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Sample records for mustela vison fed

  1. Cranial helminths of Mustela vison Schreber, 1777 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Miquel, J; Mañas, S; Asensio, V; Eira, C; Palazón, S

    2006-04-30

    A survey was carried out to investigate the presence of cranial helminths in 337 American minks (Mustela vison) from Spain. This information was obtained partly in order to evaluate potential conservation problems and sanitary risks to the congeneric European mink (Mustela lutreola), one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. Skulls and rectal faeces of each specimen were simultaneously analysed. Troglotrema acutum and Skrjabingylus nasicola were found in 5.6% of the M. vison analysed. No cranial lesions were seen in any of the examined skulls. The finding of both helminths in Spanish free-living M. vison specimens enlarges their natural definitive host spectrum in Western Europe. One relatively important focus of T. acutum in M. vison was detected (30.4%) in the Spanish Alava province while S. nasicola was found to be very infrequent. The suitability of both analytical methods was assessed in order to know to what degree coprological analysis reflects the real prevalence of cranial helminths in this host. It is possible to conclude that coprological analysis can be used instead of necropsies to analyse the possible incidence of pathogenic cranial helminths in mustelids. This aspect is very important and useful when trying to analyse the helminthological status of endangered species such as the native mink (M. lutreola) particularly in areas where both congeneric species are present and strict competition occurs.

  2. The development of homeothermy in mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Harjunpää, Sanna; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti

    2004-02-01

    In mink (Mustela vison) kits newborn mortality is very high. One of the major causes of death is hypothermia. The objectives of this study were to observe the development of thermoregulation in mink kits, and their ability to maintain their body temperature during the postnatal period (1-50 days of age). Based on the kit's body weight (BW), and rectal and ambient temperature measurements during cold (+4 degrees C) and warm (+40 degrees C) exposures, a homeothermy index (HI) and cooling and warming rates were calculated. No significant differences in the body temperatures were found between the kits and the dam after 36 days of age. The kits were able to maintain homeothermy by 22 days of age (HI 90%). The body cooling rate was 0.88+/-0.04 degrees C min(-1) on day 1 but only 0.35+/-0.03 degrees C min(-1) at 22 days of age. The body WR was lower: day 1, 0.85+/-0.04 degrees C min(-1) and 0.22+/-0.03 degrees C min(-1) at 22 days of age. All measured and calculated thermophysiological variables were significantly influenced by BW and age of the kit.

  3. Incidence of Mink, Mustela vison, and River Otter, Lutra canadensis, in a Highly Urbanized Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Mink (Mustela vison) frequently inhabited or traversed a residential, business, and industrial part of the Twin Cities, Minnesota, with little water or natural vegetation. At least one River Otter (Lutra canadensis) also resided on a small pond on a golf course in the area for several winter months.

  4. Prevalence of giant kidney worm (Dioctophyma renale) in wild mink (Mustela vison) in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Tracy, Shawn P.

    2001-01-01

    Of 138 wild mink (Mustela vison) from eastern Minnesota, 27% contained Dioctophyma renale, primarily in the right kidney. No significant difference between prevalence in adult male and immature male mink was found, nor between the prevalence in males versus female mink. Thirteen worms were found in one male mink, representing the highest documented infection intensity of a single wild mink.

  5. Selective predation by mink, Mustela vison, on waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Swanson, G.A.; Doty, H.A.

    1973-01-01

    Predation by mink (Mustela vison) on three types of ducks (captive, pen-reared-released and wild) was documented in two studies at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown, North Dakota. In the first study, 36 of 60 flightless adult and juvenile ducks held on eight 0.1-acre experimental ponds disappeared between 10 July and 4 August 1969. Available evidence indicated that all were killed by a large adult mink. The mink selected recently released incubator-hatched ducklings, females in the process of incubating, and adults and juveniles on a marginal food supply.In the second study, 152 wood duck ducklings (Aix sponsa) were released on a 76-acre marsh during 1971. Half of the ducklings, when 24 to 27 days old, were placed at weekly intervals in four floating pens and allowed to escape after 4 days. Each time birds were placed in the floating pens, a comparable group was placed in a predator-proof shoreline pen. Birds in the shoreline pen escaped as they learned to fly when approximately 60 days old. The shoreline of the marsh was periodically searched, and the remains of 21 (28%) of the floating-pen birds were identified in food remains found at 16 mink dens. No remains of birds from the shoreline pen were found at the dens. Coots (Fulica americana) were also taken commonly. Wild ducklings appeared to have been almost totally consumed, but the legs and feet of the wood ducks were often left uneaten because of bands and tags.

  6. Hyperthermia and increased physical activity in the fasting American mink Mustela Vison.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykönen, Teija; Aho, Jari; Nieminen, Petteri

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the thermoregulatory adaptations to fasting in a medium-sized mustelid with a high metabolic rate and energetic requirements. Sixteen farm-bred female American minks, Mustela vison, were divided into a fed control group and an experimental group fasted for 5 days. The deep body temperature (T(b)) of the minks was registered at 10 min intervals with intraabdominal thermosensitive loggers and the locomotor activity was videotaped continuously for 5 days during the fasting procedure. The T(b) of the fasted animals increased during the first day of fasting and decreased during the second day. After 3-4 days of fasting, the levels of physical activity and T(b) of the fasted minks increased above the levels of the fed animals. Significant increases in these parameters were observed at the beginning of the working day on the farm, during the feeding of the fed animals and around midnight. It is concluded that the mink differs from previously studied homeotherms in thermoregulatory and behavioral responses to fasting probably due to its high energy requirements and predatory success. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Chronic oral exposure to bunker C fuel oil causes adrenal insufficiency in ranch mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2008-02-01

    Animals living in the near-shore marine environment are predisposed to contact with chemical contaminants through land- and ocean-based activities. The release of petroleum hydrocarbons into the marine environment is a stressor to this environment and its resident wildlife. The stress response to chemical threats is dependent on an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which also may be a target to the effects of these chemicals. Ranch mink (Mustela vison) were used as surrogates for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) to examine the development of adrenal hypertrophy after chronic, oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil. Animals were fed three different concentrations of fuel oil (48, 520, and 908 ppm) or mineral oil (control) for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, blood and fecal samples were collected and organs were weighed and examined microscopically. In all fuel oil groups, exposure resulted in adrenal hypertrophy, an adaptation suggestive of adrenal activation. However, concentrations of serum and fecal glucocorticoids and serum progesterone were not elevated over control values. Hematologic parameters and serum chemistries showed no changes consistent with increased adrenal activity. In addition, adrenal glands from animals fed the higher concentrations of fuel oil contained large numbers of heavily vacuolated cells. We conclude that petroleum hydrocarbons are inducing an adrenal insufficiency that leads to the adaptive enlargement of the gland. This would increase the susceptibility of fuel oil-exposed animals to the deleterious effects of other environmental stressors.

  8. Mustela or Vison? Evidence for the taxonomic status of the American mink and a distinct biogeographic radiation of American weasels.

    PubMed

    Harding, Larisa E; Smith, Felisa A

    2009-09-01

    The American mink's relationship to the weasels in Mustela has been uncertain. Karyological, morphological, and phylogenetic comparisons to Eurasian Mustela support placing the mink outside the genus as Neovison vison. However, genetic comparisons that incorporate other endemic American Mustela suggest the interpretation of N. vison's position to Mustela has been handicapped by biased geographic sampling. Here, we analyzed mitochondrial cytochrome-b from all weasels endemic to the Americas, including two poorly known South American species (M. felipei, M. africana), weasels native to North America (M. vison, M. frenata, M. nigripes), Mustela migrant to North America (M. erminea, M. nivalis), palearctic Mustela, and other American members of Mustelidae. Bayesian and likelihood inference methods were used to construct a phylogeny of Mustela, and relaxed Bayesian phylogenetic techniques estimated ages of divergence within the genus using priors calibrated by fossil ages. Our analyses show that the American mink and the smaller Mustela endemic to the Americas represent a distinct phylogenetic heritage apart from their Eurasian cousins, and biogeographic barriers like the Bering and Panamanian land bridges have influenced the evolutionary history of Mustela in the Americas.

  9. First report of Cryptosporidium parvum 'ferret' genotype in American mink (Mustela vison Shreber 1777).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, H; Méndez-Hermida, F; Ares-Mazás, E

    2007-03-01

    A total of 51 faecal samples from wild and farmed mink were analysed by a direct immunofluorescence antibody test. Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified in eight, apparently healthy, farmed American mink (Mustela vison). The isolates were identified as Cryptosporidium parvum 'ferret' genotype by PCR-RFLP and sequencing analysis of a 341-base-pair fragment of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium in American mink.

  10. Spatial and temporal differences in giant kidney worm, dictophyma renale, prevalence in Minnesota Mink, Mustela vison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Examination of 110 Mink (Mustela vison) carcasses from 1998 through 2007 indicated that the giant kidney worm, Dioctophyma renale, occurred in Pine and Kanabec Counties of eastern Minnesota with annual prevalences of 0-92%. Worm prevalence increased from 20% in 1999 to 92% in 2001 and decreased to 6% in 2005. During 2000 to 2007, no worms were found in Mink from Anoka and Chisago Counties (n = 54), and in 2000, none in 107 Mink from LeSeur, Freeborn, Redwood, Brown and Watonwan Counties. Changes in kidney worm prevalence were positively related to trapping success, considered an index of Mink density.

  11. [Population aspects of sexual dimorphism in guild of the Mustelidae: Mustela lutreola, Neovison vison, Mustela putorius, Martes martes as an example].

    PubMed

    Korablev, M P; Korablev, N P; Korablev, P N

    2013-01-01

    Size sexual dimorphism was investigated on 695 skulls of four Mustelidae species. By extent of increasing of differences between sexes the species are placed in following order: European pine marten (Martes martes), European mink (Mustela lutreola), American mink (Neovison vison), and European polecat (Mustela putorius). Extent of the dimorphism characterizes ecological plasticity of the species and is population characteristic. It is shown that M. martes takes specific and relatively narrow ecological niche of forest ecosystems, entering into weak competitive relationships with smaller Mustelidae species. The level of sexual dimorphism of M. lutreola, N. vison and M. putorius reflects intensity of its interspecific relationships within study area. High level of sexual dimorphism of M. putorius is determined by further divergence of ecological niches of males and females, and also appears to be compensatory mechanism reducing consequences of hardened environmental requirements.

  12. Immunocytological analysis of meiotic recombination in the American mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Borodin, P M; Basheva, E A; Zhelezova, A I

    2009-04-01

    Using immunolocalization of MLH1, a mismatch repair protein that marks crossover sites along synaptonemal complexes, we estimated the total length of the genetic map, the recombination rate and crossover distribution in the American mink (Mustela vison). We prepared spreads from 130 spermatocytes of five male minks and mapped 3320 MLH1 foci along 1820 bivalents. The total recombination length of the male mink genome, based on the mean number of MLH1 foci for all chromosomes, was 1327 cM. The overall recombination rate was estimated to be 0.48 cM/Mb. In all bivalents, we observed prominent peaks of MLH1 foci near the distal ends and a paucity of them near the centromeres. This indicates that genes located at proximal regions of the chromosomes should display much tighter genetic linkage than physically equidistant markers located near the telomeres.

  13. The central localization of the vagus nerve in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and the mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Ranson, R N; Butler, P J; Taylor, E W

    1993-05-01

    The location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) has been determined in nine ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and seven mink (M. vison) using neuronal tract-tracing techniques employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and wheat-germ agglutinin conjugated HRP (WGA-HRP) mixtures injected into the nodose ganglion of the vagus nerve. Labelled VPN were located ipsilaterally in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DmnX), nucleus ambiguus (nA), and reticular formation (rf) of the medulla oblongata. In four of the ferrets, labelled VPN were also identified in the nucleus dorsomedialis (ndm) and the nucleus of the spinal accessory nerve (nspa). In a single mink a few labelled cells were observed in the ndm but no labelled VPN were found in the nspa. Labelling of afferent components of the vagus nerve was seen in two ferrets and two mink with the best labelling obtained following an injection of an HRP/WGA-HRP mixture into the nodose ganglion. Labelled afferents were observed to cross the ipsilateral spinal trigeminal tract (SpV) before entering the tractus solitarius (TS) in regions separate from the motor axons which exit the medulla in separate fasicles. Sensory terminal fields were identified bilaterally in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (nTS) in both species and bilaterally in the area postrema (ap) of the ferret; however, the contralateral labelling was sparse in comparison to the densely labelled ipsilateral nTS/ap. Maximal terminal labelling was seen in regions just rostral and caudal to obex in both species.

  14. Phytoestrogens alter the reproductive organ development in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoekkynen, Ari . E-mail: ryokkyne@cc.joensuu.fi; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykoenen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Haenninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Kukkonen, Jussi V.K.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reproductive effects of two perorally applied phytoestrogens, genistein (8 mg/kg/day) and {beta}-sitosterol (50 mg/kg/day), on the mink (Mustela vison) at human dietary exposure levels. Parental generations were exposed over 9 months to these phytoestrogens and their offspring were exposed via gestation and lactation. Parents and their offspring were sampled 21 days after the birth of the kits. Sex hormone levels, sperm quality, organ weights, and development of the kits were examined. The exposed females were heavier than the control females at the 1st postnatal day (PND). The control kits were heavier than the exposed kits from the 1st to the 21st PND. Phytoestrogens did not affect the organ weights of the adult minks, but the relative testicular weight of the exposed kits was higher than in the control kits. The relative prostate weight was higher and the relative uterine weight lower in the {beta}-sitosterol-exposed kits than in the control kits. Moreover, the plasma dihydrotestosterone levels were lower in the genistein-exposed male kits compared to the control male kits. This study could not explain the mechanisms behind these alterations. The results indicate that perinatal phytoestrogen exposures cause alterations in the weight of the reproductive organs of the mink kits.

  15. Biliary parasite Pseudamphistomum truncatum (Opistorchiidae) in American mink (Mustela vison) and Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Conall J; Caffrey, Joe M; Stuart, Peter; Lawton, Colin

    2010-09-01

    Native Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) and introduced American mink (Mustela vison) carcasses collected throughout Ireland were screened for biliary parasites. Secondary intermediate hosts, Cyprinid fish, were also examined for Opistorchiid metacercariae. Twenty-nine mink and 24 otter gall bladders were screened for biliary parasites. A single mink and three otters were found to be infected with the digenetic trematode Pseudamphistomum truncatum. Eighty-nine percent of roach (Rutilus rutilus) from the River Shannon were infected with P. truncatum metacercariae, confirming the persistence of the parasite. This is the first record of the species in Ireland, and its recent introduction is probably related to the movement and release of Cyprinid fishes by anglers.

  16. Nursing sickness in lactating mink (Mustela vison). I. Epidemiological and pathological observations.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, T N; Olesen, C R; Hansen, O; Wamberg, S

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective survey, the epidemiological characteristics of nursing sickness in Standard Black and Pastel mink (Mustela vison) were examined in a Danish fur research farm. Based on the clinical diagnosis of the disease, the overall morbidity in a total of 1774 lactating females amounted to 14.4% and the case fatality rate to 7.8%. Apparently healthy females weaned an average of 5.0 kits per litter, while dams suffering from nursing sickness raised and weaned an average of 5.4 kits per litter (p less than 0.01). Based on logistic regression analysis, the increasing age of the lactating dam, followed by littersize and female weight loss, appeared to be major determinants for the development of nursing sickness. The impact of additional covariates such as litter weight gain and female color type were remarkably low. At weaning (day 43) the mean individual live weight of the kits of either sex did not differ between healthy and sick dams. In Standard Black, the total biomass of the offspring raised by sick dams was significantly larger than that of the healthy controls (p less than 0.01). During the final two weeks of lactation, apparently healthy dams lost on average 14% of their body mass, whereas those affected by nursing sickness had a mean weight loss of about 31% (p less than 0.001). Postmortem examination of 25 dams with severe nursing sickness verified the clinical findings of progressive dehydration and emaciation. The gastrointestinal tract was empty and gastric ulcers and melaena were frequently present. Other common findings included small livers,enlarged adrenals and pitted kidneys.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1591661

  17. Assessing effects of PCB exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance in Portland Harbor.

    PubMed

    Luxon, Matt; Toll, John; Hanson, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an integrated analysis using a Monte Carlo exposure model, dose–response effects model and habitat,and population dynamics models, all of which allow us to quantitatively estimate the effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site (Site), and the associated uncertainties. The Site extends from river mile 1.9 of the Lower Willamette River, near its confluence with the Columbia River, to river mile 11.8, just downstream of downtown Portland, Oregon. The potential effects of PCBs on the American mink population were evaluated in the Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) due to the historical presence of mink in the are a and because mink are known to be highly sensitive to the effects of PCBs. Hazard quotients (HQs) calculated in the BERA indicated that PCB concentrations measured in Portland Harbor fish were above levels known to cause reproductive effects in mink. Further analysis was needed to evaluate the potential magnitude of effects on the Site mink population. The integrated analysis presented herein demonstrates that if an effect of PCB exposure is a less than 30% reduction in kit production, then PCB remediation is not expected to have any effect on mink abundance. This is a Site‐specific conclusion that depends on the quality, abundance, and distribution of mink habitat in Portland Harbor. The PCB dose associated with a 30% reduction in kit production was calculated as 101 mg/kg bw/d (90% CI ¼ 69–146 mg/kg bw/d). The mink PCB dose estimates from the Portland Harbor BERA indicate that if mink are present, their baseline exposure levels probably exceed 101 mg/kg bw/d. Therefore, some level of reduction in PCB exposure could be beneficial to the species if the study area provides sufficient habitat to support a mink population. This analysis demonstrates that risk analysis for population‐level assessment endpoints benefits from analyses

  18. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the Housatonic River, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA: Effects on reproduction, kit growth, and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursian, S.J.; Sharma, C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Yamini, B.; Mitchell, R.R.; Orazio, C.E.; Moore, D.R.J.; Svirsky, S.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding farm-raised mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the Housatonic River (HR; Berkshire County, MA, USA) on adult reproductive performance and kit growth and survival. Diets contained 0.22-3.54% HR fish, providing 0.34-3.7 ??g total PCBs (TPCB)/g feed wet wt (3.5-68.5 pg toxic equivalence [TEQ]/g). Female mink were fed diets before breeding through weaning of kits. Twelve kits from each treatment were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 180 d. Dietary PCBs had no effect on the number of offspring produced, gestation period, or other measures of adult reproductive performance. Mink kits exposed to 3.7 ??g TPCB/g feed (68.5 pg TEQ/g) in utero and during lactation had reduced survivability between three and six weeks of age. The lethal concentrations to 10 and 20% of the population (LC10 and LC20, respectively) were estimated to be 0.231 and 0.984 ??g TPCB/g feed, respectively. Because inclusion of PCB-contaminated fish that composed approximately 1% of the diet would reduce mink kit survival by 20% or more, it is likely that consumption of up to 30-fold that quantity of HR fish, as could be expected for wild mink, would have an adverse effect on wild mink populations. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  19. Fuel oil-induced adrenal hypertrophy in ranch mink (Mustela vison): effects of sex, fuel oil weathering, and response to adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2010-01-01

    Environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources can be a cause of stress for free-ranging wildlife. The response of wildlife to chemical contaminants requires that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis be precisely regulated to allow for proper glucocorticoid-mediated adaptive responses. Chronic oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil causes the development of adrenal hypertrophy in male ranch mink (Mustela vison) without increasing serum or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. This hypertrophy is an adaptive response to fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To determine if the same phenomenon occurs in female mink or male mink exposed to artificially weathered fuel oil, female mink were fed 0 ppm (mineral oil) or 420 ppm fuel oil and male mink were exposed to 0 ppm, 420 ppm fuel oil, or 480 ppm artificially weathered fuel oil in the diet for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, serum glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed along with body and organ weight measurements. Fecal glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed at time points throughout the exposure. Male mink fed fuel oil or weathered fuel oil and female mink fed fuel oil had adrenal enlargement without any significant increases in the serum or fecal concentration of glucocorticoids, which is consistent with fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To address the physiological consequences of adrenal insufficiency, fuel oil-exposed male mink were administered an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Fuel oil-exposed animals had a smaller incremental increase in serum glucocorticoid concentration after ACTH challenge compared to control animals. Our findings provide further evidence that the HPA axis of fuel oil-exposed animals is compromised and, therefore, not able to respond appropriately to the diverse stressors found in the environment.

  20. Incidence of mink, Mustela vison, and river otter, Lutra canadensis, in a highly urbanized area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2003-01-01

    Mink (Musela vison ) frequently inhabited or traversed a residential, business, and industrial part of the Twin Cities, Minnesota, with little water or natural vegetation. At least one River Otter (Lutra canadensis ) also resided on a small pond on a golf course in the area for several winter months.

  1. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODY TO ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS IN EUROPEAN MINK (MUSTELA LUTREOLA) AND AMERICAN MINK (NEOVISON VISON) IN SPAIN.

    PubMed

    Mañas, Sisco; Gómez, Asunción; Asensio, Victoria; Palazón, Santiago; Podra, Madis; Alarcia, Olga Esther; Ruiz-Olmo, Jordi; Casal, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The European mink (Mustela lutreola) has undergone a dramatic decline and is one of the most endangered mammals in the world. The invasive American mink (Neovison vison) is considered the main factor for this decline. However, the American mink's introduction and the subsequent ecological concurrence of the two species cannot solely explain the decline or disappearance of the European mink. Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is the main health problem in fur farming worldwide, causing varied clinical syndromes that depend on the viral strain and host factors. Infection with AMDV has been speculated to contribute to the decline of the European mink, but a detailed study has not been performed. To assess the potential effects of AMDV infection on the conservation of the European mink, we surveyed AMDV antibody in samples from 492 native European mink and 1,735 feral American mink collected over 16 yr. The antibody prevalence in European mink was 32%. There were no statistically significant differences in antibody prevalence between sexes, among years, or among weight classes. For recaptured European mink, incidence of seroconversion (negative to positive) was 0.46 cases per animal-year at risk. For positive animals, the incidence of conversion from positive to negative was 0.18 cases per animal-year at risk. In 1,735 feral American minks, the overall prevalence was 32.4% and varied among the six wild populations studied. Infection with AMDV appears to be endemic, distributed across the entire ranges of both species, and no effects on the population dynamics of either species were observed.

  2. Mercury concentrations in wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lontra canadensis) collected from eastern and Atlantic Canada: relationship to age and parasitism.

    PubMed

    Klenavic, Katherine; Champoux, Louise; Mike, O'Brien; Daoust, Pierre-Y; Evans, R Douglas; Evans, Hayla E

    2008-11-01

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were measured in the fur, brain and liver of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lontra canadensis) collected from eastern and Atlantic Canada. Total Hg concentrations in fur were strongly correlated with levels in the brain and liver. There was no difference in tissue concentrations between male and female mink; however, female otters had significantly higher fur, brain and liver Hg levels than males. Similarly, there was not a significant relationship between Hg concentration and age of mink, whereas in otters, Hg concentrations in all three tissues decreased significantly with age. In both species, only a very small percentage of the variability in Hg concentration was explained by age. After adjusting the data for site-to-site differences in Hg levels, Hg concentrations in the fur of mink infected by the parasite, Dioctophyma renale, were found to be significantly higher than Hg levels in uninfected mink.

  3. Metabolism of dietary cetoleic acid (22:1n-11) in mink (Mustela vison) and gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) studied using radiolabeled fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Margaret H; Iverson, Sara J; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti

    2006-01-01

    Cetoleic acid (22:1n-11) is a good indicator of diet in marine predators and has proven to be an important fatty acid (FA) when using adipose tissue FA composition to study diet in marine mammals and seabirds. Feeding studies have shown that 22:1 isomers are predictably underrepresented in adipose tissue relative to diet, implying that metabolism within the predator strongly influences the relationship between the level of these FAs in diet and adipose tissue. Fully understanding such metabolic processes for individual FAs is important for the quantitative estimation of predator diets. We employed a dual-label radioisotope tracer technique to investigate the potential modification of 22:1n-11 and its recovery in the blubber of gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) and in the adipose tissue and liver of mink (Mustela vison), a smaller model carnivore also accustomed to fish-based diets. In both seals and mink, (3)H radioactivity was found in the chain-shortened products of 22:1n-11, with 18:1 being the dominant product. We also found (3)H radioactivity in saturated FAs. The distribution patterns of (3)H radioactivity across the FAs isolated from seal blubber and mink subcutaneous adipose tissue were comparable, indicating that mink are a good model for the investigation of lipid metabolism in marine carnivores.

  4. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the Housatonic River, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA: Effects on organ weights and histology and hepatic concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursian, Steven J.; Sharma, Chanda; Aulerich, Richard J.; Yamini, Behzad; Mitchell, Rachel R.; Beckett, Kerrie J.; Orazio, Carl E.; Moore, Dwayne; Svirsky, Susan; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of feeding ranch mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish (88 gold fish [Carassius auratus] weighing a total of 70.3 kg and 16 carp [Cyprinus carpio] weighing a total of 77.3 kg) collected from the Housatonic River (HR; Berkshire County, MA, USA) in October 1999 on organ weights and histology and hepatic concentrations of total PCBs (ΣPCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalence (TEQ) were evaluated. Diets contained 0.22 to 3.54% HR fish, which provided 0.34 to 3.7 μg ΣPCBs/g feed (3.5-69 pg TEQ/g feed). Female mink were fed the diets eight weeks before breeding through weaning of kits at six weeks of age. Offspring were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 180 d. The dietary concentration of PCBs that caused a decrease in kit survival (3.7 μg ΣPCBs/g feed [69 pg TEQ/g]) resulted in a maternal hepatic concentration of 3.1 μg ΣPCBs/g wet weight (218 pg TEQ/g). Organ weights were not consistently affected. Mandibular and maxillary squamous cell proliferation was apparent in 31-week-old juveniles exposed to as low as 0.96 (xg ΣPCBs/g feed (9.2 pg TEQ/g). Juveniles in this treatment group had a liver concentration of 1.7 μg ΣPCBs/g wet weight (40 pg TEQ/g). Because inclusion of PCB-contaminated fish, which comprised approximately 1% of the diet, resulted in mandibular and maxillary squamous cell proliferation, it is possible that consumption of up to 30-fold that quantity of HR fish, as could be expected for wild mink, would result in more severe lesions characterized by loss of teeth, thus impacting survivability.

  5. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the Housatonic River, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA: Effects on organ weights and histology and hepatic concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursian, S.J.; Sharma, C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Yamini, B.; Mitchell, R.R.; Beckett, K.J.; Orazio, C.E.; Moore, D.; Svirsky, S.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of feeding ranch mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish (88 gold fish [Carassius auratus] weighing a total of 70.3 kg and 16 carp [Cyprinus carpio] weighing a total of 77.3 kg) collected from the Housatonic River (HR; Berkshire County, MA, USA) in October 1999 on organ weights and histology and hepatic concentrations of total PCBs (??PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalence (TEQ) were evaluated. Diets contained 0.22 to 3.54% HR fish, which provided 0.34 to 3.7 ??g ??PCBs/g feed (3.5-69 pg TEQ/g feed). Female mink were fed the diets eight weeks before breeding through weaning of kits at six weeks of age. Offspring were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 180 d. The dietary concentration of PCBs that caused a decrease in kit survival (3.7 ??g ??PCBs/g feed [69 pg TEQ/g]) resulted in a maternal hepatic concentration of 3.1 ??g ??PCBs/g wet weight (218 pg TEQ/g). Organ weights were not consistently affected. Mandibular and maxillary squamous cell proliferation was apparent in 31-week-old juveniles exposed to as low as 0.96 ??g ??PCBs/g feed (9.2 pg TEQ/g). Juveniles in this treatment group had a liver concentration of 1.7 ??g ??PCBs/g wet weight (40 pg TEQ/g). Because inclusion of PCB-contaminated fish, which comprised approximately 1% of the diet, resulted in mandibular and maxillary squamous cell proliferation, it is possible that consumption of up to 30-fold that quantity of HR fish, as could be expected for wild mink, would result in more severe lesions characterized by loss of teeth, thus impacting survivability. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  6. Accumulation of mercury and selenium in the brain of river otters (Lontra canadensis) and wild mink (Mustela vison) from Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Haines, Kevin J R; Evans, R Douglas; O'Brien, Michael; Evans, Hayla E

    2010-01-01

    Total Hg, methyl-Hg (MeHg) and Se levels were measured in the brain of river otters (Lontra canadensis) and wild mink (Mustela vison) carcasses collected from Nova Scotia, Canada. Total Hg concentrations in the otters' brain were highly variable, ranging from 0.3 to 18.0 microg/g dw and were significantly higher in animals caught from inland areas of the province versus coastal animals. Similarly, inland otters contained significantly more MeHg in the brain than did coastal otters. MeHg was highly correlated with total Hg in both inland and coastal otters and represented on average approximately 82% of the total Hg. Selenium concentrations in the otter brain ranged from 1.0 to 7.8 microg/g dw but unlike Hg, there was no significant difference in Se levels between inland and coastal otters. There was a significant positive relationship between Se and total Hg concentrations in the otters with the molar ratio of Se:Hg approximately 1:1 for animals having an Hg concentration>18 nmol/g dw. The non-random sampling protocol for the mink precluded extensive statistical analysis of the data. However, unlike otters, virtually all (i.e. 98%) of the total Hg in mink brain was present as MeHg in both inland and coastal mink. Also unlike the otter results, Se concentrations showed no relationship with either total or MeHg in both inland and coastal mink. The data suggest that mink and otters may have different mechanisms for managing high levels of Hg in the brain.

  7. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in livers of American mink (Mustela vison) and river otter (Lutra canadensis) from the Columbia and Fraser River Basins, 1990-1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.E.; Henny, Charles J.; Harris, M.L.; Wilson, L.K.; Norstrom, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in aquatic mustelid species on the Fraser and Columbia Rivers of northwestern North America. Carcasses of river otter (Lutra canadensis) (N=24) and mink (Mustela vison) (N=34) were obtained from commercial trappers during the winters of 1990-91 and 1991a??92. Pooled liver samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), including non-ortho congeners, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Most samples contained detectable concentrations of DDE, PCBs, although there was substantial variability in patterns and trends among neighboring samples. Concentrations of DDE were in some mink and several otter samples from the lower Columbia River elevated (to 4700 g/kg wet weight); excluding one mink sample from the Wenatchee area, mean DDE levels generally decreased between 1978a??79 and 1990a??92. PCBs were present in all samples. PCB concentrations in otter livers collected from the lower Columbia were ten-fold lower than measured a decade previously; nevertheless, a sample taken near Portland had a mean concentration of 1500 g/kg, within a range of concentrations associated with reproductive effects in captive mink. Concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and TCDF were generally below detection limits, except for one otter collected near a pulp mill at Castlegar, on the upper Columbia, with 11 ng TCDD/kg in liver. Elevated concentrations of higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs, probably resulting from use of chlorophenolic wood preservatives, were found in both species; one otter sample from the lower Columbia had 2200 ng OCDD/kg. International TCDD toxic equivalent levels in mink (31 ng/kg) and otter (93 ng/kg) from the lower Columbia River approached toxicity thresholds for effects on reproduction in ranch mink.

  8. Endogenous zinc excretion in relation to various levels of dietary zinc intake in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Mejborn, H. )

    1990-08-01

    Endogenous zinc excretion was studied in adult male mink fed experimental diets for 73 d, including a collection period from d 69 to 73. Dietary zinc levels were 2.8, 26 or 121 mg/kg wet weight. In accordance with the results of a methodological study, also reported here, the animals had an intramuscular injection of 65ZnCl2 12 d before the start of the collection period. Total fecal (endogenous + unabsorbed) zinc excretion for d 69-73 in the three groups was 2.3, 20.4 and 91.0 mg. The endogenous zinc excretion was 1.3, 2.0 and 6.4 mg, corresponding to 80.8, 10.6 and 6.4% of the zinc intake. Thus, the endogenous excretion was mainly important for the zinc homeostasis at low zinc intake, whereas at high intake the homeostasis was regulated via absorption from the digestive tract. The overall conclusion of the experiment was that mink are comparable to other species (including man) in regard to mechanisms controlling zinc homeostasis.

  9. First report of Cryptosporidium canis in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and identification of several novel subtype families for Cryptosporidium mink genotype in minks (Mustela vison) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siwen; Tao, Wei; Liu, Chengwu; Jiang, Yanxue; Wan, Qiang; Li, Qiao; Yang, Hang; Lin, Yongchao; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Despite the rapid and extensive advances in molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in humans and a variety of animals, the prevalence and genetic traits of the parasite in wildlife bred in captivity and the role of the neglected hosts in zoonotic transmission of human cryptosporidiosis are rarely understood. This study investigated the prevalence, species/genotype, and subtype of Cryptosporidium in farmed fur animals in China and assessed the possibility of zoonotic transmission. Three of 191 (1.6%) foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 17 of 162 (10.5%) raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), and 48 of 162 (29.6%) minks (Mustela vison) were positive for Cryptosporidium by nested PCRs targeting the small subunit rRNA gene. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of only Cryptosporidium canis in foxes and raccoon dogs. There is no significant difference in prevalence between young and adult foxes (or raccoon dogs). Three Cryptosporidium species or genotype including C. canis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, and mink genotype were determined in minks aged five to six months. Subtyping based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence polymorphisms of the 60kDa glycoprotein facilitated identification of three novel subtype families named as Xb to Xd for Cryptosporidium mink genotype. The presence of zoonotic C. canis, C. meleagridis, and Cryptosporidium mink genotype in captive-bred fur animals is of public health concerns. The findings expanded the host ranges of C. canis and C. meleagridis and confirmed genetic diversity at the subtype level in Cryptosporidium mink genotype. This is the first study reporting Cryptosporidium infections in foxes and raccoon dogs in China.

  10. Effects of different sources and levels of copper on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and elemental balance in young female mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuezhuang; Zhang, Tietao; Liu, Zhi; Zheng, Junjun; Guo, Jungang; Yang, Fuhe; Gao, Xiuhua

    2014-08-01

    An experiment was conducted in a 3 × 3 + 1 factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design to evaluate the effects of different sources of copper on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and elemental balance in young female mink on a corn-fishmeal-based diet. Animals in the control group were fed a basal diet (containing 8.05 mg Cu/kg DM; control), which mainly consisted of corn, fish meal, meat bone meal, and soybean oil, with no copper supplementation. Minks in other nine treatments were fed basal diets supplemented with Cu from reagent-grade copper sulfate, tribasic copper chloride (TBCC) and copper methionate. Cu concentrations of experiment diets were 10, 25, and 40 mg/kg copper. A metabolism trial of 4 days was conducted during the last week of experimental feeding. Final body weight and average daily gain increased (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05) as Cu increased in the diet; maximal growth was seen in the Cu25 group. Cu supplementation slightly improved the feed conversion rate (P = 0.095). Apparent fat digestibility was increased by copper level (P = 0.020). Retention nitrogen was increased by copper level (linear, P = 0.003). Copper source had a significant effect on copper retention with Cu-Met and copper sulfate treatments retention more than TBCC treatments (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that mink can efficiently utilize added dietary fat and that Cu plays an important role in the digestion of dietary fat in mink, and mink can efficiently utilize Cu-Met and CuSO4.

  11. Effects of lactic acid fermentation and gamma irradiation of barley on antinutrient contents and nutrient digestibility in mink (Mustela vison) with and without dietary enzyme supplement.

    PubMed

    Skrede, Anders; Sahlstrøm, Stefan; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Connor, Kirsti Hjelme; Skrede, Grete

    2007-06-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the effects of fermentation of barley, using two different strains of lactic acid bacteria, a Lactobacillus plantarum/pentosus strain isolated from spontaneously fermented rye sourdough (AD2) and a starch-degrading Lactobacillus plantarum (AM4), on contents of mixed-linked (1 --> 3) (1 --> 4)-beta-glucans, alpha-amylase inhibitor activity, inositol phosphates, and apparent digestibility of macronutrients in mink. Effects of fermentation were compared with effects of gamma irradiation (gamma-irradiation: 60Co gamma-rays at 25 kGy). The diets were fed to mink with and without a supplementary enzyme preparation. Both lactic acid fermentation and gamma-irradiation followed by soaking and incubation, reduced concentrations of soluble beta-glucans, phytate and alpha-amylase inhibitor activity. Dietary enzyme supplementation increased significantly digestibility of crude protein, fat, starch and crude carbohydrate (CHO). Fermentation of the barley increased digestibility of starch and CHO. Fermentation with lactic acid bacteria AD2 resulted in higher starch and CHO digestibility than strain AM4, and had greater effect than gamma-irradiation, soaking and incubation. The highest digestibility of starch and CHO was obtained after AD2 fermentation followed by enzyme supplementation. It is concluded that both lactic acid fermentation of barley and enzyme supplementation have positive nutritional implications in the mink by limiting the effects of antinutrients and improving digestibility and energy utilization.

  12. Skeleton of Extinct North American Sea Mink ( Mustela macrodon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Spiess, Arthur E.; Sobolik, Kristin D.

    2000-03-01

    Mustela macrodon (extinct sea mink) is known only from prehistoric and historic Native American shell middens dating less than 5100 years old along coastal islands of the Gulf of Maine, northeastern North America. The species is distinct from all known extant subspecies of M. vison (American mink) but still belongs to the North American subgenus Vison. Metric comparisons between M. macrodon and five subspecies of M. vison, using skull, mandible, humerus, radius, femur, and tibia skeletal elements, show that M. macrodon is larger in overall size and robustness and is proportionately larger in the dental region. Many habitat-related parallels exist between coastal island mink of the Gulf of Maine and those of the Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska, where the overall largest living subspecies of mink is found (M. v. nesolestes).

  13. Dermatophytosis in farmed mink (Mustela vison) caused by Trichophyton equinum.

    PubMed

    Overy, David P; Marron-Lopez, Fany; Muckle, Anne; Bourque, Andrea; Lund, Lorraine; MacHattie, David; Lopez, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    This report details 2 outbreaks of dermatophytosis in 2 different mink ranches. On the first farm, only kits were affected, while on the second farm, small numbers of adults were infected. Affected mink were otherwise clinically healthy and in good body condition. Three animals were euthanized and submitted for autopsy. Grossly, mink exhibited locally extensive to coalescing areas of crusting alopecia but no other significant gross lesions in internal organs. Microscopically, skin lesions were characterized by chronic hyperplastic dermatitis with folliculitis, furunculosis, occasional intracorneal pustules, and large numbers of intrafollicular fungal arthrospores and hyphae. The dermatophyte was cultured and identified as Trichophyton equinum based on molecular barcoding of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA gene. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. The first linkage map of the American mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Anistoroaei, R; Menzorov, A; Serov, O; Farid, A; Christensen, K

    2007-08-01

    Described herein, the first microsatellite linkage map for the American mink consists of 85 microsatellite markers resolved into 17 linkage groups. The map was constructed using 92 F(1) progeny from five sire families created by crossing mink with different colour types. The linkage groups ranged from 0 to 137 cM. These linkage groups were assigned to 12 of the 14 mink autosomes using a somatic cell hybrid panel. The total map covered 690 sex-averaged Kosambi units with an average marker spacing of 8 cM. This map will facilitate further genetic mapping of monogenic characters and QTL.

  15. Intrageneric diversity of the cytochrome B gene and phylogeny of eurasian species of the genus mustela (mustelidae, carnivora).

    PubMed

    Kurose, N; Abramov, A V; Masuda, R

    2000-07-01

    To illuminate molecular phylogenetic relationships among Eurasian species of the genus Mustela (Mustelidae, Carnivora), we determined nucleotide sequences of the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene region (1,140 base pairs). Molecular phylogenetic trees, constructed using the neighbor-joining and the maximum likelihood methods, showed the common topology of species relationships to each other. The American mink M. vison first branched off and was positioned very remotely from the other species of Mustela. Excluding M. vison, the ermine M. erminea first split from the rest of the species. Two small body-sized weasels, the least weasel M. nivalis and the mountain weasel M. altaica, comprised one cluster (named "the small weasel group"). The other species formed another cluster, where the remarkably close relationships among the domestic ferret M. furo, the European polecat M. putorius, and the steppe polecat M. eversmanni were noticed with 87-94% bootstrap values (named "the ferret group"), supporting the history that the ferret was domesticated from M. putorius and/or M. eversmanni. The European mink M. lutreola was the closest to the ferret group. The genetic distance between the Siberian weasel M. sibirica and the Japanese weasel M. itatsi corresponded to differences of interspecific level, while the two species were relatively close to M. lutreola and the ferret group. These results provide invaluable insight for understanding the evolution of Mustela as well as for investigating the hybridization status between native and introduced species for conservation.

  16. First report of Filaria martis Gmelin, 1790 in the European mink, Mustela lutreola (Linnaeus, 1761).

    PubMed

    Torres, Jordi; Miquel, Jordi; Fournier-Chambrillon, Christine; André, Adrien; Urra Maya, Fermín; Giralda Carrera, Gloria; Fournier, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    The riparian European mink (Mustela lutreola), currently surviving in only three unconnected sites in Europe, is now listed as a critically endangered species according to the IUCN. Habitat loss and degradation, anthropic mortality, interaction with the feral American mink (Neovison vison), and infectious diseases are among the principal causes of its decline. Surveys of helminth parasites of this host that also include focus on subcutaneous potentially pathogenic helminths such as those belonging to the genus Filaria are very scarce. We report here the presence of specimens of Filaria martis in the subcutaneous connective tissues of three M. lutreola individuals from Spain. This is the first finding of a subcutaneous nematode in a representative of the genus Mustela. The report also enlarges the known range of the definitive hosts of this nematode. These worms were mainly located in the dorsal region of mink and more rarely in the knees, elbows, and hips. Skin sloughing was only observed in one M. lutreola with both septicaemia and an associated high burden of F. martis. Therefore, more attention should be paid to potentially pathogenic helminths when designing conservation programs dedicated to M. lutreola.

  17. Orienting behaviour during aerial and underwater visual discrimination by the mink (Mustela vison schreber).

    PubMed

    Dunstone, N; Sinclair, W

    1978-02-01

    Orienting responses by mink during aerial and underwater visual discrimination tests were most frequent when the grating lines subtended angles at the eye near the visual threshold angle. Factorial analysis showed that in air and in water at ranges from 10 to 90 cm most responses occurred at 30 cm discrimination distance and more occurred to marginally supra-threshold than to marginally sub-threshold stimuli. Between media, more responses occurred in air than in water. At longer ranges the mink oriented less readily than at 30 cm but if orienting occurred better discrimination followed than if the mink did not orient.

  18. A species barrier limits transmission of chronic wasting disease to mink (Mustela vison)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) occurs as sporadic outbreaks associated with ingestion of feed presumably contaminated with some type of prion disease. Mink lack a species barrier to primary oral challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, whereas they have a barrier to such challenge ...

  19. Mastitis in the lactating mink female (Mustela vison S.) and the development of "greasy kits".

    PubMed

    Clausen, T N; Dietz, H H

    2000-01-01

    "Greasy kits" is the result of a multifactorial disease complex with few known definitive aetiological factors. Mastitis has been hypothesized as a triggering factor although classical clinical signs of mastitis (rubor, tumor, dolor, calor) are rarely seen in lactating Danish mink females. In this study we sacrificed 2 groups of lactating mink females with a total of 78 mammary glands at day 19-30 after giving birth. The first group had raised normal mink kits while the other group had suffered severe attacks of greasy kits. We found no clinical or histopathological evidence of mastitis but isolated streptococci and staphylococci from 2 mammary glands in females raising greasy kits. These glands showed no clinical or histological signs of inflammation attributable to bacteria and we conclude that mastitis is not necessary for the generation of greasy kits.

  20. Decline in Endangered Species as an Indication of Anthropic Pressures: The Case of European Mink Mustela lutreola Western Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodé, Thierry; Cormier, Jean-Paul; Le Jacques, Dominique

    2001-12-01

    Populations of threatened species, especially predators at the top of the food chain, may be affected by anthropic pressures. The endangered western population of European mink Mustela lutreola has shown a large decline over 50% of its natural range. M. lutreola disappeared from northwestern France between 1984 and 1997, and the decline was associated with an increase in mustelid trapping, changes in watercourse quality, and habitat modifications due to agricultural practices. The pattern of decline showed a fragmentation restricting the minks into very small areas. Trapping was the first known cause of mortality. Although feral American mink Mustela vison may compete with autochthonous carnivores, M. lutreola had disappeared from streams before the introduction of the American species, suggesting that competitive interactions were not responsible. Furthermore, American mink has never been found or has remained rare in 62.4% of the area from which M. lutreola has disappeared. During the past 25 years, permanent grassland surfaces were reduced by 40%, whereas fodder culture increased by 470%, causing considerable habitat changes. Furthermore, 55.7% of water courses were classified as being of bad quality or polluted. Therefore, our data suggests that a conjunction of intensive trapping, alterations in water quality and habitat modification was critical for the European mink's decline. Although there are difficulties in ascribing specific cause to distribution changes in a top predator, this decline can be regarded as an indication for anthropic pressures on natural habitats.

  1. Leptospirosis in free-ranging endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) and other small carnivores (Mustelidae, Viverridae) from southwestern France.

    PubMed

    Moinet, Marie; Fournier-Chambrillon, Christine; André-Fontaine, Geneviève; Aulagnier, Stéphane; Mesplède, Alain; Blanchard, Béatrice; Descarsin, Véronique; Dumas, Philippe; Dumas, Yann; Coïc, Christophe; Couzi, Laurent; Fournier, Pascal

    2010-10-01

    To study the possible role of disease in the decline of endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola), we conducted a survey of antibody prevalence and renal carriage of pathogenic leptospira (Leptospira interrogans sensu lato) using serum and kidney samples collected from 1990 to 2007 from several free-ranging small carnivores and farmed American mink (Mustela vison) in southwestern France. An indirect microscopic agglutination test using a panel of 16 serovars belonging to 6 serogroups (Australis, Autumnalis, Icterohæmorrhagiæ, Grippotyphosa, Panama, Sejroe) revealed antibodies in all species, with significant differences in antibody prevalences: 74% in European mink (n=99), 65.4% in European polecats (Mustela putorius, n=133), 86% in American mink (n=74), 89% in stone martens (Martes foina, n=19), 74% in pine martens (Martes martes, n=19), 35% in common genets (Genetta genetta, n=79), and 31% in farmed American mink (n=51). Serogroups Australis and Icterohæmorragiæ were dominant in most free-ranging species; serogroup Grippotyphosa had high prevalences in European mink. Such high antibody prevalences have never been reported. They are probably related to the large number of known reservoirs, rats (Rattus spp.), muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), and coypu (Myocastor coypu), in the study area. The polymerase chain reaction test specific for pathogenic leptospiral DNA detected renal carriage in 23% of 34 European mink, 22% of 18 polecats, and 15% of 33 free-ranging American mink, with no significant differences. Renal carriage shows that mustelids may shed leptospira for short periods, but their epidemiologic role is probably limited. High antibody prevalences suggest that the disease is unlikely to be highly pathogenic for these species; however, chronic forms of the disease (abortions, renal lesions) could reduce the reproductive success or life span of infected animals. Further studies on the pathogenicity of leptospirosis in these populations are needed to

  2. Symmetry fractionalization of visons in Z2 spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yang; Cheng, Meng; Fang, Chen

    In this work we study symmetry fractionalization of vison excitations in topological Z2 spin liquids. We show that in the presence of the full SO (3) spin-rotational symmetry and if there is an odd number of spin-1/2 per unit cell, the symmetry fractionalization of visons is completely fixed. On the other hand, visons can have different classes of symmetry fractionalization if the spin-rotational symmetry is reduced. As a concrete example, we show that visons in the Balents-Fisher-Girvin Z2 spin liquid have crystal symmetry fractionalization classes which are not allowed in SO (3) symmetric spin liquids, due to the reduced spin-rotational symmetry.

  3. Serologic survey for selected viral pathogens in free-ranging endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) and other mustelids from south-western France.

    PubMed

    Philippa, Joost; Fournier-Chambrillon, Christine; Fournier, Pascal; Schaftenaar, Willem; van de Bildt, Marco; van Herweijnen, Rob; Kuiken, Thijs; Liabeuf, Marie; Ditcharry, Sébastien; Joubert, Laurent; Bégnier, Michel; Osterhaus, Ab

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the possible role of selected pathogens in the decline of endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) populations and the potential for these pathogens to affect mink survival, a serologic survey was conducted using serum samples collected from March 1996 to March 2003 in eight departments of south-western France. In total, 481 free-ranging individuals of five mustelid species (including the European mink) were tested. Sympatric mustelids can serve as sentinels to determine the presence of antibodies to viruses in the study area that could potentially infect mink. Antibodies to Canine distemper virus (CDV) were detected in all species; 9% of 127 European mink, 20% of 210 polecats (Mustela putorius), 5% of 112 American mink (Mustela vison), 33% of 21 stone marten (Martes foina) and 5% of 20 pine marten (Martes martes). Antibody prevalence was significantly higher in stone marten and polecats, possibly because their ranges overlap more closely with that of domestic species than that of the other species tested. Antibodies to Canine adenovirus were detected in all species but the pine marten; antibody prevalence estimates ranging from 2% to 10%. Antibodies to canine parainfluenza virus were detected in 1% of European mink, 1% of American mink and 5% of tested polecats but were not detected in Martes species. Antibodies to Rabies virus (RV) were detected in three animals, possibly because of interspecies transmission of bat lyssaviruses as the sampling area is considered to be free of RV, or to a lack of test specificity, as antibody titers were low. The high antibody prevalence to potentially lethal CDV suggests that this pathogen could have significant effects on the free-ranging populations and has implications for the conservation efforts for the endangered European mink.

  4. Interactions between retinol, α-tocopherol and cholecalciferol need consideration in diets for farmed mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Hymøller, Lone; Clausen, Tove N; Jensen, Søren K

    2016-03-14

    A sufficient but balanced vitamin supplementation is a prerequisite for a satisfactory growth pattern and an effective immune system in mink and all other species. The fat-soluble vitamins are very sensitive to over- or under-supply because they interact with each other with respect to dose-response and chemical form. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of increasing the amount of retinol in combination with RRR-α-tocopherol or all-rac-α-tocopherol in the feed given to growing mink on their retinol, cholecalciferol and α-tocopherol concentrations in plasma and selected organs. The results showed that the mink met their retinol requirements from the basal diet, but there were no negative effects of supplying various amounts of retinol on their plasma α-tocopherol concentrations. On the other hand, the study showed that the cholecalciferol status in plasma, assessed as the 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentration, was low when retinol was supplemented in the feed at high levels. In addition, supplementation with RRR-α-tocopherol in the feed negatively affected the plasma concentration of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol compared with supplementation with all-rac-α-tocopherol. In general, female mink had higher concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins in plasma than male mink.

  5. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C R; Elliott, J E

    1999-01-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal gland and baculum masses, baculum length, and stomach contents. Livers were analyzed, individually or in pools, for residues of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. Contaminant levels were relatively low compared to those documented in other North American populations, although they ranged higher than those detected during an earlier survey (1990-1992) of these regional populations. Body condition varied slightly among collection regions, but showed no relationship with contaminant burden. Mink from the upper Fraser River had less fat stores and also had some of the lowest OC contamination levels observed. Similarly, a few individuals with enlarged livers and kidneys had low contaminant levels. Although a few individual animals with gross abnormalities of reproductive systems did not show high levels of contamination, there was a significant negative correlation between total PCB concentrations (as Aroclor 1260) and baculum length in juvenile mink (r = 0.707; p = 0.033; n = 8). The association of juvenile baculum length with eventual reproductive success is unknown, but further characterization of reproductive organ morphology and relationship to contaminants should be undertaken in a larger subset of these populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9924010

  6. Serum prolactin and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations during the summer and winter hair growth cycles of mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Rose, J; Kennedy, M; Johnston, B; Foster, W

    1998-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between serum concentrations of prolactin (PRL) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) during initiation and development of summer and winter hair growth (anagen) cycles in mink. In the spring, haloperidol (HAL) increased PRL concentrations and induced summer anagen earlier than controls, whereas melatonin (MEL) inhibited PRL secretion and completely blocked summer anagen. In the fall, HAL increased PRL concentrations, inducing anagen at an earlier time than controls, although the resulting fur was abnormal being almost devoid of underhair fibers. Exogenous MEL during the fall reduced PRL concentrations, initiating winter anagen 4 weeks earlier than controls. Adrenalectomy (ADX) induced earlier onset of summer and winter anagen and neutralized the inhibitory effects of HAL in the fall and MEL in the spring. No change in serum DHEA concentrations was observed during the onset of summer or winter anagen in any group although MEL increased DHEA levels from 27 March through 5 June relative to HAL-treated mink. We conclude that changes in serum levels of DHEA and PRL are not requisite to onset of summer or winter anagen in mink. It is possible that metabolites of DHEA and/or PRL may still affect other aspects of the hair growth cycle.

  7. [Evaluation of the immune response after vaccination against distemper at a mink (Mustela vison) farm in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Jar, A M; Ramayo, L G; Stempler, A; Goldman, L H; Mundo, S L

    2010-01-01

    Distemper virus causes a disease affecting minks with respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological and skin symptoms and showing high morbidity and mortality, mainly among puppies. It is controlled through immunization, using vaccines that are supplied for mink use. The aim of this work was to determine the seroneutralization titer against the distemper virus at a mink farm in Argentina. The antibody kinetics obtained after vaccination in 27 adult animals, as well as the duration of colostrum-transferred antibodies in 10 puppies were determined. All vaccinated adult minks showed protective titers up to at least 3 months after vaccination, and 37.5% significantly reduced their antibody levels, 12 months after vaccination. Only 20% of the puppies showed protective levels of colostrum-transferred antibodies at the age of 7 weeks, while non-detectable levels of antibodies were found when puppies reached 11 weeks old. Vaccination performed in these puppies at the age of 13 weeks, elicited protective seroneutralization titers. These results show that vaccination induces a satisfactory humoral immune response in our environment, and support the convenience of vaccinating dams annually before the beginning of the breeding season. The vaccination plan in puppies is also discussed.

  8. [Effect of mutations affecting coat color on the blood lymphocyte structure in the American mink (Mustela vison Schreber, 1777)].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Trapezov, O V; Kizhina, A G; Iliukha, V A; Trapezova, L I; Tiutiunnik, N N

    2011-01-01

    American minks with different genotypes containing the Aleutian coat color allele in the homozygous state, including the single recessive Aleutian (a/a); double recessive sapphire (a/a p/p) and lavender (m/m a/a); triple recessive violet (m/m a/a p/p); and dominant-recessive cross sapphire (S/+ a/a p/p), sapphire leopard (S(K)/+ a/a p/p), and shadow sapphire (S(H)/+ a/a p/p) minks, as well as American minks without the Aleutian allele, including the standard (+/+); single recessive silver-blue (p/p) and hedlund-white (h/h); double recessive pearl (k/k p/p), Finnish topaz (t(S)/t(S) b/b); incompletely dominant royal silver (S(R)/+), standard leopard (S(K)/+), and black crystal (C(R)/+); and dominant-recessive snowy topaz (C(R)/+ t(S)/t(S) b/b) and Kujtezhy-spotted (S(K)/+ b/b) minks have been studied. Homozygosity for the a allele has been found to disturb the subcellular structure of leukocyte, namely the formation of abnormally large granules.

  9. Disease-associated prion protein in neural and lymphoid tissues of mink (Mustela vison) inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disorder of farmed raised mink. As with the other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, the disorder is associated with accumulation of the misfolded prion protein in the brain and an invariably fatal outcome. TME outbreaks have been rare but...

  10. [Effect of coat color genes on the hair pigmentation morphology in the American mink (Mustela vison Schr. L.)].

    PubMed

    Prasolova, L A; Trapezov, O V

    2007-07-01

    The morphological patterns of hair pigmentation (the size and shape of pigment granules and their distribution among layers) have been studied in four compound coat color forms of the American mink: moil-sapphire also known as violet (genotype m/m a/a p/p); moil-silver or sage (genotype m/m p/p); the color form determined by genotype m/+ a/a; and platinum leopard (S(k)/+ a/+ p/p). The hair pigmentation pattern specific for each coat color form and its difference from the standard coat color of the American mink (genotype +/+) has been determined. The possible mechanisms of the phenotypic expression of the nonallelic genes contributing to the described compound color forms are discussed.

  11. Disease-Associated Prion Protein in Neural and Lymphoid Tissues of Mink (Mustela vison) Inoculated with Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, D. A.; Harrington, R. D.; Zhuang, D.; Yan, H.; Truscott, T. C.; Dassanayake, R. P.; O'Rourke, K. I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are diagnosed by immunodetection of disease-associated prion protein (PrPd). The distribution of PrPd within the body varies with the time-course of infection and between species, during interspecies transmission, as well as with prion strain. Mink are susceptible to a form of TSE known as transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), presumed to arise due to consumption of feed contaminated with a single prion strain of ruminant origin. After extended passage of TME isolates in hamsters, two strains emerge, HY and DY, each of which is associated with unique structural isoforms of PrPTME and of which only the HY strain is associated with accumulation of PrPTME in lymphoid tissues. Information on the structural nature and lymphoid accumulation of PrPTME in mink is limited. In this study, 13 mink were challenged by intracerebral inoculation using late passage TME inoculum after which brain and lymphoid tissues were collected at preclinical and clinical time points. The distribution and molecular nature of PrPTME was investigated by techniques including blotting of paraffin wax-embedded tissue and epitope mapping by western blotting. PrPTME was detected readily in the brain and retropharyngeal lymph node during preclinical infection with delayed progression of accumulation within other lymphoid tissues. For comparison, three mink were inoculated by the oral route and examined during clinical disease. Accumulation of PrPTME in these mink was greater and more widespread, including follicles of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Western blot analyses revealed that PrPTME accumulating in the brain of mink is structurally most similar to that accumulating in the brain of hamsters infected with the DY strain. Collectively, the results of extended passage in mink are consistent with the presence of only a single strain of TME, the DY strain, capable of inducing accumulation of PrPTME in the lymphoid tissues of mink but not in hamsters. Thus mink are a relevant animal model for further study of this unique strain, which ultimately may have been introduced through consumption of a TSE of ruminant origin. PMID:22595634

  12. Concentrations of anticoagulant rodenticides in stoats Mustela erminea and weasels Mustela nivalis from Denmark.

    PubMed

    Elmeros, Morten; Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia

    2011-05-15

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used to control rodent populations but they also pose a risk of secondary poisoning in non-target predators. Studies on anticoagulant rodenticide exposure of non-target species have mainly reported on frequency of occurrence. They have rarely analyzed variations in residue concentrations. We examine the occurrence and concentrations of five anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissue from 61 stoats (Mustela erminea) and 69 weasels (Mustela nivalis) from Denmark. Anticoagulant rodenticides were detected in 97% of stoats and 95% of weasels. 79% of the animals had detectable levels of more than one substance. Difenacoum had the highest prevalence (82% in stoats and 88% in weasels) but bromadiolone was detected in the highest concentrations in both stoat (1.290 μg/g ww) and weasel (1.610 μg/g ww). Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were highest during autumn and winter and varied with sampling method. Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were higher in stoats and weasels with unknown cause of death than in specimens killed by physical trauma. There was a negative correlation between anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations and body condition. Our results suggest that chemical rodent control in Denmark results in an extensive exposure of non-target species and may adversely affect the fitness of some stoats and weasels.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Mustela eversmannii (Carnivora: Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangshuai; Yang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Honghai; Sun, Guolei; Zhao, Chao; Dou, Huashan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Steppe polecat, Mustela eversmannii, was sequenced for the first time using muscle tissue. The mitochondrial genome is a circular molecule of 16 463 bp in length and overall base composition is A (32.7%), T (27.3%), C (26.1%), and G (13.9%), which indicates a strong A-T bias. A phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 13 protein-coding genes and two rRNA genes of 10 Mustela species' mitochondrial genomes using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) demonstrated that these Mustela species were clustered into two clades and M. eversmannii was close to M. putorius.

  14. Pyometra in a Siberian Polecat (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.D.; Biggins, D.E.; Wrigley, R.H.; Mangone, B.A.; Wimsatt, J.

    1999-01-01

    A 2-year-old Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmanni) from a breeding colony presented for ultrasound evaluation for pregnancy. It was paired with a male for 2.75 months and had remained absent of pregnancy signs when it was anesthetized and clinically evaluated. Until this time, the animal had eaten well and shown no outward signs of debility. On palpation, the animal had a fluid-filled tubular structure in the caudal abdomen, consistent in location and size with the uterus. No sign of vaginal discharge was present. Ultrasonography revealed 10 fluid-filled evaginations (approximately 12 mm in diameter) of the uterine horns. A presumptive diagnosis of a fluid-filled reproductive tract and likely reproductive failure was made in light of the animal's history, its clinical signs, and the ultrasound findings. Euthanasia was performed because the animal was nonreproductive and might yield information relevant to the breeding colony as a whole. Necropsy of the polecat revealed a distended fluctuant uterus containing mildly odiferous, thick, yellow-green, purulent material. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of pyometra. A pure and heavy growth of Enterococcus fecalis was cultured from the uterine contents. In light of results from routine minimal inhibitory concentration antibiotic sensitivity screening, this isolate was resistant to all antibiotics tested in the standard teaching hospital screen.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Neovison vison (Carnivora: Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Li; Wang, Shao-Jing; Wang, Zhuo; Liu, Han-Lu; Zhong, Wei; Yang, Ya-Han; Li, Guang-Yu

    2016-05-01

    The phylogenetic and taxonomic position of the American mink Neovison vison have long been unclear. In this paper, the complete mitogenome of N. vison was sequenced and characterized. The total length was 16,594 bp and typically consists of 37 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNA, a large control region (CR) and a light-strand replication origin (OL). Gene contents, locations, and arrangements were identical to those of typical vertebrate. The overall base composition is 33.6%, 25.4%, 27.8% and 13.3% for A, C, T and G, respectively, with a moderate bias on AT content (61.4%). This result is expected to provide useful molecular data and contribute to further taxonomic and phylogenetic studies of Mustelidae and Carnivora.

  16. Reintroduction of the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, B.; Biggins, D.; Hanebury, L.; Vargas, A.

    1994-01-01

    The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) (Figure 27.1) is a small, secretive, nocturnal member of the family Mustelidae (Hall, 1981; Honacki, Kurman and Koeppl, 1982). Ferrets have an obligate dependence on the prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) community, utilizing the prairie dog for food and its burrows for shelter (Campbell et al., 1987).

  17. Helicobacter mustelae-associated gastric MALT lymphoma in ferrets.

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, S. E.; Correa, P.; Coleman, L. A.; Schrenzel, M. D.; Li, X.; Fox, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    Gastric lymphoma resembling gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma linked with Helicobacter pylori infection in humans was observed in ferrets infected with H. mustelae. Four ferrets with ante- or postmortem evidence of primary gastric lymphoma were described. Lymphoma was diagnosed in the wall of the lesser curvature of the pyloric antrum, corresponding to the predominant focus of H. mustelae induced gastritis in ferrets. Two ferrets had low-grade small-cell lymphoma and two ferrets had high-grade large-cell lymphoma. Gastric lymphomas demonstrated characteristic lymphoepithelial lesions, and the lymphoid cells were IgG+ in all ferrets. Lymphoma was confirmed by light chain restriction, which contrasted with the 1.2:1 kappa lambda ratio observed in H. mustelae-associated chronic gastritis. H. mustelae infection in ferrets has been used as a model for gastritis, ulcerogenesis, and carcinogenesis. The ferret may provide an attractive model to study pathogenesis and treatment of gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9212752

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the Mustela altaica (Carnivora: Mustelidae) based on complete mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Yang, Bo; Yan, Chaochao; Yang, Chengzhong; Tu, Feiyun; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2014-08-01

    The mountain weasel (Mustela altaica) belongs to family Mustelidae, which is the near threatened species in the IUCN Red List. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of M. altaica was sequenced and characterized. The genome is 16,521 bases in length (GenBank accession no. KC815122). The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of M. altaica and other 20 Mustelidae species were used for phylogenetic analyses. Trees constructed by using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood demonstrated that M. altaica was close to Mustela nivalis and they were sister to Mustela putorius and Mustela sibirica.

  19. Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Pignon, Charly; Huynh, Minh; Husnik, Roman; Jekl, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common complaint in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Their relatively simple and short gastrointestinal tract makes them good candidates for flexible endoscopy. However, apart from a few references in biomedical research articles, there is little information on the use of flexible endoscopy in ferrets. This review describes patient preparation, equipment, and select gastrointestinal endoscopy techniques in ferrets, including esophagoscopy, gastroscopy, duodenoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, jejunoileoscopy, colonoscopy, and biopsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Construction and characterization of an isogenic urease-negative mutant of Helicobacter mustelae.

    PubMed Central

    Solnick, J V; Josenhans, C; Suerbaum, S; Tompkins, L S; Labigne, A

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter mustelae infects the ferret stomach and provides an opportunity to study pathogenic determinants of a Helicobacter species in its natural host. We constructed an isogenic urease-negative mutant of H. mustelae which produced no detectable urease and showed a reduced acid tolerance. This mutant provides an opportunity to further evaluate the role of urease in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter infection. PMID:7642313

  1. Theory of quantum kagome ice and vison zero modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Hermele, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We derive an effective Z2 gauge theory to describe the quantum kagome ice (QKI) state that has been observed by Carrasquilla et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 7421 (2015), 10.1038/ncomms8421] in Monte Carlo studies of the S =1/2 kagome XYZ model in a Zeeman field. The numerical results on QKI are consistent with, but do not confirm or rule out, the hypothesis that it is a Z2 spin liquid. Our effective theory allows us to explore this hypothesis and make a striking prediction for future numerical studies, namely, that symmetry-protected vison zero modes arise at lattice disclination defects, leading to a Curie defect term in the spin susceptibility, and a characteristic (Ndis-1 )ln2 contribution to the entropy, where Ndis is the number of disclinations. Only the Z2 Ising symmetry is required to protect the vison zero modes. This is remarkable because a unitary Z2 symmetry cannot be responsible for symmetry-protected degeneracies of local degrees of freedom. We also discuss other signatures of symmetry fractionalization in the Z2 spin liquid, and phase transitions out of the Z2 spin liquid to nearby ordered phases.

  2. Organochlorine and PCB residues in Lake Erie mink populations

    SciTech Connect

    Proulx, G.; Weseloh, D.V.C.; Elliott, J.E.; Teeple, S.; Anghern, P.A.M.; Mineau, P.

    1987-12-01

    PCB poisoning has been found in mink (Mustela vison) fed on Great Lakes fish but is poorly know for wild mink populations. The objective of this study was to determine whether mink from the Lake Erie basin were accumulating levels of PCB and organochlorine residues high enough to cause health effects

  3. Cause-effect linkages between chemicals and populations of mink (Mustela vison) and otter (Lutra canadensis) in the Great Lakes basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wren, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Following outbreaks of reproductive failure in commercial ranching operations, laboratory experiments showed that mink are extremely sensitive to organochlorine chemicals, particularly PCBs and dioxins. The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that, since wild mink are exposed to these compounds through consumption of Great Lakes fish, they might exhibit reproductive dysfunction and population declines. The otter, another piscivorous animal, should show the same effects. The available information is reviewed according to five epidemiological criteria. Harvest data are presented as a surrogate for the population status of mink and otters in certain locations around the Great Lakes. Data from Ohio show that the mink harvest between 1982 and 1987 from contaminated counties bordering Lake Erie was consistently lower than those from counties removed from Lake Erie, suggesting an effect of chemicals on the status of mink populations. Preliminary studies from Ontario also suggest that mink harvest is lower in potentially high PCB exposure areas compared with lower exposure areas. Evidence is also presented on the harvest data for otters taken from four New York State counties adjacent to Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. The harvest data from these four counties show that between 1960 and early 1970 otter harvest remained stable but has since increased. Increased harvest is consistent with improved water quality in Lake Ontario during the past 15 yr. Data relating to strength of association between chemicals and populations of mink and otter are weak and need to be further analyzed. The specificity of the effects of the chemicals on mink reproduction and mortality is well established from toxicological experiments, but there is poor resolution of the information on effects using field data. 104 references.

  4. Cloning of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and its expression in the uterus during embryonic diapause and implantation in the mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Houde, A; Murphy, B D

    1998-09-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is essential for embryo implantation in mice. Whether LIF plays a role in termination of embryonic diapause and initiation of implantation in carnivores, especially in species with obligate delayed implantation such as the mink, is not known. The objectives of this study were to clone the LIF coding sequence in the mink and determine its mRNA abundance in the uterus through embryonic diapause, implantation, and early postimplantation. We show that the mink LIF cDNA contains 609 nt encoding a deduced protein of 203 amino acids. The homologies are 80.6, 90, 88.2, 87.6, and 86.8% in coding sequence and 79.2, 90.1, 91, 90.1 and 85.4% in amino acid sequence with mouse, human, pig, cow, and sheep respectively. Glycosylation sites and disulfide bonds present in other species are generally conserved in the mink LIF sequence. Quantitation by polymerase chain reaction amplification indicates that LIF mRNA is expressed in mink uterus just prior to implantation and during the first two days after implantation, but not during diapause or later after implantation pregnancy. The abundance of LIF mRNA was significantly higher in the uterus at the embryo expansion stage (P < 0.05) than at days 1-2 of postimplantation. By immunohistochemical localization it was shown that LIF is expressed in the uterine epithelial glands at time of embryonic expansion and in early postimplantation. The coincidence of LIF expression with implantation in this species suggests that LIF is involved in the implantation process, and may be a maternal signal which terminates obligate embryonic diapause.

  5. [Effect of coat color mutations on behavioral polymorphism in farm populations of american minks (Mustela vison Schreber, 1777) and sables (Martes zibellina Linnaeus, 1758)].

    PubMed

    Trapezov, O V; Trapezova, L I; Sergeev, E G

    2008-04-01

    Behavioral polymorphism estimated by the expression of the defensive reaction towards humans has been studied in farm-bred American minks and sables with different color types. Most animals (both minks and sables) from farm populations displayed passive defensive behavior towards humans in the standard hand catch test. Coat color genes have been found to have pleiotropic effects; they influence both the penetrance and expressivity of domestication behavior: in animals with aberrant color types (both sapphire minks and white-and-black sables), the proportion of animals with domestication behavior and the expressivity of this behavior are significantly higher (p <0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively).

  6. [Effects of monorecessive and double recessive mutations affecting coat color on the monoamine content of the brain of the American mink (Mustela vison Schreber, 1777)].

    PubMed

    Trapezov, O V; Trapezova, L I; alekhina, T A; Klochkov, D V; Ivanov, Iu N

    2009-12-01

    The effects of mutations affecting the coat color on the dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents of the hypothalamus and brainstem of the American mink have been studied. The sample comprised standard (+/+) and mutant minks, including the monorecessive pastel (b/b), silver-blue (p/p), and white hedlund (h/h) and the combination double recessive sapphire (a/a p/p) and pearl (k/k p/p) ones. The dopamine content of the brainstem of the monorecessive pastel (b/b) and silver-blue (p/p) minks has been found to be higher than in standard (+/+) minks. Conversely, the homozigosity for two coat color loci in double recessive pearl minks (k/k p/p) significantly decreases the noradrenaline and serotonin contents of the hypothalamus. In addition, monorecessive and double recessive minks differ from each other in the serotonin contents of the midbrain and medulla.

  7. Molecular and morphometric study of metacercariae and adults of Pseudamphistomum truncatum (Opisthorchiidae) from roach (Rutilus rutilus) and wild American mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Skov, Jakob; Kania, Per W; Jørgensen, Thomas R; Buchmann, Kurt

    2008-08-17

    The presence of metacercariae and adults of the trematode Pseudamphistomum truncatum in roach and mink, respectively, was recorded in Lake Fure North of Copenhagen, Denmark. This zoonotic digenean opisthorchiid represents a threat to humans due to its ability to infect the biliary system following ingestion of inadequately processed infected fish. Therefore precise species identification of infective metacercariae in fish used for human consumption is essential. Due to the relatively limited information on metacercarial identity obtained by morphometric studies a series of molecular techniques were used to link the larval parasite in fish with the un-equivocally diagnosed adults in the biliary system of the mink. By the use of carefully selected polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers and subsequent sequencing of the ITS region from both metacercariae and adults full sequence identity of both metacercariae and adults were confirmed. The presence of this parasitosis in fish from a lake used for both commercial and recreational fisheries call for hygienic alerts in order to prevent accidental human infection with this opisthorchiid.

  8. Full genome comparison and characterization of avian H10 viruses with different pathogenicity in Mink (Mustela vison) reveals genetic and functional differences in the non-structural gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The unique property of some avian H10 viruses, particularly the ability to cause severe disease in mink without prior adaptation, enabled our study. Coupled with previous experimental data and genetic characterization here we tried to investigate the possible influence of different genes on the virulence of these H10 avian influenza viruses in mink. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between the viruses studied. Our study also showed that there are no genetic differences in receptor specificity or the cleavability of the haemagglutinin proteins of these viruses regardless of whether they are of low or high pathogenicity in mink. In poly I:C stimulated mink lung cells the NS1 protein of influenza A virus showing high pathogenicity in mink down regulated the type I interferon promoter activity to a greater extent than the NS1 protein of the virus showing low pathogenicity in mink. Conclusions Differences in pathogenicity and virulence in mink between these strains could be related to clear amino acid differences in the non structural 1 (NS1) protein. The NS gene of mink/84 appears to have contributed to the virulence of the virus in mink by helping the virus evade the innate immune responses. PMID:20591155

  9. Hybridization between escaped domestic and wild American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Kidd, A G; Bowman, J; Lesbarrères, D; Schulte-Hostedde, A I

    2009-03-01

    The release of domesticated organisms into natural populations may adversely affect these populations through predation, resource competition, and the introduction of disease. Additionally, the potential for hybridization between wild and domestic conspecifics is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. Wild American mink (Neovison vison) populations may be threatened not only by competition for resources with domestic mink originating from farms, but by breeding with such escapees. Using 10 microsatellite loci, we genotyped mink from Ontario, Canada, sampled from two farms, two putatively mixed populations in regions surrounding the mink farms, and two wild populations with no recent history of mink farming. Using individual-based Bayesian population assignment, we identified four population clusters, including one wild, and three domestic populations. The latter were not clustered by farm but rather by distinct line-bred colour phases. Population clustering also identified domestic and hybrid mink in the free-ranging populations. Nearly two-thirds of the mink sampled in the two putatively mixed populations (78% and 43%) were either farm escapees or descendants of escapees. Principal components analysis of allele frequencies supported our Bayesian assignment results. The power of our assignment test was assessed using simulated hybrid genotypes which suggested that our overall correct classification rate was 96.2%. The overwhelming presence of domestic animals and their hybridization with mink in natural populations is of great concern for the future sustainability of wild mink populations.

  10. Development of vocalization and hearing in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Brandt, Christian; Malmkvist, Jens; Nielsen, Rasmus L; Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-09-15

    American mink (Neovison vison) kits are born altricial and fully dependent on maternal care, for which the kits' vocalizations appear essential. We used auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to determine: (1) hearing sensitivity of adult females from two breeding lines known to differ in maternal behaviour and (2) development of hearing in kits 8-52 days of age. We also studied sound production in 20 kits throughout postnatal days 1 to 44. Adult female mink had a broad hearing range from 1 kHz to above 70 kHz, with peak sensitivity (threshold of 20 dB SPL) at 8-10 kHz, and no difference in sensitivity between the two breeding lines (P>0.22) to explain the difference in maternal care. Mink kits showed no signs of hearing up to postnatal day 24. From day 30, all kits had ABRs indicative of hearing. Hearing sensitivity increased with age, but was still below the adult level at postnatal day 52. When separated from their mothers, kits vocalized loudly. Until the age of 22 days, 90% of all kits vocalized with no significant decline with age (P=0.27). From day 25, concurrent with the start of hearing, the number of vocalizing kits decreased with age (P<0.001), in particular in kits that were re-tested (P=0.004). Large numbers of mink are kept in fur industry farms, and our results are important to the understanding of sound communication, which is part of their natural behaviour. Our results also suggest mink as an interesting model for studying the development of mammalian hearing and its correlation to sound production.

  11. Suspected primary hypoparathyroidism in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo E; Connolly, Maren J; Starkey, Simon R; Morrisey, James K

    2014-08-15

    A 4-year-old castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was examined because of a 3-week history of intermittent seizures, signs of depression, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia. Plasma biochemical analysis confirmed hyperphosphatemia (17.7 mg/dL) and low concentrations of total (4.3 mg/dL) and ionized (0.49 mmol/L) calcium. Serum parathyroid hormone concentration (2.30 pmol/L) was low or in the low part of the reference interval. Calcium gluconate was administered (2.0 mg/kg/h [0.9 mg/lb/h], IV), followed by a transition to administration of calcium carbonate (53 mg/kg [24.1 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) and dihydrotachysterol (0.02 mg/kg/d [0.009 mg/lb/d], PO). Attitude of the ferret improved and seizures ceased as blood calcium concentrations increased. The ferret was reexamined because of seizures approximately 1 year after oral maintenance administration of dihydrotachysterol and calcium was initiated. The ferret responded well to emergency and long-term treatment but then was lost to follow-up monitoring. The ferret died approximately 2 years after the initial evaluation and treatment. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was diagnosed during necropsy, but the parathyroid glands could not be identified. To the authors' knowledge, primary hypoparathyroidism has not previously been reported in a ferret. The condition should be considered for ferrets with hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia without azotemia. Treatment with dihydrotachysterol and oral supplementation of calcium appeared to be a viable option for long-term management.

  12. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship.

  13. Rhinitis and disseminated disease in a ferret (Mustela putorius futo) naturally infected with Sarcocystis neurona

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Naturally occurring Sarcocystis neurona infection in a ferret (Mustela putorius futo) with rhinitis and disseminated disease are described for the first time. The ferret exhibited severe rhinitis with intra-lesional S. neurona merozoites and schizonts. Diagnosis was confirmed immunohistochemically b...

  14. Massive infestation with fur mites (Lynxacarus mustelae) of a stone marten (Martes foina) from Tyrol.

    PubMed

    Visser, Martin; Messner, Christian; Rehbein, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    A massive infestation with Lynxacarus mustelae (Megnin, 1885) (Acari, Astigmata, Listrophoridae) was diagnosed in a stone marten (Martes foina) from Tyrol, Austria. In addition, Ixodes rugicollis and Trichodectes retusus are reported for the first time in Austria, and the five species of helminths found (Capillaria aerophila, C. mustelorum, C. paranalis, C. plica, Molineus patens) are first records in the stone marten in the country.

  15. High feeding intensity increases the severity of fatty liver in the American mink (Neovison vison) with potential ameliorating role for long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid body fat mobilization, obesity, and an inadequate supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been suggested to play roles in the etiology of fatty liver in the American mink (Neovison vison). This study examined the effects of feeding intensity and dietary fat source on fatty liver induced by fasting. In a multi-factorial design, 3 different fat sources (herring oil, rich in n-3 PUFA, soya oil, rich in n-6 PUFA, and canola oil, rich in n-9 monounsaturated fatty acids) were fed to mink at a low and high feeding intensity for 10 weeks, followed by an overnight or a 5-day fasting treatment to induce fatty liver. Results Fasting led to the development of fatty liver with increased severity in the mink fed at the high feeding intensity. The herring oil diet, high in long-chain n-3 PUFA, was found to decrease the severity of fatty liver in the mink at the high feeding intensity. Conclusion Preventing excessive weight gain and increasing dietary intake of n-3 long-chain PUFA may help prevent excessive lipid accumulation during prolonged periods of fasting or inappetence by promoting hepatic fatty acid oxidation. PMID:24438337

  16. High feeding intensity increases the severity of fatty liver in the American mink (Neovison vison) with potential ameliorating role for long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Dick, Morag F; Hurford, Jennifer; Lei, Sha; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Nieminen, Petteri; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti

    2014-01-16

    Rapid body fat mobilization, obesity, and an inadequate supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been suggested to play roles in the etiology of fatty liver in the American mink (Neovison vison). This study examined the effects of feeding intensity and dietary fat source on fatty liver induced by fasting. In a multi-factorial design, 3 different fat sources (herring oil, rich in n-3 PUFA, soya oil, rich in n-6 PUFA, and canola oil, rich in n-9 monounsaturated fatty acids) were fed to mink at a low and high feeding intensity for 10 weeks, followed by an overnight or a 5-day fasting treatment to induce fatty liver. Fasting led to the development of fatty liver with increased severity in the mink fed at the high feeding intensity. The herring oil diet, high in long-chain n-3 PUFA, was found to decrease the severity of fatty liver in the mink at the high feeding intensity. Preventing excessive weight gain and increasing dietary intake of n-3 long-chain PUFA may help prevent excessive lipid accumulation during prolonged periods of fasting or inappetence by promoting hepatic fatty acid oxidation.

  17. Failure of Surface Ring Mutant Strains of Helicobacter mustelae To Persistently Infect the Ferret Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, M. M.; O'Toole, P. W.; Forester, N. T.; Noonan, B.; Trust, T. J.; Xu, S.; Taylor, N. S.; Marini, R. P.; Ihrig, M. M.; Fox, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter mustelae, the gastric pathogen of ferrets, produces an array of surface ring structures which have not been described for any other member of the genus Helicobacter, including H. pylori. The unique ring structures are composed of a protein named Hsr. To investigate whether the Hsr rings are important for colonization of the ferret stomach, ferrets specific pathogen free for H. mustelae were inoculated with an Hsr-deficient mutant strain or the wild-type H. mustelae strain. Quantitative cultures from antral biopsy specimens obtained at 3, 6, and 9 weeks postinoculation demonstrated no significant difference in the levels of bacteria in the ferrets that received the Hsr-negative strain and the ferrets infected with the parent strain. However, when the ferrets were biopsied at 12 and 15 weeks and necropsied at 18 weeks after infection, the levels of bacteria of the Hsr-negative strain in the stomach antrum were significantly reduced. This decline contrasted the robust antral colonization by the wild-type strain. The Hsr-negative strain did not efficiently colonize the gastric body of the study ferrets. Histological examination at 18 weeks postinoculation revealed minimal gastric inflammation in the animals that received the mutant H. mustelae strain, a finding consistent with its waning infection status, whereas lesions characteristic of helicobacter infection were present in ferrets infected with the wild-type strain. Scant colonization by the Hsr-negative H. mustelae strain at the end of the 18-week study, despite initial successful colonization, indicates an inability of the mutant to persist, perhaps due to a specific host response. PMID:12704104

  18. Effect of dietary vitamin E and prey supplementation on semen quality in male black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Santymire, Rachel M; Lavin, Shana R; Branvold-Faber, Heather; Kreeger, Julie; Marinari, Paul

    2015-07-15

    Over the recent years, the captive population of the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes; ferret) has experienced a decline in normal sperm (NS) morphology (from 50% to 16%), which may be linked to inbreeding depression or it may have been a dietary change. We examined the role of dietary vitamin E, selenium (SE), and vitamin A on serum levels of vitamin E, SE, and vitamin A and semen quality. Ferrets (n = 55 males) were randomly assigned to one of five diet treatments (n = 11 per treatment): (1) horsemeat diet (control); (2) horsemeat diet + vitamin E (400 IU/kg Dry Matter) daily; (3) horsemeat diet + whole prey; (4) horsemeat diet + vitamin E daily + whole prey; and (5) beef diet. Both blood (prediet and postdiet change) and diets were analyzed for vitamin E, vitamin A, and SE concentrations. Electroejaculates were collected monthly and evaluated for sperm concentration, sperm motility index (includes percent motile and forward progression), and percent NS. Results reveal that the beef and horsemeat diets had comparable (P = 0.05) vitamin E and SE concentrations and all diets met most nutrient requirements for small carnivores; however, the horsemeat diet was excessive in vitamin A and the beef diet was deficient in vitamin A. Vitamin E supplementation increased (χ1(2)=25.83; P < 0.001) serum vitamin E. Ferrets fed the beef diet or prey had improved (H4 = 15.596; P = 0.004) sperm motility index than the horsemeat control group, and ferrets fed the horsemeat diet supplemented with vitamin E had the lowest (H4 = 18.408; P = 0.001) NS. In conclusion, the high levels of vitamin A in the horsemeat diet could compete with vitamin E as evidence by serum levels, which may reduce reproductive success in this endangered species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in the development of fasting-induced fatty liver in the American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Harris, Lora; Dick, Morag; Pal, Catherine; Lei, Sha; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Nieminen, Petteri

    2012-10-28

    American mink (Neovison vison) develop fatty liver quickly in response to food deprivation, which results in preferential mobilisation of n-3 PUFA. The altered n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio in the liver may activate the endocannabinoid system resulting in increased lipid synthesis. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of feeding intensity (80 or 120% RDA), dietary fat source (n-3, n-6 or n-9 fatty acids (FA)) and short-term fasting (1-7 d) on hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the development of fatty liver in mink. Significantly elevated expression of mRNA encoding for acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) and FA synthase (FAS) was observed in the liver of mink fasted for 5-7 d, while upon re-feeding for 28 d after a 7 d food deprivation, DNL returned to pre-fasting levels. The females had a higher expression of ACC-1 and FAS mRNA than the males. In the non-fasted animals, dietary fat source and feeding intensity had significant effects on ACC-1 mRNA. The highest levels were observed in the mink fed the rapeseed oil (n-9) diet at 80% RDA, while the lowest levels were seen when the same diet was fed at 120% RDA. For FAS, the highest gene expression was seen in the fasted mink fed at 80% RDA and the lowest in the non-fasted mink fed at 80%. It is concluded that short-term food deprivation induces hepatic lipidosis in mink and that during this process, hepatic DNL further exacerbates liver fat accumulation.

  20. [The mountain weasel Mustela kathiah (Carnivora: Mustelidae): molecular and karyological data].

    PubMed

    Abramov, A V; Meshcherskiĭ, I G; Aniskin, V M; Rozhnov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The karyotype of Mustela kathiah was first described. Its structure is most similar to the karyotype of M. altaica, differing inthe morphological peculiarites of five pairs of large chromosomes. A comparative analysis of mitochondrial genes in the species Mustela allowed us to clarify understanding of the place of M. kathiah in the system of the genus. The earlier hypothesized proximity of the species to a group of small weasels (altaica, nivalis) or to a group of South Asian species (strigidorsa, nudipes) was not confirmed. A high level of differences between M. kathiah of Vietnam and specimens from southern China in nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome b (7.7%) and ND2 (6-6.2%) genes was found. Perhaps these differences, manifested in populations of M. kathiah from different regions, are adaptive.

  1. Transient diabetes mellitus in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Duhamelle, Alexis; Langlois, Isabelle; Desmarchelier, Marion

    2015-07-01

    A 3.5-year-old spayed female ferret, fed a diet high in refined sugar, was referred for lethargy, polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. Treatment included insulin therapy and a low carbohydrate diet. Diabetes mellitus resolved 54 d later, and insulin therapy was discontinued. There has been no recurrence of the diabetes mellitus.

  2. Focal thoracolumbar spinal cord lymphosarcoma in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Ingrao, Joelle C.; Eshar, David; Vince, Andrew; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Nykamp, Stephanie; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale

    2014-01-01

    A 6-year-old, castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was euthanized following progressive hind limb paresis and atonia of the bladder of 1-year duration. Neurological evaluation localized the lesion to the thoracolumbar spinal region, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal intramedullary spinal cord lesion. Histopathology revealed an extensive, unencapsulated, poorly demarcated mass within the thoracolumbar spinal cord, diagnosed as lymphosarcoma. PMID:24982519

  3. Focal thoracolumbar spinal cord lymphosarcoma in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Joelle C; Eshar, David; Vince, Andrew; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Nykamp, Stephanie; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale

    2014-07-01

    A 6-year-old, castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was euthanized following progressive hind limb paresis and atonia of the bladder of 1-year duration. Neurological evaluation localized the lesion to the thoracolumbar spinal region, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal intramedullary spinal cord lesion. Histopathology revealed an extensive, unencapsulated, poorly demarcated mass within the thoracolumbar spinal cord, diagnosed as lymphosarcoma.

  4. Molecular identification of Taenia mustelae cysts in subterranean rodent plateau zokors (Eospalax baileyi)

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, Fang; ZHANG, Ming-Xia; MA, Jun-Ying; CAI, Hui-Xia; SU, Jian-Ping; CAI, Hui-Xia; HOU, Zhi-Bin; ZHANG, Tong-Zuo; LIN, Gong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Cestode larvae spend one phase of their two-phase life cycle in the viscera of rodents, but cases of cestodes infecting subterranean rodents have only been rarely observed. To experimentally gain some insight into this phenomenon, we captured approximately 300 plateau zokors (Eospalax baileyi), a typical subterranean rodent inhabiting the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and examined their livers for the presence of cysts. Totally, we collected five cysts, and using a mitochondrial gene (cox1) and two nuclear genes (pepck and pold) as genetic markers, we were able to analyze the taxonomy of the cysts. Both the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods showed that the cysts share a monophyly with Taenia mustelae, while Kimura 2-parameter distances and number of different sites between our sequences and T. mustelae were far less than those found between the examined sequences and other Taeniidae species. These results, alongside supporting paraffin section histology, imply that the cysts found in plateau zokors can be regarded as larvae of T. mustelae, illustrating that zokors are a newly discovered intermediate host record of this parasite. PMID:25017751

  5. Molecular identification of Taenia mustelae cysts in subterranean rodent plateau zokors (Eospalax baileyi).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Ma, Jun-Ying; Cai, Hui-Xia; Su, Jian-Ping; Hou, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Tong-Zuo; Lin, Gong-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Cestode larvae spend one phase of their two-phase life cycle in the viscera of rodents, but cases of cestodes infecting subterranean rodents have only been rarely observed. To experimentally gain some insight into this phenomenon, we captured approximately 300 plateau zokors (Eospalax baileyi), a typical subterranean rodent inhabiting the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and examined their livers for the presence of cysts. Totally, we collected five cysts, and using a mitochondrial gene (cox1) and two nuclear genes (pepck and pold) as genetic markers, we were able to analyze the taxonomy of the cysts. Both the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods showed that the cysts share a monophyly with Taenia mustelae, while Kimura 2-parameter distances and number of different sites between our sequences and T. mustelae were far less than those found between the examined sequences and other Taeniidae species. These results, alongside supporting paraffin section histology, imply that the cysts found in plateau zokors can be regarded as larvae of T. mustelae, illustrating that zokors are a newly discovered intermediate host record of this parasite.

  6. Rhinitis and disseminated disease in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) naturally infected with Sarcocystis neurona.

    PubMed

    Britton, Ann P; Dubey, J P; Rosenthal, Benjamin M

    2010-04-19

    Naturally occurring Sarcocystis neurona infection in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with rhinitis and disseminated disease are described for the first time. The ferret exhibited severe rhinitis with intra-lesional S. neurona merozoites and schizonts. Diagnosis was confirmed immunohistochemically by staining with S. neurona-specific antibodies, and by phylogenetic analyses of conserved and variable portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. On the basis of intense schizogony in the nasal mucosa, we propose the possibility of an olfactory nerve pathway route of infection for S. neurona meningoencephalitis.

  7. [Odontologic anomaly in the American mink Neovison vison (Carnivora, Mustelidae) and possible reasons for its appearance].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the phenomenon of substitution of the reduced M2 with a tooth of a complex structure in the American mink Neovison vison Schreber. The anomaly is observed on three skulls out of the 574 examined (0.52%) and is characterized by a clear localization, identical structure, and symmetrical manifestation. Atypical molars have two roots, equally well-developed paraconid, eokonid, hypoconid, and a less pronounced metaconid. Some possible hypotheses for the anomaly that are considered include disruption in the development of the dental germ, mutation, and phenotypic expression of genes that are characteristic of plesiomorphic species of mustelids. The substantiated viewpoint is that the cause of this phenomenon may be the "awakening of dormant genes" as a result of destabilizing selection and hybrid dysgenesis in the area of contact of farm and feral American minks.

  8. Inbreeding affects fecundity of American mink (Neovison vison) in Danish farm mink.

    PubMed

    Demontis, D; Larsen, P F; Baekgaard, H; Sønderup, M; Hansen, B K; Nielsen, V H; Loeschcke, V; Zalewski, A; Zalewska, H; Pertoldi, C

    2011-08-01

    Inbreeding is an increasing problem in farmed mink, because of limited exchange of individuals between farms. In this study, genetic relatedness within seven American mink (Neovison vison) colour strains originating from 13 different mink farms in Denmark was analysed using 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci. We detected large differences in the level of relatedness (range 0.017-0.520) within colour strains. Moreover, a very strong and highly significant negative correlation between the level of relatedness and fecundity was observed (r = 0.536, P < 0.001) [Correction added after online publication on 9 March 2011: r(2) has been changed to r]. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such a correlation has been demonstrated for commercially farmed mink. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. [Odontologic anomaly in the American mink Neovison vison (Carnivora, Mustelidae) and possible reasons for its appearance].

    PubMed

    Korablev, P N; Korablev, M P; Korablev, N P; Tumanov, I L

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the phenomenon of substitution of the reduced M2 with a tooth of a complex structure in the American mink Neovison vison Schreber. The anomaly is observed on three skulls out of the 574 examined (0.52%) and is characterized by a clear localization, identical structure, and symmetrical manifestation. Atypical molars have two roots, equally well-developed paraconid, eokonid, hypoconid, and a less pronounced metaconid. Some possible hypotheses for the anomaly that are considered include disruption in the development of the dental germ, mutation, and phenotypic expression of genes that are characteristic of plesiomorphic species of mustelids. The substantiated viewpoint is that the cause of this phenomenon may be the "awakening of dormant genes" as a result of destabilizing selection and hybrid dysgenesis in the area of contact of farm and feral American minks.

  10. [Water and energy metabolism in representatives of the genus Martes and Mustela (Mammalia: Mustelidae)].

    PubMed

    Meshcherskiĭ, I G; Rozhnov, V V; Naĭdenko, S V

    2003-01-01

    The quantities of consumed food and water, quantity and moisture content of faeces, as well as quantity and concentration of excreted urine were determined in representatives of Martes--marten (M. martes) and sable (M. zibellina)--as well as in polecat (Mustela putorius). Under the same cage conditions and free access to food, all three species had similar energy value of the daily diet. However, the level of drinking water consumption and the ratio between the quantities of arriving water and energy was reliably higher in both Martes species than in polecat. In addition, both marten and sable featured a much higher rate of evaporation loss in the overall water balance and, consequently, a higher quantity of heat dissipated with evaporation as compared to polecat. Comparison of the obtained and previous data (Sokolov et al., 1995; Rozhnov, 1991) allowed us to propose that the mentioned differences can be specific for representatives of Martes and Mustela genera irrespective of ecological specialization of particular species.

  11. Noninvasive monitoring of fetal growth and development in the Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Johnson, Jay D.; Wrigley, Robert H.; Biggins, Dean E.; Godbey, Jerry L.

    1998-01-01

    The Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmanni) is the preferred species to assess procedures and establish normative values for application in the related and endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes). This study was undertaken to physically, ultrasonographically, and radiographically evaluate fetal development in a spontaneously breeding captive Siberian polecat population. Ultrasonographically, fetal sac enlargement allowed presumptive preg nancy detection as early as 12 days of gestation, the fetal pole was the first definitive sign of pregnancy at about 18 days of gestation, when the fetal heart beat also appeared, and definitive pregnancy detection by ultrasound was essentially 100% accurate after 18 days. The estimation of fetal number by ultrasound was less reliable than by radiography, as it is in other litter-bearing species. Crown-rump growth, organ differentiation, and calcification patterns resembled those of domestic carnivores except that comparable developmental stages in polecats occurred at dispro portionately later times, suggesting that young Siberian polecats are delivered in a less developed state. Careful palpation permitted detection of pregnancy after day 17 but with less certainty than with ultrasound. Radiographic evaluation was insensitive and of limited value for pregnancy detection until near term. Litter number and fetal detail were difficult to assess until ossification could be observed, 3-6 days before parturition.

  12. A comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane for short-term anesthesia in polecats (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaynor, J. S.; Wimsatt, J.; Mallinckrodt, C.; Biggins, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) from 12 litters were anesthetized with either inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane. With 7% delivered sevoflurane and 5% delivered isoflurane, time to loss of righting reflex (mean +/- SE) with sevoflurane (1.9 +/- 0.1 min) was significantly shorter compared with isoflurane (2.6 +/- 0.1 min). During maintenance at a light plane of anesthesia, systolic arterial pressure was significantly higher with sevoflurane (83 +/- 2 mm Hg) compared with isoflurane (66 +/- 2 mm Hg), and heart rate was significantly lower with sevoflurane (191 +/- 3 beats/min) compared with isoflurane (204 +/- 3 beats/min). There was no difference in respiratory rate jugular venous pH, pCO3, HCO3-, base excess, or recovery of righting reflex. Induction of anesthesia is more rapid and blood pressure is better maintained with sevoflurane compared with isoflurane; therefore, sevoflurane may be less stressful and safer. Inhaled sevoflurane should be an appropriate anesthetic for black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) in laboratory and field conditions.

  13. Identification of a tyrosinase (TYR) exon 4 deletion in albino ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, W M; Distler, C; Dekomien, G; Arning, L; Hoffmann, K-P; Epplen, J T

    2007-08-01

    Albinism is due to a lack of pigmentation in hair, skin and eye, and has been shown to occur in several animal species. Mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene account for albinism in domestic cats, rabbits, cattle, mice and rats. In this study, we demonstrate that a TYR mutation accounts for albinism in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo). The coding sequence of the five exons of TYR was determined in genomic DNA from wild-type pigmented 'sable' coloured and albino ferrets. It was not possible to amplify TYR exon 4 in albino ferrets originating from different breeds. The deletion of exon 4 in albino ferrets was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from albino and pigmented ferrets. This is the first report of a deletion of a TYR exon in a non-human mammal.

  14. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J; Tyler, Scott R; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J; Kelly, Sara M; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the 'gold standard' for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotated 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterized the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time-course data and showed distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis disease progression, we showed that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with cystic fibrosis disease.

  15. Effects of experience and cage enrichment on predatory skills of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vargas, A.; Anderson, S.H.

    1999-01-01

    We studied ontogeny of predatory skills of growing black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) raised under different captive conditions. To test effects of maturation, experience, and cage enrichment on predatory behavior, we exposed 70 juvenile black-footed ferrets to different numbers of live hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) throughout development. Both maturation and experience increased the likelihood of a black-footed ferret making a successful kill. Black-footed ferrets exposed to greater environmental complexity (enriched cage, including encouragement of food-searching behaviors) also were more likely to kill than ferrets raised in a deprived environment. Behavioral studies of captive-raised black-footed ferrets can help refine current breeding techniques and ultimately enhance efforts to recover this endangered carnivore.

  16. Trade-offs between activity and thermoregulation in a small carnivore, the least weasel Mustela nivalis.

    PubMed

    Zub, K; Szafranska, P A; Konarzewski, M; Redman, P; Speakman, J R

    2009-05-22

    We studied factors influencing daily energy expenditures (DEE) of male least weasels (Mustela nivalis) using the doubly labelled water technique. The relationship between ambient temperature and DEE formed a triangular pattern, characterized by invariance of the maximum DEE and an inverse relationship between minimum DEE and temperature. A simple energetic model relating the DEE of male weasels to activity time (AT) and ambient temperature predicted that, across seasons, less than 10 per cent of measurements approach the upper bound of observed DEE. Male weasels were able to maintain a relatively constant maximum energy output across varying temperatures by adjusting their AT to changes in temperature. They achieved maximum energy expenditures in winter due to high thermoregulatory costs, and in spring and summer due to high levels of physical activity. This pattern exemplifies a 'metabolic niche' of a small mammal having extremely high energy expenditures primarily driven by ambient temperature.

  17. Rehabilitation of a Species: The Black-Footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Brian; Biggins, Dean E.; Hanebury, Lou; Conway, Courtney; Wemmer, Chris

    1991-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) are an endangered carnivore endemic to North America.  This small nocturnal member of the weasel family is totally dependent on the prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) ecosystem for survival.  The ferret lives in prairie dog burrows and relies on prairie dogs for 90 percent of its diet (3,21).  Poisoning of prairie dogs was largely responsible for the 98 percent reduction in geographic distribution of prairie dogs; concurrently, black-footed ferret numbers plummeted.  Recently, only a single known population of black-footed ferrets remained.  In 1985 that popuation, located near Meeteetse Wyoming, succumbed to an outbreak of canine distemper, and the few remaining ferrets were taken into captivity in an attempt to save the species through captive progation.

  18. Conservation of the European mink (Mustela lutreola): focus on reproduction and reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Amstislavsky, S; Lindeberg, H; Aalto, J; Kennedy, M W

    2008-08-01

    The European mink (Mustela lutreola) is a small mammal, which belongs to the Mustelidae family (Carnivora). Earlier, the range of distribution of this species encompassed much of the European continent. During the 20th century, the numbers of European mink declined and the range of its distribution became reduced to three fragmented populations; today this species faces extinction. The urgent necessity for effective conservation efforts to protect the European mink is accepted by the governmental organizations as well as scientific communities of most European countries. In this paper, the reasons for the disappearance of European mink are reviewed and results of past conservation efforts based on captive breeding and reintroduction programmes are critically evaluated in the broad context of modern concepts of conservation genetics and reproductive biology. The data recently obtained on the reproduction and pre-implantation development of European mink and the prospects of incorporation of modern reproductive technologies into the conservation programme of this species are discussed.

  19. FATAL GASTRIC DILATION IN TWO ADULT BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES).

    PubMed

    Hinton, Jenna D; Aitken-Palmer, Copper; Joyner, Priscilla H; Ware, Lisa; Walsh, Timothy F

    2016-03-01

    Acute gastric dilation resulting in death was identified in two adult black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) housed at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia. Both individuals were adult males (3 and 5 yr) and previously clinically healthy prior to the event. The etiology of gastric dilation in both cases could not be definitively determined, and necropsy revealed severe cardiovascular compromise secondary to bloat. Limited literature is available regarding a syndrome of this type in adult black-footed ferrets. Differential diagnoses considered included gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV), severe gastric distention of unknown origin, and gastric outflow obstruction. Given the severity of this syndrome and the findings in these two cases, acute gastric dilation should be considered in black-footed ferrets presenting with acute abdominal distention, respiratory distress, and cardiovascular compromise.

  20. [The first report of a disseminated idiopathic myofasciitis in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) from Germany].

    PubMed

    Müller, Kerstin; Dietert, Kristina; Kershaw, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    A 1.5 year old neutered male pet ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with a sudden onset of severe weakness. The ferret was kept with three healthy mates, was vaccinated against distemper regularly and was never ill before presentation. Clinically, the ferret was depressed, had a hyperthermia of 40.3 degrees C, tachypnea and ocular as well as nasal discharge. Blood work revealed a mild neutropenia, blood chemistry a hyperglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypocalcemia and hyponatremia. Despite intensive therapy including fluid replacement, antibiosis, analgesia and antipyretics, the overall condition of the ferret deteriorated and the animal was euthanized two days later. Necropsy revealed a pyogranulomatous myositis, fasciitis and steatitis of the long hyoid muscles, the esophagus and intestine. Lesions were consistent with the disseminated idiopathic myositis of ferrets. This is the first reported case of this disease in a ferret originated in Germany.

  1. Cervical chordoma in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with pulmonary metastasis.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Jennifer R; Donovan, Taryn A

    2015-09-01

    A 4-year-old, male neutered domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was evaluated for a mass in the left cervical region. The owner elected humane euthanasia, and an autopsy was performed, revealing a neoplasm with infiltration into the left cranial articular fovea of the atlas and cervical vertebrae, with regional compression of the spinal cord. Histologic evaluation was consistent with cervical chordoma. At autopsy, a left cranial lung lobe nodule was observed. Additional sectioning and histologic evaluation revealed multiple foci of metastatic chordoma at this site. A small focus of micrometastasis was also detected in a section from the right lung lobes. Chordoma is the most common musculoskeletal neoplasm of ferrets, arising from remnant fetal notochord. To our knowledge, pulmonary chordoma metastasis has not been previously reported in the ferret. This case demonstrates the potential for visceral metastasis of chordoma in the ferret, as has been reported in other species. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Putative chemosignals of the ferret (Mustela furo) associated with individual and gender recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J X; Soini, H A; Bruce, K E; Wiesler, D; Woodley, S K; Baum, M J; Novotny, M V

    2005-11-01

    Quantitative stir bar sorptive extraction methods, both in the aqueous and headspace modes, followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to investigate individual variations in the volatile components of male and female ferret (Mustela furo) urine. The urinary profiles were further compared with volatile profiles of anal gland secretions of breeding male and female ferrets. Thirty volatile compounds were quantified in male and female urine. Among them, 2-methylquinoline was unique to male urine. Four ketones (4-heptanone, 2-heptanone, o-aminoacetophenone, and a dimethoxyacetophenone) and several nitrogen compounds (e.g., 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, quinoline, 4-methylquinazoline) and low levels of three unidentified nonsulfur compounds were significantly more abundant in males than in females. Quantitative comparison of 30 volatile urinary compounds showed several statistically significant differences between the sexes and individuals of the same sex. These findings suggest that ferrets may use urine marking for sex and individual recognitions. Ten of the 26 compounds identified in anal gland secretions from females and males were also found in urine. However, most of the major compounds (thietanes, dithiolanes, and indole) in anal glands were not present in urine. This suggests that urine may convey specific signals that differ from those of anal glands. Additionally, 10 volatiles (two aldehydes, five ketones, benzothiazole, 2-methylquinoline, and 4-methylquinazoline), not previously identified, were found in ferret anal gland secretions. Among the new compounds, o-aminoacetophenone was found only in males, while only traces of this compound were found in females. Similar results were previously obtained in anal glands of three other Mustela species. These findings provide new information about the constituents of urine and volatile components of anal gland secretions in ferrets.

  3. Sequencing and characterization of mixed function monooxygenase genes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 of Mink (Mustela vison) to facilitate study of dioxin-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaowei; Moore, Jeremy N.; Newsted, John L.; Hecker, Markus Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Jones, Paul D.; Bursian, Steven J.

    2009-02-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity in mink, cDNAs encoding for CYP1A1 and the CYP1A2 mixed function monooxygenases were cloned and characterized. In addition, the effects of selected dibenzofurans on the expression of these genes and the presence of their respective proteins (P4501A) were investigated, and then correlated with the catalytic activities of these proteins as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) activities. The predicted protein sequences for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 comprise 517 and 512 amino acid residues, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis of the mink CYP1As with protein sequences of other mammals revealed high sequence homology with sea otter, seals and the dog, with amino acid identities ranging from 89 to 95% for CYP1A1 and 81 to 93% for CYP1A2. Since exposure to both 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) and 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) resulted in dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 mRNA, CYP1A2 mRNA and CYP1A protein levels an underlying AhR-mediated mechanism is suggested. The up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA in liver was more consistent to the sum adipose TEQ concentration than to the liver TEQ concentration in minks treated with TCDF or PeCDF. The result suggested that the hepatic-sequestered fraction of PeCDF was biologically inactive to the induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2.

  4. [Morphology and biochemistry of blood of various mustelids. 4. Determination of various metabolites in the arterial plasma of mink--principles of the preparation of standard values for laboratory diagnosis in farm mink (Mustela vison Schreber, 1777)].

    PubMed

    Zeissler, R; Wenzel, U D; Strauch, W

    1980-01-01

    An account is first given of latest knowledge on how to determine clinico-diagnostic applicability of certain metabolites in mink plasma and serum. Then, statistically treated results obtained from analysis of levels of total protein, albumin, creatinine, urea, total cholesterin, triglyceride, and total bilirubin are tabulated and discussed, with due consideration being given to sexual dimorphism, following determination of those values from arterial plasma of 118 male and 124 female minks, aged between six and seven months and kept under anaesthesia. The following preliminary findings are somewhat worth mentioning: (a) Total cholesterin concentrations in plasma of females were found to be higher than those recorded from the males tested. However, no sex-related differences were established for any of the other parameters. (b) Creatinine, urea, and total cholesterin followed simple normal distribution. However, plasma protein concentrations exhibited no Gaussian distribution until all individual data had been logarithmically transformed. (c) In a complementary model experiment, in which the above plasma data were determined from nine male ferrets, aged between six and seven months, evidence was produced to differentiated effects of neuroleptanalgesia on metabolite concentrations.

  5. Population viability analysis of American mink (Neovison vison) escaped from Danish mink farms.

    PubMed

    Pertoldi, C; Rødjajn, S; Zalewski, A; Demontis, D; Loeschcke, V; Kjærsgaard, A

    2013-06-01

    The American mink (Neovison vison) was introduced to Danish fur farms in the 1930s. An unknown number of mink have managed to escape these farms over the years. Today feral mink are found in the wild in most parts of Denmark. A population viability analysis (PVA) was performed using VORTEX, a stochastic population simulation software, to 1) predict the viability and potential population expansion from different sizes of founding populations of farm escapees, 2) investigate which parameters mostly affect the viability, 3) assess the effects of continuous escapes on the feral populations and how the feral populations are affected by management programs, and 4) discuss eradication strategies and their efficiency in management of the feral American mink population in Denmark. The simulations showed that juvenile mortality had the greatest effect on population viability followed by fecundity, adult mortality, and initial population size. Populations supplemented yearly by escapees all reached the carrying capacity and gained genetic variability over the years. Harvesting was modeled as the yearly number of mink caught in Denmark. Most of the simulated harvested populations crashed within few years after the first harvesting event. This indicates that the feral number of mink in Denmark is sustained due to supplements from mink farms and no true feral population exists. To manage the number of feral mink in Denmark it is essential to prevent escapees. The eradication effort would be most effective if focused on late summer and autumn when juvenile mink leave the maternal territory.

  6. Evaluation of reproductive safety of beta-sitosterol on the American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Pölönen, Ilpo; Ikonen, Katja; Määttänen, Maija; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2008-03-01

    beta-Sitosterol is a weakly estrogenic phytosterol used extensively in functional foods to lower elevated serum cholesterol concentrations due to its inhibitory action on intestinal cholesterol absorption. It caused previously decreased sex steroid concentrations in fish and lowered sperm counts in rats. In the American mink (Neovison vison), litter size increased slightly due to dietary beta-sitosterol supplement. The aim of the present experiment was to conduct a dose-response study on the effects of beta-sitosterol on the reproduction of the American mink. Juvenile male and female mink (n=480) were exposed to 0, 5, 10 or 50 mg of peroral beta-sitosterol kg(-1)d(-1) for 10 months. After 3 months of exposure in November, 15 males per group were sacrificed and general biochemical variables reflecting overall health were determined. The beta-sitosterol-treated male mink had increased absolute and relative masses of intraabdominal fat and higher blood hemoglobin and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. In spring, the top-rated male mink were mated with multiple females within each study group and reproductive success was assessed. No differences in the reproductive performance of the males (10-11 per group) or females (47-50 per group) could be detected in the exposed groups and the kits of all groups developed in a similar manner. The results suggest that dietary beta-sitosterol presents no significant risk to mammalian fertility.

  7. An invasive species as an additional parasite reservoir: Trichinella in introduced American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Hurníková, Zuzana; Kołodziej-Sobocińska, Marta; Dvorožňáková, Emília; Niemczynowicz, Agnieszka; Zalewski, Andrzej

    2016-11-15

    The American mink (Neovison vison Schreber, 1777) is one of the most invasive alien mammal species which has been introduced to many countries in Europe, Asia and South America. As a predator which feeds on various prey, American mink carry many endoparasites; however, data about infection rate and prevalence of different parasites in mink are limited, especially concerning Trichinella spp. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of American mink in the circulation of Trichinella species in its introduced range. In total, 812 muscle samples of mink from six feral populations and three farms in Poland were examined for presence of Trichinella muscle larvae using the artificial HCl-pepsin digestion method. Muscle larvae were found in 27 out of 812 individuals (3.3%) from six localities in western and north-eastern Poland. The intensity of infection varied from 0.1 to 274.8 LPG. The majority of Trichinella-positive individuals - 15 (55.6%) were infected with T. britovi, one with T. spiralis, and one with T. pseudospiralis. Two animals harboured T. britovi and T. spiralis in co-infection and this data confirmed the first report of a mixed Trichinella infection in American mink. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrient-specific compensatory feeding in a mammalian carnivore, the mink, Neovison vison.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kim; Simpson, Stephen J; Nielsen, Vivi H; Hunt, John; Raubenheimer, David; Mayntz, David

    2014-10-14

    Balancing of macronutrient intake has only recently been demonstrated in predators. In particular, the ability to regulate carbohydrate intake is little studied in obligate carnivores, as carbohydrate is present at very low concentrations in prey animal tissue. In the present study, we determined whether American mink (Neovison vison) would compensate for dietary nutritional imbalances by foraging for complementary macronutrients (protein, lipid and carbohydrate) when subsequently given a dietary choice. We used three food pairings, within which two macronutrients differed relative to each other (high v. low concentration), while the third was kept at a constant level. The mink were first restricted to a single nutritionally imbalanced food for 7 d and then given a free choice to feed from the same food or a nutritionally complementary food for three consecutive days. When restricted to nutritionally imbalanced foods, the mink were willing to overingest protein only to a certain level ('ceiling'). When subsequently given a choice, the mink compensated for the period of nutritional imbalance by selecting the nutritionally complementary food in the food choice pairing. Notably, this rebalancing occurred for all the three macronutrients, including carbohydrate, which is particularly interesting as carbohydrate is not a major macronutrient for obligate carnivores in nature. However, there was also a ceiling to carbohydrate intake, as has been demonstrated previously in domestic cats. The results of the present study show that mink regulate their intake of all the three macronutrients within limits imposed by ceilings on protein and carbohydrate intake and that they will compensate for a period of nutritional imbalance by subsequently selecting nutritionally complementary foods.

  9. A re-assigned American mink (Neovison vison) map optimal for genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Anistoroaei, Razvan; Nielsen, Vivi; Markakis, Marios Nektarios; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jørgensen, Claus B; Christensen, Knud; Fredholm, Merete

    2012-12-10

    Our previously published second generation genetic map for the American mink (Neovison vison) has been used and redesigned in its best for genome-wide studies with maximum of efficiency. A number of 114 selected markers, including 33 newly developed microsatellite markers from the CHORI-231 mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library, have been genotyped in a two generation population composed of 1200 individuals. The outcome reassigns the position of some markers on the chromosomes and it produces a more reliable map with a convenient distance between markers. A total of 104 markers mapped to 14 linkage groups corresponding to the mink autosomes. Six markers are unlinked and four markers are allocated to the X chromosome by homology but no linkage was detected. The sex-average linkage map spans 1192 centiMorgans (cM) with an average intermarker distance of 11.4cM and 1648cM when the ends of the linkage groups and the autosomal unlinked markers are added. Sex-specific genetic linkage maps were also generated. The male sex-specific map had a total length of 1014.6cM between the linked markers and an average inter-marker interval of 9.7cM. The female map has a corresponding length of 1378.6cM and an average inter-marker interval of 13.3cM. The study is complemented with additional anchorage for most of the chromosomes of the map by BAC in situ hybridization with clones containing microsatellites strategically selected from the various parts of the genome. This map provides an improved tool for genetic mapping and comparative genomics in mink, also useful for the future assembly of the mink genome sequence when this will be taken forward. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of survival skills in captive-raised Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) I: locating prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Brian; Biggins, Dean; Wemmer, Chris; Powell, Roger; Hanebury, Lou; Horn, Deborah; Vargas, Astrid

    1990-01-01

    Captive-raised mustelids appear to have a rudimentary capacity to kill prey, but the skills necessary for locating prey may be eroded during captivity. We tested the maturational component of prey-searching behavior with captive-raised Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) by subjecting polecats to a simulated prairie dog colony of 6 burrows within a 200 m2 arena. Ten naive Siberian polecats at ages 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5 months (30 total) were deprived of food for 12 hours. A dead prairie dog was placed in 1 prairie dog burrow and the other 5 were empty. A single Siberian polecat was released onto the colony shortly before sunset and its movements monitored from an observation tower. Older Siberian polecats located prey significantly quicker than younger polecats, but all age groups spent a great deal of time in surface activity not directed toward a burrow. When Siberian polecats were about 10 months old, all burrows in the arena were plugged with dirt including the burrow with the prairie dog. In this winter test, Siberian polecats located the prey but still spent a great deal of time in non-burrow directed surface activity. Economical use of surface time, with a low amount of non-burrow directed behavior, would presumably reduce the risk of predation for hunting polecats.

  11. Development of survival skills in captive-raised Siberian polecats (Mustela eversmanni) II: predator avoidance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Brian; Biggins, Dean; Wemmer, Chris; Powell, Roger; Calvo, Lorena; Hanebury, Lou; Wharton, Tracy

    1990-01-01

    We exposed naive Siberain polecats (Mustela eversmanni) (aged 2, 3, and 4 months) to a swooping stuffed great horned owl (Buho virginianus) and a stuffed badger (Taxidae taxus) mounted on a remote control toy automobile frame. The first introduction to each was harmless, the second was accompanied by a mild aversive stimulus, the third (1 day after attack) was harmless, and the fourth (30 days after attack) was harmless. Alert behavior increased after a single attack by either predator model. Escape responses of naive polecats did not differ between ages when exposed to the badger, but 4 month old polecats reduced their escape times after a single badger attack. When exposed to the swooping owl, naive 4 month old polecats redponded more quickly than the other two age groups, and 3 and 4 month old polecats reduced escape times after a single owl attack. This indicates an innate escape response to the owl model at 4 months of age, and a short-tert ability to remember a single mild aversive encounter with the badger and owl models at 3 or 4 months of age.

  12. Allometric comparison of skulls from two closely related weasels, Mustela itatsi and M. sibirica.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Abe, Mikiko; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2011-09-01

    We conducted an interspecific comparison of skulls from two closely related but differently sized mustelid species, Mustela itatsi and M. sibirica (Mammalia, Carnivora, Mustelidae); a sexual comparison within the latter species showed remarkable size dimorphism. We clarified several differences in skull proportion related to size using allometric analyses and qualitative comparisons. Allometric analysis revealed that the skulls of male M. itatsi (the smaller species) have a relatively long palate; a slender viscerocranium and postorbital constriction; a broad, short, and low neurocranium; small carnassials; and a short mandible with a thin body and small ramus compared to the skulls of male M. sibirica (the larger species). Similar results were obtained when male M. itatsi were compared to female M. sibirica, although the male M. itatsi had a broader viscerocranium than female M. sibirica. A sexual comparison in M. sibirica revealed a larger skull size among the males with a relatively wide viscerocranium; wide postorbital constriction; a slender, long, and high neurocranium; short and wide auditory bullae; short carnassials; and a long and high mandible compared to females. Qualitative comparisons revealed changes in a few characters depending on skull size or with respect to some cranial components in each species. The interspecific differences observed were clearly larger than the intraspecific differences for three qualitative characters. The allometric and qualitative differences detected between these species suggest that each species is not simply the dwarf and/or giant morph of the other, and complicated differences were clarified.

  13. The Jeju weasel, Mustela sibilica quelpartis, a new definitive host for Gnathostoma nipponicum Yamaguti, 1941.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ho-Choon; Oh, Hong-Shik; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2011-09-01

    Adult gnathostomes were discovered in the stomach of the Jeju weasel, Mustela sibilica quelpartis, road-killed in Jeju-do (Province). Their morphological characters were examined to identify the species. Total 50 gnathostome adults were collected from 6 out of 10 weasels examined. In infected weasels, 4-6 worms were grouped and embedded in each granulomatous gastric tumor, except 1 weasel. Male worms were 25.0×1.4 mm in average size, and had a tail with pedunculate papillae, a spicule, and minute tegumental spines. Females were 40.0×2.5 mm in average size, and had a tail without tegumental spines. Pointed and posteriorly curved hooklets were arranged in 8-10 rows on the head bulb. Tegumental spines were distributed from behind the head bulb to the middle portion of the body. The spines were different in size and shape by the distribution level of the body surface. Fertilized eggs were 65.5×38.9 µm in average size, and had a mucoid plug at 1 pole. These gnathostomes from Jeju weasels were identified as Gnathostoma nipponicum Yamaguti, 1941. By the present study, it was confirmed for the first time that G. nipponicum is distributed in Jeju-do, the Republic of Korea, and the Jeju weasel, M. sibilica quelpartis, plays a crucial role for its definitive host.

  14. [Clinical evaluation of three medetomidine--midazolam--ketamine combinations for neutering of ferrets (Mustela putorius furo)].

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Anita; Lendl, Christine; Busch, Raymonde; Henke, Julia

    2008-01-01

    33 ferrets (Mustela putorius furo, 11 females, 22 males, ASA I-II) were neutered in a combination anaesthesia with medetomidine, midazolam and ketamine. The animals were randomized into 3 groups. All animals received 20 microg/kg BW medetomidine and 0.5 mg/kg BW midazolam. The three groups differed regarding dosis and way of application of ketamine (IM10 = 10 mg/kg BW intramuscularly; IM07 = 7 mg/kg BW intramuscularly; SC10 = 10 mg/kg BW subcutaneously). After 30 minutes anaesthesia was partially antagonised with 100 microg/kg BW atipamezole i.m.. Sedation, muscle relaxation, analgesia, and overall anaesthetic impression were compared by a scoring protocol. Reactions to painful stimuli of clamping the spermatic cord or the ovarial ligament including the A. ovarica were judged, too. All animals lost their righting reflex and could be placed in dorsal recumbency. Induction and recovery time were significantly the shortest in study group IM10 with 1.73 +/- 0.3 and 9.73 +/- 4.6 min respectively. Recovery was significantly prolonged in group SC10 with 30.27 +/- 15.6 min. The MMK-anaesthesia with 10 mg/kg ketamine i.m. is very useful for neutering ferrets. Respiratory depression and bradycardia typically for medetomidine were seen in all three combinations, but quickly reversed after partial antagonisation. Induction and intubation, followed by inhalation anaesthesia, were possible with all three regimes.

  15. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Immunoglobulin Proteins of the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) serves as an animal model for the study of several viruses that cause human disease, most notably influenza. Despite the importance of this animal model, characterization of the immune response by flow cytometry (FCM) is severely hampered due to the limited number of commercially available reagents. To begin to address this unmet need and to facilitate more in-depth study of ferret B cells including the identification of antibody-secreting cells, eight unique murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with specificity for ferret immunoglobulin (Ig) were generated using conventional B cell hybridoma technology. These mAb were screened for reactivity against ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells by FCM and demonstrate specificity for CD79β+ B cells. Several of these mAb are specific for the light chain of surface B cell receptor (BCR) and enable segregation of kappa and lambda B cells. Additionally, a mAb that yielded surface staining of nearly all surface BCR positive cells (i.e., pan ferret Ig) was generated. Collectively, these MαF-Ig mAb offer advancement compared to the existing portfolio of polyclonal anti-ferret Ig detection reagents and should be applicable to a wide array of immunologic assays including the identification of antibody-secreting cells by FCM. PMID:28286781

  16. Stoats (Mustela erminea) provide evidence of natural overland colonization of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Natália; McDonald, Robbie A; Searle, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    The current Irish biota has controversial origins. Ireland was largely covered by ice at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and may not have had land connections to continental Europe and Britain thereafter. Given the potential difficulty for terrestrial species to colonize Ireland except by human introduction, we investigated the stoat (Mustela erminea) as a possible cold-tolerant model species for natural colonization of Ireland at the LGM itself. The stoat currently lives in Ireland and Britain and across much of the Holarctic region including the high Arctic. We studied mitochondrial DNA variation (1771 bp) over the whole geographical range of the stoat (186 individuals and 142 localities), but with particular emphasis on the British Isles and continental Europe. Irish stoats showed considerably greater nucleotide and haplotype diversity than those in Britain. Bayesian dating is consistent with an LGM colonization of Ireland and suggests that Britain was colonized later. This later colonization probably reflects a replacement event, which can explain why Irish and British stoats belong to different mitochondrial lineages as well as different morphologically defined subspecies. The molecular data strongly indicate that stoats colonized Ireland naturally and that their genetic variability reflects accumulation of mutations during a population expansion on the island. PMID:17412682

  17. Volatile compounds in anal gland of Siberian weasels (Mustela sibirica) and steppe polecats (M. eversmanni).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Xu; Sun, Lixing; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Zu-Wang; Chen, Yi; Wang, Rui

    2002-06-01

    The volatile constituents in anal gland secretions of two sympatric Mustela species, the Siberian weasel (M. sibirica) and steppe polecat (M. eversmanni), were studied by the headspace technique, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Nine sulfur-containing compounds were identified. They were 2,2-dimethylthietane, (Z)- or (E)-2,4-dimethylthietane, (E)-2,3-dimethylthietane, 2-ethylthietane, (E)-2-ethyl-3-methylthietane, (Z)-2-ethyl-3-methylthietane, 2-propylthietane, 3,3-dimethyl-1,2-dithiacyclopentane, and (Z)-3,4-dimethyl-2,2-dithiacyclopentane. Among them, (E)-2-ethyl-3- methylthietanes, (Z)-2-ethyl-3-methylthietanes, and (Z)-3,4-dimethyl-1,2-dithiacyclopentane were present in the polecat but not in the weasel. The predominant compound was 2,2-dimethylthietane in the weasel and (E)- or (Z)-2,4-dimethylthietane in the polecat. These differences were consistent between the two species, regardless of sex and age and, therefore, could possibly be used for species recognition. In the weasel, 2-ethylthietane was found only in the female, and the relative abundance of several compounds was significantly different between males and females. In the polecat, although no sex-specific volatile compounds were found, males and females differed in the relative abundance of several of the compounds. In both species, the relative abundance of some compounds varied with age. We conclude that these volatile compounds can be used to communicate information about species, sex, and age.

  18. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Immunoglobulin Proteins of the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Kirchenbaum, Greg A; Ross, Ted M

    2017-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) serves as an animal model for the study of several viruses that cause human disease, most notably influenza. Despite the importance of this animal model, characterization of the immune response by flow cytometry (FCM) is severely hampered due to the limited number of commercially available reagents. To begin to address this unmet need and to facilitate more in-depth study of ferret B cells including the identification of antibody-secreting cells, eight unique murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with specificity for ferret immunoglobulin (Ig) were generated using conventional B cell hybridoma technology. These mAb were screened for reactivity against ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells by FCM and demonstrate specificity for CD79β(+) B cells. Several of these mAb are specific for the light chain of surface B cell receptor (BCR) and enable segregation of kappa and lambda B cells. Additionally, a mAb that yielded surface staining of nearly all surface BCR positive cells (i.e., pan ferret Ig) was generated. Collectively, these MαF-Ig mAb offer advancement compared to the existing portfolio of polyclonal anti-ferret Ig detection reagents and should be applicable to a wide array of immunologic assays including the identification of antibody-secreting cells by FCM.

  19. Endogenous biosynthesis of nitrate and its role in vivo nitrosation. [Mustela putorius furo

    SciTech Connect

    Dull, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was chosen as a model animal for the metabolism of nitrate. The net biosynthesis of nitrate in the ferret was demonstrated to be 8.89-10.3 mcmole/kg/day. Nitrate balance studied indicate that, because of metabolism, excretion of nitrate was lower than ingestion which oral doses were higher than 6.3 mcmole/day. At nitrate ingestions levels of less than 6.3 mcmole/day, excretion exceeded intake. Studies with 15-N labelled nitrate indicated that only 36% of the oral dose was recovered as 15-N nitrate from urine. Oral doses of 15-N labelled ammonia resulted in the incorporation of the 15-N label into nitrate in urine and feces. This demonstrated that ammonia can serve as a precursor to biosynthesized nitrate. Oral dosing of ferrets with N-nitrosoproline results in 94.7% recovery in the urine within 48 hr. 15-N labelled N-nitrosoproline could not be detected in the urine at anytime during a ten day feeding study with 15-N labelled nitrate. 14-N labelled N-nitrosoproline was detected throughout. As 14-N N-nitrosoproline could not be detected in the diet, it would appear that excretion of 14-N labelled N-nitrosoproline must be arising from an in vivo nitrosation site other than the stomach.

  20. Epidemiological evaluation of cystine urolithiasis in domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo): 70 cases (1992-2009).

    PubMed

    Nwaokorie, Eugene E; Osborne, Carl A; Lulich, Jody P; Albasan, Hasan

    2013-04-15

    To determine the prevalence of cystine uroliths in domestic ferrets with urolithiasis and determine whether age, breed, sex, reproductive status, anatomic location, and season are risk factors associated with cystine urolith formation. Retrospective cross-sectional case-control study. Records of 435 ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with uroliths submitted for analyses between 1992 and 2009, of which 70 were cystine uroliths. Specific descriptive information was obtained about each ferret to determine whether specific risk factors were associated with the development of cystine uroliths. Cystine uroliths comprised 70 of the 435 (16%) uroliths. Cystine uroliths were more common in male (n = 54) than in female (16) ferrets. All cystine uroliths were retrieved from the lower portion of the urinary tract (bladder and urethra [n = 67]) or were voided (3); none of the uroliths were retrieved from the upper portion of the urinary tract (kidney and ureters). Awareness of the prevalence of cystine uroliths along with knowledge of etiologic, demographic, and environmental risk and protective factors for urolithiasis may facilitate development of surveillance strategies that result in earlier detection of cystinuria. Genetic factors associated with this disease have not yet been reported in ferrets, but a familial pattern of inheritance determined to be a major underlying factor in cystine urolithiasis in dogs and humans suggests that this may be a factor in ferrets and that the parent stock of ferrets in the present study may have been inbred.

  1. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tyler, Scott R.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G. Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J.; Kelly, Sara M.; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J.; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M.; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M.; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the ‘gold standard’ for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission1–4. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotate 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterize the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time courses, and show distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis (CF) disease progression, we show that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with CF disease. PMID:25402615

  2. Factors associated with usage of antimicrobials in commercial mink (Neovison vison) production in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F; Sommer, H M; Struve, T; Clausen, J; Chriél, M

    2016-04-01

    The American mink (Neovison vison) is used for commercial fur production in Denmark. In recent years, antimicrobial prescription for Danish mink has been increasing. In this study, the patterns and trends in antimicrobial use in mink were described and a multi-variable variance analysis was carried out with the objective of identifying risk factors for antimicrobial use on herd level. The study was based on register data for 2007-2012. Information on antimicrobial use was obtained from the national database VetStat, monitoring all medicinal products used for animals on prescription level. Data on microbiological feed quality was obtained from the Voluntary Feed Control under the Mink producers Organization, and data on herd size and the relation between farm and feed producer was obtained from the registers at Kopenhagen Fur, based on yearly reporting from the mink producers. Descriptive analysis showed a clear significant effect of season on antimicrobial use, with a peak in "treatment proportions", TP (defined daily doses per kg biomass-days) in May, around the time of whelping, and a high level in the following months. In autumn, a minor peak in antimicrobial use occurred throughout the study period. From 2007 to 2011, a 102% increase in annual antimicrobial TP was noted; on herd level, the increase was associated with an increasing frequency of prescription, and a decrease in the amounts prescribed in months with prescription. A binomial model showed that on herd level, the annual number of months with antimicrobial prescription was significantly (p<0.01) affected by feed producer, veterinarian, disease (specific laboratory diagnosis) infection, herd size and year, with an interaction between feed producer and year. A log-normal model showed that in months with antimicrobial use, the TP on herd level was significantly (p<0.001) affected by year, month (season), feed producer, feed quality score, veterinarian, herd size and laboratory confirmed diagnosis of

  3. Foetal life protein restriction in male mink (Neovison vison) kits lowers post-weaning protein oxidation and the relative abundance of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, C F; Blache, D; Thomsen, P D; Tauson, A-H

    2012-01-01

    Foetal life malnutrition has been studied intensively in a number of animal models. Results show that especially foetal life protein malnutrition can lead to metabolic changes later in life. This might be of particular importance for strict carnivores, for example, cat and mink (Neovison vison) because of their higher protein requirement than in other domestic mammals. This study aimed to investigate the effects of low protein provision during foetal life to male mink kits on their protein metabolism during the early post-weaning period of rapid growth and to investigate whether foetal life protein deficiency affects the response to adequate or deficient protein provision post weaning. Further, we intended to study whether the changes in the gene expression of key enzymes in foetal hepatic tissue caused by maternal protein deficiency were manifested post-weaning. A total of 32 male mink kits born to mothers fed either a low-protein diet (LP), that is, 14% of metabolizable energy (ME) from protein (foetal low - FL), n = 16, or an adequate-protein (AP) diet, that is, 29% of ME from protein (foetal adequate - FA), n = 16) in the last 16.3 ± 1.8 days of pregnancy were used. The FL offspring had lower birth weight and lower relative abundance of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (Fru-1,6-P2ase) and pyruvate kinase mRNA in foetal hepatic tissue than FA kits. The mothers were fed a diet containing adequate protein until weaning. At weaning (7 weeks of age), half of the kits from each foetal treatment group were fed an AP diet (32% of ME from protein; n = 8 FA and 8 FL) and the other half were fed a LP diet (18% of ME from protein; n = 8 FA and 8 FL) until 9.5 weeks of age, yielding four treatment groups (i.e. FA-AP, FA-LP, FL-AP and FL-LP). Low protein provision in foetal life lowered the protein oxidation post-weaning compared with the controls (P = 0.006), indicating metabolic flexibility and a better ability to conserve protein. This could not, however, be supported by

  4. Testing for Aleutian mink disease virus in the river otter (Lontra canadensis) in sympatry with infected American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jeff; Kidd, Anne G; Nituch, Larissa A; Sadowski, Carrie; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2014-07-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) occurs in the American mink (Neovison vison) in wild populations and on mink farms and can cause illness and death. The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) may be exposed to AMDV because of shared space and habitat with mink. Using serology and real-time PCR, we tested river otters across Ontario for AMDV infection. We found no evidence of infection in otters, a surprising finding given the sympatric distribution, niche overlap, and close phylogenetic relationship of the river otter and the American mink. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the major point of spillover of AMDV between mink farms and wildlife is manure and composting carcasses on mink farms. Mink farms in Ontario are generally in agricultural landscapes; it is unlikely that river otter use these habitats and thus are likely not exposed to AMDV. We found no evidence that AMD is an important disease for the river otters in Ontario.

  5. Optical conductivity of visons in Z2 spin liquids close to a valence bond solid transition on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Yejin; Punk, Matthias; Sachdev, Subir

    2013-06-01

    We consider Z2 spin liquids on the kagome lattice on the verge of a valence bond solid (VBS) transition, where vortex excitations carrying Z2 magnetic flux—so-called visons—condense. We show that these vison excitations can couple directly to the external electromagnetic field, even though they carry neither spin nor charge. This is possible via a magnetoelastic coupling mechanism recently identified. [Potter, Senthil, and Lee, arXiv:1301.3495; Hao, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.174432 85, 174432 (2012)] For the case of transitions to a 36-site unit cell VBS state, the corresponding finite ac conductivity has a specific power-law frequency dependence, which is related to the crossover exponent of the quantum critical point. The visons’ contribution to the optical conductivity at transitions to VBS states with a 12-site unit cell vanishes, however.

  6. Collateral circulation in ferrets (Mustela putorius) during temporary occlusion of the caudal vena cava.

    PubMed

    Calicchio, Kristina W; Bennett, R Avery; Laraio, Leonard C; Weisse, Chick; Zwingenberger, Allison L; Rosenthal, Karen L; Johnston, Matthew S; Campbell, Vicki L; Solomon, Jeffrey A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether extent of collateral circulation would change during temporary occlusion of the caudal vena cava (CVC) in ferrets (Mustela putorius), a pressure change would occur caudal to the occlusion, and differences would exist between the sexes with respect to those changes. ANIMALS 8 adult ferrets (4 castrated males and 4 spayed females). PROCEDURES Ferrets were anesthetized. A balloon occlusion catheter was introduced through a jugular vein, passed into the CVC by use of fluoroscopy, positioned cranial to the right renal vein, and inflated for 20 minutes. Venography was performed 5 and 15 minutes after occlusion. Pressure in the CVC caudal to the occlusion was measured continuously. A CBC, plasma biochemical analysis, and urinalysis were performed immediately after the procedure and 2 or 3 days later. RESULTS All 8 ferrets survived the procedure; no differences were apparent between the sexes. Vessels providing collateral circulation were identified in all ferrets, indicating blood flow to the paravertebral venous plexus. Complications observed prior to occlusion included atrial and ventricular premature contractions. Complications after occlusion included bradycardia, seizures, and extravasation of contrast medium. Mean baseline CVC pressure was 5.4 cm H2O. During occlusion, 6 ferrets had a moderate increase in CVC pressure (mean, 24.3 cm H2O) and 2 ferrets had a marked increase in CVC pressure to > 55.0 cm H2O. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Caval occlusion for 20 minutes was performed in healthy ferrets with minimal adverse effects noted within the follow-up period and no apparent differences between sexes. The CVC pressure during occlusion may be prognostic in ferrets undergoing surgical ligation of the CVC, which commonly occurs during adrenal tumor resection.

  7. The energy cost of voluntary running in the weasel Mustela nivalis.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark A; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zub, Karol; Konarzewski, Marek

    2013-02-15

    The small size and elongate shape of weasels (Mustela nivalis) probably evolved to facilitate movement within the burrow systems of prey species, but result in high energy costs of thermoregulation. In this study we measured metabolic rates of weasels during voluntary locomotion to determine whether energy costs of transport are also high in these unusually shaped mammals. In addition, we measured the lower and upper limits of aerobic metabolism [resting metabolic rate (RMR) and maximal oxygen consumption in forced exercise (V(O(2),max))], and used the wide size range of adult weasels to investigate the intraspecific scaling of energy metabolism. Finally, we combined measurements of energy use during running with radiotracking and doubly labeled water data from free-living weasels to estimate the importance of locomotor costs in daily energy budgets. We found that weasels have higher than predicted costs of running, largely because of an elevated intercept of the speed versus metabolic rate relationship. Running costs were strongly affected by the approximately fourfold range of body size in adults. As reported in other studies, the RMR of weasels was considerably higher than predicted from body mass. Maximal oxygen consumption was also higher than predicted, but factorial aerobic scope (V(O(2),max)/RMR) was within the normal range for mammals. Intraspecific mass scaling of RMR and V(O(2),max) did not differ from typical interspecific mammalian allometries. In wild weasels, locomotor costs comprised roughly 5% of daily energy expenditures; this low value was primarily a result of short travel times and distances.

  8. Seasonal variation of resting metabolic rate and body mass in free-living weasels Mustela nivalis.

    PubMed

    Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zub, Karol; Konarzewski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic rates and body mass of mammals vary seasonally along with ambient temperatures and food availability. At the population level, seasonal changes in metabolic rate and mass can be due to selective mortality or emigration of individuals whose metabolic rate or mass differs from the average for the population. Alternatively, the metabolic rates of individuals can change seasonally, such that the population average increases or decreases due to shifts in the physiology of the overall population. The latter implies that individuals respond in a similar manner to changing seasonal conditions. We studied seasonal changes in body mass (BM) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in free-ranging male weasels (Mustela nivalis) to test the consistency of these traits in individuals caught in different seasons of the year. At the population level, BM was remarkably stable across the seasons (F(3, 124)=0.25, P=0.9). In contrast, BM- corrected RMR varied significantly between seasons and was the lowest in winter (F(3, 135)=9.13, P<0.0001). We demonstrated that individual weasels were consistent in how their BM and RMR deviated from the seasonal means for the population (intraclass correlation, τ=0.78 and 0.33, respectively). This variation among individuals explained ~76% and 27% of the total variation of BM and basal metabolic rate, respectively. Hence, the relatively constant BM at the population level across seasons is due to a relative constancy of BM in individuals. Our study is one of relatively few research projects that demonstrate that seasonal changes in RMR observed in the wild population are in part due to a consistency in individual responses to changing environmental conditions.

  9. Taxonomic status and origin of the Egyptian weasel (Mustela subpalmata) inferred from mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mónica; Bos, Arthur R; Hoath, Richard; Schembri, Patrick J; Lymberakis, Petros; Cento, Michele; Ghawar, Wissem; Ozkurt, Sakir O; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Merilä, Juha; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Egyptian weasel (Mustela subpalmata) is a small mustelid with a distribution restricted to the lower Nile Valley and the Nile Delta. Traditionally considered a subspecies of the least weasel (M. nivalis), it is currently recognized as a separate species based on morphology. Here we present the first genetic assessment of the taxonomic status of the Egyptian weasel by comparing mitochondrial DNA (Cytochrome b gene and control region) sequences to those of least weasels from the western Palearctic, with a focus on the Mediterranean region. Our results provide no evidence to support the view that the Egyptian weasel is genetically distinct from the least weasel, as we found that, for both Cytochrome b and control region, haplotypes were shared between the two taxa. Specifically, the Cytochrome b and control region haplotypes detected in the Egyptian weasel were also present in M. nivalis from Turkey and Malta, two populations genetically analysed here for the first time. Our results suggest that the Egyptian weasel is distinct from the least weasel populations currently living in the Maghreb, which were inferred to be the result of an earlier colonization of North Africa, but the genetic data alone do not allow us to determine whether the Egyptian weasel is native or introduced. Nevertheless, the observed genetic patterns, together with the weasel fossil record in Israel and the unique commensal lifestyle of the Egyptian weasel, are consistent with the hypothesis that the Egyptian population is a relict of past range expansion from the Levant into Egypt. We suggest that the large size and characteristic sexual dimorphism of the Egyptian weasel are likely to represent ecotypic variation, but genomic studies are required to clarify the extent of its functional genetic divergence.

  10. Apoprotein isolation and activation, and vibrational structure of the Helicobacter mustelae iron urease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Proshlyakov, Denis A.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    The micro-aerophilic pathogen Helicobacter mustelae synthesizes an oxygen-labile, iron-containing urease (UreA2B2) in addition to its standard nickel-containing enzyme (UreAB). An apoprotein form of the iron urease was prepared from ureA2B2-expressing recombinant Escherichia coli cells that were grown in minimal medium. Temperature-dependent circular dichroism measurements of holoprotein and apoprotein demonstrate an enhancement of thermal stability associated with the UreA2B2 metallocenter. In parallel to the situation reported for nickel activation of the standard urease apoprotein, incubation of UreA2B2 apoprotein with ferrous ions and bicarbonate generated urease activity in a portion of the nascent active sites. In addition, ferrous ions were shown to be capable of reductively activating the oxidized metallocenter. Resonance Raman spectra of the inactive, aerobically-purified UreA2B2 holoprotein exhibit vibrations at 495 cm−1 and 784 cm−1, consistent with νs and νas modes of an Fe(III)-O-Fe(III) center; these modes undergo downshifts upon binding of urea and were unaffected by changes in pH. The low-frequency mode also exhibits an isotopic shift from 497 to 476 cm−1 upon 16O/18O bulk water isotope substitution. Expression of subunits of the conventional nickel-containing Klebsiella aerogenes urease in cells grown in rich medium without nickel resulted in iron incorporation into a portion of the protein. The inactive iron-loaded species exhibited a UV-visible spectrum similar to oxidized UreA2B2 and was capable of being reductively activated under anoxic conditions. Results from these studies more clearly define the formation and unique properties of the iron urease metallocenter. PMID:22196017

  11. Aleutian disease serology, protein electrophoresis, and pathology of the European mink (Mustela lutreola) from Navarra, Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Migallón Guzmán, David; Carvajal, Ana; García-Marín, Juan F; Ferreras, María C; Pérez, Valentín; Mitchell, Mark; Urra, Fermín; Ceña, Juan C

    2008-09-01

    The European mink, Mustela lutreola, has suffered a dramatic decline in Europe during the 20th century and is one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. The subpopulation of European mink from Navarra, Spain, estimated to number approximately 420, represents approximately two thirds of the total number of mink in Spain. Aleutian Disease Virus (ADV) is a parvovirus with a high degree of variability that can infect a broad range of mustelid hosts. The pathogenesis of this virus in small carnivores is variable and can be influenced by both host factors (e.g., species, American mink genotype, and immune status) and viral strain. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the pre-reproductive period of February-March 2004 and 2005 and the postreproductive period of September-December 2004. Mink were intensively trapped along seven rivers that were representative of the European mink habitat in Navarra. Antibody counter immunoelectrophoresis against ADV was performed on 84 European mink blood samples. All the samples were negative. Protein electrophoresis was performed on 93 plasma samples. Nine of those samples (9.6%) had gamma globulin levels exceeding 20% of the total plasma protein. Complete necropsies were performed on 23 cadavers of European mink collected in the area between 2000 and 2005. Seventeen of the mink (74%) had traumatic and hemorrhagic lesions compatible with vehicular impact injuries. Although there were no histopathologic lesions associated with ADV, this study documents the first description of a naturally occurring canine distemper virus infection in a European mink. In addition, pulmonary adiaspiromycosis in three European mink from Spain was reported.

  12. Pyogranulomatous panophthalmitis with systemic coronavirus disease in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Dana M; Eshar, David; Schumacher, Loni L; Almes, Kelli M; Rankin, Amy J

    2016-03-01

    A 15-month-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) presented for lethargy and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. Upon physical examination, a 2-mm-diameter focal area of opacity was noted in the left cornea. In addition, the ferret was quiet, in poor body condition, and dehydrated. A complete blood count and plasma biochemistry revealed a severe nonregenerative anemia, azotemia, hyperproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, and mild hyperphosphatemia and hyperchloremia. Urinalysis revealed hyposthenuria. Whole body radiographs showed multifocal thoracic nodular disease, splenomegaly, and renomegaly. Abdominal ultrasonography confirmed bilaterally enlarged kidneys, hypoechoic liver and spleen, and a caudal abdominal hypoechoic mobile nodule. The ferret was humanely euthanized, and a postmortem examination with subsequent histopathology showed multifocal necrotizing pyogranulomas in the lung, spleen, kidneys, mesenteric lymph nodes, and serosa of the duodenum. Pyogranulomatous panophthalmitis was diagnosed in the left eye. The multisystemic granulomatous lesions were suggestive of ferret systemic coronavirus (FRSCV). The presence of coronavirus in the left eye was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue from the lung, spleen, and kidney was negative for FRSCV and positive for ferret enteric coronavirus (FRECV). Systemic coronavirus disease in ferrets closely resembles feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in domestic cats, which can manifest with anterior uveitis, chorioretinitis, optic neuritis, and retinal detachment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of ocular lesions in a ferret with systemic coronavirus disease, suggesting that ferrets presented with similar ocular lesions should also be evaluated for evidence of coronavirus infection. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Imaging findings in 14 domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suran, Jantra Ngosuwan; Wyre, Nicole Rene

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common malignant neoplasia in domestic ferrets, Mustela putorius furo. However, imaging findings in ferrets with lymphoma have primarily been described in single case reports. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe imaging findings in a group of ferrets with confirmed lymphoma. Medical records were searched between 2002 and 2012. A total of 14 ferrets were included. Radiographs (n = 12), ultrasound (n = 14), computed tomography (CT; n = 1), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n = 1) images were available for review. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 5.2 years (range 3.25-7.6 years). Clinical signs were predominantly nonspecific (8/14). The time between the first imaging study and lymphoma diagnosis was 1 day or less in most ferrets (12). Imaging lesions were predominantly detected in the abdomen, and most frequently included intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy (12/14), splenomegaly (8/14), and peritoneal effusion (11/14). Lymphadenopathy and mass lesions were typically hypoechoic on ultrasound. Mild peritoneal effusion was the only detected abnormality in two ferrets. Mild pleural effusion was the most common thoracic abnormality (3/12). Expansile lytic lesions were present in the vertebrae of two ferrets with T3-L3 myelopathy and the femur in a ferret with lameness. Hyperattenuating, enhancing masses with secondary spinal cord compression were associated with vertebral lysis in CT images of one ferret. The MRI study in one ferret with myelopathy was inconclusive. Findings indicated that imaging characteristics of lymphoma in ferrets are similar to those previously reported in dogs, cats, and humans. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  14. Clinical, Cytological, Histological and Immunohistochemical Features of Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumours in Ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Vilalta, L; Meléndez-Lazo, A; Doria, G; Ramis, A; Solano-Gallego, L; Pastor, J; Martorell, J

    2016-11-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumours (cMCTs) are one of the most common cutaneous tumours in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). However, limited information is available regarding cytological and histological features of these tumours and studies evaluating KIT expression are lacking in this species. The aims of this prospective study were to describe the most common clinical, cytological and histological features of cMCTs in ferrets and to compare the usefulness of different staining techniques in the diagnosis of these tumours in ferrets as well as evaluating KIT expression in neoplastic mast cells (MCs) by immunohistochemistry. Macroscopically, the tumours were small, round to plaque-like and frequently associated with surface crusting. The most common locations were the extremities and the trunk. MC granules were stained in all cases using toluidine blue (TB) and Wright-Giemsa stains in cytological specimens, but none stained with modified Wright's stain. Haematoxylin and eosin and TB on histological sections failed to stain MC granules in all the cases. Cytological and histological examination revealed low to moderate anisocytosis and anisokaryosis. An infiltrative rather than a delineated or encapsulated growth pattern was noted histologically in all cases. Eosinophilic infiltration was not uncommon and 'collagenolysis' was detected on cytological and histological examination. KIT expression was detected in all cases evaluated. In approximately one third of the cases the MCs exhibited KIT labelling pattern I and in the remaining ferrets, KIT pattern III. No correlation was found between KIT expression pattern and biological behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inverse nickel-responsive regulation of two urease enzymes in the gastric pathogen Helicobacter mustelae.

    PubMed

    Stoof, Jeroen; Breijer, Simone; Pot, Raymond G J; van der Neut, Daan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2008-10-01

    The acidic gastric environment of mammals can be chronically colonized by pathogenic Helicobacter species, which use the nickel-dependent urea-degrading enzyme urease to confer acid resistance. Nickel availability in the mammal host is low, being mostly restricted to vegetarian dietary sources, and thus Helicobacter species colonizing carnivores may be subjected to episodes of nickel deficiency and associated acid sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate how these Helicobacter species have adapted to the nickel-restricted diet of their carnivorous host. Three carnivore-colonizing Helicobacter species express a second functional urea-degrading urease enzyme (UreA2B2), which functions as adaptation to nickel deficiency. UreA2B2 was not detected in seven other Helicobacter species, and is in Helicobacter mustelae only expressed in nickel-restricted conditions, and its expression was higher in iron-rich conditions. In contrast to the standard urease UreAB, UreA2B2 does not require activation by urease or hydrogenase accessory proteins, which mediate nickel incorporation into these enzymes. Activity of either UreAB or UreA2B2 urease allowed survival of a severe acid shock in the presence of urea, demonstrating a functional role for UreA2B2 in acid resistance. Pathogens often express colonization factors which are adapted to their host. The UreA2B2 urease could represent an example of pathogen adaptation to the specifics of the diet of their carnivorous host, rather than to the host itself.

  16. Histology and immunohistochemistry of severe inflammatory bowel disease versus lymphoma in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Watson, Megan K; Cazzini, Paola; Mayer, Joerg; Gottdenker, Nicole; Reavill, Drury; Parry, Nicola; Fox, James G; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common disorder of ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) that may progress to lymphoma. Although routine histology is used to distinguish between these diseases, misclassifications may occur. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is commonly used to distinguish between IBD and lymphoma in small animals. The objective of our study was to determine the agreement in the diagnosis reached solely using hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained, full-thickness sections versus using a combination of HE and IHC. Enteric sections from 44 ferrets previously diagnosed with IBD or intestinal lymphoma and 3 control ferrets were analyzed by pathologists with expertise in ferrets. A pathologist blinded to the original diagnosis assessed the same HE-stained sections. Analysis was then repeated using HE sections in parallel with sections stained using antibodies against CD3 and CD79a. No significant difference was found between the original HE diagnosis and the HE diagnosis reached by the blinded pathologist (p = 0.91) or between the blinded pathologist's HE versus HE with IHC diagnosis (p = 0.16). In the 2 cases where disagreement was present, IHC was pivotal in reaching a final diagnosis. There was no significant age (p = 0.29) difference between diagnoses; however, significantly more male ferrets were affected with IBD than females (p = 0.004). Immunophenotype of the lymphoma was not correlated with predilection for location in the intestinal wall (p = 0.44). Results suggest that although IHC is not necessary to distinguish IBD from intestinal lymphoma in ferrets, it can be useful a definitive diagnosis in cases of severe IBD.

  17. Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matchett, Marc R.; Biggins, Dean E.; Carlson, Valerie; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2010-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p = 0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates = 0.41, nonvaccinates = 0.42, p = 0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p = 0.026), but not for vaccinates (p = 0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest

  18. Feral ferrets (Mustela furo) as hosts and sentinels of tuberculosis in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, AE; Caley, P; Paterson, BM; Nugent, G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The control and eventual eradication of bovine tuberculosis (TB) poses major challenges in New Zealand, given the variety of wildlife species susceptible to TB, many of which are capable of onwards transmission of Mycobacterium bovis infection. Here we discuss the role of feral ferrets (Mustela furo), focussing on potential transmission or risk pathways that have implications for management of TB. Firstly inter-specific transmission to ferrets. Ferrets scavenge potentially infected wildlife, including other ferrets, thus prevalence of TB can be amplified through ferrets feeding on tuberculous carcasses, particularly brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). Secondly intra-specific transmission between ferrets. The rate of ferret-ferret transmission depends on population density, and in some places ferret densities exceed the estimated threshold for disease persistence. TB can therefore potentially be maintained independently of other sources of infection. Thirdly transmission from ferrets to other wildlife. These include the main wildlife maintenance host, brushtail possums, that will occasionally scavenge potentially tuberculous ferret carcasses. Fourthly transmission from ferrets to livestock. This is considered to occur occasionally, but the actual rate of transmission has never been measured. Fifthly geographical spread. M. bovis-infected ferrets can travel large distances and cause new outbreaks of TB at locations previously free of TB, which may have caused an expansion of TB-endemic areas.Ferrets play a complex role in the TB cycle in New Zealand; they are capable of contracting, amplifying and transmitting M. bovis infection, sometimes resulting in ferret populations with a high prevalence of TB. However, ferret population densities are usually too low to sustain infection independently, and transmission to other wildlife or livestock appears a rarer event than with possums. Nevertheless, management of ferrets remains a key part of the National

  19. Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana.

    PubMed

    Matchett, Marc R; Biggins, Dean E; Carlson, Valerie; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie

    2010-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p = 0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates = 0.41, nonvaccinates = 0.42, p = 0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p = 0.026), but not for vaccinates (p = 0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest that the effects of enzootic

  20. Feral ferrets (Mustela furo) as hosts and sentinels of tuberculosis in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Byrom, A E; Caley, P; Paterson, B M; Nugent, G

    2015-06-01

    The control and eventual eradication of bovine tuberculosis (TB) poses major challenges in New Zealand, given the variety of wildlife species susceptible to TB, many of which are capable of onwards transmission of Mycobacterium bovis infection. Here we discuss the role of feral ferrets (Mustela furo), focussing on potential transmission or risk pathways that have implications for management of TB. Firstly inter-specific transmission to ferrets. Ferrets scavenge potentially infected wildlife, including other ferrets, thus prevalence of TB can be amplified through ferrets feeding on tuberculous carcasses, particularly brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). Secondly intra-specific transmission between ferrets. The rate of ferret-ferret transmission depends on population density, and in some places ferret densities exceed the estimated threshold for disease persistence. TB can therefore potentially be maintained independently of other sources of infection. Thirdly transmission from ferrets to other wildlife. These include the main wildlife maintenance host, brushtail possums, that will occasionally scavenge potentially tuberculous ferret carcasses. Fourthly transmission from ferrets to livestock. This is considered to occur occasionally, but the actual rate of transmission has never been measured. Fifthly geographical spread. M. bovis-infected ferrets can travel large distances and cause new outbreaks of TB at locations previously free of TB, which may have caused an expansion of TB-endemic areas. Ferrets play a complex role in the TB cycle in New Zealand; they are capable of contracting, amplifying and transmitting M. bovis infection, sometimes resulting in ferret populations with a high prevalence of TB. However, ferret population densities are usually too low to sustain infection independently, and transmission to other wildlife or livestock appears a rarer event than with possums. Nevertheless, management of ferrets remains a key part of the National Pest

  1. Spargana in a Weasel, Mustela sibirica manchurica, and a Wild Boar, Sus scrofa, from Gangwon-do, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Ha; Choe, Eun-Yoon; Shin, Hyun-Duk

    2013-01-01

    To know the status of sparganum (plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei) infection in the Korean wild life, several species of wild animals were captured in Gangwon-do and examined for their status of infection with spargana. From February to December 2011, a total of 62 wild boars, 5 badgers, 1 weasel, 1 Siberian chipmunk, and 53 wild rodents were captured, and their whole muscles were examined with naked eyes for the presence of spargana worms. From the weasel and 1 wild boar, a total of 5 spargana specimens were extracted. The weasel was for the first time recorded as an intermediate or paratenic/transport host of S. erinacei in Korea, and both the weasel (Mustela sibirica manchurica) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) were added to the list of wild animals carrying spargana. PMID:23864753

  2. Spargana in a weasel, Mustela sibirica manchurica, and a wild boar, Sus scrofa, from Gangwon-do, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ha; Choe, Eun-Yoon; Shin, Hyun-Duk; Seo, Min

    2013-06-01

    To know the status of sparganum (plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei) infection in the Korean wild life, several species of wild animals were captured in Gangwon-do and examined for their status of infection with spargana. From February to December 2011, a total of 62 wild boars, 5 badgers, 1 weasel, 1 Siberian chipmunk, and 53 wild rodents were captured, and their whole muscles were examined with naked eyes for the presence of spargana worms. From the weasel and 1 wild boar, a total of 5 spargana specimens were extracted. The weasel was for the first time recorded as an intermediate or paratenic/transport host of S. erinacei in Korea, and both the weasel (Mustela sibirica manchurica) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) were added to the list of wild animals carrying spargana.

  3. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Farmed Minks (Neovison vison) in Northeastern and Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-Bin; Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Ma, Jian-Gang; Wang, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important intracellular parasite, which can infect endothermic vertebrate animals, including minks (Neovison vison). However, information on T. gondii infection in minks in China is limited. Therefore, we investigated the seroprevalence and risk factors of T. gondii infection in minks in northeastern and eastern China. A total of 1499 mink blood samples were randomly collected from eight cities between March 2014 and January 2015 in northeastern and eastern China, and antibodies to T. gondii were examined using the modified agglutination test. Overall, the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was 8.14% in the examined minks. The T. gondii seroprevalence was different among cities (ranging from 1.85% in Changchun to 15.75% in Dalian), genders (4.31% in male and 6.22% in female), seasons (spring: 11.64%; summer: 7.34%; autumn: 7.37%; and winter: 7.32%), and ages (young: 5.79%; subadult: 5.03%; and adult: 11.08%). Region and age were considered as risk factors for T. gondii infection. These results provided baseline data for the prevention and control of T. gondii infection in minks in China.

  4. Wildlife reservoirs of canine distemper virus resulted in a major outbreak in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Trebbien, Ramona; Chriel, Mariann; Struve, Tina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Gitte; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2014-01-01

    A major outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison) started in the late summer period of 2012. At the same time, a high number of diseased and dead wildlife species such as foxes, raccoon dogs, and ferrets were observed. To track the origin of the outbreak virus full-length sequencing of the receptor binding surface protein hemagglutinin (H) was performed on 26 CDV's collected from mink and 10 CDV's collected from wildlife species. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses showed that the virus circulating in the mink farms and wildlife were highly identical with an identity at the nucleotide level of 99.45% to 100%. The sequences could be grouped by single nucleotide polymorphisms according to geographical distribution of mink farms and wildlife. The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor binding region in most viruses from both mink and wildlife contained G at position 530 and Y at position 549; however, three mink viruses had an Y549H substitution. The outbreak viruses clustered phylogenetically in the European lineage and were highly identical to wildlife viruses from Germany and Hungary (99.29% - 99.62%). The study furthermore revealed that fleas (Ceratophyllus sciurorum) contained CDV and that vertical transmission of CDV occurred in a wild ferret. The study provides evidence that wildlife species, such as foxes, play an important role in the transmission of CDV to farmed mink and that the virus may be maintained in the wild animal reservoir between outbreaks.

  5. Determinants and effects of sinus worm Skrjabingylus nasicola (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidae) infestation in invasive American mink Neovison vison in Germany.

    PubMed

    Heddergott, M; Pohl, D; Steinbach, P; Salazar, L Cantú; Müller, F; Frantz, A C

    2016-09-01

    Skrjabingylus nasicola (Leuckart, 1842) are geographically widespread nematodes that parasitize the nasal and frontal sinus cavities of smaller mustelids. As most prior work was solely based on the analysis of bone injuries of museum skull, little is known about the determinants and effects of infestation in the host species. Working on fresh skulls, we aimed to analyze infestation patterns in American mink (Neovison vison Schreber, 1777) from nine study areas in northern Germany and to identify factors that explained infestation prevalence and intensity in the host species. The prevalence (46.7-62.9 %) and infestation intensity values (4.5-10.89 nematodes) reported here were relatively large, especially compared to other American mink populations in Europe. Considering mink diet, our study sites probably harbored a larger number of infested paratenic hosts and climate did not have a substantial negative influence on survival of S. nasicola larvae. We did not observe any significant sex-age differences in either prevalence or intensity of S. nasicola infestation. We did not find a negative impact of an infestation on the host animals' body weight, confirming prior results that the parasite is not a significant mortality factor in mustelids. Our study suggests that this holds even outside the native distributional range where the host's defenses might not be optimally adapted to an autochthonous parasite.

  6. Comparative morphology of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores in the tongue of the American mink, Neovison vison.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Fukue, Yuko; Kishimoto, Ryosuke; Shindo, Junji; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2014-05-01

    We observed the morphology of the lingual papillae (filiform, conical, fungiform, and vallate papillae, and lateral organ) and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) in the American mink (Neovison vison) using light and scanning electron microscopy. Filiform papillae were distributed on the apex linguae and rostral regions of the corpus linguae. Conical papillae were distributed over the caudal region and absent in the radix linguae. Numerous ridges were present in the radix linguae. Four to six vallate papillae were situated at the border between the corpus and radix linguae. Instead of foliate papillae, a pair of lateral organs was situated on the caudal edge of the corpus. The epithelial surface of each filiform papilla consisted of a single main process and 10-12 accessory processes. Notably, filiform papillae in the apex linguae exhibited morphological variation, and some were dome-like and lacked processes. In contrast, filiform papillae on the rostral part were not variable, were extended to a sharp tip, were associated with an eosinophilic stratum corneum, and lacked nuclei. The CTCs of the filiform papillae consisted of a main core and slender accessory cores surrounding a concavity. Those in the apex linguae were similar in appearance and consisted of main and adjacent accessory cores. The fungiform papillae had a dome-like epithelial surface and their CTCs were columnar, with upper concavities and flanges. The simplified lingual morphology of the American mink, particularly in the filiform papillae in the apex linguae, may be influenced by its diet and semiaquatic lifestyle.

  7. Increased reproductive success in the white American mink (Neovison vison) with chronic dietary beta-sitosterol supplement.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Pölönen, Ilpo; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2010-06-01

    Beta-sitosterol is a weakly estrogenic phytosterol used in functional foods to lower elevated serum cholesterol concentrations. It has been reported to cause reproductive disturbances in fish and lower the sperm count of rodents but, in contrast, there were indications of enhanced reproduction in a preliminary study on the brown American mink (Neovison vison). In the present experiment the effects of chronic dietary beta-sitosterol exposure on the reproduction of the American mink were evaluated with a large number of experimental animals. Male and female finnwhite mink (n=200)--a previously uninvestigated color type with lower reproductive success compared to brown mink--were exposed to 50 mg beta-sitosterol kg(-1)d(-1) for 10 months and compared with 200 control animals. After 3 months in November, 15 males per group were sacrificed and their biochemical variables determined. The serum glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were lower in the beta-sitosterol-exposed group, while other effects were minor. The females were mated with the top-rated males (4-5:1) in March and their reproductive performance was determined. The reproductive success increased in the beta-sitosterol group with significantly fewer barren females and a higher number of successfully reproducing females than in the control group, which supports previous studies on brown mink and voles indicating that beta-sitosterol could be used to enhance the reproductive performance of these mammals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Wildlife Reservoirs of Canine Distemper Virus Resulted in a Major Outbreak in Danish Farmed Mink (Neovison vison)

    PubMed Central

    Trebbien, Ramona; Chriel, Mariann; Struve, Tina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Gitte; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2014-01-01

    A major outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison) started in the late summer period of 2012. At the same time, a high number of diseased and dead wildlife species such as foxes, raccoon dogs, and ferrets were observed. To track the origin of the outbreak virus full-length sequencing of the receptor binding surface protein hemagglutinin (H) was performed on 26 CDV's collected from mink and 10 CDV's collected from wildlife species. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses showed that the virus circulating in the mink farms and wildlife were highly identical with an identity at the nucleotide level of 99.45% to 100%. The sequences could be grouped by single nucleotide polymorphisms according to geographical distribution of mink farms and wildlife. The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor binding region in most viruses from both mink and wildlife contained G at position 530 and Y at position 549; however, three mink viruses had an Y549H substitution. The outbreak viruses clustered phylogenetically in the European lineage and were highly identical to wildlife viruses from Germany and Hungary (99.29% – 99.62%). The study furthermore revealed that fleas (Ceratophyllus sciurorum) contained CDV and that vertical transmission of CDV occurred in a wild ferret. The study provides evidence that wildlife species, such as foxes, play an important role in the transmission of CDV to farmed mink and that the virus may be maintained in the wild animal reservoir between outbreaks. PMID:24454897

  9. Detection of Aleutian mink disease virus DNA and antiviral antibodies in American mink (Neovison vison) 10 days postinoculation.

    PubMed

    Farid, A Hossain; Hussain, Irshad; Arju, Irin

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of infection by the Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV; Carnivore amdoparvovirus 1) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) has important ramifications in virus eradication programs. A spleen homogenate containing a local isolate of AMDV was injected intraperitoneally into black (n = 44) and sapphire (n = 12) American mink (Neovison vison). Animals were euthanized 10 days postinoculation and anti-AMDV antibodies and AMDV DNA were tested in plasma and 7 organs by CIEP and PCR, respectively. Viral DNA was detected in the plasma, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and lung samples of all inoculated mink, but was not detected in some small intestine, kidney, and liver samples. In contrast, antibodies were detected in the plasma of 3 sapphire (25.0%) and 19 black (43.2%) mink but not in any of the organs. The sensitivity of the CIEP test on plasma samples was 39.3%, implying that low levels of antibodies during the early stages of virus exposure resulted in failure to detect infection by the CIEP test. We concluded that CIEP is not a reliable test for early detection of AMDV infection in mink and that there were considerable differences among mink of each color type for production of detectable levels of antibodies. PCR tests on samples of saliva, rectal swabs, and feces did not produce consistent and reliable results. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Comparison of hepatic and nephric total mercury concentrations between feral and ranch American mink (Neovison vison) from northwestern Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Budis, Halina; Lanocha, Natalia; Podlasinska, Joanna; Jedrzejewska, Ewa; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I

    2012-05-01

    For many years the American mink (Neovison vison) has been used in North America (where it originates from) as a sensitive indirect bioindicator in assessing the degree of mercury (Hg) contamination in terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this paper was the determination of total concentrations of Hg in the liver and kidneys of feral and ranch mink from the Warta Mouth National Park (WMNP) and from farms located in northwestern Poland, for comparison with similar data on American mink from North America. In road-killed feral mink from the WMNP, the mean concentrations were 11.8 and 14.1 mg/kg dry weight in the liver and kidney, respectively. Mean Hg concentrations in feral mink were from 240 to 90 times higher in these two respective tissues than in ranch mink. The feral mink from northwestern Poland had concentrations of hepatic and nephric Hg similar to the highest concentrations that have been recorded over the past several decades in wild American mink from certain areas of Canada and the USA.

  11. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Babesia sp. NV-1 detected from wild American Mink ( Neovison vison ) in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Haruyuki; Ishinabe, Satoki; Jinnai, Michio; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne protozoan disease affecting many mammalian species worldwide, caused by the intraerythrocytic multiplication of Babesia spp. The present study aimed to detect the presence of Babesia sp. in 13 American mink from Hokkaido, Japan. One of 13 animals was positive, as indicated by nested PCR targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) and subunit 7 (eta) of the chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT7) genes from species of Babesia and Theileria. Sequencing of the PCR product of SSU rDNA revealed 99% homology to the isolates of Babesia sp. SAP#131 found in raccoons in Hokkaido, whereas that of the CCT7 gene showed 80% homology to the isolates of Babesia gibsoni in dogs as determined by BLAST analysis. We refer to the cognate sequence as Babesia sp. NV-1. Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rDNA and CCT7 genes from Babesia sp. NV-1 revealed them to be most closely related to the Babesia sp. SAP#131 from a raccoon in Hokkaido and to canine B. gibsoni, respectively. Here, we provide the first molecular evidence of the Babesia sp. NV-1 parasite in feral American mink ( Neovison vison ) in Hokkaido, Japan.

  12. Molecular Detection and Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in Farmed Minks (Neovison vison) in Northern China by PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian-Gang; Li, Fa-Cai; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide prevalent parasite, affecting a wide range of mammals and human beings. Little information is available about the distribution of genetic diversity of T. gondii infection in minks (Neovison vison). This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from minks in China. A total of 418 minks brain tissue samples were collected from Jilin and Hebei provinces, northern China. Genomic DNA were extracted and assayed for T. gondii infection by semi-nested PCR of B1 gene. The positive DNA samples were typed at 10 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2 (5'+3' SAG2, alter.SAG2), SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. 36 (8.6%) of 418 DNA samples were overall positive for T. gondii. Among them, 5 samples were genotyped at all loci, and 1 sample was genotyped for 9 loci. In total, five samples belong to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype#9, one belong to ToxoDB genotye#3. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii in minks in China. Meanwhile, these results revealed a distribution of T. gondii infection in minks in China. These data provided base-line information for controlling T. gondii infection in minks. PMID:27806069

  13. Doubly fed induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2005-10-11

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load including an energy converter device having a doubly fed induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer coupled to the energy converter device to control the flow of power or energy through the doubly fed induction machine.

  14. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison)

    PubMed Central

    Noer, Christina Lehmkuhl; Needham, Esther Kjær; Wiese, Ann-Sophie; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison), which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts) and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts). Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality traits. PMID

  15. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Noer, Christina Lehmkuhl; Needham, Esther Kjær; Wiese, Ann-Sophie; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison), which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts) and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts). Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality traits.

  16. Growth and reproductive effects from dietary exposure to Aroclor 1268 in mink (Neovison vison), a surrogate model for marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Remington, Richard E; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the commercial mixture Aroclor 1268 were historically released into the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (southeastern Georgia, USA) from industrial operations. Sum PCBs (ΣPCBs) in blubber samples from Turtle-Brunswick River estuary bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been reported at concentrations more than 10-fold higher than those observed in dolphins from adjacent regional estuaries. Given that toxicity data specific to Aroclor 1268 and applicable to marine mammals are limited, predicting the toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 in dolphins is uncertain, particularly because of its unique congener profile and associated physiochemical characteristics compared with other PCB mixtures. American mink (Neovison vison) were chosen as a surrogate model for cetaceans to develop marine mammalian PCB toxicity benchmarks. Mink are a suitable surrogate species for cetaceans in toxicity studies because of similarities in diet and taxonomic class, and a characteristic sensitivity to PCBs provides a potential safety factor when using mink toxicology data for cross-species extrapolations. Effects of dietary exposure to Aroclor 1268 on reproduction, growth, and mortality in mink were compared with both a negative control and a positive control (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl, PCB 126). Aroclor 1268 dietary ΣPCB concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g feed wet weight to 29 µg/g feed wet weight. Whelp success was unaffected by Aroclor 1268 exposure at any level. Treatment mean litter size, kit growth, and kit survival were adversely affected relative to the negative control at dietary ΣPCB concentrations of 10.6 µg/g feed wet weight and greater.

  17. Rate of exposure of a sentinel species, invasive American mink (Neovison vison) in Scotland, to anticoagulant rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Melero, Yolanda; Giela, Anna; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Sharp, Elizabeth; Boada, Luis D; Taylor, Michael J; Camacho, María; Lambin, Xavier; Luzardo, Octavio P; Hartley, Gill

    2016-11-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are highly toxic compounds that are exclusively used for the control of rodent pests. Despite their defined use, they are nonetheless found in a large number of non-target species indicating widespread penetration of wildlife. Attempts to quantify the scale of problem are complicated by non-random sampling of individuals tested for AR contamination. The American mink (Neovison vison) is a wide ranging, non-native, generalist predator that is subject to wide scale control efforts in the UK. Exposure to eight ARs was determined in 99 mink trapped in NE Scotland, most of which were of known age. A high percentage (79%) of the animals had detectable residues of at least one AR, and more than 50% of the positive animals had two or more ARs. The most frequently detected compound was bromadiolone (75% of all animals tested), followed by difenacoum (53% of all mink), coumatetralyl (22%) and brodifacoum (9%). The probability of mink exposure to ARs increased by 4.5% per month of life, and was 1.7 times higher for mink caught in areas with a high, as opposed to a low, density of farms. The number of AR compounds acquired also increased with age and with farm density. No evidence was found for sexual differences in the concentration and number of ARs. The wide niche and dietary overlap of mink with several native carnivore species, and the fact that American mink are culled for conservation throughout Europe, suggest that this species may act as a sentinel species, and the application of these data to other native carnivores is discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence of endoplasmic reticulum stress and liver inflammation in the American mink Neovison vison with benign hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Pal, Catherine; Martin, Timothy; Harris, Lora; Astatkie, Tessema; Kryzskaya, Darya; Kärjä, Vesa; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Tammi, Raija; Tammi, Markku; Nieminen, Petteri

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the presence of inflammatory signs in the progression of fatty liver disease induced by fasting. Sixty standard black American mink (Neovison vison) were fasted for 0, 1, 3, 5, or 7 days and one group for 7 days followed by re-feeding for 28 days. Liver sections were evaluated histologically and liver mRNA levels indicating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, adipogenic transformation, and inflammation were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. After 3 days of fasting, the mink had developed moderate liver steatosis. Increased hyaluronan reactivity in lymphocytic foci but no Mallory-Denk bodies were seen in livers of the mink fasted for 5-7 days. Up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein, 78 kDa was observed on day 7 indicating ER stress, especially in the females. Liver lipoprotein lipase and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 mRNA levels increased in response to 5-7 days of food deprivation, while tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was the highest in the mink fasted for 5 days. The expression of the genes of interest, except for TNF-α, correlated with each other and with the liver fat content. The mRNA levels were found to change more rapidly below n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio threshold of 0.15. Following re-feeding, hepatocyte morphology and mRNA abundance returned to pre-fasting levels. Within the studied timeframe, evidence for ER stress, adipogenic transformation, and liver inflammation suggested incipient transition from steatosis to steatohepatitis with potential for development of more severe liver disease. This may present a possibility to influence disease progression before histologically observable steatohepatitis.

  19. FLEAS OF BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) AND THEIR POTENTIAL ROLE IN THE MOVEMENT OF PLAGUE.

    PubMed

    Mize, Erica L; Grassel, Shaun M; Britten, Hugh B

    2017-07-01

    Sylvatic plague is one of the major impediments to the recovery of the black-footed ferret ( Mustela nigripes ) because it decimates their primary prey species, prairie dogs ( Cynomys spp.), and directly causes mortality in ferrets. Fleas are the primary vector of Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of sylvatic plague. The goal of this research was to better understand the flea fauna of ferrets and the factors that might influence flea abundance on ferrets. Fleas from ferrets were tested for Y. pestis in a post hoc assessment to investigate the plausibility that some ferrets could act as incidental transporter hosts of fleas infected with Y. pestis . Fleas were collected from ferrets captured on the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in central South Dakota, US from 2009 to 2012. A total of 528 fleas collected from 67 individual ferrets were identified and tested for the presence of Y. pestis with a nested PCR assay. The predominant flea recovered from ferrets was Oropsylla hirsuta , a species that comprises 70-100% of the fleas recovered from prairie dogs and their burrows in the study area. Yersinia pestis was detected at low levels in fleas collected from ferrets with prevalence ranging from 0% to 2.9%; male ferrets harbored significantly more fleas than female ferrets. Six of 67 ferrets vaccinated against plague carried fleas that tested positive for Y. pestis , which suggests ferrets vaccinated against plague could inadvertently act as incidental transporter hosts of Y. pestis -positive fleas.

  20. A multilocus evaluation of ermine (Mustela erminea) across the Holarctic, testing hypotheses of Pleistocene diversification in response to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Natalie G.; Hope, Andrew G.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We examined data for ermine (Mustela erminea) to test two sets of diversification hypotheses concerning the number and location of late Pleistocene refugia, the timing and mode of diversification, and the evolutionary influence of insularization. Location: Temperate and sub-Arctic Northern Hemisphere. Methods: We used up to two mitochondrial and four nuclear loci from 237 specimens for statistical phylogeographical and demographic analyses. Coalescent species-tree estimation used a Bayesian approach for clade divergence based on external mutation rate calibrations. Approximate Bayesian methods were used to assess population size, timing of divergence and gene flow. Results: Limited structure coupled with evidence of population growth across broad regions, including previously ice-covered areas, indicated expansion from multiple centres of differentiation, but high endemism along the North Pacific coast (NPC). A bifurcating model of diversification with recent growth spanning three glacial cycles best explained the empirical data. Main conclusions: A newly identified clade in North America indicated a fourth refugial area for ermine. The shallow coalescence of all extant ermine reflects a recent history of diversification overlying a deeper fossil record. Post-glacial colonization has led to potential contact zones for multiple lineages in north-western North America. A model of diversification of ermine accompanied by recent gene flow was marginally less well supported than a model of divergence of major clades in response to the most recent glacial cycles.

  1. Ectoparasites in black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) from the largest reintroduced population of the Conata Basin, South Dakota, USA.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nyeema C; Livieri, Travis M; Dunn, Robert R

    2014-04-01

    The black-footed ferret, Mustela nigripes, is an endangered carnivore endemic to the grasslands of North America. We present the first investigation of ectoparasites associated with black-footed ferrets since reintroduction. We sampled more than 200 individuals from one of the largest and most successful reintroduced populations located in the Conata Basin of South Dakota, USA. We compared our findings with ectoparasite assemblages of sympatric carnivores and historic ferret records. We collected more than 1,000 ectoparasites consisting mainly of three flea and tick species, two of which were known historically from South Dakota. Despite our extensive sampling efforts, we did not detect any lice. This is notable because a putative host-specific louse, Neotrichodectes sp., was presumed to have gone extinct when black-footed ferrets were extirpated from the wild. The ectoparasite assemblage on black-footed ferrets comprised only generalist parasites, particularly those found on their prey such as prairie dogs (Cynomys sp.). Oropsylla hirsuta was the most abundant ectoparasite, representing 57% of all ectoparasites detected; a flea vector important in the persistence and transmission of plague. Black-footed ferrets like other endangered species undergo repeated parasite removal and vaccination efforts to facilitate population recovery, which may have unintentionally contributed to their depauperate ectoparasite community.

  2. Phylogeography of the weasel (Mustela nivalis) in the western-Palaearctic region: combined effects of glacial events and human movements.

    PubMed

    Lebarbenchon, C; Poitevin, F; Arnal, V; Montgelard, C

    2010-11-01

    The Iberian, Italian or Balkan peninsulas have been considered as refugia for numerous mammalian species in response to Quaternary climatic fluctuations in Europe. In addition to this 'southerly refugial model', northern refugia have also been described notably for generalist and cold-tolerant species. Here, we investigated the phylogeographic pattern of the weasel (Mustela nivalis) to assess the impact of Quaternary glaciations on the genetic structure, number and location of refugia as well as to determine the impact of human movements on the colonization of Mediterranean islands. We sequenced 1690 bp from the mitochondrial control region and cytochrome b for 88 weasels distributed throughout the western-Palaearctic region, including five Mediterranean islands. Phylogenetic analyses of combined genes produced a clear phylogeographic pattern with two main lineages. The first lineage included all of the western-continental samples (from Spain to Finland) and shows low levels of genetic structure. Demographic analysis highlighted several characteristics of an expanding group, dated approximately at 116 kiloyears (kyr; Riss glaciation). The genetic pattern suggested a northeastern-European origin from which colonization of southwestern Europe took place. The second lineage was divided into five subgroups and indicated a common origin of insular and Moroccan samples from eastern Europe. Eastern-continental weasels did not exhibit signs of sudden expansion, suggesting stable population size during the last ice ages. The time of expansion of Sicilian and Corsican populations was dated around 10 kyr ago, which supports the hypothesis of an early human intervention in the colonization of Mediterranean islands.

  3. Diet of stoats ( Mustela erminea) in an Alpine habitat:The importance of fruit consumption in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinoli, Adriano; Preatoni, Damiano G.; Chiarenzi, Barbara; Wauters, Luc A.; Tosi, Guido

    2001-02-01

    The diet of stoat, Mustela erminea, in the Italian Alps was studied from May to October 1996 and 1997 through faecal analysis. Scats were collected along twenty transects and near dens within a 10-km 2 study area. In the same area, seasonal variation in the available biomass of different prey types was estimated using capture-mark-recapture (small rodents), pitfall trap grids (insects), and fruit counts. About 60 % of scats ( n = 734) contained small rodents, indicating that they were the main prey for stoat. However, the frequency of occurrence of fruits in the diet increased significantly in August, after rodent biomass had dropped by more than 50 % in July, but increased again to previous August levels. Fruit consumption decreased in September and October, although available biomass of fruits remained constant. Thus stoat included a large amount of alternative food in their diet when fruits were mature and their availability, and probably their profitability, increased. We were, however, unable to measure absolute consumption of prey. We conclude that primary prey, rodents, is always harvested, suggesting that the costs of harvesting rodents, abundant throughout spring-autumn, are never high. The consumption of alternative prey is independent of its availability, and increases only when relative benefits of harvesting alternative prey (fruits) increases, which is consistent with optimal foraging theory.

  4. MHC class II variation in the endangered European mink Mustela lutreola (L. 1761)--consequences for species conservation.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Nieberg, C; Jahreis, K; Peters, E

    2009-04-01

    The polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has gained a specific relevance in pathogen resistance and mate choice. Particularly the antigen-binding site (ABS), encoded by exon 2 of the DRB class II gene, exhibits numerous alleles and extensive sequence variations between alleles. A lack of MHC variability has attributed to instances such as bottleneck effects or relaxed selection pressure and has a certain impact on the long-term viability of the species concerned. As a result of seriously decreased population density during the last century, the current population of the endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) has suffered from geographic isolation. In this study, we amplified a partial sequence of the MHC class II DRB exon 2 (229 bp), assessed the degree of genetic variation and compared the variability with those of other Mustelidae. As a result, nine alleles were detected in 20 investigated individuals, which differ from each other by four to 25 nucleotide substitutions (two to 11 amino acid substitutions). Whilst an equal ratio for synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions was found inside the ABS, synonymous substitutions were significantly higher than non-synonymous substitutions in the non-ABS region. Results might indicate that no positive selection exists within the ex situ population of M. lutreola, at least in the analysed fragment. In addition, phylogenetic analyses support the trans-species model of evolution.

  5. Pulse of inflammatory proteins in the pregnant uterus of European polecats (Mustela putorius) leading to the time of implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindeberg, Heli; Burchmore, Richard J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Uterine secretory proteins protect the uterus and conceptuses against infection, facilitate implantation, control cellular damage resulting from implantation, and supply pre-implantation embryos with nutrients. Unlike in humans, the early conceptus of the European polecat (Mustela putorius; ferret) grows and develops free in the uterus until implanting at about 12 days after mating. We found that the proteins appearing in polecat uteri changed dramatically with time leading to implantation. Several of these proteins have also been found in pregnant uteri of other eutherian mammals. However, we found a combination of two increasingly abundant proteins that have not been recorded before in pre-placentation uteri. First, the broad-spectrum proteinase inhibitor α2-macroglobulin rose to dominate the protein profile by the time of implantation. Its functions may be to limit damage caused by the release of proteinases during implantation or infection, and to control other processes around sites of implantation. Second, lipocalin-1 (also known as tear lipocalin) also increased substantially in concentration. This protein has not previously been recorded as a uterine secretion in pregnancy in any species. If polecat lipocalin-1 has similar biological properties to that of humans, then it may have a combined function in antimicrobial protection and transporting or scavenging lipids. The changes in the uterine secretory protein repertoire of European polecats is therefore unusual, and may be representative of pre-placentation supportive uterine secretions in mustelids (otters, weasels, badgers, mink, wolverines) in general. PMID:28405395

  6. Recombinant F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against virulent Yersinia pestis infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Mencher, J.; Smith, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Andrews, G.P.; Baeten, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) are highly susceptible to sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, and this disease has severely hampered efforts to restore ferrets to their historic range. A study was conducted to assess the efficacy of vaccination of black-footed ferrets against plague using a recombinant protein vaccine, designated F1-V, developed by personnel at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Seven postreproductive black-footed ferrets were immunized with the vaccine, followed by two booster immunizations on days 23 and 154; three control black-footed ferrets received a placebo. After the second immunization, antibody titers to both F1 and V antigen were found to be significantly higher in vaccinates than controls. On challenge with 7,800 colony-forming units of virulent plague by s.c. injection, the three control animals died within 3 days, but six of seven vaccinates survived with no ill effects. The seventh vaccinate died on day 8. These results indicate that black-footed ferrets can be immunized against plague induced by the s.c. route, similar to fleabite injection.

  7. Along the Pawnee Trail: Cultural Resource Survey and Testing at Wilson Lake, Kansas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    lupus Coyote Canis latrans Red fox Vulpes vulpes Mountain lion* Felix concolor Bobcat Lynx rufus Mink Mustela vison Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata...Saline River from the west and devastated the westernmost settlements, then in Lincoln County. The recently established Danish community was especially

  8. 2011 Feds Feed Families

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-01

    NASA employees Anita Douglas (l to r), Amy Grose, Aaron Brooks and Cabrina Bell sort through early contributions to the 2011 Feds Feed Families Food Drive at Stennis Space Center. Each summer for three years, federal agencies across the nation have worked together to collect nonperishable food for local food banks across the country.

  9. First report of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in two threatened carnivores: the Marbled polecat, Vormela peregusna and the European mink, Mustela lutreola (Mammalia: Mustelidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is a widespread cosmopolitan zoonosis caused by species belonging to the genus Borrelia. It is transmitted from animal reservoir hosts to humans through hard - ticks of genus Ixodes which are vectors of the disease. Case presentation Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection was identified in a marbled polecat, Vormela peregusna, and two European minks, Mustela lutreola, from Romania, by PCR. RFLP revealed the presence of a single genospecies, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Conclusions This is the first report of the Lyme disease spirochetes in the two mentioned hosts. PMID:22901862

  10. Indirect genetic effects contribute substantially to heritable variation in aggression-related traits in group-housed mink (Neovison vison)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the recommendations on group housing of mink (Neovison vison) were adopted by the Council of Europe in 1999, it has become common in mink production in Europe. Group housing is advantageous from a production perspective, but can lead to aggression between animals and thus raises a welfare issue. Bite marks on the animals are an indicator of this aggressive behaviour and thus selection against frequency of bite marks should reduce aggression and improve animal welfare. Bite marks on one individual reflect the aggression of its group members, which means that the number of bite marks carried by one individual depends on the behaviour of other individuals and that it may have a genetic basis. Thus, for a successful breeding strategy it could be crucial to consider both direct (DGE) and indirect (IGE) genetic effects on this trait. However, to date no study has investigated the genetic basis of bite marks in mink. Result and discussion A model that included DGE and IGE fitted the data significantly better than a model with DGE only, and IGE contributed a substantial proportion of the heritable variation available for response to selection. In the model with IGE, the total heritable variation expressed as the proportion of phenotypic variance (T2) was six times greater than classical heritability (h2). For instance, for total bite marks, T2 was equal to 0.61, while h2 was equal to 0.10. The genetic correlation between direct and indirect effects ranged from 0.55 for neck bite marks to 0.99 for tail bite marks. This positive correlation suggests that mink have a tendency to fight in a reciprocal way (giving and receiving bites) and thus, a genotype that confers a tendency to bite other individuals can also cause its bearer to receive more bites. Conclusion Both direct and indirect genetic effects contribute to variation in number of bite marks in group-housed mink. Thus, a genetic selection design that includes both direct genetic and indirect genetic

  11. Habitat requirements of weasels Mustela nivalis constrain their impact on prey populations in complex ecosystems of the temperate zone.

    PubMed

    Zub, K; Sönnichsen, L; Szafrańska, P A

    2008-10-01

    Differences in habitat use by prey and predator may lead to a shift of occupied niches and affect dynamics of their populations. The weasel Mustela nivalis specializes in hunting rodents, therefore habitat preferences of this predator may have important consequences for the population dynamics of its prey. We investigated habitat selection by weasels in the Białowieza Forest in different seasons at the landscape and local scales, and evaluated possible consequences for the population dynamics of their prey. At the landscape scale, weasels preferred open habitats (both dry and wet) and avoided forest. In open areas they selected habitats with higher prey abundance, except during the low-density phase of the vole cycle, when the distribution of these predators was more uniform. Also in winter, the distribution of weasels at the landscape scale was proportional to available resources. In summer, within open dry and wet habitats, weasels preferred areas characterised by dense vegetation, but avoided poor plant cover. In winter, weasels used wet open areas proportionally to availability of habitats when hunting, but in contrast to summer, they rested only in habitats characterized by a lower water level, which offered better thermal conditions. At the local scale, the abundance of voles was a less important factor affecting the distribution of these predators. Although we were not able to provide direct evidence for the existence of refuges for voles, our results show that they may be located within habitat patches, where availability of dense plant cover and physiological constraints limit the activity of weasels. Our results indicate that in complex ecosystems of the temperate zone, characterized by a mosaic pattern of vegetation types and habitat specific dynamics of rodents, impact of weasels on prey populations might be limited.

  12. Environmental and genetic influences on body mass and resting metabolic rates (RMR) in a natural population of weasel Mustela nivalis.

    PubMed

    Zub, Karol; Piertney, Stuart; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Konarzewski, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Body mass (BM) and resting metabolic rates (RMR) are two inexorably linked traits strongly related to mammalian life histories. Yet, there have been no studies attempting to estimate heritable variation and covariation of BM and RMR in natural populations. We used a marker-based approach to construct a pedigree and then the 'animal model' to estimate narrow sense heritability (h(2) ) of these traits in a free-living population of weasels Mustela nivalis--a small carnivore characterised by a wide range of BM and extremely high RMR. The most important factors affecting BM of weasels were sex and habitat type, whereas RMR was significantly affected only by seasonal variation of this trait. All environmental factors had only small effect on estimates of additive genetic variance of both BM and RMR. The amount of additive genetic variance associated with BM and estimates of heritability were high and significant in males (h(2)  = 0.61), but low and not significant in females (h(2 ) =( ) 0.32), probably due to small sample size for the latter sex. The results from the two-trait model revealed significant phenotypic (r(P)  = 0.62) and genetic correlation (r(A)  = 0.89) between BM and whole body RMR. The estimate of heritability of whole body RMR (0.54) and BM corrected RMR (0.45) were lower than estimates of heritability for BM. Both phenotypic and genetic correlations between BM corrected RMR and BM had negative signals (r(P)  = -0.42 and r(A)  = -0.58). Our results indicate that total energy expenditures of individuals can quickly evolve through concerted changes in BM and RMR.

  13. Constant rate infusion of glucagon as an emergency treatment for hypoglycemia in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Katarina R; Gaunt, M Casey; Parker, Dennilyn L

    2015-02-15

    A 3-year-old female domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with an insulinoma was treated because of a hypoglycemic crisis prior to scheduled pancreatectomy with concurrent nodulectomy. Previously, the ferret had clinical signs of lethargy and hind limb weakness; at that time, blood glucose concentration was low, and a tentative diagnosis (subsequently confirmed) of insulinoma was made. Prednisolone treatment (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) did not improve clinical signs; the dosage was gradually increased over a 1-month course (1.8 mg/kg [0.82 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) and maintained for 10 days. Overall, the treatment was ineffective, and the ferret remained lethargic and developed inappetence. At a reevaluation, the ferret had severe weakness and nonresponsiveness nearing a comatose state. Standard treatment with dextrose (1 mL of 50% solution, IV), and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], SC) was administered with resultant improvement in mentation. The ferret was discharged from the hospital and then returned 3 days later for stabilization prior to pancreatectomy with concurrent nodulectomy. The day before surgery, the ferret was administered a glucagon constant rate infusion at a rate of 15 ng/kg/min (6.8 ng/lb/min), which resulted in an increase in blood glucose concentration to a euglycemic state and resolution of clinical signs of hypoglycemia. As illustrated by the case described in this report, a glucagon constant rate infusion can be used successfully for the emergency treatment of hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic crisis in insulinomic ferrets.

  14. Comparative phylogeography between the ermine Mustela erminea and the least weasel M. nivalis of Palaearctic and Nearctic regions, based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Naoko; Abramov, Alexei V; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2005-10-01

    Phylogeography of the ermine Mustela erminea and the least weasel M. nivalis from Palaearctic and Nearctic regions were investigated based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences. Mustela erminea exhibited a very low level of genetic variation, and geographic structures among populations were unclear. This may indicate that M. erminea recently reoccupied a wide territory in Eurasia following the last glacial retreat. In comparison with M. erminea, genetic variations within and among populations of M. nivalis were much greater. Molecular phylogenetic relationships showed that two lineages of M. nivalis occurred in the Holarctic region: one spread from the Eurasian region to North America, and the other occurred in south-eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia. The results suggest either mitochondrial DNA introgression among populations of south-eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia, or ancestral polymorphisms remaining in those populations. Contrastive phylogeographic patterns between the two mustelid species could reflect differences of their migration histories in Eurasia after the last glacial age.

  15. 2012 Feds Feed Families

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-12

    Stennis Space Center employees concluded their 2012 Feds Feed Families effort at the end of August with collection of 6,701 pounds of nonperishable food items. NASA Office of Human Capital Manager Dorsie Jones (second from right) joined office employees (l to r) Apolonia Acker, Cecile Saltzman, Cabrina Bell and Jeanie Frederick during pickup of the final food items. Stennis food items are contributed to the Hancock County Food Pantry in Bay St. Louis and the Mt. Olive Soup Kitchen in Slidell, La.

  16. Evaluation of oral and subcutaneous delivery of an experimental canarypox recombinant canine distemper vaccine in the Siberian polecate (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.; Innes, Kim; Taylor, Bobbi; Garell, Della

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the safety and efficacy of an experimental canarypox-vectored recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) subunit vaccine in the Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmanni), a close relative of the black-footed ferret, (M. nigripes), an endangered species that is highly susceptible to the virus. Siberian polecats were randomized into six treatment groups. Recombinant canine distemper vaccine was administered s.c. at three dose levels (104.5, 105.0, and 105.5 plaque-forming units [PFU] per dose) and was administered orally by spraying the vaccine into the oropharnyx at two dose levels (105.5, 108.0 PFU per dose). The sixth group of control animals was not vaccinated. For both routes of administration, two 1-ml doses of reconstituted vaccine were delivered 4 wk apart, followed by live virus challenge 3 wk after the second vaccination. During the challenge, Synder Hill test strain CDV obtained from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, was administered i.p. Serial blood samples for CDV serology were collected immediately before vaccination and challenge, and 10, 15, and 20 days after challenge. Clinical signs and body weights were recorded up to 32 days after challenge. The survival rate in animals receiving vaccine at the highest oral dose (108.0 PFU per dose) was 83.3%. Survival rate was 50.0% in the high s.c. and 60.0% in the medium s.c. groups. All animals in the low–s.c. dose, low–oral dose, and control groups died after exposure. Vaccine dose overall (oral and s.c.) and dose in response to s.c. administration when considered alone were significant predictors of survival (P = 0.006 and P = 0.04, respectively). Among the polecats challenged with virulent virus, those that died became sick sooner than those that survived. Animals that died lost significantly more weight during the 10 days after challenge than did animals that survived (P = 0.02). Survival rates did not differ by sex, founder female status, or breeding pedigree in any of

  17. Nutrient digestibility and colonic fermentation processes in species of the families Mustelidae and Canidae fed the same diet.

    PubMed

    Gugołek, Andrzej; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy; Strychalski, Janusz; Konstantynowicz, Małgorzata; Zwoliński, Cezary

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient digestibility was compared and the influence of colonic fermentation processes on nutrient digestibility was determined in the American mink (Neovison vison) and the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes). It was hypothesized that gut microbiota exert varied effects on digestion processes in the analyzed species. The experiment was performed in December, on a group of 10 male mink and 10 male foxes. All animals were fed identical diets for fur-bearing carnivores, with the following chemical composition (%): dry matter (DM)-33.12, total protein (TP)-12.01, ether extract (EE)-8.64, crude fiber (CF)-12.01, N-free extracts (N-FE)-9.32, and gross energy (GE)-7.313 MJ/kg(-1) . The coefficients of DM, OM, TP and EE digestibility were significantly higher in foxes than in mink. Mink were characterized by significantly higher utilization of N-FE. In foxes, as compared with mink, fermentation rates were higher in the final section of the gastrointestinal tract, which improved nutrient digestibility. In mink, characterized by lower fermentation rates in the colon, increased enzyme secretion by bacterial cells is one of the physiological mechanisms that enable to optimize nutrient absorption in the large intestine.

  18. Cryptococcus gattii infection in a Spanish pet ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and asymptomatic carriage in ferrets and humans from its environment.

    PubMed

    Morera, Neus; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Torres, Josep M; Andreu, Mariano; Sánchez, Manuel; Zamora, María Ángeles; Colom, M Francisca

    2011-10-01

    A domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with lymphadenopathy and acute bilateral blindness. Cytologic evaluation and biopsy of an affected lymph node revealed pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis with intralesional yeast consistent with Cryptococcus sp. Subsequent studies demonstrated Cryptococcus gattii serotype B VGI/AFLP4 as the causative agent. The ferret was treated with fluconazole and prednisone. After one month of therapy, an improvement of the clinical symptoms was detected although blindness persisted. Seven months after presentation, the disease progressed to a severe neurologic condition, and it was euthanized. Postmortem exam revealed disseminated cryptococcosis with prominent neurologic involvement. Nasal swabs of other ferrets and humans from the same household revealed that two ferrets and two humans to be asymptomatic carriers of the same strain of cryptococcus as the necropsied ferret. These findings stress the importance of veterinary diagnostic work with pets and epidemiological investigations for disease prevention in them and in their owners.

  19. The Fed's Year of Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Niederjohn, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to: (1) Examine the historical development of the Federal Reserve System; (2) Provide background on Ben Bernanke, the new Fed chairman; (3) Explain the basic tools of monetary policy used by the Fed; (4) Examine the causes of the Great Depression, a topic of special interest to Bernanke; and (5) Provide some key…

  20. The Fed's Year of Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.; Niederjohn, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to: (1) Examine the historical development of the Federal Reserve System; (2) Provide background on Ben Bernanke, the new Fed chairman; (3) Explain the basic tools of monetary policy used by the Fed; (4) Examine the causes of the Great Depression, a topic of special interest to Bernanke; and (5) Provide some key…

  1. FED reactor engineering features

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, P.H.; Brown, T.G.; Fuller, G.M.; Smith, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) Baseline design incorporates a number of features which were selected to enhance its maintainability, as well as limit cost and achieve reliable operation. An installation of ten TF coils and ten torus sectors was selected on the basis of plasma chamber segmentation studies and TF coil cost tradeoff studies, permitting removal of a torus sector with a single radial motion. The design also features a shield sector support spool which provides a plasma chamber vacuum boundary and access to the shield sectors. The vacuum seals are made at the outboard face of the torus so that they can be readily cut and rewelded. A pumped limiter provides plasma edge definition and impurity control. Ten individual blades are inserted through the shield sector in an arrangement that permits replacement without sector removal. ICRH is used for plasma bulk heating. Two EF coils, which are located inside the TF coil bore, are segmented so that they can be removed if necessary. The removal of the superconducting lower outboard EF coil, which is trapped under the TF coil assembly, presents a problem; consideration is being given to increasing its diameter and relocating it so that it can be lifted up around the TF coils.

  2. Field emitter display (FED) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ronald

    1995-06-01

    Harris Corporation, Government Aerospace Systems Division, recognized the need for a lower cost alternative to the Active Matrix Liquid Crystal flat-panel display with potentially superior optical performance, lower power dissipation, and less volume at significantly reduced life-cycle cost. This paper compares the performance of Harris' Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD) with the potential performance of a comparable FED. The FED offers superior sunlight- viewable optical performance compared with the AMLCD. The FED projects a significant reduction in power dissipation that will enhance the reliability of the displays and reduce the cooling loads on the cockpit design. It also promises reduced volume and weight. The simpler FED manufacturing processed, and the elimination of expendable backlight and heaters, will result in reductions in the cost of acquisition and ownership of flat-panel displays.

  3. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  4. Age-dependent baseline values of faecal cortisol metabolites in the American mink (Neovison vison) under semi-natural housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Rauch, E; Bergmann, S; Hagn, A; Meixensperger, J; Reese, S; Palme, R; Erhard, M H

    2014-06-01

    The welfare of an animal is ensured if it is able to fully satisfy its essential species-typical needs in all functional aspects of behaviour. In mink, stereotypies and apathy, internal and/or external injuries as well as increased susceptibility to disease have been known to occur as a result of chronic stress. The non-invasive method of analysing faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) allows conclusions to be drawn about the stress level in the respective housing system. The objective of this study is to find out how the cortisol metabolites content in the faecal changes with increasing age of the mink under semi-natural housing conditions. Thus, 40 American mink (Neovison vison) were housed in two outdoor enclosures imitating natural conditions. Throughout the entire study (13th to 32nd week of life), faecal samples were collected to measure cortisol metabolites. No differences in FCM concentrations between the two outdoor enclosures were found. In the young mink lower, less fluctuating FCM levels were found than in older animals. After the first faecal collection in the 13th/14th week of life, the level of metabolites decreased slightly (p = 0.032; 17th/18th week). From the 22nd/23rd week onwards until the 30th/31st week, shortly before the animals were pelted, continuously increasing concentrations were then measured. Increasing FCM levels with advancing age of the animals are probably attributable to the onset of sexual maturity and/or the respective season. This has to be taken into account in future studies using this method for assessing welfare and when comparing different mink housing systems.

  5. Genetic Variation and Population Structure of American Mink Neovison vison from PCB-Contaminated and Non-Contaminated Locales in Eastern North America

    PubMed Central

    Wirgin, Isaac; Maceda, Lorraine; Waldman, John; Mayack, David T.

    2015-01-01

    American mink Neovison vison may be particularly vulnerable to toxicities of persistent contaminants such as PCBs because of their aquatic-based diet, position near the top of the food web, and small deme sizes. Furthermore, ranched mink are sensitive to reproductive toxicities of fish diets from PCB-polluted sites. The upper Hudson River is highly contaminated with PCBs and previous studies have shown elevated hepatic burdens of total and coplanar PCBs in mink collected near the river compared with those from more distant locales in New York and elsewhere. We hypothesized that bioaccumulation of PCBs in Hudson River mink has reduced their levels of genetic diversity or altered their genetic population structure. To address this, we conducted microsatellite DNA analysis on collections made in proximity to and from more distant locales in the Hudson River watershed, elsewhere in New York State, and at other sites in eastern North America including New Brunswick, four locales in Ontario, multiple drainages in Maine, and two ecoregions in Rhode Island. We did not find reduced genetic diversity at the individual or population levels in mink collected near (< 6 km) to PCB hotspots in the Hudson River nor evidence of altered population structure. Consistent with their distribution in small localized and isolated demes, we did find significant genetic population structure among many mink collections in New York State and elsewhere. Depending on the analytical approach used, genetically distinct populations numbered between 16 when using STRUCTURE to 19-20 when using Exact G tests, FST, or AMOVA analyses. Genetically distinct population units were found among major ecoregions and minor ecoregions in New York State, among different hydrologic subunits within the Hudson River watershed, among spatially separate locales in Ontario, and among most watersheds in Maine. However, despite this localization and potential heightened impact of stressors, genetic diversity and genetic

  6. Genetic variation and population structure of American mink Neovison vison from PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated locales in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Wirgin, Isaac; Maceda, Lorraine; Waldman, John; Mayack, David T

    2015-11-01

    American mink Neovison vison may be particularly vulnerable to toxicities of persistent contaminants such as PCBs because of their aquatic-based diet, position near the top of the food web, and small deme sizes. Furthermore, ranched mink are sensitive to reproductive toxicities of fish diets from PCB-polluted sites. The upper Hudson River is highly contaminated with PCBs and previous studies have shown elevated hepatic burdens of total and coplanar PCBs in mink collected near the river compared with those from more distant locales in New York and elsewhere. We hypothesized that bioaccumulation of PCBs in Hudson River mink has reduced their levels of genetic diversity or altered their genetic population structure. To address this, we conducted microsatellite DNA analysis on collections made in proximity to and from more distant locales in the Hudson River watershed, elsewhere in New York State, and at other sites in eastern North America including New Brunswick, four locales in Ontario, multiple drainages in Maine, and two ecoregions in Rhode Island. We did not find reduced genetic diversity at the individual or population levels in mink collected near (<6 km) to PCB hotspots in the Hudson River nor evidence of altered population structure. Consistent with their distribution in small localized and isolated demes, we did find significant genetic population structure among many mink collections in New York State and elsewhere. Depending on the analytical approach used, genetically distinct populations numbered between 16 when using STRUCTURE to 19-20 when using Exact G tests, F ST, or AMOVA analyses. Genetically distinct population units were found among major ecoregions and minor ecoregions in New York State, among different hydrologic subunits within the Hudson River watershed, among spatially separate locales in Ontario, and among most watersheds in Maine. However, despite this localization and potential heightened impact of stressors, genetic diversity and genetic

  7. Comparison of a human portable glucometer and an automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Larrat, Sylvain; Brown, Dorothy C.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, −0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, −2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species. PMID:25183894

  8. Vaccination with F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague upon oral challenge with Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Smith, Susan; Marinari, Paul; Kreeger, Julie; Enama, Jeffrey T; Powell, Bradford S

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have established that vaccination of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) with F1-V fusion protein by subcutaneous (SC) injection protects the animals against plague upon injection of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This study demonstrates that the F1-V antigen can also protect ferrets against plague contracted via ingestion of a Y. pestis-infected mouse, a probable route for natural infection. Eight black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated with F1-V protein by SC injection at approximately 60 days-of-age. A booster vaccination was administered 3 mo later via SC injection. Four additional ferret kits received placebos. The animals were challenged 6 wk after the boost by feeding each one a Y. pestis-infected mouse. All eight vaccinates survived challenge, while the four controls succumbed to plague within 3 days after exposure. To determine the duration of antibody postvaccination, 18 additional black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated and boosted with F1-V by SC injection at 60 and 120 days-of-age. High titers to both F1 and V (mean reciprocal titers of 18,552 and 99,862, respectively) were found in all vaccinates up to 2 yr postvaccination, whereas seven control animals remained antibody negative throughout the same time period.

  9. Comparison of a human portable glucometer and an automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie M; Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Larrat, Sylvain; Brown, Dorothy C

    2014-09-01

    This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, -0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, -2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species.

  10. Vaccination with F1-V fusion protein protects black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) against plague upon oral challenge with Yersinia pestis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.; Marinari, Paul E.; Kreeger, J.; Enama, J.T.; Powell, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have established that vaccination of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) with F1-V fusion protein by subcutaneous (SC) injection protects the animals against plague upon injection of the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This study demonstrates that the F1-V antigen can also protect ferrets against plague contracted via ingestion of a Y. pestis-infected mouse, a probable route for natural infection. Eight black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated with F1-V protein by SC injection at approximately 60 days-of-age. A booster vaccination was administered 3 mo later via SC injection. Four additional ferret kits received placebos. The animals were challenged 6 wk after the boost by feeding each one a Y. pestis-infected mouse. All eight vaccinates survived challenge, while the four controls succumbed to plague within 3 days after exposure. To determine the duration of antibody postvaccination, 18 additional black-footed ferret kits were vaccinated and boosted with F1-V by SC injection at 60 and 120 days-of-age. High titers to both F1 and V (mean reciprocal titers of 18,552 and 99,862, respectively) were found in all vaccinates up to 2 yr postvaccination, whereas seven control animals remained antibody negative throughout the same time period. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  11. The FedEx Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The original shipping strategy of FedEx was to fly all packages to a hub during the afternoon and evening, sort them there, and then fly them to their destinations overnight for delivery the next day. This leads to interesting mathematical questions: Given a population represented by points in Euclidean space or on a sphere, what is the location…

  12. The FedEx Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The original shipping strategy of FedEx was to fly all packages to a hub during the afternoon and evening, sort them there, and then fly them to their destinations overnight for delivery the next day. This leads to interesting mathematical questions: Given a population represented by points in Euclidean space or on a sphere, what is the location…

  13. Reproduction in mallards fed selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Weller, D.M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed diets containing 1, 5, 10, 25 or 100 ppm selenium as sodium selenite, a diet containing 10 ppm selenium as seleno-DL-methionine or a control diet. There were no effects of 1, 5 or 10 ppm selenium as sodium selenite on either weight or survival of adults or on reproductive success, and there did not appear to be a dose-response relationship at these lower levels. The 100 ppm selenium diet killed 11 of 12 adults; one adult male fed 25 ppm selenium died. Selenium at 25 and 100 ppm caused weight loss in adults. Females fed 25 ppm selenium took longer to begin laying eggs and intervals between eggs were longer than in females in other treatment groups. Hatching success appeared to be reduced in birds fed 10 ppm selenium at selenomethionine, but the reduction was not statistically significant. The survival of ducklings and the mean number of 21-d-old ducklings produced per female were reduced in the 25 ppm selenium as sodium selenite group and the 10 ppm selenium as selenomethionine group. Egg weights were not affected by any selenium treatment, but 25 ppm selenium lowered the Ratcliffe Index. Duckling weights at hatching and at 21 d of age were reduced 28 and 36%, respectively, in birds fed 25 ppm selenium, as compared with controls. Body weights measured on day 21 were lower for ducklings fed 10 ppm selenium as selenomethionine than in some other groups. Selenium in concentrations of 10 and 25 ppm as sodium selenite caused mainly embryotoxic effects, whereas 10 ppm as selenomethionine was more teratogenic, causing hydrocephaly, bill defects, eye defects (microphthalmia and anophthalmia) and foot and toe defects, including ectrodactyly. Selenomethionine was much more readily taken up by mallards and passed into their eggs than was sodium selenite, and a greater proportion of the selenium in the eggs ended up in the white when selenomethionine was fed. Adult males accumulated more selenium than did females, probably because of the

  14. Disposal and Reuse of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan. Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    House mouse Mus musculus Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata Mink Mustela vison Little brown bat Myotis lucifugus White-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus...use and employment due to redevelopment, and anticipated phasing of the various elements of each reuse plan (as measured at the closure baseline, and...Proposed Action Acres Disturbed (by phase ) Land Use 1993-1998 1998-2003 2003-2013 Total Airfield 50 0 0 50 Aviation support 15 8 6 29 Industrial 55

  15. Spatial and temporal analysis of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticide residues in polecats (Mustela putorius) from throughout their range in Britain, 1992-1999.

    PubMed

    Shore, R F; Birks, J D S; Afsar, A; Wienburg, C L; Kitchener, A C

    2003-01-01

    Polecats (Mustela putorius) in Britain are currently expanding their range eastwards from Wales to reoccupy central and eastern areas of England. Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs), to which polecats are exposed by eating contaminated prey, are used more extensively in these central and eastern regions, leading to fears of increased exposure, and possible resultant mortality. We measured bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and brodifacoum concentrations in the livers of 50 polecats from areas that included newly recolonised habitats and found that at least one SGAR was detected in the livers of 13 out of 37 (35.1%) male and 5 out of 13 (38.5%) female polecats. Difenacoum and bromadiolone were detected most frequently. We then combined these data with measurements on another 50 individuals from earlier studies to create a dataset for 100 polecats collected throughout the 1990s from across the whole of their current range. Using this dataset, we determined if there was any evidence that contamination in polecats had increased during the 1990s and whether animals from England were more contaminated than those from Wales, as might be expected given regional differences in the patterns of SGAR use. Overall, 31 of the 100 polecats analysed to date contained SGAR residues. The incidence was a little higher (40%) in animals that died between January and June and this probably better reflects the overall proportion of animals that are sub-lethally exposed. There was no statistically significant change during the 1990s in the proportion of polecats exposed to SGARs nor any evidence that greater use of SGARs in England resulted in more contamination of polecats. Contrary to expectation, the proportion of animals that contained difenacoum was marginally higher in Wales than elsewhere.

  16. Slow cooling prevents cold-induced damage to sperm motility and acrosomal integrity in the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Santymire, R M; Marinari, P E; Kreeger, J S; Wildt, D E; Howard, J G

    2007-01-01

    The endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) has benefited from artificial insemination; however, improved sperm cryopreservation protocols are still needed. The present study focused on identifying factors influencing gamete survival during processing before cryopreservation, including: (1) the presence or absence of seminal plasma; (2) temperature (25 degrees C v. 37 degrees C); (3) type of medium (Ham's F10 medium v. TEST yolk buffer [TYB]); (4) cooling rate (slow, rapid and ultra-rapid); and (5) the presence or absence of glycerol. Seminal plasma did not compromise (P > 0.05) sperm motility or acrosomal integrity. Sperm motility traits were maintained longer (P < 0.05) at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C in Ham's or TYB, but temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) acrosomal integrity. Overall, TYB maintained optimal (P < 0.05) sperm motility compared with Ham's medium, but Ham's medium maintained more (P < 0.05) intact acrosomes than TYB. Slow cooling (0.2 degrees C min(-1)) was optimal (P < 0.05) compared to rapid cooling (1 degrees C min(-1)), and ultra-rapid cooling (9 degrees C min(-1)) was found to be highly detrimental (P < 0.05). Results obtained in TYB with 0% or 4% glycerol were comparable (P > 0.05), indicating that 4% glycerol was non-toxic to ferret sperm; however, glycerol failed to ameliorate the detrimental effects of either rapid or ultra-rapid cooling. The results of the present study demonstrate that the damage observed to black-footed ferret spermatozoa is derived largely from the rate of cooling.

  17. Behavioral and Heart Rate Pattern Differences Between Breast-Fed and Bottle-Fed Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Assessed behavioral and physiological differences between 61 breast-fed and 39 bottle-fed neonates. Mean postpartum assessment occurred at 37 hours. Results suggest that breast-fed infants had significantly longer heart periods, elevated heart period variability, and higher vagal tone than bottle-fed infants. (Author/RWB)

  18. FED baseline engineering studies report

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    Studies were carried out on the FED Baseline to improve design definition, establish feasibility, and reduce cost. Emphasis was placed on cost reduction, but significant feasibility concerns existed in several areas, and better design definition was required to establish feasibility and provide a better basis for cost estimates. Design definition and feasibility studies included the development of a labyrinth shield ring concept to prevent radiation streaming between the torus spool and the TF coil cryostat. The labyrinth shield concept which was developed reduced radiation streaming sufficiently to permit contact maintenance of the inboard EF coils. Various concepts of preventing arcing between adjacent shield sectors were also explored. It was concluded that installation of copper straps with molybdenum thermal radiation shields would provide the most reliable means of preventing arcing. Other design studies included torus spool electrical/structural concepts, test module shielding, torus seismic response, poloidal conditions in the magnets, disruption characteristics, and eddy current effects. These additional studies had no significant impact on cost but did confirm the feasibility of the basic FED Baseline concept.

  19. Sarcocystis sp. in mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in Washington: prevalence and search for the definitive host.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J

    1989-10-01

    During October and November 1986, Sarcocystis sp. was detected in 24 of 56 (43%) tongues from hunter-killed mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in Washington (USA). Sarcocysts had an unusual sessile polyp-shaped branched wall. Mean size of 154 sarcocysts was 71.3 x 37.8 microns (range, 20 to 248 x 10 to 120 microns), and the mean intensity was 2.3 (range, 1 to 28). In an attempt to identify the definitive host, infected tongues were fed to four coyotes (Canis latrans), eight domestic dogs, four domestic cats, three bears (Ursus americanus), two raccoons (Procyon lotor), two martens (Martes americana), two fishers (Martes pennanti), three skunks (Mephitis mephitis), five mink (Mustela vison), five ferrets (Mustela putorius), one pigtail macaque (Macaca nemestrina), two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and one great horned owl (Bubo virginianus). Oocysts or sporocysts were not detected in the feces of any host for less than or equal to 20 days after ingestion of the infected meat. The definitive host for Sarcocystis sp. in mountain goats was not identified.

  20. MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

  1. MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

  2. Using Fur to Estimate Mercury Concentrations in Mink

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations in fur and muscle tissue from mink (Mustela vison) were compared to determine the utility of fur analysis as a non-lethal and convenient method for predicting mercury concentrations in tissues. Sixty nine wild-trapped mink were collected in Rhode...

  3. MERCURY AND STABLE ISOTPOES OF CARBON AND NITROGEN IN MINK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The total mercury concentrations, δ15N and δ13C in tissues of mink (Mustela vison) captured in Rhode Island during winters of the years 1999-2004 showed samples to be statistically distinct based on location. Mink captured in salt marsh environments (salt marsh group mink, SMGM)...

  4. A COMAPRISON OF MERCURY IN MINK AND FISHER IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparison of total mercury concentrations and nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values in muscle tissue and stomach contents of mink (Mustela vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti) from Rhode Island in 2000- 2003 showed results which appeared to reflect dietary differences betwee...

  5. Definitive hosts of a fatal Versteria species (Cestoda: Taeniidae) in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously reported fatal metacestode infection in a captive orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) with a novel taeniid tapeworm, Versteria sp. Data from ermine (Mustela erminea) and mink (Neovison vison) implicate mustelids as definitive North America hosts and expand known Versteria diversity. The orangu...

  6. Using Fur to Estimate Mercury Concentrations in Mink

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations in fur and muscle tissue from mink (Mustela vison) were compared to determine the utility of fur analysis as a non-lethal and convenient method for predicting mercury concentrations in tissues. Sixty nine wild-trapped mink were collected in Rhode...

  7. Newcastle disease virus from domestic mink, China, 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Sun, Lingshuang; Sun, Xiao; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Wen; Pulscher, Laura A; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a pathogen that most often infects poultry species. In investigating a 2014 outbreak of encephalitis and death among farmed mink (Mustela vison), we found pathological and later experimental evidence that NDV can infect and cause severe encephalitic and pneumonic disease in these animals. Our findings confirm the host range of NDV.

  8. A COMAPRISON OF MERCURY IN MINK AND FISHER IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparison of total mercury concentrations and nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values in muscle tissue and stomach contents of mink (Mustela vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti) from Rhode Island in 2000- 2003 showed results which appeared to reflect dietary differences betwee...

  9. MERCURY AND STABLE ISOTPOES OF CARBON AND NITROGEN IN MINK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The total mercury concentrations, δ15N and δ13C in tissues of mink (Mustela vison) captured in Rhode Island during winters of the years 1999-2004 showed samples to be statistically distinct based on location. Mink captured in salt marsh environments (salt marsh group mink, SMGM)...

  10. Genetic identification of mammalian carnivore species in the Kushiro Wetland, eastern Hokkaido, Japan, by analysis of fecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Shimatani, Yukari; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Tatsuzawa, Shirow; Ikeda, Tohru; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2008-07-01

    To identify mammalian carnivore species distributed in the Kushiro Wetland, eastern Hokkaido, Japan, we developed molecular-genetic methods for identification of the species from fecal samples collected from the field. Species-specific primers and PCR programs were established for five native and six alien species of carnivores: Martes zibellina, Mustela nivalis, Mustela erminea, Vulpes vulpes, and Nyctereutes procyonoides as native species, and Neovison vison, Martes melampus, Mustela itatsi, Canis familiaris, Felis catus, and Procyon lotor as alien species in Hokkaido. Touchdown PCR, in which the annealing temperature is decreased 1 degrees C every cycle, was more effective for some species from which fecal DNA was not amplified species-specifically with standard PCR programs. Of 405 fecal samples collected from the Kushiro Wetland, the species of origin of 246 samples were successfully identified: 88 samples for N. vison, 140 for M. zibellina, 13 for V. vulpes, four for C. familiaris and one for F. catus. The results show the particular applicability of this method to monitoring M. zibellina and N. vison. In addition, methods to PCR-amplify DNA from two crayfish species (Pacifastacus leniusculus and Cambaroides japonicus) were developed to determine whether the carnivore fecal samples contained detectable DNA from the prey crayfishes. DNA from P. leniusculus was amplified from feces of N. vison identified in the present study, but no DNA from C. japonicus was detected. This indicates that N. vison preys on the alien species P. leniusculus.

  11. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shank, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) was to show, in a simulated spacecraft environment, the feasibility of using a microprocessor to automate the onboard orbit determination functions. The software and hardware configuration used to support FEDS during the demonstration and the results of the demonstration are discussed.

  12. FED. Zoning for TRUMP Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Elrod, D.

    1987-10-23

    FED reduces the effort required to obtain the necessary geometric input for problems which are to be solved using the heat-transfer code, TRUMP. TRUMP calculates transient and steady-state temperature distributions in multidimensional systems. FED can properly zone any body of revolution in one, two, or three dimensions.

  13. Reproduction and health of mallards fed endrin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Hulse, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of 0, 1 and 3 ppm endrin in dry duck mash were fed to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) starting in December, and health and reproduction were measured the following spring and summer. One male fed 3 ppm endrin died with 2.0 ppm endrin (wet weight), a diagnostically lethal level, in its brain. Birds fed 1 ppm endrin reproduced as well as, if not better than, controls. Birds fed 1 ppm endrin had significantly greater hatching success of fertile eggs than did those fed 0 or 3 ppm, and their clutches hatched significantly earlier than did those of birds fed 3 ppm. Mallards fed 3 ppm endrin appeared to reproduce more poorly than controls, but this finding must be regarded with caution because the results of statistical tests often were not significant. Endrin accumulated in eggs to a mean of 1.1 and 2.9 ppm (wet weight) when fed to hens at 1 and 3 ppm. The concentration of endrin in the cacasses of adults was similar to that in eggs, but the concentration in the fat of adults was about 4 to 7 times higher than in eggs.

  14. Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) software system

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, J.A.; Wrench, L.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) Model is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program and the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory. FEDS is a multi-level energy analysis software system designed to provide a comprehensive approach to fuel-neutral, technology-independent, integrated (energy) resource planning and acquisition. The FEDS system includes Level-1, a top-down, first-pass energy systems analysis and energy resource acquisition decision software model for buildings and facilities; and the Level-2 software model, which allows specific engineering inputs and provides detailed output. FEDS Level-1 is a user-friendly, DOS-based, menu-driven software program for assessing the energy efficiency resource at a large federal installation. It uses high-level installation information (number, age, size, and types of buildings and energy systems), an internal data base of typical energy-system configurations and performance data, and sophisticated energy simulation and optimization models to estimate the net present value of potential energy retrofits in federal installations. The FEDS Level-1 analysis will typically be followed by a FEDS Level-2 analysis, which allows FEDS Level-1 information to be augmented with detailed energy-system information, and returns detailed project-by-project technology selection and economic information. FEDS Level-1 was released in October 1992. FEDS Level-2 is planned for release in October 1993. The first release which includes both levels will cover only building systems. The next release in early 1994 will cover other energy systems, including central heating and cooling plants and thermal distribution loops.

  15. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Rutherford, P. H.; Hogan, J.T.; Attenberger, S. E.; Holmes, J.A.; Borowski, S. K.; Brown, T. G.; Carreras, B. A.; Ehst, D. A.; Haines, J.R.; Hively, L. M.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Iida, H.; Lee, V. D.; Lynch, S.J.; Reid, R. L.; Rothe, K. E.; Strickler, Dennis J; Stewart, L. D.

    1983-08-01

    This document is one of four describing studies performed in FY 1982 within the context of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) Program for the Office of Fusion Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. The documents are: 1. FED Baseline Engineering Studies (ORNL/FEDC-82/2), 2. FED-A, An Advanced Performance FED Based on Low Safety Factor and Current Drive (this document), 3. FED-R, A Fusion Device Utilizing Resistive Magnets (ORNL/FEDC-82/1), and 4. Technology Demonstration Facility TDF. These studies extend the FED Baseline concept of FY 1981 and develop innovative and alternative concepts for the FED. The FED-A study project was carried out as part of the Innovative and Alternative Tokamak FED studies, under the direction of P. H. Rutherford, which were part of the national FED program during FY 1982. The studies were performed jointly by senior scientists in the magnetic fusion community and the staff of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Y-K. M. Peng of the FEDC, on assignment from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, served as the design manager.

  16. Radiation from Axisymmetric Waveguide Fed Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, G. C.; Hoppe, D. J.; Epp, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Return losses and radiation patterns for axisymmetric waveguide fed horns are calculated with the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with the method of moments (MoM) and the mode matching technique (MM).

  17. Radiation from Axisymmetric Waveguide Fed Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, G. C.; Hoppe, D. J.; Epp, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Return losses and radiation patterns for axisymmetric waveguide fed horns are calculated with the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with the method of moments (MoM) and the mode matching technique (MM).

  18. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) functional description and interface document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, R. C.; Shank, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a functional description of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) and of interfaces between FEDS and external hardware and software. FEDS is a modification of the Automated Orbit Determination System (AODS). FEDS has been developed to support a ground demonstration of microprocessor-based onboard orbit determination. This document provides an overview of the structure and logic of FEDS and details the various operational procedures to build and execute FEDS. It also documents a microprocessor interface between FEDS and a TDRSS user transponder and describes a software simulator of the interface used in the development and system testing of FEDS.

  19. Rapid development of fasting-induced hepatic lipidosis in the American mink (Neovison vison): effects of food deprivation and re-alimentation on body fat depots, tissue fatty acid profiles, hematology and endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Conway, Rebecca; Pal, Catherine; Harris, Lora; Saarela, Seppo; Strandberg, Ursula; Nieminen, Petteri

    2010-02-01

    Hepatic lipidosis is a common pathological finding in the American mink (Neovison vison) and can be caused by nutritional imbalance due to obesity or rapid body weight loss. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the timeline and characterize the development of hepatic lipidosis in mink in response to 0-7 days of food deprivation and liver recovery after 28 days of re-feeding. We report here the effects on hematological and endocrine variables, body fat mobilization, the development of hepatic lipidosis and the alterations in the liver lipid classes and tissue fatty acid (FA) sums. Food deprivation resulted in the rapid mobilization of body fat, most notably visceral, causing elevated hepatosomatic index and increased liver triacylglycerol content. The increased absolute amounts of liver total phospholipids and phosphatidylcholine suggested endoplasmic reticulum stress. The hepatic lipid infiltration and the altered liver lipid profiles were associated with a significantly reduced proportion of n-3 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) in the livers and the decrease was more evident in the females. Likewise, re-feeding of the female mink resulted in a more pronounced recovery of the liver n-3 PUFA. The rapid decrease in the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio in response to food deprivation could trigger an inflammatory response in the liver. This could be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of fatty liver disease in mink influencing disease progression.

  20. Cardiac lesions in rats fed rapeseed oils.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, K M; Corner, A H; Davey, K; Kramer, J K; Mahadevan, S; Sauer, F D

    1975-01-01

    Fully refined rapeseed oils containing different amounts of erucic acid (1.6%, 4.3% and 22.3%) were fed, at 20% by weight of diet, to weanling male and female Sprague-Dawley rats for periods up to 112 days. Transient myocardial lipidosis characterized by accumulation of fat droplets in myocardial fibers was marked in male and female rats fed oxidized and unoxidized rapeseed oil containing 22.3% erucic acid, moderate with rapeseed oil containing 4.3% erucic acid and very slight in rats fed rapeseed oil containing 1.6% erucic acid. Peak intensity of myocardial lipidosis occurred at three to seven days and regressed thereafter. Focal myocardial necrosis and fibrosis occurred in male rats fed rapeseed oils containing different levels of erucic acid for 112 days. The incidence of myocardial necrosis and fibrosis was markedly lower in female rats, and the incidence of these lesions in either sex was not affected by the state of oxidation of these oils. In a second experiment, male rats were fed diets containing crude, partially refined or fully refined rapeseed oils. There was no correlation between the number of foci of myocardial necrosis and fibrosis and the state of refinement of the oils, but there were generally fewer lesions in rats fed those oils having the lowest levels of erucic acid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:1170010

  1. Oral microbial profile discriminates breast-fed from formula-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Holgerson, Pernilla L; Vestman, Nelly R; Claesson, Rolf; Ohman, Carina; Domellöf, Magnus; Tanner, Anne C R; Hernell, Olle; Johansson, Ingegerd

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the effect of diet on the oral microbiota of infants, although diet is known to affect the gut microbiota. The aims of the present study were to compare the oral microbiota in breast-fed and formula-fed infants, and investigate growth inhibition of streptococci by infant-isolated lactobacilli. A total of 207 mothers consented to participation of their 3-month-old infants. A total of 146 (70.5%) infants were exclusively and 38 (18.4%) partially breast-fed, and 23 (11.1%) were exclusively formula-fed. Saliva from all of their infants was cultured for Lactobacillus species, with isolate identifications from 21 infants. Lactobacillus isolates were tested for their ability to suppress Streptococcus mutans and S sanguinis. Oral swabs from 73 infants were analysed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) and by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for Lactobacillus gasseri. Lactobacilli were cultured from 27.8% of exclusively and partially breast-fed infants, but not from formula-fed infants. The prevalence of 14 HOMIM-detected taxa, and total salivary lactobacilli counts differed by feeding method. Multivariate modelling of HOMIM-detected bacteria and possible confounders clustered samples from breast-fed infants separately from formula-fed infants. The microbiota of breast-fed infants differed based on vaginal or C-section delivery. Isolates of L plantarum, L gasseri, and L vaginalis inhibited growth of the cariogenic S mutans and the commensal S sanguinis: L plantarum >L gasseri >L vaginalis. The microbiota of the mouth differs between 3-month-old breast-fed and formula-fed infants. Possible mechanisms for microbial differences observed include species suppression by lactobacilli indigenous to breast milk.

  2. Foetal life protein provision of mink (Neovison vison) changes the relative mRNA abundance of some hepatic enzymes regulating fat metabolism.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Connie Frank; Casañas, Maria Arantzazu Aguinaga; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2014-01-01

    The nutrient provision to pregnant females has high impact on the growth and metabolism of their offspring. The objective was to investigate if the expression of hepatic enzymes regulating the fat metabolism was affected in foetuses and adult female mink born by dams fed either a low or an adequate level of protein during late gestation. The relative abundances of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) mRNA were determined by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in the livers of F₀- and F₁-generation dams and in F₁-generation foetuses. Low protein provision during foetal life resulted in a lower expression of FAS in foetal liver but a tendency towards increased expression in the liver of adult dams. There was a tendency towards an effect of life stage of the animal on the expression of ACC resulting in a higher expression among F₁ foetuses exposed to low protein during foetal life than F₀ dams fed a low protein diet during late gestation. The expression of CPT1 was significantly lower among dams exposed to low protein provision during foetal life than controls, possibly indicating a lower rate of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Further investigations are needed to clarify the consequences of these changes for the fat metabolism.

  3. Comprehensive facility energy assessment using FEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, D.L.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Quinones, R.

    1994-12-01

    The energy savings and demand reduction opportunities at the Army`s National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, were evaluated. The Fort Irwin analysis made use of the recently developed Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) System Level-2 software tool. FEDS is a systematic, technology-neutral, and fuel-neutral approach to evaluating energy savings opportunities at large facilities. FEDS analyzes most major building end uses (e.g., heating, cooling, lighting, ventilation, and service hot water), including interactive effects (e.g., the effect of a lighting technology on heating and cooling loads). FEDS output provides specific cost, energy (and demand) charges, and life-cycle cost (LCC) information, by cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs). The remaining end uses common to large facilities (e.g., motors, transmission and distribution, vehicles) are analyzed using manual calculation methods. The present value (PV) of the installed cost of all EROs constituting the minimum LCC efficiency resource (i.e., cost-effective) at Fort Irwin is approximately $23.9 million in 1994 dollars (1994$). The PV of the energy and demand, operations and maintenance (O&M), and replacement savings associated with this investment is approximately $87.3 million, for an overall NPV of $63.6 million. This paper will describe the FEDS process and present detailed results of the comprehensive energy resource assessment conducted at Fort Irwin.

  4. Relationship of Breast-fed and Bottle-fed First Grade Students and I.Q.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Danette

    Previous studies have indicated some support for the hypothesis that breast feeding has a positive effect on intelligence and attainment among young children. This study examined the effects of breast-feeding versus bottle-feeding on the intelligence quotients (IQs) of first graders. A total of 26 breast-fed and 26 bottle-fed first graders from an…

  5. Outcome Differences between Breast-Fed and Bottle-Fed Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sandra K.; And Others

    DiPietro, Larson, and Porges (1987) found behavioral and physiological differences between breast-fed and bottle-fed newborns. It was suggested that breast-feeding is associated with more optimal physiological organization and with increased irritable reactivity early in the neonatal period. The present study investigated whether breast-fed…

  6. Transcriptomic profiling of spleen in grass-fed and grain-fed Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The grass-fed cattle obtain nutrients directly from pastures containing limited assimilable energy but abundant amount of fiber; by contrast, grain-fed steers receive a diet that is comprised mainly of grains and serves as an efficient source of high-digestible energy. Besides energy, these two type...

  7. Proceedings of FED remote maintenance equipment workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, P.; Garin, J.; Hager, E.R.; Spampinato, P.T.; Tobias, D.; Young, N.

    1981-11-01

    A workshop was convened in two sessions in January and March 1981, on the remote maintenance equipment for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The objectives of the first session were to familiarize the participants with the status of the design of the FED and to develop a remote maintenance equipment list for the FED. The objective of the second session was to have the participants present design concepts for the equipment which had been identified in the first session. The equipment list was developed for general purpose and special purpose equipment. The general purpose equipment was categorized as manipulators and other, while the special purpose equipment was subdivided according to the reactor subsystem it serviced: electrical, magnetic, and nuclear. Both mobile and fixed base manipulators were identified. Handling machines were identified as the major requirement for special purpose equipment.

  8. Pressure fed thrust chamber technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for the Pressure Fed Technology Program. It details the design, fabrication and testing of subscale hardware which successfully characterized LOX/RP combustion for a low cost pressure fed design. The innovative modular injector design is described in detail as well as hot-fire test results which showed excellent performance. The program summary identifies critical LOX/RP design issues that have been resolved by this testing, and details the low risk development requirements for a low cost engine for future Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELVi).

  9. Pressure fed thrust chamber technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glen M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for the Pressure Fed Technology Program. It details the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware which successfully characterized Liquid Oxygen Rocket Propulsion (LOX/RP) combustion for low cost pressure fed design. The innovative modular injector design is described in detail as well as hot-fire test results which showed excellent performance. The program summary identifies critical LOX/RP design issues that have been resolved in this testing, and details the low risk development requirements for low cost engines for future Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV).

  10. Status of FED/INTOR electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.

    1983-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the electromagnetic studies, calculations, and conclusions in the evolution of the base design of FED/INTOR (Fusion Engineering Device/International Tokamak Reactor). The electromagnetic feastures include the startup, control, disruptions, and design of structures. This report provides information concerning the evolution of the electromagnetic studies on FED and the justification for the eddy current design feature. The report shows that a major design feature required is the provision of a low induction and resistive path for toroidal currents to flow in the structures in order to provide self-stabilization and to manage the disruption energy dissipation.

  11. Dietary exposure of mink to carp from Saginaw Bay, Michigan: 2. Hematology and liver pathology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heaton, S. N.; Bursian, S.J.; Giesy, J.P.; Tillitt, D. E.; Render, J. A.; Jones, P.D.; Verbrugge, D.A.; Kubiak, T.J.; Aulerich, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of consumption of environmental contaminants contained in carp (Cyprinus carpio)from Saginaw Bay, Michigan on various hematological parameters and liver integrity of adult female mink (Mustela vison) were determined. Mink were fed diets that contained 0 (control), 10, 20, or 40% carp prior to and throughout the reproductive period (182 days). The diets contained 0.015, 0.72, 1.53, and 2.56 mg polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)/kg diet and 1.0, 19, 40, and 81 pg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs)/g diet, respectively. Mink fed the diets containing carp showed a general dose-dependent occurrence of clinical signs commonly associated with chlorinated hydrocarbon toxicity, including listlessness, nervousness when approached, anorexia, and melena. Erythrocyte counts were less in mink exposed to Saginaw Bay carp than in controls, while the number of white blood cells was greater than in controls. Significant differences (p<0.05) in the concentrations of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils were also found between the control and carp-fed groups, but are considered to be of limited clinical or biological importance. Hematocrit values for the mink fed the 20 and 40% carp diets were significantly less than those of mink in the control and 10% carp groups. There were no significant differences in hemoglobin concentrations among the groups. Necropsies revealed enlarged yellowish livers in many of the carp-fed mink, especially those fed the 40% carp diet. Liver, spleen, and lung weights of carp-fed mink were significantly greater than those of control mink. Histopathologic examination of the livers revealed various degrees of congestion, hepatocellular fatty changes, and scattered portal lymphocytic infiltration which were most prevalent in mink fed the carp diets. These clinical signs, hematological effects, and histologic alterations are similar to those previously described for chlorinated hydrocarbon toxicoses in mink.

  12. Ruminal Transcriptomic Analysis of Grass-Fed and Grain-Fed Angus Beef Cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaokun; Carrillo, José A; Ding, Yi; He, YangHua; Zhao, Chunping; Zan, Linsen; Song, Jiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Beef represents a major diet component and one of the major sources of protein in human. The beef industry in the United States is currently undergoing changes and is facing increased demands especially for natural grass-fed beef. The grass-fed beef obtained their nutrients directly from pastures, which contained limited assimilable energy but abundant amount of fiber. On the contrary, the grain-fed steers received a grain-based regime that served as an efficient source of high-digestible energy. Lately, ruminant animals have been accused to be a substantial contributor for the green house effect. Therefore, the concerns from environmentalism, animal welfare and public health have driven consumers to choose grass-fed beef. Rumen is one of the key workshops to digest forage constituting a critical step to supply enough nutrients for animals' growth and production. We hypothesize that rumen may function differently in grass- and grain-fed regimes. The objective of this study was to find the differentially expressed genes in the ruminal wall of grass-fed and grain-fed steers, and then explore the potential biopathways. In this study, the RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) method was used to measure the gene expression level in the ruminal wall. The total number of reads per sample ranged from 24,697,373 to 36,714,704. The analysis detected 342 differentially expressed genes between ruminal wall samples of animals raised under different regimens. The Fisher's exact test performed in the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software found 16 significant molecular networks. Additionally, 13 significantly enriched pathways were identified, most of which were related to cell development and biosynthesis. Our analysis demonstrated that most of the pathways enriched with the differentially expressed genes were related to cell development and biosynthesis. Our results provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms resulting in the phenotype difference between grass-fed and grain-fed

  13. Ruminal Transcriptomic Analysis of Grass-Fed and Grain-Fed Angus Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaokun; Carrillo, José A.; Ding, Yi; He, YangHua; Zhao, Chunping; Zan, Linsen; Song, Jiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Beef represents a major diet component and one of the major sources of protein in human. The beef industry in the United States is currently undergoing changes and is facing increased demands especially for natural grass-fed beef. The grass-fed beef obtained their nutrients directly from pastures, which contained limited assimilable energy but abundant amount of fiber. On the contrary, the grain-fed steers received a grain-based regime that served as an efficient source of high-digestible energy. Lately, ruminant animals have been accused to be a substantial contributor for the green house effect. Therefore, the concerns from environmentalism, animal welfare and public health have driven consumers to choose grass-fed beef. Rumen is one of the key workshops to digest forage constituting a critical step to supply enough nutrients for animals’ growth and production. We hypothesize that rumen may function differently in grass- and grain-fed regimes. The objective of this study was to find the differentially expressed genes in the ruminal wall of grass-fed and grain-fed steers, and then explore the potential biopathways. In this study, the RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) method was used to measure the gene expression level in the ruminal wall. The total number of reads per sample ranged from 24,697,373 to 36,714,704. The analysis detected 342 differentially expressed genes between ruminal wall samples of animals raised under different regimens. The Fisher’s exact test performed in the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software found 16 significant molecular networks. Additionally, 13 significantly enriched pathways were identified, most of which were related to cell development and biosynthesis. Our analysis demonstrated that most of the pathways enriched with the differentially expressed genes were related to cell development and biosynthesis. Our results provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms resulting in the phenotype difference between grass-fed and

  14. Valuing Fed Cattle Using Objective Tenderness Measures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beef tenderness is critical in consumer satisfaction with beef steak products. Current fed cattle valuation systems do not differentiate carcasses based upon tenderness variation. However, considerable research indicates consumers are willing to pay more for tender relative to tough beef steak. T...

  15. Microbial biodiversity in glacier-fed streams

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Linda; Singer, Gabriel A; Fasching, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    While glaciers become increasingly recognised as a habitat for diverse and active microbial communities, effects of their climate change-induced retreat on the microbial ecology of glacier-fed streams remain elusive. Understanding the effect of climate change on microorganisms in these ecosystems is crucial given that microbial biofilms control numerous stream ecosystem processes with potential implications for downstream biodiversity and biogeochemistry. Here, using a space-for-time substitution approach across 26 Alpine glaciers, we show how microbial community composition and diversity, based on 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, in biofilms of glacier-fed streams may change as glaciers recede. Variations in streamwater geochemistry correlated with biofilm community composition, even at the phylum level. The most dominant phyla detected in glacial habitats were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria/chloroplasts. Microorganisms from ice had the lowest α diversity and contributed marginally to biofilm and streamwater community composition. Rather, streamwater apparently collected microorganisms from various glacial and non-glacial sources forming the upstream metacommunity, thereby achieving the highest α diversity. Biofilms in the glacier-fed streams had intermediate α diversity and species sorting by local environmental conditions likely shaped their community composition. α diversity of streamwater and biofilm communities decreased with elevation, possibly reflecting less diverse sources of microorganisms upstream in the catchment. In contrast, β diversity of biofilms decreased with increasing streamwater temperature, suggesting that glacier retreat may contribute to the homogenisation of microbial communities among glacier-fed streams. PMID:23486246

  16. Microbial biodiversity in glacier-fed streams.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Linda; Singer, Gabriel A; Fasching, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina

    2013-08-01

    While glaciers become increasingly recognised as a habitat for diverse and active microbial communities, effects of their climate change-induced retreat on the microbial ecology of glacier-fed streams remain elusive. Understanding the effect of climate change on microorganisms in these ecosystems is crucial given that microbial biofilms control numerous stream ecosystem processes with potential implications for downstream biodiversity and biogeochemistry. Here, using a space-for-time substitution approach across 26 Alpine glaciers, we show how microbial community composition and diversity, based on 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, in biofilms of glacier-fed streams may change as glaciers recede. Variations in streamwater geochemistry correlated with biofilm community composition, even at the phylum level. The most dominant phyla detected in glacial habitats were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria/chloroplasts. Microorganisms from ice had the lowest α diversity and contributed marginally to biofilm and streamwater community composition. Rather, streamwater apparently collected microorganisms from various glacial and non-glacial sources forming the upstream metacommunity, thereby achieving the highest α diversity. Biofilms in the glacier-fed streams had intermediate α diversity and species sorting by local environmental conditions likely shaped their community composition. α diversity of streamwater and biofilm communities decreased with elevation, possibly reflecting less diverse sources of microorganisms upstream in the catchment. In contrast, β diversity of biofilms decreased with increasing streamwater temperature, suggesting that glacier retreat may contribute to the homogenisation of microbial communities among glacier-fed streams.

  17. Thrombocytopenia in lambs fed with bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, B E

    1993-03-01

    Artificially reared lambs, fed with bovine colostrum, died within 48 hours after birth, showing thrombocytopenia and extensive haemorrhages on autopsy. The mechanism behind was not fully understood, but experimental immunization of young cattle against sheep red blood cells, carried out five years earlier on the same farm, may have played a role.

  18. Doubly fed machine review: agenda. Conference report, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The visual aids presented at the doubly fed machine review are presented. The doubly fed machine is a generating system either for wind turbines or hydro systems. Conceptual design and trade-offs are included, as well as testing. (LEW)

  19. Stennis employees join Feds Feed Families effort

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-09

    Cabrina Bell (l to r) and Jeanie Frederick with the Stennis Space Center Office of Human Capital help Hancock County Food Pantry representatives Edward Catone and Frank Manchester load collected food items July 9 as part of the 2010 Feds Feed Families campaign. The second annual national food drive was launched last month and involves federal agencies and employees across the country. Organizers hope to collect 1.2 million pounds of food items throughout the summer.

  20. Altered avoidance behavior of young black ducks fed cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 4 or 40 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride. One-week-old ducklings that had been fed thc same dietary concentrations of cadmium as had their parents were tested for avoidance of a fright stimulus. Ducklings fed 4 ppm cadmium ran significantly farther from the stimulus than did controls or ducklings fed 40 ppm cadmium. Such an alteration in behavior could have harmful effects on wild birds.

  1. Sky Subtraction with Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Myriam

    2017-09-01

    "Historically, fiber-fed spectrographs had been deemed inadequate for the observation of faint targets, mainly because of the difficulty to achieve high accuracy on the sky subtraction. The impossibility to sample the sky in the immediate vicinity of the target in fiber instruments has led to a commonly held view that a multi-object fibre spectrograph cannot achieve an accurate sky subtraction under 1% contrary to their slit counterpart. The next generation of multi-objects spectrograph at the VLT (MOONS) and the planed MOS for the E-ELT (MOSAIC) are fiber-fed instruments, and are aimed to observed targets fainter than the sky continuum level. In this talk, I will present the state-of-art on sky subtraction strategies and data reduction algorithm specifically developed for fiber-fed spectrographs. I will also present the main results of an observational campaign to better characterise the sky spatial and temporal variations ( in particular the continuum and faint sky lines)."

  2. Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    Mephitis mephitis Meadow vole Microtus pennsy/vanicus House mouse Mus musculus Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata Mink Mustela vison Little brown bat...FB Disposal and Reuse FEIS S-7 󈧰 *0 0.00 .4- - a a~ SO Sig > U 00 - 00 .C -* LW5 0C~ 7 cca!’ ae- 2 L a a Co’s mU E ’ED IA ~ EU a a c I- .. 9U2= 4 0...and utility effects of each proposal as a function of proposed land use and employment due to redevelopment, and anticipated phasing of the various

  3. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    The FED-A study aims to quantify the potential improvement in cost-effectiveness of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by assuming low safety factor q (less than 2 as opposed to about 3) at the plasma edge and noninductive current drive (as opposed to only inductive current drive). The FED-A performance objectives are set to be : (1) ignition assuming International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) plamsa confinement scaling, but still achieving a fusion power amplification Q greater than or equal to 5 when the confinement is degraded by a factor of 2; (2) neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m/sup 2/, with 0.5 MW/m/sup 2/ as a conservative lower bound; and (3) more clearly power-reactor-like operations, such as steady state.

  4. Regional distribution of cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic neurons in the brain of two carnivore species: The feliform banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) and the caniform domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Pillay, Sashrika; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Bertelsen, Mads F; Patzke, Nina; Engler, Gerhard; Engel, Andreas K; Manger, Paul R

    2017-07-01

    The nuclear organization of the cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic neurons in the brains of two species of carnivore, the banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) and domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo), is presented. The banded mongoose belongs to the feliform suborder and the domestic ferret to the caniform suborder, having last shared a common ancestor approximately 53 million years ago; however, they have a very similar overall morphology and life history, presenting an interesting opportunity to examine the extent of evolutionary plasticity in these systems. The brains of the two carnivore species were coronally sectioned and immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and orexin-A. The overall organization and complement of the nuclei of these systems was identical between the two species, although minor differences were noted. Moreover, this overall organization is identical to other studies undertaken in the domestic cat and dog. While for the most part the nuclei forming these systems are similar to those observed in other mammals, two species differences, which appear to be carnivore-specific, were noted. First, cholinergic neurons were observed in the lateral septal nucleus of both species, an apparently carnivore specific feature not recorded previously in other mammals. Second, the serotonergic neurons of the peripheral division of the dorsal raphe complex exhibited a significant caudad expansion, intermingling with the cholinergic and catecholaminergic nuclei of the pons, a carnivore specific feature. These carnivore specific features likely have functional consequences related to coping with stress and the expression of sleep. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peanut by-products fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary M

    2002-07-01

    Peanut by-products supply substantial quantities of feedstuffs to beef cattle grown in the same region where peanuts are produced. Included in the list of products fed to cattle are peanuts and peanut meal, peanut skins, peanut hulls, peanut hay, and silages. Residual peanut hay is by far the most widely used peanut by-product fed to beef cattle, and if it is properly harvested with minimal leaf shatter, it is comparable to good-quality grass hays in nutrient content. Peanut skins are often included in small quantities in cattle and pet foods, supplying both protein and energy. High tannin content of peanut skins can cause severe performance depressions in beef cattle if peanut skins are included at levels higher than 10% of the diet, unless diets contain relatively high CP (above 15% CP), or additional N sources are added such as ammonia or urea. Because dairy cattle diets are often above 16% CP in the total dietary DM, peanut skins may increase milk production when added at levels up to 16% of the dry matter. Peanut hulls are effectively used as a roughage source at levels up to 20% of beef finishing diets, for bedding in dairy cattle loafing sheds (if tested and found to contain low aflatoxin levels), and in a variety of manufactured products. Peanut hulls are economically priced because of their quantity, their inherent high fiber, and low CP content, and they should not be fed as a primary feedstuffs for beef cattle. Peanut by-products are generally priced below other by-products, and they can be incorporated into a variety of supplements and diets for cow herds, growing-finishing cattle, and dairy cattle.

  6. Lipid peroxidation in rats chronically fed ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J P; Greenfield, S M; Watson, D; Punchard, N A; Miller, N; Rice-Evans, C A; Thompson, R P

    1994-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces cytochrome P450IIE1, enabling habitual abusers to consume far greater quantities of alcohol than normal subjects. This pathway of metabolism leads to the production of free radical species, which cause tissue damage through peroxidation of cell membranes. Groups of Wistar rats of equal male: female ratio (n = 24) were fed alcohol by gavage twice daily to achieve a dosage of 15 g/kg body weight. Mean peak blood alcohol concentrations of 186 mg% were produced in males and 156 mg% in females. The animals were allowed free access to standard laboratory chow and water. Control animals were pair-fed to the alcoholic group and fed isocaloric glucose by gavage. Groups of animals were killed between 9 and 11 am on consecutive mornings, after nocturnal feeding, since it has previously been shown that fasting rapidly depletes hepatic glutathione concentrations. Hepatic glutathione was measured by a spectrophotometric enzymatic recycling procedure. As a marker of lipid peroxidation hepatic malonaldehyde (MDA) was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Hepatic MDA was increased in the alcoholic group (p < 0.001), as was total hepatic glutathione (p < 0.0001). Plasma concentrations of alpha-tocopherol were increased in the alcoholic group, but ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase values were not affected. No sex differences were detected. The increased MDA production in the alcohol group is strong evidence that lipid peroxidation is a mechanism of alcoholic tissue damage. The rise in hepatic glutathione may be an adaptive response to free radical production that protects the rat against tissue damage. PMID:7828990

  7. Acid-base balance and selected hematologic, electrolyte, and blood chemical variables in calves: milk-fed vs conventionally fed.

    PubMed

    Reece, W O

    1980-01-01

    Several hematologic, acid-base, and electrolyte variables were chacterized for newborn milk-fed calves and conventionally fed calves at weekly intervals for 15 weeks. Definition was given to the iron deficiency, microcytic, hypochromic anemia which developed in milk-fed calves. Acid-base variables in milk-fed calves differed from variables in conventionally fed calves only in having a greater value for base excess. Acid-base variables responded with decreasing magnitude by weeks for both feeding treatments, and responses associated with ambient temperature were suggested. Responses of the other variables and their comparisons between the feeding treatments also were analyzed.

  8. Malignant neoplasms in rats fed lasiocarpine.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M. S.; Reddy, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Lasiocarpine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid, was fed at a dietary concentration of 50/10(6) for 55 weeks, to 20 male F-344 rats. Malignant tumours developed in 17/20 animals between 48 and 59 weeks. Forty-five percent (9/20) developed angiosarcomas of the liver and 35% (7/20) had hepatocellular carcinomas. Other tumours included malignant adnexas tumour of the skin (1 rat) and lympohoma (1 rat). Lung metastases were observed in 4 animals with angiosarcoma of the liver and one animal with hepatocellular carcinoma. From one animal, angiosarcoma was successfully transplanted through 4 generations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:204322

  9. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  10. The FIREBall fiber-fed UV spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Schiminovich, David; Milliard, Bruno; Grange, Robert; Martin, D. Christopher; Rahman, Shahinur; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; McLean, Ryan; Tajiri, Gordon; Matuszewski, M.

    2008-07-01

    FIREBall (Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) had a successful first engineering flight in July of 2007 from Palestine, Texas. Here we detail the design and construction of the spectrograph. FIREBall consists of a 1m telescope coupled to a fiber-fed ultraviolet spectrograph flown on a short duration balloon. The spectrograph is designed to map hydrogen and metal line emission from the intergalactic medium at several redshifts below z=1, exploiting a small window in atmospheric oxygen absorption at balloon altitudes. The instrument is a wide-field IFU fed by almost 400 fibers. The Offner mount spectrograph is designed to be sensitive in the 195-215nm window accessible at our altitudes of 35-40km. We are able to observe Lyα, as well as OVI and CIV doublets, from 0.3 < z < 0.9. Observations of UV bright B stars and background measurements allow characterization of throughput for the entire system and will inform future flights.

  11. Coupling Between Waveguide-Fed Slot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between two waveguide-fed planar slot arrays has been investigated using full-wave analysis. The analysis employs the method-of-moments solution to the pertinent coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field of all slots. In order to compute coupling between two arrays, the input port of the first array is excited with a TE(sub 10) mode wave while the second one is match-terminated. After solving the moment method matrix equations, the aperture fields of all slots are obtained and thereby the TE(sub 10) mode wave received at the input port of the second array is determined. Coupling between two arrays is the ratio of the wave amplitude arriving in the second array port to the incident wave amplitude at the first array port. The coupling mechanism has been studied as a function of spacing between arrays in different directions, e.g. the electric field plane, the magnetic field plane, and the diagonal plane. Computed coupling values are presented for different array geometries. This work is novel since it provides a good understanding of coupling between waveguide-fed slot arrays as a function of spacing and orientation for different aperture distributions and array architectures. This serves as a useful tool for antenna design engineers and system engineers.

  12. Transcriptomic Profiling of Spleen in Grass-Fed and Grain-Fed Angus Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaokun; Carrillo, José A.; Ding, Yi; He, Yanghua; Zhao, Chunping; Liu, Jianan; Liu, George E.; Zan, Linsen; Song, Jiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    The grass-fed cattle obtain nutrients directly from pastures containing limited assimilable energy but abundant amount of fiber; by contrast, grain-fed steers receive a diet that is comprised mainly of grains and serves as an efficient source of high-digestible energy. Besides energy, these two types of diet differ in a large number of nutritional components. Additionally, animals maintained on rich-energy regimen are more likely to develop metabolic disorders and infectious diseases than pasture raised individuals. Thus, we hypothesize that spleen–a relevant immune organ–may function differently under disparate regimes. The objective of this study was to find the differentially expressed genes in the spleen of grass-fed and grain-fed steers, and furtherly explore the potential involved biopathways. Through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we detected 123 differentially expressed genes. Based on these genes, we performed an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and identified 9 significant molecular networks and 13 enriched biological pathways. Two of the pathways, Nur77 signaling in T lymphocytes and calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis which are immune related, contain a pair of genes HLA-DRA and NR4A1 with dramatically altered expression level. Collectively, our results provided valuable insights into understanding the molecular mechanism of spleen under varied feeding regimens. PMID:26367387

  13. Transcriptomic Profiling of Spleen in Grass-Fed and Grain-Fed Angus Cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaokun; Carrillo, José A; Ding, Yi; He, Yanghua; Zhao, Chunping; Liu, Jianan; Liu, George E; Zan, Linsen; Song, Jiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    The grass-fed cattle obtain nutrients directly from pastures containing limited assimilable energy but abundant amount of fiber; by contrast, grain-fed steers receive a diet that is comprised mainly of grains and serves as an efficient source of high-digestible energy. Besides energy, these two types of diet differ in a large number of nutritional components. Additionally, animals maintained on rich-energy regimen are more likely to develop metabolic disorders and infectious diseases than pasture raised individuals. Thus, we hypothesize that spleen-a relevant immune organ-may function differently under disparate regimes. The objective of this study was to find the differentially expressed genes in the spleen of grass-fed and grain-fed steers, and furtherly explore the potential involved biopathways. Through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we detected 123 differentially expressed genes. Based on these genes, we performed an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and identified 9 significant molecular networks and 13 enriched biological pathways. Two of the pathways, Nur77 signaling in T lymphocytes and calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis which are immune related, contain a pair of genes HLA-DRA and NR4A1 with dramatically altered expression level. Collectively, our results provided valuable insights into understanding the molecular mechanism of spleen under varied feeding regimens.

  14. Higher lipid accumulation in broilers fed on saturated fats than in those fed on unsaturated fats.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Flores, A; De Ayala, P P; Lopez-Bote, C J

    1999-03-01

    1. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of fat sources differing in degree of saturation on the performance of and fat deposition in broiler chickens fed on isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets. 2. There were no differences in initial body weight between sexes but female broilers had lower daily gains (P<0.0001), final weights (P<0.0001) and food intakes (P<0.0001) than males. Abdominal fat pad weight was lower in male broilers than in female (P<0.001). 3. There were no significant differences in intake, weight gain, final body weight or food-to-gain ratios between birds fed on diets differing solely in the degree of fat saturation. Broilers fed on diets containing an animal fat blend or tallow had higher abdominal fat pad weight (P<0.001) and intramuscular lipid content (P=0.0085) than those fed on diets containing sunflower oil. 4. It was concluded that dietary fat saturation affects fat accumulation in broiler chickens.

  15. Archeological Investigations at the Cow-Killer Site, 140S347, Melvern Lake, Kansas, 1974-1975.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Total 3 Family: Mustelidae Mustela vison mink Left Femur 1 :% [ 9Family: Geomyidae Geomys bursarius Pocket gopher Left Mandible section 3 Right Mandible...8217. . . -8- Narrow strips of vegetation that occur along the Marais des Cygnes river and tributaries are generally of the ash-cottonwood type with...orioidae (shrew) 2 * P4,stelid’ge (skunk, mink, weasel) 5 Cervidae (deer) 1 "ciuridac (squirrels) 6 -Gomyidac ( gophers ) 1 H ’trcm ’Ja, (kangaroo rat, mice

  16. Converter fed sub sea motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, R.O.; Henriksen, T.; Raphael, H.

    1995-12-31

    A sub sea adjustable speed motor fed via a long cable in range of several tenths of kilometers between the cable and the motor are analyzed by simulations. Due to resonance one critical frequency range occurs where significant generation of harmonics from the inverter should be avoided. A voltage source inverter is more feasible than a current source inverter since it is easier to modify the output waveform in order to avoid resonance problems. The resistive voltage drop in the long cable reduces the air gap torque of the motor particular at low frequencies. This causes a problem for the start-up of the motor due to stiction torque. A start-up strategy is envisaged which is a compromise between voltage boost, inverter current and transformer core dimensions. In normal operation mode the inverter voltage is proportional to the frequency. An open speed loop is used which keeps the system stable for potential load variations.

  17. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  18. Dietary CLA-induced lipolysis is delayed in soy oil-fed mice compared to coconut oil-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, S; Angius, Z; Sanda, M; Barnes, K M

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to cause a reduction in obesity in several species. CLA-induced body fat loss is enhanced when mice are fed coconut oil (CO) and involves increased lipolysis. The objective of this paper was to determine if the CLA-induced lipolysis in mice fed with different oil sources was time-dependent. Mice were fed 7 % soybean oil (SO) or CO diets for 6 week and then supplemented with 0 or 0.5 % CLA for 3, 7, 10 or 14 days. Body fat and ex-vivo lipolysis was determined. Body fat was reduced by CO on day 7 (P < 0.01) and in both CO and SO-fed mice (P < 0.05) in response to CLA on d14. Lipolysis was increased by CLA in CO-fed mice (P < 0.01) but not in SO-fed mice on day 7 and 10, but on day 14 CLA increased lipolysis in both CO- and SO-fed mice (P < 0.001). Expression and activation level of proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis was determined by western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. No significant differences were detected in protein expression. CO-fed mice had greater fatty acid synthase and stearyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression and less acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Sterol regulatory binding protein 1c was decreased by CLA in CO-fed mice and increased in SO-fed mice (P < 0.05). Malic enzyme expression was increased by CLA (P < 0.001) and CO (P < 0.01). Therefore, CLA-induced lipolysis occurs more rapidly in CO vs SO-fed mice and lipogenesis is decreased in CO-fed mice with CLA supplementation.

  19. Accumulation patterns of heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons by sea otters, Enhydra lutris, in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Risebrough, R.W.

    1989-06-30

    Chemical contaminants and naturally occurring toxic compounds in the coastal ecosystem of California currently inhabited by sea otters, Enhydra lutris, do not appear to have, or have had, any effect on the status of the population. Ratios of pups to adults appear to be within the expected ranges and do not indicate any depressed productivity that might be caused by one or a combination of environmental toxicants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), however, which cause nearly complete reproductive failures when fed at levels as low as 0.6 ppm in another member of the family Mustelidae, the mink, Mustela vison, were present in livers of a number of animals at higher levels than those associated with reproductive failure in mink. An interspecific difference in sensitivity, or relatively lower amounts of the more toxic PCB compounds in the sea otter population, is indicated. A decline in PCB (and DDE) levels along the California coast recorded in mussels, Mytilus californianus, and the ending of PCB uses reduce any potential threat to the otter population from PCB contamination.

  20. Vitamins A{sub 1}, A{sub 2}, and E in minks exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclor 1242{reg{underscore}sign}) and copper, via diet based on freshwater or marine fish

    SciTech Connect

    Kaekelae, R.; Kaekelae, A.; Hyvaerinen, H.; Asikainen, J.; Dahl, S.K.

    1999-11-01

    Minks (Mustela vison) fed diets based on either freshwater fish or marine fish were exposed to 1 mg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Aroclor 1242) daily for 28 d. To minks on the freshwater diet, copper was also given with or without PCBs. The marine diet included more vitamin A, and E than the freshwater diet. The authors studied how the exposures affected levels of vitamins A{sub 1}, A{sub 2}, and E in liver and adipose tissues and levels of vitamins A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} in plasma. In females and males on the freshwater diet, the hepatic level of vitamin A{sub 2} was decreased because of the PCBs, and in these males the hepatic levels of vitamin E also decreased. Interestingly, with coexposure to PCBs and copper, the vitamin levels were, in general, close to the control values. In adipose tissues also, the PCBs induced significant changes in the concentrations of vitamins A{sub 1} and A{sub 2}. In plasma, vitamins A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} were decreased in all patterns of exposure and on both diets. However, plasma thyroxine was slightly increased, a finding opposite to that reported previously in rodent studies. The results suggest that, in mink, diet greatly modulates the responses to PCBs, which may also differ in males and females. Furthermore, vitamins A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} may not be metabolized equally during PCB administration.

  1. Gut Microbial Gene Expression in Mother-Fed and Formula-Fed Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Poroyko, Valeriy; White, James Robert; Wang, Mei; Donovan, Sharon; Alverdy, John; Liu, Donald C.; Morowitz, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Effects of diet on the structure and function of gut microbial communities in newborn infants are poorly understood. High-resolution molecular studies are needed to definitively ascertain whether gut microbial communities are distinct in milk-fed and formula-fed infants. Methodology/Principal Findings Pyrosequencing-based whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to evaluate community wide gut microbial gene expression in 21 day old neonatal piglets fed either with sow's milk (mother fed, MF; n = 4) or with artificial formula (formula fed, FF; n = 4). Microbial DNA and RNA were harvested from cecal contents for each animal. cDNA libraries and 16S rDNA amplicons were sequenced on the Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium system. Communities were similar at the level of phylum but were dissimilar at the level of genus; Prevotella was the dominant genus within MF samples and Bacteroides was most abundant within FF samples. Screened cDNA sequences were assigned functional annotations by the MG-RAST annotation pipeline and based upon best-BLASTX-hits to the NCBI COG database. Patterns of gene expression were very similar in MF and FF animals. All samples were enriched with transcripts encoding enzymes for carbohydrate and protein metabolism, as well as proteins involved in stress response, binding to host epithelium, and lipopolysaccharide metabolism. Carbohydrate utilization transcripts were generally similar in both groups. The abundance of enzymes involved in several pathways related to amino acid metabolism (e.g., arginine metabolism) and oxidative stress response differed in MF and FF animals. Conclusions/Significance Abundant transcripts identified in this study likely contribute to a core microbial metatranscriptome in the distal intestine. Although microbial community gene expression was generally similar in the cecal contents of MF and FF neonatal piglets, several differentially abundant gene clusters were identified. Further

  2. Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, were determined in a 138-d feeding trial conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. Pigs were weaned at 21d of age and were fed a commercial starter-...

  3. Manure total nitrogen flux from condensed tannin fed beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of three levels of condensed tannins fed to 27 beef feedyard steers on total nitrogen (N) flux from manure. Condensed tannins were fed at rates of 0, 0.5, and 1 percent of the daily ration on a dry matter basis. Manure and urine were collected over two ...

  4. A comparison of intakes of breast-fed and bottle-fed infants during the first two days of life.

    PubMed

    Dollberg, S; Lahav, S; Mimouni, F B

    2001-06-01

    In the first days of life, breast-fed infants consume minimal amounts of milk; this may be explained by substrate limitation (limited milk output) and/or by self-limitation (through low appetite and/or suck-swallow competency). The spontaneous milk intake of unrestricted formula-fed infants has not been studied to date. We compared the spontaneous formula intake of unrestricted formula-fed infants to that of breast-fed infants over the first 48 hours of life. We hypothesized that 1) spontaneous formula intake of unrestricted infants is much higher than that of breast-fed infants and 2) spontaneous formula intake correlates positively with gestational age or birthweight. We studied 43 healthy, term infants. By maternal choice, 15 infants were exclusively breast-fed and 28 were formula-fed ad libitum every four hours. Breast-fed infants were weighed before and one hour after initiation of feeding, and intake was calculated from the difference between the measurements and corrected individually for the infant's normal postnatal decrease in body weight. Bottles offered to formula-fed infants contained 60 cc, and the remainder was carefully measured. Intakes were expressed as cc/kg/d, and weight changes as % of birthweight. Statistical methods included Student's t tests and stepwise regression analysis. Breast feeding on Day I was 9.6 +/- 10.3 (mean +/- SD) vs. 18.5 +/- 9.6 cc/kg/d in formula-fed infants (p=0.011); on Day 2 it was 13.0 +/- 11.3 vs. 42.2 +/- 14.2 cc/kg/d (p<0.001). Breast-fed infants lost significantly more weight on Day 2 (p=0.015). In multiple regression, when the dependent variable was the second-day intake, the significant independent variables were group (higher intake in the formula-fed group), weight loss (the higher the weight loss, the lower the intake), and first-day intake (the higher the first-day intake, the higher the second-day intake). Newborn infants offered formula ad libitum every four hours consumed much larger amounts than breast-fed

  5. Growth is compromised in rats fed ozone-treated casein

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, T.; Iwashita, A.; Kiriyama, S. )

    1993-05-01

    Modified casein containing few phenylalanine residues and no other aromatic amino acid residues was obtained by ozonolysis of casein. Although 68% of phenylalanine was decomposed by ozonolysis of casein, ozonolysis caused alterations beyond the destruction of aromatic amino acid residues. Nearly the same degree of decomposition of amino acid residues was observed in casein ozonated after predigestion by pepsin. Rats were fed diets containing 8% casein supplemented with methionine and aspartic acid (8C-AA), 8% ozonated casein supplemented with methionine and free amino acids lost by ozonolysis (8OC-AA), 8% casein ozonated after predigestion by pepsin supplemented with methionine and free amino acids lost during preparation (8POC-AA) or 7.6% amino acid mixture. The growth of rats fed the 8OC-AA diet was significantly lower than that of those fed 8C-AA or 7.6AA diets. The growth of rats fed the 8POC-AA diet was comparable to growth of those fed 8OC-AA. The biological values of the 8OC-AA and 8POC-AA were comparable to that of 8C-AA, but true digestibility of 8OC-AA was significantly lower than that of 8C-AA. True digestibility 8POC-AA was significantly improved relative to 8OC-AA, but the growth of rats fed 8POC-AA was not improved relative to that of those fed 8OC-AA. Kidney and cecum weights of rats fed 8OC-AA and 8POC-AA were significantly heavier than those of the 8C-AA-fed group, although histopathological examination of kidneys showed no deterioration compared to that of the 8C-AA-fed group.

  6. Turbo Pump Fed Micro-Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, P.; Tajmar, M.; Seco, F.; Guraya, C.; Perennes, F.; Soldati, A.; Lang, M.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-satellites (from 10kg up to 100kg) have mass, volume, and electrical power constraints due to their low dimensions. These limitations lead to the lack in currently available active orbit control systems in micro-satellites. Therefore, a micro-propulsion system with a high thrust to mass ratio is required to increase the potential functionality of small satellites. Mechatronic is presently working on a liquid bipropellant micro-rocket engine under contract with ESA (Contract No.16914/NL/Sfe - Micro-turbo-machinery Based Bipropellant System Using MNT). The advances in Mechatronic's project are to realise a micro-rocket engine with propellants pressurised by micro-pumps. The energy for driving the pumps would be extracted from a micro-turbine. Cooling channels around the nozzle would be also used in order to maintain the wall material below its maximum operating temperature. A mass budget comparison with more traditional pressure-fed micro-rockets shows a real benefit from this system in terms of mass reduction. In the paper, an overview of the project status in Mechatronic is presented.

  7. Liquid-Metal-Fed Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A short document proposes liquid-metal-fed pulsed plasma thrusters for small spacecraft. The propellant liquid for such a thruster would be a low-melting-temperature metal that would be stored molten in an unpressurized, heated reservoir and would be pumped to the thruster by a magnetohydrodynamic coupler. The liquid would enter the thruster via a metal tube inside an electrically insulating ceramic tube. A capacitor would be connected between the outlet of the metal tube and the outer electrode of the thruster. The pumping would cause a drop of liquid to form at the outlet, eventually growing large enough to make contact with the outer electrode. Contact would close the circuit through the capacitor, causing the capacitor to discharge through the drop. The capacitor would have been charged with enough energy that the discharge would vaporize, ionize, and electromagnetically accelerate the contents of the metal drop. The resulting plasma would be ejected at a speed of about 50 km/s. The vaporization of the drop would reopen the circuit through the capacitor, enabling recharging of the capacitor. As pumping continued, a new drop would grow and the process would repeat.

  8. FET commutated current-FED inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A shunt switch comprised of a field-effect transistor (Q.sub.1) is employed to commutate a current-fed inverter (10) using thyristors (SCR1, SCR2) or bijunction transistors (Q.sub.2, Q.sub.3) in a full bridge (1, 2, 3, 4) or half bridge (5, 6) and transformer (T.sub.1) configuration. In the case of thyristors, a tapped inverter (12) is employed to couple the inverter to a dc source to back bias the thyristors during commutation. Alternatively, a commutation power supply (20) may be employed for that purpse. Diodes (D.sub.1, D.sub.2) in series with some voltage dropping element (resistor R.sub.12 or resistors R.sub.1, R.sub.2 or Zener diodes D.sub.4, D.sub.5) are connected in parallel with the thyristors in the half bridge and transformer configuration to assure sharing the back bias voltage. A clamp circuit comprised of a winding (18) negatively coupled to the inductor and a diode (D.sub.3) return stored energy from the inductor to the power supply for efficient operation with buck or boost mode.

  9. Converter-fed subsea motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, R.O.; Raphael, H.B.; Henriksen, T.; Hadler-Jacobsen, A.

    1996-09-01

    A subsea adjustable-speed motor fed via a long cable in range of several tens of kilometers between the converter and the motor are analyzed by simulations. Due to resonance, one critical frequency range occurs where significant generation of harmonics from the inverter should be avoided. A voltage source inverter is more feasible than a current source inverter since it is easier to modify the output waveform in order to avoid resonance problems. The resistive voltage drop in the long cable reduces the air-gap torque of the motor particular at low frequencies. This causes a problem for the start-up of the motor due to stiction torque. A start-up strategy is envisaged which is a compromise between voltage boost, inverter current, and transformer core dimensions. In normal operation mode the inverter voltage is proportional to the frequency. An open speed lop is used which keeps the system stable for potential load variations. The results from a 1-MW full-scale system test are summarized.

  10. Large Mesozoic mammals fed on young dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaoming; Meng, Jin; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Chuankui

    2005-01-13

    Mesozoic mammals are commonly portrayed as shrew- or rat-sized animals that were mainly insectivorous, probably nocturnal and lived in the shadow of dinosaurs. The largest known Mesozoic mammal represented by substantially complete remains is Repenomamus robustus, a triconodont mammal from the Lower Cretaceous of Liaoning, China. An adult individual of R. robustus was the size of a Virginia opossum. Here we report a new species of the genus, represented by a skeleton with most of the skull and postcranium preserved in articulation. The new species is 50% larger than R. robustus in skull length. In addition, stomach contents associated with a skeleton of R. robustus reveal remains of a juvenile Psittacosaurus, a ceratopsian dinosaur. Our discoveries constitute the first direct evidence that some triconodont mammals were carnivorous and fed on small vertebrates, including young dinosaurs, and also show that Mesozoic mammals had a much greater range of body sizes than previously known. We suggest that Mesozoic mammals occupied diverse niches and that some large mammals probably competed with dinosaurs for food and territory.

  11. Comparison of evoked arousability in breast and formula fed infants

    PubMed Central

    Horne, R; Parslow, P; Ferens, D; Watts, A; Adamson, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: Currently, there is no consistent evidence that breast feeding reduces the risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Arousal from sleep is believed to be an important survival mechanism that may be impaired in victims of SIDS. Previously it has been shown that arousability is impaired by the major risk factors for SIDS such as prone sleeping and maternal smoking. Aims: To establish whether arousability was altered by method of feeding, and whether breast fed infants would have lower arousal thresholds. Methods: Forty three healthy term infants were studied using daytime polysomnography on three occasions: 2–4 weeks post-term, 2–3 months post-term, and 5–6 months post-term. Multiple measurements of arousal threshold (cm H2O) in response to nasal air jet stimulation applied alternately to the nares were made in both active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS) while infants slept supine. Arousal thresholds and sleep period lengths were compared between formula fed and breast fed infants at each age. Results: Arousal thresholds were not different between breast fed and formula fed infants in QS. However, in AS breast fed infants were significantly more arousable than formula fed infants at 2–3 months of age. There was no difference between groups of infants when sleep period length was compared at any study. Conclusions: Breast fed infants are more easily aroused from AS at 2–3 months of age than formula fed infants. This age coincides with the peak incidence of SIDS. PMID:14709496

  12. THE DEPOSITION OF LINOLEIC ACID IN RATS FED CORN OIL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Rats were fed different levels (0-30%) of corn oil in a purified basal diet, and the proportion of linoleic acid in the total fatty acids of carcass...fat was 2%, wherea in those receiving 20% corn oil the proportion was 46%; this level was not exceeded when 0% corn oil was fed for the same time. In...rats fed 2 or 20% corn oil for intervals up to 24 days, the proportion of linoleic acid in the liver fatty acids reached a maximum more quickly than

  13. An American mink (Neovison vison) transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Knud; Anistoroaei, Razvan

    2014-04-01

    HiSeq2000 Illumina pair-end sequenced transcript data originating from a pool of four different tissues of a wild-type American mink yielded approximately 90 Gb of raw data. Subsequently, unique contigs were assembled by a combined approach using velvet and phrap. Of these assembled contigs, about 136 000 match the dog genome and nearly 30 000 contigs match the human transcriptome at more than 17 000 unique gene locations. Gene annotation for these contigs was performed employing custom-made scripts run in combination with comparative sequence similarity search and alignment in the dog and human genome using blast algorithms. Transcripts representing five genes known to be associated with pigmentation were reliably aligned against large mink genomic contigs derived from BAC clones. Sequence comparison between transcript and genomic data revealed seven SNPs. In this study, we generated and annotated mink transcript sequences representing more than 16 000 known genes. This is the first comprehensive transcriptome for the American mink genome, which will facilitate further development in mink expression profiling studies and provide a good annotation basis in the perspectives of a whole genome sequencing project. The project was deposited at EMBL database with the accession number PRJEB1260. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Growing consumer interest in grass-fed beef products has raised a number of questions with regard to the perceived differences in nutritional quality between grass-fed and grain-fed cattle. Research spanning three decades suggests that grass-based diets can significantly improve the fatty acid (FA) composition and antioxidant content of beef, albeit with variable impacts on overall palatability. Grass-based diets have been shown to enhance total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (C18:2) isomers, trans vaccenic acid (TVA) (C18:1 t11), a precursor to CLA, and omega-3 (n-3) FAs on a g/g fat basis. While the overall concentration of total SFAs is not different between feeding regimens, grass-finished beef tends toward a higher proportion of cholesterol neutral stearic FA (C18:0), and less cholesterol-elevating SFAs such as myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) FAs. Several studies suggest that grass-based diets elevate precursors for Vitamin A and E, as well as cancer fighting antioxidants such as glutathione (GT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as compared to grain-fed contemporaries. Fat conscious consumers will also prefer the overall lower fat content of a grass-fed beef product. However, consumers should be aware that the differences in FA content will also give grass-fed beef a distinct grass flavor and unique cooking qualities that should be considered when making the transition from grain-fed beef. In addition, the fat from grass-finished beef may have a yellowish appearance from the elevated carotenoid content (precursor to Vitamin A). It is also noted that grain-fed beef consumers may achieve similar intakes of both n-3 and CLA through the consumption of higher fat grain-fed portions. PMID:20219103

  15. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef.

    PubMed

    Daley, Cynthia A; Abbott, Amber; Doyle, Patrick S; Nader, Glenn A; Larson, Stephanie

    2010-03-10

    Growing consumer interest in grass-fed beef products has raised a number of questions with regard to the perceived differences in nutritional quality between grass-fed and grain-fed cattle. Research spanning three decades suggests that grass-based diets can significantly improve the fatty acid (FA) composition and antioxidant content of beef, albeit with variable impacts on overall palatability. Grass-based diets have been shown to enhance total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (C18:2) isomers, trans vaccenic acid (TVA) (C18:1 t11), a precursor to CLA, and omega-3 (n-3) FAs on a g/g fat basis. While the overall concentration of total SFAs is not different between feeding regimens, grass-finished beef tends toward a higher proportion of cholesterol neutral stearic FA (C18:0), and less cholesterol-elevating SFAs such as myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) FAs. Several studies suggest that grass-based diets elevate precursors for Vitamin A and E, as well as cancer fighting antioxidants such as glutathione (GT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as compared to grain-fed contemporaries. Fat conscious consumers will also prefer the overall lower fat content of a grass-fed beef product. However, consumers should be aware that the differences in FA content will also give grass-fed beef a distinct grass flavor and unique cooking qualities that should be considered when making the transition from grain-fed beef. In addition, the fat from grass-finished beef may have a yellowish appearance from the elevated carotenoid content (precursor to Vitamin A). It is also noted that grain-fed beef consumers may achieve similar intakes of both n-3 and CLA through the consumption of higher fat grain-fed portions.

  16. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer July 18, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH EAST - Jonathan Warner House, Middlesex Turnpike, Chester, Middlesex County, CT

  17. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer July 17, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF FRONT FROM SOUTH EAST - Colonel Henry Champion House, Colchester, New London County, CT

  18. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 27, 1940 (B) EXT. SUMMER HOUSE IN REAR OF MANSION - Captain Nathaniel Shaw Mansion, 11 Blinman Street, New London, New London County, CT

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 6, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR DETAIL OF PEDIMENT ON FRONT - North Congregational Church, Town Square Vicinity, Woodbury, Litchfield County, CT

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer July 16, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE FROM SOUTH EAST - Governor Jonathan Trumbull House, (moved from Town Street & Colchester Road), Lebanon, New London County, CT

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer July 29, 1940 (B) DETAIL OF END GABLE FROM NORTH - Major General Solomon Cowles House, Main Street, Farmington, Hartford County, CT

  2. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon. Photographer Mar. 26, 1940 (B) EXT. DETAIL ENTRANCE DOORWAY - General Joseph Walker House, 2175 Elm Street, Stratford, Fairfield County, CT

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), March 18, 1940, Stanley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), March 18, 1940, Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) EXT. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE GABLE AND DOORWAY. - Erasmus Hall (Academy), Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  4. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 6, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF DOORWAY & CENTRAL PEDIMENT, FROM NORTH EAST. - Elisha Sheldon House, Litchfield, Litchfield County, CT

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer (B) SHOWING HOUSE ENLARGED, WITH ADDITION OF SECOND FLOOR (1667) - Bird-Sawyer House, 41 Humphreys Street, Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 16, 1940, Stanley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 16, 1940, Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) INTERIOR, FROM SECOND STORY LEVEL, LOOKING INTO ROOF, SHOWING FRAMING & FIRING PORTS. - Johnson Hall, Blockhouse, Johnstown, Fulton County, NY

  7. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 5, 1940 (B) EXT. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE, SOUTH FRONT - David Kinney House, Black Hill Road, Canterbury, Windham County, CT

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 18, 1940, Stanley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 18, 1940, Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) EXTERIOR, ELEVATION OF NORTH FRONT. - Indian Castle Church, State Route 55, Indian Castle, Herkimer County, NY

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 5, 1940 (B) EXT. MAIN ENTRANCE FEATURE, WEST FRONT - Captain John Benjamin Clark House, Canterbury, Windham County, CT

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), July 27, 1940, Stanley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), July 27, 1940, Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF REAR AND SIDE, FROM SOUTH WEST. - Lasher House, State Route 9G Vicinity, Germantown, Columbia County, NY

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 26, 1940 (B) EXT. DETAIL OF BRACKET ON OVERHANG BESIDE DOORWAY - Hyland-Fiske-Wildman House, Boston Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 28, 1940 (B) EXT. DETAIL ENTRANCE PORCH AND DOORWAY - House, Post Office Vicinity, North Stonington, New London County, CT

  13. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE & ENTRANCE FRONT, FROM WEST - Watson-Bancroft House, Main Street, East Windsor Hill, Hartford County, CT

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 16, 1940, Stanley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) June 16, 1940, Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF HOUSE AND BLOCKHOUSE, FROM SOUTH EAST. - Johnson Hall, Johnstown, Fulton County, NY

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 27, 1940 (B) INT. FRONT HALL AND STAIRWAY FROM FIRST FLOOR - Captain Thomas Noyes House, Old Pequot Trail, Pawcatuck, New London County, CT

  16. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer March 18, 1940, (T) INT. DETAIL OF CUPBOARD DOOR, SOUTH WALL OF PARLOR. - Wyckoff-Bennett House, Kings Highway & 1669 East Twenty-second Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 6, 1940 (A) HOUSE AT GREEN AND DEFOREST STREET, ENTRANCE AND CIRCULAR PORCH (The latter probably a recent addition) - Green & De Forest Streets (House), Watertown, Litchfield County, CT

  18. 13. Detail view of arched opening where fuel was fed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of arched opening where fuel was fed to fire Jamaican Train. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  19. San Miguel sea lion virus fed to mink and pigs.

    PubMed

    Wilder, F W; Dardiri, A H

    1978-04-01

    Mink became infected with San Miguel sea lion virus when fed ground meat from seal carcasses showing vesicular-like lesions in the skin. The mink also contracted the infection when they were fed San Miguel sea lion virus infected pig meat or cell culture propagated virus. San Miguel sea lion virus infection in mink was inapparent but the virus was isolated from blood and rectal swabs. Pigs treated similarly with the same virus preparations given to mink developed a severe vesicular disease syndrome similar to that produced by vesicular exanthema of swine. In a separate trial, pigs fed a large sample of commercial ground seal meat did not develop disease signs or antibodies. Further work is needed to assess the hazard of introducing San Miguel sea lion virus into swine on the same premises when potentially San Miguel sea lion virus infective seal meat is fed to mink.

  20. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer July 23, 1940, (P) INTERIOR, VIEW OF SOUTH WEST CORNER ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. - Hasbrouck House, Washington, Liberty, Lafayette, Colden Streets, Newburgh, Orange County, NY

  1. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 14, 1940 (P) INTERIOR, DETAIL OF DOOR AND ARCHWAY, FRONT LIVING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Solomon Rockwell House, Prospect Street, Winsted, Litchfield County, CT

  2. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 25, 1940, (C) INT. OLD WALL CASES WITH SLIDING LOWER DOORS. - Apothecary Shop (Interiors), 10 Greenwich Street, New York County, NY

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 25, 1940, (A) INT. UPPER PART OF OLD WALL CASES. - Apothecary Shop (Interiors), 10 Greenwich Street, New York County, NY

  4. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (G) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF OLD TAVERN SIGN (ENGLISH SIDE) WITH PAINTED LION - Captain Arah Phelphs Inn, Colebrook, Litchfield County, CT

  5. Streamlining and Refining FEDS Loads Models - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dirks, James A.

    2013-02-05

    The Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) software is a powerful buildings energy analysis tool developed by Battelle at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with support from numerous organizations including several within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). FEDS is used extensively throughout the federal sector to examine building energy efficiency potential and recommend energy saving retrofit projects. The focus of this CRADA was to update the foundation of the FEDS loads models, to improve the core functionality and calculation methods and position the building efficiency analysis software for continued growth. The broader intent was to increase FEDS utility and user satisfaction via improving modeling accuracy, facilitating development and making possible a wide range of new and desired capability enhancements. This report provides an summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (B) EXT. AIRPLANE VIEW LOOKING DOWN ON BATTERY PARK AND AREA BETWEEN GREENWICH STREET AND WASHINGTON STREET. - Greenwich Street Study (Plot plan), New York County, NY

  7. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer June 16, 1940, (E) INTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW, SOUTH WEST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. - Sir William Johnson House, State Routes 5 & 67, Fort Johnson, Montgomery County, NY

  8. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer June 16, 1940, (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF FRONT, FROM SOUTH WEST. - Sir William Johnson House, State Routes 5 & 67, Fort Johnson, Montgomery County, NY

  9. 27. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer June 16, 1940, (F) INTERIOR, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE AND MANTEL, WEST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. - Sir William Johnson House, State Routes 5 & 67, Fort Johnson, Montgomery County, NY

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer (D) COPY OF OLD PHOTO TAKEN ABOUT 1905 SHOWING ORIGINAL SURROUNDINGS OF HOMESTEAD - Bird-Sawyer House, 41 Humphreys Street, Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 27, 1940 (A) EXT. GEN. VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST SIDES - Captain Nathaniel Shaw Mansion, 11 Blinman Street, New London, New London County, CT

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer, (C) EXT. VIEW OF BATTERY PLACE BUILDINGS FROM ACROSS BATTERY PARK. - Greenwich Street Study (Plot plan), New York County, NY

  13. NCI at Frederick Surpasses Feds Feed Families Goal | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The 2016 Feds Feed Families campaign recently concluded, with the numbers released earlier this week. A grand total of 33,447 pounds of food were donated in less than three months, surpassing the goal of 28,000 pounds.

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer May 16, 1940 (A) EXT. VIEW SHOWING STRUCTURE AS LEFT BY 1938 HURRICANE - General Israel Putnam Privy, Brooklyn, Windham County, CT

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer May 16, 1940 (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW EAST (TOWER) END AND SOUTH SIDE. (Belfry & Spire have been rebuilt since Hurricane of Sept 21, 1938) - Unitarian Church, Brooklyn, Windham County, CT

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer May 16, 1940 (B) EXTERIOR, VIEW FROM NORTH EAST, SHOWING ROOF, AS LEFT BY 1938 HURRICANE. (UNITARIAN CHURCH IN DISTANCE) - General Israel Putnam Privy, Brooklyn, Windham County, CT

  17. Safe Drinking Water Information System Federal Version (SDWIS/FED)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SDWIS/FED is EPA’s national database that manages and collects public water system information from states, including reports of drinking water standard violations, reporting and monitoring violations, and other basic information.

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanely P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 27, 1940 (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW FROM STREET BELOW) (JUST MADE INTO TENEMENTS & EXTERIOR COVERED WITH ASBESTOS SHINGLES) - Jonathan Latimer House, New London, New London County, CT

  19. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 15, 1940 (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT ON GREEN - Bronson House, Winchester Center Green Vicinity, Winchester Center, Litchfield County, CT

  20. Glycerol production by fermentation: a fed-batch approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaikishore, P.; Karanth, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this investigation the bioconversion of glycerol from glucose was studied in a laboratory fermentor using an alkaline medium with a fed batch mode of carbon source addition yielding 30% glycerol concentration in the final broth. (Refs. 9).

  1. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 15, 1940 (G) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW SOUTH END OF HOUSE FROM SOUTH EAST SHOWING COACH HOUSE AND PRIVY - Solomon Rockwell House, Prospect Street, Winsted, Litchfield County, CT

  2. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 15, 1940 (I) EXTERIOR, DETAIL EAST GABLES, COACH HOUSE AND PRIVY - Solomon Rockwell House, Prospect Street, Winsted, Litchfield County, CT

  3. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 15, 1940 (H) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF COACH HOUSE AND PRIVY AT SOUTH END OF HOUSE - Solomon Rockwell House, Prospect Street, Winsted, Litchfield County, CT

  4. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 15, 1940 (F) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE (EAST) FRONT, WITH COACH HOUSE IN FOREGROUND - Solomon Rockwell House, Prospect Street, Winsted, Litchfield County, CT

  5. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (C) EXTERIOR, VIEW FROM REAR (SOUTH EAST) SHOWING COACH HOUSE AT RIGHT. - Watson-Bancroft House, Main Street, East Windsor Hill, Hartford County, CT

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept 16, 1940 (D) EXTERIOR, PRIVY AT REAR OF LOT, VIEW FROM SOUTH EAST - Watson-Bancroft House, Main Street, East Windsor Hill, Hartford County, CT

  7. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 16, 1940 (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH WEST - Watson-Bancroft House, Main Street, East Windsor Hill, Hartford County, CT

  8. Analysis of a Slot Coupled Coplanar Waveguide Fed Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Jui-Ching; Dib, Nihad I.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1994-01-01

    A slot-coupled CPW fed patch antenna is analyzed using two different techniques: the Spectral Domain Method and the Finite Difference Time Domain Method. The results from both techniques are in good agreement with experimentally obtained data.

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 25, 1940, (B) INT. ORIGINAL LOWER SECTION OF WALL CASES (HERB DRAWERS). - Apothecary Shop (Interiors), 10 Greenwich Street, New York County, NY

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Sept. 14, 1940 (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH CORNER - Hosford House, Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village, Litchfield County, CT

  11. NCI at Frederick Surpasses Feds Feed Families Goal | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The 2016 Feds Feed Families campaign recently concluded, with the numbers released earlier this week. A grand total of 33,447 pounds of food were donated in less than three months, surpassing the goal of 28,000 pounds.

  12. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer May 16, 1940 (O) INTERIOR OF ATTIC, LOOKING WEST OVER BALLROOM, SHOWING OLD LOG RAFTERS & 'SPLIT' OR OPEN RIDGE POLE. - Eli Adams House, Oakham, Worcester County, MA

  13. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer Mar. 21, 1940, (K) INT. TYPICAL DOOR AND WINDOW, FRONT ROOM (SECOND FLOOR). - 10 Greenwich Street (House), New York County, NY

  14. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer May 16, 1940 (K) INT. DETAIL OF PART OF FEATHER EDGE PANELING AND DOOR (NORTHEAST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR) - Eli Adams House, Oakham, Worcester County, MA

  15. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer June 19, 1940, (B) EXTERIOR, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE, FROM NORTH WEST. - Guy Park Manor, West Main Street, Amsterdam, Montgomery County, NY

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.), Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer June 19, 1940, (A) EXTERIOR, GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTH WEST OF FRONT TOWARD ROAD (RIVER AT BACK). - Guy Park Manor, West Main Street, Amsterdam, Montgomery County, NY

  17. Food intake reduction and immunologic alterations in mice fed dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Weindruch, R; McFeeters, G; Walford, R L

    1984-01-01

    A diet containing 0.4% DHEA was fed to male mice of a long-lived strain from 3 weeks until 18 weeks of age. These mice were compared with others fed a control diet ad libitum and with mice pair-fed the control diet in amounts approximating the intake of the DHEA-fed group. Mice fed the DHEA diet failed to eat all of the food presented to them whereas the pair-fed mice ate all of their food. All mice were studied at 18 weeks of age for two age-sensitive immune parameters (spleen lymphocyte proliferation induced by T-cell mitogens [PHA or ConA] and natural killer cell lysis of an allogeneic tumor). DHEA feeding led to: 1) a decrease in food intake (approximately 30% less than for mice fed the control diet ad libitum), 2) a lower body weight at 18 weeks of age (approximately 40% lower than for ad libitum controls) due to a decrease in the body weight gained from 3 weeks through 18 weeks of age (approximately 55% lower than controls), 3) a lower spleen weight (approximately 30% lower than controls) but without lower numbers of nucleated cells per spleen, 4) an increase in PHA-induced proliferation by spleen lymphocytes (approximately 100% higher than for controls) and, 5) no influence on splenic natural killer cell activity. The inhibition of body weight gain for mice fed DHEA appeared due to both a reduction in food intake and a metabolic effect since mice eating DHEA gained less body weight per gram of food eaten than did mice in either group eating the control diet.

  18. Doubly Fed Induction Machine Control For Wind Energy Conversion System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Induction Generator (DFIG), Voltage Source Inverter (VSI), Space Vector Modulation (SVM), Wind Turbine, Field Programmable Gate Array ( FPGA ), Wind...basics of using a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) to convert the mechanical energy of the wind into useful electrical power that can be used to...thesis covers the basics of using a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) to convert the mechanical energy of the wind into useful electrical power

  19. Optimal control of a fed-batch fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dekkers, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The common cultivation of bakers' yeast is an aerobic fed-batch fermentation under sugar-limited growth. The ultimate objective of on-line computer control is to optimize the process through maximizing the productivity of biomass formation while minimizing the consumption of raw materials for the product. Results obtained on the optimal control of a fed-batch fermentation are given. The aspects to be considered are instrumentation, state estimation, optimization and process control.

  20. Rain-fed fig yield as affected by rainfall distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Ensieh; Sepaskhah, Ali Reza

    2014-08-01

    Variable annual rainfall and its uneven distribution are the major uncontrolled inputs in rain-fed fig production and possibly the main cause of yield fluctuation in Istahban region of Fars Province, I.R. of Iran. This introduces a considerable risk in rain-fed fig production. The objective of this study was to find relationships between seasonal rainfall distribution and rain-fed fig production in Istahban region to determine the critical rainfall periods for rain-fed fig production and supplementary irrigation water application. Further, economic analysis for rain-fed fig production was considered in this region to control the risk of production. It is concluded that the monthly, seasonal and annual rainfall indices are able to show the effects of rainfall and its distribution on the rain-fed fig yield. Fig yield with frequent occurrence of 80 % is 374 kg ha-1. The internal rates of return for interest rate of 4, 8 and 12 % are 21, 58 and 146 %, respectively, that are economically feasible. It is concluded that the rainfall in spring especially in April and in December has negatively affected fig yield due to its interference with the life cycle of Blastophaga bees for pollination. Further, it is concluded that when the rainfall is limited, supplementary irrigation can be scheduled in March.

  1. Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, Amir; Narayan, Nicole R.; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Lu, Ding; Rauch, Marcus; Huang, Yong; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Lynch, Susan V.; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop markedly different immune systems, which remain different 6 months after weaning when the animals begin receiving identical diets. In particular, breast-fed infants develop robust populations of memory T cells as well as T helper 17 (TH17) cells within the memory pool, whereas bottle-fed infants do not. These findings may partly explain the variation in human susceptibility to conditions with an immune basis, as well as the variable protection against certain infectious diseases. PMID:25186175

  2. Modeling and simulation of fed-batch protein refolding process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Guang-Quan; Li, Wei; Sun, Yan

    2004-01-01

    The simplified kinetic model that assumes competition between first-order folding and third-order aggregation was used to model the fed-batch refolding of denatured-reduced lysozyme. It was found that the model was able to describe the process at limited concentration ranges, i.e., 1-2 and 5-7 mg mL(-)(1), respectively, at extensive guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) concentrations and controlled concentrations of oxidizing and reducing agents. The folding or aggregation rate constant was different at the two protein concentration ranges and strongly dependent on the denaturant concentration. As a result, both rate constants at the two concentration ranges were expressed as functions of GdmCl concentration. The rate constants determined by fed-batch experiments could be employed for the prediction of the fed-batch process but were not able to be extended to a batch refolding by direct dilution. Computer simulations show that the denaturant concentration and fed-batch flow rate are important factors influencing the refolding yield. Prolonged fed-batch time is beneficial to keep the transient intermediate concentration at a low level and to increase the yield of correctly folded protein. This is of importance when the denaturant concentration in refolding buffer solution is low. Thus, at a low denaturant concentration, fed-batch time should be sufficiently long, whereas at an appropriately high GdmCl concentration, a short fed-batch time or a high feed rate of the denatured protein is effective to give a high refolding yield.

  3. Microcirculatory effects of zinc on fructose-fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, R C; Barros, C M M R; Boa, B C S; Bouskela, E

    2016-04-01

    Fructose is a major dietary component directly related to vascular dysfunction and diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Zinc is considered a non-pharmacological alternative for treating diabetes due to its antioxidant and hyperglycemia-lowering effects in diabetic animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary zinc supplementation on the microcirculatory parameters of fructose-fed hamsters. Male hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) were fed drinking water substituted by 10% fructose solution for 60 days, whereas control animals were fed drinking water alone. Their microcirculatory function was evaluated using cheek pouch preparation, as well as their blood glucose and serum insulin levels. Their microcirculatory responses to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an endothelium-independent vasodilator) as well as the increase in macromolecular permeability induced by 30 min of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) were noted. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was significantly increased in control animals with high zinc supplementation compared to the groups without zinc supplementation. Zinc was able to protect against plasma leakage induced by I/R in all control and fructose-fed groups, although the microvascular permeability was higher in animals fed drinking water substituted by 10% fructose solution compared to those fed filtered drinking water alone. Our results indicate that dietary zinc supplementation can improve microvascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial-dependent dilatation and reducing the increase in macromolecular permeability induced by I/R in fructose-fed animals. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Performance optimization for doubly fed wind power generation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, S.; Spee, R.; Enslin, J.H.R.

    1999-08-01

    Significant variation of the resource kinetic energy, in the form of wind speed, results in substantially reduced energy capture in a fixed-speed wind turbine. In order to increase the wind energy capture in the turbine, variable-speed generation (VSG) strategies have been proposed and implemented. However, that requires an expensive ac/ac power converter, which increases the capital investment significantly. Consequently, doubly fed systems have been proposed to reduce the size of the power converter and, thereby, the associated cost. Additionally, in doubly fed systems, as a fixed operating point (power and speed), power flow can be regulated between the two winding systems on the machine. This feature can by utilized to essentially minimize losses in the machine associated with the given operating point or achieve other desired performance enhancements. In this paper, a brushless doubly fed machine (BDFM) is utilized to develop a VSG wind power generator. The VSG controller employs a wind-speed-estimation-based maximum power point tracker and a heuristic-model-based maximum efficiency point tracker to optimize the power output of the system. The controller has been verified for efficacy on a 1.5-kW laboratory VSG wind generator. The strategy is applicable to all doubly fed configurations, including conventional wound-rotor induction machines, Scherbius cascades, BDFM's and doubly fed reluctance machines.

  5. Outcomes of human milk-fed premature infants.

    PubMed

    Schanler, Richard J

    2011-02-01

    Significant benefits to infant host defense, sensory-neural development, gastrointestinal maturation, and some aspects of nutritional status are observed when premature infants are fed their mothers' own milk. A reduction in infection-related morbidity in human milk-fed premature infants has been reported in nearly a dozen descriptive, and a few quasi-randomized, studies in the past 25 years. Human milk-fed infants also have decreased rates of rehospitalization for illness after discharge. Studies on neurodevelopmental outcomes have reported significantly positive effects for human milk intake in the neonatal period and long-term mental and motor development, intelligence quotient, and visual acuity through adolescence. Body composition in adolescence also is associated with human milk intake in the neonatal intensive care unit. Finally, human milk intake is less associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome than infant formula feeding.

  6. Behavior of mallard ducklings from parents fed 3 ppm DDE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Mallard ducks fed a diet containing 3 ppm DDE (equal to about 0.6 ppm in a natural succulent diet) laid eggs that contained an average of 5.8 ppm DDE; ducklings that hatched from these eggs differed from controls in behavioral tests designed to measure responses to a maternal call and to a frightening stimulus. In response to the maternal call, ducklings from parents fed DDE were hyper-responsive; compared to controls, a greater percentage approached the call and a greater percentage of those that approached remained near the call for the remainder of the test. In a test of avoidance behavior, ducklings whose parents were fed DDE traveled shorter distances from the firghtening stimulus than did controls.

  7. Patch Antenna Fed via Unequal-Crossed-Arm Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry

    2005-01-01

    A proposed rectangular-patch antenna for transmitting or receiving microwave circularly polarized (CP) radiation would be fed via a cross-shaped aperture that would have unequal arms and would, in turn, be fed at a single point via a microstrip transmission line. As a consequence of the unequal-arm aperture design, the antenna could be made smaller in one dimension, relative to a typical prior CP antenna that comprises a nearly square patch fed via an equal-crossed-arm aperture. Hence, in designing a phased array of such antennas, the antennas could be packed together more closely along one dimension, making it possible to scan the beam radiated by the antenna over a wider angular range in a plane that includes that dimension. Alternatively or in addition, one could lay out transmission lines in the extra spaces created by the shortening in one dimension

  8. Sympathetic activity is lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet than in rats fed a safflower oil diet.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Shimomura, Y; Saitoh, S; Tokuyama, K; Takeuchi, H; Suzuki, M

    1995-07-01

    Effects of dietary fats consisting of different fatty acids on sympathetic activity and body fat accumulation were studied in rats. Rats were meal-fed an isoenergetic diet based on either beef tallow or safflower oil for 8 weeks. Carcass fat content was greater (P < .05) in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet. Norepinephrine (NE) turnover rate was significantly lower (P < .05) in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) and pancreas in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet, resulting in a decreased (P < .05) diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and an increased (P < .05) serum insulin concentration in the former. To confirm the effects of dietary fats on sympathetic activity in relation to body fat accumulation, rats were chemically sympathectomized. Sympathectomy abolished the differences in body fat accumulation, DIT, and serum insulin concentration between the two dietary groups. These results suggest that the beef tallow diet promotes body fat accumulation by reducing sympathetic activity as compared with intake of the safflower oil diet.

  9. Plasma selenium levels and dietary selenium intakes of formula-fed (FF) and cow's milk-fed (CMF) infants

    SciTech Connect

    Gropper, S.; Anderson, K.; Landing, W.; Acosta, P. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee Ross Labs., Columbus, OH )

    1990-02-26

    The plasma selenium concentrations of 57 infants eight to 12 months of age ingesting either cow's milk or milk-based infant formula as their primary beverage as part of a mixed diet for at least three months was assessed using flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean ({plus minus}SD) daily dietary selenium intake of 26 cow's milk-fed infants (34{plus minus} 13 ug) was significantly greater than that of 31 formula-fed infants (22{plus minus}11 ug). The mean ({plus minus}SD) plasma selenium concentration of infants fed cow's mild (39{plus minus}11 ug/L) was also significantly greater than that of infants fed formula (31{plus minus}12 ug/L). Both groups of infants ingested similar total energy intakes; however, the infants fed cow's milk received more total protein and selenium and a greater percentage of protein and selenium from their primary beverage than the infants receiving formula. Both groups of infants were consuming a mixed diet with similar sources of selenium. These data suggest that cow's milk is a richer source of selenium than infant formulas.

  10. Mitochondrial alterations in livers of Sod1-/- mice fed alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kessova, Irina G; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2007-05-15

    Chronic alcohol consumption induced liver injury in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-deficient mice (Sod1-/-), with extensive centrilobular necrosis and inflammation and a reduction in hepatic ATP content. Mechanisms by which ethanol decreased ATP in these mice remain unclear. We investigated alterations in mitochondria of Sod1-/- mice produced by chronic ethanol treatment. These mitochondria had an increase in State 4 oxygen consumption with succinate and especially with glutamate plus malate compared to mitochondria from pair-fed Sod1-/- mice or mitochondria from wild-type mice fed dextrose or ethanol. This uncoupling was associated with a decrease in ADP/O and respiratory control ratios, a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial permeability transition, and decreased aconitase activity. Total thiols and uncoupling protein 2 levels were elevated in the pair-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, perhaps an adaptive response to oxidant stress. However, no such increases were found with the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria, suggesting a failure to develop these adaptations. The mitochondria from the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mice had elevated levels of cleaved Bax, Bak, Bcl-xl, and adenine nucleotide translocator. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed increased association of Bax and Bak with the adenine nucleotide translocator. ADP-ATP exchange was very low in the ethanol-fed Sod1-/- mitochondria. These results suggest that ethanol treatment of Sod1-/- mice produces uncoupling and a decline in Deltapsi, swelling, increased association of proapoptotic proteins involved in the permeability transition, and decreased adenine nucleotide translocator activity, which may be responsible for the decline in ATP levels and development of necrosis in this model of alcohol-induced liver injury.

  11. Impaired reproduction of mallards fed an organic form of selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Gold, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    We fed mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) diets supplemented with 0-, 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, or 16-ppm selenium in the form of selenomethionine. We fed another group of mallards a diet containing 16-ppm selenium as selenocystine. Females fed the control diet produced a mean of 8.1 ducklings that survived to 6 days of age, which was significantly greater than the 4.6 young produced by females fed 8-ppm selenium as selenomethionine and the zero surviving young of females fed 16-ppm selenium as selenomethionine. Selenocystine did not impair reproduction. Diets containing 8- and 16-ppm selenium as selenomethionine caused malformations in 6.8 and 67.9%, respectively, of unhatched eggs compared with 0.6% for controls. The most common malformations were of eyes, bill, legs, and feet. Selenium did not affect the onset or frequency of egg laying, egg size, shell thickness, fertility of eggs, or sex ratio of ducklings. Reduced survival and growth occurred in ducklings hatched from groups whose parents had received 8- or 16-ppm selenium as selenomethionine, even though all ducklings were fed a control diet. Concentrations of selenium in eggs and liver of adults could be predicted from dietary concentrations. We conclude that the dietary threshold of selenium as selenomethionine necessary to impair reproduction is between 4 and 8 ppm. It is difficult to identify 1 level of selenium in eggs that will be diagnostic of reproductive impairment in the field because different chemical forms of selenium appear to have different toxicities in eggs. However, when eggs from a wild population contain .gtoreq. 1-ppm selenium on a wet-weight basis, reproductive impairment may be possible and should be evaluated in that population. At 5-ppm selenium in eggs, reproductive impairment is much more likely to occur.

  12. Choline deprivation induces hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed low methionine diets.

    PubMed

    Setoue, Minoru; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2008-12-01

    To clarify the relationship between dietary choline level and plasma homocysteine concentration, the effects of choline deprivation on plasma homocysteine concentration and related variables were investigated in rats fed a standard (25%) casein (25C) diet or standard soybean protein (25S) diet. Using the 25S diet, the time-dependent effect of choline deprivation and the comparative effects of three kinds of lipotropes were also investigated. Feeding rats with the choline-deprived 25S diet for 10 d significantly increased plasma total homocysteine concentration to a level 2.68-times higher than that of the control group, whereas choline deprivation had no effect in rats fed the 25C diet. Increases in hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine and homocysteine concentrations, decreases in hepatic betaine concentration and the activity of cystathionine beta-synthase, but not betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, and fatty liver also occurred in rats fed the choline-deprived 25S diet. Plasma homocysteine concentration increased when rats were fed the choline-deprived 25S diet for only 3 d, and the increase persisted up to 20 d. The hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deprivation was effectively suppressed by betaine or methionine supplementation. Choline deprivation caused hyperhomocysteinemia also in rats fed a choline-deprived low (10%) casein diet. The results indicate that choline deprivation can easily induce prominent hyperhomocysteinemia when rats are fed relatively low methionine diets such as a standard soybean protein diet and low casein diet, possibly through the suppression of homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. This hyperhomocysteinemia might be a useful model for investigating the role of betaine in the regulation of plasma homocysteine concentration.

  13. Fatty Acid Profiles, Meat Quality, and Sensory Palatability of Grain-fed and Grass-fed Beef from Hanwoo, American, and Australian Crossbred Cattle.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Hwa; Joo, Seon-Tea

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid profiles in relation to meat quality traits and sensory palatability of grain-fed and grass-fed beef from Hanwoo, American, and Australian crossbred cattle were examined in this study. There were significant (p<0.001) differences in fat content and fatty acid compositions between grain-fed and grass-fed beef. Grain-fed Hanwoo had significantly (p<0.001) lower saturated fatty acid (SFA) proportion but higher monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) proportion compared to grass-fed cattle. The proportion of oleic acid in grain-fed Hanwoo was significantly (p<0.001) higher than that in grass-fed Hanwoo, Australian crossbred, or American crossbred cattle. Grain-fed Hanwoo had significantly (p<0.001) lower percentages of drip loss and cooking loss compared to other cattle. Overall palatability panel scores of grain-fed cattle were significantly (p<0.001) higher than those of grass-fed cattle. Consequently, sensory overall palatability was negatively correlated with proportions of SFA and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), but positively correlated with the proportion of MUFA. In particular, the proportion of oleic acid was strongly and positively correlated with fat content (r=0.91, p<0.001) and overall palatability (r=0.92, p<0.001). These results implied that high-concentrate grain-fed could increase intramuscular fat (IMF) content and the proportion of oleic acid, thus increasing the sensory palatability of Hanwoo beef.

  14. Fatty Acid Profiles, Meat Quality, and Sensory Palatability of Grain-fed and Grass-fed Beef from Hanwoo, American, and Australian Crossbred Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Young-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid profiles in relation to meat quality traits and sensory palatability of grain-fed and grass-fed beef from Hanwoo, American, and Australian crossbred cattle were examined in this study. There were significant (p<0.001) differences in fat content and fatty acid compositions between grain-fed and grass-fed beef. Grain-fed Hanwoo had significantly (p<0.001) lower saturated fatty acid (SFA) proportion but higher monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) proportion compared to grass-fed cattle. The proportion of oleic acid in grain-fed Hanwoo was significantly (p<0.001) higher than that in grass-fed Hanwoo, Australian crossbred, or American crossbred cattle. Grain-fed Hanwoo had significantly (p<0.001) lower percentages of drip loss and cooking loss compared to other cattle. Overall palatability panel scores of grain-fed cattle were significantly (p<0.001) higher than those of grass-fed cattle. Consequently, sensory overall palatability was negatively correlated with proportions of SFA and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), but positively correlated with the proportion of MUFA. In particular, the proportion of oleic acid was strongly and positively correlated with fat content (r=0.91, p<0.001) and overall palatability (r=0.92, p<0.001). These results implied that high-concentrate grain-fed could increase intramuscular fat (IMF) content and the proportion of oleic acid, thus increasing the sensory palatability of Hanwoo beef. PMID:28515638

  15. A mathematical model for the doubly fed wound rotor generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of a doubly-fed wound rotor machine used as a constant frequency generator is presented. The purpose of this analysis is to derive a consistent set of circuit equations which produce constant stator frequency and constant stator voltage. Starting with instantaneous circuit equations, the necessary rotor voltages and currents are derived. The model, thus obtained, is assumed to be valid, since the resulting relationships between mechanical power and active volt-amperes agrees with the results of others. In addition, the model allows for a new interpretation of the power flow in the doubly-fed generator.

  16. Concentration of cadmium in Coturnix quail fed earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Stoewsand, G.S.; Bache, C.A.; Gutenmann, W.H.; Lisk, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Earthworms (Lumbriscus terrestris), collected from soils in southern Ontario, Canada, that had no previous history of cadmium application, contained 3 ppm cadmium. They were fed to Coturnix quail as 60% dry weight of their diet for 63 d to examine the extent of deposition of native cadmium. Cadmium in kidney, liver, and excreta was greatly elevated above that of birds fed a control diet without worms. No increase in the level of cadmium in eggs was found. The factors affecting the association of cadmium in soils and worms and their assimilation and possible toxic effects in foraging birds are discussed.

  17. Eggshell breakage by incubating black ducks fed DDE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longcore, J.R.; Samson, F.B.

    1973-01-01

    Black duck (Anas rubripes) hens fed 10 ppm dry weight (approximately 3 ppm wet weight) of p,p'-DDE in the diet laid eggs with shells 22 percent thinner at the equator, 30 percent thinner at the cap, and 33 percent thinner at the apex than those of controls. Natural incubation increased shell cracking more than fourfold as compared with mechanical incubation. Hens removed cracked eggs from nests, and one hen terminated incubation. Hens fed DDE produced one-fifth as many ducklings as controls. DDE in eggs of dosed hens averaged 64.9 ppm wet weight.

  18. FED-R: a fusion engineering device utilizing resistive magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Kalsi, S.S.

    1983-04-01

    The principal purpose of the FED-R tokamak facility is to provide a substantial quasi-steady flux of fusion neutrons irradiating a large test area in order to carry out thermal, neutronic, and radiation effects testing of experimental blanket assemblies having a variety of configurations, compositions, and purposes. The design of the FED-R device also suggests potential for an upgrade that could be employed as a full-scale demonstration reactor for some specific fusion-neutron application when required.

  19. Apparent digestible energy value of crude glycerol fed to pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apparent digestible energy of crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, was determined in two studies conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. In the first study, 24 barrows with an average body weight of 11.0 kg were fed 376 g/d of a basal corn...

  20. Decreasing Diet Density: Direct Fed Microbials and L-threonine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alterations in nutritional strategies are becoming more prevalent as broiler integrators are faced with high feed costs compared to historical averages. If broiler diets are devoid of antimicrobials and contain lower than average nutrient content, could the addition of a direct fed microbial ingred...

  1. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer March 18, 1940, (P) INT. DETAIL VIEW OF INSIDE FRONT-WEST-DOOR, SHOWING HARDWARE. - Wyckoff-Bennett House, Kings Highway & 1669 East Twenty-second Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  2. New series-fed traveling-wave array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaeddine, A.; Rammal, M.; Reineix, A.; Jecko, B.

    1994-06-01

    A method of designing a series-fed microstrip traveling-wave array to produce a shaped pattern is described. A theoretical analysis of the traveling-wave element is given and experimental results are presented. High efficiency and good directivity have been observed on the array.

  3. Plasma assessments for the fusion engineering device (FED)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.; Lyon, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    An initial range of plasma assumptions and scenarios has been examined for the US tokamak FED concept. The results suggest that the current FED baseline parameters of R = 4.8 m, B/sub t/ = 3.6 T, a = 1.3 m, b = 2.1 m (D-shape), and I/sub p/ = 4.8 to 5.4 MA are appropriate for achieving its nominal goals of P(fusion) approx. = 180 MW and a plasma Q greater than or equal to to 5 for a pulse length greater than 100 s. However, large uncertainty still exists in the areas of current startup, ion-cyclotron wave launching, influence of plasma shape on achievable beta, impurity control, plasma edge transport, and plasma disruption. Various options and remedies have been suggested to alleviate the impact of the uncertainty on the FED design concept. They appear promising because they can be studied experimentally and are not expected to lead to fundamental design modifications of FED.

  4. Weaning Preparation for Children Fed by G-Tube

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tube Share | Weaning Preparation for Children Fed by G-Tube Joan Arvedson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BC-NCD, ... their nutrition and/or fluids via gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes). Depending on the etiology of the child’s ...

  5. The Proposed DESDynI Array-Fed Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Hodges, R.; Vacchione, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the feed antenna for a proposed NASA Earth orbiting radar sensor currently in formulation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The proposed array-fed reflector antenna architecture would enable large physical aperture imaging from space at relatively low cost and high technology readiness. Design, construction, and modeling of the feed antenna are described.

  6. Using glycerin as a supplement for forage-fed ruminants.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The utility of crude glycerin as a feed additive for forage–fed ruminants depends largely on how well the animals are able to utilize the glycerol and other dietary components when crude glycerin is added to the diet. Several studies have demonstrated that ruminal fermentation of pure glycerol resul...

  7. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey (Fed.) Stanley P. Mixon, Photographer March 18, 1940, (F) EXT. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTH END GABLES, KITCHEN WING IN FOREGROUND. - Wyckoff-Bennett House, Kings Highway & 1669 East Twenty-second Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  8. Low serum biotin in Japanese children fed with hydrolysate formula.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Ogawa, Eishin; Kodama, Hiroko; Mimaki, Masakazu

    2016-09-01

    Given that nutritional biotin deficiency in Japanese infants has been reported, a straightforward method for estimating biotin level is needed. The biotin content in infant formula, breast milk, and the sera of infants fed with various types of formula were measured using avidin-binding assay. A commercially available ELISA kit was used for the measurement of biotin in 54 types of formula, including hydrolysate formulas for milk allergy, as well as in breast milk and in the sera of 27 infants fed with these formulas. The biotin content reached the recommended value in only five formulas. All of the hydrolysate formulas and more than half of the special formulas contained biotin <0.1 μg/dL. Serum biotin was low in infants fed only with the hydrolysate formulas, and one of them had alopecia related to biotin deficiency. While many were asymptomatic, infants fed with formulas lacking biotin are at risk of developing symptomatic disease. The addition of biotin to breast milk substitutes was finally approved in the middle of 2014, however pediatricians in Japan should still be vigilant with regard to nutritional biotin deficiency in infants for the time being. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Taurine prevents collagen abnormalities in high fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nandhini, A T Anitha; Thirunavukkarasu, V; Anuradha, C V

    2005-08-01

    Accumulation of collagen and changes in its physiochemical properties contribute to the development of secondary complications of diabetes. We undertook this study to see the effects of taurine on the content and characteristics of collagen from tail tendon of rats fed with high fructose diet. The rats were divided into four groups of six each: control group (CON), taurine-supplemented control group (CON+TAU), taurine supplemented (FRU+TAU) and not supplemented fructose-fed group (FRU). The physico-chemical properties of collagen isolated from the tail tendon were studied. Fructose administration caused accumulation of collagen in tail tendon. Enhanced glycation and advanced glycation end products (AGE)-linked fluorescence together with alterations in aldehyde content, solubility pattern, susceptibility to denaturing agents and shrinkage temperature were observed in fructose-fed rats. Elevated b component of type I collagen was evidenced from the SDS gel pattern of collagen from the fructose-fed rats. Simultaneous administration of taurine alleviated these changes. Taurine administration to fructose-rats had a positive influence on both quantitative and qualitative properties of collagen. The results of the present study suggested a role for the action of taurine in delaying diabetic complications and the possible use of taurine as an adjuvant therapeutic measure in the management of diabetes and its complications.

  10. Discrimination learning in adult bobwhite quail fed paraquat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Bunck, T.J.; Sileo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Adult male bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) were fed a diet containing 0, 25 or 100 ppm paraquat dichloride. After 60 d on treated diets, discrimination learning was evaluated with acquisition and reversal tests. The three groups performed similarly on these tests. Dose-related histopathological lesions were not found in liver, kidney or lung tissues

  11. Oligosaccharides in feces of breast- and formula-fed babies.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Schols, Henk A; van Zoeren, Diny; van Lingen, Richard A; Groot Jebbink, Liesbeth J M; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-10-18

    So far, little is known on the fate of oligosaccharides in the colon of breast- and formula-fed babies. Using capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detector coupled to a mass spectrometer (CE-LIF-MS(n)), we studied the fecal oligosaccharide profiles of 27 two-month-old breast-, formula- and mixed-fed preterm babies. The interpretation of the complex oligosaccharide profiles was facilitated by beforehand clustering the CE-LIF data points by agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC). In the feces of breast-fed babies, characteristic human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) profiles, showing genetic fingerprints known for human milk of secretors and non-secretors, were recognized. Alternatively, advanced degradation and bioconversion of HMOs, resulting in an accumulation of acidic HMOs or HMO bioconversion products was observed. Independent of the prebiotic supplementation of the formula with galactooligosaccharides (GOS) at the level used, similar oligosaccharide profiles of low peak abundance were obtained for formula-fed babies. Feeding influences the presence of diet-related oligosaccharides in baby feces and gastrointestinal adaptation plays an important role herein. Four fecal oligosaccharides, characterized as HexNAc-Hex-Hex, Hex-[Fuc]-HexNAc-Hex, HexNAc-[Fuc]-Hex-Hex and HexNAc-[Fuc]-Hex-HexNAc-Hex-Hex, highlighted an active gastrointestinal metabolization of the feeding-related oligosaccharides. Their presence was linked to the gastrointestinal mucus layer and the blood-group determinant oligosaccharides therein, which are characteristic for the host's genotype.

  12. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spacecraft array fed reflector antenna systems were assessed for particular application to a multiple fixed spot beam/multiple scanning spot beam system. Reflector optics systems are reviewed in addition to an investigation of the feasibility of the use of monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifiers and phase shifters in each element of the array feed.

  13. Fate and transport of arsenic from organoarsenicals fed to poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the fate of arsenic (As) in land-applied litter from chickens that have been fed roxarsone, an organic feed additive containing As. This chapter seeks to review the likelyhood of the biodegradation of roxarsone and the subsequent transport of As in runoff from a case study cond...

  14. The Proposed DESDynI Array-Fed Reflector Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Hodges, R.; Vacchione, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the feed antenna for a proposed NASA Earth orbiting radar sensor currently in formulation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The proposed array-fed reflector antenna architecture would enable large physical aperture imaging from space at relatively low cost and high technology readiness. Design, construction, and modeling of the feed antenna are described.

  15. Characterization of F18 fimbrial genes fedE and fedF involved in adhesion and length of enterotoxemic Escherichia coli strain 107/86.

    PubMed

    Imberechts, H; Wild, P; Charlier, G; De Greve, H; Lintermans, P; Pohl, P

    1996-09-01

    Infection of susceptible weaned pigs with oedema disease strains of E. coli is associated with bacterial adhesion to the small intestine. F18 fimbria (previously named F107) was the first colonisation factor described on oedema disease strains, and its genetic determinant was cloned. In the present study, genes fedE and fedF were positioned in the F18 gene cluster, downstream of the major structural subunit gene fedA. Two fedE and two fedF mutants were identified that had lost their capacity to adhere to isolated porcine villi. Moreover, these mutants produced significantly longer fimbriae. In vitro adhesion tests, electron microscopy study, transcomplementation tests, and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that proteins FedE and FedF are F18 minor subunits essential for fimbrial adhesion and effecting fimbrial length.

  16. Oral Microbial Profile Discriminates Breastfed from Formula-Fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holgerson, Pernilla Lif; Vestman, Nelly Romani; Claesson, Rolf; Öhman, Carina; Domellöf, Magnus; Tanner, Anne CR; Hernell, Olle; Johansson, Ingegerd

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the impact of diet on the oral microbiota of infants although diet is known to affect the gut microbiota. The aims of the present study were to compare the oral microbiota in breastfed and formula-fed infants, and investigate growth inhibition of streptococci by infant-isolated lactobacilli. Subjects and Methods 207 mothers consented to participation of their three-month old infants. 146 (70.5%) infants were exclusively and 38 (18.4%) partially breastfed, and 23 (11.1%) were exclusively formula-fed. Saliva from all infants was cultured for Lactobacillus species, with isolate identifications from 21 infants. Lactobacillus isolates were tested for their ability to supress Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis. Oral swabs from 73 infants were analysed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) and by q-PCR for Lactobacilius gasseri. Results Lactobacilli were cultured from 27.8% of exclusively and partially breastfed infants, but not from formula-fed infants. The prevalence of 14 HOMIM detected taxa, and total salivary lactobacilli counts differed by feeding method. Multivariate modelling of HOMIM detected bacteria and possible confounders clustered samples from breastfed infants separately from formula-fed infants. The microbiota of breastfed infants differed based on vaginal or C-section delivery. Isolates of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. gasseri and Lactobacillus vaginalis inhibited growth of the cariogenic S. mutans and the commensal S. sanguinis: L. plantarum > L. gasseri > L. vaginalis. Conclusion The microbiota of the mouth differs between breastfed and formula-fed three-month-old infants. Possible mechanisms for microbial differences observed include species suppression by lactobacilli indigenous to breast milk. PMID:22955450

  17. Triglyceride kinetics in fasted and fed E. coli septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Tabares, A. )

    1990-02-26

    The mechanism for the development of hypertriglyceridemia during gram-negative sepsis was studies by examining the liver production and clearance of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride (TG). To assess the liver output and peripheral clearance the kinetics of VLDL-TG were determined by a constant intravenous infusion of (2-{sup 3}H) glycerol-labeled VLDL in fasted control, fasted E. coli-treated, fed control, and fed E.coli-treated rats. Lewis inbred rats, 275-300 g, were made septic with 8 {times} 10{sup 7} live E.coli colonies per 100 g body weight. Twenty-four hours following E.coli injection serum TG of fasted E.coli-treated rats was elevated by 170% which was attributed to a 67% decrease in the clearance rate of VLDL-TG in fasted E.coli-treated rats compared with their fasted controls. The secretion of VLDL-TG declined by 31% in the livers of the fasted E.coli-treated rats which was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in the composition of liver TG. In a second series of experiments control and E.coli-treated rats were fed intragastrically (IG) a balanced solution containing glucose plus fat as the sources of nonprotein calories. Serum TG were 26% lower in the fed E.coli-treated rats because the clearance rate increased by 86%. The secretion of TG in the fed septic rats increased by 40% but this difference was not significant. In the septic rat the ability to clear triglycerides from the plasma depends upon the nutritional state.

  18. Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems.

    PubMed

    Ardeshir, Amir; Narayan, Nicole R; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Lu, Ding; Rauch, Marcus; Huang, Yong; Van Rompay, Koen K A; Lynch, Susan V; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J

    2014-09-03

    Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop markedly different immune systems, which remain different 6 months after weaning when the animals begin receiving identical diets. In particular, breast-fed infants develop robust populations of memory T cells as well as T helper 17 (TH17) cells within the memory pool, whereas bottle-fed infants do not. These findings may partly explain the variation in human susceptibility to conditions with an immune basis, as well as the variable protection against certain infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Ultrasonographic patterns of reproductive organs in infants fed soy formula: Comparisons to infants fed breast milk and milk formula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to determine if differences exist in hormone sensitive organ size between infants fed soy formula (SF), milk formula (MF), or breast milk (BF). Breast buds, uterus, ovaries, prostate, and testicular volumes were assessed by ultrasonography in 40 BF, 41 MF, and 39 SF infants at age ...

  20. Growth, Nutrition, and Cytokine Response of Breast-fed Infants and Infants Fed Formula With Added Bovine Osteopontin.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Peerson, Janet M; Donovan, Sharon M; Peng, Yong-mei

    2016-04-01

    Breast milk contains a high concentration of osteopontin (OPN), a protein having multiple functions. In contrast, infant formula is low in OPN. A randomized clinical trial was performed to evaluate effects of adding a highly enriched bovine OPN fraction to formula, and infants whose mothers had already decided not to breast-feed were recruited. They were fed regular formula (F0) or the same formula with bovine OPN at 65 (F65) or 130 (F130) mg/L (50% and 100% of human milk level, respectively) from 1 to 6 months of age and were compared with a reference group of breast-fed (BF) infants. Morbidity was recorded daily and 3-day dietary records collected monthly. Anthropometry was assessed monthly, and blood samples were taken at 1, 4, and 6 months of age. Hematology and iron status, serum cytokines, plasma amino acids, and blood urea nitrogen were analyzed. Formulas were well tolerated and there were no significant differences in formula intake or growth among the formula-fed groups. The F130 group had significantly lower plasma threonine than the F0 and F65 groups, and significantly lower plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) than the F0 group and, thus, was closer to BF infants. Plasma TNF-α was higher in formula-fed infants than in BF infants. Among the formula-fed groups, the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α was significantly lower in the F65 and F130 groups than in the F0 group, suggesting that OPN downregulates inflammatory cytokines and thus affects immune function. Addition of OPN to infant formula changes amino acid metabolism and cytokine responses of FF infants and makes them more similar to BF infants. The lower prevalence of pyrexia in the F130 infants than in F0 infants suggests that adding OPN may confer health benefits.

  1. Performance and carcass traits of finishing heifers fed crude glycerin.

    PubMed

    Parsons, G L; Shelor, M K; Drouillard, J S

    2009-02-01

    Crossbred heifers (n = 373; 421.6 kg +/- 28.9) were fed finishing diets containing 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16% crude glycerin (DM basis). Diets consisted of steam-flaked corn with 6% alfalfa hay and 1.2% urea and provided 300 mg of monensin, 90 mg of tylosin, and 0.5 mg of melengestrol acetate per animal daily. Cattle were stratified by BW and allocated randomly, within strata, to concrete-surfaced feedlot pens each containing 6 to 7 heifers, with 9 pens per dietary treatment. Cattle were transitioned from the control diet to diets containing increasing proportions of glycerin over a period of 10 d. Cattle had ad libitum access to feed, and diets were delivered once daily throughout the 85-d trial period. As the concentration of glycerin increased, DMI decreased linearly (P < 0.001). Heifers fed 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16% glycerin had ADG of 1.19, 1.34, 1.29, 1.25, 1.17, and 1.03 kg, respectively (linear, P = 0.013; quadratic, P = 0.010). Feeding glycerin had a quadratic effect on G:F, and G:F was optimal when glycerin was fed at 2% of the diet (quadratic, P = 0.046). Glycerin increased the final BW by 12.7, 8.1, and 5.3 kg when fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but reduced the final BW by 1.9 and 14.3 kg when included at 12 and 16% of the diet (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Similarly, HCW increased by 8.1, 5.1, and 3.3 kg when glycerin was fed at 2, 4, and 8% of the diet, respectively, but were 1.2 and 9.1 kg less than controls when glycerin was fed at 12 and 16%, respectively (linear, P = 0.009; quadratic, P = 0.006). Longissimus muscle area decreased linearly as glycerin concentrations increased (P < 0.013). Feeding glycerin resulted in linear decreases in subcutaneous fat over the 12th rib and marbling scores (P = 0.045). Glycerin tended to decrease the percentage of cattle grading USDA Choice (P = 0.084) and increase the percentage of cattle grading USDA Select. Adding glycerin to cattle-finishing diets improved BW gain and feed efficiency

  2. Methane emissions from feedlot cattle fed barley or corn diets.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K A; McGinn, S M

    2005-03-01

    Methane emitted from the livestock sector contributes to greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Understanding the variability in enteric methane production related to diet is essential to decreasing uncertainty in greenhouse gas emission inventories and to identifying viable greenhouse gas reduction strategies. Our study focused on measuring methane in growing beef cattle fed corn- or barley-based diets typical of those fed to cattle in North American feedlots. The experiment was designed as a randomized complete block (group) design with two treatments, barley and corn. Angus heifer calves (initial BW = 328 kg) were allocated to two groups (eight per group), with four cattle in each group fed a corn or barley diet. The experiment was conducted over a 42-d backgrounding phase, a 35-d transition phase and a 32-d finishing phase. Backgrounding diets consisted of 70% barley silage or corn silage and 30% concentrate containing steam-rolled barley or dry-rolled corn (DM basis). Finishing diets consisted of 9% barley silage and 91% concentrate containing barley or corn (DM basis). All diets contained monensin (33 mg/kg of DM). Cattle were placed into four large environmental chambers (two heifers per chamber) during each phase to measure enteric methane production for 3 d. During the backgrounding phase, DMI was greater by cattle fed corn than for those fed barley (10.2 vs. 7.6 kg/d, P < 0.01), but during the finishing phase, DMI was similar for both diets (8.3 kg/d). The DMI was decreased to 6.3 kg/d with no effect of diet or phase while the cattle were in the chambers; thus, methane emissions (g/d) reported may underestimate those of the feedlot industry. Methane emissions per kilogram of DMI and as a percentage of GE intake were not affected by grain source during the backgrounding phase (24.6 g/kg of DMI; 7.42% of GE), but were less (P < 0.05) for corn than for barley during the finishing phase (9.2 vs. 13.1 g/kg of DMI; 2.81 vs. 4.03% of GE). The results indicate the

  3. Blood concentrations of chlortetracycline in macaws fed medicated pelleted feed.

    PubMed

    Flammer, K; Cassidy, D R; Landgraf, W W; Ross, P F

    1989-01-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the suitability of using a pelleted diet containing chlortetracycline (CTC) for treatment of chlamydiosis in macaws. Macaws, normally fed seed and fruit diets in captivity, are notoriously difficult to treat with CTC-medicated mash diets. Healthy macaws fed a pelleted diet containing 1% or 1.5% CTC for 30 or 45 days maintained adequate food intake and mean blood concentrations of 1-2 CTC micrograms/ml blood throughout the treatment period. There were no significant differences between blood concentrations induced by the different dietary CTC concentrations. Blood concentrations of 1 microgram/ml are considered therapeutic, so it is likely that 1% CTC-medicated pellets will be adequate for treating chlamydiosis in these species.

  4. Optimization for a recombinant E. coli fed-batch fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.; Bentley, W.E.; Weigand, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    The operating strategy that produces the maximum foreign protein expression for a fed-batch process is desired. This is achieved by using a feasible quadratic programming (FSQP) algorithm with a structured model that describes cell growth and product formation for recombinant E. coli. Optimization calculations for a fed-batch culture have not been performed with a model of this complexity up to this point. A constraint on the maximum cell concentration was included. For a fixed value of batch time, the results show that the optimal time profile of feed flow rate can increase the yield of foreign protein by 12-29% over a constant feed rate policy. Also, it was found that the computation time for the FSQP algorithm can be reduced significantly by considering suboptimal profiles of the feed rate, with a minor effect on calculated protein yield.

  5. Sky background subtraction with fiber-fed spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Yang, Y.; Flores, H.; Royer, F.; Disseau, K.; Gonçalves, T.; Hammer, F.; Cirasuolo, M.; Evans, C. J.; Li Causi, G.; Maiolino, R.; Melo, C.

    2014-08-01

    Fiber-fed spectrographs can now have throughputs equivalent to slit spectrographs. However, the sky subtraction accuracy that can be reached on such instruments has often been pinpointed as one of their major issues, in relation to difficulties in scattered light and flat-field corrections or throughput losses associated with fibers. Using technical time observations with FLAMES-GIRAFFE, two observing techniques, namely dual staring and cross beam switching modes, were tested and the resulting sky subtraction accuracy reached in both cases was quantified. Results indicate that an accuracy of 0.6% on the sky subtraction can be reached, provided that the cross beam switching mode is used. This is very encouraging regarding the detection of very faint sources with future fiber-fed spectrographs such as VLT/MOONS or E-ELT/MOSAIC.

  6. Material considerations for the fusion engineering device (FED) pump limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, J. R.; Cramer, B. A.; Davisson, J. P.; Mantz, H. C.

    A mechanical pump limiter is provided in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) to establish the plasma edge, to exhaust plasma particles, to handle a significant fraction of the plasma heat load, and to protect the first wall from large particle and energy fluxes. Various protective surface materials were evaluated for applicability to the limiter. Bare metal and armor tile design concepts were considered. The protective surface concept selected for the baseline FED limiter consists of graphite tiles brazed to a water cooled copper substrate. Graphite and copper were selected because of their resistance to damage at high heat fluxes, the low atomic number of graphite and the potential for reliable brazing of copper and graphite.

  7. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  8. Visible spectroscopy on carcass fat combined with chemometrics to distinguish pasture-fed, concentrate-fed and concentrate-finished pasture-fed lambs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Andueza, D; de Oliveira, L; Zawadzki, F; Prache, S

    2015-03-01

    We used visible spectroscopy of fat to discriminate lambs that were pasture-fed (n=76), concentrate-fed (n=79) or concentrate-finished after pasture-feeding (n=69). The reflectance spectrum of perirenal and subcutaneous caudal fat was measured at slaughter and 24h post mortem. In Method 1 (W450-510), the optical data were used at wavelengths in the range of 450-510nm to calculate an index quantifying light absorption by carotenoids. In Method 2 (W400-700), the full set of data at wavelengths in the range of 400-700nm was used to differentiate carcasses using PLS-DA as a classification method. W400-700 proved more reliable than W450-510 (P<0.0001). The proportion of correctly classified lambs using W400-700 was 95.6% and 95.9% for measurements made on perirenal fat at slaughter and 24h post mortem. The intensity of light absorption by carotenoids decreased exponentially with live weight gain during the finishing period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen excretion and ammonia emissions from pigs fed modified diets.

    PubMed

    Panetta, D M; Powers, W J; Xin, H; Kerr, B J; Stalder, K J

    2006-01-01

    Two swine feeding trials were conducted (initial body weight = 47 +/- 2 and 41 +/- 3 kg for Trials 1 and 2, respectively) to evaluate reduced crude protein (CP) and yucca (Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Ortgies) extract-supplemented diets on NH3 emissions. In Trial 1, nine pigs were offered a corn-soybean meal diet (C, 174 g kg(-1) CP), a Lys-supplemented diet (L, 170 g kg(-1) CP), or a 145 g kg(-1) CP diet supplemented with Lys, Met, Thr, and Trp (LMTT). In Trial 2, nine pigs were fed diet L supplemented with 0, 62.5, or 125 mg of yucca extract per kg diet. Each feeding period consisted of a 4-d dietary adjustment followed by 72 h of continuous NH3 measurement. Urine and fecal samples were collected each period. Feeding the LMTT diet reduced (P < 0.05) average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency (G:F) compared to diet L. Fecal N concentration decreased with a reduction in dietary CP, but urinary ammonium increased from pigs fed diet LMTT (2.0 g kg(-1), wet basis) compared to those fed diet C (1.1 g kg(-1)) or L (1.0 g kg(-1)). When pigs were fed reduced CP diets NH3 emission rates decreased (2.46, 2.16, and 1.05 mg min(-1) for diets C, L, and LMTT). Yucca had no effect on feed intake, ADG, or G:F. Ammonium and N concentrations of manure and NH3 emission rates did not differ with yucca content. Caution must be executed to maintain animal performance when strategies are implemented to reduce NH3 emissions.

  10. Shaped beam synthesis with series-fed microstrip patch arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, P. C.

    A numerical optimization procedure to minimize the phase-error and temperature sensitivity of series-fed microstrip patch arrays is described and demonstrated. By varying feed line impedance while keeping patch width constant, arrays can be designed to produce shaped beams which do not degrade off the H-plane boresight. Typical results are presented graphically, and the applicability of the arrays produced to the design of a microwave-landing-system azimuth antenna is indicated.

  11. Anticholesteremic property of Lactobacillus acidophilus yogurt fed to mature boars.

    PubMed

    Danielson, A D; Peo, E R; Shahani, K M; Lewis, A J; Whalen, P J; Amer, M A

    1989-04-01

    Three strains of Lactobacilus acidophilus (LA) were isolated from the feces of mature boars that were not being fed antibiotics from the Nebraska Gene Pool (NGP). All three LA isolates were screened in vitro for anticholesteremic and antimicrobial activities. One strain, LA16, caused the greatest reduction in cholesterol and inhibited both Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli the most. LA16 was used to produce 16, 18.9-liter quantities of acidophilus yogurt (AY), over a period of 8 wk, for use as a feed ingredient in diets for the NGP boars. Colony forming units (cfu), pH, protein, energy, Ca and P were consistent across all 16 batches of yogurt. All of the 18 boars were fed a high-cholesterol diet for a period of 56 d at a rate of 2.268 kg/(hd.d) to furnish 6.661 g/(hd.d) of cholesterol. Nine of the boars then were fed 1.81 kg/(hd.d) of a second diet that was supplemented with .454 kg/(hd.d) of AY. The other nine boars were fed the original diet. Cholesterol intake was the same for the two dietary treatments. Blood samples were collected weekly from the brachial-jugular region and the sera were analyzed for lipids. Acidophilus yogurt reduced serum cholesterol (P less than .01) and low density lipoproteins (P less than .08), but it had no effect on serum triglycerides (P greater than .23) or on high density lipoproteins (P greater than .11).

  12. Pancreatic functions in high salt fed female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lasheen, Noha N

    2015-01-01

    Salt consumption has been increased worldwide and the association of high salt diets with enhanced inflammation and target organ damage was reported. Little data were available about the effect of high salt diet on exocrine function of pancreas, while the relation between high salt intake and insulin sensitivity was controversial. This study was designed to investigate the effect of high salt diet on exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions, and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanism(s). Twenty adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups; control group; fed standard rodent diet containing 0.3% NaCl, and high salt fed group; fed 8% NaCl for 8 weeks. On the day of sacrifice, rats were anesthized by i.p. pentobarbitone (40 μg/kg B.W.). Nasoanal length was measured and fasting blood glucose was determined from rat tail. Blood samples were obtained from abdominal aorta for determination of plasma sodium, potassium, amylase, lipase, aldosterone, insulin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL6). Pancreata of both groups were histologically studied. Compared to control group, 8-week high salt fed group showed: significant elevation in body weight, body mass index, Lee index, plasma sodium, TGF-β1 and IL6, however, plasma aldosterone, amylase, lipase, and insulin levels were significantly decreased. A nonsignificant increase in plasma potassium and nonsignificant changes in fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR were detected between groups. Pancreatic fibrosis was observed in test group. High salt diet for 8 weeks caused pancreatic fibrosis evidenced by decline of both exocrine and endocrine functions of pancreas in Wistar rats. PMID:26216433

  13. Spermatogenesis in bald eagles experimentally fed a diet containing DDT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Chura, N.J.; Stewart, P.A.

    1966-01-01

    When Bald Eagles were fed DDT in the diet at the level of 10 ppm (dry weight basis) for periods of 60 and 120 days, there was no interference with spermatogenic activity. Degenerative testicular changes were produced only by levels of DDT that produced abnormal neurological signs and usually resulted in death. Histological examination of these testes indicates that Bald Eagles have a seasonal testicular cycle similar to that reported for many other birds of the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Fed-batch cultivation of Cellulomonas on sugarcane bagasse pith

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, H.; Enriquez, A.

    1985-02-01

    A high biomass concentration (19.9 g/L) was obtained with the fed-batch cultivation of Cellulomonas on pretreated sugarcane bagasse pith. Similar results in biomass concentration, yield, and substrate consumption were obtained with the discontinuous feed of bagasse as with discontinuous feed supplemented with a partial continuous addition of salts. Two or more growth phases were detected, probably caused by the differential utilization of bagasse components. An acceptably low content of bagasse components remained in the biomass after separation.

  15. Continuous Cellulosic Bioethanol Fermentation by Cyclic Fed-Batch Cocultivation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, He-Long; He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Hemme, Christopher L.; Wu, Liyou

    2013-01-01

    Cocultivation of cellulolytic and saccharolytic microbial populations is a promising strategy to improve bioethanol production from the fermentation of recalcitrant cellulosic materials. Earlier studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of cocultivation in enhancing ethanolic fermentation of cellulose in batch fermentation. To further enhance process efficiency, a semicontinuous cyclic fed-batch fermentor configuration was evaluated for its potential in enhancing the efficiency of cellulose fermentation using cocultivation. Cocultures of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum LQRI and saccharolytic Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus strain X514 were tested in the semicontinuous fermentor as a model system. Initial cellulose concentration and pH were identified as the key process parameters controlling cellulose fermentation performance in the fixed-volume cyclic fed-batch coculture system. At an initial cellulose concentration of 40 g liter−1, the concentration of ethanol produced with pH control was 4.5-fold higher than that without pH control. It was also found that efficient cellulosic bioethanol production by cocultivation was sustained in the semicontinuous configuration, with bioethanol production reaching 474 mM in 96 h with an initial cellulose concentration of 80 g liter−1 and pH controlled at 6.5 to 6.8. These results suggested the advantages of the cyclic fed-batch process for cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by the cocultures. PMID:23275517

  16. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) version 7.0

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    Designed for building energy managers, utilities and firms providing energy services, FEDS provides a comprehensive and user-friendly method for users to quickly and accurately identifying energy conversion and end-use technology improvements that offer maximum savings in energy usage and cost. FEDS enables the user to assess energy efficiency and consumption, identify retrofit opportunities, select minimum life cycle costs, determine payback, and prioritize investments in energy efficiency retrofit projects for multiple or single buildings across a particular site. As part of the life-cycle cost optimization it also considers several options for partial or complete abandonment of central energy plants including: individual technologies dropping off a thermal loop, a loop and all technologies dropping off a central plant, and all technologies and loops dropping off a central plant resulting in its complete abandonment. Improvements in release 7.0 include: • FEDS 7.0 is now a full hourly simulation model (runs every hour of the year as opposed to the previous simplified hourly approach which ran 9 24-hour periods to represent each month). • Enhanced building operation and occupancy modeling • New HVAC technology options (VAV, Economizers, Demand Controlled Ventilation, Terminal Reheat, Subcool Dehumidification) • Additional chiller types • New lighting technologies (LED, Halogen, Induction, additional fluorescent options) • Completely updated retrofit cost and performance data • Regional cost data tied to zip code (previously applied state level averages) • Updated and enhanced reporting capabilities • New pier floor model

  17. Control aspects of the brushless doubly-fed machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauw, H. K.; Krishnan, S.

    1990-09-01

    This report covers the investigations into the control aspects of a variable-speed generation (VSG) system using a brushless double-fed generator excited by a series-resonant converter. The brushless double-fed machine comprises two sets of stator 3-phase systems which are designed with common windings. The rotor is a cage rotor resembling the low-cost and robust squirrel cage of a conventional induction machine. The system was actually designed and set up in the Energy Laboratory of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Oregon State University. The series-resonant converter designed to achieve effective control for variable-speed generation with the brushless doubly-fed generator was adequate in terms of required time response and regulation as well as in providing for adequate power quality. The three elements of the VSG controller, i.e., voltage or reactive power controller, the efficiency maximizer and the stabilizer, could be designed using conventional microprocessor elements with a processing time well within the time period required for sampling the variables involved with executing the control tasks. The report treats in detail the stability problem encountered in running the machine at certain speed regions, even if requirements for steady-state stability are satisfied. In this unstable region, shut down of the VSG system is necessary unless proper stabilization controls are provided for. The associated measures to be taken are presented.

  18. Continuous cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by cyclic fed-batch cocultivation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, He-Long; He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Hemme, Christopher L; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-03-01

    Cocultivation of cellulolytic and saccharolytic microbial populations is a promising strategy to improve bioethanol production from the fermentation of recalcitrant cellulosic materials. Earlier studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of cocultivation in enhancing ethanolic fermentation of cellulose in batch fermentation. To further enhance process efficiency, a semicontinuous cyclic fed-batch fermentor configuration was evaluated for its potential in enhancing the efficiency of cellulose fermentation using cocultivation. Cocultures of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum LQRI and saccharolytic Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus strain X514 were tested in the semicontinuous fermentor as a model system. Initial cellulose concentration and pH were identified as the key process parameters controlling cellulose fermentation performance in the fixed-volume cyclic fed-batch coculture system. At an initial cellulose concentration of 40 g liter(-1), the concentration of ethanol produced with pH control was 4.5-fold higher than that without pH control. It was also found that efficient cellulosic bioethanol production by cocultivation was sustained in the semicontinuous configuration, with bioethanol production reaching 474 mM in 96 h with an initial cellulose concentration of 80 g liter(-1) and pH controlled at 6.5 to 6.8. These results suggested the advantages of the cyclic fed-batch process for cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by the cocultures.

  19. Isoprene Increases Thermotolerance of Fosmidomycin-Fed Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Chen, Xiuyin; Yeh, Sansun

    2001-01-01

    Isoprene is synthesized and emitted in large amounts by a number of plant species, especially oak (Quercus sp.) and aspen (Populus sp.) trees. It has been suggested that isoprene improves thermotolerance by helping photosynthesis cope with high temperature. However, the evidence for the thermotolerance hypothesis is indirect and one of three methods used to support this hypothesis has recently been called into question. More direct evidence required new methods of controlling endogenous isoprene. An inhibitor of the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway, the alternative pathway to the mevalonic acid pathway and the pathway by which isoprene is made, is now available. Fosmidomycin eliminates isoprene emission without affecting photosynthesis for several hours after feeding to detached leaves. Photosynthesis of fosmidomycin-fed leaves recovered less following a 2-min high-temperature treatment at 46°C than did photosynthesis of leaves fed water or fosmidomycin-fed leaves in air supplemented with isoprene. Photosynthesis of Phaseolus vulgaris leaves, which do not make isoprene, exhibited increased thermotolerance when isoprene was supplied in the airstream flowing over the leaf. Other short-chain alkenes also improved thermotolerance, whereas alkanes reduced thermotolerance. It is concluded that thermotolerance of photosynthesis is a substantial benefit to plants that make isoprene and that this benefit explains why plants make isoprene. The effect may be a general hydrocarbon effect and related to the double bonds in the isoprene molecule. PMID:11299379

  20. Survival and reproductive success of black ducks fed methyl mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finley, M.T.; Stendell, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A diet containing 3 ppm mercury was fed to black ducks (Anas rubripes) for periods of 28 weeks during two consecutive breeding seasons. Clutch size, egg production, number of eggs incubated, hatchability and survival of ducklings were lower during both years in hens fed mercury. Reduced hatchability and poor duckling survival were the most harmful effects. During 2 years, 13 pairs of breeders fed mercury produced only 16 ducklings that survived 1 week compared with 73 ducklings from 13 pairs of controls. Mercury residues in eggs, embryos and ducklings averaged about 30% lower during the second breeding season compared with first year results. Third eggs laid by treated hens contained a mean of 6?14 and 3?86 ppm mercury during the first and second years. Whole embryos that failed to hatch contained means of 9?62 and 6?08 ppm mercury during the first and second years. Brains of dead ducklings contained between 3?25 and 6?98 ppm mercury and exhibited lesions characteristic of mercury poisoning. Relative tissue mercury levels for treated adult breeders were: feathers > liver > kidney > breast muscle > brain. Mercury levels in males and females did not differ.

  1. High efficiency vapor-fed AMTEC system for direct conversion. Appendices for final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.

    1997-05-23

    This report consists of four appendices for the final report. They are: Appendix A: 700 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Calculations; Appendix B: 700 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Parts Drawings; Appendix C: 800 C Vapor-Fed AMTEC Cell Calculations; and Appendix D: 800 C Wick-Pumped AMTEC Cell System Design.

  2. Investigation of bacterial diversity in the feces of cattle fed different diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study is to investigate individual animal variation of bovine fecal microbiota including as affected by diets. Fecal samples were collected from 426 cattle fed 1 of 3 diets typically fed to feedlot cattle: 1) 143 steers fed finishing diet (83% dryrolled corn, 13% corn silage, a...

  3. Fatty acid metabolism in lambs fed citrus pulp.

    PubMed

    Lanza, M; Scerra, M; Bognanno, M; Buccioni, A; Cilione, C; Biondi, L; Priolo, A; Luciano, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, we have hypothesized that replacing barley with high proportions of dried citrus pulp in a concentrate-based diet for lambs could increase the intake of unsaturated fatty acids and could reduce the rate of the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA, with a consequent improvement of the intramuscular fatty acid composition. To test this hypothesis, 26 Comisana lambs were divided into 3 groups and for 56 d were fed a barley-based concentrate diet (CON; 8 lambs) or 2 diets in which barley was replaced with 24% (CIT24; 9 lambs) or 35% (CIT35; 9 lambs) dried citrus pulp. An overall improvement of the fatty acid composition of LM from lambs fed citrus pulp-containing diets was found. The PUFA/SFA ratio was lower (P < 0.05) in the LM from lambs in the CON group compared with both the CIT24 and CIT35 groups. The thrombogenic index was lower (P < 0.05) in meat from lambs fed the CIT35 diet compared with those fed the CON diet. The CIT35 diet increased the proportion of C20:5 n-3 in the LM (P < 0.05), whereas the CIT24 diet enhanced that of C22:6 -3 (P < 0.05) compared with the CON diet. Some of these results might be explained considering that feeding the CIT24 and CIT35 diets increased the intake of total fatty acids (P < 0.05) and of C18:3 n-3 (P < 0.01) compared with feeding the CON treatment. On the other hand, phenolic compounds present in citrus pulp could have inhibited the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA. This is supported by the fact that regardless of the level of inclusion in the diet, citrus pulp increased the proportion of rumenic acid (P < 0.001) in LM compared with the CON diet. The plasma from lambs fed both CIT24 and CIT35 diets had a greater percentage of vaccenic acid (VA; < 0.001) compared with that from lambs fed the CON diet, and the CIT35 diet increased the proportion of rumenic acid in plasma compared with the CON treatment (P < 0.05). In the ruminal fluid, stearic acid (SA) tended to decrease, and the sum of CLA tended to increase

  4. Incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections, symptomatic and asymptomatic, in breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Gianino, P; Mastretta, E; Longo, P; Laccisaglia, A; Sartore, M; Russo, R; Mazzaccara, A

    2002-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the most important aetiological agents of nosocomial infections in childhood. We studied the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections in 420 patients (age range 1-18 months) consecutively admitted from 1 December 1999 to 31 May 2000 to the infant ward of the Department of Paediatrics, University of Turin. We also evaluated the protective effect of breast feeding. Faecal specimens were collected from every child (whether developing diarrhoeic symptoms or not) and tested for rotavirus during hospitalization and 72 h after discharge. The incidence of rotavirus nosocomial infections was 27.7%. The incidence of symptomatic nosocomial infections was 16.8%, and the incidence of asymptomatic infections was 10.9%. The attack rate of the infections that occurred during hospitalization was 11.8%, while for those occurring after discharge, it was 15.9%. Rotavirus infection, on average, prolonged hospital stay from 5.2 to 6.4 days. 10.6% of breast-fed infants and 32.4% of non-breast-fed infants contracted rotavirus infection (P<0.005). None of the breast-fed infants who contracted rotavirus infection developed diarrhoeic symptoms.

  5. Breast-feeding at 12 months of age and dietary habits among breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Lande, Britt; Andersen, Lene Frost; Veierød, Marit B; Baerug, Anne; Johansson, Lars; Trygg, Kerstin U; Bjørneboe, Gunn-Elin Aa

    2004-06-01

    To analyse factors associated with breast-feeding and use of sweetened drinks at 12 months, and to compare dietary habits among breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants. Data were collected by a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire filled in by the parents. National dietary survey in Norway. In total, 1932 12-month-old infants were included. At 12 months, 36% of the infants were breast-fed. The odds of breast-feeding at this age were more than doubled both for mothers > or =35 years compared with mothers <25 years and for mothers in the highest educational group compared with mothers in the lowest. A negative association was found for maternal smoking, and the odds of breast-feeding were 40% lower for mothers who smoked than for non-smokers. Some dietary differences were observed between breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants apart from intake of milk. In particular, breast-fed infants had a significantly lower daily intake of sweetened drinks than non-breast-fed infants and a 16% lower mean daily intake of added sugars (P<0.001). Furthermore, breast-fed infants had 30% higher odds of not receiving sweetened drinks daily, compared with non-breast-fed infants. Maternal age, education and smoking status were important factors for breast-feeding at 12 months. Breast-fed infants had lower intakes of sweetened drinks and added sugars than non-breast-fed infants. From a public health perspective, continued promotion of breast-feeding is needed to reduce inequalities in breast-feeding. Moreover, prevention of high intakes of sweetened drinks and added sugars should start in infancy.

  6. Metamaterial-inspired reconfigurable series-fed arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijaz, Bilal

    One of the biggest challenges in modern day wireless communication systems is to attain agility and provide more degrees of freedom in parameters such as frequency, radiation pattern and polarization. Existing phased array antenna technology has limitations in frequency bandwidth and scan angle. So it is important to design frequency reconfigurable antenna arrays which can provide two different frequency bandwidths with a broadside radiation pattern having a lower sidelobe and reduced frequency scanning. The reconfigurable antenna array inspired by the properties of metamaterials presented here provides a solution to attain frequency agility in a wireless communication system. The adaptive change in operating frequency is attained by using RF p-i-n diodes on the antenna array. The artificially made materials having properties of negative permeability and negative permittivity have antiparallel group and phase velocities, and, in consequence of that, they support backward wave propagation. The key idea of this work is to demonstrate that the properties of metamaterial non-radiating phase shifting transmission lines can be utilized to design a series-fed antenna array to operate at two different frequency bands with a broadside radiation pattern in both configurations. In this research, first, a design of a series-fed microstrip array with composite right/left-handed transmission lines (CRLH-TLs) is proposed. To ensure that each element in the array is driven with the same voltage phase, dual-band CRLH-TLs are adopted instead of meander-line microstrip lines to provide a compact interconnect with a zero phase-constant at the frequency of operation. Next, the work is extended to design a reconfigurable series-fed antenna array with reconfigurable metamaterial interconnects, and the expressions for array factor are derived for both switching bands.

  7. Darwinian Behavior in a Cold, Sporadically Fed Pool of Ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A testable, explicit origin for Darwinian behavior, feasible on a chaotic early Earth, would aid origins discussion. Here I show that a pool receiving unreliable supplies of unstable ribonucleotide precursors can recurrently fill this role. By using numerical integration, the differential equations governing a sporadically fed pool are solved, yielding quantitative constraints for the proliferation of molecules that also have a chemical phenotype. For example, templated triphosphate nucleotide joining is >104 too slow, suggesting that a group more reactive than pyrophosphate activated primordial nucleotides. However, measured literature rates are sufficient if the Initial Darwinian Ancestor (IDA) resembles a 5′-5′ cofactor-like dinucleotide RNA, synthesized via activation with a phosphorimidazolide-like group. A sporadically fed pool offers unforeseen advantages; for example, the pool hosts a novel replicator which is predominantly unpaired, even though it replicates. Such free template is optimized for effective selection during its replication. Pool nucleotides are also subject to a broadly based selection that impels the population toward replication, effective selection, and Darwinian behavior. Such a primordial pool may have left detectable modern traces. A sporadically fed ribonucleotide pool also fits a recognizable early Earth environment, has recognizable modern descendants, and suits the early shape of the phylogenetic tree of Earthly life. Finally, analysis points to particular data now needed to refine the hypothesis. Accordingly, a kinetically explicit chemical hypothesis for a terran IDA can be justified, and informative experiments seem readily accessible. Key Words: Cofactor—RNA—Origin of life—Replication—Initial Darwinian Ancestor (IDA). Astrobiology 12, 870–883. PMID:22946838

  8. Energy intake of rats fed a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Prats, E; Monfar, M; Castellà, J; Iglesias, R; Alemany, M

    1989-02-01

    The proportion of lipid, carbohydrate and protein energy self-selected by male and female rats from a cafeteria diet has been studied for a 48-day period (36-day in female rats). The diet consisted in 12 different items and was offered daily, in excess and under otherwise standard conditions, to rats--caged in groups of three--from weaning to adulthood. Groups of control animals were studied in parallel and compared with the cafeteria groups. Cafeteria diet fed groups of rats ingested more energy and lowered their metabolic efficiency with age. Male rats ate more than females and increased their body weight even after female practically stopped growing. There was a wide variation in the aliments consumed each day by the cafeteria-fed rats. However, the proportion of lipid, protein and carbohydrate the rats ate remained constant. Male rats ingested more lipid than females. Carbohydrate consumption was constant in control and cafeteria fed groups of rats independently of sex. Protein consumption was higher in cafeteria rats than in controls, but the differences were not so important as with liquid. Fiber content of the cafeteria diet was lower than that of the control diet. The cafeteria diet selected by the rats was, thus, hypercaloric and hyperlipidic, with practically the same amount of carbohydrate than the control diet, slightly hyperproteic and, nevertheless, remarkably constant in its composition with respect to time. Cafeteria rats had a higher water intake than controls. All these trends were maintained despite the observed changes in the animals' tastes and their differential consumption of the ailments of the diet.

  9. Doxycycline plasma concentrations in macaws fed a medicate corn diet.

    PubMed

    Prus, S E; Clubb, S L; Flammer, K

    1992-01-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the doxycycline plasma concentrations attained by feeding a medicated corn diet to large psittacine birds. Doxycycline is the preferred drug for the treatment of chlamydiosis in psittacine birds. Healthy macaws were fed a 0.1% doxycycline-medicated corn diet for 45 days, and plasma doxycycline concentrations were determined by microbiological assay on treatment days 3, 15, 30, and 45. Plasma doxycycline concentrations exceeded 1 microgram/ml in 87% of the samples assayed. As blood concentrations of 1 microgram/ml are considered therapeutic, a doxycycline-medicated corn diet may be efficacious in the treatment of chlamydiosis in large psittacine birds.

  10. Identifying differences in feed efficiency among group-fed cattle.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, L O; Fox, D G; Baker, M J; Kirschten, D P

    2006-03-01

    Identification of efficient animals in the postweaning growth phase for use in selection for improved feed efficiency is important to improve the economic and environmental sustainability of the beef cattle industry. Progeny testing using group-fed animals in commercial feedlots is the most common and practical method used to evaluate postweaning growth on large numbers of animals. We developed the Cornell Value Discovery System (CVDS) to dynamically predict growth rate, accumulated weight, days required to reach target body composition, carcass weight, and composition of individual beef cattle fed in group pens. Observed BW, ADG, BW at 28% empty body fat (EBF), breed type, environmental conditions, and dietary ME concentration are used by the CVDS to predict, for each animal in a pen, the feed DM required for maintenance (FFM), the feed DM required for gain, and the total DM required for maintenance and gain (DMR). The CVDS then computes DMR-to-ADG ratio (DMR:ADG), which is a feed conversion measure, and ADG-to-DMR ratio (ADG:DMR), which is a feed efficiency measure, for each animal. This study used the observed F:G ratio of 362 individually fed steers to evaluate CVDS-predicted indicators of feed efficiency and the Kleiber ratio. A subset of 37 data points was used to evaluate residual feed intake (RFI) as an indicator of feed efficiency. The database included 4 published studies, each with detailed individual animal description, environment, diet, and body composition information. The CVDS-predicted DMR:ADG accounted for 84% of the variation in the actual F:G ratio with a mean bias of 1.94% (P = 0.20). The predicted FFM to actual DMI ratio had a high correlation with actual ADG (R2 = 0.76), and indicated a decay-type nonlinear dilution of FFM as ADG increased. The CVDS-predicted ADG:DMR and the Kleiber ratio had a significant (R2 = 0.88) logarithmic relationship. In an analysis of a contemporary group within the database, RFI was highly correlated with the F

  11. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  12. Thin edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) octagons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalejs, J.P. )

    1992-03-01

    Mobil Solar Energy Corp. investigated manufacturing crystalline silicon wafers using the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) technique. This report identifies the following: (1) current capabilities for manufacturing 200-micron-thick crystalline silicon wafers (10 cm {times} 10 cm) produced by growing octagons using the EFG technique and laser cutting them into wafers; (2) potential manufacturing improvements from decreasing the thickness of the wafers, improving the quality of the laser cut edge, and increasing cutting speed, all of which lead to reduce manufacturing costs, improved performance, and increased production capacities; (3) problems that impede achieving these potentials; and (4) costs and other requirements involved in overcoming the problems.

  13. Brain lesions in mallard ducklings from parents fed methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Locke, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Methylmercury dicyandiamide was fed to mallard ducks at 3 ppm mercury. Mercury accumulated in the eggs to an average of 7.18 and 5.46 ppm on a wet-weight basis in 2 successive years. Mercury in the eggs is believed to have caused brain lesions in the hatched ducklings. Lesions included demyelination, neuron shrink-age, necrosis, and hemorrhage in the meninges overlying the cerebellum. Brains of dead ducklings contained an average of 6.17 and 5.19 ppm mercury on a wet-weight basis in 2 successive years.

  14. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  15. Active CPW-fed slot antennas for power combining applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kormanyos, Brian K.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1992-01-01

    We have combined integrated circuit antenna technology with microwave oscillator design to build an active slot-oscillator. The design is planar, does not require via holes and is compatible with monolithic transistor technology. The CPW-fed antenna impedance is calculated using a full-wave analysis technique. Slot-oscillators were built at 7, 13, and 22 GHz, and the predicted oscillation frequencies agree well with experiments. The design is easily scaled to millimeter-wave frequencies and can be extended to power combining arrays.

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance in Enterococci Isolated from Turkey Flocks Fed Virginiamycin

    PubMed Central

    Welton, L. A.; Thal, L. A.; Perri, M. B.; Donabedian, S.; McMahon, J.; Chow, J. W.; Zervos, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    From 125 separate cloacal cultures from three turkey flocks fed virginiamycin, 104 Enterococcus faecium and 186 Enterococcus faecalis isolates were obtained. As the turkeys aged, there was a higher percentage of quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolates, with isolates from the oldest flock being 100% resistant. There were no vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated there were 11 PFGE types of E. faecalis and 7 PFGE types of E. faecium that were in more than one group of flock cultures. PMID:9517958

  17. Investigation of a liquid-fed water resistojet plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, D. H.; Carney, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux and flow angle were taken throughout the forward flow region of the exhaust of a liquid-fed water resistojet using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The resistojet operated at a mass flow rate of 0.1 g/s with a power input of 330 Watts. Measured values were compared to theoretical predictions obtained by employing a source flow approximation. Excellent agreement between predicted and measured mass flux values was attained; however, this agreement was highly dependent on knowledge of nozzle flow conditions. Measurements of the temperature at which the exhaust condensed on the QCM were obtained as a function of incident mass flux.

  18. Estimation of optimal feeding strategies for fed-batch bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2005-07-01

    A generic methodology for feeding strategy optimization is presented. This approach uses a genetic algorithm to search for optimal feeding profiles represented by means of artificial neural networks (ANN). Exemplified on a fed-batch hybridoma cell cultivation, the approach has proven to be able to cope with complex optimization tasks handling intricate constraints and objective functions. Furthermore, the performance of the method is compared with other previously reported standard techniques like: (1) optimal control theory, (2) first order conjugate gradient, (3) dynamical programming, (4) extended evolutionary strategies. The methodology presents no restrictions concerning the number or complexity of the state variables and therefore constitutes a remarkable alternative for process development and optimization.

  19. Band-notched reconfigurable CPW-fed UWB antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, H. A.; Rahim, M. K. A.; Hamid, M. R.; Murad, N. A.; Samsuri, N. A.; Yusof, M. F. M.; Kamarudin, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    A reconfigurable band-notched CPW-fed UWB antenna using electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure is proposed. Two structures are positioned adjacent to the transmission line of the UWB antenna. The band-notched characteristic can be disabled by switching the state of switch place at the strip line. The EBG structure produces reconfigurable band notched at 4.0 GHz, which covers C-band satellite communication (3.625-4.2 GHz) systems. The proposed antenna is suitable for UWB systems, which requires reconfigurable band reject function.

  20. Dogs acquire food preferences from interacting with recently fed conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Lupfer-Johnson, Gwen; Ross, Julie

    2007-01-10

    Social transmission of food preferences has been documented in many species including humans, rodents, and birds. In the current experiment, 12 pairs of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) were utilized. Within each pair, one dog (the demonstrator) was fed dry dog food flavored with either basil or thyme. The second dog (the observer) interacted with one demonstrator for 10 min before being given an equal amount of both flavored foods. Observers exhibited a significant preference for the flavored diet consumed by their demonstrators, indicating that dogs, like rats, prefer foods smelled on a conspecific's breath.

  1. The effects of phentolamine on fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kangbin; Kumar, Ujendra; Yuen, Violet G; McNeill, John H

    2012-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. MS is associated with obesity, increased blood pressure, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia. This study was designed to investigate the pharmacological profile of phentolamine, a nonselective α adrenergic receptor antagonist, in the prevention of increased blood pressure in fructose-fed rats. Phentolamine prevented the fructose-induced increase in systolic blood pressure without affecting insulin sensitivity and major metabolic parameters. The levels of plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin II, 2 proposed contributors to the development of fructose-induced elevated blood pressure, were examined. Neither noradrenaline nor angiotensin II levels were affected by phentolamine treatment. Since overproduction of nitric oxide has been shown to lead to an elevation in peroxynitrite, the role of oxidative stress, a proposed mechanism of fructose-induced elevated blood pressure and insulin resistance, was examined by measuring plasma levels of total nitrate/nitrite. Plasma nitrate/nitrite was significantly elevated in all fructose-fed animals, regardless of treatment with phentolamine. Another proposed contributor toward fructose-induced MS is an elevation in uric acid levels. In this experiment, plasma levels of uric acid were found to be increased by dietary fructose and were unaffected by phentolamine treatment.

  2. Adequate bone mineralization in breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C C; Chan, G M; Folland, D; Rayburn, C; Jackson, R

    1981-08-01

    To determine if human milk provides sufficient nutrients for adequate bone mineralization in healthy term infants, 76 term Caucasian infants were evaluated at 2 and 16 weeks of age. The infants and their mothers were divided according to the infant's diet into three groups: human milk alone, human milk with supplemental vitamin D, and Similac. At 2 and 16 weeks of age, bone mineral content was measured by photon absorptiometry and blood was drawn for measurement of serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-OH vitamin D. At both 2 and 16 weeks of age, BMC was similar among all three feeding groups. At 16 weeks of age there was no difference in serum total Ca, ionized Ca, P, or alkaline phosphatase values. At 16 weeks of age the serum 25-OH D concentration was lower in the infants fed human milk alone (P less than 0.05), but was within the normal adult range. Maternal BMC and serum 25-OH D values are similar among the three groups. No seasonal effect on BMC was observed. Our data suggest that during the first 16 weeks of life, routine vitamin D supplementation for breast-fed term Caucasian infants may not be necessary.

  3. Hyperphenylalaninaemia and outcome in intravenously fed preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Lucas, A; Baker, B A; Morley, R M

    1993-05-01

    Hyperphenylalaninaemia is likely to have occurred in many infants fed the intravenous amino acid solution Vamin 9. In this study of 336 preterm infants plasma phenylalanine was measured weekly during their hospital stay. Reference data on plasma phenylalanine were prepared for 243 infants who did not receive Vamin. Only 1% of these infants had a peak plasma phenylalanine concentration greater than 150 mumol/l (maximum 202 mumol/l) compared with 23% in 93 infants fed Vamin 9, seven of whom had concentrations > 300 mumol/l (maximum 704 mumol/l). High concentrations only occurred when the total energy to protein energy ratio in the intravenous solutions decreased to less than 8.5:1 and always occurred with a ratio less than 6.5:1, implying that hyperphenylalaninaemia may be minimised with an intravenous energy intake of greater than 34 kcal (142 kJ)/g protein. Nevertheless, follow up at 18 months post-term showed that increased plasma phenylalanine in this instance was not associated with any impairment of the Bayley mental development index (or subscales including fine motor, cognitive, or language development), the psychomotor development index, or the social maturity quotient. Thus, despite theoretical concern, an adverse outcome after hyperphenylalaninaemia induced by intravenous feeding has not been observed.

  4. Hyperphenylalaninaemia and outcome in intravenously fed preterm neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, A; Baker, B A; Morley, R M

    1993-01-01

    Hyperphenylalaninaemia is likely to have occurred in many infants fed the intravenous amino acid solution Vamin 9. In this study of 336 preterm infants plasma phenylalanine was measured weekly during their hospital stay. Reference data on plasma phenylalanine were prepared for 243 infants who did not receive Vamin. Only 1% of these infants had a peak plasma phenylalanine concentration greater than 150 mumol/l (maximum 202 mumol/l) compared with 23% in 93 infants fed Vamin 9, seven of whom had concentrations > 300 mumol/l (maximum 704 mumol/l). High concentrations only occurred when the total energy to protein energy ratio in the intravenous solutions decreased to less than 8.5:1 and always occurred with a ratio less than 6.5:1, implying that hyperphenylalaninaemia may be minimised with an intravenous energy intake of greater than 34 kcal (142 kJ)/g protein. Nevertheless, follow up at 18 months post-term showed that increased plasma phenylalanine in this instance was not associated with any impairment of the Bayley mental development index (or subscales including fine motor, cognitive, or language development), the psychomotor development index, or the social maturity quotient. Thus, despite theoretical concern, an adverse outcome after hyperphenylalaninaemia induced by intravenous feeding has not been observed. PMID:8323359

  5. Fed-batch production of tetanus toxin by Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Fratelli, Fernando; Siquini, Tatiana Joly; de Abreu, Marcelo Estima; Higashi, Hisako Gondo; Converti, Attilio; de Carvalho, João Carlos Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of the initial nitrogen source (NZ Case TT) level and the protocol of glucose addition during the fed-batch production of tetanus toxin by Clostridium tetani. An increase in the initial concentration of NZ Case TT (NZ(0)) accelerated cell growth, increased the consumption of the nitrogen source as well as the final yield of tetanus toxin, which achieved the highest values (50-60 L(f)/mL) for NZ(0) > or = 50 g/L. The addition of glucose at fixed times (16, 56, and 88 h) ensured a toxin yield ( approximately 60 L(f)/mL) about 33% higher than those of fed-batch runs with addition at fixed concentration ( approximately 45 L(f)/mL) and about 300% higher than those obtained in reference batch runs nowadays used at industrial scale. The results of this work promise to substantially improve the present production of tetanus toxin and may be adopted for human vaccine production after detoxification and purification.

  6. LFCM (liquid-fed ceramic melter) processing characteristics of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Goles, R.W.; Sevigny, G.J.; Andersen, C.M.

    1990-06-01

    An experimental-scale liquid-fed ceramic melter was used in a series of tests to evaluate the processing characteristics of mercury in simulated defense waste under various melter operating conditions. This solidification technology had no detectable capacity for incorporating mercury into its borosilicate, vitreous, product, and essentially all the mercury fed to the melter was lost to the off-gas system as gaseous effluent. An ejector venturi scrubber condensed and collected 97% of the mercury evolved from the melter. Chemically the condensed mercury effluent was composed entirely of chlorides, and except in a low-temperature test, mercury chlorides (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) was the primary chloride formed. As a result, combined mercury accounted for most of the insoluble mass collected by the process quench scrubber. Although macroscopic quantities of elemental mercury were never observed in process secondary waste streams, finely divided and dispersed mercury that blackened all condensed Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} residues was capable of saturating the quenched process exhaust with mercury vapor. However, the vapor pressure of mercury in the quenched melter exhaust was easily and predictably controlled with an off-gas stream chiller. 5 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. The Early Stages of Groundwater-fed River Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, R.; Seybold, H. F.; Gibbins, G.; Rothman, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work shows, both theoretically and empirically, that river networks fed by subsurface flow bifurcate on average at an angle of 2π/5 [1]. However, the network's existence within a complex natural framework obscures the emergence of this pattern. Fortunately, this ambiguity betrays the presence of processes that have had some effect on the channels during the network's long history. In particular, we concern ourselves with the signature of the third dimension - the topographic relief - on the early stages of channel bifurcation. While, on average, channels grow in a direction dictated by the shape of the groundwater table, we hypothesize that the valley relief plays a crucial role in determining the opening angle and its relaxation to 2π/5 in this regime. A network-wide averaging of several thousand channel bifurcations driven by subsurface flow on the Florida Panhandle reveals that rivers on average branch initially at an angle wider than 2π/5, yet quickly relax to 2π/5 after a few meters. We hypothesize that this initial wide growth direction is governed by the shape of the topography. As these channels form independent valleys, the Laplacian field prevails, yielding an emergent 2π/5 branching angle. Our results therefore suggest that the path-selection of incipient channels fed by subsurface flow is coupled both to the local topography and the surrounding groundwater field. 1. Devauchelle, Olivier, et al. "Ramification of stream networks." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109.51 (2012): 20832-20836.

  8. Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rockets for space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Leyse, C.F. , Idaho Falls, ID ); Madsen, W.W.; Ramsthaler, J.H.; Schnitzler, B.G. )

    1989-08-01

    The National Space Policy includes a long range goal of expanding human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system. This has renewed interest in the potential application of Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) to space flight, particularly for human expeditions to the Moon and Mars. Recent NASA studies consider applications of the previously developed NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) technology and the more advanced gas core reactors and show their potential advantages in reducing the initial mass in Earth orbit (IMEO) compared to advanced chemical rocket engines. Application of NERVA technology will require reestablishing the prior technological base or extending it to an advanced NERVA type engine, while the gas core NTR will require an extensive high risk research and development program. A technology intermediate between NERVA and the gas core NTR is a low pressure engine based on solid fuel, a Pressure Fed NTR (PFNTR). In addition to the simplicity of the gas pressurized engine cycle, the PFNTR takes advantage of the dissociation of hydrogen-the increases in specific impulse become significant as the chamber pressure decreases below 1.0 MPa (10 atmospheres) and the chamber temperature increases above 3000 K. The developmental status of technology applicable to a Pressure Fed Nuclear Thermal Rocket (PFNTR) lies between that of the NERVA engine and the gas core NTR (GCNTR). This document investigates PFNTR performance and provides typical mission analyses.

  9. Reproduction in eastern screech-owls fed selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Raptors are occasionally exposed to excessive selenium from contaminated prey, but the effects of this exposure on reproduction are unknown. Therefore, we fed captive eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) diets containing 0, 4.4, or 13.2 ppm (wet wt) added selenium in the form of seleno-DL-methionine. Adult mass at sacrifice and reproductive success of birds receiving 13.2 ppm selenium were depressed (P < 0.05) relative to controls. Parents given 4.4 ppm selenium produced no malformed nestlings, but femur lengths of young were shorter (P = 0.015) than those of controls. Liver biochemistries indicative of oxidative stress were affected (P < 0.05) in 5-day-old nestlings from parents fed 4.4 ppm selenium and included a 19% increase in glutathione peroxidase activity, a 43% increase in the ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH), and a 17% increase in lipid peroxidation. Based on reproductive effects relative to dietary exposure, sensitivity of eastern screech-owls to selenium was similar to that of black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) but less than that of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

  10. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-02

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Methodological developments in the use of visible reflectance spectroscopy for discriminating pasture-fed from concentrate-fed lamb carcasses.

    PubMed

    Dian, P H M; Andueza, D; Barbosa, C M P; Amoureux, S; Jestin, M; Carvalho, P C F; Prado, I N; Prache, S

    2007-09-01

    The ability to authenticate the feed given to animals from the animal products has become a major challenge for scientists, monitoring bodies and commercial entities alike. This study compared two methods based on the use of the visible reflectance spectrum of the fat to discriminate pasture-fed (P) from stall concentrate-fed (S) lamb carcasses. A total of 307 (143 P and 164 S) Limousine lambs were used over 2 years. Pasture-fed lambs grazed a permanent pasture that was maintained at a leafy, green vegetative stage, and offered ad libitum; they received no supplementation at pasture. Body weight of P lambs when turning out to pasture and at slaughter averaged 9.2 (standard deviation (s.d.) 2.21) kg and 33.2 (s.d. 2.89) kg, respectively. S lambs were fed indoors on an ad libitum diet of commercial concentrate and hay until slaughter at a mean body weight of 33.7 (s.d. 3.62) kg. The reflectance spectrum of perirenal and subcutaneous caudal fat was measured at slaughter and at 24 h post mortem. Plasma carotenoid concentration was measured at slaughter. In method 1, the fat reflectance spectrum data were used at wavelengths between 450 and 510 nm to calculate an index quantifying light absorption by carotenoid pigments. In method 2, a multivariate analysis was performed over the full set of fat reflectance data at wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm. Method 2 yielded a higher proportion of correctly classified lambs compared with method 1 (P < 0.05 to 0.001), except for measurements made at 24 h post mortem on perirenal fat for S lambs. The proportion of lambs correctly classified using method 2 was 87.4% and 92.9% for measurements made on perirenal and caudal fat at slaughter, and 93.9% and 91.0% for measurements made on perirenal and caudal fat 24 h post mortem. Plasma carotenoid concentrations were higher in P lambs than in S lambs (P < 0.001), which led to correct classification of 90.7% of the lambs.

  12. Lead and iron status of breast and formula-fed infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, A.H.; Kasler, J.S.; Shrock, R.O.; Signs, S.A.

    1981-06-01

    We examined the iron and lead status of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from birth through the first year of life. Not only has the adequacy of iron intake of breast and formula-fed infants been questioned but also the contamination of breast milk with environmental pollutants such as Pb. In addition, it is believed that a state of Fe deficiency may promote the absorption of Pb. We compared the blood Pb and Fe levels of 23 breast-fed and 23 formula-fed infants whose mothers were enrolled in a longitudinal study determining the effects of maternal nutritional and environmental factors on the infants' subsequent growth and development. Serum iron, TIBC and %SAT values were obtained at 6 and 12 mo. Additional biochemical values including Pb and erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations were obtained at birth and 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 mo. Iron status was similar at 6 mo for the breast-fed and formula-fed infants, but somewhat higher for the breast-fed infants at 12 mo (NS). Results indicate no differences in Pb or EP status between breast-fed and formula-fed infants. Biochemical values were within normal limits. We conclude that dietary intake of Pb and Fe by infants whether breast-feeding or formula-feeding reflects adequate Fe status and apparent safe Pb state.

  13. Grape marc reduces methane emissions when fed to dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Moate, P J; Williams, S R O; Torok, V A; Hannah, M C; Ribaux, B E; Tavendale, M H; Eckard, R J; Jacobs, J L; Auldist, M J; Wales, W J

    2014-01-01

    Grape marc (the skins, seeds, stalk, and stems remaining after grapes have been pressed to make wine) is currently a by-product used as a feed supplement by the dairy and beef industries. Grape marc contains condensed tannins and has high concentrations of crude fat; both these substances can reduce enteric methane (CH4) production when fed to ruminants. This experiment examined the effects of dietary supplementation with either dried, pelleted grape marc or ensiled grape marc on yield and composition of milk, enteric CH4 emissions, and ruminal microbiota in dairy cows. Thirty-two Holstein dairy cows in late lactation were offered 1 of 3 diets: a control (CON) diet; a diet containing dried, pelleted grape marc (DGM); and a diet containing ensiled grape marc (EGM). The diet offered to cows in the CON group contained 14.0kg of alfalfa hay dry matter (DM)/d and 4.3kg of concentrate mix DM/d. Diets offered to cows in the DGM and EGM groups contained 9.0kg of alfalfa hay DM/d, 4.3kg of concentrate mix DM/d, and 5.0kg of dried or ensiled grape marc DM/d, respectively. These diets were offered individually to cows for 18d. Individual cow feed intake and milk yield were measured daily and milk composition measured on 4d/wk. Individual cow CH4 emissions were measured by the SF6 tracer technique on 2d at the end of the experiment. Ruminal bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protozoan communities were quantified on the last day of the experiment. Cows offered the CON, DGM, and EGM diets, ate 95, 98, and 96%, respectively, of the DM offered. The mean milk yield of cows fed the EGM diet was 12.8kg/cow per day and was less than that of cows fed either the CON diet (14.6kg/cow per day) or the DGM diet (15.4kg/cow per day). Feeding DGM and EGM diets was associated with decreased milk fat yields, lower concentrations of saturated fatty acids, and enhanced concentrations of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular cis-9,trans-11 linoleic acid. The mean CH4 emissions were

  14. Toxoplasmosis in a free-ranging mink.

    PubMed

    Jones, Yava L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Sikarske, James G; Murphy, Alice; Grosjean, Nicole; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-10-01

    A free-ranging mink (Mustela vison), estimated to be 3 mo old, was found on the campus of Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan; it exhibited clinical signs of left hind limb lameness, ataxia, head tremors, and bilateral blindness. Histologically, the animal had a mild, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis and severe chorioretinitis with intralesional bradyzoites and tachyzoites. Protozoal organisms were identified as Toxoplasma gondii based on histology, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a free-ranging mink.

  15. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in wildlife populations within a watershed landscape in southeastern New York State.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Peter E; Wade, Susan E; Schaaf, Stephanie L; Stern, David A; Nadareski, Christopher A; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2007-06-20

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in wildlife in the New York City (NYC) Watershed in southeastern New York State. A total of 6227 fecal samples were collected and evaluated from 5892 mammals (38 species), 263 birds (14 species), 2 reptiles (2 species), 8 amphibians (4 species), and 62 fish (15 species). Cryptosporidium was detected in 30 species. Of the species found positive for Cryptosporidium, 16 represented new records for this parasite-Alosa pseudoharengus, Larus delawarensis, Blarina brevicauda, Sorex cinereus, Parascalops breweri, Myotis lucifugus, Peromyscus maniculatus, Microtus pennsylvanicus, Clethrionomys gapperi, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus, Marmota monax, Erethizon dorsatum, Canis latrans, Mustela erminea, Mustela vison, and Lynx rufus. Factors such as age, sex, season, and land use were evaluated to determine if there was any association with infection by this parasite. Animals were more likely to be positive for Cryptosporidium during spring and in agricultural land use.

  16. Deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA of the neonatal oral microbiome: a comparison of breast-fed and formula-fed infants

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehri, S. S.; Sweeney, E. L.; Cowley, D. M.; Liley, H. G.; Ranasinghe, P. D.; Charles, B. G.; Shaw, P. N.; Vagenas, D.; Duley, J. A.; Knox, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In utero and upon delivery, neonates are exposed to a wide array of microorganisms from various sources, including maternal bacteria. Prior studies have proposed that the mode of feeding shapes the gut microbiota and, subsequently the child’s health. However, the effect of the mode of feeding and its influence on the development of the neonatal oral microbiota in early infancy has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to compare the oral microbiota of healthy infants that were exclusively breast-fed or formula-fed using 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. We demonstrated that the oral bacterial communities were dominated by the phylum Firmicutes, in both groups. There was a higher prevalence of the phylum Bacteroidetes in the mouths of formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants (p = 0.01), but in contrast Actinobacteria were more prevalent in breast-fed babies; Proteobacteria was more prevalent in saliva of breast-fed babies than in formula-fed neonates (p = 0.04). We also found evidence suggesting that the oral microbiota composition changed over time, particularly Streptococcus species, which had an increasing trend between 4–8 weeks in both groups. This study findings confirmed that the mode of feeding influences the development of oral microbiota, and this may have implications for long-term human health. PMID:27922070

  17. Growth, behavior, and economics of group-fed dairy calves fed once or twice daily in an organic production system.

    PubMed

    Kienitz, M J; Heins, B J; Chester-Jones, H

    2017-04-01

    Heifer calves (n = 102) were used to evaluate the effect of once- or twice-daily feeding on growth, behavior, and economics of calves in an organic group management system. Calves were assigned to replicate feeding groups of 10 in superhutches by birth order, during 2 seasons from September to December 2013 and March to May 2014 at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center, Morris. Calves in groups were the experimental unit. Breed groups of calves were Holsteins (n = 26), crossbreds (n = 45) including combinations Holsteins, Montbéliarde, and Viking Red (selected for high production), and crossbreds (n = 31) including combinations of Holsteins, Jersey, Normande, and Viking Red (selected for robustness). Treatment groups were once-daily feeding (1×) or twice-daily feeding (2×). Calves in both groups were fed 6 L per calf/daily of organic milk with 13% total solids and then weaned at 60 d when the group consumption averaged 0.91 kg/d of starter per calf. Body weight and hip height were recorded at birth, once a week, at weaning, and at 90 and 120 d of age. Hobo Pendant G loggers (Onset Computer Corp., Bourne, MA) were applied to the right rear leg of calves to measure total lying and standing time. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Independent variables for analyses were the fixed effects of birth weight (co-variable), season of birth, and treatment group, along with replicate as a random effect. No significant differences were found between feeding groups for body weight, weight gain, average daily gain, hip height, or heart girth. For calves in 1× and 2× groups, respectively, weaning group performance was as follows: gain per day was 0.79 and 0.81 kg, weaning weight was 92.7 and 93.3 kg, and weaning hip height was 95.2 and 95.3 cm. Daily gain to 90 d was 0.85 and 0.85 kg, and daily gain to 120 d was 0.85 and 0.83 kg for 1× and 2× calves, respectively. For lying time, calves in groups 1

  18. Reproduction, growth, and tissue residues of deer fed dieldrin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, D.A.; Korschgen, L.J.

    1970-01-01

    Feeding tests were conducted from January, 1966, to January, 1969, to ascertain the effects of daily ingestions of sublethal amounts of dieldrin on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Groups of deer on 0 ppm dieldrin (controls), 5 ppm, and 25 ppm dieldrin were maintained at these respective levels, as were their progeny. Treated food was readily accepted. Dieldrin intoxication was not observed, and 9 of 10 animals of each group survived 3 years of treatment. No differences in conception or in utero mortality were found between groups. Fawns from dieldrin-fed does were smaller at birth and greater post-partum mortality occurred. Fertility of male progeny was not affected. Growth was slower and remained reduced in dieldrin-treated females which were immature when the study began. Hematologic values and serum protein concentrations were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to treatment. Liver/body weight ratios were significantly (P < 0.05) larger for the 25-ppm-dieldrin group. Pituitary glands were smaller and thyroids were larger in dieldrin-fed deer. Weight gains of fawns were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced 2 of 3 years in dieldrin-treated groups. Placental transfer of dieldrin occurred. Whole milk from does fed 25 ppm dieldrin contained residues of 17 ppm. Residue levels in brain, liver, and thigh muscle tissues showed no evidence of increasing with length of treatment, but showed definite relationships to levels of dieldrin in daily diets. Nursing fawns had higher residues in brain tissues than did older deer on 5 ppm a d 25 ppm dieldrin. Highest brain residues (12.60 and 12.10 ppm, wet weight) occurred in fawns only a few days of age at death. Equilibrium between ingestion and storage or excretion of dieldrin occurred prior to 200 days and continued until nearly 1,100 days. There was no evidence of a sharp decline in residues after a long period of continued dosage. Daily ingestion of 100 and 200 ppm of dieldrin proved fatal to yearling male deer at 27

  19. Body condition of dogs fed diets containing soya hulls.

    PubMed

    Sabchuk, Tabyta T; Scheraiber, Mariana; Zanatta, Carolina P; Maiorka, Alex; Félix, Ananda P; Oliveira, Simone G

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem in dogs. Therefore, there is an increasing need of foods for obese dogs with high-fibre content to dilute energies and to reduce energy absorption. Soya hulls are cheap and are widely available as a fibre source. We aimed at evaluating the body condition of dogs fed diets containing 0 % soya hulls (0SH) or 16 % soya hulls (16SH) in replacement of maize. Twelve adult dogs, with 11·3 (se 1·6) kg average body weight (BW), 4·1 (se 0·1) years old and body condition score (BCS) between 4 and 7, were completely randomised assigned (six per treatment) and were fed the 0SH diet according to their maintenance energy requirements or the same amount in grams (g/kg BW(0·75)) of the 16SH diet once daily for 56 d. The animals were evaluated on days 0 and 57 for BW, BCS (1, very thin to 9, obese), subcutaneous fat thickness in the L7 vertebra using ultrasound (L7), canine BMI (CBMI) and body fat (BF). Data were analysed by the Student's t test and Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0·05). The change (final - initial) in BW (-0·58 v. -0·49 kg), BCS (-1 v. -1), L7 (-2 v. 0·35 mm), CBMI (-0·85 v. -0·63 kg/m(2)) and BF (-5·0 v. -5·4 %) of dogs fed the 0SH and 16SH diets, respectively, were not different (P > 0·05). The 16SH diet, with 11·4 % restriction in metabolisable energy, did not change the BCS of adult dogs. Further studies evaluating the supply of soya hulls only to overweight/obese dogs should to be carried out, because these dogs may respond differently than the group evaluated, which had a BCS between 4 and 7 (ideal to overweight).

  20. Staphylococcus epidermidis: A differential trait of the fecal microbiota of breast-fed infants

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Esther; Delgado, Susana; Maldonado, Antonio; Arroyo, Rebeca; Albújar, Mar; García, Natalia; Jariod, Manel; Fernández, Leonides; Gómez, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast milk is an important source of staphylococci and other bacterial groups to the infant gut. The objective of this work was to analyse the bacterial diversity in feces of breast-fed infants and to compare it with that of formula-fed ones. A total of 23 women and their respective infants (16 breast-fed and 7 formula-fed) participated in the study. The 16 women and their infants provided a sample of breast milk and feces, respectively, at days 7, 14, and 35. The samples were plated onto different culture media. Staphylococcal and enterococcal isolates were submitted to genetic profiling and to a characterization scheme, including detection of potential virulence traits and sensitivity to antibiotics. Results The feeding practice had a significant effect on bacterial counts. A total of 1,210 isolates (489 from milk, 531 from breast-fed and 190 from formula-fed infants) were identified. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant species in milk and feces of breast-fed infants while it was less prevalent in those of formula fed-infants. Enterococcus faecalis was the second predominant bacterial species among the fecal samples provided by the breast-fed infants but it was also present in all the samples from the formula-fed ones. The biofilm-related icaD gene and the mecA gene were only detected in a low number of the S. epidermidis strains. Several enterococcal isolates were also characterized and none of them contained the cylA or the vanABDEG antibiotic-resistance genes. All were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion The presence of S. epidermidis is a differential trait of the fecal microbiota of breast-fed infants. Globally, the staphyloccal isolates obtained from milk and feces of breast-fed infants contain a low number of virulence determinants and are sensitive to most of the antibiotics tested. PMID:18783615

  1. Performance Analysis of Coaxial Fed Stacked Patch Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Satish K.; Jain, Shobha

    2014-01-01

    A performance analysis of coaxial fed stacked dual patch electromagnetic-coupled microstrip antenna useful for satellite communication working in X/Ku band is presented. A simplified structure of stacked dual patch antenna is proposed with adjustable foam-gap between patches. Few important geometrical parameters were chosen on which the performance of stacked dual patch antenna mainly depends. Dimension of lower square patch, upper square patch and height of foam-gap between two patches are the parameters, which were varied one by one keeping other parameters constant. The performance was observed through the reflection coefficient (dB) and smith chart impedance plot, obtained from the numerical simulator (IE3D) for the dual resonance frequency and bandwidth. Proposed geometry of stacked dual patch antenna was also analyzed with cavity model and artificial neural network modeling technique. Dual resonance frequencies and associated bandwidth were calculated through them and results were cross checked in the laboratory with a few experimental findings.

  2. Vertical-Strip-Fed Broadband Circularly Polarized Dielectric Resonator Antenna.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Amir; Jung, Jin-Woo; Yang, Youngoo; Lee, Kang-Yoon; Hwang, Keum Cheol

    2017-08-18

    A vertical-strip-fed dielectric resonator antenna exhibiting broadband circular polarization characteristics is presented. A broad 3 dB axial ratio bandwidth (ARBW) is achieved by combining multiple orthogonal modes due to the use of a special-shaped dielectric resonator. The proposed antenna is fabricated to evaluate its actual performance capabilities. The antenna exhibits a measured 3 dB ARBW of 44.2% (3.35-5.25 GHz), lying within a -10 dB reflection bandwidth of 82.7% (2.44-5.88 GHz). The measured peak gain within 3 dB ARBW is found to be 5.66 dBic at 4.8 GHz. The measured results are in good agreement with the simulated results.

  3. Body condition effects in American kestrels fed selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, J T; Santolo, G M

    2000-10-01

    Body composition was measured in male American kestrels (Falco sparverius) beginning after a 77-day exposure to 0, 6, or 12 ppm (dry wt.) selenium as seleno-L-methionine in their diet. Total body mass, lean body mass, and body fat were compared among groups to identify potential wasting effects of selenium, as had been reported for wild waterfowl from a selenium-contaminated site. On the last day of selenium treatment, selenium concentrations in the blood of kestrels was significantly negatively correlated with lean mass. Kestrels that had been exposed to 12 ppm selenium in the diet exhibited relatively higher lean mass (relative to total body mass) and lower normalized body fat than kestrels fed 0 or 6 ppm dietary selenium. These differences persisted throughout the 6 mo study period. The effect observed on body condition of kestrels at environmentally relevant exposure levels has implications for wild birds with respect to both overwinter survival and reproductive success.

  4. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  5. Pump Fed Propulsion for Mars Ascent and Other Challenging Maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    2007-05-09

    Returning Mars geology samples to Earth within science mission budgets requires a miniature launch vehicle (100-200 kg) for ascending from Mars to an orbital rendezvous. A Mars Ascent Vehicle must deliver a velocity change exceeding 4 km/s within minutes, entirely outside the capabilities of satellite propulsion. A possible solution is to scale down liquid launch vehicle principles to achieve stage propellant mass fractions near 90 percent. Feeding a high-pressure engine from thin-walled low pressure tanks permits stage hardware to be sufficiently lightweight and compact, if very high performance pumps can be made available. NASA's Mars Technology Program has funded refinement and testing of a miniature piston pump, powered by reacted propellant. A pump-fed bipropellant rocket stage remains to be developed. The technology could also benefit other future lunar and planetary science programs.

  6. A Cassegrain Offset-Fed Dual-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Han, Chulmin; Chang, Kai

    2006-01-01

    An X/Ka dual-band microstrip reflectarray with circular polarization (CP) has been constructed using thin membranes and Cassegrain offset-fed configuration. It is believed that this is the first Cassegrain reflectarray ever been developed. This antenna has a 75-cm-diameter aperture and uses metallic subreflector and angular-rotated annular ring elements. It achieved a measured -3dB-gain bandwidth of 700 MHz at X-band and 1.5 GHz at Ka-band, as well as a CP bandwidth (3dB axial ratio) of more than 700 MHz at X-band and more than 2 GHz at Ka-band. The measured peak efficiencies are 49.8% at X-band and 48.2% at Ka-band.

  7. Performance of the WIYN fiber-fed MOS system: Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; Armandroff, Taft

    1995-06-01

    The KPNO fiber-fed, multi-object spectroscopic instrument, Hydra, has been moved from the Mayall to the WIYN telescope. Modifications to the instrument allow the fibers to align with the telescope exit pupil while lying along the curved focal surface. We also upgraded the manner in which the fibers are held in place around the focal plane in order to reduce neighboring fiber interactions beyond the pivot circle. In addition, the wavelength calibration assembly was modified to take advantage of extra room within the instrument. We developed guiding algorithms which utilize the field orientation probes (7-fiber coherent bundles). The bench spectrograph associated with Hydra was also moved over to the WIYN. Commissioning is currently underway at the time of this paper and is expected to be complete by mid-summer of 1995. We give a general description of the instrument, discuss initial efficiency and scattered light measurements, and comment on the performance of the guider.

  8. Components for Quasi-Optically-Fed Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Petelin, M.; Kuzikov, S.; Hirshfield, J.; Danilov, Yu. Yu.; Pavelyev, V.; Schegolkov, D.; Yunakovsky, A.

    2006-01-03

    If a high-gradient multi-TeV electron-positron collider is decided to be driven with millimeter waves, the high-intensity flow might be efficiently controlled by oversized, high-selectivity, quasi-optical components. Two examples are discussed in the paper. The first is an accelerating structure composed of coaxial radially-corrugated disks, where each cell is fed individually through a sufficiently broad coupler; this structure seems attractive for maximizing the accelerating gradient while avoiding RF breakdown and surface fatigue from pulsed RF heating of metallic surfaces. The second example is a delay-line-distribution, pulse-compression and wave-flow-focusing feeder to the structure that could include control and protection components based on use of corrugated mirrors.

  9. Temperature control system for liquid-fed ceramic melters

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    A temperature-feedback system has been developed for controlling electrical power to liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCM). Software, written for a microcomputer-based data acquisition and process monitoring system, compares glass temperatures with a temperature setpoint and adjusts the electrical power accordingly. Included in the control algorithm are steps to reject failed thermocouples, spatially average the glass temperatures, smooth the averaged temperatures over time using a digital filter, and detect foaming in the glass. The temperature control system has proved effective during all phases of melter operation including startup, steady operation, loss of feed, and shutdown. This system replaces current, power, and resistance feedback control systems used previously in controlling the LFCM process.

  10. Intermittently-fed high-pressure gasifier process

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.M.; Zadoks, A.L.

    1993-11-30

    An improved gasifier is described which is adapted for gasifying a predetermined charge of non-gaseous fuel into fuel gas. Each charge of non-gaseous fuel, which may have optional conditioning materials added to it, is intermittently fed to a gasifier chamber where each charge is partially burned with high-pressure air supplied thereto. High-pressure and temperature fuel gas is produced which is cleansed prior to passing out of the gasifier chamber. After gasification of the charge of fuel is ended, the gasifier chamber is vented. The residue of the burned charge in the gasifier chamber is removed, along with the contaminated or reacted conditioning materials, and replaced by a fresh charge. The subject invention provides a feasible way of continuously fueling an internal combustion engine with gasified fuel and is compact enough to be practical for even mobile applications. 3 figures.

  11. Online automatic tuning and control for fed-batch cultivation

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Gerrit; van der Pol, Leo A.; van Boxtel, Anton J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Performance of controllers applied in biotechnological production is often below expectation. Online automatic tuning has the capability to improve control performance by adjusting control parameters. This work presents automatic tuning approaches for model reference specific growth rate control during fed-batch cultivation. The approaches are direct methods that use the error between observed specific growth rate and its set point; systematic perturbations of the cultivation are not necessary. Two automatic tuning methods proved to be efficient, in which the adaptation rate is based on a combination of the error, squared error and integral error. These methods are relatively simple and robust against disturbances, parameter uncertainties, and initialization errors. Application of the specific growth rate controller yields a stable system. The controller and automatic tuning methods are qualified by simulations and laboratory experiments with Bordetella pertussis. PMID:18157554

  12. A Cassegrain Offset-Fed Dual-Band Reflectarray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Han, Chulmin; Chang, Kai

    2006-01-01

    An X/Ka dual-band microstrip reflectarray with circular polarization (CP) has been constructed using thin membranes and Cassegrain offset-fed configuration. It is believed that this is the first Cassegrain reflectarray ever been developed. This antenna has a 75-cm-diameter aperture and uses metallic subreflector and angular-rotated annular ring elements. It achieved a measured -3dB-gain bandwidth of 700 MHz at X-band and 1.5 GHz at Ka-band, as well as a CP bandwidth (3dB axial ratio) of more than 700 MHz at X-band and more than 2 GHz at Ka-band. The measured peak efficiencies are 49.8% at X-band and 48.2% at Ka-band.

  13. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper.

  14. Reproductive success of screech owls fed Aroclor 1248

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLane, M.A.R.; Hughes, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Aroclor? 1248 was fed to captive screech owls (Otus asio) at the rate of three ppm in the diet to determine if reproductive effects such as fewer eggs per clutch, lower hatchability, malformation of the chicks, or higher mortality rates of chicks would appear in this raptorial species as they did in chickens. There were no effects on eggshell thickness, number of eggs laid, young hatched, and young fledged from feeding a low level of Aroclor? 1248 to captive screech owls. The polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues found in the eggs of the dosed birds ranged from 3.9 ppm to 17.8 ppm. Background PCB residues in the diet of all experimental birds ranged from non-detected to 0.62 ppm.

  15. Type C botulism in cattle being fed ensiled poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Neill, S D; McLoughlin, M F; McIlroy, S G

    1989-05-27

    A botulinum toxin from ensiled poultry litter which caused a major outbreak of bovine botulism was characterised as type C1. The litter produced transient ataxia when fed to two experimental calves and the clinical signs were accompanied by a transient appearance of serum toxin. Type C1 toxin was demonstrated in muscle tissues which had been taken during the outbreak from an affected animal with high circulating serum toxin, and held frozen for seven months. Clostridium botulinum type C organisms were demonstrated in faeces from another affected animal and also in kidney tissue from a third animal. These observations have implications for the diagnosis and management of future outbreaks of botulism and for the potential health risk from the meat of affected animals.

  16. Intermittently-fed high-pressure gasifier process

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, John M.; Zadoks, Abraham L.

    1993-11-30

    An improved gasifier adapted for gasifying a predetermined charge of non-gaseous fuel into fuel gas. Each charge of non-gaseous fuel, which may have optional conditioning materials added to it, is intermittently fed to a gasifier chamber where each charge is partially burned with high-pressure air supplied thereto. High-pressure and temperature fuel gas is produced which is cleansed prior to passing out of the gasifier chamber. After gasification of the charge of fuel is is ended, the gasifier chamber is vented. The residue of the burned charge in the gasifier chamber is removed, along with the contaminated or reacted conditioning materials, and replaced by a fresh charge. The subject invention provides a feasible way of continuously fueling an internal combustion engine with gasified fuel and is compact enough to be practical for even mobile applications.

  17. Vitamin E protects against impairment of endothelium-mediated relaxations in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Lee, A L; Forster, L A; Nourooz-Zadeh, J; Ferns, G A; Anggård, E E

    1994-03-01

    The vascular effects of dietary vitamin E were investigated in isolated carotid artery preparations from cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits. Rabbits were fed either a control, 1% cholesterol, or 1% cholesterol plus 0.2% vitamin E diet for 4 weeks. In raised-tone preparations, relaxant responses to acetylcholine were enhanced in rabbits fed cholesterol plus vitamin E, reversing the reduction in responses measured in preparations from cholesterol-fed rabbits. Relaxant responses to the calcium ionophore A23187 were significantly enhanced in cholesterol plus vitamin E-fed rabbits compared with those fed cholesterol alone, with no difference between control and cholesterol-fed rabbits. Relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were not different between the three dietary groups. Constrictor responses to noradrenaline and serotonin in isolated carotid artery preparations at basal tone were unaltered after cholesterol and cholesterol plus vitamin E diets. The copper-induced oxidation of beta-very-low-density lipoproteins (beta VLDL) isolated from plasma of rabbits fed a cholesterol plus vitamin E diet was almost completely inhibited compared with the oxidation of beta VLDL from rabbits fed cholesterol alone. These results show that vitamin E prevents endothelial dysfunction associated with cholesterol feeding and suggests that vitamin E may be beneficial in preventing functional impairment associated with atherosclerosis.

  18. Growth, food consumption, and energy status of juvenile pallid sturgeon fed natural or artificial diets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Hilary A.; Chipps, Steven R.; Graeb, Brian D. S.; Klumb, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stocking of hatchery-raised fish is an important part of the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus recovery program. In the wild, juvenile pallid sturgeon consume primarily aquatic insects, although little is known about specific dietary needs. In hatchery settings, pallid sturgeon are fed commercial diets that are formulated for salmonids. To compare food consumption, growth, and energy status of pallid sturgeon fed artificial or natural diets, we conducted a laboratory study using 24 juvenile pallid sturgeon (initial fork length 153–236 mm). Pallid sturgeon were fed a daily ration of either commercial pellets (1 mm, slow sinking; 45% protein, 19% fat) or chironomid larvae for 5 wk. Natural-fed pallid sturgeon exhibited a greater specific growth rate (2.12% d−1) than pellet-fed fish (0.06% d−1). Similarly, relative condition was greater for natural-fed sturgeon (Kn = 1.11) than that observed for pellet-fed fish (Kn = 0.87). In contrast, the hepatosomatic index was significantly higher in pellet-fed fish (2.5%), indicating a high lipid diet compared with natural-fed sturgeon (1.4%). Given the importance of natural diets to fish digestion and growth, it is suggested that a more holistic approach be applied in the development of a practical diet for pallid sturgeon that incorporates attributes of natural prey.

  19. Decreased cysteine and proline synthesis in parenterally fed, premature infants.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Jahoor, F; Jaksic, T

    1995-07-01

    Little is known about the amino acid (AA) biosynthetic capacity and requirements of premature infants. This study assessed the synthesis of seven biochemically nonessential AA from a universal precursor, glucose, in stable, parenterally fed, premature neonates. Seven infants (six boys, one girl) were studied at a mean age of 6.3 +/- 0.6 (SEM) days; mean gestational age was 29.7 +/- 1.3 (SEM) weeks, and mean birth weight was 1,222.8 +/- 176.5 (SEM) grams. All infants were parenterally fed a mixture of 7.5% to 12.5% dextrose and 2.2% Trophamine, with or without lipid. Mean caloric intake was 93 +/- 8.4 (SEM) kcal/kg/d, and total AA intake was standardized at 2.86 g/kg/d AA, plus supplemental cysteine (30 mg/g AA/d). Each infant received a 4-hour continuous, unprimed intravenous infusion of a stable isotope tracer of D(-)[U13C] glucose (200 mg/kg). Blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the infusion. Conversion of the glucose tracer into seven biochemically nonessential AA (cysteine [Cys], proline [Pro], aspartate [Asp], serine [Ser], glutamate [Glu], alanine [Ala], and glycine [Gly]) was assessed by measuring their isotopic enrichment in plasma, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and expressed as mole percent excess (MPE) (mean +/- SEM). The isotopic enrichment of plasma glucose was also measured using GC/MS. Free plasma AA concentrations (mean +/- SD) were measured using an automated amino acid analyzer. Mean MPE for M + 1, M + 2 and M + 3 Cys, and for M + 1 and M + 3 Pro were not significantly different from 0; M + 2 Pro barely achieved statistical significance (P = .048).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Improved growth of toddlers fed a milk containing synbiotics.

    PubMed

    Firmansyah, Agus; Dwipoerwantoro, Pramita G; Kadim, Muzal; Alatas, Safira; Conus, Nelly; Lestarina, Leilani; Bouisset, Florilene; Steenhout, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum (BL999), Lactobacillus rhamonosus (LPR), prebiotics (inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides), and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) are believed to have health benefits. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial we compared growth and development of toddlers fed milk containing synbiotics (BL999, LPR, and prebiotics) and LCPUFA or a control milk. Three hundred and ninety three healthy, 12 month-old toddlers were fed approximately 400 mL/day for 12 months. Anthropometric measurements were taken at 12, 14, and 16 months. Toddlers' response to measles and hepatitis A vaccine was measured at 16 months, and Bayley scale for motor, cognitive, and behavioral functions made at 24 months. The primary outcome was weight gain between 12 and 16 months. Secondary outcomes were gain in length, head circumference, and body mass index, gastrointestinal tolerance (stool characteristics), stool bacterial counts, safety, anti-vaccine IgG, and neurodevelopment. Weight gain was greater in the synbiotics group (mean±SD, 7.57±4.13 g/day) compared with the control group (6.64±4.08 g/day). The difference of 0.93 g/day (with a 95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 1.75) is significant (p=0.025). The gain in the synbiotics group resulted in a change in z-score weight-for-age closer to WHO Child Growth Standard. There was a significant increase in lactobacilli and enterococci counts between 12 months and 16 months in the synbiotic group. We conclude that in healthy toddlers milk containing synbiotics and LCPUFA provides better growth and promotes favorable gut colonization, as shown by higher Lactobacillus counts.

  1. Ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion in sheep fed hydroxyethylsoyamide.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T C

    1997-08-01

    Hydroxyethylsoyamide (HESA) was reported previously to protect soybean oil from ruminal biohydrogenation and increase plasma unsaturated fatty acids in sheep. Two digestibility trials with sheep and a rumen in vitro trials were conducted in this study to determine the effects of HESA on ruminal VFA and nutrient digestibility. Trial 1 was a 4 x 4 Latin square with 17-d periods in which four wethers were fed either a control diet (CON) with no added fat, 2.5% soybean oil (SBO), 5% butylsoyamide (BuSA), or 5% HESA. The HESA diet was ground with a mortar and pestle before feeding to disperse fat lumps that formed during diet mixing. Compared with the CON diet, the HESA diet reduced DMI, acetate/ propionate (A/P), and total tract fiber digestibility, but these were not affected by SBO or BuSA. Trial 2 was a 24-h rumen in vitro study showing that total VFA concentration and A/P in cultures were reduced by 10% linoleic acid but not by 10% ethanolamine or 10% HESA. In Trial 3, four wethers were fed the CON and HESA diets in a replicated 2 x 2 Latin square to determine digestibility responses to HESA when grinding was avoided. Fiber digestibilities and A/P were not affected by HESA in Trial 3. The HESA in this study had variable effects on fiber digestibility that may have been related to physical attributes of the diet, including particle size. Substitution of ethanolamine for butylamine during synthesis of the amide increased fatty acid digestibility but reduced dry matter intake.

  2. Intestinal hydrogen and methane of men fed space diet.

    PubMed

    Calloway, D H; Murphy, E L

    1969-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria form two gases, hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4), that could constitute a fire hazard in a closed chamber. So H2 and CH4 pass from the anus but these gases are also transported by the blood to the lungs and removed to the atmosphere. Several factors affect gas formation: 1) amount and kind of fermentable substrate; 2) abundance, types, and location of microflora; and 3) psychic and somatic conditions that affect the gut. We evaluated the first factor by studying men fed different diets and have also recorded influences of uncontrollable factors. One group of 6 men ate Gemini-type diet (S) and another received a bland formula (F), for 42 days. Breath and rectal gases were analyzed during the first and final weeks. Flatus gases varied widely within dietary groups but much more gas was generated with diet S than with F. In the first 12-hour collection, subjects fed S passed 3 to 209 ml (ATAP) of rectal H2 (avg 52) and 24 to 156 ml (avg 69) from the lungs (assuming normal pulmonary ventilation). With F, these values were 0 to 3 ml (avg 1) and 6 to 36 ml (avg 20). Subjects were calmer during the second test. Gas production was lower with S than initially; F values were unchanged. Methane differed idiosyncratically, presumably due to differences in flora. Computed from 12-hour values, maximum potential daily H2 and CH4 are per man: for S, 730 ml and 382 ml; for F, 80 and 222 ml. Volumes would be larger at reduced spacecraft and suit pressures.

  3. Lunar Surface Access Module Pump-Fed Engine Turbopump Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Randall J.

    2007-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new Exploration architecture. Preliminary studies indicate that a 4 engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a likely configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The main Lunar Surface Access Module engines will likely be responsible for mid-course correction burns, lunar orbit insertion burns, a deorbit burn, and the powered descent to the lunar surface. This multi-task engine philosophy imposes a wide throttling requirement on the engines in the range of 10:1. Marshall Space Flight Center has initiated an internal effort to mature the technologies needed for full scale development of such a LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine. In particular, a fuel turbopump is being designed and fabricated at MSFC to address the issues that a small high speed turbopump of this class will face. These issues include adequate throttling performance of the pump and turbine over a very wide operating range. The small scale of the hardware presents issues including performance scaling, and manufacturing issues like that will challenge the traditional methods we have used to fabricate and assemble larger scale turbopumps. The small high speed turbopump being developed at MSFC will operate at speeds greater than 100,000-rpm. These speeds create issues that include structural dynamics and high cycle fatigue as well as rotordynamic stability. The fuel turbopump development at MSFC will address these issues, and plans are in work for component level testing as well as operation in a test bed engine environment. The fuel turbopump design is nearing completion and described herein.

  4. Lunar Surface Access Module Pump-Fed Engine Turbopump Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Randall J.

    2007-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new Exploration architecture. Preliminary studies indicate that a 4 engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a likely configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The main Lunar Surface Access Module engines will likely be responsible for mid-course correction burns, lunar orbit insertion burns, a deorbit burn, and the powered descent to the lunar surface. This multi-task engine philosophy imposes a wide throttling requirement on the engines in the range of 10:1. Marshall Space Flight Center has initiated an internal effort to mature the technologies needed for full scale development of such a LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine. In particular, a fuel turbopump is being designed and fabricated at MSFC to address the issues that a small high speed turbopump of this class will face. These issues include adequate throttling performance of the pump and turbine over a very wide operating range. The small scale of the hardware presents issues including performance scaling, and manufacturing issues like that will challenge the traditional methods we have used to fabricate and assemble larger scale turbopumps. The small high speed turbopump being developed at MSFC will operate at speeds greater than 100,000-rpm. These speeds create issues that include structural dynamics and high cycle fatigue as well as rotordynamic stability. The fuel turbopump development at MSFC will address these issues, and plans are in work for component level testing as well as operation in a test bed engine environment. The fuel turbopump design is nearing completion and described herein.

  5. Alpha-mannosidase activity in goats fed with Sida carpinifolia.

    PubMed

    Bedin, Marisete; Moleta Colodel, Edson; Viapiana, Marli; Matte, Ursula; Driemeier, David; Giugliani, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Human alpha-mannosidosis results from alpha-mannosidase deficiency and progressive accumulation of mannose-rich oligosaccharides in lysosomes. Two days before Saanen goats were fed with Sida carpinifolia, alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes was 128+/-28 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein (first trial) and 104+/-6 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein (second trial). At day 5, after the introduction of S. carpinifolia diet, the alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes was significantly increased, both in the first (288+/-13 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein) and in the second trial (303+/-45 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein), and it returned to normal levels 2 days after the withdrawal of the plant from the diet (114+/-7 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein in first trial, and 108+/-25 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein in the second one). Plasma alpha-mannosidase activity decreased significantly 4 days after animal exposure to the S. carpinifolia diet (769+/-167 nmoles4-MU/h/ml) and returned to normal values 10 days after the withdrawal of the plant from the diet (1289+/-163 nmoles4-MU/h/ml). Thin-layer chromatography showed an abnormal excretion of oligosaccharides in urine as of day 2 after diet exposure, which persisted until one day after the withdrawal of the plant. Animals presented neurological clinical signs beginning at day 37 (in the first trial) and at day 25 (in the second trial) after being fed with the plant. The results obtained herein suggest that oligosaccharides observed in urine are a result of a decrease in alpha-mannosidase activity in plasma. S. carpinifolia seems to have other compounds that act on alpha-mannosidase enzyme in leukocytes in a competitive manner with swainsonine. The increase in alpha-mannosidase enzyme in leukocytes could be attributed to one of these compounds present in S. carpinifolia.

  6. Comparison of growth and exploratory behavior in mice fed an exclusively milk formula diet and mice fed a food-pellet diet post weaning.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Itou, Takuya; Nishimura, Masakazu

    2005-11-26

    An exclusively milk formula diet stunted the growth of mice immediately following weaning. Milk-fed mice displayed a low-frequency profile of exploratory behavior, while pellet-fed mice showed high-frequency exploration. In contrast to exploratory behavior, feeding behavior did not differ significantly between milk- and pellet-fed mice. Despite showing low-frequency exploratory behavior, mice on an exclusively milk formula diet showed no difference in behavioral activities analyzed by an automatic hole-board apparatus compared to pellet-fed mice. These results suggest that the growth stunt caused by an exclusively milk formula diet retards the acquisition of active exploratory behavior without affecting the emotional state of mice.

  7. Variation of terpenes in milk and cultured cream from Norwegian alpine rangeland-fed and in-door fed cows.

    PubMed

    Borge, Grethe Iren A; Sandberg, Ellen; Øyaas, Jorun; Abrahamsen, Roger K

    2016-05-15

    The terpene content of milk and cream made from milk obtained from cows fed indoors, and by early or late grazing, in alpine rangeland farms in Norway, were analysed for three consecutive years. The main terpenes identified and semi-quantified were the monoterpenes β-pinene, α-pinene, α-thujene, camphene, sabinene, δ-3-carene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, camphor, β-citronellene, and the sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. The average total terpene content increased five times during the alpine rangeland feeding period. The terpenes α-thujene, sabinene, γ-terpinene and β-citronellene were only detected in milk and cultured cream from the alpine rangeland feeding period and not in samples from the indoors feeding period. These four terpenes could be used, as indicators, to show that milk and cultured cream originate from the alpine rangeland feeding period. The terpenes did not influence the sensorial quality of the milk or the cultured cream.

  8. Global Transcriptional Dynamics of Diapause Induction in Non-Blood-Fed and Blood-Fed Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Poelchau, Monica F.; Armbruster, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is a vector of increasing public health concern due to its rapid global range expansion and ability to transmit Dengue virus, Chikungunya virus and a wide range of additional arboviruses. Traditional vector control strategies have been largely ineffective against Ae. albopictus and novel approaches are urgently needed. Photoperiodic diapause is a crucial ecological adaptation in a wide range of temperate insects. Therefore, targeting the molecular regulation of photoperiodic diapause or diapause-associated physiological processes could provide the basis of novel approaches to vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the global transcriptional profiles of diapause induction in Ae. albopictus by performing paired-end RNA-Seq of biologically replicated libraries. We sequenced RNA from whole bodies of adult females reared under diapause-inducing and non-diapause-inducing photoperiods either with or without a blood meal. We constructed a comprehensive transcriptome assembly that incorporated previous assemblies and represents over 14,000 annotated dipteran gene models. Mapping of sequence reads to the transcriptome identified differential expression of 2,251 genes in response to diapause-inducing short-day photoperiods. In non-blood-fed females, potential regulatory elements of diapause induction were transcriptionally up-regulated, including two of the canonical circadian clock genes, timeless and cryptochrome 1. In blood-fed females, genes in metabolic pathways related to energy production and offspring provisioning were differentially expressed under diapause-inducing conditions, including the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and lipid metabolism genes. Conclusions/Significance This study is the first to utilize powerful RNA-Seq technologies to elucidate the transcriptional basis of diapause induction in any insect. We identified candidate genes and pathways regulating diapause induction, including a conserved set of

  9. Comparative characterization of bacterial communities in geese fed all-grass or high-grain diets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Yuan, Xiaoya; Gu, Tiantian; Li, Yang; Dai, Wangcheng; Shen, Xiaokun; Song, Yadong; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Chang, Guobin; Chen, Guohong

    2017-01-01

    Gut microbial composition is dependent on diet. Geese are herbivores and can digest crude fibre, but the relationship between composition of the microbiota and a fibre-rich diet in geese is not well understood. Here, caecal and faecal samples were collected simultaneously from all-grass-fed geese and high-grain-fed geese and the hypervariable V3-V4 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were sequenced. The results was identified that high-grass-fed geese possessed significantly higher alpha diversity both in caecum and faeces compared with that in all-grain-fed geese. In addition, the composition of dominant bacterium occurred remarkable shifting due to different diet patterns, Firmicutes were more abundant in all-grass-fed geese, whereas Bacteroidetes were abundant in high-grain-fed geese. Fusobacteria and Deferribacteres were obviously present in high-grain-fed geese and few in all-grass-fed geese. Most importantly, some specific microorgnisms such as Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroidaceae which may associated with cellulose-degrading that were characterized to show distinctly diverse between the two diet patterns. PICRUSt analysis revealed the metabolic pathways such as carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism were overrepresented in all-grass-fed geese. In conclusion, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were identified abundantly when the geese was fed with all-grass feed and high-grain feed, respectively. And Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroidaceae were recognized as main cellulose-degrading bacteria in the geese. The functional profiles of gut microbiota revealed the dominant microbiota communities were involved mainly in the carbohydrate metabolism in all-grass-fed geese.

  10. Infants Fed a Lower Calorie Formula With 2′FL Show Growth and 2′FL Uptake Like Breast-Fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marriage, Barbara J.; Buck, Rachael H.; Goehring, Karen C.; Oliver, Jeffery S.; Williams, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the growth and tolerance of infants fed infant formulas with a caloric density closer to human milk (HM) supplemented with human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and to study uptake of the HMOs. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled, growth and tolerance study was conducted in healthy, singleton infants (birth weight ≥2490 g), who were enrolled by day of life (DOL) 5. Formula-fed infants were randomized to 1 of 3 formulas with a caloric density of 64.3 kcal/dL. Each formula contained galactooligosaccharides, and the 2 experimental formulas contained varying levels (0.2 and 1.0 g/L) of the HMO 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL). The 3 formula groups were compared with an HM-fed reference group. Infants were exclusively fed either formula (n = 189) or HM (n = 65) from enrollment to 119 DOL. 2′FL was measured in the blood and urine collected from a subset of infants at DOL 42 and 119, and in HM collected from breast-feeding mothers at DOL 42. Results: There were no significant differences among any groups for weight, length, or head circumference growth during the 4-month study period. All of the formulas were well tolerated and comparable for average stool consistency, number of stools per day, and percent of feedings associated with spitting up or vomit. 2′FL was present in the plasma and urine of infants fed 2′FL, and there were no significant differences in 2′FL uptake relative to the concentration fed. Conclusions: This is the first report of infants fed 2′FL-fortified formulas with a caloric density similar to HM. Growth and 2′FL uptake were similar to those of HM-fed infants. PMID:26154029

  11. Bone mineral content is not reduced despite low vitamin D status in breast milk-fed infants versus cow's milk based formula-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Park, M J; Namgung, R; Kim, D H; Tsang, R C

    1998-04-01

    The effect of low or borderline vitamin D status on bone mineralization of exclusively breast milk-fed infants has not been studied. The low vitamin D status of Korean breast milk-fed infants may theoretically have adverse effects on bone mineralization. Assuming that bone mineral content (BMC) relates in part to vitamin D status, we hypothesized that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and BMC would be low, and serum osteocalcin concentration high, reflecting active bone turnover, in breast milk- versus formula-fed infants born in the winter. Eighteen breast milk- and 17 formula-fed infants were recruited at ages 2 to 5 months. The BMC of the lumbar1-4 spine region was measured by using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The BMC and serum osteocalcin levels were similar for both groups. The serum 25-OHD level was significantly lower in breast milk- than formula-fed infants; 44% of the breast milk group versus 6% of the formula group had serum 25-OHD levels less than 28 nmol/L (11 ng/ml), the lower limit of normal. The BMC did not correlate with the serum 25-OHD level. Thus BMC and serum osteocalcin levels in 2- to 5-month-old infants were not different by type of feeding, despite low vitamin D status in breast milk-fed infants. We speculate that adequate mineral absorption occurs during this period from a predominantly (vitamin D independent) passive transport mechanism.

  12. Are agrochemicals present in high fructose corn syrup fed to honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Honey bee colonies are commonly fed high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as a nectar substitute. Many agrochemicals are applied to corn during cultivation including systemic neonicotinoids. Whether agrochemicals are present in HFCS fed to bees is unknown. Samples from the major manufacturers and distri...

  13. Similar calcium status is present in infants fed formula with and without prebiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides can increase calcium absorption in adolescents and adults. Whether they affect calcium absorption in infants has not been assessed. Few data are available to compare the calcium status of infants fed modern infant formulas to that of breast fed infants. To evaluate calcium...

  14. Rice expressing lactoferrin and lysozyme has antibiotic-like properties when fed to chicks.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Brooke D; Huang, Ning; Klasing, Kirk C

    2002-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether rice that has been genetically produced to express human lactoferrin (LF) or lysozyme (LZ) protects the intestinal tract similarly to subtherapeutic antibiotics (bacitracin + roxarsone; Antibiotics). Experiment 1 compared 10 corn-soy diets containing 20% of various proportions of LF, LZ or conventional rice (CONV). Chicks fed 5% LF + 10% LZ + 5% CONV had significantly better feed efficiency and thinner lamina propria in the duodenum than those fed 20% CONV. Experiment 2 compared five corn-soy diets containing experimental rice combinations totaling 15% rice. Chicks fed 10% LZ + 5% CONV or 5% LF + 10% LZ had significantly lower feed intake and significantly better feed efficiency than those fed 15% CONV. Chicks fed 10% LZ + 5% CONV, 5% LF + 10% LZ or Antibiotics had significantly greater villous height in the duodenum compared with chicks fed 15% CONV. The lamina propria of the ileum was thinner and contained fewer leukocytes in chicks fed 10% LZ + 5% CONV or Antibiotics compared with those fed 15% CONV. The results from these experiments demonstrate a potential of genetically produced LF and LZ rice to be used as a substitute for antibiotics in broiler diets.

  15. Age- and sex-related effects in German cockroaches fed an allopurinol diet (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Suiter, D R; Koehler, P G; Patterson, R S

    1993-09-01

    The effects of feeding several ages of adult and nymphal German cockroaches a laboratory rat chow diet containing 0.10% allopurinol were investigated. All cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet suffered increased mortality. The range of LT50 values (the time required to kill 50% of an experimental cohort) for four ages of nymphs (1-8, 16-23, 21-28, and 28-35 d old following hatch) continuously fed the allopurinol diet was 1.36 wk (4.72-6.08 wk). Regardless of sex, young adult (1-7 d old following eclosion) cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet died significantly sooner than older adults (28-35 d old following eclosion); males died significantly sooner than females. All females fed the allopurinol diet as nymphs aborted their oothecae. Although an initial ootheca were hatched from cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet as adults, all subsequent oothecae were aborted. Untreated females mated with allopurinol-fed males experienced successful reproduction, but allopurinol-fed females mated with either allopurinol- or control diet-fed males failed to reproduce. Evidence suggests that cockroaches suffer increased mortality and reproductive failure from increased levels of hypoxanthine and xanthine.

  16. Nitrogen dynamics of spring-fed wetland ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada foothills oak woodland

    Treesearch

    Randall D. Jackson; Barbara Allen-Diaz

    2002-01-01

    Spring-fed wetlands are small, highly productive, patchy ecosystems nested within the oak woodland/annual grassland matrix of the Sierra Nevada foothills. In an effort to place these wetlands in a landscape context, we described seasonal variation (1999-2000 growing season) in nitrogen cycling parameters at 6 spring-fed wetland sites of the Sierra Nevada foothill oak...

  17. Postprandial lipoprotein composition in pigs fed diets differing in type and amount of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Luhman, C M; Faidley, T D; Beitz, D C

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effects of diet on postprandial lipoprotein composition, growing pigs were fed diets containing 20 or 40% of energy as soybean oil, tallow or a 50:50 blend of soybean oil and tallow. At the end of wk 6, a blood sample was drawn from pigs fasted for 12 h. Pigs were then fed, and blood samples were drawn 1 and 4 h later. In LDL, concentrations of free and total cholesterol were greater in pigs fed 40% of energy as fat than in pigs fed 20% of energy as fat (P less than 0.02). Pigs fasted for 12 h had lesser concentrations of triacylglycerol and greater concentrations of phospholipid in LDL and HDL than did pigs fasted for 1 and 4 h (P less than 0.05). In HDL, total cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations were greater in pigs fed 40% of energy as fat than in pigs fed 20% of energy as fat (P less than 0.01). A greater concentration of triacylglycerol was found in VLDL of pigs fed 40% of energy as fat than in pigs fed 20% of energy as fat (P less than 0.01). Amount of dietary fat had a greater effect than did type of dietary fat on composition of lipoproteins from postprandial pigs.

  18. How can varieties and rain-fed production environments affect malting quality in spring barley?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rain-fed barley production environments can be highly variable across a region and across years. Almost all malting barley production in Washington State is under rain-fed conditions. The industry has noticed that in some cases malt beta-glucan levels and other malting quality parameters have been u...

  19. Manure ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle fed condensed tannins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of three levels of condensed tannins fed to 27 beef feed yard steers on ammonia and GHG emissions from manure. Condensed tannins were fed at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 percent on a dry matter basis. Manure and urine were collected from two periods over 6 d...

  20. 75 FR 28686 - FedFirst Financial Corporation, Monessen, PA; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision FedFirst Financial Corporation, Monessen, PA; Approval of Conversion... application of FedFirst Financial MHC and First Federal Savings Bank, Monessen, Pennsylvania, to convert to... Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552, and the OTS Northeast Regional Office, Harborside Financial...

  1. Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time

  2. Performance optimization for doubly-fed generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Shibashis

    A variable speed generation (VSG) system converts energy from a variable resource such as wind or water flow into variable rotational mechanical energy of a turbine or a similar device that converts translational kinetic energy into rotational mechanical energy. The mechanical energy is then converted into electrical energy by an electrical generator. Presently available and proposed generators include systems based mainly on dc machines, synchronous and induction machine technology as well as reluctance machines. While extracting more energy from the resource, most proposed VSG systems suffer a cost disadvantage due to the required rating of the power electronic interface. This cost penalty may eventually render the additional energy capture meaningless. Thus, reducing the cost of the power electronic hardware is essential for VSG systems to achieve viable and competitive $/kWh ratios when compared to fossil fuel-based generating systems. A variable speed constant frequency (VSCF) system and controller are proposed that utilize a doubly-fed machine (DFM) as the energy conversion device. The system includes a power converter that provides the current excitation for the control winding of the DFM. Both the magnitude and frequency of the excitation is determined by an adaptive model-based controller which maximizes the power flow from the mechanical turbine to the electrical grid and reduces the generator losses by maintaining the maximum efficiency point throughout the mechanical input power range. The proposed strategy has been experimentally verified in controlled laboratory conditions for a proof-of-concept brushless doubly-fed machine (BDFM) system of 1500 Watts power rating. Issues relating to power converter development and its incorporation in the system have been investigated. The controller and circuit design of a four quadrant, AC/AC power converter is presented and a novel sensorless current controller for the active rectifier stage is presented in detail

  3. Zinc deprivation of methanol fed anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Fermoso, Fernando G.; Collins, Gavin; Bartacek, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of omitting zinc from the influent of mesophilic (30 °C) methanol fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors, and latter zinc supplementation to the influent to counteract the deprivation, was investigated by coupling the UASB reactor performance to the microbial ecology of the bioreactor sludge. Limitation of the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) on methanol due to the absence of zinc from the influent developed after 137 days of operation. At that day, the SMA in medium with a complete trace metal solution except Zn was 3.4 g CH4-COD g VSS−1 day−1, compared to 4.2 g CH4-COD g VSS−1 day−1 in a medium with a complete (including zinc) trace metal solution. The methanol removal capacity during these 137 days was 99% and no volatile fatty acids accumulated. Two UASB reactors, inoculated with the zinc-deprived sludge, were operated to study restoration of the zinc limitation by zinc supplementation to the bioreactor influent. In a first reactor, no changes to the operational conditions were made. This resulted in methanol accumulation in the reactor effluent after 12 days of operation, which subsequently induced acetogenic activity 5 days after the methanol accumulation started. Methanogenesis could not be recovered by the continuous addition of 0.5 μM ZnCl2 to the reactor for 13 days. In the second reactor, 0.5 μM ZnCl2 was added from its start-up. Although the reactor stayed 10 days longer methanogenically than the reactor operated without zinc, methanol accumulation was observed in this reactor (up to 1.1 g COD-MeOH L−1) as well. This study shows that zinc limitation can induce failure of methanol fed UASB reactors due to acidification, which cannot be restored by resuming the continuous supply of the deprived metal. PMID:18283507

  4. Reproductive potential of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) fed cattle, chicken, or horse blood.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Kristina M; Johnson, Gregory D

    2012-05-01

    Reproductive potential was assessed for stable fly cohorts fed cattle, chicken, or horse blood. Flies provided chicken blood oviposited 20% more eggs per day than did those fed cattle or horse blood. However, flies provided cattle or horse blood were fecund 50% longer. When both egg viability and number of eggs produced were considered, lifetime reproductive potential was almost twice as high for flies fed cattle or chicken blood than for flies fed horse blood. Maternal investment, which took egg production and volume into account, was higher in cohorts fed cattle blood (70 mm3) when compared with the other treatments (chicken = 54 mm3, horse = 55 mm3). This is the first report of stable flies producing viable eggs after feeding on bird blood. Results from this study in addition to field observations indicate that stable fly interactions with birds may be limited to relatively low risk scenarios.

  5. Growth and intestinal morphology of pigs from sows fed two zinc sources during gestation and lactation.

    PubMed

    Payne, R L; Bidner, T D; Fakler, T M; Southern, L L

    2006-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the effects of organic (Zn AA complex, ZnAA) and inorganic Zn (ZnSO4) sources on sows and their progeny during gestation and lactation and on the pigs during the nursery period. The dietary treatments were 1) a corn-soybean meal diet with 100 ppm Zn from ZnSO4 (control); 2) diet 1 + 100 ppm additional Zn from ZnSO4; and 3) diet 1 + 100 ppm additional Zn from ZnAA. Dietary additions were on an as-fed basis. Thirty-one primaparous and multiparous sows were allotted to the treatment diet beginning on d 15 of gestation and continuing through lactation. At weaning (d 17 of age), 202 pigs (63, 55, and 84 pigs for treatments 1 to 3, respectively) were allotted to the same dietary treatment as their dam. The pigs were fed a 3-phase diet regimen during the nursery period: d 0 to 7 (phase I); d 7 to 21 (phase II); and d 21 to 28 (phase III). At weaning and at the end of phase III, 1 gilt per replicate was killed, and the left front foot, liver, pancreas, and entire small intestine were removed. Diet had no effect (P > 0.10) on any response during gestation. During lactation, there was an increase (P < 0.10) in litter birth weight in sows fed ZnAA compared with those fed the control or ZnSO4 diets. The sows fed ZnAA nursed more pigs (P < 0.10) than sows fed the ZnSO4 diet, and they weaned more pigs (P < 0.05) than sows fed the control diet. Jejunal villus height of the weaned pigs from sows fed ZnSO4 was increased (P < 0.05) compared with those from the sows fed the control diet. During the nursery period, growth performance was not affected (P > 0.10) by diet. Pigs fed ZnSO4 had greater duodenal villus width (P < 0.05) than those fed ZnAA, and pigs fed ZnSO4 or the control diet had greater ileal villus width (P < 0.05) than those fed ZnAA. Pigs fed ZnSO4 or ZnAA had more (P < 0.05) bone Zn than those fed the control diet. Liver Zn concentration was greatest in pigs fed ZnSO4, followed by those fed ZnAA, and then by those fed the control

  6. Changes in environmental temperature influence leptin responsiveness in low- and high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ruth B S; Mitchell, Tiffany D; Kelso, Emily W; Flatt, W P

    2007-07-01

    Loss of body fat in leptin-treated animals has been attributed to reduced energy intake, increased thermogenesis, and preferential fatty acid oxidation. Leptin does not decrease food intake or body fat in leptin-resistant high-fat (HF)-fed mice, possibly due to a failure of leptin to activate hypothalamic receptors. We measured energy expenditure of male C57BL/6 mice adapted to low-fat (LF) or HF diet and infused them for 13 days with PBS or 10 mug leptin/day from an intraperitoneal mini-osmotic pump to test whether leptin resistance prevented leptin-induced increases in energy expenditure and fatty acid oxidation. There was no effect of low-dose leptin infusions on either of these measures in LF-fed or HF-fed mice, even though LF-fed mice lost body fat. Experiment 2 tested leptin responsiveness in LF-fed and HF-fed mice housed at different temperatures (18 degrees C, 23 degrees C, 27 degrees C), assuming that the cold would increase and the hot environment would inhibit food intake and thermogenesis, which could potentially interfere with leptin action. LF-fed mice housed at 23 degrees C were the only mice that lost body fat during leptin infusion, suggesting that an ability to modify energy expenditure is essential to the maintenance of leptin responsiveness. HF-fed mice in cold or warm environments did not respond to leptin. HF-fed mice in the hot environment were fatter than other HF-fed mice, and, surprisingly, leptin caused a further increase in body fat, demonstrating that the mice were not totally leptin resistant and that partial leptin resistance in a hot environment favors positive energy balance and fat deposition.

  7. Feeding Experimentation Device (FED): A flexible open-source device for measuring feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Katrina P; O'Neal, Timothy J; Bolonduro, Olurotimi A; White, Elecia; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2016-07-15

    Measuring food intake in rodents is a conceptually simple yet labor-intensive and temporally-imprecise task. Most commonly, food is weighed manually, with an interval of hours or days between measurements. Commercial feeding monitors are excellent, but are costly and require specialized caging and equipment. We have developed the Feeding Experimentation Device (FED): a low-cost, open-source, home cage-compatible feeding system. FED utilizes an Arduino microcontroller and open-source software and hardware. FED dispenses a single food pellet into a food well where it is monitored by an infrared beam. When the mouse removes the pellet, FED logs the timestamp to a secure digital (SD) card and dispenses a new pellet into the well. Post-hoc analyses of pellet retrieval timestamps reveal high-resolution details about feeding behavior. FED is capable of accurately measuring food intake, identifying discrete trends during light and dark-cycle feeding. Additionally, we show the utility of FED for measuring increases in feeding resulting from optogenetic stimulation of agouti-related peptide neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. With a cost of ∼$350 per device, FED is >10× cheaper than commercially available feeding systems. FED is also self-contained, battery powered, and designed to be placed in standard colony rack cages, allowing for monitoring of true home cage feeding behavior. Moreover, FED is highly adaptable and can be synchronized with emerging techniques in neuroscience, such as optogenetics, as we demonstrate here. FED allows for accurate, precise monitoring of feeding behavior in a home cage setting. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Investigation of a compact coaxially fed switched oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2013-09-01

    To generate a relative high frequency mesoband microwave, a compact coaxially fed transmission line switched oscillator with high voltage capability is investigated. The characteristic impedance and voltage capability of the low impedance transmission line (LITL) have been analyzed. It is shown that the working voltage of the oscillator can reach up to 200 kV when it is filled by pressurized nitrogen and charged by a nanosecond driving source. By utilizing a commercial electromagnetic simulation code, the transient performance of the switched oscillator with a lumped resistance load is simulated. It is illustrated that the center frequency of the output signal reaches up to ˜0.6 GHz when the spark gap practically closes with a single channel. Besides, the influence of the closing mode and rapidity of the spark gap, the permittivity of the insulator at the output end of the LITL, and the load impedance on the transient performance of the designed oscillator has been analyzed in quantification. Finally, the good transient performance of the switched oscillator has been preliminarily proved by the experiment.

  9. Development of cable fed flash X-ray (FXR) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rakhee; Mitra, S.; Patel, A. S.; Kumar, R.; Singh, G.; Senthil, K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Kolge, T. S.; Roy, Amitava; Acharya, S.; Biswas, D.; Sharma, Archana

    2017-08-01

    Flash X-ray sources driven by pulsed power find applications in industrial radiography, and a portable X-ray source is ideal where the radiography needs to be taken at the test site. A compact and portable flash X-ray (FXR) system based on a Marx generator has been developed with the high voltage fed to the FXR tube via a cable feed-through arrangement. Hard bremsstrahlung X-rays of few tens of nanosecond duration are generated by impinging intense electron beams on an anode target of high Z material. An industrial X-ray source is developed with source size as low as 1 mm. The system can be operated from 150 kV to 450 kV peak voltages and a dose of 10 mR has been measured at 1 m distance from the source window. The modeling of the FXR source has been carried out using particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations for the electron beam dynamics and X-ray generation, respectively. The angular dose profile of X-ray has been measured and compared with the simulation.

  10. Mortality of adult Stomoxys calcitrans fed isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Lysyk, T J; Kalischuk-Tymensen, L D; Selinger, L B

    2012-10-01

    We examined the ability of five isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner to cause mortality in adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Isolates Bacillus thuringiensis tolworthi 4L3 (serotype 9), Bacillus thuringiensis darmstadiensis 4M1 (serotype 10a10b), Bacillus thuringiensis thompsoni 401 (serotype 12), Bacillus thuringiensis thuringiensis HD2 (serotype 1), and Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD945 (serotype 3a3b3c) were administered to adult flies in diets containing blood only, sugar only, and both sugar and blood combined. B. t. tolworthi 4L3 had no effect on adult mortality regardless of the feeding substrate. The remaining isolates tended to cause the greatest mortality when administered in blood alone. B. t. thompsoni 401 was the only isolate that consistently caused adult mortality when fed in blood at concentrations ranging from 0.21 to 50.0 microg of protein per ml of blood. This isolate also caused mortality when applied topically. The time to 50% mortality declined with dose and reached a lower asymptote at approximately equal to 1.3 d at an oral dose of 8.75 microg/ml and at a topical dose of 0.14 microg per fly.

  11. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer.

  12. Review: Drinking water for liquid-fed pigs.

    PubMed

    Meunier-Salaün, M-C; Chiron, J; Etore, F; Fabre, A; Laval, A; Pol, F; Prunier, A; Ramonet, Y; Nielsen, B L

    2016-11-07

    Liquid feeding has the potential to provide pigs with sufficient water to remain hydrated and prevent prolonged thirst. However, lack of permanent access to fresh water prevents animals from drinking when they are thirsty. Moreover, individual differences between pigs in a pen may result in uneven distribution of the water provided by the liquid feed, leading to some pigs being unable to meet their water requirements. In this review, we look at the need for and provision of water for liquid-fed pigs in terms of their production performance, behaviour, health and welfare. We highlight factors which may lead to water ingestion above or below requirements. Increases in the need for water may be caused by numerous factors such as morbidity, ambient temperature or competition within the social group, emphasising the necessity of permanent access to water as also prescribed in EU legislation. The drinkers can be the target of redirected behaviour in response to feed restriction or in the absence of rooting materials, thereby generating water losses. The method of water provision and drinker design is critical to ensure easy access to water regardless of the pig's physiological state, and to limit the amount of water used, which does not benefit the pig.

  13. Feeding behavior of steers fed a complete mixed ration.

    PubMed

    Chase, L E; Wangsness, P J; Baumgardt, B R

    1976-11-01

    Feeding behavior of five Holstein steers fed a complete mixed ration was studied by use of individual, electronically controlled feeding behavior units. Both individual meal and daily behavioral parameters were measured. Number of meals, size of each individual meal, time spent eating, and intervals between meals were measured. Eating rates were then calculated. Diurnal feeding patterns were observed with 60.9% of the meals occurring between 0600 and 1800 h. For individual meals, body weight accounted for less than 30% of the variation in meal size. Average meal size was 414.5 g. Respective means for overall meal duration, actual meal duration, overall eating rate, and actual eating rate were 20.3 min, 13.7 min, 23.1 g/min, and 30.0 g/min. Meal size per body weight (g/kg or g/kg.75) was relatively constant during observation. Both increased eating rate and increased meal length were associated with larger meals. However, eating rate tended to plateau while meal length continued to increase with larger meals. Steers consumed 10.01 meals per day while total daily overall meal duration and actual meal duration were 220.9 and 156.4 min.

  14. Bioavailability of lead in oysters fed to young Japanese quail

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.L.; Spivey Fox, M.R.; Hogye, K.S.

    1981-12-01

    The presence of lead in atmospheric particulates, soil, and seawater reflects the input of both domestic and industrial wastes. Because bivalves can concentrate large quantities of heavy metals, particularly lead, consumption of their meat may be a potential risk. The relative bioavailability of lead physiologicaly incorporated into oyster meat was investigated. Day-old Japanese quail were fed purified diets with three levels of lead added as either lead acetate, freeze-dried lead-dosed oyster, or lead acetate plus freeze-dried control oyster for 2 weeks. Feeding lead from any source had little or no effect on body weight, hemoglobin, hematocrit, or percentage ash in the tibia. The concentration of lead in tibia at each level of dietary lead for each type of diet was different from those for all other levels of dietary lead. Slope-ratio analysis of the data showed that lead intrinsically incorporated into oyster meat was 69-75% as bioavailable as lead in lead acetate at levels between 25 and 100 ppm dietary lead. The combinations of (1) control oyster meat with lead acetate and (2) lead acetate with copper and zinc levels equal to those in oyster meat gave responses similar to those of the lead-dosed oyster groups. Although these data showed lower bioavailability of lead in oyster meat as compared with lead acetate, the intercept of the lines at 25 ppm dietary lead suggests that the relative bioavailability may be reserved at lower levels of lead intake.

  15. Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine system development program, phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G. C.; Spee, R.; Wallace, A. K.

    Since the inception of the Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine (BDFM) System Development Program in 1989, the value of BDFM technology has become apparent. The BDFM provides for adjustable speed, synchronous operation while keeping costs associated with the required power conversion equipment lower than in competing technologies. This provides for an advantage in initial as well as maintenance expenses over conventional drive system. Thus, the BDFM enables energy efficient, adjustable speed process control for applications where established drive technology has not been able to deliver satisfactory returns on investment. At the same time, the BDFM challenges conventional drive technologies in established markets by providing for improved performance at lower cost. BDFM converter rating is kept at a minimum, which significantly improves power quality at the utility interface over competing power conversion equipment. In summary, BDFM technology can be expected to provide significant benefits to utilities as well as their customers. This report discusses technical research and development activities related to Phase 3 of the BDFM System Development Program, including work made possible by supplemental funds for laboratory improvement and prototype construction.

  16. dc power control for a liquid-fed resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.

    1988-01-01

    A simple breadboard power controller was designed and demonstrated for a new liquid-fed water resistojet. The 1-piece laboratory model thruster has an integrated vaporizer/superheater using a single heating element. Heater temperature was maintained at or near a preset reference value with the closed loop controller providing pulse width modulated (PWM) dc power into the thruster heater. A combined thruster, temperature readout, PWM transfer function was experimentally determined. This transfer function was used to design a proportional plus integral controller that demonstrated zero steady state error, conservative stability margins and adequate transient response to step changes in propellant flow rate, input voltage and temperature reference. Initial turn-on temperature overshoot from room temperature to a 650 C setpoint was 80 C. In addition, EMI was alleviated by reducing heater dI/dt and dV/dt using a simple diode-inductor-capacitor network. Based on limited initial tests, thruster preheat with no propellant flow was necessary to achieve stable system operation during startup. Breadboard power efficiency was 99 percent at 1 kW, and component mass was 0.4 kg excluding the power loss and mass of an input filter required for spacecraft integration.

  17. Efficient complementary metamaterial element for waveguide-fed metasurface antennas.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Insang; Imani, Mohammadreza F; Sleasman, Timothy; Smith, David R

    2016-12-12

    We present a metamaterial element designed as an efficient radiator for waveguide-fed metasurface antennas. The metamaterial element is an electrically-small, complimentary electric-LC (cELC) resonator designed to exhibit large radiated power while maintaining low ohmic losses. The shape of the element is tapered to simultaneously achieve broadband operation and suppression of cross polarization radiation. Full-wave numerical studies at the K-band are conducted to examine its performance when etched into a microstrip line. In this configuration, the element shows a radiation efficiency of 90.2% and a fractional bandwidth of 8.7%. To investigate the potential benefits of the proposed element in two-dimensional platforms, the radiative characteristics of the element are calculated when the element is embedded in a dielectric-filled parallel-plate waveguide. This efficient metamaterial element has potential application as a building block for metasurface devices used in imaging, sensing, wireless power transfer, and wireless communication systems.

  18. The dc power control for a liquid-fed resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.

    1988-01-01

    A simple breadboard power controller was designed and demonstrated for a new liquid-fed water resistojet. The 1-piece laboratory model thruster has an integrated vaporizer/superheater using a single heating element. Heater temperature was maintained at or near a preset reference value with the closed loop controller providing pulse width modulated (PWM) dc power into the thruster heater. A combined thruster, temperature readout, PWM transfer function was experimentally determined. This transfer function was used to design a proportional plus integral controller that demonstrated zero steady state error, conservative stability margins and adequate transient response to step changes in propellant flow rate, input voltage and temperature reference. Initial turn-on temperature overshoot from room temperature to a 650 C setpoint was 80 C. In addition, EMI was alleviated by reducing heater dI/dt and dV/dt using a simple diode-inductor-capacitor network. Based on limited initial tests, thruster preheat with no propellant flow was necessary to achieve stable system operation during startup. Breadboard power efficiency was 99 percent at 1 kW, and component mass was 0.4 kg excluding the power loss and mass of an input filter required for spacecraft integration.

  19. Melter viewing system for liquid-fed ceramic melters

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    Melter viewing systems are an integral component of the monitoring and control systems for liquid-fed ceramic melters. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has designed cameras for use with glass melters at PNL, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This report is a compilation of these designs. Operating experiences with one camera designed for the PNL melter are discussed. A camera has been fabricated and tested on the High-Bay Ceramic Melter (HBCM) and the Pilot-Scale Ceramic Melter (PSCM) at PNL. The camera proved to be an effective tool for monitoring the cold cap formed as the feed pool developed on the molten glass surface and for observing the physical condition of the melter. Originally, the camera was built to operate using the visible light spectrum in the melter. It was later modified to operate using the infrared (ir) spectrum. In either configuration, the picture quality decreases as the size of the cold cap increases. Large cold caps cover the molten glass, reducing the amount of visible light and reducing the plenum temperatures below 600/sup 0/C. This temperature corresponds to the lowest level of blackbody radiation to which the video tube is sensitive. The camera has been tested in melter environments for about 1900 h. The camera has withstood mechanical shocks and vibrations. The cooling system in the camera has proved effective in maintaining the optical and electronic components within acceptable temperature ranges. 10 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M. )

    1990-11-01

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine and (1-{sup 14}C)KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO{sub 2} production, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with (1-{sup 14}C)leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis.