patterning and integration events are an area of great interest in musculoskeletal biology. Hox genes are a family of important developmental regulators and play critical roles in skeletal patterning throughout the axial and appendicular skeleton. Unexpectedly, Hox genes are not expressed in the differentiated cartilage or other skeletal cells, but rather are highly expressed in the tightly associated stromal connective tissues as well as regionally expressed in tendons and muscle connective tissue. Recent work has revealed a previously unappreciated role for Hox in patterning all the musculoskeletal tissues of the limb. These observations suggest that integration of the musculoskeletal system is regulated, at least in part, by Hox function in the stromal connective tissue. This review will outline our current understanding of Hox function in patterning and integrating the musculoskeletal tissues.

  10. Musculoskeletal symptoms among truck assembly workers.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tokeer

    2004-12-01

    Concerns were raised about the possibility of a high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in a truck assembly plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in a group of truck assembly workers. A cross-sectional study of 461 truck assembly workers was carried out using a modified version of the Nordic questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Employees were further subdivided into three distinct occupational subgroups: skilled line workers (252), bench subassembly workers (108) and material handlers (101). Responses were analysed according to occupational subgroup. Seventy per cent of 461 truck assembly workers responded to the questionnaires. Seventy-nine per cent of respondents had been troubled with musculoskeletal symptoms in the last 12 months. The commonest musculoskeletal symptoms were from the lower back (65%), neck (60%) and shoulders (57%). Musculoskeletal symptoms were related to age, length of service, occupational subgroup and GHQ12 score. There was a high reported prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in this group of truck assembly workers, with a differing pattern of symptom reporting depending on occupational subgroup. Risk reduction recommendations were made to the site management. A further study investigating the relationship between symptoms and specific hazards is planned.

  11. Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.

    PubMed

    Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol

  12. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  13. Approach to managing musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Richard H.; Choquette, Denis; Craig, Brian N.; De Angelis, Carlo; Habal, Flavio; Fulthorpe, Gordon; Stewart, John I.; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Davis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians and pharmacists with practical, evidence- and expertise-based guidance on choosing the safest approach to using analgesics to manage patients with musculoskeletal pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Health care providers from family practice, rheumatology, gastroenterology, hepatology, internal medicine, and pharmacy participated in an educational needs assessment regarding the management of pain and the safety of commonly used analgesics. Feedback from one-on-one interviews was compiled and distributed to participants who selected key topics. Topics chosen formed the basis for the discussions of this multidisciplinary panel that reviewed data on the safety of analgesics, particularly in regard to comorbidity and concurrent use with other therapies. MAIN MESSAGE Treatment should begin with an effective analgesic with the best safety profile at the lowest dose and escalate to higher doses and different analgesics as required. Acetaminophen is a safe medication that should be considered first-line therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with potential adverse gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, and cardiovascular effects. Physicians should not prescribe NSAIDs before taking a careful history and doing a physical examination so they have the information they need to weigh the risks (adverse effects and potential drug interactions) and benefits for individual patients. CONCLUSION Taking a complete and accurate history and doing a physical examination are essential for choosing the safest analgesic for a particular patient. PMID:17872814

  14. Mini Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Because NASA's approach to space exploration calls for long-term extended missions, there is a pressing need to equip astronauts with effective exercise regimens that will maintain musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. ZIN Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative miniature treadmill for use in both zero-gravity and terrestrial environments. The treadmill offers excellent periodic impact exercise to stimulate cardiovascular activity and bone remodeling as well as resistive capability to encourage full-body muscle maintenance. A novel speed-control algorithm allows users to modulate treadmill speed by adjusting stride, and a new subject load device provides a more Earth-like gravity replacement load. This new and compact treadmill offers a unique approach to managing astronaut health while addressing the inherent and stringent challenges of space flight. The innovation also has the potential to offer numerous terrestrial applications, as a real-time daily load stimulus (DLS) measurement feature provides an effective mechanism to combat or manage osteoporosis, a major public health threat for 55 percent of Americans over the age of 50.

  15. Environmental discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Elovainio, M; De Nardis, I; Heponiemi, T; Bergamaschi, A

    2011-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the most common occupational disease in Europe, with high prevalence among hospital workers. Both environmental and psychosocial work factors may impact significantly on the development and exacerbation of MSDs. To evaluate whether environmental factors at work are associated with MSDs in hospital workers and to investigate potential interactions between environmental and psychosocial risk factors in the workplace that are associated with MSDs. A cross-sectional investigation was performed using the Nordic questionnaire to assess MSDs, the IAQ/MM-040 indoor air questionnaire for environmental factors, the demand-control model for job strain and the Goldberg questionnaire for anxiety and depression. The association between environmental factors and MSDs was studied using logistic regression analysis. In addition, the interactions of environmental factors with strain, anxiety and depression for MSDs were examined. Environmental complaints were associated with MSDs. The strongest associations were found between temperature complaints (OR 2.73), noise and light complaints (OR 2.22), other environmental complaints (OR 3.12) and upper limb disorders. A significant interaction between temperature complaints and strain for upper limb disorders (F = 9.52, P < 0.05) was found. To prevent MSDs, a multi-level approach is needed, including environmental measures and interventions directed to both psychosocial and organizational factors.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders among Irish farmers.

    PubMed

    Osborne, A; Blake, C; McNamara, J; Meredith, D; Phelan, J; Cunningham, C

    2010-12-01

    Farming is an occupation that predisposes individuals to health problems including musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There is limited research regarding MSDs among farmers especially in Ireland. To establish the prevalence of MSDs, identify the most commonly affected body regions and to explore what factors may influence the development of the most common MSDs among farmers in Ireland. A questionnaire survey of Irish farmers was conducted. The study sample comprised 600 farmers (100 farmers from each of the six main farm enterprise systems in Ireland). Of the 600 farmers, 56% had experienced a MSD in the previous year. The most commonly experienced MSDs were back pain (37%) and neck/shoulder pain (25%). Other MSDs experienced in the previous year included knee pain (9%), hand-wrist-elbow pain (9%), ankle/foot pain (9%) and hip pain (8%). Overall, MSDs were more common in farmers working longer hours (P < 0.05). Back pain was more prevalent in full-time farmers (P < 0.05), while prevalence of hip pain was greater in farmers who were older (P < 0.01), full time (P < 0.05), farming for longer (P < 0.01) and working for longer hours (P < 0.01). Farm enterprise was not a factor in influencing the development of MSDs. These findings suggest that the number of hours worked by farmers, rather than enterprise specific tasks render farmers more susceptible to MSDs. Further investigation is needed to explore risk factors in the development of MSDs.

  17. Recognising neuroplasticity in musculoskeletal rehabilitation: a basis for greater collaboration between musculoskeletal and neurological physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Heneghan, Nicola R; Tsao, Henry; Stanwell, Peter T; Rivett, Darren A; Van Vliet, Paulette M

    2014-12-01

    Evidence is emerging for central nervous system (CNS) changes in the presence of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain. Motor control exercises, and potentially manual therapy, can induce changes in the CNS, yet the focus in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice is conventionally on movement impairments with less consideration of intervention-induced neuroplastic changes. Studies in healthy individuals and those with neurological dysfunction provide examples of strategies that may also be used to enhance neuroplasticity during the rehabilitation of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction, improving the effectiveness of interventions. In this paper, the evidence for neuroplastic changes in patients with musculoskeletal conditions is discussed. The authors compare and contrast neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapy clinical paradigms in the context of the motor learning principles of experience-dependent plasticity: part and whole practice, repetition, task-specificity and feedback that induces an external focus of attention in the learner. It is proposed that increased collaboration between neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapists and researchers will facilitate new discoveries on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning sensorimotor changes in patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. This may lead to greater integration of strategies to enhance neuroplasticity in patients treated in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The genetic pleiotropy of musculoskeletal aging

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, David; Cohen-Zinder, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal aging is detrimental to multiple bodily functions and starts early, probably in the fourth decade of an individual's life. Sarcopenia is a health problem that is expected to only increase as a greater portion of the population lives longer; prevalence of the related musculoskeletal diseases is similarly expected to increase. Unraveling the biological and biomechanical associations and molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases represents a formidable challenge. There are two major problems making disentangling the biological complexity of musculoskeletal aging difficult: (a) it is a systemic, rather than “compartmental,” problem, which should be approached accordingly, and (b) the aging per se is neither well defined nor reliably measurable. A unique challenge of studying any age-related condition is a need of distinguishing between the “norm” and “pathology,” which are interwoven throughout the aging organism. We argue that detecting genes with pleiotropic functions in musculoskeletal aging is needed to provide insights into the potential biological mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences insusceptibility to the musculoskeletal diseases. However, exploring pleiotropic relationships among the system's components is challenging both methodologically and conceptually. We aimed to focus on genetic aspects of the cross-talk between muscle and its “neighboring” tissues and organs (tendon, bone, and cartilage), and to explore the role of genetics to find the new molecular links between skeletal muscle and other parts of the “musculoskeleton.” Identification of significant genetic variants underlying the musculoskeletal system's aging is now possible more than ever due to the currently available advanced genomic technologies. In summary, a “holistic” genetic approach is needed to study the systems's normal functioning and the disease predisposition in order to improve musculoskeletal health. PMID:22934054

  19. The genetic pleiotropy of musculoskeletal aging.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Cohen-Zinder, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal aging is detrimental to multiple bodily functions and starts early, probably in the fourth decade of an individual's life. Sarcopenia is a health problem that is expected to only increase as a greater portion of the population lives longer; prevalence of the related musculoskeletal diseases is similarly expected to increase. Unraveling the biological and biomechanical associations and molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases represents a formidable challenge. There are two major problems making disentangling the biological complexity of musculoskeletal aging difficult: (a) it is a systemic, rather than "compartmental," problem, which should be approached accordingly, and (b) the aging per se is neither well defined nor reliably measurable. A unique challenge of studying any age-related condition is a need of distinguishing between the "norm" and "pathology," which are interwoven throughout the aging organism. We argue that detecting genes with pleiotropic functions in musculoskeletal aging is needed to provide insights into the potential biological mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences insusceptibility to the musculoskeletal diseases. However, exploring pleiotropic relationships among the system's components is challenging both methodologically and conceptually. We aimed to focus on genetic aspects of the cross-talk between muscle and its "neighboring" tissues and organs (tendon, bone, and cartilage), and to explore the role of genetics to find the new molecular links between skeletal muscle and other parts of the "musculoskeleton." Identification of significant genetic variants underlying the musculoskeletal system's aging is now possible more than ever due to the currently available advanced genomic technologies. In summary, a "holistic" genetic approach is needed to study the systems's normal functioning and the disease predisposition in order to improve musculoskeletal health.

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations in diabetic versus prediabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Alimohammad; Iraj, Bijan; Barzanian, Jafar; Maracy, Mohammadreza; Smiley, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in a sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and those with prediabetes and compare the findings between the two groups. One hundred and eighty-eight patients with DM and 125 prediabetic subjects were randomly enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Demographic data and past history were recorded. Musculoskeletal physical examinations were done by a single rheumatologist. Regression analyses were employed to assess the crude and adjusted effects of determinants on DM musculoskeletal manifestations (DMMMs). Female/male ratio was not significantly different between diabetic and prediabetic patients (4.4 vs. 4.7, respectively, P = 0.9). However, diabetic patients were significantly older than the prediabetic ones (56.6 vs. 52 years, respectively, P = 0.0001); 83.5% of diabetic patients and 52.8% of prediabetic ones had at least one musculoskeletal manifestation (P = 0.0001). The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and shoulder involvement were almost two times more common (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.015) in diabetic patients than in prediabetic ones (73.4% vs. 38% and 21.2% vs. 9.5%, respectively). Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) was 48% and 36.5% in patients with diabetes and prediabetes, respectively (P = 0.053). Multivariate backward regression analysis showed age, sex, BMI (body mass index) and DM as the significant determinants in development of musculoskeletal manifestations in all subjects. Age and BMI were the only significant factors associated with musculoskeletal manifestations in both diabetic and prediabetic patients. Diabetic and prediabetic patients may show high prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations. In non-diabetic patients diagnosed with CTS, prediabetes might be ruled out. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Abdominal and pelvic tumors with musculoskeletal histology.

    PubMed

    Dyrstad, Sara W; Fowler, Amy M; Jokerst, Clint E; Baker, Jonathan C; Hillen, Travis J; Menias, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case-based review of the broad spectrum of tumors with musculoskeletal histology that can arise in the abdomen or pelvis and involve the soft tissues, muscle, and bone. In this article, pathology-proven cases are presented with a focus on radiographic, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography findings. The imaging features that differentiate tumors with musculoskeletal histology from more common abdominal tumors are discussed. Representative cases include malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, desmoplastic fibroma, neurofibrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, intimal sarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, teratoma, and chordoma. A variety of tumors with musculoskeletal histology can arise in the abdomen and pelvis. In some cases, unique imaging characteristics allow a confident diagnosis, whereas other cases have a more nonspecific appearance. Recognition of imaging features that suggest a musculoskeletal tumor including direct extension from a bone or neural foramen, the presence of cartilaginous or osseous matrix, or macroscopic fat would allow the radiologist to suggest the proper diagnosis. Recognizing imaging characteristics of tumors with musculoskeletal histology is important clinically as management and prognosis differ from that of more common abdominal tumors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Imaging features of extraaxial musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Sanghvi, Darshana A; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. TB can involve pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary sites. The musculoskeletal system is involved in 1–3% of patients with tuberculosis. Although musculoskeletal TB has become uncommon in the Western world, it remains a huge problem in Asia, Africa, and many developing countries. Tuberculous spondylitis is the most common form of musculoskeletal TB and accounts for approximately 50% of cases. Extraspinal musculoskeletal TB shows a predilection for large joints (hip and knee) and para-articular areas; isolated soft tissue TB is extremely rare. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are mandatory to prevent serious destruction of joints and skeletal deformity. However, due to the nonspecific and often indolent clinical presentation, the diagnosis may be delayed. Radiological assessment is often the first step in the diagnostic workup of patients with musculoskeletal TB and further investigations are decided by the findings on radiography. Both the radiologist and the clinician should be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis. In this manuscript we review the imaging features of extraspinal bone, joint, and soft tissue TB. PMID:19881081

  3. Evolving strategies in mechanobiology to more effectively treat damaged musculoskeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Butler, David L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Shearn, Jason T; Kinneberg, Kirsten R C; Breidenbach, Andrew P; Lalley, Andrea L; Gilday, Steven D; Gooch, Cynthia; Rao, M B; Liu, Chia-feng; Wylie, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we had four primary objectives. (1) We reviewed a brief history of the Lissner award and the individual for whom it is named, H.R. Lissner. We examined the type (musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and other) and scale (organism to molecular) of research performed by prior Lissner awardees using a hierarchical paradigm adopted at the 2007 Biomechanics Summit of the US National Committee on Biomechanics. (2) We compared the research conducted by the Lissner award winners working in the musculoskeletal (MS) field with the evolution of our MS research and showed similar trends in scale over the past 35 years. (3) We discussed our evolving mechanobiology strategies for treating musculoskeletal injuries by accounting for clinical, biomechanical, and biological considerations. These strategies included studies to determine the function of the anterior cruciate ligament and its graft replacements as well as novel methods to enhance soft tissue healing using tissue engineering, functional tissue engineering, and, more recently, fundamental tissue engineering approaches. (4) We concluded with thoughts about future directions, suggesting grand challenges still facing bioengineers as well as the immense opportunities for young investigators working in musculoskeletal research. Hopefully, these retrospective and prospective analyses will be useful as the ASME Bioengineering Division charts future research directions.

  4. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

  5. Pitfalls in MR imaging of musculoskeletal tumors.

    PubMed

    Arkun, Remide; Argin, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    A wide range of musculoskeletal tumors and tumor-like conditions may be encountered when patients undergo radiologic examinations. Although MR imaging is a powerful medical imaging method that has been used extensively in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors, nontumoral or tumorlike lesions may have similar imaging findings. The imaging features of certain normal, reactive, benign neoplastic, inflammatory, traumatic, or degenerative processes in the musculoskeletal system may mimic malignant tumors. Misinterpretation of the imaging findings can lead to inappropriate clinical management of the patient. We review and describe the MR imaging characteristics of nontumoral bone lesions that are located in the marrow cavity, cortical bone, or in both, and soft tissue lesions that may be misinterpreted as sarcoma. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Musculoskeletal infections associated with Citrobacter koseri

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Z; Weerasinghe, C; Dunkow, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Citrobacter koseri is a well known cause of central nervous system infections in the paediatric setting. Musculoskeletal infections caused by C koseri are rare, with only 14 previously reported cases. We present the first recorded case of C koseri induced septic arthritis of the knee along with a review of the literature. Methods A search of the PubMed, Embase® and Google Scholar™ databases was undertaken. Only complete or near complete cases were reviewed. Findings Fourteen musculoskeletal infections were identified. Of these, five were associated with an operative procedure and five involved a septic joint. Surgical treatment was required in the majority of cases and cure was achieved in all cases following prolonged antibiotic use. Conclusions C koseri associated musculoskeletal infections may complicate primary orthopaedic procedures. The organism can present aggressively and can be difficult to identify microbiologically. It is sensitive to newer generation beta-lactams, cephalosporin-based antibiotics and timely surgery. PMID:27412805

  7. Musculoskeletal infections associated with Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Kwaees, T A; Hakim, Z; Weerasinghe, C; Dunkow, P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Citrobacter koseri is a well known cause of central nervous system infections in the paediatric setting. Musculoskeletal infections caused by C koseri are rare, with only 14 previously reported cases. We present the first recorded case of C koseri induced septic arthritis of the knee along with a review of the literature. Methods A search of the PubMed, Embase(®) and Google Scholar™ databases was undertaken. Only complete or near complete cases were reviewed. Findings Fourteen musculoskeletal infections were identified. Of these, five were associated with an operative procedure and five involved a septic joint. Surgical treatment was required in the majority of cases and cure was achieved in all cases following prolonged antibiotic use. Conclusions C koseri associated musculoskeletal infections may complicate primary orthopaedic procedures. The organism can present aggressively and can be difficult to identify microbiologically. It is sensitive to newer generation beta-lactams, cephalosporin-based antibiotics and timely surgery.

  8. Aquatic exercise & balneotherapy in musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2012-06-01

    This is a best-evidence synthesis providing an evidence-based summary on the effectiveness of aquatic exercises and balneotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. The most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions addressed in this review include: low back pain, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. Over 30 years of research demonstrates that exercises in general, and specifically aquatic exercises, are beneficial for reducing pain and disability in many musculoskeletal conditions demonstrating small to moderate effect sizes ranging between 0.19 and 0.32. Balneotherapy might be beneficial, but the evidence is yet insufficient to make a definitive statement about its use. High-quality trials are needed on balneotherapy and aquatic exercises research especially in specific patient categories that might benefit most.

  9. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Danyu

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  10. Complementary and alternative treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Grazio, Simeon; Balen, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high and increasing worldwide. Patients usually use CAM in addition to conventional medicine, mainly to treat pain. In a large number of cases, people use CAM for chronic musculoskeletal pain as in osteoarthritis, back pain, neck pain, or fibromyalgia. Herewith, a review is presented of CAM efficacy in treating musculoskeletal pain for which, however, no scientific research has so far provided evidence solid enough. In some rare cases where adequate pain control cannot be achieved, CAM might be considered in rational and individual approach based on the first general rule in medicine "not to harm" and on the utility theory of each intervention, i.e. according to the presumed mechanism of painful stimulus and with close monitoring of the patient's response. Further high quality studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy and side effects of CAM methods. Therefore, conventional medicine remains the main mode of treatment for patients with musculoskeletal painful conditions.

  11. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R

    2014-11-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomic and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter. In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal metrics of white matter integrity compared with healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD in the anterior limbs of the internal capsule and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a P < .01 level: fractional anisotropy in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with total pain experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of the internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus was correlated with total pain experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both total pain experience and pain catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that white matter abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain as a cause, a predisposing factor, a consequence, or a compensatory adaptation. Patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit altered metrics of diffusion in the brain's white matter compared with healthy volunteers, and some of these differences are

  12. Musicians' illness perceptions of musculoskeletal complaints.

    PubMed

    Kok, Laura M; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; Fiocco, Marta; Kaptein, Ad A; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to know the views of people about their illness, i.e., illness perceptions, determine coping strategies, and outcome. Previous research suggests a higher prevalence and a different perception of musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. The aim of this study is to compare illness perceptions related to musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. In this cross-sectional study, students from three music academies (n = 345) and one university medical center (n = 2,870) in the Netherlands received an electronic questionnaire concerning questions on sociodemographic characteristics, use of musical instruments, occurrence and characteristics of musculoskeletal complaints in the past year, and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Baseline and B-IPQ scores were compared between the samples by means of t tests, chi-square tests, and regression models to adjust for differences in sociodemographic characteristics. Eighty-three music academy students and 494 medical students completed the questionnaire (response rates, 25.5 and 17.6 %, respectively). Seventy-four (89 %) persons in the musician group and 382 (78 %) persons in the nonmusician group reported occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints during the last 12 months. Adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, the B-IPQ scores of the domains consequences (my illness is a serious condition), concern (I am extremely concerned about my illness), and emotions (my illness makes me scared) were significantly higher among musicians, whereas personal control (there is little I can do to improve my illness), identity (number of symptoms patient sees as part of illness) were not significantly different. Music academy students had a significant more positive score on treatment control. Music academy students report more negative perceptions of their musculoskeletal complaints compared to medical students. Although some selection bias is

  13. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; Richardson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of the Musculoskeletal System features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors; infections; musculoskeletal trauma; spinal disorders; and miscellaneous conditions. The authors comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans. An outstanding selection of more than 250 detail-revealing illustrations depicts representatives MRI findings.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  15. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Studies of the Musculoskeletal System PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Subburaman Mohan, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Loma Linda Veterans...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03...proposed research projects focuses on bone health, including relevance to the musculoskeletal system in battlefield performance and in battlefield

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of musculoskeletal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Aglamis, Serpil; Bozdag, Pinar Gundogan; Denk, Affan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis. Sixty-eight among 304 patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis, aged 12-82 years (average, 50.2 years), were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical findings, Brucella agglutination tests, and MRI findings. MRI was performed to all of the patients with sacroiliitis, spondylitis-spondylodiscitis, and peripheral arthritis. Brucella serum agglutination test was >1/160 in all cases and blood cultures were positive in twelve cases. The most commonly affected site was the spine (57.3%), wherein lumbar vertebrae were found to be most commonly affected. The second most common affected site was sacroiliac joint (26.4%), whereas peripheral joints were affected in 11 cases (16.1%). Brucellosis may affect various sites in musculoskeletal system. The spine was the most frequently affected site in our study. Sacroiliac joints and the other peripheral joints were less commonly involved sites. Brucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a patient with arthralgia or symptoms of musculoskeletal system disorders especially in endemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Musculoskeletal tumors: significance of morphological diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Hauptmann, K; Lohmann, C H; Jundt, G

    2009-06-01

    Musculoskeletal tumors, particularly bone neoplasms, are very rare. Diagnosis and treatment require an interdisciplinary concept as well as wide experience of all physicians involved. The final histopathologic diagnosis should not be confirmed without information regarding the patient's age, exact localization, and radiological findings. The requirements of additional diagnostic procedures (molecular pathology) have to be taken into consideration when planning a biopsy.

  18. Prevalence and clinical picture of musculoskeletal sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Salari, Masoumeh; Rezaieyazdi, Zahra

    2014-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease affecting different organs with different frequency rates depending on geographical location. Musculoskeletal abnormalities includes osseous lesions (small and large bone sarcoidosis), sarcoidal arthropathy, and sarcoidal myopathy. Musculoskeletal involvement is reported in a significant number of patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical picture of musculoskeletal sarcoidosis in Iranian cohort of patients with sarcoidosis. We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study including 30 patients with sarcoidosis who had hospitalized in the Rheumatology Department at Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. The patients were evaluated for musculoskeletal symptoms using history, physical examination, and paraclinical data. Of the 30 studied patients, 24 were female (80%) and six were male (20%). The mean age at diagnosis was 38 years. Sarcoidal arthropathy (arthritis and periarthritis) was observed in 26 patients (86.6%). Furthermore, the initial presentation was associated with joint symptoms in 19 cases (63.3%); acute arthritis developed in 17 (65%) while bone and muscle involvements each occurred in 2 (6.6%). Sarcoidosis is a common disease in women aged 20 to 40 years. The most common involved joint were consecutively ankles, knees, and wrists, reaching a accumulated frequency of 86.6%; however, bone and muscle involvements were uncommon.

  19. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  20. Chronic musculoskeletal pain in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Small, Eric

    2002-06-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is becoming increasingly common in young athletes. When these athletes do not respond well to standard treatments, for example physical theraphy and anti-inflammatories, other diagnoses must be considered, such as reflex sympathetic dystrophy, fibromyalgia, and/or overtraining syndrome.

  1. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  2. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  3. Optimising musculoskeletal care for patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Carcao, Manuel; Hilliard, Pamela; Escobar, Miguel A; Solimeno, Luigi; Mahlangu, Johnny; Santagostino, Elena

    2015-12-01

    Despite recent improvements in the quality of care and treatment outcomes for haemophilia, joint disease remains a major concern for patients with and without inhibitors. Most bleeding episodes occur in the musculoskeletal system, and recurrent bleeding may result in progressive joint damage, leading to haemophilic arthropathy. Consequently, early identification and management of musculoskeletal bleeding episodes are important to prevent crippling deformities and dysfunction. Management strategies should aim at optimising joint function by reducing the frequency of, and preventing, joint bleeds. Although prophylactic factor replacement is proven to be effective in reducing bleeding frequency into joints and preserving musculoskeletal function in patients without inhibitors, the role for prophylaxis (with bypassing agents) in patients with inhibitors remains unclear. The available bypassing agents, activated prothrombin complex concentrate and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), are currently the standard of care for acute bleeding episodes in patients with high-titre inhibitors. These agents also prevent bleeding during elective orthopaedic surgery (EOS) in this patient population. This review discusses published data and uses illustrative cases to describe effective strategies for assessing joint health and maintaining optimal musculoskeletal care, focusing on the use of rFVIIa for haemostatic control in haemarthroses and when EOS is required in patients with inhibitors.

  4. Comparison of work-related fear-avoidance beliefs across different anatomical locations with musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Simon, Corey B; Stryker, Sandra E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    The influence of work-related fear-avoidance on pain and function has been consistently reported for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain. Emerging evidence suggests similar influences exist for other anatomical locations of musculoskeletal pain, such as the cervical spine and extremities. However, research is limited in comparing work-related fear-avoidance and associations with clinical outcomes across different anatomical locations. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between work-related fear-avoidance, gender, and clinical outcomes across four different musculoskeletal pain locations for patients being treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting. This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained prospectively from a cohort of 313 participants receiving physical therapy from an outpatient clinic. No interaction was found between gender and anatomical location of musculoskeletal pain on work-related fear-avoidance scores. Work-related fear-avoidance scores were higher in the cervical group versus the lower extremity group; however, there were no other differences across anatomical locations. Work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake pain intensity in patients with spine pain but not extremity pain. Conversely, work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake function for participants with extremity pain but not spine pain. Similar results were observed for change scores, with higher work-related fear-avoidance being associated with more, not less, change in pain and function for certain anatomical locations. These findings suggest that work-related fear-avoidance is similar for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain. However, associations between work-related fear-avoidance and clinical outcomes may differ based on the anatomical location of that pain. Further, increased work-related fear-avoidance may not be indicative of poor clinical outcomes for this type of patient population.

  5. Musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste workers in India: A cross-sectional risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Endreddy Manikanta; Yasobant, Sandul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Waste management is a necessary activity around the world, but involves a variety of health hazards. In a developing country like India, municipal solid waste is collected manually requiring heavy physical activity. Among all occupational health issues, musculoskeletal problems are common among waste collectors in the form of nonfatal injuries because of the presence of such risk factors (lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing). We have thus conducted this study to evaluate musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among municipal solid waste (MSW) workers. Methodology: A cross-sectional study using probability proportionate to size sampling, recruited 220 MSW workers from the Chennai Municipal Corporation, India for this study. A pretested validated questionnaire has been used to collect data on demographic and occupational history and information on musculoskeletal pain. Data analysis was performed using R software (3.0.1 version). Results: 70% of the participants reported that they had been troubled with musculoskeletal pain in one or more of the 9 defined body regions during the last 12 months, whereas 91.8% had pain during the last 7 days. Higher prevalence of symptoms in knees, shoulders, and lower back was found to be 84.5%, 74.5%, and 50.9% respectively. Female illiterate workers with lower socioeconomic status were found to have higher odds for MSDs. Similarly, higher body mass index having no physical activity increases the chance of odds having MSDs. Conclusion: The higher percentage of musculoskeletal symptoms among MSW workers could be attributed to the long duration of employment, the low job control, and the nature of their job, which is physically demanding. A workplace of health promotion model integration can minimize the reported high prevalence, and a prospective cohort study could be recommended further. PMID:26985409

  6. Cluster Analysis of Symptoms Among Patients with Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piligian, George; Glutting, Joseph J.; Hanlon, Alexandra; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Some musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity are not readily classified. The study objective was to determine if there were symptom patterns in self-identified repetitive strain injury (RSI) patients. Methods Members (n = 700) of the Dutch RSI Patients Association filled out a detailed symptom questionnaire. Factor analysis followed by cluster analysis grouped correlated symptoms. Results Eight clusters, based largely on symptom severity and quality were formulated. All but one cluster showed diffuse symptoms; the exception was characterized by bilateral symptoms of stiffness and aching pain in the shoulder/neck. Conclusions Case definitions which localize upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders to a specific anatomical area may be incomplete. Future clustering studies should rely on both signs and symptoms. Data could be collected from health care providers prospectively to determine the possible prognostic value of the identified clusters with respect to natural history, chronicity, and return to work. PMID:20414797

  7. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G.; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomical and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter (WM). In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics, and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal WM integrity as compared to healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the splenium of corpus callosum, and left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD bilaterally in the anterior limbs of internal capsule, and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a p<0.01 level: FA in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with Total Pain Experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus were correlated with Total Pain Experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both Total Pain Experience and Pain Catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that WM abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain; either as a cause, predisposing factor, consequence, or compensatory adaptation. PMID:25135468

  8. Final diagnosis of children and adolescents with musculoskeletal complaints.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Ozlem; Düzova, Ali; Tekşam, Ozlem; Karabulut, Erdem; Derman, Orhan; Kale, Gulsev; Ozen, Seza

    2017-02-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) are one of the leading causes of outpatient admissions. However, analytical and epidemiological data are limited. The aim of this study is to identify the etiology of MSCs (excluding acute traumatic conditions) in children and adolescents, and to identify clues for the differential diagnosis. Children and adolescents presenting with musculoskeletal pain, swelling or limitation of movement were enrolled in a prospective design. Demographic, clinical and laboratory features were recorded. Four hundred and twenty-two children (48.2% female) with a mean age of 7.90±3.95 years were enrolled. Etiology was identified in 97.2% of the cases: non-inflammatory and mechanical conditions (NIMC; 42.2%), rheumatic diseases (RD; 31%), infection-related disorders (IRD; 21.6%) and malignancy (M; 2.4%). NIMC was characterized by longer duration of complaints, a higher rate of non-articular complaints, a lower rate of joint involvement and limping and lower levels of leukocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The prevalence of RD was higher in the age group of >12 years; younger age was associated with higher prevalence of IRD. Small-joint involvement was highest in the RD group. Median ESR in RD and M groups was higher; compared to the other groups; the frequency of patients with ESR ≥ 60 mm/hr was higher in the M group; compared to the RD group. In the RD group familial Mediterranean fever (9.7%), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (8.3%) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (5.7%) were the leading causes of MSCs. RD accounted for one-third of the etiologies for MSCs. Age, duration of complaints, pattern of joint involvement and acute phase reactants are practical tools that may guide the pediatrician for diagnosis.

  9. Reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire for patients with musculoskeletal disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Jung, Jin-Hwa; In, Tae-Sung; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire, which was translated into Korean, for patients with musculoskeletal disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five subjects (26 males and 29 females) with musculoskeletal diseases participated in the study. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire focuses on a limited range of physical functions and includes a dysfunction index and a bother index. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, and validity was examined by correlating short musculoskeletal function assessment scores with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) score. [Results] The reliability was 0.97 for the dysfunction index and 0.94 for the bother index. Validity was established by comparison with Korean version of the SF-36. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:27799696

  10. Reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire for patients with musculoskeletal disorder.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoung-Sim; Jung, Jin-Hwa; In, Tae-Sung; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and validity of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire, which was translated into Korean, for patients with musculoskeletal disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five subjects (26 males and 29 females) with musculoskeletal diseases participated in the study. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire focuses on a limited range of physical functions and includes a dysfunction index and a bother index. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient, and validity was examined by correlating short musculoskeletal function assessment scores with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) score. [Results] The reliability was 0.97 for the dysfunction index and 0.94 for the bother index. Validity was established by comparison with Korean version of the SF-36. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the Korean version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. In vivo tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Seth D; Chow, Andre G Y; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-10-01

    Tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissues often involves the in vitro manipulation and culture of progenitor cells, growth factors and biomaterial scaffolds. Though in vitro tissue engineering has greatly increased our understanding of cellular behavior and cell-material interactions, this methodology is often unable to recreate tissue with the hierarchical organization and vascularization found within native tissues. Accordingly, investigators have focused on alternative in vivo tissue engineering strategies, whereby the traditional triad (cells, growth factors, scaffolds) or a combination thereof are directly implanted at the damaged tissue site or within ectopic sites capable of supporting neo-tissue formation. In vivo tissue engineering may offer a preferential route for regeneration of musculoskeletal and other tissues with distinct advantages over in vitro methods based on the specific location of endogenous cultivation, recruitment of autologous cells, and patient-specific regenerated tissues.

  12. Musculoskeletal Injuries Resulting from Use of Hoverboards.

    PubMed

    Ho, Michelle; Horn, B David; Lin, Ines C; Chang, Benjamin; Carrigan, Robert B; Shah, Apurva

    2017-01-01

    Hoverboards were recently introduced to the US consumer market and experienced rapid popularity. Given the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury with other wheeled recreation devices, we sought to analyze hoverboard injuries in children. A retrospective review of patients with musculoskeletal injury related to hoverboard use was performed at a tertiary care children's hospital. From November 2015 to January 2016, 2.3% of all fractures were related to hoverboards. Common injury mechanisms were fall (79%) and finger entrapment between wheel and wheel-well (10%). The most frequently fractured sites included the distal radius (43%) and phalanx (17%). Common surgical procedures were nailbed repair and pinning for Seymour fracture and percutaneous pinning for distal radius fracture. There exists high risk for distal radius fractures from falls and phalanx fractures from finger entrapment between the wheel and wheel-well. Hoverboard safety can be improved with regular use of wrist guards and improved wheel-well design.

  13. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports.

  14. Musculoskeletal dysfunctions associated with swimmers' shoulder.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Tate, Angela; Kuppens, Kevin; Feijen, Stef; Michener, Lori A

    2017-02-11

    Shoulder pain is the most reported area of orthopaedic injury in swimmers. The so-called 'swimmers' shoulder' has been applied to a variety of complaints involving shoulder pain in swimmers without specific reference to contributing mechanisms or structures. Knowledge of dysfunctions associated with swimmers' shoulder can assist clinicians in developing rehabilitation strategies. This literature review aims at providing clinicians insight into the musculoskeletal mechanisms and impairments associated with swimmers' shoulder that could aid them in developing rehabilitation strategies. The following musculoskeletal dysfunctions will be discussed: muscle activity, strength, endurance, muscle control, range of motion, glenohumeral laxity, glenohumeral instability, shoulder posture and scapular dyskinesis. The findings in this review may have implications for swimmers, their coaches, and rehabilitation specialists working with swimmers.

  15. Principles of surgical management of musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Ramakrishnan

    2008-06-01

    Practical procedures for treatment of fractures and dislocations have been used since the time of Hippocrates in fourth century BC. Orthopaedic surgery became a recognized part of surgical treatment since the mid-nineteenth century, but saw major developments with the invention of x-rays and antibiotics in the early part of the twentieth century. Though orthopaedic surgery had started with an interest in the correction of deformities in children, the major musculoskeletal problems facing orthopaedic surgery today relate to osteoarthritis, trauma (including sports injuries), and osteoporosis. The practice of orthopaedic surgery has evolved with technology: advances in engineering and material science and increasing expectations towards faster rehabilitation have moved orthopaedics into the era of joint replacements, arthroscopy, and less invasive surgical procedures. This chapter aims to provide an evidence-based condensed overview of the surgical management for a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders encountered by primary-care clinicians and rheumatologists.

  16. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; Richardson, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight chapters, the first one presenting the basic principles and terminology of MR imaging. Other chapters provide a sound basis for the understanding of the physics of MR imaging. The results of MR imaging in different pathologic conditions are presented and compared with those obtained with other, more conventional modalities. This book provides an excellent background on the use and possibilities of MR imaging in musculoskeletal conditions.

  17. [The shoe industry and the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, Giacomo; Capodaglio, Edda Maria; Mancin, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Shoes factory workers are engaged in ripetitive tasks, often performed in constrained postures and in concomitance of force applied, which result in increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Risk assessment and ergonomic interventions are part of the on-site prevention program, which should pertain also to gender and age differences. Health and safety issues can be adequately faced by an active epidemiological surveillance complemented by ergonomics.

  18. Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit: Summit Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Walton, Marlei; Davis-Street, Janis; Smaka, Todd J.; Griffin, DeVon

    2006-01-01

    The Medical Informatics and Health Care Systems group in the Office of Space Medicine at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been tasked by NASA with improving overall medical care on the International Space Station (ISS) and providing insights for medical care for future exploration missions. To accomplish this task, a three day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held on August 23-25th, 2005 at Space Center Houston. The purpose of the summit was to review NASA#s a) current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, b) current treatment methods in-flight, and c) risk mitigation strategy for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes that could occur or impact the mission. Additionally, summit participants provided a list of research topics NASA should consider to mitigate risks to astronaut health. Prior to the summit, participants participated in a web-based pre-summit forum to review the NASA Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL) of musculoskeletal conditions that may occur on ISS as well as the resources currently available to treat them. Data from the participants were compiled and integrated with the summit proceedings. Summit participants included experts from the extramural physician and researcher communities, and representatives from NASA Headquarters, the astronaut corps, JSC Medical Operations and Human Adaptations and Countermeasures Offices, Glenn Research Center Human Research Office, and the Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Reconditioning (ASCR) group. The recommendations in this document are based on a summary of summit discussions and the best possible evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal care for astronauts while on the ISS, and include recommendati ons for exploration class missions.

  19. Musculoskeletal symptoms in pharmaceutical sales representatives.

    PubMed

    Sang, Katherine; Gyi, Diane; Haslam, Cheryl

    2010-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a leading cause of work-related ill health. Existing literature indicates that pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs) report a high prevalence of MSDs, possibly exacerbated by the nature of work (prolonged driving and manual handling). In addition, they experience difficulty in accessing occupational health services. To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among PSRs in order to assist their occupational health management through raising risk awareness. A self-completed questionnaire distributed to 205 PSRs within a UK pharmaceutical company was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, psychosocial factors, work tasks undertaken and company car use. To assist understanding of work tasks and organizational factors, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 12 key personnel. The questionnaire response rate was 68%. PSRs reported high mileage and 100% reported working from the car in a typical day. Forty-seven per cent reported both manual handling for > or = 4 h/day and 'often' or 'sometimes' working from the car. Fifty-seven per cent reported low back symptoms in the last 12 months. Interview data revealed issues relating to car choice, storage in the boot and working from the car, which should be considered when developing priorities for preventive management of MSDs. Musculoskeletal symptoms appear to be a problem for PSRs, with risk factors reported as prolonged driving, sitting in the car, working from the car and manual handling. Interventions to facilitate their occupational health management should focus on raising awareness of the risks of prolonged driving and working from the car.

  20. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  1. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a review of the principles and techniques of musculoskeletal MRI and its broad range of diagnostic applications. Opening chapters of the book summarize the principles of musculoskeletal MRI, explaining how these principles can be applied to provide optimal tissue contrast and characterization. Step-by-step guidelines are then offered on patient selection, positioning, and coil techniques, with full consideration of how coils, number of averages, matrix size, repetition time, and other factors affect image quality. Patient throughput and the most commonly used pulse sequences are also discussed. The book features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors;infections;musculoskeletal trauma;spinal disorders;and miscellaneous conditions. The authors' comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans.

  3. [Musculoskeletal disorders in the offshore oil industry].

    PubMed

    Morken, Tone; Tveito, Torill H; Torp, Steffen; Bakke, Ashild

    2004-10-21

    Musculoskeletal disorders are important causes of sick leave and disability among Norwegian offshore petroleum workers. More knowledge and interventions are needed in order to prevent this. In this review we consider prevalence and risk factors among offshore petroleum workers and point to the need for more research. Literature searches on ISI Web of Science and PubMed were supplemented by reports from Norwegian offshore industry companies and the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. Few studies were found on musculoskeletal disorders among offshore petroleum workers. The disorders are widespread, particularly among catering, construction and drilling personnel. It is not clear whether the prevalence is different from that among onshore workers. Risk factors are physical stressors and fast pace of work. Among catering personnel, these disorders are important causes of loss of the required health certificate but we could not identify any review of causes in the offshore industry generally. More scientific studies are needed on musculoskeletal disorders as comparisons of prevalence and risk factors for offshore and onshore workers may point to more effective interventions. Better knowledge of the causes of loss of the health certificate may contribute to preventing early retirement. Interventions to prevent these disorders should be evaluated by controlled intervention studies.

  4. [Effectiveness of rehabilitation with musculoskeletal diseases].

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Wilfried H; Farin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Multidisciplinary treatment focusing on impairments, activities and participation are an important component within the therapeutic regimen in musculoskeletal conditions. In Germany, for more than 95% of the patients multidisciplinary treatment is provided as inpatient rehabilitation. According to the results of a study from the Netherlands, inpatient rehabilitation is superior to usual care in terms of decreasing disease activity and improving emotional well-being in rheumatoid arthritis. Another randomized, controlled study gives evidence that rehabilitation is more effective as compared to usual care in ankylosing spondylitis. In patients suffering from fibromyalgia, after inpatient rehabilitation, symptoms improve significantly and this is true even one year after discharge. The results of a quality management project financed by the German health insurance and including several thousand patients with musculoskeletal diseases show an improvement in physical and emotional dimensions of health status at discharge and after a six month follow-up. Recent studies comparing inpatient with outpatient rehabilitation in patients with musculoskeletal diseases provide information that both forms are equally effective. Taking into account the high number of inpatient rehabilitation procedures in Germany, more outcomes research is required urgently.

  5. A novel application of musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Cortes, Nelson; Ferenček, Zrinka Gregurić; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-09-17

    Ultrasound is an attractive modality for imaging muscle and tendon motion during dynamic tasks and can provide a complementary methodological approach for biomechanical studies in a clinical or laboratory setting. Towards this goal, methods for quantification of muscle kinematics from ultrasound imagery are being developed based on image processing. The temporal resolution of these methods is typically not sufficient for highly dynamic tasks, such as drop-landing. We propose a new approach that utilizes a Doppler method for quantifying muscle kinematics. We have developed a novel vector tissue Doppler imaging (vTDI) technique that can be used to measure musculoskeletal contraction velocity, strain and strain rate with sub-millisecond temporal resolution during dynamic activities using ultrasound. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the repeatability and potential applicability of the vTDI technique in measuring musculoskeletal velocities during a drop-landing task, in healthy subjects. The vTDI measurements can be performed concurrently with other biomechanical techniques, such as 3D motion capture for joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography for timing of muscle activation and force plates for ground reaction force. Integration of these complementary techniques could lead to a better understanding of dynamic muscle function and dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of musculoskeletal disorders.

  6. A Novel Application of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eranki, Avinash; Cortes, Nelson; Ferenček, Zrinka Gregurić; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an attractive modality for imaging muscle and tendon motion during dynamic tasks and can provide a complementary methodological approach for biomechanical studies in a clinical or laboratory setting. Towards this goal, methods for quantification of muscle kinematics from ultrasound imagery are being developed based on image processing. The temporal resolution of these methods is typically not sufficient for highly dynamic tasks, such as drop-landing. We propose a new approach that utilizes a Doppler method for quantifying muscle kinematics. We have developed a novel vector tissue Doppler imaging (vTDI) technique that can be used to measure musculoskeletal contraction velocity, strain and strain rate with sub-millisecond temporal resolution during dynamic activities using ultrasound. The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the repeatability and potential applicability of the vTDI technique in measuring musculoskeletal velocities during a drop-landing task, in healthy subjects. The vTDI measurements can be performed concurrently with other biomechanical techniques, such as 3D motion capture for joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography for timing of muscle activation and force plates for ground reaction force. Integration of these complementary techniques could lead to a better understanding of dynamic muscle function and dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:24084063

  7. Origin of petroleum within our solar system, a review: emphasis on the future prospects of major oil and gas discovery within Mars and moons of various planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.; Mossman, David J.; Ehrman, James M.

    2009-08-01

    comets, recent discoveries of methane, gas hydrates, water as ice and snow storms, and the key geological features within Mars, liquid low molecular weight hydrocarbon (methane to propane) lakes and solid gas hydrates within various moons of Saturn and Jupiter all point to the presence of biologically derived petroleum within our Solar System. Our model of a Universal Unconventional Petroleum System promises major prospects of oil and gas throughout our Solar System and especially within Mars and various moons of Saturn. Based on the physicochemical constraints, earlier research, and recent discoveries we predict a major prospect of heavy oil (similar to Tar Sand in Alberta, Canada; light hydrocarbon gases within Mars.

  8. Musculoskeletal modelling in dogs: challenges and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dries, Billy; Jonkers, Ilse; Dingemanse, Walter; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Vander Sloten, Jos; van Bree, Henri; Gielen, Ingrid

    2016-05-18

    Musculoskeletal models have proven to be a valuable tool in human orthopaedics research. Recently, veterinary research started taking an interest in the computer modelling approach to understand the forces acting upon the canine musculoskeletal system. While many of the methods employed in human musculoskeletal models can applied to canine musculoskeletal models, not all techniques are applicable. This review summarizes the important parameters necessary for modelling, as well as the techniques employed in human musculoskeletal models and the limitations in transferring techniques to canine modelling research. The major challenges in future canine modelling research are likely to centre around devising alternative techniques for obtaining maximal voluntary contractions, as well as finding scaling factors to adapt a generalized canine musculoskeletal model to represent specific breeds and subjects.

  9. Health status, work limitations, and return-to-work trajectories in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Côté, Pierre; Lee, Hyunmi; Severin, Colette; Vidmar, Marjan; Carnide, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the health status and work limitations in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders at 1 month post-injury, stratified by return-to-work status, and to document their return-to-work trajectories 6 months post-injury. Methods A sample of 632 workers with a back or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder, who filed a Workplace Safety and Insurance Board lost-time claim injury, participated in this prospective study. Participants were assessed at baseline (1 month post-injury) and at 6 months follow-up. Results One month post-injury, poor physical health, high levels of depressive symptoms and high work limitations are prevalent in workers, including in those with a sustained first return to work. Workers with a sustained first return to work report a better health status and fewer work limitations than those who experienced a recurrence of work absence or who never returned to work. Six months post-injury, the rate of recurrence of work absence in the trajectories of injured workers who have made at least one return to work attempt is high (38%), including the rate for workers with an initial sustained first return to work (27%). Conclusions There are return-to-work status specific health outcomes in injured workers. A sustained first return to work is not equivalent to a complete recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:17616838

  10. Risk factors for visiting a medical department because of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Werner, Robert A; Franzblau, Alfred; Gell, Nancy; Hartigan, Anne G; Ebersole, Marissa; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-04-01

    This study followed 279 auto assembly workers over 1 year to identify which factors influenced whether a worker would visit the plant medical department because of an upper-extremity musculoskeletal problem. Incident cases were defined as involving workers who had not gone to the plant medical department in the preceding 6 months and then subsequently visited the medical department with a work-related musculoskeletal disorder that was potentially due to repetitive work activity (acute fractures or lacerations were excluded). There were 45 cases identified during the study period. Based on Cox regression analysis, significant predictors for visiting a medical department included exceeding the threshold limit value for hand activity and peak force, a history of diabetes, a current diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, elbow tendonitis, and age under 40 years. The results of this study are consistent with those of other prospective studies that showed that both ergonomic and past medical history are risk factors for an upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder and suggests that there is a healthy worker or survivor effect among older workers.

  11. The effect of financial compensation on health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Murgatroyd, Darnel F; Casey, Petrina P; Cameron, Ian D; Harris, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of financial compensation on health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury requires further exploration because results to date are varied and controversial. This systematic review identifies compensation related factors associated with poorer health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury. Searches were conducted using electronic medical journal databases (Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Informit, Web of Science) for prospective studies published up to October 2012. Selection criteria included: prognostic factors associated with validated health outcomes; six or more months follow up; and multivariate statistical analysis. Studies solely measuring return to work outcomes were excluded. Twenty nine articles were synthesised and then assessed using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology to determine evidence levels. The results were mixed. There was strong evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer psychological function; and legal representation and poorer physical function. There was moderate evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer physical function; and legal representation and poorer psychological function. There was limited evidence of an association between compensation status and increased pain. In seven studies the association depended on the outcome measured. No studies reported an association between compensation related factors and improved health outcomes. Further research is needed to find plausible reasons why compensation related factors are associated with poorer health following musculoskeletal injury.

  12. The Effect of Financial Compensation on Health Outcomes following Musculoskeletal Injury: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Murgatroyd, Darnel F.; Casey, Petrina P.; Cameron, Ian D.; Harris, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of financial compensation on health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury requires further exploration because results to date are varied and controversial. This systematic review identifies compensation related factors associated with poorer health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury. Searches were conducted using electronic medical journal databases (Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Informit, Web of Science) for prospective studies published up to October 2012. Selection criteria included: prognostic factors associated with validated health outcomes; six or more months follow up; and multivariate statistical analysis. Studies solely measuring return to work outcomes were excluded. Twenty nine articles were synthesised and then assessed using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology to determine evidence levels. The results were mixed. There was strong evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer psychological function; and legal representation and poorer physical function. There was moderate evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer physical function; and legal representation and poorer psychological function. There was limited evidence of an association between compensation status and increased pain. In seven studies the association depended on the outcome measured. No studies reported an association between compensation related factors and improved health outcomes. Further research is needed to find plausible reasons why compensation related factors are associated with poorer health following musculoskeletal injury. PMID:25680118

  13. [Musculoskeletal tissue banks in Mexico. Part I. Regulation and organization].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-San Martín, R

    2012-01-01

    Although Tissue Banks and their activities are not new in Mexico, the specific regulations for the activities of tissue banks and musculoskeletal tissues considered as health supplies are still under development. This review paper intends to provide information on the national situation of musculoskeletal tissue banks, major aspects concerning their regulation and organization, and the recognition of the national instances pertaining to the Coordination for Organ and Tissue Donation for Transplant Purposes for the obtention of (musculoskeletal) tissues from deceased donors.

  14. ASICs Mediate Pain and Inflammation in Musculoskeletal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is debilitating and affects ∼20% of adults. Tissue acidosis is present in painful musculoskeletal diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. ASICs are located on skeletal muscle and joint nociceptors as well as on nonneuronal cells in the muscles and joints, where they mediate nociception. This review discusses the properties of different types of ASICs, factors affecting their pH sensitivity, and their role in musculoskeletal hyperalgesia and inflammation. PMID:26525344

  15. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: A prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Dan; Anderberg, Ulla Maria; Theorell, Töres; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. Methods A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23–64) from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention) lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. Results After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA) decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference) remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. Conclusion The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today. PMID:16042796

  16. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: a prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861].

    PubMed

    Hasson, Dan; Anderberg, Ulla Maria; Theorell, Töres; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2005-07-25

    The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23-64) from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention) lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA) decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference) remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  17. Radiation dose reduction in thoracic and lumbar spine instrumentation using navigation based on an intraoperative cone beam CT imaging system: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pireau, Nathalie; Cordemans, Virginie; Banse, Xavier; Irda, Nadia; Lichtherte, Sébastien; Kaminski, Ludovic

    2017-07-22

    Spine surgery still remains a challenge for every spine surgeon, aware of the potential serious outcomes of misplaced instrumentation. Though many studies have highlighted that using intraoperative cone beam CT imaging and navigation systems provides higher accuracy than conventional freehand methods for placement of pedicle screws in spine surgery, few studies are concerned about how to reduce radiation exposure for patients with the use of such technology. One of the main focuses of this study is based on the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable). A prospective randomized trial was conducted in the hybrid operating room between December 2015 and December 2016, including 50 patients operated on for posterior instrumented thoracic and/or lumbar spinal fusion. Patients were randomized to intraoperative 3D acquisition high-dose (standard dose) or low-dose protocol, and a total of 216 pedicle screws were analyzed in terms of screw position. Two different methods were used to measure ionizing radiation: the total skin dose (derived from the dose-area product) and the radiation dose evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeters on the surgical field. According to Gertzbein and Heary classifications, low-dose protocol provided a significant higher accuracy of pedicle screw placement than the high-dose protocol (96.1 versus 92%, respectively). Seven screws (3.2%), all implanted with the high-dose protocol, needed to be revised intraoperatively. The use of low-dose acquisition protocols reduced patient exposure by a factor of five. This study emphasizes the paramount importance of using low-dose protocols for intraoperative cone beam CT imaging coupled with the navigation system, as it at least does not affect the accuracy of pedicle screw placement and irradiates drastically less.

  18. Accuracy of Cup Positioning With the Computed Tomography-Based Two-dimensional to Three-Dimensional Matched Navigation System: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuki; Endo, Hirosuke; Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Miyake, Takamasa; Sanki, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-08-12

    The accuracy of various navigation systems used for total hip arthroplasty has been described, but no publications reported the accuracy of cup orientation in computed tomography (CT)-based 2D-3D (two-dimensional to three-dimensional) matched navigation. In a prospective, randomized controlled study, 80 hips including 44 with developmental dysplasia of the hips were divided into a CT-based 2D-3D matched navigation group (2D-3D group) and a paired-point matched navigation group (PPM group). The accuracy of cup orientation (absolute difference between the intraoperative record and the postoperative measurement) was compared between groups. Additionally, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate patient factors affecting the accuracy of cup orientation in each navigation. The accuracy of cup inclination was 2.5° ± 2.2° in the 2D-3D group and 4.6° ± 3.3° in the PPM group (P = .0016). The accuracy of cup anteversion was 2.3° ± 1.7° in the 2D-3D group and 4.4° ± 3.3° in the PPM group (P = .0009). In the PPM group, the presence of roof osteophytes decreased the accuracy of cup inclination (odds ratio 8.27, P = .0140) and the absolute value of pelvic tilt had a negative influence on the accuracy of cup anteversion (odds ratio 1.27, P = .0222). In the 2D-3D group, patient factors had no effect on the accuracy of cup orientation. The accuracy of cup positioning in CT-based 2D-3D matched navigation was better than in paired-point matched navigation, and was not affected by patient factors. It is a useful system for even severely deformed pelvises such as developmental dysplasia of the hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pre-pregnancy mental distress and musculoskeletal pain and sickness absence during pregnancy - a twin cohort study.

    PubMed

    Seglem, Karoline B; Ørstavik, Ragnhild; Torvik, Fartein A; Gjerde, Line C; Røysamb, Espen; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Tambs, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    Sickness absence (SA) among pregnant women is high. The aim of this study was to examine whether factors known to predict SA in general also predict SA during pregnancy by estimating the association between prior mental distress and musculoskeletal pain and SA during pregnancy, and to assess the influence of familial (genetic and shared environmental) factors. In this prospective cohort study, data from 2076 female twins born 1967-79 who participated in a questionnaire study in 1998 were linked to register data on SA and childbirth during the years 1998-2008. Baseline measures included mental distress (symptoms of anxiety and depression; SCL-5) and musculoskeletal pain (lumbar spine, neck/shoulder and/or persisting muscular pain). SA was measured as a ratio of days on SA divided by potential working days. Negative binomial regression was performed for individual and within-pair effects. Musculoskeletal pain, but not mental distress, was prospectively associated with overall SA during pregnancy in the adjusted individual-level analyses. With each standard deviation increase in musculoskeletal pain, SA granted for any disorder increased with 12% (IRR 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17) and SA granted for pregnancy related disorders increased with 9% (IRR 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.17). Within-pair estimates were similar, suggesting little or no familial confounding. Women with previous musculoskeletal pain are at increased risk of SA during pregnancy, whereas no increased risk in women with previous symptoms of mental distress could be demonstrated. SA during pregnancy seems partly to be associated with different factors than SA in general.

  20. Effect of Neurocognition and Concussion on Musculoskeletal Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Daniel C.; Zaremski, Jason L.; Vincent, Heather K.; Vincent, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Research regarding musculoskeletal injury risk has focused primarily on anatomical, neuromuscular, hormonal, and environmental risk factors; however, subsequent injury risk screening and intervention programs have been largely limited to neuromuscular factors and have faced challenges in both implementation and efficacy. Recent studies indicate that poor neurocognitive performance, either at baseline or in the aftermath of a concussion, is associated with elevated risk of musculoskeletal injury. Despite the relatively limited current understanding regarding the nature of the relationship between different aspects of neurocognitive performance and musculoskeletal injury risk, this is a promising area of research that may yield significant advances in musculoskeletal injury risk stratification, rehabilitation, and prevention. PMID:25968852

  1. Spectrum of musculo-skeletal disorders in sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease in Nigeria. Past studies from West Africa focused on isolated aspects of its medical and surgical presentations. To the best of our knowledge, the musculo-skeletal presentations amongst Nigerians with SCA have not been documented in a single all encompassing study. This work aims to prospectively document the musculo-skeletal disease burden among SCA patients. Methods In a prospective study of 318 consecutive patients with genotype-confirmed SCA at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), the musculo-skeletal pathologies, anatomic sites, grade of disease, age at presentation and management outcome were recorded over a one-year period. Data obtained were analyzed using Epi-Info software version 6.0. Data are presented as frequencies (%) and mean values (SD) as appropriate. Results The HbSS genotype occurred in 296 (93.0%), while 22 (7.0%) were HbSC. 100 (31.4%) patients with average presenting haemoglobin concentration of 8.2 g/100 ml in the study group, presented with 131 musculo-skeletal pathologies in 118 anatomic sites. Osteomyelitis 31 (31%) and septic arthritis 19 (19%) were most commonly observed in children less than 10 years. Skin ulcers and avascular necrosis (AVN) occurred predominantly in the older age groups, with frequencies of 13 (13.0%) and 26 (26.0%) respectively. 20 (71.5%) of diagnosed cases of AVN presented with radiological grade 4 disease. The lower limbs were involved in 84 (71.1%) of sites affected. Lesions involving the spine were rare 11 (0.9%). Multiple presentations occurred in 89 (28.0%) of patients; 62 (69.7%) of which were children below 10 years. Conclusions Musculo-skeletal complications are common features of sickle cell anaemia seen in 31.4%. Infectious aetiologies predominate with long bones and joints of lower limbs more commonly affected by osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Healthcare providers managing SCA should be aware of the potential morbidity and

  2. Spectrum of musculo-skeletal disorders in sickle cell disease in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Rufai A; Obalum, Dike C; Giwa, Suleiman O; Adekoya-Cole, Thomas O; Ogo, Chidiebere N; Enweluzo, George O

    2010-01-18

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease in Nigeria. Past studies from West Africa focused on isolated aspects of its medical and surgical presentations. To the best of our knowledge, the musculo-skeletal presentations amongst Nigerians with SCA have not been documented in a single all encompassing study. This work aims to prospectively document the musculo-skeletal disease burden among SCA patients. In a prospective study of 318 consecutive patients with genotype-confirmed SCA at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), the musculo-skeletal pathologies, anatomic sites, grade of disease, age at presentation and management outcome were recorded over a one-year period. Data obtained were analyzed using Epi-Info software version 6.0. Data are presented as frequencies (%) and mean values (SD) as appropriate. The HbSS genotype occurred in 296 (93.0%), while 22 (7.0%) were HbSC. 100 (31.4%) patients with average presenting haemoglobin concentration of 8.2 g/100 ml in the study group, presented with 131 musculo-skeletal pathologies in 118 anatomic sites. Osteomyelitis 31 (31%) and septic arthritis 19 (19%) were most commonly observed in children less than 10 years. Skin ulcers and avascular necrosis (AVN) occurred predominantly in the older age groups, with frequencies of 13 (13.0%) and 26 (26.0%) respectively. 20 (71.5%) of diagnosed cases of AVN presented with radiological grade 4 disease. The lower limbs were involved in 84 (71.1%) of sites affected. Lesions involving the spine were rare 11 (0.9%). Multiple presentations occurred in 89 (28.0%) of patients; 62 (69.7%) of which were children below 10 years. Musculo-skeletal complications are common features of sickle cell anaemia seen in 31.4%. Infectious aetiologies predominate with long bones and joints of lower limbs more commonly affected by osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Healthcare providers managing SCA should be aware of the potential morbidity and mortality of these conditions to ensure

  3. T1ρ MR Imaging of Human Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the direct visualization of human musculoskeletal (MSK) system, especially all diarthrodial tissues including cartilage, bone, menisci, ligaments, tendon, hip, synovium etc. Conventional MR imaging techniques based on T1- and T2-weighted, proton density (PD) contrast are inconclusive in quantifying early biochemically degenerative changes in MSK system in general and articular cartilage in particular. In recent years, quantitative MR parameter mapping techniques have been used to quantify the biochemical changes in articular cartilage with a special emphasis on evaluating joint injury, cartilage degeneration, and soft tissue repair. In this article, we will focus on cartilage biochemical composition, basic principles of T1ρ MR imaging, implementation of T1ρ pulse sequences, biochemical validation, and summarize the potential applications of T1ρ MR imaging technique in MSK diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and knee joint repair. Finally, we will also review the potential advantages, challenges, and future prospects of T1ρ MR imaging for widespread clinical translation. PMID:24935818

  4. T₁ρ MRI of human musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the direct visualization of the human musculoskeletal (MSK) system, especially all diarthrodial tissues including cartilage, bone, menisci, ligaments, tendon, hip, synovium, etc. Conventional MRI techniques based on T1 - and T2 -weighted, proton density (PD) contrast are inconclusive in quantifying early biochemically degenerative changes in MSK system in general and articular cartilage in particular. In recent years, quantitative MR parameter mapping techniques have been used to quantify the biochemical changes in articular cartilage, with a special emphasis on evaluating joint injury, cartilage degeneration, and soft tissue repair. In this article we focus on cartilage biochemical composition, basic principles of T1ρ MRI, implementation of T1ρ pulse sequences, biochemical validation, and summarize the potential applications of the T1ρ MRI technique in MSK diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and knee joint repair. Finally, we also review the potential advantages, challenges, and future prospects of T1ρ MRI for widespread clinical translation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Impact of a Musculoskeletal Clerkship on Orthopedic Surgery Applicant Diversity.

    PubMed

    London, Daniel A; Calfee, Ryan P; Boyer, Martin I

    Orthopedic surgery lacks racial and sexual diversity, which we hypothesized stems from absence of exposure to orthopedics during medical school. We conducted a study to determine whether diversity of matched orthopedic surgery residency applicants increased after introduction of a required third-year rotation. We compared 2 groups: precurriculum and postcurriculum. The postcurriculum group was exposed to a required 1-month musculoskeletal rotation during the third year of medical school. Comparisons were made of percentage of total students exposed to orthopedics, percentage who applied to and matched to orthopedic surgery, and proportion of women and underrepresented minorities. A prospective survey was used to determine when students chose orthopedics and what influenced their decisions. The required rotation increased the percentage of third-year students rotating on orthopedics (25%) with no change in application rate (6%). It also led to an 81% relative increase in the proportion of female applicants and a 101% relative increase in underrepresented minority applicants. According to survey data, 79% of students chose orthopedics during their third year, and 88% thought they were influenced by their rotation. A required third-year rotation exposes more medical students to orthopedics and increases the diversity of matching students.

  6. Civil engineering airman at increased risk for injuries and injury-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Webb, Timothy S; Wells, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    With the advent of electronic records, the opportunity to conduct research on workplace-related injuries and musculoskeletal disorders has increased dramatically. The purpose of this study was to examine the United States Air Force Civil Engineering career field to determine if they are negatively impacted by their work environment. Specifically, the objective of this study was to determine if enlisted Civil Engineering Airmen (n = 25,385) were at increased risk for injury or injury-related musculoskeletal disorders compared to enlisted Information Management/Communications Airmen (n = 28,947). Using an historical prospective design, electronic data were assembled and analyzed using Cox's proportional hazards modeling. Models were stratified by gender and adjusted for race/ethnicity, marital status, birth year, and deployment status. Male Civil Engineers were observed to be at greater risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.54-2.26) and injuries (HR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.48-2.11), while female Civil Engineers were more than double the risk for both inpatient injury-related musculoskeletal disorders (HR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.28-3.73) and injuries (HR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.27-3.88) compared to Information Management/Communications Airmen. Although analyses do not allow exploration of specific causes, they highlight the utility of using electronic data to identify occupations for further evaluation. Based on these results, additional resources were allocated to survey Civil Engineers on their physical work demands and job requirements to identify key problem areas for further study and mitigation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. 78 FR 32261 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee...

  8. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee...

  9. 78 FR 64509 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee...

  10. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  11. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee...

  12. 78 FR 40486 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical...

  13. 77 FR 60447 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee...

  14. 78 FR 58320 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee...

  15. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee...

  16. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee...

  17. 77 FR 61011 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee...

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Schibye, B; Skov, T; Ekner, D; Christiansen, J U; Sjøgaard, G

    1995-12-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to describe the prevalences and development of musculoskeletal symptoms among sewing machine operators in relation to age and exposure and among former sewing machine operators who changed exposure by changing occupation. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed among 327 sewing machine operators in 1985 with the use of the standardized Nordic questionnaire. A follow-up study in 1991 showed that approximately one-third was still working as a sewing machine operator, one-third had changed occupation, and the rest were out of employment. The exposure was assessed by a questionnaire regarding the type of machine being operated, work organization, workplace design, units produced per day, and payment system. High prevalences of musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulders were found, with some associations to exposure variables such as efficiency. Initially symptom-free sewing machine operators were not at a higher risk of developing symptoms when they continued sewing during the six-year follow-up when compared with those who changed to other employment. However, symptomatic sewing machine operators who quit sewing were much more likely to be relieved of their symptoms than were symptomatic operators who continued sewing, odds ratio 3.26 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.38-7.72] for 12-month symptoms and odds ratio 3.90 (95% CI 1.28-11.90) for 7-day symptoms. This trend also applied to long-lasting symptoms. The results demonstrate that, for many sewing machine operators, neck and shoulder symptoms are reversible and may be influenced by reallocation to other worktasks.

  19. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in union ironworkers.

    PubMed

    Forde, Martin S; Punnett, Laura; Wegman, David H

    2005-04-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) symptoms and doctor-diagnosed musculoskeletal disorders (DDMDs) were estimated among union construction ironworkers by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Of 1996 ironworkers eligible, 1566 were contacted and 981 were interviewed. The prevalence of self-reported MSD symptoms was high for the lower back (56%), wrist/hands/fingers (40%), knees (39%), and shoulders (36%). The most common DDMDs were tendonitis (19%), ruptured disk in the back (18%), bursitis in the shoulder (15%), and carpal tunnel syndrome (12%). Generally, the prevalence of DDMDs and MSD symptoms increased with duration of employment. In age-adjusted logistic regression analyses, those who worked 25 to 35 years were more likely to have tendonitis (odds ratio [OR] 7.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.116.6), shoulder bursitis (OR 13.7, 95% CI 3.160.4), knee bursitis (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.025.1), and ruptured intervertebral back disk (OR 6.7, 95% CI 2.617.5). The effect of prior injury was also consistently high (upper extremities, OR 4.6; lower extremities OR 5.1; lower back, OR 6.0). Among workers without prior injuries, MSD symptoms were more frequent for the lower back in structural ironwork (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.12.6), and for the upper extremity in concrete reinforcement ironwork (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.22.9). These findings suggest that some musculoskeletal morbidity in construction ironworkers may be work related and thus preventable.

  20. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed. PMID:24715952

  1. STEM CELL HOMING IN MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Li Shan E.; Chan, Casey K.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2010-01-01

    The regenerative potential of injured adult tissue suggests the physiological existence of cells capable of participating in the reparative process. Recent studies indicate that stem-like cells residing in tissues contribute to tissue repair and are replenished by precursor bone marrow–derived cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are among the candidates for reparative cells. These cells can potentially be mobilized into the circulation in response to injury signals and exert their reparative effects at the site of injury. Current therapies for musculoskeletal injuries pose unavoidable risks which can impede full recovery. Trafficking of MSC to the injury site and their subsequent participation in the regenerative process is thought to be a natural healing response that can be imitated or augmented by enhancing the endogenous MSC pool with exogenously administered MSC. Therefore, a promising alternative to the existing strategies employed in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries is to reinforce the inherent reparative capacity of the body by delivering MSC harvested from the patient’s own tissues to the site of injury. The aim of this review is to inform the reader of studies that have evaluated the intrinsic homing and regenerative abilities of MSC, with particular emphasis on the repair of musculoskeletal injuries. Research that supports the direct use of MSC (without in vitro differentiation into tissue-specific cells) will also be reported. Based on accruing evidence that the natural healing mechanism involves the recruitment of MSC and their subsequent reparative actions at the site of injury, as well as documented therapeutic response after the exogenous administration of MSC, the feasibility of the emerging strategy of instant stem-cell therapy will be proposed. PMID:20933277

  2. Novel Musculoskeletal Loading and Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based and ISS (International Space Station) exercise research have shown that axial loading via two-point loading at the shoulders and load quality (i.e. consistent load and at least 1:1 concentric to eccentric ratio) are extremely important to optimize musculoskeletal adaptations to resistance exercise. The Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED) is on ISS now and is the "state of the art" for resistance exercise capabilities in microgravity; however, the ARED is far too large and power consuming for exploration vehicles. The single cable exercise device design selected for MPCV (Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle), does not readily allow for the two-point loading at the shoulders.

  3. Management of musculoskeletal dysfunction in infants

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; DENG, XINGQIANG; WANG, MINGGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Excessive crying (or infant colic) is a common pain syndrome of infancy without any specific known aetiology or effective management. Many cases result in long-term poor sleep, behavioral problems and parental stress. The biomechanical aspects of this condition lack adequate investigation despite its strong link with assisted and/or difficult births. The present review focused on the current trends in the management of this mal-musculoskeletal health of infants associated with the condition of excessive crying. In addition, the risk factors associated with therapeutic procedures used to manage the above conditions were also discussed. PMID:27284288

  4. Evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain.

    PubMed

    Ayloo, Amba; Cvengros, Teresa; Marella, Srimannarayana

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain. Conditions such as costochondritis, rib pain caused by stress fractures, slipping rib syndrome, chest wall muscle injuries, fibromyalgia, and herpes zoster are discussed, with emphasis on evaluation and treatment of these and other disorders. Many of these conditions can be diagnosed by the primary care clinician in the office by history and physical examination. Treatment is also discussed, including description of manual therapy and exercises as needed for some of the conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Coping with Musculoskeletal Pain: Implications for Office Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztug, Ozhan; Cowie, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to understand how office workers cope with back, neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders at work (and their implications for work). A small (N = 120) questionnaire survey collected information about potential participants' background and history of musculoskeletal disorders. These data were used to inform…

  6. Musculoskeletal reported symptoms among aircraft assembly workers: a multifactorial approach.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Fabrício Augusto; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with reported work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among aircraft assembly workers. Population consisted of 552 (491 men/61 women) workers who performed tasks related to the work of aircraft assembly. Participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire, including socio-demographic information, habits/lifestyles, working conditions, and work organization. Workers also answered the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to obtain data on musculoskeletal symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to analyze factors associated with musculoskeletal reported symptoms. Results showed that body regions with the highest prevalence of reported musculoskeletal symptoms were similar when referred the past twelve months and the past seven days. Significant factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms included variables related to conflicts at work, sleep problems, mental fatigue, and lack of time for personal care and recovery. Working time in the industry was associated only with reports for the last seven days and regular physical activity off-work seems to be a positive factor in preventing musculoskeletal symptoms for the past twelve months. The results highlight the multi-factorial nature of the problem. Actions to prevent musculoskeletal diseases at the aircraft assembly work should consider multiple interventions that would promote better recovery between work shifts.

  7. Stress and musculoskeletal discomfort among hydrocarbon industry workers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Avila-Chaurand, R; Prado-León, L R; González-Muñoz, E L

    2012-01-01

    This study of 114 workers in the hydrocarbon industry was conducted to identify the relationship between stress and musculoskeletal discomfort, and to view the roles played by such factors as age, schooling, obesity, workplace and job seniority. All factors except seniority were found to affect the presence of musculoskeletal discomfort in some area of the body.

  8. Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries among Sedentary and Physically Active Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hootman, Jennifer M.; Macera, Carol A.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Addy, Cheryl L.; Martin, Malissa; Blair, Steven N.

    2002-01-01

    Examined types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries among adults with above average activity levels enrolled in the Dallas Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Participant surveys and examinations indicated that one-quarter of all respondents reported musculoskeletal injuries (most of which were activity- related). Sport participants had the…

  9. Musculoskeletal tumor imaging, biopsy, and therapies: self-assessment module.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Catherine C; Liu, Patrick T; Wenger, Doris E

    2009-12-01

    The educational objectives for this self-assessment module are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her understanding of musculoskeletal tumor imaging, biopsy, and therapies. The solutions in this activity review the imaging characteristics of musculoskeletal tumors, biopsy approaches, and therapies.

  10. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders among apprentice construction workers.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Linda A; Rosecrance, John C; Anton, Dan; Cook, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major cause of work-related disability and lost-time illnesses for many occupational groups. This study determined the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among young construction workers. A symptom and job factors survey was self-administered to 996 construction apprentices. Prevalence was determined by the percent of positive responses to musculoskeletal symptom questions. Odds ratios and 95 percent confidence intervals were the measures of association between prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms and demographic, leisure, and job factors and were determined by logistic regression. The low back was the site most commonly reported for job-related musculoskeletal symptoms (54.4%), which was also the most common reason for seeking care from a physician (16.8%) and missing work (7.3%). Number of years worked in the construction trade was significantly associated with knee (p-trend = 0.0009) and wrist/hand (p-trend < 0.04) MSD symptoms and was suggestive of an association with low back pain (p-trend = 0.05). "Working in the same position for long periods" was the job factor identified as most problematic, with 49.7 percent of all construction apprentices rating it as a moderate/major problem contributing to musculoskeletal symptoms. Musculoskeletal symptoms are a significant problem among young construction workers at the beginning of their careers. Prevention strategies are needed early in the apprentice training program to reduce the potential disability associated with work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders.

  11. Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging Applications to Quantify Musculoskeletal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements. PMID:24949846

  12. Dynamic ultrasound imaging applications to quantify musculoskeletal function.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-07-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements.

  13. Musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate laptop users in a Nigerian University.

    PubMed

    Obembe, Adebimpe Olayinka; Johnson, Olubusola Esther; Tanimowo, Tolulope Odunayo; Onigbinde, Ayodele Teslim; Emechete, Anne Anthonette

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorder is a significant health problem affecting adults and young people alike. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain resulting from musculoskeletal disorders is on the increase especially with increased use of laptops. This study determined the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate students of Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife who use laptops. This was a cross-sectional study and participants were selected using the non-probability sampling technique. The Boston University Computer and Health Survey questionnaire was self-administered to 400 undergraduate laptop users. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of frequency and percentage. Three hundred and seventy six out of 400 copies of administered questionnaires were amenable to data analysis representing a response rate of 94%. Pain in the shoulder was the most reported musculoskeletal complaint from 268 (75.7%) participants. Elbow pain was the least common complaint from 132 (37.3%) participants. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was slightly higher among female students 93 (50.3%) of 185 and highest among students aged between 24 and 26 years: 60 (37.5%). In addition, the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints was highest among those who used single-strap laptop bags 176 (94.1%). There is a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among undergraduate laptop users in OAU and shoulder pain was the most commonly reported.

  14. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA) first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:22433113

  15. Musculoskeletal interventional radiology: ultrasound and CT.

    PubMed

    Martel Villagrán, J; Bueno Horcajadas, Á; Agrela Rojas, E

    2016-05-01

    We aim to describe imaging-guided (ultrasound and CT) interventional techniques in the musculoskeletal system that can be performed by general radiologists, whether in hospitals, primary care clinics, private offices, or other settings. The first requirement for doing these procedures is adequate knowledge of the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system. The second requirement is to inform the patient thoroughly about the technique, the risks involved, and the alternatives available in order to obtain written informed consent. The third requirement is to ensure that the procedure is performed in accordance with the principles of asepsis in relation to the puncture zone and to all the material employed throughout the procedure. The main procedures that can be done under ultrasound guidance are the following: fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), core needle biopsy (CNB), diagnostic and/or therapeutic arthrocentesis, drainage of juxta-articular fluid collections, drainage of abscesses, drainage of hematomas, treatment of Baker's cyst, treatment of ganglia, treatment of bursitis, infiltrations and treatment of plantar fasciitis, plantar fibrosis, epicondylitis, Achilles tendinopathy, and Morton's neuroma, puncture and lavage of calcifications in calcifying tendinopathy. We also review the following CT-guided procedures: diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, FNAC of metastases, arthrography, drainages. Finally, we also mention more complex procedures that can only be done in appropriate settings: bone biopsies, treatment of facet joint pain, radiofrequency treatment. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Regularity Aspects in Inverse Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Marie; Stâhl, Fredrik; Gulliksson, Mârten

    2008-09-01

    Inverse simulations of musculoskeletal models computes the internal forces such as muscle and joint reaction forces, which are hard to measure, using the more easily measured motion and external forces as input data. Because of the difficulties of measuring muscle forces and joint reactions, simulations are hard to validate. One way of reducing errors for the simulations is to ensure that the mathematical problem is well-posed. This paper presents a study of regularity aspects for an inverse simulation method, often called forward dynamics or dynamical optimization, that takes into account both measurement errors and muscle dynamics. Regularity is examined for a test problem around the optimum using the approximated quadratic problem. The results shows improved rank by including a regularization term in the objective that handles the mechanical over-determinancy. Using the 3-element Hill muscle model the chosen regularization term is the norm of the activation. To make the problem full-rank only the excitation bounds should be included in the constraints. However, this results in small negative values of the activation which indicates that muscles are pushing and not pulling, which is unrealistic but the error maybe small enough to be accepted for specific applications. These results are a start to ensure better results of inverse musculoskeletal simulations from a numerical point of view.

  17. Upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Occhionero, Vincenzo; Korpinen, Leena; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2014-01-01

    The literature on upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (UL-MSD) in different groups of healthcare workers was reviewed: 65 relevant studies were collected. In dentists, the neck was the most frequently affected segment, with prevalences up to 73% and exceeding 50% in 7 out of 12 studies. In dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, the hand/wrist had the highest prevalence in the majority of the studies. In nurses, the most seriously affected anatomic sites were the neck and shoulders. Physiotherapists had the lowest prevalence of UL-MSD. A high prevalence of upper limb disease, mainly carpal tunnel syndrome, was reported in dentists, dental hygienists, anesthesia nurses and endoscopists. The high prevalence of upper limb disorders/diseases reported in health personnel supports the hypothesis of a significant risk in these workers. However, the possible role of biomechanical overload, as much as that of stress or other personal factors, cannot be currently assessed. Practitioner Summary: Published studies support the hypothesis of a significant risk of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders in healthcare activities. The neck was the most frequently affected segment in dentists, the hand/wrist in dental hygienists and in laboratory technicians, and the neck and shoulders in nurses. Lower prevalence was reported in physiotherapists. A high prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome was also observed in various healthcare activities.

  18. Musculoskeletal injuries in the Afghan war.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M K; Curtis, M J; Smith, G S

    1992-01-01

    Among the 1274 patients admitted to a Pakistan border hospital from 1985 to 1987, the distribution and outcome of musculoskeletal war injuries differed from those seen in other conflicts. Serious complications from injuries were found in approximately 50 per cent of patients, of which most were wound infections, chronic osteomyelitis, and restriction of joint motion. Guerrillas in the Afghan war had no access to acute medical treatment in the field. Many patients died before reaching the hospital, as reflected in the low proportion of paraxial injuries; very high complication rates were noted for all injuries. Although some complications, such as soft tissue infection and foreign body retention are not site specific, other complications such as contracture, non-union, loss of range of motion, and chronic osteomyelitis are highly related to the region injured. Early surgical management and evacuation of those with musculoskeletal war injuries can greatly improve the outcome from war trauma and reduce the subsequent disability. However, the increasing use of hand-held anti-aircraft missiles may prevent the rapid evacuation of the wounded in future conflicts, and may make the situation seen in Afghanistan more common.

  19. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis). However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy. PMID:22778972

  20. Lower leg musculoskeletal geometry and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Albracht, Kirsten; Braunstein, Bjoern; Moreno Catala, Maria; Goldmann, Jan-Peter; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sprint performance is related to lower leg musculoskeletal geometry within a homogeneous group of highly trained 100-m sprinters. Using a cluster analysis, eighteen male sprinters were divided into two groups based on their personal best (fast: N=11, 10.30±0.07s; slow: N=7, 10.70±0.08s). Calf muscular fascicle arrangement and Achilles tendon moment arms (calculated by the gradient of tendon excursion versus ankle joint angle) were analyzed for each athlete using ultrasonography. Achilles tendon moment arm, foot and ankle skeletal geometry, fascicle arrangement as well as the ratio of fascicle length to Achilles tendon moment arm showed no significant (p>0.05) correlation with sprint performance, nor were there any differences in the analyzed musculoskeletal parameters between the fast and slow sprinter group. Our findings provide evidence that differences in sprint ability in world-class athletes are not a result of differences in the geometrical design of the lower leg even when considering both skeletal and muscular components.

  1. Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Beutler, Anthony I; O'Connor, Francis G

    2008-10-15

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection.

  2. Helpful tips for performing musculoskeletal injections.

    PubMed

    Metz, John P

    2010-01-01

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection.

  3. Common musculoskeletal problems in the performing artist.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pamela A; Reed, Kristi

    2006-11-01

    In this chapter we touched on a wide variety of unique musculoskeletal conditions in the musician and dancer. We outlined generalized methods of evaluation that stress the importance of the interdisciplinary approach in this highly specialized patient population and stressed the importance of specific involvement of the music or dance instructor in evaluation and management. We sought to emphasize the need to refer to specialized care early when in doubt of diagnosis or when usual first-line treatments fail. We gave examples of specific injury patterns common in these subgroups and suggestions for early management. Finally, we described some general principals for prevention of musculoskeletal injury in this group. A physician treating the performing artist must always keep in mind that in this unique patient population, their occupation is not only a means of earning a living, it is their passion. Artists make great sacrifice both physically and mentally to bring the world such immeasurable beauty. It is our responsibility to care for them in the most comprehensive and compassionate manner possible while informing them as honestly as possible about their treatment options.

  4. Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    There are numerous imaging tests for diagnosing musculoskeletal infection. Radiographs are routinely performed, because even when not diagnostic, they provide an anatomic overview of the region of interest that could influence subsequent procedure selection and interpretation. MRI is sensitive and provides superb anatomic detail. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. (67)Ga is used primarily for spondylodiskitis. Although in vitro labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide test of choice for complicating osteomyelitis such as diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection, it is not useful for spondylodiskitis. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments have limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for spondylodiskitis. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of the antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin are promising infection-specific agents. (18)F-FDG is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for spondylodiskitis. Its role in diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection is not established. Preliminary data suggest (68)Ga may be useful in musculoskeletal infection. (124)I-fialuridine initially showed promise as an infection-specific radiopharmaceutical, but subsequent investigations were disappointing. The development of PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging systems, which combine anatomic and functional imaging, has revolutionized diagnostic imaging. These hybrid systems are redefining the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected or known infection and inflammation by improving diagnostic accuracy and influencing patient management. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Texting on mobile phones and musculoskeletal disorders in young adults: A five-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ewa; Thomée, Sara; Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Hagberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to examine whether texting on a mobile phone is a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities in a population of young adults. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study with Swedish young adults (aged 20-24 years) data were collected via a web-based questionnaire at baseline (n = 7092) and after one and five years. Cross-sectional associations were found between text messaging and reported ongoing symptoms in neck and upper extremities (odds ratios, ORs 1.3-2.0). Among symptom-free at baseline prospective associations were only found between text messaging and new cases of reported symptoms in the hand/fingers (OR 2.0) at one year follow up. Among those with symptoms at baseline prospective associations were found between text messaging and maintained pain in neck/upper back (OR 1.6). The results imply mostly short-term effects, and to a lesser extent, long-term effects on musculoskeletal disorders in neck and upper extremities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. An overview of recent patents on musculoskeletal interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit T; Browe, Daniel P; Lowe, Christopher J; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues, e.g., between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article, we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose.

  7. Interface tissue engineering: next phase in musculoskeletal tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sambit; Teh, Thomas Kh; He, Pengfei; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Ch

    2011-05-01

    Increasing incidence of musculoskeletal injuries coupled with limitations in the current treatment options have necessitated tissue engineering and regenerative medicine- based approaches. Moving forward from engineering isolated musculoskeletal tissues, research strategies are now being increasingly focused on repairing and regenerating the interfaces between dissimilar musculoskeletal tissues with the aim to achieve seamless integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues. This article reviews the state-of-the-art in the tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a focus on Singapore's contribution in this emerging field. Various biomimetic scaffold and cellbased strategies, the use of growth factors, gene therapy and mechanical loading, as well as animal models for functional validation of the tissue engineering strategies are discussed.

  8. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Mo; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2007-06-01

    The unique ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to visualize injuries of bone, cartilage, bone marrow, and supporting soft tissue structure makes it ideally suited for the evaluation of musculoskeletal trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging also offers exquisitely detailed anatomical information on the musculoskeletal system. The widespread availability of MR imaging and the constantly improving technology make it the imaging modality of choice for the patients with a musculoskeletal trauma. This review discusses the role and applications of MR imaging for musculoskeletal trauma. It covers traumatic conditions of the musculoskeletal system, including hemarthrosis, lipohemarthrosis, stress fracture, occult fractures, cartilage injuries, the muscle and tendon trauma, avulsion injuries, extensor mechanism injuries, and traumatic conditions of joints.

  9. Influence of modified work on return to work for employees on sick leave due to musculoskeletal complaints.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Miranda; Lötters, Freek; Burdorf, Alex

    2005-05-01

    To determine which individual and work-related factors are associated with performing modified work and to evaluate the influence of modified work on the duration of sick leave and health-related outcomes among employees with musculoskeletal complaints. A prospective study with 12 months follow-up. In this prospective study a total of 164 employees on sick leave for 2-6 weeks due to musculoskeletal complaints completed 2 questionnaires. At baseline we gathered information about individual characteristics, physical and psychosocial workload, and disease specific and general health. The follow-up questionnaire, sent to respondents who returned to their original job on full duty, collected information about having performed modified work, and disease-specific and general health. Employees were less likely to perform modified work when their regular work was characterized by frequent lifting and their relationship with colleagues was less than good. Employees were more likely to return to modified work when they had a better mental health, had prolonged periods of standing in their regular job and had less skill discretion. Duration of sick leave was influenced by chronicity of complaints and disability, but not by modified work. Modified work, as the only advice given by a occupational health physician, did not influence the total duration of sick leave nor the improvement in health during sick leave for employees on sick leave due to musculoskeletal complaints.

  10. Clinical course and prognosis of musculoskeletal pain in patients referred for physiotherapy: does pain site matter?

    PubMed

    de Vos Andersen, Nils-Bo; Kent, Peter; Hjort, Jakob; Christiansen, David Høyrup

    2017-03-29

    Danish patients with musculoskeletal disorders are commonly referred for primary care physiotherapy treatment but little is known about their general health status, pain diagnoses, clinical course and prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe the clinical course of patients with musculoskeletal disorders referred to physiotherapy, 2) identify predictors associated with a satisfactory outcome, and 3) determine the influence of the primary pain site diagnosis relative to those predictors. This was a prospective cohort study of patients (n = 2,706) newly referred because of musculoskeletal pain to 30 physiotherapy practices from January 2012 to May 2012. Data were collected via a web-based questionnaire 1-2 days prior to the first physiotherapy consultation and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, from clinical records (including primary musculoskeletal symptom diagnosis based on the ICPC-2 classification system), and from national registry data. The main outcome was the Patient Acceptable Symptom State. Potential predictors were analysed using backwards step-wise selection during longitudinal Generalised Estimating Equation regression modelling. To assess the influence of pain site on these associations, primary pain site diagnosis was added to the model. Of the patients included, 66% were female and the mean age was 48 (SD 15). The percentage of patients reporting their symptoms as acceptable was 32% at 6 weeks, 43% at 3 months and 52% at 6 months. A higher probability of satisfactory outcome was associated with place of residence, being retired, no compensation claim, less frequent pain, shorter duration of pain, lower levels of disability and fear avoidance, better mental health and being a non-smoker. Primary pain site diagnosis had little influence on these associations, and was not predictive of a satisfactory outcome. Only half of the patients rated their symptoms as acceptable at 6 months. Although satisfactory outcome was difficult to

  11. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    PubMed

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  12. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Edmund YS; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation. PMID:17343764

  13. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Iranian Steel Workers.

    PubMed

    Aghilinejad, M; Choobineh, A R; Sadeghi, Z; Nouri, M K; Bahrami Ahmadi, A

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders in developing countries are considered as main cause of occupational disorders and disability and highly associated with socioeconomic burden to individual, organization and society in general view. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and associated risk factors among Iranian steel workers. In a cross-sectional study, 1439 questionnaires were provided from 1984 randomly selected workers of four Iranian steel industries. Data of musculoskeletal disorders was gathered by means of standardized Nordic self-reporting questionnaire. Demographic and work related data were collected into the check list. Out of 1984 individuals, 1439 questionnaires returned and mean age of study workers was 37.23±8.74 years old. Among workers, 46.3% in the past week and 61% in the last year claimed one of musculoskeletal disorders in their bodies. Lumbar, knee(s) and neck areas had the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders had significant association with the job time of work and BMI. Musculoskeletal disorders in Iranian steel industries happened in high rate. Ergonomic interventions strategies into the workplaces must be focused to eliminate environmental hazards such as apposition on the time of work and manual handling of heavy loads.

  14. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions among Indian Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Maiya, Arun G.; Kumar, Pratap; Kamath, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Pregnancy triggers a wide range of changes in a woman's body leading to various musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Most commonly reported musculoskeletal discomforts by pregnant women are low back pain and symphysis pubis pain. The culture and the environmental factors may influence the discomforts experienced by a pregnant woman. There is a dearth of literature in India, regarding the common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by a pregnant woman, and hence this study. Method. A questionnaire to identify the musculoskeletal dysfunction was developed; content was validated and was translated to local languages through parallel back translation. 261 primiparous pregnant women participated in the study and filled the questionnaire in their native language. Results. Among the musculoskeletal dysfunctions reported by the pregnant women, 64.6% reported calf muscle cramps, 37.1% reported foot pain, and 33.7% experienced low back pain in their third trimester. In the second trimester, common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by the women were that of calf pain (47.8%), low back pain (42%), and pelvic girdle pain (37%). Conclusion. Musculoskeletal dysfunctions and general discomforts very commonly affect the activities of daily living of pregnant women. Understanding the common discomforts during various trimesters of pregnancy will help to develop a comprehensive program for prevention and cure. PMID:25642349

  15. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cho, KiHun; Cho, Hwi-Young; Han, Gyeong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psychosocial stress, occupational stress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners. [Subjects and Methods] Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to 401 dental practitioners in Korea. To assess the risk factors related to musculoskeletal disorders, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale, and Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form were used. General and work-related characteristics of the subjects consisted of seven items, including age, career, height, weight, working days/week, working hours/day, and physical strain levels. [Results] In this study, 86.8% of the practitioners experienced musculoskeletal symptoms (shoulders, 72.8%; neck, 69.3%; waist, 68.3%; wrist, 58.4%; back, 44.1%; ankle, 38.7%; knee, 36.9%; hip, 20.4%; and elbows, 9.2%). Moreover, psychosocial and occupational stress can affect the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, we found that psychosocial stress has significant influence on the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] To increase the quality of life and provide high-quality medical service for dental practitioners, risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders must be managed. Accordingly, dental practitioners must maintain good posture, get an appropriate amount of rest, and perform regular stretching exercise to reduce psychological stress and improve the work environment.

  16. An integrative approach for evaluating work related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Wricha; Amitabha, De; Iqbal, R; Gangopadhyay, S; Chandra, A M

    2012-01-01

    To develop a framework for evaluating the work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs). The proposed framework was tested on 15~jewellery manufacturing workers working at Chinchpokhli region in Mumbai, India and on 15 students studying in a management institute of Mumbai, India. The framework has been broken into three phases. Phase 1--Ergonomic-risk evaluation; Phase 2--Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation and Phase 3--Clinical examination. Ergonomic-risk evaluation determines the relationship between work relatedness and musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation tries to assess the presence of discomforts/disabilities in different body regions, through subjective evaluation tools. Ergonomic-risk evaluation involved QEC, PLIBEL and posture analysis by RULA. Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) evaluation involved administration of self reported questionnaires. Clinical examination involved muscle grading by a physiotherapist and back strength measurement. The framework suggested that ergonomic risk evaluation techniques, self reported body part questionnaires and physical measurement of physiological/biomechanical transients may have a relationship and can be used for the evaluation of work related musculoskeletal disorders. The proposed integrative approach will help in developing stage wise intervention strategies for work related musculoskeletal disorders.

  17. Prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions among Indian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Preetha; Maiya, Arun G; Kumar, Pratap; Kamath, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy triggers a wide range of changes in a woman's body leading to various musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Most commonly reported musculoskeletal discomforts by pregnant women are low back pain and symphysis pubis pain. The culture and the environmental factors may influence the discomforts experienced by a pregnant woman. There is a dearth of literature in India, regarding the common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by a pregnant woman, and hence this study. A questionnaire to identify the musculoskeletal dysfunction was developed; content was validated and was translated to local languages through parallel back translation. 261 primiparous pregnant women participated in the study and filled the questionnaire in their native language. Among the musculoskeletal dysfunctions reported by the pregnant women, 64.6% reported calf muscle cramps, 37.1% reported foot pain, and 33.7% experienced low back pain in their third trimester. In the second trimester, common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by the women were that of calf pain (47.8%), low back pain (42%), and pelvic girdle pain (37%). Musculoskeletal dysfunctions and general discomforts very commonly affect the activities of daily living of pregnant women. Understanding the common discomforts during various trimesters of pregnancy will help to develop a comprehensive program for prevention and cure.

  18. [A survey on musculoskeletal disorders in physiotherapists].

    PubMed

    Carta, A; Parmigiani, F; Parrinello, G; Porru, S

    2007-01-01

    Only few studies focused on musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists (PT). The study population consisted of 50 PT and 50 clerical workers belonging to the same three rehabilitation hospitals in Northern Italy. The participants filled in a specifically designed questionnaire focused on risk factors, symptoms and diseases related to MSD. Data were self reported. Preliminary data show a significantly higher prevalence of low back symptoms (70%) and upper limb symptoms (36%) in PT than controls (16% and 4% respectively). PT had a higher prevalence of lumbar disk degeneration (20%), shoulder disorders (14%), wrist and hand tendinopathy (10%) than clerical workers (4% and 2% respectively). Both PT and clerical workers attributed their cervical symptoms to work (85% and 95% respectively). Only PT believed that low back and upper limb symptoms were work related (83% and 94% respectively). Our survey supported the findings that PT have e high prevalence of MSD. Specific preventive intervention should be applied to reduce risk of work related MSD.

  19. Interventional musculoskeletal ultrasonography: Precautions and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Draghi, F; Robotti, G; Jacob, D; Bianchi, S

    2010-09-01

    In recent years ultrasonography (US) has emerged as the imaging technique of choice for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures including those related to the musculoskeletal system. However, the absence of ionizing radiation and the elevated safety of the method must not lead us to forget that there are precautions and contraindications to keep in mind, which are crucial to the protection of both the patient and the physician.Among these precautions it is first of all essential to obtain the patient's accurate clinical history including current medication, particularly if it involves drugs influencing the blood clotting, and information related to possible allergies. The patient should furthermore receive detailed information concerning the procedure (sterile precautions as well as possible side-effects of the drugs which will be injected). In addition to this, there must be a close contact between the radiologist and the patient's general physician (GP) in order to obtain the best possible result of the procedure.

  20. Limb salvage in musculoskeletal oncology: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of musculoskeletal sarcomas has made vast strides in the last few decades. From an era where amputation was the only option to the current day function preserving resections and complex reconstructions has been a major advance. The objectives of extremity reconstruction after oncologic resection include providing skeletal stability where necessary, adequate wound coverage to allow early subsequent adjuvant therapy, optimising the aesthetic outcome and preservation of functional capability with early return to function. This article highlights the concepts of surgical margins in oncology, discusses the principles governing safe surgical resection in these tumors and summarises the current modalities and recent developments relevant to reconstruction after limb salvage. The rationale of choice of a particular resection modality, the unique challenges of reconstruction in skeletally immature individuals and the impact of adjuvant modalities like chemotherapy and radiotherapy on surgical outcomes are also discussed. PMID:25190911

  1. Musculoskeletal scintigraphy of the equine athlete.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear scintigraphic examination of equine athletes has a potentially important role in the diagnosis of lameness or poor performance, but increased radiopharmaceutical uptake (IRU) is not necessarily synonymous with pain causing lameness. Nuclear scintigraphy is highly sensitive to changes in bone turnover that may be induced by loading and knowledge of normal patterns of RU is crucial for accurate diagnosis. Blood pool images can be useful for identification of some soft tissue injuries, although acute bone injuries may also have intense IRU in blood pool images. Some muscle injuries may be associated with IRU in bone phase images. The use of scintigraphy together with other diagnostic imaging modalities has helped us to better understand the mechanisms of some musculoskeletal injuries. In immature racehorses, stress-related bone injury is a common finding and may be multifocal, whereas in mature sport horses, a very different spectrum of injuries may be identified. False-negative results are common with some injuries.

  2. [Prevention of venous thromboembolism in musculoskeletal surgery].

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Eichinger-Hasenauer, Sabine; Grohs, Josef; Hochreiter, Josef; Kastner, Norbert; Korninger, Hans Christian; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle; Marlovits, Stefan; Niessner, Herwig; Rachbauer, Franz; Ritschl, Peter; Wurnig, Christian; Windhager, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Musculoskeletal surgery is associated with a high risk of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) has broadened the possibilities for prevention of venous thromboembolism in the course of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Addressing this recent development, the Austrian Societies of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (ÖGO), Trauma Surgery (ÖGU), Hematology and Oncology (OeGHO) and of Anaesthesiology, Reanimation und Intensive Care Medicine (ÖGARI) have taken the initiative to create Austrian guidelines for the prevention of thromboembolism after total hip and knee replacement, hip fracture surgery, interventions at the spine and cases of minor orthopedic and traumatic surgery. Furthermore, the pharmacology of the DOAK and the pivotal trial data for each of the three currently available substances - apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban - are briefly presented. Separate chapters are dedicated to "anticoagulation and neuroaxial anesthesia" and "bridging".

  3. Corticosteroid Injections for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Zoë J; Voss, Tyler T; Hatch, Jacquelynn; Frimodig, Adam

    2015-10-15

    Family physicians considering corticosteroid injections as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for musculoskeletal diagnoses will find few high-quality studies to assist with evidence-based decision making. Most studies of corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis, tendinopathy, bursitis, or neuropathy include only small numbers of patients and have inconsistent long-term follow-up. Corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis result in short-term improvements in pain and range of motion. For subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief and improvement in function. In medial and lateral epicondylitis, corticosteroid injections offer only short-term improvement of symptoms and have a high rate of symptom recurrence. Corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome may help patients avoid or delay surgery. Trigger finger and de Quervain tenosynovitis may be treated effectively with corticosteroid injections. Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis may have short-term symptom relief with corticosteroid injections.

  4. Musculoskeletal imaging in physical therapist practice.

    PubMed

    Deyle, Gail D

    2005-11-01

    This article presents an overview of current concepts of evidence-based diagnosis using a variety of imaging modalities for a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and syndromes. There is limited but increasing evidence that physical therapists appropriately use diagnostic studies in clinical practice. Pathology revealed by diagnostic studies must be viewed in the context of the complete examination, as pathology is common in the asymptomatic population. Special diagnostic challenges are presented by patients with areas of referred pain, multiple injuries or multiple areas of pathology, neoplasms, and infections. Plain film radiographs have been overused in the clinical management of many conditions, including low back pain. Clinical decision rules provide simple evidence-based guidelines for the appropriate use of imaging studies.

  5. Pro musculoskeletal ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohrndorf, Sarah; Backhaus, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound has become a widely used imaging diagnostic tool both in the use of daily clinical practice and for clinical studies in monitoring treatment efficiency and predicting disease outcome. By US, detection of inflammatory soft tissue and erosive bone lesions is possible. Grey-scale and power Doppler ultrasound examination is more sensitive and more reliable than clinical examination. Furthermore, patients with unclear arthritic symptoms can be better diagnosed for arthritis by US than by clinical examination. This article gives an overview about the use of US in the diagnosis of early arthritis, especially early rheumatoid arthritis, its role as a prognostic assessor (structural damage), as a monitor for treatment response, as an detector of "real" remission, and a guide to injection procedure.

  6. Mapping lubricin in canine musculoskeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yulong; Berger, Evelyn J; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Jay, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Lubricin, also known as superficial zone protein or PRG4, has many distinct biological functions, including lubrication, antiadhesion, and as a regulator of cell growth. This study investigated lubricin in canine musculoskeletal tissues using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. One or more variants were noted in canine flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon, Achilles tendon, patellar tendon, A2 pulley, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), knee lateral collateral ligament (LCL), articular cartilage, meniscus, muscle, and skin. We found 6 N-terminal lubricin splicing variants. The variants with larger sizes were identified in FDP tendon, ACL, LCL, A2 pulley, and cartilage. Lubricin was distributed both on the tissue surfaces and at the interface of fiber bundles within tissues, but this distribution varied by tissue type. We conclude that lubricin is present in many tissues; variations in splicing and physical distribution suggest that the variants of lubricin may play different roles in different locations.

  7. A biomechanical approach to musculoskeletal disease.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Najia; Moisio, Kirsten

    2004-04-01

    The importance of biomechanical factors in musculoskeletal disease may be appreciated in the clinical characteristics and pathophysiology of joint degeneration in osteoarthritis. The biomechanical characteristics of the neuromuscular system are integral in determining the function and stability of the synovial joint and in mediating the biochemical structure of articular cartilage. Alterations in the neuromuscular system including abnormal gait and dynamic joint loading patterns as well as muscle strength and proprioception deficits have been independently studied and associated with osteoarthritis. These factors have close functional and physiological interactions. Nevertheless, specific relations between muscle strength and proprioception and their independent contributions to dynamic joint loading are not yet clear. Targeted interventions to moderate these factors may, in the future, be a therapeutic option for the management of osteoarthritis.

  8. Musculoskeletal conditions and complementary/alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2004-08-01

    Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions. It is, therefore, essential to define CAM's value for such indications. This chapter summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for back pain, fibromyalgia, neck pain, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. None of the treatments in question is totally devoid of risks. By and large the data are not compelling, not least due to their paucity and methodological limitations. It is, therefore, concluded that our research efforts must be directed towards defining which form of CAM generates more good than harm for which condition.

  9. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  10. Sonoelastography in the musculoskeletal system: Current role and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Naomi; Lalam, Radhesh; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an essential modality within musculoskeletal imaging, with the recent addition of elastography. The elastic properties of tissues are different from the acoustic impedance used to create B mode imaging and the flow properties used within Doppler imaging, hence elastography provides a different form of tissue assessment. The current role of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will be reviewed, in particular with reference to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and soft tissue tumours. The different ultrasound elastography methods currently available will be described, in particular strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Future directions of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will also be discussed. PMID:27928468

  11. Planning, Building, and Maintaining a Successful Musculoskeletal Service Line.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Zain; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Chambers, Monique C; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Within the past 3 decades, a recent trend in the growth of musculoskeletal service lines has been seen nationally. Orthopedics offers an appealing concourse for implementation of service-line care. Within this review, the authors address the components involved in planning and building a musculoskeletal service line. The authors also address methods by which orthopedic surgeons can maintain the efficacy of their service lines by examining how orthopedic surgeons can navigate their service line through recent advents in health care reform. Finally, the authors review successful examples of musculoskeletal service lines currently in practice within the orthopedic community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pressure pain thresholds and musculoskeletal morbidity in automobile manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Judith E; Punnett, Laura; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2006-02-01

    Reduced pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) have been reported in occupational groups with symptoms of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether automobile manufacturing workers (n=460) with signs and symptoms of UEMSDs had reduced PPTs (greater sensitivity to pain through pressure applied to the skin) when compared with unaffected members of the cohort, which served as the reference group. The association of PPTs with symptom severity and localization of PE findings was investigated, as was the hypothesis that reduced thresholds would be found on the affected side in those with unilateral physical examination (PE) findings. PPTs were measured during the workday at 12 upper extremity sites. A PE for signs of UEMSDs and symptom questionnaire was administered. After comparison of potential covariates using t tests, linear regression multivariable models were constructed with the average of 12 sites (avgPPT) as the outcome. Subjects with PE findings and/or symptoms had a statistically significant lower avgPPT than non-cases. AvgPPT was reduced in those with more widespread PE findings and in those with greater symptom severity (test for trend, Pprospective large cohort studies to determine if low PPTs are predictive of UEMSDs in asymptomatic individuals or of progression and spread of UEMSDs from localized to more diffuse disorders.

  13. The role of PGRN in musculoskeletal development and disease.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Jessica; Richbourgh, Brendon; Liu, Chuanju

    2014-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a growth factor that has been implicated in wound healing, inflammation, infection, tumorigenesis, and is most known for its neuroprotective and proliferative properties in neurodegenerative disease. This pleiotropic growth factor has been found to be a key player and regulator of a diverse spectrum of multi-systemic functions. Its critical anti-inflammatory role in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disease models has allowed for the propulsion of research to establish its significance in musculoskeletal diseases, including inflammatory conditions involving bone and cartilage pathology. In this review, we aim to elaborate on the emerging role of PGRN in the musculoskeletal system, reviewing its particular mechanisms described in various musculoskeletal diseases, with special focus on osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disease patho-mechanisms and potential therapeutic applications of PGRN and its derivatives in these and other musculoskeletal diseases.

  14. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN AND ASSOCIATED DISABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Coggon, David

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been given to the physical determinants of common musculoskeletal complaints such as back and arm pain, research points to a stronger influence of psychological factors. Multiple studies have implicated poor mental health and somatisation (a tendency to worry about common somatic symptoms) in the incidence and chronicity of musculoskeletal pain and associated disability. Also important are adverse beliefs about the prognosis of such disorders, and about the role of physical activity in their development and persistence. Differences in societal beliefs may have contributed to major variation in the prevalence of disabling musculoskeletal pain that has been observed between countries and in the same countries over time. Psychosocial aspects of work have also been linked with musculoskeletal pain, although relative risks have generally been smaller. There is a need to take account of psychological factors in the clinical management of patients with back, neck and arm pain. PMID:26612236

  15. Diagnostic approach to catastrophic musculoskeletal injuries in racehorses.

    PubMed

    Diab, Santiago S; Stover, Susan M; Carvallo, Francisco; Nyaoke, Akinyi C; Moore, Janet; Hill, Ashley; Arthur, Rick; Uzal, Francisco A

    2017-07-01

    Catastrophic musculoskeletal injuries are the most common cause of euthanasia or spontaneous death in racehorses, and the most common cause of jockey falls with potential for serious human injury. Horses are predisposed to the vast majority of these injuries by preexisting lesions that can be prevented by early diagnosis and adequate bone injury management. A thorough examination of the musculoskeletal system in racehorses often determines the cause of these injuries and generates data to develop injury prevention strategies. We describe the diagnostic approach to musculoskeletal injury, review the methodology for the examination of racehorse limbs, and provide anatomy and pathology tools to perform an organized and thorough postmortem examination of the musculoskeletal system in equine athletes.

  16. Vitamin D reduces musculoskeletal pain after infusion of zoledronic acid for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Antonino; Morabito, Nancy; Atteritano, Marco; Basile, Giorgio; Cucinotta, Domenico; Lasco, Antonino

    2012-04-01

    The acute-phase response (APR) is a frequent occurrence after infusion of zoledronic acid and is caused by activation of γδ T cells. Vitamin D receptor is expressed in immune cells, and vitamin D has immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this prospective study was to test the effect of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) on the incidence of APR and intensity of pain in women undergoing infusion of zoledronic acid for postmenopausal osteoporosis. 60 women were enrolled and randomized into two groups. At baseline, 30 women received an oral bolus of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU), while another 30 women received placebo. On day 5 both groups were treated with a single infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) and received a daily supplementation of calcium (1,000 mg) and vitamin D (800 IU). Patients were clinically evaluated and inflammatory markers were assayed before zoledronic acid administration and every 24 h for the following 2 days. The onset of APR has been defined by the occurrence of fever or at least one of the typical symptoms, such as musculoskeletal pain after zoledronic acid infusion. Intensity of pain was measured by a one-dimensional scale (0 = no pain, 10 = unbearable pain). APR developed in 66.6% of patients, with no significant difference between groups. The vitamin group experienced less musculoskeletal pain [median 1 (0-4) vs. 2 (1-8), P < 0.05] and exhibited lower inflammatory markers (P < 0.005 vs. placebo). Our data demonstrate that cholecalciferol at a dose of 300,000 IU reduces the intensity of musculoskeletal pain after infusion of zoledronic acid for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  17. Patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia: an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Yung, Vivian; Mackey, Martin; Adams, Roger; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2012-11-01

    (1) To attain a quantitative estimate of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care for musculoskeletal conditions in Australia; (2) to compare the observed level of patient satisfaction with care in Australia with those from other countries; and (3) to compare factors contributing to patient satisfaction between Australia and the United States (US). We conducted a prospective study of 274 patients presenting for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal disorder in Australian clinics. Patient satisfaction was measured using the 20-item MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) and satisfaction scores were compared with those from Northern Europe, North America, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. To investigate factors contributing to patient satisfaction between Australia and the US, we compared 20-item MRPS data from Australian and Spanish-speaking US cohorts. Mean Australian MRPS satisfaction score was 4.55 (95% confidence interval: 4.51-4.59) on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 indicates high dissatisfaction and 5 indicates high satisfaction. This high level of patient satisfaction is consistent with international data. Australian respondents specifically valued interpersonal aspects of care, including advice and information about their condition and an explanation about self-management. The correlation between treatment outcomes and global patient satisfaction was low (r = -0.22). A comparison of data collected from Australia and the US showed that MRPS items regarding interpersonal aspects of care, such as the therapists' communication skills, correlated strongly with global satisfaction in both countries. However, there were other questionnaire items for which the correlation with global satisfaction was significantly different between Australia and the US. Patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia is high and comparable with Northern Europe, North America, the United Kingdom and

  18. Patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia: an international comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hush, Julia M; Yung, Vivian; Mackey, Martin; Adams, Roger; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To attain a quantitative estimate of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care for musculoskeletal conditions in Australia; (2) to compare the observed level of patient satisfaction with care in Australia with those from other countries; and (3) to compare factors contributing to patient satisfaction between Australia and the United States (US). Methods: We conducted a prospective study of 274 patients presenting for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal disorder in Australian clinics. Patient satisfaction was measured using the 20-item MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) and satisfaction scores were compared with those from Northern Europe, North America, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. To investigate factors contributing to patient satisfaction between Australia and the US, we compared 20-item MRPS data from Australian and Spanish-speaking US cohorts. Results: Mean Australian MRPS satisfaction score was 4.55 (95% confidence interval: 4.51–4.59) on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 indicates high dissatisfaction and 5 indicates high satisfaction. This high level of patient satisfaction is consistent with international data. Australian respondents specifically valued interpersonal aspects of care, including advice and information about their condition and an explanation about self-management. The correlation between treatment outcomes and global patient satisfaction was low (r = −0.22). A comparison of data collected from Australia and the US showed that MRPS items regarding interpersonal aspects of care, such as the therapists’ communication skills, correlated strongly with global satisfaction in both countries. However, there were other questionnaire items for which the correlation with global satisfaction was significantly different between Australia and the US. Conclusions: Patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia is high and comparable with

  19. Are Dietary Supplements and Nutraceuticals Effective for Musculoskeletal Health and Cognitive Function? A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, G; Gimigliano, R; Bianco, M; De Sire, A; Moretti, A; Giusti, A; Malavolta, N; Migliaccio, S; Migliore, A; Napoli, N; Piscitelli, P; Resmini, G; Tarantino, U; Gimigliano, F

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our scoping review was to summarize the state of the art regarding micronutrients in order to identify which of them might effectively improve health status in the areas typically impaired in older people: bone, skeletal muscle, and cognitive function. Scoping review. The Italian Study Group on Healthy Aging by Nutraceuticals and Dietary Supplements (HANDS) performed this scoping review, based on the following steps: doing a list of micronutrients related with musculoskeletal or cognitive functions, included in dietary supplements and nutraceuticals commercialized in Italy; planning a research on PubMed, according to an evidence-based approach, in order to the most relevant positive study for each micronutrient into each of the three areas involved (bone, skeletal muscle and cognitive function); identifying the micronutrients effective in maintaining or achieving an adequate health status in older people, specifying the effective and safe daily doses, according to the selected studies. In literature we found 12 relevant positive studies (1 international society guidelines/recommendations, 1 systematic review, 7 randomized controlled trials, and 3 prospective cohort studies). We showed that only 16 micronutrients resulted to have appropriate scientific evidences in terms of improving musculoskeletal health and/or cognitive function in older people: beta-alanine, calcium, creatine, fluorides, leucine, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin B9, vitamin B12, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K2, and zinc. This scoping review showed that selected micronutrients in adequate doses might have an ancillary role in musculoskeletal health and cognitive functions in older people.

  20. Concussion Frequency Associates with Musculoskeletal Injury in Retired NFL Players.

    PubMed

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Golightly, Yvonne M; Mihalik, Jason P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Concussion is commonly associated with immediate and persistent alterations in motor function affecting postural control and gait. Patients with lower extremity joint injury have demonstrated functional alterations in the cerebral cortex, suggesting that musculoskeletal injury may be linked to alterations in brain function. Therefore, we examined the associations between concussion frequency and lower extremity musculoskeletal injury sustained during professional careers of National Football League (NFL) players in a cross-sectional study. An inclusive health history survey was mailed to 3647 NFL players who retired during 1930-2001. Respondents reported total concussion frequency (zero, one, two, or three or more) and presence (yes/no) of specific knee and ankle musculoskeletal injury during their NFL career. Separate logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between concussion frequency and each musculoskeletal injury type, adjusting for number of years played in the NFL, body mass index while playing in the NFL, and playing position. Data from 2429 players (66.6% response rate) were available for analysis. Nearly 61% reported experiencing a concussion while competing in the NFL. Meniscal tear was the most commonly reported musculoskeletal injury (32%). Compared with NFL players who did not sustain a concussion, retired NFL players with one, two, or three or more concussions had between 18% and 63%, 15% and 126%, and 73% and 165% higher odds of reporting various musculoskeletal injuries, respectively. A history of concussions was associated with a history of musculoskeletal injuries during NFL careers. These data suggest that a higher number of concussions is linked with higher odds of reporting a musculoskeletal injury.

  1. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations 5b. GRANT NUMBER...evaluated the relationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different loading conditions and positions, and the pathophysiology of the

  2. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...31May2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER During Simulated Military Operations 5b...ABSTRACT This study evaluated the relationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different loading conditions and positions, and the

  3. Choosing the right diagnostic imaging modality in musculoskeletal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Andrea L; Melek, Maged

    2013-12-01

    Radiological studies can confirm or rule out competing diagnoses for musculoskeletal injuries and pain. Obtaining a detailed history and physical examination is pivotal for localizing the pain generator and choosing the most appropriate imaging studies, based on the suspected injured tissue. Judicious use of imaging is important to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure, minimize cost, and avoid therapy targeting asymptomatic imaging abnormalities. This article compares and contrasts the diagnostic imaging commonly used for detecting musculoskeletal injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Records Review of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Aeromedical Evacuation Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-21

    military medical records containing ICD-9 codes to investigate the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries within flight nurses and medical technicians...the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries within flight nurses and medical technicians compared to their non-flying counterparts from 2006 through...healthcare facilities. Back and joint pain are frequently reported, with 52% of nurses reporting back pain.21–26 An investigation of occupational

  5. Flat, hurdle and steeple racing: risk factors for musculoskeletal injury.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C J; Reid, S W; Hodgson, D R; Bourke, J M; Rose, R J

    1998-11-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify and quantify risk factors for serious musculoskeletal injury sustained at 4 Australian metropolitan racetracks. During the period of study (August 1988-July 1995) there were 196 cases from flat racing, 52 cases from hurdle racing and 53 cases from steeplechases. The incidences of fatal musculoskeletal injuries per start for flat, hurdle and steeple races were 0.06, 0.63 and 1.43% respectively. Logistic regression identified harder track surfaces, horses being older than age 3 years, one racecourse (Flemington) and jumping races as significant risk factors which increased the risk of musculoskeletal breakdown. The incidence of fatal musculoskeletal injuries for flat races at the 4 study tracks was similar to that reported in the UK but less than the USA. Death rates for hurdle and steeple races in the study population were higher than in the UK. Strategies to reduce the incidence of serious musculoskeletal injuries may include avoidance of excessively hard track surfaces through closer regulation of track moisture content; implementation of more rigorous prerace lameness examinations of horses, particularly older horses; and altering the design and number of jumps in hurdle and steeple races. The quantification of risk, as we have reported here, is the first step towards addressing the causes of musculoskeletal breakdown and should help in applying a reasoned approach to intervention measures that may be effective in reducing racing injuries.

  6. Effect of physical activity on musculoskeletal discomforts among handicraft workers

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Mahnaz; Rismanchian, Masoud; Khalili, Pejman; Torki, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Handicrafts seems to be one of the high-risk jobs regarding work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) which necessitate the implementation of different corrective intervention like regular physical activities. This study aimed to investigate the impact of physical activity on WMSDs among craftsmen. Methods: This cross-sectional study was an analytical – descriptive study carried out on 100 craftsmen working in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling method was census, and all workshops involved with this job were included. Information on demographic parameters and physical activity was collected by demographic forms. The data related to worker's musculoskeletal discomforts were conducted using Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using statistical tests including independent t-test, Chi-square, and ANOVA. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18. Results: The highest percentages of complaints related to severe musculoskeletal discomfort were reported in right shoulder (%36), right wrist (%26), neck (%25), and upper right arm (%24), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between physical activity and musculoskeletal discomforts of left wrist (P = 0.012), lower back (P = 0.016), and neck (P = 0.006). Discussion and Conclusion: Based on the study results, it can be inferred that regular but not too heavy physical activity can have a positive impact on decreasing the musculoskeletal discomforts. PMID:27512700

  7. [Musculoskeletal rehabilitation and bone. Musculoskeletal response to human space flight and physical countermeasures].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The assembly of the Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo" to international space station was completed in 2009 and Koichi Wakata became the first Japanese station astronaut who spent more than 4 months in the station. Bone and muscle losses are significant medical concerns for long duration human space flight. Effective countermeasure program for bone loss and muscle atrophy is necessary to avoid post flight bone fracture and joint sprain after landing. The musculoskeletal response to human space flight and current physical countermeasure program for station astronauts are described.

  8. The influence of a dynamic elastic garment on musculoskeletal and respiratory wellness in computer users.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Gomas, Kellie A; Narvy, Steven J; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Evidence is growing that computer users are at increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders, particularly those involving the upper extremity, with significant financial cost and lost productivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term effects of wearing a dynamic elastic garment (Posture Shirt[Formula: see text]; AlignMed, USA) on musculoskeletal wellness and health in the computer workplace. Ninety-six computer users were evaluated. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was completed. A functional assessment of posture, lung function, and grip strength was performed after wearing the Posture Shirt[Formula: see text] for 4 weeks. A training log was kept to track usage of the garment, as well as weekly sensations of fatigue, productivity, and energy level. After 4 weeks, there was statistically significant improvement in forward shoulder and head posture, thoracic kyphosis, and grip strength. Improvements in spirometry measures did not meet statistical significance. Postural fatigue and muscular fatigue decreased by 21% and 29%, respectively, and energy level and productivity increased by 20% and 13%, respectively. This prospective study demonstrated positive short-term impact of the Posture Shirt[Formula: see text] on both subjective and objective measures of posture, lung function, grip strength, fatigue, and productivity.

  9. Immediate effects of Tuina techniques on working-related musculoskeletal disorder of professional orchestra musicians.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cláudia Maria; Moreira, Luis; Coimbra, Daniela; Machado, Jorge; Greten, Henry J

    2015-07-01

    Musicians are a prone group to suffer from working-related musculoskeletal disorder (WRMD). Conventional solutions to control musculoskeletal pain include pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation programs but their efficiency is sometimes disappointing. The aim of this research is to study the immediate effects of Tuina techniques on WRMD of professional orchestra musicians from the north of Portugal. We performed a prospective, controlled, single-blinded, randomized study. Professional orchestra musicians with a diagnosis of WRMD were randomly distributed into the experimental group (n=39) and the control group (n=30). During an individual interview, Chinese diagnosis took place and treatment points were chosen. Real acupoints were treated by Tuina techniques into the experimental group and non-specific skin points were treated into the control group. Pain was measured by verbal numerical scale before and immediately after intervention. After one treatment session, pain was reduced in 91.8% of the cases for the experimental group and 7.9% for the control group. Although results showed that Tuina techniques are effectively reducing WRMD in professional orchestra musicians of the north of Portugal, further investigations with stronger measurements, double-blinding designs and bigger simple sizes are needed.

  10. Beware of the dog? An observational study of dog-related musculoskeletal injury in the UK.

    PubMed

    Willmott, H; Greenheld, N; Goddard, R

    2012-05-01

    Although owning a dog confers numerous health benefits, dogs can cause falls resulting in musculoskeletal injury and fractures. We conducted a prospective observational study over a two-month period to investigate the incidence and epidemiology of dog-related musculoskeletal injury. All patients attending the Emergency Department, trauma ward or fracture clinic were asked whether their injury was caused by a dog. Thirty-seven patients were identified. There were 26 fractures, 10 soft-tissue injuries and one head injury. Seventeen patients were admitted to the hospital and sixteen cases required an operation. Older people were statistically more likely to sustain a fracture (p=0.0003) or require hospital admission (p=0.02). Mechanisms of injury are discussed and can be classified into direct or indirectly caused by the dog. The most common injury mechanism was being pulled over by a dog on a lead. Injury avoidance strategies are discussed. We conclude that dogs are a potential hazard, particularly to the elderly and the morbidity associated with these injuries may offset the health benefits conferred by dog ownership.

  11. The clinical profile of musculoskeletal injuries in children attending a major hospital in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Sural, Sumit; Verma, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Background Children are vulnerable to musculoskeletal injuries both at home and on the street for various reasons. Morbidity and disabilities resulting from these, mostly preventable, injuries, make them a burden to their families and society. The role of various factors associated with injuries is often not documented. Methods This prospective study, done on 100 children aged up to 12 years with musculoskeletal trauma, analysed in details, the various modes of injuries. Results One in every five patient was a child below 12 years of age. Boys were injured more than girls. Injuries, especially fractures, were most common in the extremities, the upper limb more commonly injured than the lower limb. Most of the injuries occurred at home. The most common mode of injuries was falls that happened while playing both within and outside the home, followed by road traffic accidents. Most injuries occurred during daytime. Conclusions Injuries in children were found to be preventable. Small interventions while constructing homes can contribute tremendously to injury prevention and control in children. Parental awareness about the various modes of injury, role of supervised playing and their responsibility towards injury prevention can play a key role in reducing the morbidity associated with childhood fractures. PMID:26549946

  12. HIV and Orthopaedics: Musculoskeletal Manifestations and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Subhawong, Ty; Hernandez, Victor H; Campo, Rafael

    2016-05-04

    ➤Advances in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in recent years have transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease when treatment is available, increasing a patient's life expectancy and the chances that orthopaedic surgeons will encounter such patients in their clinical practice.➤Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with HIV infection are common and sometimes are the initial presentation of the disease. Knowledge about neoplasms and associated conditions affecting muscle, bones, and joints is essential for successful management.➤Since the advent of cART, total joint arthroplasty has been shown to be a safe procedure; however, perioperative infection is still a small risk in patients with uncontrolled viral loads or CD4 counts of <400 cells/mm(3).➤With regard to trauma surgery, the rates of early and late infection around implants, as well as union rates, are comparable with those in the HIV-negative population; however, there is an increased risk of pulmonary, renal, and infectious or septic complications in the polytrauma setting.➤Factors such as CD4 count, nutritional status, cART therapy, viral load count, and other comorbidities (hemophilia, infection among intravenous drug users, etc.) should be considered when treating these patients in order to optimize their clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  13. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  14. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  15. Musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging: importance of radiography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Hunter, Tim B; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Pope, Thomas L

    2003-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of radiography for interpretation of musculoskeletal (MSK) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. DESIGNS AND PATIENTS: In a 1-year period, 1,030 MSK MRI studies were performed in 1,002 patients in our institution. For each study, the interpreting radiologist completed a questionnaire regarding the availability and utility of radiographs, radiological reports and clinical information for the interpretation of the MRI study. Radiographs were essential, very important or added information in 61-75% of all MSK MRI cases. Radiographs were judged as essential for reading of MRI studies more often for trauma, infection/inflammation and tumors than for degenerative and miscellaneous/normal diagnoses (chi(2)=60.95, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical information was rated as "essential" or "useful" significantly more often than not (chi(2)=93.07, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical and MRI diagnoses were the same or partially concordant significantly more often for tumors than for trauma, infection/inflammation and degenerative conditions, while in the miscellaneous/normal group they were different in 64% of cases. When the diagnoses were different, there were more instances in which radiographs were not available. Radiographs are an important, and sometimes essential, initial complementary study for reading of MSK MRI examinations. It is highly recommended that radiographs are available when MSK MRI studies are interpreted.

  16. [Aging at work and musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, E; Colombini, D

    2000-01-01

    By means of a critical review of the international literature and of their own published experiences, the Authors discuss the influence of the "age" factor on work related musculoskeletal disorders of the spine and upper limbs. Regarding the spine, the lumbosacral spine in particular, there is evidence (both in relation to pathways and from epidemiological data) of the influence of age in determining a progressive increase in the occurrence of spondyloarthropathy with clear radiological signs. For upper limb disorders the influence of the "age" factor is still under debate and in any case does not seem of great importance. As far prevention is concerned for elderly workers subject to fixed postures and repetitive movements of the upper limbs it seems sufficient, to adopt the general measures used for the whole working population. However, specific measures should be adopted for elderly workers exposed to manual material handling (MMH). These consist in using reference values for the recommended weight that are lower than those adopted for younger workers (aged 18-45 years) and in implementing specific programs of active health surveillance.

  17. NASA Musculoskeletal Space Medicine and Reconditioning Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Scheuring, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Rehabilitation (ASCR) group is comprised of certified strength and conditioning coaches and licensed and certified athletic trainers. The ASCR group works within NASA s Space Medicine Division providing direction and supervision to the astronaut corp with regards to physical readiness throughout all phases of space flight. The ASCR group is overseen by flight surgeons with specialized training in sports medicine or physical medicine and rehabilitation. The goals of the ASCR group include 1) designing and administering strength and conditioning programs that maximize the potential for physical performance while minimizing the rate of injury, 2) providing appropriate injury management and rehabilitation services, 3) collaborating with medical, research, engineering, and mission operations groups to develop and implement safe and effective in-flight exercise countermeasures, and 4) providing a structured, individualized post-flight reconditioning program for long duration crew members. This Panel will present the current approach to the management of musculoskeletal injuries commonly seen within the astronaut corp and will present an overview of the pre-flight physical training, in-flight exercise countermeasures, and post-flight reconditioning program for ISS astronauts.

  18. Poverty and musculoskeletal impairment in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Rischewski, Dorothea; Kuper, Hannah; Atijosan, Oluwarantimi; Simms, Victoria; Jofret-Bonet, Mireia; Foster, Allen; Lavy, Christopher

    2008-06-01

    The recently adopted UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities acknowledges the need to address social exclusion and poverty of persons with disabilities. However, policy makers, especially in low-income countries, often lack information about the socioeconomic situation of this vulnerable group of society. This study aimed to assess the association between poverty and musculoskeletal impairment (MSI) in Rwanda. A nationwide population-based matched case-control study was undertaken in Rwanda. Data were collected on education, literacy, employment, household expenditure and assets for 345 cases and 532 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was performed, and the results indicated that adults with MSI in Rwanda are more likely to have no employment (odds ratio (OR)=3.3, 95% CI 2.1-5.2) while children with MSI are less likely to attend school (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Cases with MSI are disadvantaged vis-à-vis housing conditions and household size, potentially indicating crowding. However, cases with MSI were not poorer than controls in terms of assets or expenditure. These data suggest that increased efforts should be undertaken in Rwanda in order to ensure that children with disabilities are included in schools and that adults with disabilities can find appropriate employment opportunities.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal infections.

    PubMed

    Modic, M T; Pflanze, W; Feiglin, D H; Belhobek, G

    1986-06-01

    In summary, MRI has a high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory disease involving the musculoskeletal system. Because of the usual anatomic pattern of involvement in the vertebral column, there is also a high specificity. In the appendicular skeleton and pelvis, it is unclear whether MRI can add to the sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide studies in uncomplicated cases of acute infection. However, it can be performed more rapidly and provides greater anatomic detail and delineation of the extent of marrow involvement than radionuclide studies. MRI can be used in both acute and chronic osteomyelitis to guide a diagnostic interventional test to the appropriate site. It is capable of excluding involvement of the medullary canal, and it is better than radionuclide studies for differentiating soft tissue infection with periostitis from osteomyelitis. It has only a limited role in the immediate postoperative period, and in the presence of metallic implants, an indium-labeled leukocyte scan may be more appropriate. Finally, it must be remembered that the current data base of MRI is small and that further refinement of its role in the evaluation of inflammatory processes will be forthcoming.

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders in hotel restaurant workers.

    PubMed

    Chyuan, Jong-Yu Adol; Du, Chung-Li; Yeh, Wen-Yu; Li, Chung-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A variety of occupational groups have been shown to experience elevated risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). Little information on WMSD is available in hotel restaurant workers. To document the profile of WMSD in a sample of hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information regarding body site specific WMSD, pain intensity and strategies for pain relief amongst a sample of hotel restaurant workers. Among 905 restaurant workers, 785 (84%) reported experience of WMSD in the previous month, with the highest prevalence rate found for the shoulder (58%). The highest mean score for perceived pain intensity was found for the lower back/waist (2.50 points). Despite a high prevalence rate, only a small portion of those reporting WMSD (12%) considered their work capacity or activities of daily living to be affected by WMSD, and only <5% of workers with WMSD sought medical treatment. WMSD related pain is common among hotel restaurant workers in Taiwan, but it does not appear to interfere with job performance or daily living. Self-treatment and alternative therapies that have not been evaluated for effectiveness are commonly employed by hotel restaurant workers.

  1. The idiopathic musculoskeletal pain syndromes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Sherry, David D; Malleson, Peter N

    2002-08-01

    Idiopathic musculoskeletal pain syndromes in children have a variety of manifestations; they can be diffuse or well localized, constant or intermittent, with or without autonomic symptoms and signs, completely incapacitating or not limiting activities, and they can tax the physician's diagnostic skill. A careful history and examination is usually all that is needed to make a diagnosis, although the differential diagnosis is large and might require laboratory and radiographic investigation. Pain and functional assessment help track the progress with therapy. Intense exercise therapy is associated with the best outcome. Psychologic issues should be evaluated to determine if further psychologic intervention is indicated. The medium-term outcome is probably good for most of these children, but the long-term prognosis is unknown. One must be aware that other manifestations of psychologic problems might emerge. By the time these children and their families see the rheumatologist they are desperate and can be frustrating to work with due to their difficulty in accepting any kind of psychologic element to the pain and its associated disability. Nevertheless, it is rewarding to help the children understand and work through their pain so they can resume normal lives.

  2. Deducing a mechanism of all musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Verrall, Geoffrey; Dolman, Bronwyn

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The mechanism of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries is not well understood. This research applies principles of elastic motion to the anatomy and movement patterns of MSK structures. From this an insight into the application and timing of forces on MSK structures can be established and the mechanism/s of injury derived. Methods (Current Knowledge) All MSK structures demonstrate varying degrees of elasticity. Movement occurs primarily as a consequence of Muscle Tendon Unit (MTU) shortening. The application of an applied external force results in MSK structure lengthening. Results The MTU acts as a non-idealised Hookean Spring. The resting length of MSK structures is the minimum distance between attachment points. The anatomical constraints results in MSK structures having adequate compressive strength during shortening. Thus MSK injuries only occur during lengthening of the MSK structure. From this with knowledge of MSK movement cycles, we can derive the mechanism of injury. Conclusions MSK injuries result from an inability to counter applied forces whilst lengthening. Muscles, tendons and ligaments can only injure during their lengthening contraction phase. Insertional tendons and bone near attachment points injure during the MTU shortening phase. Injuries to other MSK structures can occur independent of the lengthening and shortening phases such as direct contact injuries. PMID:27900289

  3. MUSCULOSKELETAL SCREENING AND FUNCTIONAL TESTING: CONSIDERATIONS FOR BASKETBALL ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Youth participation in basketball is on the rise, with basketball one of the top five participation sports in Australia. With increased participation there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of the pre-participation examination, including musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing as part of a multidisciplinary approach to reducing the risk for future injuries. As majority of all basketball injuries affect the lower extremities, pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance testing should assess fundamental movement qualities throughout the kinetic chain with an emphasis on lower extremity force characteristics, specifically eccentric loading tasks. Thus, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the existing literature elucidating pre-participation musculoskeletal screening and functional performance tests that can be used as a framework for rehabilitation professionals in assessing basketball athletes’ readiness to safely perform the movement demands of their sport. Methods Relevant articles published between 2000 and 2016 using the search terms ‘musculoskeletal screening’, ‘functional testing’, ‘youth athletes’, and ‘basketball’ were identified using MEDLINE. From a basketball-specific perspective, several relevant musculoskeletal assessments were identified, including: the Functional Hop Test Combination, the Landing Error Scoring System, the Tuck Jump Assessment, the Weight-Bearing Lunge Test, and the Star Excursion Balance Test. Each of these assessments creates movement demands that allow for easy identification of inefficient and/or compensatory movement tendencies. A basic understanding of musculoskeletal deficits including bilateral strength and flexibility imbalances, lower crossed syndrome, and dominance-related factors are key components in determination of injury risk. Discussion Assessment of sport-specific movement demands through

  4. The accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound imaging for musculoskeletal soft tissue pathology of the extremities: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rogan E A; Walker, Bruce F; Young, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diagnostic ultrasound imaging (MSK-DUSI) has been growing outside the traditional radiology speciality. Increased use of this technology has been reported in several healthcare settings, however an apparent gap in the knowledge of the accuracy of this diagnostic technology indicated a review was warranted. We undertook a structured review of the literature to assess the accuracy of MSK-DUSI for the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft tissue pathology of the extremities. An electronic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database (1972 to mid-2014) was conducted. All relevant systematic reviews of diagnostic studies, all diagnostic studies published after the date of the latest systematic reviews and relevant diagnostic studies outside the scope the systematic reviews that directly compared the accuracy of MSK-DUSI (the index test) to an appropriate reference standard for the target condition were included. A fundamental appraisal of the methodological quality of studies was completed. The individual sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio data were extracted and entered into diagnostic accuracy tables. A total of 207 individual studies were included. The results show that MSK-DUSI has acceptable diagnostic accuracy for a wide spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions of the extremities. However, there is a lack of high quality prospective experimental studies in this area and as such clinicians should interpret the results with some caution due to the potential for overestimation of diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Improved education in musculoskeletal conditions is necessary for all doctors.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina; Dreinhöfer, Karsten E.; Woolf, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    It is likely that everyone will, at some time, suffer from a problem related to the musculoskeletal system, ranging from a very common problem such as osteoarthritis or back pain to severely disabling limb trauma or rheumatoid arthritis. Many musculoskeletal problems are chronic conditions. The most common symptoms are pain and disability, with an impact not only on individuals' quality of life but also, importantly, on people's ability to earn a living and be independent. It has been estimated that one in four consultations in primary care is caused by problems of the musculoskeletal system and that these conditions may account for up to 60% of all disability pensions. In contrast, teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels--and the resulting competence and confidence of many doctors--do not reflect the impact of these conditions on individuals and society. Many medical students do not have any clinical training in assessing patients with bone and joint problems. Under the umbrella of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010, experts from all parts of the world with an interest in teaching have developed recommendations for an undergraduate curriculum to improve the teaching of musculoskeletal conditions in medical schools. The goal for each medical school should be a course in musculoskeletal medicine concentrating on clinical assessment, common outpatient musculoskeletal problems and recognition of emergencies. Improving competency in the management of musculoskeletal problems within primary care settings through improved education is the next aim, but there are needs for improvement for all professionals and at all levels within the health care system. PMID:14710510

  6. Importance of musculoskeletal pain in work activities in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Caberlon, C F; Padoin, A V; Mottin, C C

    2013-12-01

    The consequences of obesity include musculoskeletal pain and its influence on a person's social, personal, and professional life, which is a great challenge for the multidisciplinary team in the treatment of obesity. The objective of this work was to evaluate musculoskeletal pain in the work activities of obese individuals. An uncontrolled cross-sectional study was conducted. During 8 months, all obese individuals seen in the preoperative period at a tertiary care referral center for the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome were invited to participate in the study. Ninety-five persons filled out the Nordic questionnaire for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms (Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ)) after having signed an informed consent form and having met the inclusion criteria of the study. Of the 95 patients assessed, 71 were females, the mean age was 39.3 ± 10.1 years, and mean body mass index was 47.25 ± 8.72 kg/m(2). Sixty-three (66.31 %) individuals felt musculoskeletal pain in some region of the body in the last 12 months, and 42 (44.21 %) sometimes gave up working in the same period because of musculoskeletal pain. There was a statistical association between BMI and the three aspects evaluated by the NMQ. Musculoskeletal pain was very related to obese individuals who participated in this study, and in the majority cases, execution of the work activities of these persons was impeded. This indicates a need for further studies that address this subject to better attend to and intervene in the health of this population.

  7. Fitness training and its effect on musculoskeletal pain in professional ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Ramel, E; Thorsson, O; Wollmer, P

    1997-10-01

    In a controlled, prospective, randomized study, half of the dancers in a professional ballet company were asked to do extra self-administered fitness training, while the other half became the control group. The aim was to examine if the dancers in the training group would be able to keep up the extra training during a regular season and to examine its effect on their maximum oxygen uptake and on their self-estimated musculoskeletal pain. The training group increased their oxygen uptake more than the control group. The self-estimated functional inability because of pain (SEFIP) indicated significantly less pain the week after the première for the study population taken as a whole, but not for the two groups when considered separately. The training group claimed that the fitness training had helped them to cope with the psychological strain during rehearsals.

  8. Effectiveness of the Bern Ambulatory Interprofessional Rehabilitation (BAI-Reha) programme for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gantschnig, Brigitte Elisabeth; Heigl, Franziska; Widmer Leu, Colette; Bütikofer, Lukas; Reichenbach, Stephan; Villiger, Peter Matthias

    2017-05-10

    Chronic pain has a high impact on individuals and society. (Cost-)effective interventions are desperately needed. We evaluated short- and long-term effects of the Bern Ambulatory Interprofessional Rehabilitation (BAI-Reha) for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. We analysed data prospectively collected from patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain before and after BAI-Reha (at 12 weeks, 1 year and 2 years) using linear mixed-models and logistic generalised estimating equations. The first thirty consecutive patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, aged between 20 and 73 years (mean 44.83, standard deviation 12.57 years) were included. We found significant changes over time compared with baseline for return to work (p <0.001), Euro quality of life visual analogue scale score (p = 0.026), burden of suffering (p = 0.001), self-rated and observed quality of daily life task motor performance (p <0.001 and p = 0.012, respectively) but not for pain intensity (p = 0.16) and observed quality of daily life task process performance (p = 0.28). At the first postintervention visit we found significant differences compared with baseline in return to work (odds ratio 5.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-15.39], burden of suffering (mean difference 5.26, 95% CI 2.09-8.44], self-rated quality (mean difference 2.31, 95% CI 1.57-3.05) and satisfaction (mean difference 2.80, 95% CI 1.95-3.66) with daily life task performance, and observed quality with daily life task motor performance (mean difference 0.31, 95% CI 0.02-0.60). This study confirms earlier data and supports the effectiveness of interprofessional rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  9. Timing of Physical Therapy Initiation for Nonsurgical Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders and Effects on Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Heidi A; Wyrsta, Nadia J; Davenport, Todd E; Egan, William E; Gellhorn, Alfred C

    2016-02-01

    Systematic review. Current US practice guidelines suggest an initial "wait-and-see" approach following onset of musculoskeletal pain, particularly for spinal pain. Several studies suggest that early, compared with delayed, initiation of physical therapy for musculoskeletal conditions may decrease health costs and improve outcomes. To compare early and delayed initiation of physical therapy for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions and to assess effects on patient-important outcomes and cost. MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), Web of Science, and PEDro were the data sources. We included studies that compared early and delayed initiation of physical therapy for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Studies in which early and delayed interventions differed were excluded. Two independent reviewers extracted study characteristics and outcomes, and determined eligibility and quality through consensus with a third reviewer. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used in summary conclusions. Standardized effect sizes (d) and odds ratios were calculated to assess the effect strength of early versus delayed physical therapy for each included study. Of the 3855 articles initially screened, 14 studies were included. The majority of articles studied low back pain (only 2 articles studied cervical pain). For spinal pain, there was low-quality evidence that early versus delayed physical therapy was associated with decreased cost and decreased frequency of opioid prescriptions, advanced imaging, and surgeries without compromising patient-important outcomes. One subgroup analyzed showed improved function/disability with early physical therapy in an occupational health setting. Although there were consistent results across studies favoring early physical therapy for decreased cost and medical utilization, quality was limited. Preliminary evidence suggests that early physical therapy may decrease cost without compromising

  10. Bushehr Elderly Health (BEH) programme: study protocol and design of musculoskeletal system and cognitive function (stage II)

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Gita; Ostovar, Afshin; Heshmat, Ramin; Darabi, Hossein; Sharifi, Farshad; Raeisi, Alireza; Mehrdad, Neda; Shadman, Zhaleh; Razi, Faride; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud; Meybodi, Hamidreza Aghaei; Soltani, Akbar; Nabipour, Iraj; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal disorders and cognitive diseases are prevalent, and they are significant determinants of morbidity and mortality in older adults. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal and cognitive diseases and their risk factors and also to assess their associations during future follow-ups. Methods and analysis Bushehr Elderly Health (BEH) programme is a population-based prospective cohort study being conducted in Bushehr, a southern province of Iran. A total of 3000 older people aged ≥60 years participated in the first stage from which 2772 were eligible to participate in the second stage, which started after 2.5 years. Data including demographic status, lifestyle factors, general healthandmedical history, and mentalandfunctional health are collected through a questionnaire. Anthropometric measures, performance testsandmuscle strength, blood pressure and and body composition measurements are done. A total 25 cc venous blood is taken, and sera are stored at –80°C for possible future analyses. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Science as well as the Research Ethics Committee of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. A written informed consent was signed by all the participants. The study findings will show the prevalence of musculoskeletal disease, cognitive impairment and their risk factors in an elderly population. The participants will be followed during the study to measure the occurrence outcomes. This study will also have the potential to inform the development of beneficial interventions to improve the management of musculoskeletal and cognitive impairment in Iran and other countries in the Middle East. Our findings will be disseminated via scientific publication as well as presentation to stakeholders, including the patients, clinicians, the public and

  11. Prevalence of burnout among musculoskeletal radiologists.

    PubMed

    Chew, Felix S; Mulcahy, Michael J; Porrino, Jack A; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Relyea-Chew, Annemarie

    2017-04-01

    Burnout is a job-related psychological syndrome with three aspects: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and perceived lack of personal accomplishment. Burnout is associated with deleterious effects on both workers and their work. When burnout affects physicians, their well-being, longevity, and care of patients are at risk. Recent studies concerning physician burnout treat specialists such as radiologists as one group. We studied burnout in musculoskeletal (MSK) subspecialist radiologists. An institutional review board exemption was obtained. Society of Skeletal Radiology members received invitations to an anonymous survey that included questions from the Maslach Burnout Inventory ™ (MBI) measuring all three aspects of burnout. The response rate was 36.4% (433/1190). The prevalence of emotional exhaustion was 61.7% (255/413), of depersonalization 53.3% (219/411), and of perceived lack of personal accomplishment 39.6% (161/407). Only 19.5% (79/405) of MSK radiologists reported no burnout, while 80.5% (326/405) reported burnout along one or more dimensions. For all three dimensions, the prevalence was higher and the mean severity was worse for private practice compared with academic practice. The prevalence of burnout was affected more by practice setting than by gender. Burnout prevalence and severity also varied systematically with years since completion of training. Among MSK radiologists, we found a much higher prevalence and greater severity of burnout than has been previously reported for radiologists and other physicians. There were differences in prevalence and severity of burnout among practice settings, genders, and longevity cohorts.

  12. Health care utilization for musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Crystal; Canizares, Mayilee; Davis, Aileen M; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2010-02-01

    To examine patterns of ambulatory care and hospital utilization for people with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including arthritis and related conditions, bone and spinal conditions, trauma and related conditions, and unspecified MSDs. Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database for ambulatory care physician visits, the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System database for day (outpatient) surgeries and emergency department visits, and the Discharge Abstract Database for hospital discharges were used to examine health care utilization for MSDs in fiscal year 2006-2007. Person visit rates (number of people with physician visits or hospital encounters per population) were calculated. Overall, 22.3% of Ontario's population (2.8 million persons) saw a physician for an MSD in ambulatory settings. Person visit rates were highest for arthritis and related conditions (107.7 per 1,000 population), followed by trauma and related conditions (89.6 per 1,000 population), unspecified MSDs (71.0 per 1,000 population), and bone and spinal conditions (62.4 per 1,000 population). The majority of visits were to primary care physicians, with 83.2% of those with visits for all MSDs seeing a primary care physician at least once. Overall, 33.0% of people with a physician visit for an MSD saw a specialist, with orthopedic surgeons being the most commonly consulted type of specialist. In hospital settings, person visit rates for MSDs were highest in the emergency department, followed by day surgeries and inpatient hospitalizations. The findings of our study highlight the magnitude of health care utilization for MSDs and the central role of primary care physicians in the management of these conditions.

  13. Sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; de Vet, Henrica C W; Picavet, H Susan J

    2007-05-20

    Cross-sectional population-based study. To study sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain (MP): limited functioning, work leave or disability, and healthcare use. MP is a major public health problem in developed countries due to high prevalence rates and considerable consequences. There are indications that consequences of MP differ for men and women. Data of a Dutch population-based study were used, limited to persons 25 to 64 years of age (n = 2517). Data were collected by a postal questionnaire. Women with any MP report more healthcare use for MP, i.e., contact with a medical caregiver and use of medicines than men, while men report more work disability (ever in life) due to low back pain only, irrespective of work status. None of the sex differences can be explained by age, household composition, educational level, smoking status, overweight, physical activity, and pain catastrophizing. Older age was related to more limited functioning due to MP (women), work disability due to MP (men), and healthcare use due to MP (men and women). A one-person household was associated with work disability (women) and use of medicines (men). Low educational level was associated with limited functioning (men), work leave (men), contact with a medical caregiver (men), and work disability (men and women). Smoking was associated with limited functioning (men), work leave (women), and healthcare use (women). Physical inactivity was associated with limited functioning due to MP in women. Pain catastrophizing was associated with limited functioning, work leave, and healthcare use (men and women) and work disability (men). Consequences of MP show a slightly different pattern for men and women. Women with any MPreport more healthcare use for MP, while men report more work disability due to low back pain only. These sex differences can not be explained by general risk factors, but associations between these factors and consequences of MP show some sex differences.

  14. Musculoskeletal MRI findings of juvenile localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Eutsler, Eric P; Horton, Daniel B; Epelman, Monica; Finkel, Terri; Averill, Lauren W

    2017-04-01

    Juvenile localized scleroderma comprises a group of autoimmune conditions often characterized clinically by an area of skin hardening. In addition to superficial changes in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, juvenile localized scleroderma may involve the deep soft tissues, bones and joints, possibly resulting in functional impairment and pain in addition to cosmetic changes. There is literature documenting the spectrum of findings for deep involvement of localized scleroderma (fascia, muscles, tendons, bones and joints) in adults, but there is limited literature for the condition in children. We aimed to document the spectrum of musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of both superficial and deep juvenile localized scleroderma involvement in children and to evaluate the utility of various MRI sequences for detecting those findings. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated 20 MRI studies of the extremities in 14 children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Each imaging sequence was also given a subjective score of 0 (not useful), 1 (somewhat useful) or 2 (most useful for detecting the findings). Deep tissue involvement was detected in 65% of the imaged extremities. Fascial thickening and enhancement were seen in 50% of imaged extremities. Axial T1, axial T1 fat-suppressed (FS) contrast-enhanced and axial fluid-sensitive sequences were rated most useful. Fascial thickening and enhancement were the most commonly encountered deep tissue findings in extremity MRIs of children with juvenile localized scleroderma. Because abnormalities of the skin, subcutaneous tissues and fascia tend to run longitudinally in an affected limb, axial T1, axial fluid-sensitive and axial T1-FS contrast-enhanced sequences should be included in the imaging protocol.

  15. Prospective evaluation of 2 acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) grading systems: a joint Société Française de Greffe de Moëlle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC), Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), and International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, Jean-Yves; Klein, John P.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Milpied, Noël; Blaise, Didier; Antin, Joseph H.; Leblond, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Loberiza, Fausto; Ringden, Olle; Barrett, A. John; Horowitz, Mary M.; Socié, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    The most commonly used grading system for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was introduced 30 years ago by Glucksberg; a revised system was developed by the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) in 1997. To prospectively compare the 2 classifications and to evaluate the effect of duration and severity of aGVHD on survival, we conducted a multicenter study of 607 patients receiving T-cell-replete allografts, scored weekly for aGVHD in 18 transplantation centers. Sixty-nine percent of donors were HLA-identical siblings and 28% were unrelated donors. The conditioning regimen included total body irradiation in 442 (73%) patients. The 2 classifications performed similarly in explaining variability in survival by aGVHD grade, although the Glucksberg classification predicted early survival better. There was less physician bias or error in assigning grades with the IBMTR scoring system. With either system, only the maximum observed grade had prognostic significance for survival; neither time of onset nor progression from an initially lower grade of aGVHD was associated with survival once maximum grade was considered. Regardless of scoring system, aGVHD severity accounted for only a small percentage of observed variation in survival. Validity of these results in populations receiving peripheral blood transplants or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens remains to be tested. (Blood. 2005;106:1495-1500) PMID:15878974

  16. Prospective evaluation of 2 acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) grading systems: a joint Société Française de Greffe de Moëlle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC), Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), and International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) prospective study.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Jean-Yves; Klein, John P; Lee, Stephanie J; Milpied, Noël; Blaise, Didier; Antin, Joseph H; Leblond, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Loberiza, Fausto; Ringden, Olle; Barrett, A John; Horowitz, Mary M; Socié, Gérard

    2005-08-15

    The most commonly used grading system for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was introduced 30 years ago by Glucksberg; a revised system was developed by the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) in 1997. To prospectively compare the 2 classifications and to evaluate the effect of duration and severity of aGVHD on survival, we conducted a multicenter study of 607 patients receiving T-cell-replete allografts, scored weekly for aGVHD in 18 transplantation centers. Sixty-nine percent of donors were HLA-identical siblings and 28% were unrelated donors. The conditioning regimen included total body irradiation in 442 (73%) patients. The 2 classifications performed similarly in explaining variability in survival by aGVHD grade, although the Glucksberg classification predicted early survival better. There was less physician bias or error in assigning grades with the IBMTR scoring system. With either system, only the maximum observed grade had prognostic significance for survival; neither time of onset nor progression from an initially lower grade of aGVHD was associated with survival once maximum grade was considered. Regardless of scoring system, aGVHD severity accounted for only a small percentage of observed variation in survival. Validity of these results in populations receiving peripheral blood transplants or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens remains to be tested.

  17. Basing musculoskeletal curriculum changes on the opinions of practicing physicians.

    PubMed

    Pasley, Thomas; Chan, Song; Poole, Phillippa; Wild, Martin; McQueen, Fiona

    2011-05-27

    To establish which musculoskeletal conditions are deemed to be the most important in clinical practice. To use this information to inform the development of a new musculoskeletal curriculum, with emphasis on common and relevant conditions. A survey listing 29 musculoskeletal conditions was sent to 150 doctors in Auckland, New Zealand. Doctors from 5 specialties, including general practice, were asked to score each condition on a rating scale from 0 to 7, to determine which conditions were perceived to be the most important as encountered in day-to-day clinical practice. The overall response rate to the survey was 36% and this was predominantly due to the low response rate from general practitioners. Fifteen conditions were given average ratings of 4.5/7 or greater and the top 5 of these were as follows: prolapsed intervertebral disc, hip fracture, mechanical back pain, gout at the great toe and osteoarthritis of the hip. This study has used a consensus approach to identify specific musculoskeletal conditions deemed to be the most important in clinical practice. The information obtained can be used for designing a contemporary and relevant musculoskeletal medical curriculum.

  18. Dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Arsanjani Shirazi, Azam; Nasiri, Morteza; Yazdanpanah, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DFS) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), which early effective assessment can reduce the severity of complications including ulceration and amputations. This study aimed to review dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot. In this review article, we searched for articles published between March 1, 1980 and July 28, 2015 in PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus, for both English and non-English language articles with the following keywords: "Diabetic foot syndrome", "Ulceration", "Amputation", "Foot assessment", "Skin disorders" and "Musculoskeletal deformities". In dermatological dimension, most studies focused on elucidated changes in skin temperature, color, hardiness and turgor as well as common skin disorders such as Diabetic Dermopathy (DD), Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) and Diabetic Bullae (DB), which are common in diabetic patients and have high potential for leading to limb-threatening problems such as ulceration and infection. In musculoskeletal dimension, most studies focused on range of motion and muscle strength, gait patterns and as well as foot deformities especially Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA), which is the most destructive musculoskeletal complication of diabetes. DFS as a common condition in DM patients lead to ulceration and lower limb amputation frequently unless a prompt and comprehensive assessment was taken. So that dermatological and musculoskeletal assessments are usually neglected in primary health care, these assessments should be done frequently to reduce the high risk of serious complications. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risks of musculoskeletal disorders among betel quid preparers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Chen, Chih-Yong; Sumd, Shih-Bin; Yin, Hsin-I; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Betel quid chewing is common in Taiwan. The work of betel quid preparers is characterized by long hours of static work, awkward working posture and highly repetitive hand/wrist motion. However, the musculoskeletal health of betel quid preparers receives very little attention. The Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was administered, and electrogoniometers and electromyography were used in this cross-sectional study to characterize the hand/wrist motion of the subjects. Physical examinations on the thumbs and wrists of the subjects were conducted by means of Phalen's test and Finkelstein's test, respectively. Among the 225 participants, more than 95% attributed their musculoskeletal complaints to their work, and shoulder, neck, hand/wrist, and lower back discomfort were most frequently reported. More than 70% of the preparers did not seek medical treatment for their musculoskeletal problems. Based on the physical examination, 24% of the participants had suspected symptom of either carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or DeQuervain's tenosynovitis. The instrumental measurements indicated that betel quid preparation is characterized by extreme angle ranges and moderate repetition of wrist motion as well as low forceful exertion. This study concludes that betel quid preparers are a high risk group of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Future studies by electrogoniometers and detailed physical examination on betel quid preparers are needed to determine the predisposing factors for CTS. Some intervention measures to prevent MSDs and to lessen psychological stress for this group of workers are strongly suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A systematic review of prolotherapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Best, Thomas M; Beamsley, Mark; Patterson, Jeffrey

    2005-09-01

    Prolotherapy, an injection-based treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain, has grown in popularity and has received significant recent attention. The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of prolotherapy for treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. We searched Medline, PreMedline, Embase, CINAHL, and Allied and Complementary Medicine with search strategies using all current and historical names for prolotherapy and injectants. Reference sections of included articles were scanned, and content area specialists were consulted. All published studies involving human subjects and assessing prolotherapy were included. Data from 34 case reports and case series and 2 nonrandomized controlled trials suggest prolotherapy is efficacious for many musculoskeletal conditions. However, results from 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conflicting. Two RCTs on osteoarthritis reported decreased pain, increased range of motion, and increased patellofemoral cartilage thickness after prolotherapy. Two RCTs on low back pain reported significant improvements in pain and disability compared with control subjects, whereas 2 did not. All studies had significant methodological limitations. There are limited high-quality data supporting the use of prolotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain or sport-related soft tissue injuries. Positive results compared with controls have been reported in nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials. Further investigation with high-quality randomized controlled trials with noninjection control arms in studies specific to sport-related and musculoskeletal conditions is necessary to determine the efficacy of prolotherapy.

  1. Musculoskeletal symptoms among female garment factory workers in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Sarah R; Vijitha de Silva, P; Lipscomb, Hester J; Ostbye, Truls

    2012-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and their association with sociodemographic risk factors among female garment factory workers in Sri Lanka. 1058 randomly selected female garment factory workers employed in the free trade zone of Kogalla, Sri Lanka were recruited to complete two interviewer-administered questionnaires assessing musculoskeletal symptoms and health behaviors. Musculoskeletal complaints among female garment workers in the FTZ of Kogalla are less common than expected. Sociocultural factors may have resulted in underreporting and similarly contribute to the low rates of healthcare utilization by these women. 164 (15.5%) of workers reported musculoskeletal symptoms occurring more than 3 times or lasting a week or more during the previous 12-month period. Back (57.3%) and knee (31.7%) were the most common sites of pain. Although most symptomatic women reported that their problems interfered with work and leisure activities, very few missed work as a result of their pain. Prevalence correlated positively with increased age and industry tenure of less than 12 months. Job type, body mass index, and education were not significant predictors of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  2. Stem cells for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Labusca, Luminita; Zugun-Eloae, Florin; Mashayekhi, Kaveh

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal-related pain is one of the most disabling health conditions affecting more than one third of the adult population worldwide. Pain from various mechanisms and origins is currently underdiagnosed and undertreated. The complexity of molecular mechanisms correlating pain and the progression of musculoskeletal diseases is not yet fully understood. Molecular biomarkers for objective evaluation and treatment follow-up are needed as a step towards targeted treatment of pain as a symptom or as a disease. Stem cell therapy is already under investigation for the treatment of different types of musculoskeletal-related pain. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies are already being tested in various clinical trials that use musculoskeletal system-related pain as the primary or secondary endpoint. Genetically engineered stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells, offer promising novel perspectives for pain treatment. It is possible that a more focused approach and reassessment of therapeutic goals will contribute to the overall efficacy, as well as to the clinical acceptance of regenerative medicine therapies. This article briefly describes the principal types of musculoskeletal-related pain and reviews the stem cell-based therapies that have been specifically designed for its treatment. PMID:25621109

  3. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in musculoskeletal diseases: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Dallaudière, B; Lecouvet, F; Vande Berg, B; Omoumi, P; Perlepe, V; Cerny, M; Malghem, J; Larbi, A

    2015-04-01

    MR imaging is currently regarded as a pivotal technique for the assessment of a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) is a relatively recent sequence that provides information on the degree of cellularity of lesions. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value provides information on the movement of water molecules outside the cells. The literature contains many studies that have evaluated the role of DWI in musculoskeletal diseases. However, to date they yielded conflicting results on the use and the diagnostic capabilities of DWI in the area of musculoskeletal diseases. However, many of them have showed that DWI is a useful technique for the evaluation of the extent of the disease in a subset of musculoskeletal cancers. In terms of tissue characterization, DWI may be an adjunct to the more conventional MR imaging techniques but should be interpreted along with the signal of the lesion as observed on conventional sequences, especially in musculoskeletal cancers. Regarding the monitoring of response to therapy in cancer or inflammatory disease, the use of ADC value may represent a more reliable additional tool but must be compared to the initial ADC value of the lesions along with the knowledge of the actual therapy.

  4. Ergonomic intervention, workplace exercises and musculoskeletal complaints: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Heydari, Mohammad; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent occupational disorders in different jobs such as office work. Some interventions such as ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises are introduced as the methods for alleviating these disorders. In this study we compared the effect of ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises on musculoskeletal pain and discomfort in a group of office workers. Methods: In an interventional study on office workers, the effect of two interventions was compared. Ergonomic modification consisted of correcting the arrangement of workstation and changing some equipment; workplace exercises included stretching exercises focusing on neck, shoulders, low back, and hand and wrist. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed and compared before and after 1 month interventions. Results: The frequency of musculoskeletal complaints was high before the study. Both interventions significantly reduced complaints in a similar manner except for low back pain which was reduced in exercise group more than the other group. Conclusion: In this study we found a beneficial short-term effect for both ergonomic modifications and stretching work-place exercises on reducing musculoskeletal pain in office workers. PMID:25405134

  5. Ergonomic intervention, workplace exercises and musculoskeletal complaints: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Heydari, Mohammad; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent occupational disorders in different jobs such as office work. Some interventions such as ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises are introduced as the methods for alleviating these disorders. In this study we compared the effect of ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises on musculoskeletal pain and discomfort in a group of office workers. In an interventional study on office workers, the effect of two interventions was compared. Ergonomic modification consisted of correcting the arrangement of workstation and changing some equipment; workplace exercises included stretching exercises focusing on neck, shoulders, low back, and hand and wrist. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed and compared before and after 1 month interventions. The frequency of musculoskeletal complaints was high before the study. Both interventions significantly reduced complaints in a similar manner except for low back pain which was reduced in exercise group more than the other group. In this study we found a beneficial short-term effect for both ergonomic modifications and stretching work-place exercises on reducing musculoskeletal pain in office workers.

  6. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Ross A; Lackner, Johanna B; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. Fourteen RCTs, 1 case-control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood-Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive objective but not subjective outcomes in two studies. All 15 studies

  7. Relative rates and features of musculoskeletal complications in adult sicklers.

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, Jean; Atangana, Réné; Techa, André; Monny-Lobe, Marcel; Sosso, Maurice; Hoffmeyer, Pierre

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively look for the relative rates and features of musculoskeletal complications in a sample of adult homozygous SS sicklers in Yaoundé. During a 3-year period, known homozygous SS sicklers aged sixteen years or more, with suspicion or evidence of locomotor system disease, including leg ulcer, were consecutively investigated through complete medical history, clinical examination, full blood count, C-reactive protein, standard radiographs of the area of complaint, and, when necessary, CT scan and pus analysis. Those patients with no definite diagnosis were excluded. The study group comprised 84 patients aged 16 to 51 years (mean age: 22 years), with a male/female ratio of 0.75. Four of them (4.5%) were older than 40 years. Thirty five (41.6%) presented a total of 50 lesions of aseptic osteonecrosis, which were located in the hips in 25 cases (50%), in the lumbar spine in 20 cases (40%), in the humeral head in four cases (10%) and in the talar body in one case. The hip necrosis was grade I in 6 cases, grade II in four, grade III in 11 and terminal in four. Multiple sites of necrosis were observed in six patients. Nineteen (22.6%) of the sicklers came on with 36 malleolar ulcers, more frequently in males (sex ratio: 5/1) and 28 (78%) located on the medial side. Fifteen sites of osteomyelitis were noted in 14 patients (17.8%) and septic arthritis in six (7%). Less frequent complications were impingement syndrome, gout osteoarthropathy, stress fracture, subtalar fusion, knee osteoarthritis, tendonitis of the anterior tibialis, and recurrent dislocation of the patella. All patients were managed conventionally, except for advanced aseptic necrosis in which the indication for arthroplasty was delayed till the terminal stage. As suggested by another recent report from Senegal, efforts should be made to improve the life expectancy of sicklers in Sub-Saharan African countries, by acting on education, social and medical care

  8. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. STUDY SELECTION Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive

  9. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. Methods A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. Results A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies

  10. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chester, Rachel; Shepstone, Lee; Daniell, Helena; Sweeting, David; Lewis, Jeremy; Jerosch-Herold, Christina

    2013-07-08

    People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies demonstrated no association (p > 0

  11. Musculoskeletal interventional procedures: With or without imaging guidance?

    PubMed

    Kane, David; Koski, Juhani

    2016-08-01

    Aspiration and injection of joints and soft tissues is an indispensable skill used in everyday practice by the clinical rheumatologist. Most rheumatologists recognise that performing these procedures using anatomical landmarks is not always successful, particularly in the case of small or infrequently injected joints, bursae or tendon sheaths. Musculoskeletal ultrasound confirms the local pathological-anatomical diagnosis and is the most applicable and feasible imaging method that can be applied in clinical practice in guiding musculoskeletal interventional procedures. From 1993, there has been substantial examination of the accuracy of landmark- and imaging-guided procedures. We have searched the literature and ascertained whether imaging techniques improve the accuracy of musculoskeletal procedures and whether the accuracy of needle placement can be translated into improved clinical outcome (efficacy). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Musculo-skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Ganger, Rudolf; Schreiner, Simone; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2013-01-01

    A leptosomic body type is tall and thin with long hands. Marfanoid features may be familial in nature or pathological, as occurs in congenital contractual arachnodactyly (Beal's syndrome) and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome mimicking some of the changes of Marfan syndrome, although not accompanied by luxation of lens and dissecting aneurysm of aorta. In this article we collected eight patients who were consistent with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome via phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Our patients manifested a constellation of variable presentations of musculo-skeletal abnormalities ranging from developmental dysplasia of the hip, protrusio acetabuli, leg length inequality, patellar instability, scoliosis, to early onset osteoarthritis. Each abnormality has been treated accordingly. This is the first paper which includes the diagnosis and the management of the associated musculo-skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome, stressing that patients with Marfan syndrome are exhibiting great variability in the natural history and the severity of musculo-skeletal abnormalities.

  13. Pre-internship Nigerian medical graduates lack basic musculoskeletal competency.

    PubMed

    Nottidge, Timothy Eyo; Ekrikpo, Udeme; Ifesanya, Adeleke Olusegun; Nnabuko, Richard E; Dim, Edwin Maduakonam; Udoinyang, Clement Inyang

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the basic musculoskeletal competency of pre-internship graduates from Nigerian medical schools. We administered the Freedman and Bernstein basic musculoskeletal competency examination to 113 pre-internship graduates from seven Nigerian medical schools over a three year period from 2008 to 2010 at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital. Five specialist residents took the examination to test criteria relevance. All graduates failed this test, obtaining scores ranging from 7% to 67%. The duration of the orthopaedic posting, and observation of operative fracture fixation, were not significant determinants of the score. The two final-year specialist residents each had a marginal pass in the examination. Basic musculoskeletal competency among pre-internship Nigerian medical-school graduates is inadequate.

  14. Influence of Musculoskeletal Conditions on Oral Health Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Jennifer L.; Lamster, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Both musculoskeletal disorders and diseases of the oral cavity are common and potentially serious problems among older persons, yet little attention has been given to the links between them. Several musculoskeletal diseases, including osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and arthritic disorders, may directly involve the oral cavity and contiguous structures. Drugs used to treat musculoskeletal diseases, including corticosteroids and bisphosphonates, increase the risk of suppression of the immune system and osteonecrosis of the jaw, respectively. Many people with disabling osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions have difficulty practicing good oral hygiene and traveling to dental offices for professional help. Various inexpensive measures can help such individuals, including education of their caregivers and provision of antimicrobial mouthwashes and special toothbrushes. PMID:18511715

  15. Novel Musculoskeletal Loading System for Small Exercise Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan; Newby, Nate; Trinh, Tinh; Hanson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight places astronauts at increased risk for muscle strain and bone fracture upon return to a 1-g or partial gravity environment. Functionally limiting decrements in musculoskeletal health are likely during Mars proving-ground and Earth-independent missions given extended transit times and the vehicle limitations for exercise devices (low-mass, small volume, little to no power). This is particularly alarming for exploration missions because astronauts will be required to perform novel and physically demanding tasks (i.e. vehicle egress, exploration, and habitat building activities) on unfamiliar terrain. Accordingly, NASA's exploration roadmap identifies the need for development of small exercise equipment that can prevent musculoskeletal atrophy and has the ability to assess musculoskeletal health at multiple time points during long-duration missions.

  16. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  17. Current status of musculoskeletal application of shear wave elastography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a very powerful diagnostic modality for the musculoskeletal system due to the ability to perform real-time dynamic high-resolution examinations with the Doppler technique. In addition to acquiring morphologic data, we can now obtain biomechanical information by quantifying the elasticity of the musculoskeletal structures with US elastography. The earlier diagnosis of degeneration and the ability to perform follow-up evaluations of healing and the effects of treatment are possible. US elastography enables a transition from US-based inspection to US-based palpation in order to diagnose the characteristics of tissue. Shear wave elastography is considered the most suitable type of US elastography for the musculoskeletal system. It is widely used for tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is important to understand practice guidelines in order to enhance reproducibility. Incorporating viscoelasticity and overcoming inconsistencies among manufacturers are future tasks for improving the capabilities of US elastography. PMID:28292005

  18. Musculoskeletal Health: Addressing the Leading Causes of Disability.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelli D

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are not only the most common group of chronic health problems in our country, but they have a profound impact on critical domains of health including pain, disability, work participation, mental health, and potentially mortality. There are challenges to the treatment of common musculoskeletal conditions, including the current epidemic of opioid misuse and abuse. However, there are also evidence-based therapies that can be more effectively incorporated into care models for these conditions. This issue of the NCMJ describes the impact of common musculoskeletal conditions, gaps in care, and strategies for improving both prevention and management of these conditions. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  19. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Symptoms Among Batik Workers in Kelantan

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Razlan; Kyi, Win; Rampal, K.G

    2000-01-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out to evaluate the extent of occupational health problems focusing on some aspects of musculoskeletal symptoms among batik workers in Kelantan, Malaysia. The workers selected must have been in that industry for at least one year. Using cluster sampling, 202 workers were selected from 21 factories. More than half (60.2%) of the workers had been troubled with musculoskeletal symptoms at work. The most common symptoms were pain over the shoulders (41.0%), lower back (34.4%) and ankle (34.4%). Duration of employment, younger age group, prolonged standing and awkward working task were among contributing factors. It is therefore necessary to improve on both ergonomic and psychosocial environments of batik workers in order to prevent these musculoskeletal symptoms. PMID:22977385

  20. A primary care musculoskeletal clinic for residents: success and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Houston, Thomas K; Connors, Robert L; Cutler, Naomi; Nidiry, Mary Anne

    2004-05-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are common, but are often underemphasized in residency training. We evaluated the experience of residents (12) in 4 sessions of an innovative concentrated ambulatory, community-based musculoskeletal (MS) clinic precepted by general internists with additional training in teaching MS medicine. Compared with the year long longitudinal house staff (HS) clinic experience, the mean number of musculoskeletal diagnoses per resident seen in MS clinic was higher (13.9 [standard deviation 4.0] vs 5.4 [standard deviation 4.0]; P <.01). Common diagnoses in MS clinic included shoulder, hip, and knee tendonitis/bursitis, and the majority of diagnoses in HS clinic were nonspecific arthralgia (66%). Fifty-two injections were performed in MS clinic over the year, compared with one in HS clinic.

  1. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  17. Dynamic loading on the human musculoskeletal system -- effect of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Arkady S.; Mizrahi, Joseph; Verbitsky, Oleg; Isakov, Eli

    1998-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fatigue on the ability of human musculoskeletal system to deal with the onslaught of the heel strike initiated shock waves. DESIGN: Running on a treadmill at the anaerobic threshold level for 30 min was used to acquire the experimental data on the foot strike initiated shock waves. BACKGROUND: Muscles act to lower the bending stress on bone and to attenuate the dynamic load on human musculoskeletal system. Fatigue may diminish their ability to dissipate and attenuate loading on the system. Knowledge of the effects of fatigue on the ability of the human musculoskeletal system to attenuate the shock waves may help in design of the training procedures and exercises. METHODS: Twenty-two young healthy males participated in this study. Each one was running on the treadmill at the speed corresponding to his anaerobic threshold for 30 min. The heel strike induced shock waves were recorded every 5 min on the tibial tuberosity and sacrum. The data obtained were analyzed in both temporal and frequency domains. RESULTS: The results reveal significant increase in the dynamic loading experienced by the human musculoskeletal system with fatigue. This may be attributed to the inability of the fatigued system to provide an efficient way to attenuate shock waves. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of the recorded signals suggests that fatigue contributes to the reduction of the human musculoskeletal system's capacity to attenuate and dissipate those shock waves. This capacity appears to be a function not only of the fatigue level, but also of the vertical location along the skeleton. RELEVANCE: Fatigue during running may affect the ability of the human musculoskeletal system to attenuate and dissipate the heel strike induced shock waves. The study of the fatigue effect on shock wave attenuation provides information that may benefit the runner.

  18. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Conditions in Tennis-Teaching Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Ricardo E.; Aune, Kyle T.; Propst, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tennis-teaching professionals represent a significant proportion of all avid tennis players worldwide, with 15,000 belonging to the largest professional organization, the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA). However, there is no epidemiologic study to date reporting the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in these tennis-teaching professionals. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in tennis-teaching professionals following the International Tennis Federation’s (ITF) guidelines for epidemiologic studies. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Electronic surveys were distributed to 13,500 American members of the USPTA. The prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions was calculated. Results: A total of 1176 USPTA members completed the survey. Most participants reported teaching more than 5 days per week and more than 2 hours per day. The prevalence of musculoskeletal injury secondary to teaching tennis was 42%. The most affected area was the lower extremities (43% of all injuries) followed by the upper extremities (37%). The most commonly injured structures were muscles or tendons (36% of all injuries) and joints or ligaments (28%). The majority of injuries did not cause participants to miss more than 24 hours of teaching (57%). Conclusion: This is the first epidemiologic study on the occupational risk of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions in tennis-teaching professionals. Tennis-teaching professionals have a significant risk of musculoskeletal injuries or conditions related to their occupation. The prevalence of injury is consistent with previously published studies of injury prevalence among other tennis-playing populations. The proportions of upper and lower extremity injuries were fairly equitable. PMID:27790624

  19. Recommendations from NASA's Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.; Scheuring, R. A.; Walton, M. E.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Smaka, T.; McCulley, P. A.; Jones, J. A.; Stokes, C. R.; Parker, K. K.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Continuously evolving medical standards of care, limited crew training time, and the inherent constraints of space flight necessitate regular revisions of the mission medical support infrastructure and methodology. A three-day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held to review NASA s current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, risk mitigation for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes, treatment methods during flight, and research topics to mitigate risks to astronaut health. The Summit also undertook consideration of the best evidence-based terrestrial musculoskeletal practices to recommend their adaptation for use in space. Methods: The types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by short- and long-duration astronauts were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health. The Summit panel was comprised of experts from the clinical and research communities, as well as representatives from NASA Headquarters, the Astronaut corps, and the offices of JSC Medical Operations, JSC Human Adaptation and Countermeasures, Glenn Research Center Human Research, and Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation. Before the summit, panelists participated in a Web-based review of NASA s Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL). Results: The Summit generated seventy-five operational and research recommendations to the NASA Office of Space Medicine, including changes to the SMCL and to the musculoskeletal section of the ISS debrief questionnaire. From these recommendations, seven were assigned highest value and priority, and could be immediately adopted for the exploration architecture. Discussion: Optimized exercise and conditioning to improve performance and forestall musculoskeletal damage on orbit were the primary area of focus. Special attention was paid to exercise timing and muscle group specificity. The panel s recommendations are currently in various stages of consideration or integration

  20. Musculoskeletal injuries in construction: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S P

    2001-11-01

    The first step in addressing any problem is recognition of the problem and a measure of its size and scope. There have been few reviews to date of the evidence of a musculoskeletal disorders problem in construction, particularly in the United States. Construction contractors in the United States have questioned the existence of a musculoskeletal disorders problem in construction, so a review of the evidence is warranted. The types of evidence reviewed include: 1) historical evidence, 2) injury data, 3) workers' compensation data, 4) medical exam data, 5) survey data, and 6) exposure data. Injury data generally represent injuries that the employers have identified as work-related and recorded or reported. Workers' compensation data are from cases that have been filed by workers for compensation and quite often represent only "closed" cases where compensation has been awarded. Medical exam data are from physical examinations of workers. Symptom survey data are the most inclusive and show the number of workers who self-report musculoskeletal problems. Exposure data include measurements made of exposure to musculoskeletal risk factors. The existing data show construction workers to be at significant risk of musculoskeletal injury, specifically related to the work they do. Their risk of musculoskeletal injury is much higher than that of other workers who have less heavy work, about 50 percent higher than all other workers. Several trades have been extensively studied, while others have been studied to a lesser extent. While the exact relationship between exposures and injuries is complex and often multifaceted, it would be difficult to deny the existence of the problem and the fact that these injuries are, to a great extent, related to the work that construction workers perform.

  1. The prevalence and incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by flautists.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, J; Milanese, S

    2016-03-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms are reportedly common among musicians. Flautists may be at high risk of symptoms, due to their asymmetrical playing posture. To determine the prevalence and incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms among flautists. A systematic search of four databases, with reference and citation lists of included studies, screened for additional studies. Included studies were assigned to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine levels of evidence and critical appraisal was performed using a previously published tool. Data extracted included the country, sample size, data collection methods, response rates, sample demographics and data pertaining to the prevalence or incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms among flautists. Seven studies (evidence levels 1 and 3) were included. These were at moderate to high risk of bias. There was wide variation in the populations and the types of musculoskeletal symptoms investigated. Lifetime prevalence of any musculoskeletal symptoms of any duration varied from 15 to 95% depending on the populations and symptoms investigated. In schoolchildren, this was as high as 79%, and 95% in university students. The upper extremities were most commonly affected, with minimal differences in the prevalence of symptoms between right and left sides. Due to the differences in the types of data collected, different groups of flautists could not be directly compared. The lack of studies with high evidence levels and low risk of bias in this area precludes a clear understanding of the prevalence and location of musculoskeletal symptoms in flautists, although current evidence suggests that the prevalence is high. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Recommendations from NASA's Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.; Scheuring, R. A.; Walton, M. E.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Smaka, T.; McCulley, P. A.; Jones, J. A.; Stokes, C. R.; Parker, K. K.; Wear, M.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Continuously evolving medical standards of care, limited crew training time, and the inherent constraints of space flight necessitate regular revisions of the mission medical support infrastructure and methodology. A three-day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held to review NASA s current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, risk mitigation for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes, treatment methods during flight, and research topics to mitigate risks to astronaut health. The Summit also undertook consideration of the best evidence-based terrestrial musculoskeletal practices to recommend their adaptation for use in space. Methods: The types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by short- and long-duration astronauts were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health. The Summit panel was comprised of experts from the clinical and research communities, as well as representatives from NASA Headquarters, the Astronaut corps, and the offices of JSC Medical Operations, JSC Human Adaptation and Countermeasures, Glenn Research Center Human Research, and Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation. Before the summit, panelists participated in a Web-based review of NASA s Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL). Results: The Summit generated seventy-five operational and research recommendations to the NASA Office of Space Medicine, including changes to the SMCL and to the musculoskeletal section of the ISS debrief questionnaire. From these recommendations, seven were assigned highest value and priority, and could be immediately adopted for the exploration architecture. Discussion: Optimized exercise and conditioning to improve performance and forestall musculoskeletal damage on orbit were the primary area of focus. Special attention was paid to exercise timing and muscle group specificity. The panel s recommendations are currently in various stages of consideration or integration

  3. Occupational Respiratory and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Egyptian Female Hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Hassan, O M; Bayomy, H

    2015-08-01

    Hairdressing is associated with exposure to a variety of harmful agents which have been linked to respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders in hairdressers. This study aimed to identify respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders in hairdressers compared to office workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 80 female hairdressers and 50 matched controls. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on personal and occupational data, hairdressing activities, the presence of respiratory symptoms and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in the past 12 months. Reported symptoms were compared between hairdressers and controls. The associations between self-reported symptoms and hairdressing activities were investigated. Hairdressers were more likely to report symptoms than controls particularly for those who were older, with higher body mass index and longer duration of work as hairdresser. There were significant associations between frequent hair treatments (bleaching, dye and wave) and hand dermatitis (P < 0.001), running nose (P < 0.05), eye irritation (P < 0.01) and phlegm (P < 0.05). Elbow pain and shoulder and back pain were the most prevalent musculoskeletal pains in the past 12 months (13.8 and 12.5% respectively), back and knee pains were the most frequent chronic pain (7.5%), hand and wrist pain led 12.5% of hairdressers to visit a doctor and shoulder pain and back pain indicated a period of sickness absence in 13.8% of hairdressers. Musculoskeletal disorders were associated with manual handling, prolonged standing, strenuous shoulder movements and awkward body posture. Hairdressing is associated with increased risk to respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders due to adverse work conditions.

  4. Chiropractors & Osteopaths Musculo-Skeletal Interest Group (COMSIG)

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bruce F.

    1992-01-01

    The Chiropractors & Osteopaths Musculo-Skeletal Interest Group evolved from regular clinical meetings at Ringwood Clinic, a multi-disciplinary clinic in Melbourne In 1987 the Directors of the clinic Bruce F. Walker D.C. and Alison Hogg MB.BS. (Hons), FRACGP. Decided to invite a range of guest speakers (on musculo-skeletal topics) to give an address every 6 weeks Local practitioners of all persuasions were invited to attend these meetings. Although all groups were represented, by far the greatest interest shown by the chiropractors and osteopaths In 1989 Peter D. Werth B.App.Sc.(Chiro) joined the team and together with the writer formulated a plan to broaden the list of invited guests to all registered chiropractors and osteopaths in Melbourne Naturally, this required a larger venue and organisation. After several successful meetings attracting groups of 60 to 70 practitioners we formalised the COMSIG organisation and gained the invaluable assistance of David de l Harpe B.Sc., B.App.Sc.(Chiro), MB.,BS., Shane Carter B.App.Sc.(Chiro) and Simon Clement D.O. on our committee. More recently Shane Carter left for overseas and was ably replaced by Miriam Bourke B.App.Sc.(Chiro) This year COMSIG incorporated under the name of the long established Chiropractic & Osteopathic College of Australasia So, what is COMSIG and what are it’s objectives? COMSIG is a special interest group of the Chiropractic & Osteopathic College of Australasia. More specifically, it is an affiliation of Chiropractors and Osteopaths with interests pertaining to the musculo-skeletal system The objectives for which COMSIG was established are: to promote knowledge of disorders of the musculo-skeletal system.to provide a forum for the interchange of ideas related to such disorders.to educate chiropractors, osteopaths and other health professionals about the diagnosis and management of such disorders.to encourage the diagnosis and management of musculo-skeletal disorders in a scientific and ethical

  5. The effect of relaxin on the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, F; Haerian, B S; Muniandy, S; Yusof, A; Dragoo, J L; Salleh, N

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin is a hormone structurally related to insulin and insulin-like growth factor, which exerts its regulatory effect on the musculoskeletal and other systems through binding to its receptor in various tissues, mediated by different signaling pathways. Relaxin alters the properties of cartilage and tendon by activating collagenase. This hormone is also involved in bone remodeling and healing of injured ligaments and skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the literature on the effect of relaxin in musculoskeletal system to provide a broad perspective for future studies in this field. PMID:24283470

  6. A musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. Musculotendon parameters and the skeletal geometry were determined for the musculoskeletal model in the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing both isometric and ballistic elbow joint complex movements. In general, the model predicted kinematic and muscle excitation patterns similar to what was experimentally measured.

  7. Principles of neuro mobilization for treating musculoskeletal disease.

    PubMed

    Dwornik, Michał; Białoszewski, Dariusz; Korabiewska, Izabela; Wroński, Zbigniew

    2007-01-01

    Neuro mobilization is a method of conservative treatment of disorders of neural tissue. The rationale for using neuro mobilization in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions is based on in vivo and in vitro studies which point to a high efficacy of neuro mobilization procedures. Appropriate use of neuro mobilization procedures depends on excellent knowledge of normal and pathological anatomy, differences between individual etiological factors, development of disease and symptom variability. The present paper familiarizes the reader with evidence-based conservative treatment of musculoskeletal conditions by neuro mobilization.

  8. Musculoskeletal exam and joint injection training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie; Oyler, Julie; Harada, Caroline; Utset, Tammy

    2006-05-01

    We developed a musculoskeletal education intervention for internal medicine residents consisting of lectures, anatomic models, and a joint injection clinic. Written tests, observed musculoskeletal exams, and self-confidence scales were administered to 27 internal medicine residents before and after the intervention. Improvement was found in observed physical exam and self-reported confidence levels in performing knee injections. Confidence in shoulder injection skills improved, but remained low. Improved scores on written examination, though statistically significant, were not educationally significant. This single-institution pilot study demonstrates that a simple educational program results in improved knee and shoulder examination skills and confidence in performing knee injections.

  9. The role of MRI in musculoskeletal practice: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dean Deyle, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This clinical perspective presents an overview of current and potential uses for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in musculoskeletal practice. Clinical practice guidelines and current evidence for improved outcomes will help providers determine the situations when an MRI is indicated. The advanced competency standard of examination used by physical therapists will be helpful to prevent overuse of musculoskeletal imaging, reduce diagnostic errors, and provide the appropriate clinical context to pathology revealed on MRI. Physical therapists are diagnostically accurate and appropriately conservative in their use of MRI consistent with evidence-based principles of diagnosis and screening. PMID:22851878

  10. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic aid in bovine musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann

    2009-11-01

    In the last 15 years, ultrasonography of the bovine musculoskeletal system has become an established diagnostic method used routinely in many veterinary teaching hospitals worldwide. Ultrasonography is ideal for the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders because they are often associated with extensive soft tissue swelling and inflammatory exudation. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. Not only does ultrasonography improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis, added use of the machine helps recoup expenses.

  11. Attributes and skills of an effective musculoskeletal consumer.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Peter S; Wilson, Andrew J; Brooks, Peter M; Driedger, S Michelle; Gallois, Cindy; O'Connor, Annette M; Qualman, Ann; Santesso, Nancy; Wale, Janet; Wells, George A

    2005-11-01

    The OMERACT 7 Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Workshop brought together people with rheumatoid arthritis, healthcare professionals, and researchers to discuss what they thought made a musculoskeletal consumer effective at managing their disease. Preliminary work before OMERACT provided a draft list of potential characteristics of an effective consumer. Participants at the workshop provided feedback about the list including relevance, missing items, format, and language. The feedback provided was useful and will be incorporated into a revised list to aid in the development of an instrument to measure health consumer effectiveness.

  12. Prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders in active union carpenters

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, G. K.; Atterbury, M. R.; Booth-Jones, A. D.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ollila-Glenn, N.; Forrester, C.; Forst, L.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for work related musculoskeletal disorders among union carpenters. METHODS: A detailed questionnaire on musculoskeletal symptoms and work history was administered to 522 carpenters. The symptom questions assessed if carpenters experienced pain, numbness, or tingling in a particular body region. A subset of this group then received a physical examination of the upper extremities and knees. RESULTS: The study group was primarily white (94.9%) and male (97.8%) with a mean age of 42.3 years. The highest prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders cases by carpentry specialty ranged from 20%-24% for those doing drywall or ceiling, finishing or framing, and the building of concrete forms. Generally, as duration of employment increased, the prevalence of symptoms increased. An adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that the group with the longest (> or = 20 years) duration of employment in carpentry was significantly associated with work related musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulders (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 8.9), hands or wrists (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 8.4), and knees (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 9.2). Also, analyses showed that carpenters who reported that they had little or no influence over their work schedule had significant increases of work related musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulders, hips, and knees with ORs of 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2), 2.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 7.2), and 2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.1), respectively. Feeling exhausted at the end of day was also a significant risk factor for work related musculoskeletal disorders of the knee (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1). Upper extremity disorders were the most prevalent work related musculoskeletal disorders reported among all carpenters. Drywall or ceiling activities involve a considerable amount of repetitive motion and awkward postures often with arms raised holding heavy dry walls in place, whereas form work is

  13. Radiographic presentation of musculoskeletal involvement in Werner syndrome (adult progeria).

    PubMed

    David, A; Vincent, M; Arrigoni, P P; Barbarot, S; Pistorius, M A; Isidor, B; Frampas, E

    2016-12-05

    Werner syndrome (i.e., adult progeria) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the WRN gene, which is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Patients with Werner syndrome can present with musculoskeletal complaints, associated with suggestive radiographic features with a potential prognostic or therapeutic impact. This review illustrates the main radiographic features of Werner syndrome, focusing on the musculoskeletal system, such as soft-tissue calcification, muscular atrophy, osteoporosis, foot deformities, osteitis and osteomyelitis, and bone or soft-tissues malignancies. The identification of these features by radiologists can therefore be useful in the clinical screening of Werner syndrome.

  14. Non-pharmacological management of musculoskeletal disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Bremander, Ann; Bergman, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases as a group are one of the most common causes of contact in primary care and the most common causes of disability and long-term sick leave in several Western countries. Pain and dysfunction are often present without any specific findings in the musculoskeletal system, and a strictly biomedical approach is often inadequate. Body structure and function interact with personal and environmental factors, affecting the ability to perform activities and participate in society. It is important to meet these needs in primary care, and non-pharmacological principles such as physical activity and patient education with a cognitive approach are cornerstones in a multimodal management model.

  15. 76 FR 1187 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 1, 2011...

  16. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd...

  17. 78 FR 25753 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 4, 2013...

  18. 75 FR 28260 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 15, 2010...

  19. 77 FR 47653 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September 11...

  20. 75 FR 48979 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September 28...

  1. 78 FR 47327 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: September 10...

  2. 75 FR 27352 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Suite...

  3. 76 FR 24896 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: June 14, 2011...

  4. 77 FR 75181 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal... Committee: National Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 5, 2013...

  5. Musculoskeletal Complications and Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Estrogen Deprivation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0358 TITLE: Musculoskeletal Complications and Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Estrogen...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Musculoskeletal Complications and Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients... musculoskeletal complications in my model of breast cancer bone metastases. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer; bone metastases; estrogen; endocrine therapy

  6. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  7. Quality of life assessment in musculo-skeletal health.

    PubMed

    Beaudart, Charlotte; Biver, Emmanuel; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René

    2017-06-29

    Musculoskeletal disorders affect morbidity, quality of life and mortality, and represent an increasing economic and societal burden in the context of population aging and increased life expectancy. Improvement of quality of life should be one of the priorities of any interventions to prevent and treat musculoskeletal disorders in the ageing population. Two main approaches, namely generic and disease-specific instruments, can be applied to measure health-related quality of life. Among the generic tools available in scientific literature, the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and the Euroqol five item questionnaire (EQ-5D) are two of the most popular questionnaires used to quantify the health related quality of life in people with musculoskeletal disorders. However, because generic tools may not always be able to detect subtle effects of a specific condition on quality of life, a specific tool is highly valuable. Specific tools improve the ability to clinically characterize quality of life in subjects with a specific musculoskeletal disorder, as well as the capacity to assess changes over time in the QoL of these subjects. The recent development of specific tools should help to validate preventive and therapeutic interventions in this field.

  8. Some musculo-skeletal sequelae in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Aksnes, Liv Hege; Bruland, Øyvind Sverre

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with some of the musculo-skeletal complication that can occur after cancer treatment. In particular, we focus on Cancer Treatment Induced Bone Loss (CTIBL) and the musculo-skeletal complications that can occur in patients treated for extremity sarcoma. In addition we discuss peripheral neuropathy, musculo-skeletal pain and briefly mention some of the complications related to radiotherapy. CTIBL is mostly studied in breast cancer and prostate cancer survivors. The cause in these groups is mainly due to treatment induced hypogonadism. Other causes of CTIBL are indirect or direct cause of chemotherapy, physical inactivity and inadequate intake of vitamin D and calcium. Treatment of CTIBL consists of diet and lifestyle changes and pharmacological intervention. Extremity bone sarcomas constitute a special group since they often experience mutilating surgery and heavy combination chemotherapy. The treatment results in worse function than the normal population and the amputated usually have lower physical functioning than patients treated with limb sparing surgery (LSS). However, most studies fail to show differences in quality of life between the amputated and LSS. Most of the studies performed on musculo-skeletal sequelae have been done on survivors of childhood cancer, breast cancer or prostate cancer. More studies among the other cancer groups are needed to reveal the extent and prevalence of these complications.

  9. Musculoskeletal Disorders: Addressing Disparities in Prevalence, Severity, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lisa C

    2017-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in musculoskeletal disorders have been consistently documented in research conducted both nationally and in North Carolina. These disparities represent a higher clinical need that must be met with increased access to safe and effective interventions across medical, pharmacological, and psychosocial/behavioral modalities. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  10. The emerging roles of HTRA1 in musculoskeletal disease.

    PubMed

    Tiaden, André Nicki; Richards, Peter James

    2013-05-01

    High-temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HTRA1) is one of four known proteases belonging to the broadly conserved family of HTRA proteins. Although it was originally considered as representing an important modulator of tumorigenesis, an increasing number of reports have suggested that its influence on human disease may extend beyond cancer. HTRA1 has the capacity to degrade numerous extracellular matrix proteins, and as such, its potential involvement in diseases of the musculoskeletal system has been gaining increased attention. Musculoskeletal disease constitutes a wide variety of degenerative conditions that can manifest themselves in different ways such as joint and back pain, as well as deficiencies in skeletal bone quality, and ultimately result in significant suffering and reduced quality of life. Convincing data now exist to support a detrimental role for HTRA1 in the pathogenesis of joint and intervertebral disk degeneration. However, the function of HTRA1 in other closely related musculoskeletal diseases affecting bone and muscle remains unclear and largely unexplored. To help set the stage for future research, we discuss here some of the recent advances in our understanding of the role played by HTRA1 in musculoskeletal pathology. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. NSAIDs and Musculoskeletal Treatment: What is the Clinical Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovitz, Steven D.; Johnson, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for musculoskeletal injuries because the conditions are considered inflammatory in nature. However, because inflammation is a necessary component in healing, decreasing inflammation may be counterproductive. Also, many tendon injuries are, in fact, degenerative and not…

  12. Design and control of a pneumatic musculoskeletal biped robot.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-04-29

    Pneumatic artificial muscles are quite promising actuators for humanoid robots owing to their similar characteristics with human muscles. Moreover, biologically inspired musculoskeletal systems are particularly important for humanoid robots to perform versatile dynamic tasks. This study aims to develop a pneumatic musculoskeletal biped robot, and its controller, to realize human-like walking. According to the simplified musculoskeletal structure of human lower limbs, each leg of the biped robot is driven by nine muscles, including three pairs of monoarticular muscles which are arranged in the flexor-extensor form, as well as three biarticular muscles which span two joints. To lower cost, high-speed on/off solenoid valves rather than proportional valves are used to control the muscles. The joint trajectory tracking controller based on PID control method is designed to achieve the desired motion. Considering the complex characteristics of pneumatic artificial muscles, the control model is obtained through parameter identification experiments. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the biped robot is able to walk with this control strategy. The proposed musculoskeletal structure and control strategy are effective for the biped robot to achieve human-like walking.

  13. Musculoskeletal manifestations of mild osteogenesis imperfecta in the adult.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Fergus E

    2005-12-01

    The musculoskeletal manifestations of mild forms of osteogenesis imperfecta are not well defined in the adult. The aim of this study was to characterize the musculoskeletal manifestations and resulting impairments reported by adults with mild osteogenesis imperfecta. For this task a survey of musculoskeletal symptoms and impairments was hosted on the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation web site for 6 weeks. Survey responses are reported herein. There were 111 unduplicated, adult respondents (78 female). Mean age was 40.8 years. More than one-quarter of 3,410 lifetime fractures occurred in adulthood. Nearly half of respondents reported an established diagnosis of "arthritis" (usually osteoarthritis), and the majority of these reported some degree of impairment attributable to arthritis. Articular pain, stiffness and instability were dominant in the large, weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities. Back pain and scoliosis were common. Of the respondents, 15% required assistance with light physical tasks and personal care. Two-thirds reported joint hyper-mobility, and one-third reported a previous tendon rupture. Complex regional pain syndrome was rare. Respondents reported frequent use of medications known to have potential adverse skeletal effects. In spite of these concerns the majority rated their overall physical health as good or excellent. Adults with mild osteogenesis imperfecta continue to sustain fractures into adulthood, and the majority reports some functional impairment due to musculoskeletal issues. Significant impairment is not rare.

  14. Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Injuries in Rehabilitation Nursing.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, Rozina

    2016-11-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal injuries remain a concern for the nursing profession. The purpose of this study was to reduce work-related musculoskeletal nursing injuries by 10% on the rehabilitation unit in a Midwestern hospital. Using a quality improvement and evidence-based practice lens, one group time-series design was employed. Shift reports, interdisciplinary collaboration, self-study educational packets, and journal club sessions were implemented. Results, although not statistically significant, indicated over a 50% reduction in work-related musculoskeletal nursing injuries. Self-engagement and the Hawthorne effect are thought to have contributed to this decline in injury rates. A cost-benefit analysis indicates an estimated savings of $90,000 over 4 months. A yearly practice-based education program and improvement in electronic health records is advocated to sustain this decrease in nursing injury rates. Context-specific interventions, communication, algorithm approach to patient transfers, and research knowledge are needed to decrease rehabilitation work-related musculoskeletal nursing injuries. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  15. Musculoskeletal symptoms among handicraft workers engaged in hand sewing tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Iman; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among Iranian handicraft workers engaged in different hand sewing tasks. Methods: Data were collected using questionnaires (including the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire) as well as direct observations of posture (using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment [RULA] method) from 632 workers including carpet handicraft workers (n=222), textiles handicraft workers (n=209), and leather handicraft workers (n=201) in Tabriz, Iran. Results: The response rate was 88.8%. The overall prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, particularly in the neck (57.9%), lower back (51.6%), and shoulders (40.5%) was relatively high. The prevalence of neck and shoulder pain was higher among females and with increasing age. Working posture and fast working were associated with neck, shoulder, and lower back pain. Years worked as a sewing worker was associated with neck and lower back pain. Long duration of continuous sitting work (>2 h) without a break was associated with neck pain. Body mass index, marital status, sport/physical activity, smoking, daily working hours, job satisfaction, and perceived pressure due to work had no effect. Conclusions: The findings indicate a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among the studied handicraft workers and emphasize the importance of individual, physical, and psychosocial aspects of hand sewing tasks in this regard. PMID:27725482

  16. NSAIDs and Musculoskeletal Treatment: What is the Clinical Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovitz, Steven D.; Johnson, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for musculoskeletal injuries because the conditions are considered inflammatory in nature. However, because inflammation is a necessary component in healing, decreasing inflammation may be counterproductive. Also, many tendon injuries are, in fact, degenerative and not…

  17. Body mass index and musculoskeletal pain: is there a connection?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most common complaints that patients report to physicians and two-thirds of the population has an elevated body mass index (BMI), indicating they are either overweight or obese. It was once assumed that extra body weight would stress the low back and lead to pain, however, researchers have reported inconsistencies association between body weight and back pain. In contrast, more recent studies do indicate that an elevated BMI is associated with back pain and other musculoskeletal pain syndromes due to the presence of a chronic systemic inflammatory state, suggesting that the relationship between BMI and musculoskeletal pains be considered in more detail. Objective To describe how an elevated BMI can be associated with chronic systemic inflammation and pain expression. To outline measurable risk factors for chronic inflammation that can be used in clinical practice and discuss basic treatment considerations. Discussion Adiposopathy, or “sick fat” syndrome, is a term that refers to an elevated BMI that is associated with a chronic systemic inflammatory state most commonly referred to as the metabolic syndrome. The best available evidence suggests that the presence of adiposopathy determines if an elevated BMI will contribute to musculoskeletal pain expression. It is not uncommon for physicians to fail to identify the presence of adiposopathy/metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Patients with an elevated BMI should be further examined to identify inflammatory factors associated with adiposopathy, such as the metabolic syndrome, which may be promoting back pain and other musculoskeletal pain syndromes. PMID:23687943

  18. [Healthcare consumption due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery sector workers].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Beatriz; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Martínez-Rodríguez, Alicia; Fernández-Cervantes, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    To determine the frequency and factors associated with medicine consumption and consultations with family physicians due to musculoskeletal pain in fishery workers. We performed a cross-sectional study (n = 929). The variables analyzed consisted of sociodemographic factors, the frequency of musculoskeletal pain, healthcare resource consumption, back pain disability (Roland-Morris) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). A total of 98.7% of the sample were women, with a mean age of 50.6 years. Musculoskeletal pain was reported by 66.5%, 43% were taking medication, and 64% had consulted their family physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The factors associated with medication intake in the logistic regression analysis were the number of years worked in the sector, hip-knee pain, bodily pain and physical functioning. The variables associated with physician visits were the presence of hip-knee pain, neck-back-shoulder pain, bodily pain, and social functioning. The variables most closely associated with resource utilization were hip-knee pain and the physical dimension of health-related quality of life, especially bodily pain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. The Utility of Dual Energy Computed Tomography in Musculoskeletal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Goyal, Aakshit; Singh, Bhumika; Chaudhary, Mriganki; Sabharwal, Tushar; Jain, Shreshtha; Sharma, Hritik

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the mechanisms, advantages and disadvantages of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) over conventional tomography (CT) in musculoskeletal imaging as DECT provides additional information about tissue composition and artifact reduction. This provides clinical utility in detection of urate crystals, bone marrow edema, reduction of beam hardening metallic artifact, and ligament and tendon analysis. PMID:28900555

  20. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks in Australia.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    In Australia, there are six Therapeutic Goods Administration-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories providing bacterial and fungal bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal samples sent from 10 tissue banks. Musculoskeletal swab and/or tissue biopsy samples are collected at the time of allograft retrieval and sent to bacteriology laboratories for bioburden testing, in some cases requiring interstate transport. Bacteria and fungi may be present within the allograft at the time of retrieval or contaminated from an external source. The type of organism recovered will determine if the allograft is rejected for transplant, which may include all allografts from the same donor. Bacteriology staff also provides unpaid support of tissue banks through meeting involvement, consultations, licence-related activities, validations and research funded by their organisation and not part of any contractual agreement. Bacteriology laboratories and tissue banks must be compliant to the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice - Human Blood and Tissues and regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. Clinical bacteriology laboratories also require mandatory accreditation to Standards Australia International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) 15189:2009 medical laboratories - particular requirements for quality and competence, and may also attain Standards Australia/New Zealand Standard ISO 9001:2000 quality management systems certification. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks are integral partners in providing safe allograft musculoskeletal tissue for transplant.

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders among Thai women in construction-related work.

    PubMed

    Hanklang, Suda; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Mungarndee, Suriyaphun S

    2014-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder symptoms and its risk factors among women rebar workers. A simple random sampling method was used and data were collected by face-to-face interview and ergonomic assessment from February to March 2011. A total of 272 women rebar workers with at least 6 months' job experience participated in this study. The findings revealed that 57.7% of workers reported musculoskeletal disorder symptoms with low back and shoulders as the most common body parts affected (46.0%). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated 2 variables that are significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders: prolonged working hours (adjusted odds ratio = 7.63; 95% confidence interval = 2.06-28.31) and awkward posture (adjusted odds ratio = 43.79; 95% confidence interval = 17.09-112.20). The high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among women rebar workers suggests that an appropriate ergonomic workstation design and ergonomic training for women rebar workers are necessary.

  2. Musculoskeletal symptoms in workers of a Telecom Company.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Evelise Dias; de Araújo, Célia Regina Alves; Abage, Zilda

    2012-01-01

    Millions of people work with computers every day. Human work provides a means of comfort and ease to perform the tasks, favoring incorrect postures. Among the employees of a telecom company, it appears that all make use of computer, remaining in a seated position leading in musculoskeletal symptoms. This is a quantitative study, conducted in a telecom company in the city of Curitiba. Were interviewed 27 analysts who work in engineering department, who agreed to participate and receive guidelines regarding sitting posture. This study, consisted of a structured questionnaire and the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire with musculoskeletal symptoms indicators. After answering the questionnaire, the subjects were guided through the folder on correct posture and positioning front the computer. Of employees 74% were male, and 100% of the employees are the computer's user, remaining in the sitting posture during working day. Concerning the break time, 74% reported that they frequently do it. Been the average working day is 8 hours. Regarding the frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms, 70% of employees reported some symptoms during the last 12 months but only one came to be sick leave. It is necessary to an analysis of the work situation, evaluating and correcting inadequacies of securities and the risks inherent in function, making prevention.

  3. The phenotypic and genetic signatures of common musculoskeletal pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Diatchenko, Luda; Fillingim, Roger B.; Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, William

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia and low back pain, tend to coexist in affected individuals and are characterized by a report of pain greater than expected based on the results of a standard physical evaluation. The pathophysiology of these conditions is largely unknown, we lack biological markers for accurate diagnosis, and conventional therapeutics have limited effectiveness. Growing evidence suggests that chronic pain conditions are associated with both physical and psychological triggers, which initiate pain amplification and psychological distress; thus, susceptibility is dictated by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we review phenotypic and genetic markers of common musculoskeletal pain conditions, selected based on their association with musculoskeletal pain in previous research. The phenotypic markers of greatest interest include measures of pain amplification and ‘psychological’ measures (such as emotional distress, somatic awareness, psychosocial stress and catastrophizing). Genetic polymorphisms reproducibly linked with musculoskeletal pain are found in genes contributing to serotonergic and adrenergic pathways. Elucidation of the biological mechanisms by which these markers contribute to the perception of pain in these patients will enable the development of novel effective drugs and methodologies that permit better diagnoses and approaches to personalized medicine. PMID:23545734

  4. Analyzing musculoskeletal neck pain, measured as present pain and periods of pain, with three different regression models: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Andersson, Eva M; Hagberg, Mats

    2009-06-19

    In the literature there are discussions on the choice of outcome and the need for more longitudinal studies of musculoskeletal disorders. The general aim of this longitudinal study was to analyze musculoskeletal neck pain, in a group of young adults. Specific aims were to determine whether psychosocial factors, computer use, high work/study demands, and lifestyle are long-term or short-term factors for musculoskeletal neck pain, and whether these factors are important for developing or ongoing musculoskeletal neck pain. Three regression models were used to analyze the different outcomes. Pain at present was analyzed with a marginal logistic model, for number of years with pain a Poisson regression model was used and for developing and ongoing pain a logistic model was used. Presented results are odds ratios and proportion ratios (logistic models) and rate ratios (Poisson model). The material consisted of web-based questionnaires answered by 1204 Swedish university students from a prospective cohort recruited in 2002. Perceived stress was a risk factor for pain at present (PR = 1.6), for developing pain (PR = 1.7) and for number of years with pain (RR = 1.3). High work/study demands was associated with pain at present (PR = 1.6); and with number of years with pain when the demands negatively affect home life (RR = 1.3). Computer use pattern (number of times/week with a computer session > or = 4 h, without break) was a risk factor for developing pain (PR = 1.7), but also associated with pain at present (PR = 1.4) and number of years with pain (RR = 1.2). Among life style factors smoking (PR = 1.8) was found to be associated to pain at present. The difference between men and women in prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was confirmed in this study. It was smallest for the outcome ongoing pain (PR = 1.4) compared to pain at present (PR = 2.4) and developing pain (PR = 2.5). By using different regression models different aspects of neck pain pattern could be addressed and

  5. Musculoskeletal pain and limitations in work ability in Swedish marines: a cross-sectional survey of prevalence and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Andreas; Larsson, Helena; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Äng, Björn O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of self-rated musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability in Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) marines, and to study factors potentially associated with pain limiting work ability for the most prevalent pain regions reported. Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey. Participants There were 272 SAF marines from the main marine battalion in Sweden included in the study. Outcomes Self-assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting the marines' work ability within a 6-month period, as obtained from structured questionnaires. The association of individual, health and work-related factors with musculoskeletal pain limiting work ability was systematically regressed with multiple logistic models, estimating OR and 95% CI. Results Musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability were most common in the back, at 46% and 20%, and lower extremities at 51% and 29%, respectively. Physical training ≤1 day/week (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.8); body height ≤1.80 m (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 15.1) and ≥1.86 m (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.1); computer work 1/4 of the working day (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.0) and ≥1/2 (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.1) of the working day were independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. None of the studied variables emerged significantly associated with such pain for the lower extremities. Conclusions Our findings show that musculoskeletal pain and resultant limitations in work ability are common in SAF marines. Low frequency of physical training emerged independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. This suggests that marines performing physical training 1 day per week or less are suitable candidates for further medical evaluation and secondary preventive actions. While also associated, body height and computer work need further exploration as underlying mechanisms for back pain limiting work ability. Further prospective studies are necessary to clarify the direction

  6. Keele Aches and Pains Study protocol: validity, acceptability, and feasibility of the Keele STarT MSK tool for subgrouping musculoskeletal patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Paul; Hill, Jonathan C; Protheroe, Joanne; Afolabi, Ebenezer K; Lewis, Martyn; Beardmore, Ruth; Hay, Elaine M; Mallen, Christian D; Bartlam, Bernadette; Saunders, Benjamin; van der Windt, Danielle A; Jowett, Sue; Foster, Nadine E; Dunn, Kate M

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions represent a considerable burden worldwide, and are predominantly managed in primary care. Evidence suggests that many musculoskeletal conditions share similar prognostic factors. Systematically assessing patient’s prognosis and matching treatments based on prognostic subgroups (stratified care) has been shown to be both clinically effective and cost-effective. This study (Keele Aches and Pains Study) aims to refine and examine the validity of a brief questionnaire (Keele STarT MSK tool) designed to enable risk stratification of primary care patients with the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations. We also describe the subgroups of patients, and explore the acceptability and feasibility of using the tool and how the tool is best implemented in clinical practice. The study design is mixed methods: a prospective, quantitative observational cohort study with a linked qualitative focus group and interview study. Patients who have consulted their GP or health care practitioner about a relevant musculoskeletal condition will be recruited from general practice. Participating patients will complete a baseline questionnaire (shortly after consultation), plus questionnaires 2 and 6 months later. A subsample of patients, along with participating GPs and health care practitioners, will be invited to take part in qualitative focus groups and interviews. The Keele STarT MSK tool will be refined based on face, discriminant, construct, and predictive validity at baseline and 2 months, and validated using data from 6-month follow-up. Patient and clinician perspectives about using the tool will be explored. This study will provide a validated prognostic tool (Keele STarT MSK) with established cutoff points to stratify patients with the five most common musculoskeletal presentations into low-, medium-, and high-risk subgroups. The qualitative analysis of patient and health care perspectives will inform practitioners on how to embed the tool

  7. The Influence of a Sudden Increase in Playing Time on Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Complaints in High-Level Amateur Musicians in a Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Haitjema, Saskia; Groenewegen, Karlijn A.; Rietveld, A. Boni M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies in the domain of professional musicians describe the relation between playing time and the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints in professional musicians. To date, no longitudinal cohort study into this relationship has been performed and no amateur musicians were studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the causal relationship between a sudden increase in playing time among amateur musicians on the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints in a prospective cohort study. Methods All members of two national Dutch Students Orchestras were asked to participate in the study. These project-based orchestras, consisting of high-level amateurs, followed a nine-hour rehearsing schedule for ten consecutive days. On the first day (t0) and after one week (t1) the subjects were asked to complete a paper-based questionnaire including sociodemographic characteristics, music-related questions, questions regarding playing-related musculoskeletal complaints and the music module of the disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire. Results The NSO consisted of 85 and the NESKO of 41 members during the study period. 59 subjects completed the questionnaire at both timepoints (response rate 47%). 9 subjects were excluded for being a music academy student, leaving 50 subjects (mean age 22.1, 72% female) suitable for analysis. During the rehearsal week, the prevalence of at least one playing-related musculoskeletal complaint increased from 28% to 80%. The most frequently affected areas were the neck, upper and lower back, hand/and or wrists and shoulders. The DASH music module score increased from 14 at t0 to 23 at t1. Conclusion A point prevalence of 28% at the start of the study that increased remarkably to 80% within a one-week period. Future research should evaluate other risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints in amateur musicians. These risk factors should be the base for the development of preventive measures. PMID:27657537

  8. The Influence of a Sudden Increase in Playing Time on Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Complaints in High-Level Amateur Musicians in a Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kok, Laura M; Haitjema, Saskia; Groenewegen, Karlijn A; Rietveld, A Boni M

    Several studies in the domain of professional musicians describe the relation between playing time and the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints in professional musicians. To date, no longitudinal cohort study into this relationship has been performed and no amateur musicians were studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the causal relationship between a sudden increase in playing time among amateur musicians on the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints in a prospective cohort study. All members of two national Dutch Students Orchestras were asked to participate in the study. These project-based orchestras, consisting of high-level amateurs, followed a nine-hour rehearsing schedule for ten consecutive days. On the first day (t0) and after one week (t1) the subjects were asked to complete a paper-based questionnaire including sociodemographic characteristics, music-related questions, questions regarding playing-related musculoskeletal complaints and the music module of the disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire. The NSO consisted of 85 and the NESKO of 41 members during the study period. 59 subjects completed the questionnaire at both timepoints (response rate 47%). 9 subjects were excluded for being a music academy student, leaving 50 subjects (mean age 22.1, 72% female) suitable for analysis. During the rehearsal week, the prevalence of at least one playing-related musculoskeletal complaint increased from 28% to 80%. The most frequently affected areas were the neck, upper and lower back, hand/and or wrists and shoulders. The DASH music module score increased from 14 at t0 to 23 at t1. A point prevalence of 28% at the start of the study that increased remarkably to 80% within a one-week period. Future research should evaluate other risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints in amateur musicians. These risk factors should be the base for the development of preventive measures.

  9. Individual expectation: an overlooked, but pertinent, factor in the treatment of individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Cleland, Joshua A

    2010-09-01

    Physical therapists consider many factors in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. The current literature suggests expectation is an influential component of clinical outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain for which physical therapists frequently do not account. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to highlight the potential role of expectation in the clinical outcomes associated with the rehabilitation of individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain. The discussion focuses on the definition and measurement of expectation, the relationship between expectation and outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain conditions, the mechanisms through which expectation may alter musculoskeletal pain conditions, and suggested ways in which clinicians may integrate the current literature regarding expectation into clinical practice.

  10. Individual Expectation: An Overlooked, but Pertinent, Factor in the Treatment of Individuals Experiencing Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; Cleland, Joshua A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical therapists consider many factors in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. The current literature suggests expectation is an influential component of clinical outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain for which physical therapists frequently do not account. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to highlight the potential role of expectation in the clinical outcomes associated with the rehabilitation of individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain. The discussion focuses on the definition and measurement of expectation, the relationship between expectation and outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain conditions, the mechanisms through which expectation may alter musculoskeletal pain conditions, and suggested ways in which clinicians may integrate the current literature regarding expectation into clinical practice. PMID:20592270

  11. Musculoskeletal symptoms among seafood production workers in North Norway.

    PubMed

    Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit; Egeness, Cathrine; Løchen, Maja-Lisa

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among male and female production workers in different types of seafood industries in North Norway and to analyse associations between musculoskeletal symptoms and some possible risk factors in the seafood industry. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, covering several aspects concerning occupational environment and health issues, was mailed to employees in seafood-processing plants in North Norway. A total of 1767 employees in 118 seafood-processing plants participated giving a 50% response rate. This included 744 production workers in whitefish, shrimp and salmon industries, and 129 administrative workers in all types of seafood industries. The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms was high among seafood production workers. The odds ratio for symptoms from upper limbs was significantly higher for females compared to men. Production workers had the highest relative risk for symptoms from wrist/hands (OR = 4.1-9.4) and elbows (OR = 3.5-5.2) when compared to administrative workers. The main difference between types of seafood industries was the high prevalence of symptoms from wrist/hands among female (82%) and male (64%) production workers in the salmon industry compared to whitefish (62 and 47%, respectively) and shrimp industry (66 and 37%, respectively). Musculoskeletal symptoms were found among the majority of production workers in the whitefish, shrimp and salmon industry, the highest prevalence being among female workers. The main difference between types of seafood industries was the high prevalence of symptoms from wrist/hands among workers in the salmon industry. Cold work was an important risk factor for musculoskeletal symptoms.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of paracoccidioidomycosis in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Leonor G; Monsignore, Lucas M; de Andrade Hernandes, Mateus; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2015-10-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Retrospective case series study after IRB approval. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed in consensus the MRI findings of 11 patients with microbiologically and/or pathologically proven osteoarticular PCM. The MRI evaluation included discrimination of abnormalities in joints, bones and soft tissues. Mean age of patients was 29 years (10-55 years), eight men and three women. Musculoskeletal involvement was the only or the primary presentation of the disease in seven patients (63%). Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, with seven cases (63%). Primary arthritis was found in one patient (9%). Isolated extra-articular soft tissue PCM was found in three patients: myositis (2) and subcutaneous infection (1). All cases showed regions with signal intensity higher than or similar to the signal of muscle on T1-weighted images. Penumbra sign was present in five cases (45%). T2-weighted images showed reactive soft tissue oedema in eight cases (72%). Post-gadolinium images showed peripheral (8/9) or heterogeneous (1/9) enhancement. Synovial enhancement was present in all cases of joint involvement (6/6). Lipomatosis arborescens was documented in one case of chronic knee involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case series describing MRI findings of musculoskeletal PCM. Musculoskeletal involvement was the primary presentation of the disease in most cases, and therefore, neoplasms were initially in the differential diagnosis. Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, often with secondary involvement of joint and or soft tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Diagnostic Efficacy of UBI Scan in Musculoskeletal Infections.

    PubMed

    Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Azarsina, Salman; Safdari, Farshad; Amoui, Mahasti; Hosseinzadeh, Samaneh

    2015-06-01

    Limited recent studies have demonstrated that 99mTc-UBI scan can be a helpful method in precise diagnosis of infection. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of 99mTc-UBI scan in detection of musculoskeletal infections. Fifty patients with suspected musculoskeletal infections (painful THA, TKA, implant and nonunion) were enrolled in this study. After injection of 99mTc-Ubiquicidin 29-41, up to 30 minutes, dynamic imaging was performed every 1 minute. Whole body anterior and posterior images were acquired at 60 and 120 min (5 min/frame). A polygonal region of interest (ROI) was drawn manually around the area of increased accumulation of tracer (lesion) and anatomically similar area on the contralateral side (background) and the lesion to background ratio (LBR) was calculated. Then, patients underwent surgical procedures to assess infection by tissue sampling and histopathologic studies as gold standard. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to find a cut-off value for LBR and determining the diagnostic efficacy of UBI scan in musculoskeletal infections. Histopathologic studies revealed infection in 38 patients. The mean LBR was significantly higher in infected patients (2.05 ± 0.41 vs. 1.52 ± 0.22; P < 0.001). ROC analysis showed that a cut-off point of 1.74 for LBR will have 94.7% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity and 92% accuracy for diagnosis of musculoskeletal infections. UBI scan is a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation of patients with suspected musculoskeletal infection. However, UBI imaging has some limitations which result in some incorrect diagnoses. It is important to interpret the results of the scan with regard to the clinical findings.

  14. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic assessments of cleaners.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Liu, Chia-Yi; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Professional cleaning has emerged as a new industry in Taiwan in the past few years. However, information about the workload and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among these workers is still limited. This study investigated the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts and the characteristics of musculoskeletal activities of cleaning workers in Taiwan. Face-to-face interviews to collect basic information and to administer the Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire were conducted on 180 cleaners. Biaxial electrogoniometers and electromyography were used to characterize the motion and forceful exertion of 56 cleaners during work. Nearly 90% of the participants reported musculoskeletal discomfort in at least one body part due to work. Of the nine body parts examined, hand/wrist (41.7%), shoulder (41.1%), low back (37.8%), and elbow (33.3%) were most frequently reported to exhibit discomfort. Additionally, time pressure as a psychosocial risk factor was found to be associated with discomfort in several body parts. Measurements of electrogoniometry showed that wrists of many cleaners were frequently held in extreme angles of ulnar/radial deviation, leading to an increased risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Motion repetitiveness and force output during mopping and sweeping tasks were considered less influential in developing hand/wrist discomfort. Cleaners in Taiwan are a high-risk group for developing MSDs, and solutions are needed to avoid extreme motion angles of the wrists when performing cleaning tasks. Moreover, both psychosocial stress and the welfare of this group of workers deserve immediate attention from management and the government. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. An Interactive Simulator for Imposing Virtual Musculoskeletal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Christopher

    2017-05-10

    Disease processes are often marked by both neural and muscular changes that alter movement control and execution, but these adaptations are difficult to tease apart because they occur simultaneously. This is addressed by swapping an individual's limb dynamics with a neurally-controlled facsimile using an interactive musculoskeletal simulator (IMS) that allows controlled modifications of musculoskeletal dynamics. This paper details the design and operation of the IMS, quantifies and describes human adaptation to the IMS, and determines whether the IMS allows users to move naturally, a prerequisite for manipulation experiments. Healthy volunteers (n = 4) practiced a swift goal-directed task (back-and-forth elbow flexion/extension) for 90 trials with the IMS off (normal dynamics) and 240 trials with the IMS on, i.e. the actions of a user's personalized electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model are robotically imposed back on to the user. After practicing with the IMS on, subjects could complete the task with end-point errors of 1.56°, close to the speed-matched IMS-off error of 0.57°. Muscle activity, joint torque, and arm kinematics for IMS-on and -off conditions were well matched for three subjects (root-meansquared error [RMSE] = 0.16 Nm), but the error was higher for one subject with a small stature (RMSE = 0.25 Nm). A well-matched musculoskeletal model allowed IMS users to perform a goal-directed task nearly as well as when the IMS was not active. This advancement permits real-time manipulations of musculoskeletal dynamics, which could increase our understanding of muscular and neural co-adaptations to injury, disease, disuse, and aging.

  16. Predisposing factors for musculoskeletal symptoms in intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, D; Esin, M N

    2015-03-01

    Intensive care unit nurses have more ergonomic risks than nurses working in other units in hospital. Although musculoskeletal disorders are common among intensive care nurses, studies on the prevalence of symptoms, as well as associated factors, are scarce. This is a cross-sectional study to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated factors in intensive care nurses. The study population comprised 1515 nurses working in the intensive care units of public, private and university hospitals in Turkey. The study sample included 323 nurses selected by stratified random sampling. Data were obtained by a tailored data collection form, a workplace observation form and a Rapid Upper Limb Assessment tool to delineate ergonomic risks. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 21.0 software was used in the statistical analysis. The highest prevalence for the musculoskeletal symptoms of the nurses was in the legs, lower back and back. Most of the nurses had encountered musculoskeletal pain or discomfort related to the previous month. The risky body movements that were frequently performed by the nurses during a shift were 'turning the patient' and 'bending down'. The final Rapid Upper Limb Assessment score for the patient turning movement was found to be higher than for the bending down movement. Musculoskeletal symptoms, which may occur in any region of the body, are mainly associated with organizational factors, such as type of hospital, type of shift work and frequency of changes in work schedule, rather than with personal factors. Nursing administrators should determine the ergonomic risks of intensive care unit nurses by using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment tool. Health policy makers should develop occupational health teams, and 'ergonomic risk prevention programs' should be implemented throughout the units. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Musculoskeletal symptoms and type A behaviour in blue collar workers.

    PubMed Central

    Flodmark, B T; Aase, G

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Type A behaviour pattern, characterised by excessive competitiveness, impatience, hostility and time urgency, has been previously investigated as a risk factor for coronary heart disease. There are few studies concerning musculoskeletal symptoms and type A behaviour. Could there be a higher frequency of musculoskeletal symptoms with a more pronounced type A behaviour? DESIGN--A cross sectional retrospective study. Standardised nordic questionnaires were used for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms and the Bortner questionnaire and its subscales (1) speed and (2) hard driving and competitiveness were used to assess type A behaviour. SETTING--Factory based (a manufacturing industry where they make ventilating shafts). SUBJECTS--58 blue collar workers (51 men and seven women). Mean age was 36.9 years. Mean employment time was seven years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Blue collar workers with musculoskeletal symptoms had a more pronounced type A behaviour than those without symptoms. RESULTS--For shoulder symptoms during the past 12 months blue collar workers had a more pronounced type A behaviour (p < 0.001). For symptoms during the past seven days the results were significant for the neck (p < 0.01), the shoulder (p < 0.01), and also for lower back pain (p < 0.05). There were no differences in age, psychosocial factors, or psychosomatic symptoms. According to the Bortner subscales, the speed subscale seems to be more important than the hard driving and competitiveness subscales. CONCLUSIONS--Blue collar workers with a more pronounced type A behaviour seem to have a higher incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms. PMID:1419855

  18. Musculoskeletal evaluation in severe haemophilia A patients from Latin America.

    PubMed

    Ozelo, M C; Villaça, P R; Pérez-Bianco, R; Candela, M; Garcia-Chavez, J; Moreno-Rodriguez, B; Rodrigues, M B; Rodriguez-Grecco, I; Solano, M H; Chumpitaz, G; Morales-Gana, M M; Ruiz-Sáez, A

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on haemophilia treatment in Latin American countries, a region characterized by rapidly improving systems of care, but with substantial disparities in treatment between countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal status of haemophilia patients from Latin America and to examine the relationship between musculoskeletal status and treatment practices across countries. The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups conducted a survey of its member country representatives on key aspects of haemophilia treatment in 10 countries. Musculoskeletal status of patients was obtained during routine comprehensive evaluations between March 2009 and March 2011. Eligible patients had severe haemophilia A (factor VIII <1%) without inhibitors (<0.6 BU mL(-1) ) and were ≥5 years of age. Musculoskeletal status was compared between three groups of countries, based primarily on differences in the availability of long-term prophylaxis. Overall, 143 patients (5-66 years of age) were enrolled from nine countries. In countries where long-term prophylaxis had been available for at least 10 years (Group A), patients aged 5-10 years had significantly better mean World Federation of Hemophilia clinical scores, fewer target joints and fewer affected joints than patients from countries where long-term prophylaxis has been available for about 5 years (Group B) or was not available (Group C). In Latin America, the musculoskeletal status of patients with severe haemophilia without inhibitors has improved significantly in association with the provision of long-term prophylaxis. As more countries in Latin America institute this practice, further improvements are anticipated.

  19. Musculoskeletal evaluation in severe haemophilia A patients from Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Ozelo, M C; Villaça, P R; Pérez-Bianco, R; Candela, M; Garcia-Chavez, J; Moreno-Rodriguez, B; Rodrigues, M B; Rodriguez-Grecco, I; Solano, M H; Chumpitaz, G; Morales-Gana, M M; Ruiz-Sáez, A

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is a paucity of literature on haemophilia treatment in Latin American countries, a region characterized by rapidly improving systems of care, but with substantial disparities in treatment between countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal status of haemophilia patients from Latin America and to examine the relationship between musculoskeletal status and treatment practices across countries. The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups conducted a survey of its member country representatives on key aspects of haemophilia treatment in 10 countries. Musculoskeletal status of patients was obtained during routine comprehensive evaluations between March 2009 and March 2011. Eligible patients had severe haemophilia A (factor VIII <1%) without inhibitors (<0.6 BU mL−1) and were ≥5 years of age. Musculoskeletal status was compared between three groups of countries, based primarily on differences in the availability of long-term prophylaxis. Overall, 143 patients (5–66 years of age) were enrolled from nine countries. In countries where long-term prophylaxis had been available for at least 10 years (Group A), patients aged 5–10 years had significantly better mean World Federation of Hemophilia clinical scores, fewer target joints and fewer affected joints than patients from countries where long-term prophylaxis has been available for about 5 years (Group B) or was not available (Group C). In Latin America, the musculoskeletal status of patients with severe haemophilia without inhibitors has improved significantly in association with the provision of long-term prophylaxis. As more countries in Latin America institute this practice, further improvements are anticipated. PMID:24354487

  20. Musculoskeletal injuries in Homer's Iliad: the War of Troy revisited.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Tok, Fatih; Simşek, Ayşe; Ozçakar, Levent

    2014-04-01

    Homer's Iliad--the most famous and influential epic poem--has been previously reviewed with respect to head, craniomaxillofacial, neck, thoracic, and hand injuries in the literature. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no data regarding musculoskeletal injuries. This article describes the musculoskeletal injuries that had ensued during the war of Troy. The Turkish translation of the original epic poem Iliad was reviewed for musculoskeletal injuries, that is, their descriptions, outcome, the weapons used, and the engaged warriors. Extremity injuries were evaluated as regards the affected bones. The pertinent treatment methods were also recorded. In total, 103 musculoskeletal injuries were detected during 81 combats. The most commonly involved areas were the shoulder (15.5%), the head (14.5%), the cervical vertebrae (14.5%), and the thoracic vertebrae (8.7%). The weapons used were spear (n = 52); sword (n = 9); arrow (n = 9); stone (n = 8); and cane, animal, the hand, Chariot race, and broken yoke (n = 1 for each). Fifty-four combats (66.6%) resulted in death. Therapeutic herbs, compound of milk, and essence of fig were used as treatment alternatives. While providing a historic snapshot on the war of Troy, in this article, the authors have reviewed the musculoskeletal injuries and their management in those ancient times. Despite the long period in between, unfortunately, physicians/surgeons are still faced with war injuries in current medical practice. The authors strongly hope that, at least in the near future, physicians will be left with only natural health problems and without those artificially generated by human beings.

  1. Diagnosis and initial management of musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis in children.

    PubMed

    Ho, Aaron K; Shrader, M Wade; Falk, Miranda N; Segal, Lee S

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an invasive fungal infection caused by the inhalation of aerosolized spores of Coccidioides spp., which reside in the arid soil of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Approximately two thirds of cases are asymptomatic, and the remainder usually present with mild flu-like symptoms. Dissemination of coccidioidomycosis is rare, and can lead to extrapulmonic diseases including meningitis, osteomyelitis, and skin and soft-tissue involvement. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis in children. This was a retrospective chart review of patients with musculoskeletal infection with Coccidioides spp. at a tertiary care pediatric hospital from 1997 to 2010, identified by a search of ICD-9 codes and hospital diagnoses. Demographic and clinical data were collected from medical records, including the age of the patient, sex, white blood cell count, immunocompetence, length of stay, location of involvement, and initial treatment. In total, 20 children were identified with musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis. The mean age was 12.3 years (range, 2 to 17 y) at time of diagnosis. Diagnostic criteria included positive imaging tests (plain film+MRI), serologic positive titers, and/or biopsy with positive cultures. The most common presenting symptom was bone pain (100%); only 3 (15%) patients had accompanying signs/symptoms of pulmonary infection. Only 2 (5%) patients had a white blood cell count >15×10/L (5%). Locations of infection included the foot (28%), knee (14%), spine (12%), forearm (10%), lower leg (6%), and other sites (30%). Fluconazole was the most common antifungal agent used (75%). Surgical intervention was required in 10 (50%) patients. This is the first series that has described musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis exclusively in children. This study suggests that the initial presentation of this disease can be nonspecific and difficult to recognize in children. Clinicians should

  2. Role of yoga and physical activity in work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dentists

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain is one of the occupational hazards in dentists. Aims: To find the prevalence and severity of musculoskeletal pain in dentists, to compare musculoskeletal pain among dentists practicing yoga, those practicing physical activities, and those without any physical activity, and also to know the effects of sex, age, and workload on musculoskeletal pain. Materials and Methods: A self-reporting work-related questionnaire and the Nordic questionnaire for analysis of musculoskeletal disorders were given to graduated dentists attending Indian dental conference in Mumbai, to know the musculoskeletal pain experienced in the last 12 months and feedback was obtained from 220 dentists. Results: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dentists was 34.5%. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 10.5%, 21.7%, and 45.6% in dentists with regular yoga practice, other physical activity, and no physical activity, respectively. There was statistically significant difference in the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among dentists who were practicing yoga when compared with those in no regular activity group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there was significant role of physical activity on the quality and quantity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders experienced by dentists. Yoga was found to be more effective than other modes of physical activities. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems in dentists, with an emphasis on larger sample sizes and correlating other factors like age and sex of the dentists, duration of practice, years of practicing yoga, and working hours per week. PMID:26236679

  3. Depressive Symptoms, Anatomical Region, and Clinical Outcomes for Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Valencia, Carolina; Werneke, Mark W.; Hart, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines advocate the routine identification of depressive symptoms for patients with pain in the lumbar or cervical spine, but not for other anatomical regions. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of depressive symptoms for patients with musculoskeletal pain across different anatomical regions. Design This was a prospective, associational study. Methods Demographic, clinical, depressive symptom (Symptom Checklist 90–Revised), and outcome data were collected by self-report from a convenience sample of 8,304 patients. Frequency of severe depressive symptoms was assessed by chi-square analysis for demographic and clinical variables. An analysis of variance examined the influence of depressive symptoms and anatomical region on intake pain intensity and functional status. Separate hierarchical multiple regression models by anatomical region examined the influence of depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Results Prevalence of severe depression was higher in women, in industrial and pain clinics, and in patients who reported chronic pain or prior surgery. Lower prevalence rates were found in patients older than 65 years and those who had upper- or lower-extremity pain. Depressive symptoms had a moderate to large effect on pain ratings (Cohen d=0.55–0.87) and a small to large effect on functional status (Cohen d=0.28–0.95). In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms contributed additional variance to pain intensity and functional status for all anatomical locations, except for discharge values for the cervical region. Conclusions Rates of depressive symptoms varied slightly based on anatomical region of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a consistent detrimental influence on outcomes, except on discharge scores for the cervical anatomical region. Expanding screening recommendations for depressive symptoms to include more anatomical regions may be indicated in physical therapy

  4. A pilot study to profile the lower limb musculoskeletal health in children with obesity.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Grace; Hussey, Juliette; Roche, Edna

    2012-01-01

    : Evidence suggests a negative effect of obesity on musculoskeletal health in children. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the presence of musculoskeletal impairments in children with obesity and to explore the relationships among body mass index, physical activity, and musculoskeletal measures. : Lower limb musculoskeletal health (pain, power, balance, flexibility, and range of motion), physical activity, and screen time were assessed using standardized methods. : Seventeen children (mean age = 12.21 years) participated. Mean values for lower limb musculoskeletal measures are presented. Moderate negative correlations were found between body composition and range of motion, flexibility, and strength. Genu valgum deformity was moderately positively correlated to body mass index. : The results of this pilot study suggest that children who are obese may present with musculoskeletal impairments of the lower limb. Clinicians working with children who are obese should conduct a thorough musculoskeletal assessment and consider the presence of impairments when promoting physical activity.

  5. Patient Satisfaction with private Physiotherapy for musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Casserley-Feeney, Sarah N; Phelan, Martin; Duffy, Fionnuala; Roush, Susan; Cairns, Melinda C; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite emphasis on patient centred healthcare, healthcare professionals have been slow to use validated measurements of patient satisfaction in physiotherapy practice. The aim of this cross sectional survey was to measure patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy in Ireland, for patients with musculoskeletal pain, using a previously validated survey instrument. Methods A multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire 'PTOPS', which assesses patient satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy treatment, was translated from American English to European English, and relevant demographic and global satisfaction items were included. This was then circulated to patients with musculoskeletal pain (n = 240) for anonymous completion and return to the research team. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, v.12). Results In total 55% (n = 131/240) of questionnaires were returned. Just over half of the respondents were male (53.4%, n = 70), with a mean age (SD) of 37.7 years (12.4), and had previous experience of physiotherapy (65.6%, n = 86). The most common site of musculoskeletal pain was spinal (51.5% n = 66). The mean (SD) number of treatments was 8.3 (8.3), at a mean total cost (SD) of €350.2 (€322.8). The 'PTOPS' questionnaire categorised and scored satisfaction items under four domains, Enhancer, Detractor, Location and Cost. The mean score (SD), optimum score, and scoring range for each domain were: 'Enhancer' 41.2 (3.8), 50, 10–50; 'Detractor' 19.4 (4.4), 10, 10–50; 'Location' 28.0 (4.1), 35, 7–35; 'Cost' 18.9 (2.8), 7, 7–35. "Overall satisfaction with physiotherapy experience" was scored on a five-point scale "excellent to poor", with a modal response of "Very Good" (42%; n = 55). Conclusion This study measured patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal pain in Ireland using a previously validated outcome measure and provides a template for future studies of

  6. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone FKBP5 predict persistent musculoskeletal pain after traumatic stress exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Diatchenko, Luda; Soward, April C.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Rossi, Catherine; Swor, Robert A.; Hauda, William E.; Peak, David A.; Jones, Jeffrey S.; Holbrook, Debra; Rathlev, Niels K.; Foley, Kelly A.; Lee, David C.; Collette, Renee; Domeier, Robert M.; Hendry, Phyllis L.; McLean, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Individual vulnerability factors influencing the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to the risk of the development of persistent musculoskeletal pain after traumatic stress exposure. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in the gene encoding FK506 binding protein 51, FKBP5, a glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone, and musculoskeletal pain severity six weeks after two common trauma exposures. The study included data from two prospective emergency department-based cohorts: a discovery cohort (n=949) of European Americans experiencing motor vehicle collision and a replication cohort of adult European American women experiencing sexual assault (n=53). DNA was collected from trauma survivors at the time of initial assessment. Overall pain and neck pain six weeks after trauma exposure were assessed using a 0–10 numeric rating scale. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, six FKBP5 polymorphisms showed significant association (minimum p <0.0001) with both overall and neck pain in the discovery cohort. The association of rs3800373, rs9380526, rs9394314, rs2817032, and rs2817040 with neck pain and/or overall pain six weeks after trauma was replicated in the sexual assault cohort, showing the same direction of the effect in each case. The results of this study indicate that genetic variants in FKBP5 influence the severity of musculoskeletal pain symptoms experienced during the weeks after motor vehicle collision and sexual assault. These results suggest that glucocorticoid pathways influence the development of persistent post-traumatic pain, and that such pathways may be a target of pharmacologic interventions aimed at improving recovery after trauma. PMID:23707272

  7. Links between nurses' organisational work environment and upper limb musculoskeletal symptoms: independently of effort-reward imbalance! The ORSOSA study.

    PubMed

    Herin, Fabrice; Paris, Christophe; Levant, Aude; Vignaud, Marie-Chantal; Sobaszek, Annie; Soulat, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    The role of psychosocial factors in the development of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders has now been clearly demonstrated. However, only a few studies have analysed the association between the organisational work environment and musculoskeletal disorders in health care workers. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that some specific organisational constraints may be related to upper limb musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by registered nurses, independently of the effort/reward imbalance model and major confounding factors. In 2006, 2194 female registered nurses in 7 French teaching hospitals, recruited from the baseline screening of an epidemiological cohort study (the ORSOSA study), responded to valid self-report questionnaires (ERI [effort-reward imbalance], Nordic-style questionnaire). The organisational work environment was assessed by the self-rated Nursing Work Index-Extended Organisation scale. Multilevel models were used for analyses. We found that 2 organisational health care constraints: low level of shared values about work between members in the unit and lack of support from the administration were significantly associated with upper limb symptoms, independently of ERI perceptions. This study identified and quantified specific health care organisational factors that have an impact on nurses' upper limb symptoms, sometimes independently of ERI perception. A prospective study is needed to clarify the causal role of psychosocial and organisational work factors in upper limb injury in nurses. Organisational approaches may be more effective in improving health at work and may also have a longer-lasting impact than individual approaches. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodiversity Prospecting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittenfeld, Ana; Lovejoy, Annie

    1994-01-01

    Examines the use of biodiversity prospecting as a method for tropical countries to value biodiversity and contribute to conservation upkeep costs. Discusses the first agreement between a public interest organization and pharmaceutical company for the extraction of plant and animal materials in Costa Rica. (LZ)

  9. Comparison of physical examination performance of medical students trained by musculoskeletal versus non-musculoskeletal specialists.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luciano; Schrieber, Leslie; Eyles, Jillian; Deveza, Leticia A; Meneses, Sarah R F; Hunter, David J

    2017-04-01

    To compare the musculoskeletal (MSK) physical examination skills, knowledge acquisition and performance of first-year medical students trained by MSK specialist tutors to students trained by non-MSK specialist tutors, after a 6-week MSK physical examination tutorial program. Twenty-first year medical students took part in the study. They were recruited into two groups, according to their exposure to either an MSK specialist or a non-MSK specialist tutor during their 6-week MSK training block. Knowledge acquisition was measured via a pre- and post-training objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). We assessed students' self-belief and confidence levels regarding their newly acquired skills via a questionnaire. Independent t tests were used to examine mean group differences of OSCE scores and perceived level of confidence. Both groups demonstrated a significant improvement (3.9 and 3.8 points, respectively, on an eight-point scale for shoulder assessment, P < 0.01, 3.3 and 3.5, respectively, on a five-point scale for spine assessment, P < 0.01) in OSCE scores compared to baseline after completing the 6-week MSK physical examination tutorial program. There was no between-group difference in the OSCE scores from pre- to post-training (P = 0.92 for shoulder, P = 0.66 for spine) or for perceived level of confidence in performing a basic MSK examination after training (P = 0.91). Students exposed to MSK specialist tutors did not demonstrate increased skill levels or knowledge in the area of MSK physical examination compared to those receiving the same training under the supervision of non-MSK specialist tutors. Both student groups demonstrated improvement. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Commentary: the importance of musculoskeletal medicine and anatomy in medical education.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Ahn, Christine S

    2010-03-01

    Medical schools in the United States have continued to demonstrate deficiencies in musculoskeletal education. In response to the findings of numerous studies and to the objectives of the U.S. Bone and Joint Decade (an international collaborative movement sanctioned by the United Nations and the World Health Organization for the purpose of promoting awareness of musculoskeletal disease), several institutions, including Harvard Medical School, have reassessed the preclinical musculoskeletal curriculum at their respective medical schools. A cross-sectional survey at Harvard in 2004 found that students lacked clinical confidence in dealing with the musculoskeletal system. In addition, only one quarter of the graduating class of medical students passed a nationally validated exam in basic musculoskeletal competency. In 2005, 33 total hours of musculoskeletal medicine were added to the musculoskeletal blocks of the preclinical anatomy, pathophysiology, and physical examination courses. Alongside this movement toward more musculoskeletal education, there has been continued debate over the relevance and cost-effectiveness of cadaveric and surface anatomy labs. With the advent of advanced imaging technology, some argue that dissection anatomy is outdated and labor-intensive, whereas three-dimensional images are more accessible and time-effective for today's students. However, knowledge of anatomy is a critical foundation to learning musculoskeletal medicine. Thus, making room for more musculoskeletal curriculum time by cutting out cadaveric anatomy labs may ultimately be counterproductive.

  11. Prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean string instrument players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yong; Kim, Mi-Sook; Min, Seung-Nam; Cho, Young-Jin; Choi, Junhyeok

    2012-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in players of a variety of traditional Korean classical instruments: gayageum, geomungo, ajaeng, and haegeum. A large percentage of these musicians suffer from musculoskeletal pain of various body parts. However, there has been no research regarding the extent of musculoskeletal disorders in players of these instruments. Through a focus group interview, a questionnaire was developed to investigate musculoskeletal disorders. The questionnaire consisted of four parts: demographic factors, performance factors, musculoskeletal disorder symptoms, and musculoskeletal disorder experiences. Eighty-six expert players participated in this survey. The data from the survey were analyzed by correlation analysis and chi-squared analysis. Musculoskeletal disorders symptoms and severe pain were reported in the neck, shoulder, back and knee. These problems were statistically related to height for players of the gayageum and geomungo. In addition, the musculoskeletal disorder experience of geomungo players was correlated with age and career length. The symptoms of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in traditional Korean music players were reported as being mostly observed in the neck, shoulder, back, and knee. In addition, these symptoms were related to various demographic factors such as age, height, career length, and hobby styles. The results of this study can be used as preliminary data for developing guidelines to prevent traditional Korean musical instrument players from developing musculoskeletal injuries.

  12. Usefulness of strain elastography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a widely used technique for assessing the mechanical characteristics of tissues. Although there are several ultrasound elastography techniques, strain elastography (SE) is currently the most widely used technique for visualizing an elastographic map in real time. Among its various indications, SE is especially useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal system. In this article, we review the SE techniques for clinical practice and describe the images produced by these techniques in the context of the musculoskeletal system. SE provides information about tissue stiffness and allows real-time visualization of the image; however, SE cannot completely replace gray-scale, color, or power Doppler ultrasonography. SE can increase diagnostic accuracy and may be useful for the follow-up of benign lesions. PMID:26810195

  13. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Korean Police Personnel.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Hak Young; Cho, Jae Hwan; Seok, Jong Min; Cho, Taek Sang; Jeon, Woo Jin; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate efficient, systematic management of the Korean police and to examine the status and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in Korean police officers. For police officers in special working environments, the importance of basic data is emphasized for human resources (HR) management and the prevention of industrial hazards from an industrial health care perspective. This study was conducted on police officers who visited the national police hospital and who underwent x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. The results revealed that examinations for the lower extremities and spine were most frequently conducted using x-ray, CT, and MRI. In particular, knee and lumbar examinations were most frequently conducted among all lower extremity and spine examinations, respectively.

  14. Role of diagnostic ultrasound in the assessment of musculoskeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    The wide availability and recent improvement in technology coupled with portability, low cost and safety makes ultrasound the first choice imaging investigation for the evaluation of musculoskeletal diseases. Diagnostic use of ultrasound findings is greatly enhanced by knowledge of the clinical presentation. Conversely, ultrasound skills with its prerequisite anatomical knowledge make the clinical diagnosis more precise and reduce uncertainty in the choice of therapy. Therefore, it is essential for rheumatologists to acquire ultrasonography skills in order to improve patient care. Ultrasound examination provides an excellent opportunity for patient education and to explain the rationale for therapy. This review summarizes the indications for musculoskeletal ultrasound and describes its role in diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis. PMID:23024711

  15. Musculoskeletal Function and Obesity: Implications for Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sarah P; Byrne, Nuala M; Hills, Andrew P

    2014-09-01

    However quantified, obesity is a global health problem of significant magnitude. The condition is no longer limited to the developed world, with an increasing proportion of low-to-middle income countries burdened by obesity and its comorbidities. Specifically, obesity is a risk factor for a raft of psychosocial, physiological, cardiovascular, and metabolic problems. The carriage of excess body weight, including an unhealthy proportion of body fat, also has important implications for musculoskeletal health. To date, this important relationship has not received as much attention by the research community. Coincidentally, there has been a heightened interest in the role of physical activity and exercise across the lifespan in the prevention, treatment and management of obesity. This paper considers some of the more common musculoskeletal problems in children, adolescents and adults with implications for the overweight and obese and their meaningful engagement in physical activity.

  16. Musculoskeletal melioidosis: An under-diagnosed entity in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hitendra G; Gundavda, Manit; Shetty, Vivek; Soman, Rajeev; Rodriques, Camilla; Agashe, Vikas M

    2016-03-01

    Melioidosis is a saprophytic infectious disease caused by Gram-negative soil-dwelling bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei. We report three cases of musculoskeletal melioidosis that are presented to our department from 2011 to 2013. One of the patients died due to post-septicemic ARDS. The other two patients have recovered fully and are followed up for minimum of 6 months. There were no recurrences. Though musculoskeletal infection due to melioidosis is not common in India, new cases are being reported from Karnataka, Goa and Southern Maharashtra. The need for diagnosing this entity is due to the fact that the septicemic form has a mortality rate that exceeds 90%, and though culture sensitivity report shows susceptibility to various antibiotics, the infection responds to only specific set of antibiotics i.e. intravenous ceftazidime and combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

  17. Exercise Prescriptions to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-01-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises – concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  18. Musculoskeletal risk assessment in small furniture manufacturing workshops.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Naser Hashemi; Choobineh, Alireza; Rahimifard, Hoda; Haidari, Hamid Reza; Tabatabaei, Sayed Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    In Iran, furniture is mainly manufactured in small workshops, where most activities are performed manually. This study was conducted among workers of furniture workshops to determine prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and to assess ergonomic working conditions to identify major risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms. In this study, 410 randomly selected furniture workers participated. The Nordic questionnaire and an ergonomics checklist consisting of 6 sections were used as data collection tools. An index was calculated for each section of the checklist. Action categories indicating the priority of corrective measures were also defined. The highest prevalence of symptoms was reported in the knees (39%), lower back (35.6%) and wrists/hands (29.5%). It was found that manual material handling, poor workstation design and awkward working postures were associated with the reported symptoms in these regions (OR 1.77-4.52). Poor general working conditions and work organization showed association as well. Any interventional measures should focus on these areas.

  19. Ergonomic job design to accommodate and prevent musculoskeletal disabilities.

    PubMed

    Waters, T R; MacDonald, L A

    2001-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) account for a major portion of the cost of work-related injury and illness in the United States. Many of these injuries and illnesses lead to temporary or permanent disability. It is generally accepted that the incidence of MSDs increases when the demands of the job exceed the capabilities of the worker. As the workforce ages and physical capabilities decline, it is anticipated that many more Americans will request disability-related leave resulting from musculoskeletal disorders because they are unable to meet the demands of the job. To prevent these disabilities and to accommodate a wider range of people in the workforce, physical job demands may have to be reduced so that a larger portion of the population will be capable of working. Providing engineering controls or alternative work arrangements allows for accommodation of workers with a wide range of capabilities and can assist in rehabilitation and early return to work following injury.

  20. Education of garment workers: prevention of work related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Pun, Jane Chao; Burgel, Barbara J; Chan, Jackie; Lashuay, Nan

    2004-08-01

    This educational intervention was designed as part of a garment worker occupational health and safety initiative, with the goal to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in this monolingual Cantonese speaking population. Using risk communication and the Chinese concepts of yin and yang, the class curriculum was designed to be participatory. It focused on linking symptoms to high risk work activities; explaining the nature of musculoskeletal injury; and encouraging compliance with self care measures of ice, stretching, and early symptom reporting. A total of 21 women completed the Healthy Work Classes, with an increase in perceived levels of energy measured after each class. Additionally, contingency contracting for both individual and workplace change was piloted. This curriculum was revised to become a "train the trainer" program, with training of garment worker leaders and the goal to disseminate this prevention based curriculum to garment workers in the Oakland, California community.

  1. Observational stress factors and musculoskeletal disorders in urban transit operators.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit A; Krause, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    Associations and pathways between observed (rather than self-reported) job stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in 66 transit operators were investigated to determine specific stressors and vulnerable body regions affected, while adjusting for physical workload. Job stressors, defined as barriers to progress with work, comprised 7 categories and the sum of stressors. Outcomes included back and neck pain, low back pain, neck pain, pain of the upper extremities and the lower extremities, and any combination of these. Stressors were significantly associated with the combined musculoskeletal disorders category (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55), back and neck pain (OR = 1.41), low back pain (OR = 1.46), and pain in the lower extremities (OR = 1.44) after controlling for confounders. Five barrier categories had at least 1 significant association with outcomes. Results provide specific intervention targets by avoiding common method variance bias.

  2. Community based rehabilitation program for people with musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Polovina, Andrea; Bobinac-Georgievski, Ana; Jaksić, Mirka; Polovina-Prolosić, Tajana; Grazio, Simeon

    2007-06-01

    Community based rehabilitation program in people with musculoskeletal conditions was evaluated using Dartmouth COOP Functional Health Assessment Charts/WONCA (COOP/WONCA charts). The program consisted of educative and training protocol in a primary healthcare setting. It had two parts, both with six visits, in the first part three times a week and in the second part once a week. Clients with musculoskeletal conditions (N = 204) were included if they agreed to take active part in the rehabilitation process. The first part of the program was completed by 77 clients, and complete program by 52 subjects. Positive changes on the COOP/WONCA charts were achieved by more than 50% of the subjects that completed the program, in all categories but Social Activities. The program proved effective in terms of short-term evaluation with COOP/WONCA charts in those that complete the program. The high dropout rate and long-term efficiency have yet to be investigated.

  3. Developmental process of musculoskeletal integration in ostracod antenna.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomonari

    2012-03-01

    The functional morphology of arthropod appendages shows remarkable diversity. Plausible functional integrations, particularly between muscles and the exoskeleton, must be achieved in these diverse morphologies. This study provides an insight into the evolutionary pathway of diversified appendages from a functional point of view. The musculoskeletal structure and development of antennae in five species of Cypridocopina were compared. The muscle and skeletal systems are integrated in several ways: The integration in Propontocypris attenuata occurs during various stages of the molting growth, whereas that in Fabaeformiscandona breuili occurs during the myogenesis. These two types of developmental processes have notable similarities, despite their occurrence during different developmental phases. From the overview of the molecular phylogeny presented by earlier studies, it is suggested that the integrated musculoskeletal system has reappeared repeatedly in cypridoid lineages as an atavism. This study demonstrates how arthropod appendages evolve without losing the integrity of the functional whole.

  4. Lysosomal storage disorders: A review of the musculoskeletal features.

    PubMed

    James, Rebecca A; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Lee, Senq-J; McGill, Jim; Adib, Navid

    2016-03-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders are a collection of progressive, multisystem disorders that frequently present in childhood. Their timely diagnosis is paramount as they are becoming increasingly treatable. Musculoskeletal manifestations often occur early in the disease course, hence are useful as diagnostics clues. Non-inflammatory joint stiffness or pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger fingers, unexplained pain crises and short stature should all prompt consideration of a lysosomal storage disorder. Recurrent ENT infections, hepatosplenomegaly, recurrent hernias and visual/hearing impairment - especially when clustered together - are important extra-skeletal features. As diagnostic and therapeutic options continue to evolve, children with lysosomal storage disorders and their families are facing more sophisticated options for screening and treatment. The aim of this article is to highlight the paediatric presentations of lysosomal storage disorders, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal features.

  5. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided biopsy plays an important role in the management of multiple pathologic conditions involving the musculoskeletal system. The vast majority of these conditions require histologic diagnosis to guide decision making concerning treatment. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy has supplanted open surgical biopsy as the primary modality for tissue diagnosis in this patient cohort. The safety, efficacy, and clinical outcome of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for a multitude of musculoskeletal conditions are well documented. Improvements in needle design and image guidance have continued to further the efficacy and safety of this diagnostic technique. Complications associated with percutaneous biopsy are minimal compared with those seen in open surgical biopsy, whereas diagnostic accuracy is comparable to that of surgical biopsy.

  6. Musculoskeletal applications of flat-panel volume CT.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Benjamin; Sarwar, Ammar; Bartling, Soenke H; Cheung, Arnold; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Bredella, Miriam A; Brady, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajiv

    2008-12-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a recent development in imaging. We discuss some of the musculoskeletal applications of a high-resolution flat-panel CT scanner. FpVCT has four main advantages over conventional multidetector computed tomography (MDCT): high-resolution imaging; volumetric coverage; dynamic imaging; omni-scanning. The overall effective dose of fpVCT is comparable to that of MDCT scanning. Although current fpVCT technology has higher spatial resolution, its contrast resolution is slightly lower than that of MDCT (5-10HU vs. 1-3HU respectively). We discuss the efficacy and potential utility of fpVCT in various applications related to musculoskeletal radiology and review some novel applications for pediatric bones, soft tissues, tumor perfusion, and imaging of tissue-engineered bone growth. We further discuss high-resolution CT and omni-scanning (combines fluoroscopic and tomographic imaging).

  7. Musculoskeletal Discomfort, Physical Demand and Caregiving Activities in Informal Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Darragh, Amy R.; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Lavender, Steve A.; Tanner, Kelly J.; Vogel, Kasey; Campo, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the burden of care and musculoskeletal discomfort associated with caring for adults with chronic physical disability among informal caregivers and to describe the most physically demanding caregiving activities, and contributing factors, as perceived by informal caregivers of adults with physical disabilities. Methods A mixed methods approach was used for the study. Forty-six informal caregivers of adults with physical disability participated in the study. Results Most of the caregivers were classified as “high burden” caregivers. They reported high levels of physical strain and musculoskeletal discomfort. Caregivers identified several activities related to mobility and self-care as the most physically demanding. Factors affecting physical demand included caregiver and care recipeint characteristics, activity requirements, and the physical environment. Conclusion Interventions that specifically target high demand caregiving activities, including all three aspects of caregiving activity performance, are necessary to support, in the home, adults with disabilities and their caregivers. PMID:24652897

  8. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    PubMed

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of children with multifocal musculoskeletal infections].

    PubMed

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2011-04-11

    We describe the case of a three-week-old female, who presented with fever and swelling of the left thigh. Initial examination revealed signs of infection in both hips, which was confirmed at surgery. However, as the child did not recover despite relevant antibiotics, a full body MRI was performed, revealing multiple abscesses, some of which had to be managed surgically. We emphasize the benefit of MRI as part of the preoperative assessment of multifocal musculoskeletal infections in children.

  10. Evidence for pleiotropic factors in genetics of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2016-01-01

    There are both theoretical and empirical underpinnings that provide evidence that the musculoskeletal system develops, functions, and ages as a whole. Thus, the risk of osteoporotic fracture can be viewed as a function of loading conditions and the ability of the bone to withstand the load. Both bone loss (osteoporosis) and muscle wasting (sarcopenia) are the two sides of the same coin, an involution of the musculoskeletal system. Skeletal loads are dominated by muscle action; both bone and muscle share environmental, endocrine and paracrine influences. Muscle also has an endocrine function by producing bioactive molecules, which can contribute to homeostatic regulation of both bone and muscle. It also becomes clear that bone and muscle share genetic determinants; therefore the consideration of pleiotropy is an important aspect in the study of the genetics of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. The aim of this review is to provide an additional evidence for existence of the tight genetic co-regulation of muscles and bones, starting early in development and still evident in aging. Recently, important papers were published, including those dealing with the cellular mechanisms and anatomic substrate of bone mechanosensitivity. Further evidence has emerged suggesting that the relationship between skeletal muscle and bone parameters extends beyond the general paradigm of bone responses to mechanical loading. We provide insights into several pathways and single genes, which apparently have a biologically plausible pleiotropic effect on both bones and muscles; the list is continuing to grow. Understanding the crosstalk between muscles and bones will translate into a conceptual framework aimed at studying the pleiotropic genetic relationships in the etiology of complex musculoskeletal disease. We believe that further progress in understanding the common genetic etiology of osteoporosis and sarcopenia will provide valuable insight into important biological underpinnings for both

  11. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Lumbar Spine Musculoske l etal Physiol ogy and Biomechanics Dur i ng s i mul ated Military Operati ons Sb...l ationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different l oading conditions and positions , and the pathophysiol ogy of the

  12. Characteristics of 10 patients with paraneoplastic rheumatologic musculoskeletal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yo; Ozaki, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Takahashi, Yuko; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kano, Toshikazu; Mimori, Akio

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the possible correlation of malignant neoplasms and paraneoplastic rheumatologic syndromes. We studied a series of 10 patients with paraneoplastic rheumatological syndromes collected from our Division of Rheumatic Disease between 2006 and 2012. Our series consisted of four males and six females, with a mean age of 65.5 years (range, 57-78 years). Of the 10 patients recruited, six had hematological malignancies and four had solid cancers. Malignancies were diagnosed after rheumatic symptoms were reported in all patients. Compared to solid tumors, hemopathy was diagnosed at a later time point (16.2 vs. 7.3 months). Extra-articular symptoms were associated with rheumatologic musculoskeletal manifestations in 100% of the patients. Polyarthritis was the main rheumatologic musculoskeletal manifestation (50% of the patients). The other manifestations were oligopolyarthritis and polymyalgia rheumatic-like symptoms (20% of the patients). Symmetric arthritis was present in 60% of the patients, and the remaining patients developed asymmetric arthritis. Musculoskeletal manifestations completely regressed in 66.7% of the patients after cancer therapy. When tumor relapse was observed, rheumatic symptoms did not recur in any of our patients (100%). Rheumatic disorders with atypical clinical presentation in older patients, poor response to usual treatment and systemic features such as weight loss and clinical findings compatible with well-recognized paraneoplastic syndromes should alert clinicians to the possible coexistence of an occult malignancy. Especially in cases of paraneoplastic rheumatic/musculoskeletal manifestations associated with hemopathy, the primary disease is unlikely to have manifested yet, making the diagnosis difficult. Thus, caution is required.

  13. Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 4. Musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, D L; Oh, T H; Lim, P A; Brander, V A; Biundo, J J

    2000-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights assessment and therapeutic options in the rehabilitation of patients with orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. It is part of the chapter on rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article discusses new advances in such topics as idiopathic scoliosis, nontraumatic shoulder pain, rotator cuff tendinitis, and Dupuytren's disease.

  14. Musculoskeletal disorders among male sewing machine operators in shoemaking.

    PubMed

    Serratos-Perez, J N; Mendiola-Anda, C

    1993-07-01

    Research on the relationship between the operation of sewing machines and the appearance of musculoskeletal disorders has been conducted mainly among women working in garment or textile production, in developed countries; little is known about male sewing machine operators in other industries, in less developed countries. This study involved 143 Mexican men operating sewing machines in eight shoe factories; 132 of them operated flat-type machines, 11 column-type machines. When studied, the operators had been in this task for at least one year. The study aimed to identify the body regions more liable to develop musculoskeletal disorders and the rates both of appearance of such troubles and of sick leave resulting from them. A questionnaire was given to each worker, asking for their work history, the presence of musculoskeletal disorders at the time of the inquiry, and the frequency of sick leave during the previous 12 months; additionally, a number of workers were filmed on video and this material was then used to identify the body regions undergoing the major work demands. 47.5% of the subjects declared current musculoskeletal disorders; a statistical difference was found when the two groups were considered separately. Low back pain was the most frequent at a rate of 18.2% for both groups; the shoulder was a site of complaint for 14% of the subjects, being three times more frequent among column-machine operators; the back as a whole was mentioned also by 14% of the subjects, all of them flat-machine operators; 4.9% of the subjects complained of neck pain and again none of the column-machine operators was affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physical therapy care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Cameron, Kirsten; Mackey, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important patient-centered health outcome. To date, no systematic review of the literature on patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physical therapy care has been conducted. The purpose of this study was to systematically and critically review the literature to determine the degree of patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physical therapy care and factors associated with satisfaction. The databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EBM Reviews were searched from inception to September 2009. Articles were included if the design was a clinical trial, observational study, survey, or qualitative study; patient satisfaction was evaluated; and the study related to the delivery of musculoskeletal physical therapy services conducted in an outpatient setting. The search located 3,790 citations. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two authors extracted patient satisfaction data and details of each study. A meta-analysis of patient satisfaction data from 7 studies was conducted. The pooled estimate of patient satisfaction was 4.44 (95% confidence interval=4.41-4.46) on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 indicates high satisfaction and 1 indicates high dissatisfaction. Additional data were summarized in tables and critically appraised. Nonrespondent bias from individual studies may affect the accuracy and representativeness of these data. Patients are highly satisfied with musculoskeletal physical therapy care delivered across outpatient settings in northern Europe, North America, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. The interpersonal attributes of the therapist and the process of care are key determinants of patient satisfaction. An unexpected finding was that treatment outcome was infrequently and inconsistently associated with patient satisfaction. Physical therapists can enhance the quality of patient-centered care by understanding and optimizing these determinants of patient satisfaction.

  16. Epidemiological aspects of studying work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Tim

    2011-02-01

    There are many challenges to conducting valid epidemiological research of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and interpreting reports describing the results. In particular, these concern the basic study design, selection of subjects, measurement of exposure and outcome, control of confounding and the limitations of workers' compensation data systems. Researchers and people interested in the research results need to be aware of the major potential problems and pay careful attention to them when designing, conducting and using the results of such research.

  17. Musculoskeletal Modeling Component of the NASA Digital Astronaut Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, B. E.; Pennline, J. A.; Stalker, A. R.; Mulugeta, L.; Myers, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Digital Astronaut Project s (DAP) objective is to provide computational tools that support research of the physiological response to low gravity environments and analyses of how changes cause health and safety risks to the astronauts and to the success of the mission. The spaceflight risk associated with muscle atrophy is impaired performance due to reduced muscle mass, strength and endurance. Risks of early onset of osteoporosis and bone fracture are among the spaceflight risks associated with loss of bone mineral density. METHODS: Tools under development include a neuromuscular model, a biomechanical model and a bone remodeling model. The neuromuscular model will include models of neuromuscular drive, muscle atrophy, fiber morphology and metabolic processes as a function of time in space. Human movement will be modeled with the biomechanical model, using muscle and bone model parameters at various states. The bone remodeling model will allow analysis of bone turnover, loss and adaptation. A comprehensive trade study was completed to identify the current state of the art in musculoskeletal modeling. The DAP musculoskeletal models will be developed using a combination of existing commercial software and academic research codes identified in the study, which will be modified for use in human spaceflight research. These individual models are highly dependent upon each other and will be integrated together once they reach sufficient levels of maturity. ANALYSES: The analyses performed with these models will include comparison of different countermeasure exercises for optimizing effectiveness and comparison of task requirements and the state of strength and endurance of a crew member at a particular time in a mission. DISCUSSION: The DAP musculoskeletal model has the potential to complement research conducted on spaceflight induced changes to the musculoskeletal system. It can help with hypothesis formation, identification of causative mechanisms and

  18. Mechanisms of Aromatase Inhibitor-induced Musculoskeletal Symptoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    the blood, there are neurosteroids metabolized by cytochrome P450s within first and second-order sensory neurons. These neurosteroids have been...aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapies in breast cancer is limited in many patients because they induce musculoskeletal pain; however, the effects of...AIs) are the current standard of care for endocrine treatment of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Yet the use of AIs is limited in many

  19. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    PubMed

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p < 0.001; adjusted R(2), 0.33) was the only factor independently associated with lower job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  20. Surveillance of work-related musculoskeletal injuries among union carpenters.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, H J; Dement, J M; Loomis, D P; Silverstein, B; Kalat, J

    1997-12-01

    Combined data sources, including union administrative records and workers' compensation claims, were used to construct event histories for a dynamic cohort of union carpenters from Washington State during the period 1989-1992. Person-time at risk and the events of interest were stratified by age, sex, time in the union, and predominant type of carpentry work. Poisson regression techniques were used to identify subgroups at greatest risk of filing claims for a variety of musculoskeletal disorders defined by ANSI codes for body part injured and injury nature. Distinguishing different kinds of musculoskeletal disorders, even crudely with ANSI codes, led to different conclusions about the effects of the explanatory variables. Among older workers, the rates of fractures of the foot were higher, while rates of contusions of the hand and foot were lower. Women had higher rates of sprain/strains and nerve conditions of the wrist/forearm. Higher rates of injuries to the axial skeleton were seen among carpenters who did predominantly light commercial and drywall work, while piledrivers had lower rates of these injuries. Drywall workers had higher rates of sprains to the ankle/lower leg. Workers who were members of the union as long as four years had lower risks for the vast majority of musculoskeletal disorders studied. Similar patterns were seen for more serious claims that resulted in paid lost time from work.

  1. Musculo-Skeletal Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Ganger, Rudolf; Schreiner, Simone; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Background A leptosomic body type is tall and thin with long hands. Marfanoid features may be familial in nature or pathological, as occurs in congenital contractual arachnodactyly (Beal’s syndrome) and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome mimicking some of the changes of Marfan syndrome, although not accompanied by luxation of lens and dissecting aneurysm of aorta. Methods In this article we collected eight patients who were consistent with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome via phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Results Our patients manifested a constellation of variable presentations of musculo-skeletal abnormalities ranging from developmental dysplasia of the hip, protrusio acetabuli, leg length inequality, patellar instability, scoliosis, to early onset osteoarthritis. Each abnormality has been treated accordingly. Conclusion This is the first paper which includes the diagnosis and the management of the associated musculo-skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome, stressing that patients with Marfan syndrome are exhibiting great variability in the natural history and the severity of musculo-skeletal abnormalities. PMID:23399831

  2. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D's central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  3. Musculoskeletal problems among workers of an Iranian communication company

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Alireza; Tabatabaei, Sayed Hamidreza; Tozihian, Marzieh; Ghadami, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a common health problem throughout the world and a major cause of disability in the workplace. Awkward working posture is a main risk factor for developing WMSDs. Assessment of exposure level to WMSDs risks can be an appropriate base for planning and implementing interventional ergonomics program in the workplace. This study was conducted among workers of an Iranian communication company with the objectives of a) determination of WMSDs prevalence and b) assessment of exposure level to WMSDs risks. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 85 randomly selected workers from assembly line and closed circuit TV (CCTV) participated. Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ) was used to study prevalence of WMSDs and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) technique was applied to assess physical exposure to the risks. Results: The results of NMQ revealed that WMSDs occurred at an high rate. The highest rates of WMSDs prevalence were reported in shoulders (73%), knees (67.1%) and back (66.7%). RULA showed that the Grand Score of 88.1% of cases were high and very high (action levels 3 and 4). Significant association was found between risk level and musculoskeletal symptoms in lower back (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Given the association between RULA score and the prevalence of the problems, reducing RULA score by designing ergonomic workstation may reduce the prevalence of WMSDs among the workers. PMID:21957370

  4. Musculoskeletal adaptations to weightlessness and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; White, T. P.; Arnaud, S. B.; Edgerton, V. R.; Kraemer, W. J.; Kram, R.; Raab-Cullen, D.; Snow, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    A Research Roundtable, organized by the American College of Sports Medicine with sponsorship from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, met in November 1995 to define research strategies for effective exercise countermeasures to weightlessness. Exercise was considered both independently of, and in conjunction with, other therapeutic modalities (e.g., pharmacological nutritional, hormonal, and growth-related factors) that could prevent or minimize the structural and functional deficits involving skeletal muscle and bone in response to chronic exposure to weightlessness, as well as return to Earth baseline function if a degree of loss is inevitable. Musculoskeletal deficits and countermeasures are described with respect to: 1) muscle and connective tissue atrophy and localized bone loss, 2) reductions in motor performance, 3) potential proneness to injury of hard and soft tissues, and 4) probable interaction between muscle atrophy and cardiovascular alterations that contribute to the postural hypotension observed immediately upon return from space flight. In spite of a variety of countermeasure protocols utilized previously involving largely endurance types of exercise, there is presently no activity-specific countermeasure(s) that adequately prevent or reduce musculoskeletal deficiencies. It seems apparent that countermeasure exercises that have a greater resistance element, as compared to endurance activities, may prove beneficial to the musculoskeletal system. Many questions remain for scientific investigation to identify efficacious countermeasure protocols, which will be imperative with the emerging era of long-term space flight.

  5. MUSCULOSKELETAL PRESENTATION OF MULTIPLE MYELOMA AT GENERAL HOSPITAL DOUALA, CAMEROON.

    PubMed

    Doualla-Bija, M; Ndongho, E N; Oben, D T; Namme, H L; Mbanya, D

    2014-09-01

    Background: very little is known about musculoskeletal features of multiple myeloma (MM) in Africa. To describe the musculoskeletal features of multiple myeloma at presentation in a tertiary health care centre in sub-Saharan Africa. A Cross sectional observational study. The Douala General Hospital, Cameroon from 2007 to 2013. A patient was said to have MM according the current international consensus criteria for diagnosis and staging of MM. Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, solitary plamocytoma and other haematologic malignancies were excluded. A total of 62 patients were diagnosed with multiple myeloma, 63% were female. Mean age was 57 ± 12,1 (19-81) years. Musculoskeletal presentation included spine bone pains (75.6%); vertebral fracture with spinal cord compression in 46.8 %. Other clinical features at presentation included anaemia (70.93%), and nephropathy (17.74%). The average percentage of bone marrow plasmacytosis at diagnosis was 33% and Immunoglobulin G was found in 86% of patients. Sixty three per cent of patients were diagnosed at stage III of the disease. Presence of bone pain and anaemia should alert the clinician to investigate along the lines of multiple myeloma. Majority of the patients have osteolytic lesions and pathologic fractures at the time of diagnosis.

  6. Musculoskeletal phenotype through the life course: the role of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kate

    2012-02-01

    This review considers the definition of a healthy bone phenotype through the life course and the modulating effects of muscle function and nutrition. In particular, it will emphasise that optimal bone strength (and how that is regulated) is more important than simple measures of bone mass. The forces imposed on bone by muscle loading are the primary determinants of musculoskeletal health. Any factor that changes muscle loading on the bone, or the response of bone to loading results in alterations of bone strength. Advances in technology have enhanced the understanding of a healthy bone phenotype in different skeletal compartments. Multiple components of muscle strength can also be quantified. The critical evaluation of emerging technologies for assessment of bone and muscle phenotype is vital. Populations with low and moderate/high daily Ca intakes and/or different vitamin D status illustrate the importance of nutrition in determining musculoskeletal phenotype. Changes in mass and architecture maintain strength despite low Ca intake or vitamin D status. There is a complex interaction between body fat and bone which, in addition to protein intake, is emerging as a key area of research. Muscle and bone should be considered as an integrative unit; the role of body fat requires definition. There remains a lack of longitudinal evidence to understand how nutrition and lifestyle define musculoskeletal health. In conclusion, a life-course approach is required to understand the definition of healthy skeletal phenotype in different populations and at different stages of life.

  7. Pelvic musculoskeletal infection in infants -- diagnostic difficulties and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Kearney, S E; Carty, H

    1997-10-01

    Musculoskeletal infection involving the pelvis has rarely been reported in infants. When such infections involve the pelvic muscles they are generally believed to result from secondary spread from adjacent structures. We report five cases of primary pelvic musculoskeletal infection affecting infants <1 year, all of which presented during a 1-year period. In two patients the infection appeared to arise primarily in muscle. Clinical features were generally non-specific and often misleading, mimicking hip (4/5) or vascular (3/5) pathology; as a result, diagnosis was delayed in four patients. Radiological investigation was required to make the diagnosis and delineate the extent of the lesion in all cases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was the most useful imaging technique, accurately identifying the infection and its extent in all cases in which it was used. However, plain films, ultrasound (US), scintigraphy and computed tomography (CT) were all useful in individual cases and have a role in the primary investigation of these difficult infections. The clinical presentation of pelvic musculoskeletal infection in infants and the role of the various radiological investigations in its diagnosis is discussed.

  8. Sleep patterns in female adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Logan, Deirdre E; Mindell, Jodi A

    2005-01-01

    This study examined sleep patterns in female adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Twenty-six participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed questionnaires during their clinic visit, and three 24-Hour Sleep Patterns Interviews during the following 2 weeks. Compared to normative data (Acebo & Carskadon, 2002), adolescents with chronic pain reported similar total sleep time (TST) and bedtimes. However, study participants reported significantly longer sleep onset latency, more night wakings, a later morning wake time, and more symptoms of daytime sleepiness. Pain improved after sleep for 27% of the study sample, and was associated with longer TST. Finally, depression and anxiety were related to daytime sleepiness, but not total sleep time or sleep onset latency. Female adolescents with chronic pain either may be more sensitive to the chronic sleep debt that is common in this age group, or they may experience underlying physiological sleep disrupters (e.g., periodic limb movement disorder) or sleep abnormalities (e.g., alpha-delta intrusions) not measured in this study. Additional research is needed to examine the complex relation between sleep and chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  9. Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders among Secondary School Saudi Female Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Zuhair, Shatha Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to estimate prevalence and pattern of musculoskeletal pain disorders among secondary school Saudi female teachers in Al-Khobar area and the psychodemographic and psychosocial factors that may affect them. Material and Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted using sample of secondary schools teachers (governmental and private school) in Al-Khobar area, Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Result. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders was 79.17%. Main sites of pain were lower back (63.8%) followed by shoulder (45.4%), neck (42.1%), leg (40.0%), wrist (16.2%), and elbow joint (10.0%). Factors that showed significant relationship were type of school (p value 0.038), age (p value 0.002), weight (p value 0.007), number of children (p value 0.006), shoe type (p value 0.000), teaching years (p value 0.003), and working daily hours (p value 0.027). Conclusion. Secondary school female teachers showed high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders in most anatomic sites, namely, the back, shoulder, neck, legs, wrist, and elbow joint. Risk factors associated with significant pain were type of school, age, weight, number of children, and number of teaching years. PMID:23970968

  10. Musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulder among dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Radanović, B; Vučinić, P; Janković, T; Mahmutović, E; Penjašković, D

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulder represent a condition whose basic characteristic is pain. These conditions are very often present in dental health professionals. The aim of the paper was to determine presence of discomforts in areas of head, neck, shoulders, upper back and upper limbs at health professionals in area of dentistry, as well as discomfort localisation and methods of treatment. The research included 45 health professionals (dentists, dental assistants and dental technicians) employed at Dental Clinic of Vojvodina. The information was collected via questionnaire for analysis musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the dentists (75.9%) and the dental assistants (90.9%) as well as nearly half of the dental technicians (40%) experience discomforts in area of the neck, which are occasional, present in all three working positions and this discomforts are a little more frequent at women. The present musculoskeletal disorders are followed by headache, whose presence is statistically more significant compared to the other symptoms. The headache is usually located in the occipital part, it occurs individually or joined with other symptoms. Due to said discomforts the examinees in 59.4% of the cases don't contact the doctor. Medical therapy prevails in opposition to physical therapy. The discomforts deriving from the cervical part of the spine are present at great percentage of our examinees. Considering the fact that the said discomforts affect performing both professional and everyday activities, its prevention is necessary in order to avoid the consequences they carry.

  11. Musculoskeletal adaptations to weightlessness and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; White, T. P.; Arnaud, S. B.; Edgerton, V. R.; Kraemer, W. J.; Kram, R.; Raab-Cullen, D.; Snow, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    A Research Roundtable, organized by the American College of Sports Medicine with sponsorship from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, met in November 1995 to define research strategies for effective exercise countermeasures to weightlessness. Exercise was considered both independently of, and in conjunction with, other therapeutic modalities (e.g., pharmacological nutritional, hormonal, and growth-related factors) that could prevent or minimize the structural and functional deficits involving skeletal muscle and bone in response to chronic exposure to weightlessness, as well as return to Earth baseline function if a degree of loss is inevitable. Musculoskeletal deficits and countermeasures are described with respect to: 1) muscle and connective tissue atrophy and localized bone loss, 2) reductions in motor performance, 3) potential proneness to injury of hard and soft tissues, and 4) probable interaction between muscle atrophy and cardiovascular alterations that contribute to the postural hypotension observed immediately upon return from space flight. In spite of a variety of countermeasure protocols utilized previously involving largely endurance types of exercise, there is presently no activity-specific countermeasure(s) that adequately prevent or reduce musculoskeletal deficiencies. It seems apparent that countermeasure exercises that have a greater resistance element, as compared to endurance activities, may prove beneficial to the musculoskeletal system. Many questions remain for scientific investigation to identify efficacious countermeasure protocols, which will be imperative with the emerging era of long-term space flight.

  12. Ultrasound-guided therapeutic procedures in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    del Cura, Jose Luis

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound allows the exploration of most of the musculoskeletal system, including lytic bone lesions. Its flexibility, availability, and low cost make it the best tool to guide interventional therapeutic procedures in any musculoskeletal system lesion visible on ultrasound. These techniques include drainages of abscesses, bursitis, hematomas or muscular strains, treatment of cystic lesions (ganglions, Baker's cysts), arthrocentesis, injection of substances in joints and soft tissues, and aspiration of calcific tendinitis. Although the puncture of joints for arthrocentesis and injection of substances are performed by clinicians using palpation, the use of ultrasound guidance improves the effectiveness of the technique especially for small or poorly accessible lesions and joints and for obese patients. Drainage can be performed using catheters or needles and can avoid a more aggressive approach most of the time. Intracavitary urokinase helps when the aim is to drain clotted hematomas or fibrinous collections. Injection of corticoids is useful in the treatment of ganglia, Baker's cysts, tendinitis, and noninfected arthritis. Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder can be effectively treated using percutaneous "lavage" with lidocaine. Calcifications usually disappear and symptoms improve in nearly 90% of the cases within a year. Most of these techniques are low cost and require only a moderate skill. Ultrasound-guided procedures are useful tools to effectively treat some diseases of the musculoskeletal system and should be routine in any imaging department.

  13. Common musculoskeletal problem experienced by fishing industry workers

    PubMed Central

    Dabholkar, Tejashree Ajit; Nakhawa, Priyanka; Yardi, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a common health problem throughout the world and a major cause of disability in the workplace. Awkward working posture is a main risk factor for developing WMSDs. Assessment of exposure level to WMSDs risks can be an appropriate base for planning and implementing interventional ergonomics program in the workplace. Fihing in India is a major industry in the coastal states employing over 14 million people. The job demand of fishermen make them vulnerable for various musculoskeletal problems This study was conducted among workers of fishing industry in Mumbai, India with the objective to determine WMSDs prevalence in fishing industry. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 randomly selected workers from fishing industry, India, Mumbai, Anonymous questionnaire was used to study prevalence of WMSDs.visual analogue scale used to assess intensity of pain. Results: The results of NMQ revealed that WMSDs occurrence was high. The highest rates of WMSDs prevalence were reported in Low back(92.4%), Shoulder (64.8%) and Knee(31%) and Hand (25%). Conclusion: This study showed that maximum of the fishermen have musculoskeletal problem with the most common joint involved is low back and then followed by shoulder, knee, and hand. Ergonomic risk factor involved were found to be repeated pulling and throwing of the net as well as repeated bending forward action to lift heavy load and transfer that heavy load. PMID:25568597

  14. [Sensitivity and antibiotic resistance in infections of the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Mata-Hernández, Argenis; Rivera-Villa, Adrián Huematzin; Miguel-Pérez, Adrián; Pérez-Atanasio, José Manuel; Torres-González, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the musculoskeletal system are a devastating complication for patients, due to it's long rehabilitation process and even sometimes the removal of the implant, the chronicity of infection, is often due to lack of coverage in empirical antibiotics. A retrospective, observational, descriptive cohort study was performed. All cultures form musculoskeletal system infected patients reported of sensitivity and resistance of germs isolated were analyzed. A total of 143 positive results were included. Reported more frequent germ Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 75 positive cases, followed by Escherichia coli with 31 positive results. Antibiotics with better sensitivity according to the type of microorganisms were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin, levofloxacin and linezolid, gentamicin, erythromycin and amikacin. Regarding antibiotic resistance, those reported with the highest percentage were penicillin G, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and ampicillin. We recommend using empirical treatments in musculoskeletal system infections, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are the best choice because they have the same sensitivity compare with vancomycin and a resistance rate of 7.6%. Betalactamics have a high percentage of resistance and low sensitivity so we must consider alternatives.

  15. Chronic pelvic pain: comorbidity between chronic musculoskeletal pain and vulvodynia.

    PubMed

    Biasi, G; Di Sabatino, V; Ghizzani, A; Galeazzi, M

    2014-06-06

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a common condition that has a major impact on the quality of life of both men and women. Male CPP is usually attributable to well-defined urogenital conditions (most frequently infectious/non infectious prostatic diseases) or musculoskeletal or bowel diseases, whereas the features of female CPP are much more complex and are of particular clinical and epidemiological importance. It is a multifactorial syndrome that can be due to diseases of the urogenital, gastrointestinal, or musculoskeletal systems, or to neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not always easy to identify its predominant pathogenesis, although it often occurs as a central sensitization syndrome triggered by an initial stimulus which is no longer detectable and only manifests itself clinically through pain. In this respect, there are some very interesting relationships between vulvodynia and fibromyalgic syndrome, as identified in a preliminary study of women with chronic musculoskeletal pain in which it was demonstrated that vulvar pain plays an important role, although it is often overlooked and undiagnosed.

  16. Study of musculoskeletal risks of the office-based surgeries.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, James E; Choi, Sang D

    2012-01-01

    Due to the cost and time benefits associated with patients and physicians, outpatient surgeries continue to become more and more popular over time. With the increase in the number of office-based surgical procedures, the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) associated with office-based surgeries has been reported. The purpose of this pilot study is to ergonomically evaluate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of physicians/surgeons performing office-based surgery (OBS). Ergonomic assessment tools included Questionnaire, the BodyMap and the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment for measuring potential ergonomic concerns. The findings have shown that the ergonomic issues of greatest concerns were the discomforts in the neck, shoulders, arms/wrists, and back. Some additional comments were provided by the participants regarding the duration of discomfort or clarification on the frequency of their body discomfort. This study suggests that there is a considerable risk of musculoskeletal injuries of physicians/surgeons performing the OBS tasks. By properly using the ergonomic assessment techniques, valuable information on ergonomic OBS workplace design and selection could assist in the early interventions of WMSD prevention.

  17. Postural Preference and Musculoskeletal Complaints in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Corey A; Strauss, Robert A; Best, Alvin M

    2017-04-26

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons traditionally have musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this study was to determine the postural preferences of oral and maxillofacial surgeons and their effect on musculoskeletal pain. The authors designed and implemented a cross-sectional study. The association of demographic characteristics with postural preferences and use of loupes was explored. Then, the relation of demographic characteristics, postural preferences, and use of loupes to painful musculoskeletal complaints was analyzed. Contingency analysis was used to compare participants' responses and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify relevant predictor variables. The sample was composed of 153 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of which 32% indicated that they had ever had pain attributable to their practice that lasted longer than 2 weeks. Practitioners reported neck and back pain as being most common. Eighty-four percent of practitioners stood for extractions and placement of implants. Those who stood did so for visibility. Practitioners who sat indicated they did so for orthopedic reasons (P < .001). Thirty-one percent of practitioners indicated loupes use. Those who used loupes were more likely to report pain (P = .022). Most respondents stood and did not use loupes. Those who did use loupes were more likely to report pain. Those who stood did so for visibility; those who sat did so for orthopedic reasons. Almost one third of respondents reported pain lasting at least 2 weeks during practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms in support staff in a large telecommunication company.

    PubMed

    Fagarasanu, Mircea; Kumar, Shrawan

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent and severity of the musculoskeletal problems in office workers in a telecommunication company. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders' symptoms, their perceived intensity and interaction with ability to work among office workers. The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire and Cornell Hand Discomfort Questionnaire developed by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University were used on a sample of 140 office workers in a telecommunication company. Discomfort/pain/ache at the wrist level was reported by 86.5% for the left side and 95.5% for the right side. Additionally, discomfort/pain/ache was reported by 77.5% of the sample for neck and 31% of the sample for the left and 50% for the right shoulder region. At the hand site, the area in the distal proximity of the wrist was the most affected site being indicated in 90% of cases for left side and 95% of cases for the right side. An overview of problems associated with the body parts in office work may allow targeted prevention and intervention.

  19. Shear-Wave Elastography: Basic Physics and Musculoskeletal Applications.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Gimber, Lana H; Becker, Giles W; Latt, L Daniel; Klauser, Andrea S; Melville, David M; Gao, Liang; Witte, Russell S

    2017-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, sonoelastography has been progressively used as a tool to help evaluate soft-tissue elasticity and add to information obtained with conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonographic techniques. Recently introduced on clinical scanners, shear-wave elastography (SWE) is considered to be more objective, quantitative, and reproducible than compression sonoelastography with increasing applications to the musculoskeletal system. SWE uses an acoustic radiation force pulse sequence to generate shear waves, which propagate perpendicular to the ultrasound beam, causing transient displacements. The distribution of shear-wave velocities at each pixel is directly related to the shear modulus, an absolute measure of the tissue's elastic properties. Shear-wave images are automatically coregistered with standard B-mode images to provide quantitative color elastograms with anatomic specificity. Shear waves propagate faster through stiffer contracted tissue, as well as along the long axis of tendon and muscle. SWE has a promising role in determining the severity of disease and treatment follow-up of various musculoskeletal tissues including tendons, muscles, nerves, and ligaments. This article describes the basic ultrasound physics of SWE and its applications in the evaluation of various traumatic and pathologic conditions of the musculoskeletal system. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  20. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  1. Work-related musculoskeletal diseases and the workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae-Won; Koo, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Soon-Chan; Song, Jaechul

    2014-06-01

    The Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Act (IACIA) regulates the workers' compensation insurance system and the standards for the recognition of occupational diseases (ODs). Since its establishment in 1994, the IACIA has been amended several times. Before 2008, the approval of compensation for work-related musculoskeletal diseases (WMSDs) was decided based on the recommendation of consultants of the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL). The IACIA was amended in 2008, and since then, the approval of compensation for occupational injuries has been decided based on the recommendation of COMWEL consultants, whereas the approval of compensation for ODs was decided based on the judgment of Committee on Occupational Diseases Judgment (CODJ) which was established in 2008. According to the 2013 amendment to the IACIA, degenerative musculoskeletal diseases among workers engaged in musculoskeletal-burdening work should be considered compensable ODs. Despite some commendable changes to the workers' compensation insurance system, other significant issues persist. To resolve these issues, related organizations including the associations of orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, and occupational and environmental medicine; Ministry of Employment and Labor; and COMWEL need to work cooperatively.

  2. A pictorial review of signature patterns living in musculoskeletal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Cheon, Ji Hyun; Seo, Won Jun; Yang, Geun Young; Choi, Yun Mi

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is mainly composed of the bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, in addition to nerves and blood vessels. The greatest difficulty in an ultrasonographic freeze-frame created by the examiner is recognition of the targeted structures without indicators, since an elephant's trunk may not be easily distinguished from its leg. It is not difficult to find descriptive ultrasonographic terms used for educational purposes, which help in distinguishing features of these structures either in a normal or abnormal anatomic condition. However, the terms sometimes create confusion when describing common objects, for example, in Western countries, pears have a triangular shape, but in Asia they are round. Skilled experts in musculoskeletal ultrasound have tried to express certain distinguishing features of anatomic landmarks using terms taken from everyday objects which may be reminiscent of that particular feature. This pictorial review introduces known signature patterns of distinguishing features in musculoskeletal ultrasound in a normal or abnormal condition, and may stir the beginners' interest to play a treasure-hunt game among unfamiliar images within a boundless ocean. PMID:27738500

  3. Physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain among forest industry workers.

    PubMed

    Miranda, H; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R; Takala, E P; Riihimäki, H

    2001-08-01

    The study investigated the relations between physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain among forest industry workers. We studied a population of 3312 Finnish forest industry workers, who replied to a questionnaire survey in 1994 (response rate 77%). The outcome variables in this cross-sectional study were the number of days with pain in the low back, neck, shoulder and knee during the preceding 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in statistical analyses. Active walkers had more sciatic pain, active volleyball players had more shoulder pain and those who practiced trekking actively had more knee pain than those who practiced these activities less. The risk of shoulder pain was more than three times higher for those who played volleyball actively compared to those who played less. In addition, age, mental stress and work-related physical loading were strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain. When studying the relations between physical exercise and musculoskeletal pain in a working population, it is important to not only detect the general physical activity but also to specify the different modes of exercise. In addition, the other factors which are strongly related to pain (such as mental stress and work-related physical loading) should be taken into account.

  4. Association between shift working and musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing personnel

    PubMed Central

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Raeisi, Saeed; Namvar, Mohamad; Golabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some health problems are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are considered as one of the most common health-related problems that can cause disability among health care workers. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between shift working and the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSs) among nursing personnel. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among 454 health care workers including nurses and nurses’ aides in a general hospital in Iran. A Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to evaluate the prevalence of MSs. Logistic regression analysis with adjusting for confounding factors was performed to evaluate the associations between shift working and the prevalence of MSs. Results: Lower back, knees, and upper back symptoms with the prevalence of 57.4%, 48.4%, and 47%, respectively, were the most common MSs. The prevalence of MSs in eight regions of the body (lower back, neck, knees, upper back, shoulder, wrist, buttock, and ankle) was higher among shift workers than day workers. The differences were statistically significant only in the lower back and ankle regions (P < 0.05). Odds Ratio for lower back symptoms in shift workers was 1.94 compared to day workers (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that shift working could be associated with increased prevalence of lower back disorders among nursing personnel. This study emphasizes on the importance of proper work planning and regulating working hours for nursing personnel. PMID:24949072

  5. Musculoskeletal pain and psychological distress in hospital patient care workers.

    PubMed

    Reme, Silje Endresen; Dennerlein, Jack T; Hashimoto, Dean; Sorensen, Glorian

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the association of psychological distress and musculoskeletal pain, how it is related to pain interference with work and multiple pain areas, and potential differences between the different pain areas in hospital patient care workers. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers (n = 1,572) from two large hospitals. Patient care workers with musculoskeletal pain reported significantly more psychological distress than those without pain. Psychological distress was significantly related to pain interference with work, even after adjusting for pain and demographics (OR = 1.05; CI = 1.01-1.09). The association was strongest for those with both upper- and lower body pain (OR = 1.12; CI = 1.06-1.18). Psychological distress was also independently associated with multiple pain areas. Psychological distress was found to be higher in workers with musculoskeletal pain, and highest among workers with both upper and lower body pain. Distress was further significantly associated with pain interference with work as well as number of pain areas. The findings may be followed up with a longitudinal design to better determine the direction of the associations, and to investigate if psychological distress increases the risk of work disability and injuries.

  6. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  7. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Meredith D.; Tarbox, Grayson J.; Palmer, Antony J.; Park, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems. PMID:28090448

  8. Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Part 2: Clinical assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicholas C; Röijezon, Ulrik; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Proprioception can be impaired in gradual-onset musculoskeletal pain disorders and following trauma. Understanding of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor dysfunction and methods for assessment and interventions is of vital importance in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. In Part 1 of this two-part Masterclass we presented a theory-based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal conditions, and general principles of assessment and interventions. The aim of this second part is to present specific methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and extremities. Clinical assessment of proprioception can be performed using goniometers, inclinometers, laser-pointers, and pressure sensors. Manual therapy, taping, and bracing can immediately enhance proprioception and should be used to prepare for exercise interventions. Various types of exercise (active joint repositioning, force sense, co-ordination, muscle performance, balance/unstable surface, plyometric, and vibration training) should be employed for long-term enhancement of proprioception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of future trends in electronic data collection on musculoskeletal research and evidence-based orthopaedic care.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Ian

    2003-11-01

    Electronic medical documentation systems offer the greatest potential source of data to enable the evolution to evidence-based musculoskeletal care. To this end, it is important that providers of musculoskeletal care embrace structured medical records systems that record medical information in fields thereby making data easily accessible for the purpose of later analysis. Gathering data in a structured format can be labor intensive but significant time and cost savings are realized by reduced dictation and transcription and the automated output of requisitions and correspondence. Physicians will only use structured electronic records if the system reduces overhead while at the same time minimizing their work load. Since getting information into the system is the greatest impediment to successful implementation of a structured record, the use of Web forms for previsit patient data entry and touch screen handheld computers with wireless connectivity for provider data entry will play an important role in facilitating their adoption. Ultimately, industry-standard, field-naming nomenclature for specific historical features, examination findings, and therapeutic interventions will make data in all documentation systems comparable regardless of vendor. When that day comes, every new patient assessed will be a candidate for a prospective study.

  10. Moving from evidence to practice: Models of care for the prevention and management of musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Speerin, Robyn; Slater, Helen; Li, Linda; Moore, Karina; Chan, Madelynn; Dreinhöfer, Karsten; Ebeling, Peter R; Willcock, Simon; Briggs, Andrew M

    2014-06-01

    With musculoskeletal conditions now identified as the second highest cause of the morbidity-related global burden of disease, models of care for the prevention and management of disability related to musculoskeletal conditions are an imperative. Musculoskeletal models of care aim to describe how to operationalise evidence-based guidelines for musculoskeletal conditions and thus support implementation by clinical teams and their health systems. This review of models of care for musculoskeletal pain conditions, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and musculoskeletal injuries and trauma outlines health system and local implementation strategies to improve consumer outcomes, including supporting access to multidisciplinary teams, improving access for vulnerable populations and levering digital technologies to support access and self-management. However, the challenge remains of how to inform health system decision-makers and policy about the human and fiscal benefits for broad implementation across health services. Recommendations are made for potential solutions, as well as highlighting where further evidence is required.

  11. Children, computer exposure and musculoskeletal outcomes: the development of pathway models for school and home computer-related musculoskeletal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Courtenay; Straker, Leon; Pollock, Clare; Smith, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Children's computer use is rapidly growing, together with reports of related musculoskeletal outcomes. Models and theories of adult-related risk factors demonstrate multivariate risk factors associated with computer use. Children's use of computers is different from adult's computer use at work. This study developed and tested a child-specific model demonstrating multivariate relationships between musculoskeletal outcomes, computer exposure and child factors. Using pathway modelling, factors such as gender, age, television exposure, computer anxiety, sustained attention (flow), socio-economic status and somatic complaints (headache and stomach pain) were found to have effects on children's reports of musculoskeletal symptoms. The potential for children's computer exposure to follow a dose-response relationship was also evident. Developing a child-related model can assist in understanding risk factors for children's computer use and support the development of recommendations to encourage children to use this valuable resource in educational, recreational and communication environments in a safe and productive manner. Computer use is an important part of children's school and home life. Application of this developed model, that encapsulates related risk factors, enables practitioners, researchers, teachers and parents to develop strategies that assist young people to use information technology for school, home and leisure in a safe and productive manner.

  12. Musculoskeletal imaging in pediatric emergencies: the basics through three clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Garcés Iñigo, E F; Guasp Vizcaíno, M; Gómez Fernández-Montes, J

    2016-05-01

    A high percentage of the pediatric imaging studies requested during calls are related to musculoskeletal disease. Since bones and joints in children are immature, constantly growing and remodeling, they have physiological and anatomical peculiarities that make it necessary to use an approach specific for pediatric patients. In this article, we use three clinical scenarios (limping, fractures, and musculoskeletal infections) to summarize and transmit the concepts that are essential in emergency musculoskeletal imaging in children.

  13. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0163 TITLE: Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0163 Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A...SUBJET TERMS Auricular Therapy; Musculoskeletal Pain 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  14. Inter-rater Reliability of Three Musculoskeletal Physical examination Techniques Used to Assess Motion in Three Planes While Standing

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; Steger-May, Karen; Hayes, Marcie Harris; Knaus, Evan; Clohisy, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to measure the reliability between examiners of three basic maneuvers of the Total Body Functional Profile© physical examination test. The hypothesis was musculoskeletal health care providers of different disciplines could reliably use the three basic maneuvers as part of the musculoskeletal physical examination. Design A prospective observational study was conducted. Twenty-eight adult volunteers were measured on both the left and right side by two independent raters on a single occasion. Setting The subjects were recruited through advertisements placed by the orthopedic department at a tertiary university. Participants 28 volunteers were recruited and completed the study. The volunteers were between the ages of 18 and 51 years of age, had no symptoms in the lower extremity or spine, had no previous history of surgery or tumor involving the lower extremity, and no medical conditions that would preclude participation. Assessment On a single occasion, two examiners per one volunteer were blinded to their own and each others' measurements. Each examiner assessed the distance of frontal and sagittal plane lunge and angle of motion for transverse plane testing. Main Outcome Measurements Inter-rater agreement is expressed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The difference between raters is reported with 95% CIs. Baseline demographics, UCLA, and Harris hip questionnaires were completed by all participants. Results The UCLA and Harris hip scores showed no significant activity restrictions or pain limitations in all participants. The inter-rater reliability for sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane matrix testing was good with ICCs of 0.86 (95% CI 0.77, 0.91), 0.90 (95% CI 0.84, 0.94), and 0.85 (95% CI 0.75, 0.91) respectively. The rater reliability between disciplines for transverse, sagittal and frontal plane matrix testing was good with ICCs of 0.89 (95% CI 0.80, 0

  15. A New Pre-employment Functional Capacity Evaluation Predicts Longer-Term Risk of Musculoskeletal Injury in Healthy Workers

    PubMed Central

    Burgess-Limerick, Robin; Peeters, Geeske

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective cohort study. Objective. To determine if a job-specific pre-employment functional assessment (PEFA) predicts musculoskeletal injury risk in healthy mineworkers. Summary of Background Data. Traditional methods of pre-employment screening, including radiography and medical screenings, are not valid predictors of occupational musculoskeletal injury risk. Short-form job-specific functional capacity evaluations are increasing in popularity, despite limited evidence of their ability to predict injury risk in healthy workers. Methods. Participants were recruited from an Australian coal mine between 2002 and 2009 as part of the hiring process. At baseline, participants were screened with the JobFit System PEFA, and classified as PEFA 1 if they met job demands and PEFA>1, if not. Males who completed the PEFA and were employed were included. Injury data from company records were coded for body part, mechanism, and severity. The relationship between PEFA classification and time to first injury was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustments for department and post hoc stratification for time (0–1.3 yr, 1.3–6 yr). Results. Of the 600 participants (median age, 37 yr, range, 17.0–62.6 yr), 427 scored PEFA 1. One hundred ninety-six sprain/strain injuries were reported by 121 workers, including 35 back injuries from manual handling. Significant differences between PEFA groups were found in time to first injury for all injury types during the long term (any injury: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–3.9; manual handling injury: HR = 3.3, CI = 1.6–7.2; any back injury: HR = 3.3, CI = 1.6–6.6; back injuries from manual handling HR = 5.8, CI = 2.0–16.7), but not during the short term. An area under the receiver operator curve value of 0.73 (CI = 0.61–0.86) demonstrated acceptable predictive ability for back injuries from manual handling during the long term. Conclusion. JobFit System

  16. [How family physicians estimate their knowledge and skills in musculoskeletal problems?].

    PubMed

    Mashov, Rita; Tabenkin, Hava

    2011-03-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are common reasons for consultation in primary care and constitute 14-28% of primary care visits and visits to emergency services. General practitioners [GP] diagnose and treat the majority of patients with musculoskeletal problems. Surveys conducted confirmed the discrepancy between the number of GP musculoskeLetal consultations and the amount of time spent on orthopedic and musculoskeletal teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate education in different countries. It would be considered negligent for a GP to be incompetent in assessing the function of the heart or lungs, yet it is quite common for students to leave medical school without being able to make a general assessment of the musculoskeletal system. This review analyses the forms and duration of medical teaching on musculoskeletal disorders in several parts of the world and in Israel. Some studies have investigated the current situation in the undergraduate education of musculoskeletal teaching. The recent survey by the Bone and Joint Decade of undergraduate teaching in different specialties in 32 countries considered that the average length of medical teaching time of orthopedics, rheumatology and physical medical rehabilitation is insufficient and usually emphasize surgically managed musculoskeletal problems that are not relevant for the future practice of most doctors. The surveys that investigate postgraduate training have tested the confidence of GPs in performing regional musculoskeletal examinations and management of specific conditions. They found the different levels of confidence between GPs in UK, Canada, USA (including Hawaii) and developing, countries, with the tests showing deficient knowledge and skills in assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. It should be the personal obligation of GPs to update themselves regularly and monitor their performance to ensure the appropriate care of musculoskeletal problems. This will be possibLe through increasing

  17. 75 FR 41577 - VBA/VHA Musculoskeletal Forum: Improving VA's Disability Evaluation Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA)/Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Musculoskeletal Forum... discussed. Contingent upon available capacity and time, individuals wishing to make oral statements will...

  18. Self-reported work-related musculoskeletal injuries and isometric handgrip strength.

    PubMed

    Grobler, C J

    2013-04-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are common in car assembly workers, causing significant morbidity. There is evidence that increased muscle strength reduces musculoskeletal injury risk and that handgrip strength is a predictor of general muscle strength. Aims To investigate whether isometric handgrip strength (IHGS) is a predictor of increased musculoskeletal injury risk in automotive assembly workers. We measured IHGS in a cross-sectional survey of final assembly line workers in an automotive manufacturing plant. Weak handgrip was defined as two standard deviations below the normative mean value for age and gender. Self-reported musculoskeletal injury/accident data and recent musculoskeletal symptoms were recorded using a modified Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. Of 445 final assembly line workers, 206 (46%) participated. Sixty participants (29%) reported a musculoskeletal injury/accident at work in the preceding 5 years. Mean IHGS in this population was lower than international normative values. Odds ratios for self-reported injury (adjusted for gender and rec