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Sample records for mutagenesis increases protein

  1. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts. PMID:27490089

  2. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  3. Protein engineering: single or multiple site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Chung; Vaisvila, Romualdas

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis techniques are invaluable tools in molecular biology to study the structural and functional properties of a protein. To expedite the time required and simplify methods for mutagenesis, we recommend two protocols in this chapter. The first method for single site-directed mutagenesis, which includes point mutations, insertions, or deletions, can be achieved by an inverse PCR strategy with mutagenic primers and the high-fidelity Phusion(®) DNA Polymerase to introduce a site-directed mutation with exceptional efficiency. The second method is for engineering multiple mutations into a gene of interest. This can be completed in one step by PCR with mutagenic primers and by assembling all mutagenized PCR products using the Gibson Assembly™ Master Mix. This method allows multiple nucleotides to be changed simultaneously, which not only saves time but also reagents compared to traditional methods of mutagenesis. PMID:23423897

  4. Topology of transmembrane proteins by scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Casey, Joseph R

    2007-04-01

    Integral membrane proteins of the plasma membrane span from the inside to the outside of the cell. The primary structural element of integral membrane proteins is their topology: the pattern in which the protein traverses the membrane. A full description of topology, defining which parts of the protein face outside versus inside, goes a long way toward understanding the folding of these proteins. Many approaches have been established to define membrane protein topology. Here, we present the technique of scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM). This approach uses the unique chemical reactivity of the cysteine sulfhydryl to probe membrane protein structure. Individual cysteine residues are introduced into the target protein by mutagenesis. The ability to chemically react these residues using sulfhydryl-directed reagents (either membrane permeant or impermeant) defines each site as either extracellular or intracellular, thus establishing topology of a location. This analysis performed on many sites in the protein will define the protein's topology. PMID:17367716

  5. An algorithm for protein engineering: simulations of recursive ensemble mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A P; Youvan, D C

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for protein engineering, termed recursive ensemble mutagenesis, has been developed to produce diverse populations of phenotypically related mutants whose members differ in amino acid sequence. This method uses a feedback mechanism to control successive rounds of combinatorial cassette mutagenesis. Starting from partially randomized "wild-type" DNA sequences, a highly parallel search of sequence space for peptides fitting an experimenter's criteria is performed. Each iteration uses information gained from the previous rounds to search the space more efficiently. Simulations of the technique indicate that, under a variety of conditions, the algorithm can rapidly produce a diverse population of proteins fitting specific criteria. In the experimental analog, genetic selection or screening applied during recursive ensemble mutagenesis should force the evolution of an ensemble of mutants to a targeted cluster of related phenotypes. Images PMID:1502200

  6. RNA mutagenesis yields highly diverse mRNA libraries for in vitro protein evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kopsidas, George; Carman, Rachael K; Stutt, Emma L; Raicevic, Anna; Roberts, Anthony S; Siomos, Mary-Anne V; Dobric, Nada; Pontes-Braz, Luisa; Coia, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Background In protein drug development, in vitro molecular optimization or protein maturation can be used to modify protein properties. One basic approach to protein maturation is the introduction of random DNA mutations into the target gene sequence to produce a library of variants that can be screened for the preferred protein properties. Unfortunately, the capability of this approach has been restricted by deficiencies in the methods currently available for random DNA mutagenesis and library generation. Current DNA based methodologies generally suffer from nucleotide substitution bias that preferentially mutate particular base pairs or show significant bias with respect to transitions or transversions. In this report, we describe a novel RNA-based random mutagenesis strategy that utilizes Qβ replicase to manufacture complex mRNA libraries with a mutational spectrum that is close to the ideal. Results We show that Qβ replicase generates all possible base substitutions with an equivalent preference for mutating A/T or G/C bases and with no significant bias for transitions over transversions. To demonstrate the high diversity that can be sampled from a Qβ replicase-generated mRNA library, the approach was used to evolve the binding affinity of a single domain VNAR shark antibody fragment (12Y-2) against malarial apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) via ribosome display. The binding constant (KD) of 12Y-2 was increased by 22-fold following two consecutive but discrete rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The mutagenesis method was also used to alter the substrate specificity of β-lactamase which does not significantly hydrolyse the antibiotic cefotaxime. Two cycles of RNA mutagenesis and selection on increasing concentrations of cefotaxime resulted in mutants with a minimum 10,000-fold increase in resistance, an outcome achieved faster and with fewer overall mutations than in comparable studies using other mutagenesis strategies. Conclusion The RNA based approach

  7. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  8. Specific mutagenesis of a chlorophyll-binding protein. Progress report.

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton-Rye, Dr., Julian; Shen, Gaozhong

    1990-01-01

    During the first phase of the project regarding specific mutagenesis of the chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in photosystem II (PS II) most of the time has been devoted to (1) establishment of an optimal procedure for the reintroduction of psbB (the gene encoding CP47) carrying a site-directed mutation into the experimental organism, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, (2) preparations for site-directed mutagenesis, and (3) creation and analysis of chimaeric spinach/cyanobacterial CP47 mutants of Synechocystis. In the coming year, psbB constructs with site-directed mutations in potential chlorophyll-binding regions of CP47 will be introduced into the Synechocystis genome, and site-directed mutants will be characterized according to procedures described in the original project description. In addition, analysis of chimaeric CP47 mutants will be continued.

  9. Efficient mutagenesis by Cas9 protein-mediated oligonucleotide insertion and large-scale assessment of single-guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Valen, Eivind; Thyme, Summer B; Huang, Peng; Akhmetova, Laila; Ahkmetova, Laila; Pauli, Andrea; Montague, Tessa G; Zimmerman, Steven; Richter, Constance; Schier, Alexander F

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been implemented in a variety of model organisms to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. A wide range of mutation rates has been reported, but at a limited number of genomic target sites. To uncover the rules that govern effective Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in zebrafish, we targeted over a hundred genomic loci for mutagenesis using a streamlined and cloning-free method. We generated mutations in 85% of target genes with mutation rates varying across several orders of magnitude, and identified sequence composition rules that influence mutagenesis. We increased rates of mutagenesis by implementing several novel approaches. The activities of poor or unsuccessful single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) initiating with a 5' adenine were improved by rescuing 5' end homogeneity of the sgRNA. In some cases, direct injection of Cas9 protein/sgRNA complex further increased mutagenic activity. We also observed that low diversity of mutant alleles led to repeated failure to obtain frame-shift mutations. This limitation was overcome by knock-in of a stop codon cassette that ensured coding frame truncation. Our improved methods and detailed protocols make Cas9-mediated mutagenesis an attractive approach for labs of all sizes. PMID:24873830

  10. Efficient mutagenesis by Cas9 protein-mediated oligonucleotide insertion and large-scale assessment of single-guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Valen, Eivind; Thyme, Summer B; Huang, Peng; Akhmetova, Laila; Ahkmetova, Laila; Pauli, Andrea; Montague, Tessa G; Zimmerman, Steven; Richter, Constance; Schier, Alexander F

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been implemented in a variety of model organisms to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. A wide range of mutation rates has been reported, but at a limited number of genomic target sites. To uncover the rules that govern effective Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in zebrafish, we targeted over a hundred genomic loci for mutagenesis using a streamlined and cloning-free method. We generated mutations in 85% of target genes with mutation rates varying across several orders of magnitude, and identified sequence composition rules that influence mutagenesis. We increased rates of mutagenesis by implementing several novel approaches. The activities of poor or unsuccessful single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) initiating with a 5' adenine were improved by rescuing 5' end homogeneity of the sgRNA. In some cases, direct injection of Cas9 protein/sgRNA complex further increased mutagenic activity. We also observed that low diversity of mutant alleles led to repeated failure to obtain frame-shift mutations. This limitation was overcome by knock-in of a stop codon cassette that ensured coding frame truncation. Our improved methods and detailed protocols make Cas9-mediated mutagenesis an attractive approach for labs of all sizes.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CC chemokine binding protein 35K-Fc reveals residues essential for activity and mutations that increase the potency of CC chemokine blockade.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; McNeill, Eileen; Christou, Ivy; Channon, Keith M; Greaves, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chemokines of the CC class are key mediators of monocyte recruitment and macrophage differentiation and have a well documented role in many inflammatory diseases. Blockade of chemokine activity is therefore an attractive target for anti-inflammatory therapy. 35K (vCCI) is a high-affinity chemokine binding protein expressed by poxviruses, which binds all human and murine CC chemokines, preventing their interaction with chemokine receptors. We developed an Fc-fusion protein of 35K with a modified human IgG1 Fc domain and expressed this construct in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Purified 35K-Fc is capable of inhibiting CC chemokine-induced calcium flux, chemotaxis, and β-arrestin recruitment in primary macrophages and transfected cells. To elucidate the residues involved in chemokine neutralization, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of six key amino acids in 35K and expressed the mutant Fc-fusion proteins in vitro. We screened the mutants for their ability to block chemokine-induced β-arrestin recruitment in transfected cells and to inhibit primary macrophage signaling in an electric cell substrate impedance sensing assay. Using a sterile model of acute inflammation, zymosan-induced peritonitis, we confirmed that wild-type 35K-Fc can reduce monocyte recruitment, whereas one mutant (R89A) showed a more pronounced blockade of monocyte influx and another mutant (E143K) showed total loss of function. We believe that 35K-Fc will be a useful tool for exploring the role of CC chemokines in chronic inflammatory pathologies, and we have identified a higher potency form of the molecule that may have potential therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory disease.

  12. Increase in UV mutagenesis by heat stress on UV-irradiated E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Swati; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    When leu- auxotrophs of Escherichia coli, after UV irradiation, were grown at temperatures between 30 and 47°C, the frequency of UV-induced mutation from leu- to leu+ revertant increased as the UV dose and the temperature increased. For cells exposed to a UV dose of 45 J/m2, the mutation frequency at 47°C was 1.9 times that at 30°C; for a dose of 90 J/m2, it was 3.25 times; and for 135 J/m2, it was 4.8 times. Similar enhancement of reversion frequency was observed when the irradiated cells were grown at 30°C in the presence of a heat shock inducer, ethanol (8% v/v). Heat shock-mediated enhancement of UV mutagenesis did not occur in an E. coli mutant sigma 32 (heat shock regulator protein), but sigma 32 overexpression in the mutant strain (transformed with a sigma 32-bearing plasmid) increased the UV-induced mutation frequency. These results suggest that heat stress alone has no mutagenic property, but when applied to UV-damaged cells, it enhances the UV-induced frequency of cell mutation.

  13. Mutagenesis of SugE, a small multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Son, Mike S; Del Castilho, Colin; Duncalf, Karen A; Carney, Dominic; Weiner, Joel H; Turner, Raymond J

    2003-12-26

    The small multidrug resistance protein family has two subclasses. In this study we used a mutation approach to see what is necessary to convert a SUG subgroup member into a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) transporter. We chose four key residues (H24, M39, I43, and A44) conserved within SUGs but conserved differently within the QAC transporters. Altogether, seven mutants were generated in Citrobacter freundii SugE. Surprisingly, the mutated SugE demonstrated an increased sensitivity to representative QACs. Additionally, ethidium uptake is found to be more prominent in the hypersensitive mutants. We conducted orientation studies using topology reporter gene fusions which indicated that SugE and the QAC transporter EmrE both have their N- and C-termini in the cytoplasm as predicted. The results imply that SugE can be converted to a QAC transporter with only a single mutation. However, because hypersensitivity was observed, the SugE mutant proteins are behaving as importers rather than as exporters. PMID:14651958

  14. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  15. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  16. The role of Dbf4-dependent protein kinase in DNA polymerase ζ-dependent mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luis N; Ferguson, Rebecca; Santoro, Irma; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    The yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) (composed of Dbf4 and Cdc7 subunits) is an essential, conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates multiple processes in the cell, including DNA replication, recombination and induced mutagenesis. Only DDK substrates important for replication and recombination have been identified. Consequently, the mechanism by which DDK regulates mutagenesis is unknown. The yeast mcm5-bob1 mutation that bypasses DDK's essential role in DNA replication was used here to examine whether loss of DDK affects spontaneous as well as induced mutagenesis. Using the sensitive lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assay, we show DDK is required to generate "complex" spontaneous mutations, which are a hallmark of the Polζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. DDK co-immunoprecipitated with the Rev7 regulatory, but not with the Rev3 polymerase subunit of Polζ. Conversely, Rev7 bound mainly to the Cdc7 kinase subunit and not to Dbf4. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ may be regulated by DDK phosphorylation as immunoprecipitates of yeast Cdc7 and also recombinant Xenopus DDK phosphorylated GST-Rev7 in vitro. In addition to promoting Polζ-dependent mutagenesis, DDK was also important for generating Polζ-independent large deletions that revert the lys2ΔA746 allele. The decrease in large deletions observed in the absence of DDK likely results from an increase in the rate of replication fork restart after an encounter with spontaneous DNA damage. Finally, nonepistatic, additive/synergistic UV sensitivity was observed in cdc7Δ pol32Δ and cdc7Δ pol30-K127R,K164R double mutants, suggesting that DDK may regulate Rev7 protein during postreplication "gap filling" rather than during "polymerase switching" by ubiquitinated and sumoylated modified Pol30 (PCNA) and Pol32. PMID:24875188

  17. Random mutagenesis of amelogenin for engineering protein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Johan; Bülow, Leif

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles made from recombinant proteins offer excellent potential for several nanotechnological applications. However, only a very limited number of proteins are currently being used for such purposes due to limited availability and stability. Therefore, we have investigated the enamel matrix protein amelogenin as a new alternative protein for use as recombinant nanoparticles. Amelogenin is a robust protein that has the ability to self-assemble into nanosized particles termed nanospheres. This self-assembly property of amelogenin is highly pH-dependent, and modifications of the solubility behavior for amelogenin can be particularly important for some applications such as drug delivery, where responsiveness at a specific pH is an essential property. In this study, an amelogenin mutant library was created and used to screen amelogenin variants with modified solubility/aggregation profiles in response to externally applied pH changes. Fifty amelogenin mutants were identified and produced recombinantly, purified and characterized. Several mutants with distinct solubility profiles were obtained that could form uniform nanospheres, ranging from 30 to 60 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. The mutants displayed a shifted onset of pH-dependent aggregation compared to wild-type amelogenin. At physiological pH, some mutants formed soluble nanospheres, while others generated nanosphere aggregates, suggesting different practical uses for the different mutants. By mixing and co-assembling mutant and wild-type amelogenin at different ratios, the level of nanosphere aggregation could be tuned at a given pH. By exploring combinations of different amelogenin variants it is possible to control aggregation events in nanomedical applications where a specific pH response is required. PMID:25664685

  18. A facile and efficient transposon mutagenesis method for generation of multi-codon deletions in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Su; Wei, Xuan; Ji, Qun; Xin, Xiu; Jiang, Biao; Liu, Jia

    2016-06-10

    Substitutions, insertions and deletions are all important mutation events in natural and laboratory protein evolution. However, protein engineering using insertions and deletions (indels) is hindered by the lack of a convenient mutagenesis method. Here, we describe a general transposon mutagenesis method that allows for removal of up to five consecutive in-frame codons from a random position of a target protein. This method, referred to as codon deletion mutagenesis (CDM), relies on an engineered Mu transposon that carries asymmetric terminal sequences flanking the MuA transposase recognition sites. CDM requires minimal DNA manipulations, and can generate multi-codon deletions with high efficiency (>90%). As a proof of principle, we constructed five libraries of green fluorescent protein (GFP) containing one to five random codon deletions, respectively. Several variants with multi-codon deletions remained fluorescent, none of which could be easily identified using traditional mutagenesis method. CDM provides a facile and efficient approach to sampling a protein sequence with multi-codon deletions. It will not only facilitate our understanding of the effects of amino acid deletions on protein function but also expedite protein engineering using deletion mutagenesis. PMID:27071724

  19. The role of flexibility and molecular shape in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Devedjiev, Yancho D

    2015-02-01

    Proteins are dynamic systems and interact with their environment. The analysis of crystal contacts in the most accurately determined protein structures (d < 1.5 Å) reveals that in contrast to current views, static disorder and high side-chain entropy are common in the crystal contact area. These observations challenge the validity of the theory that presumes that the occurrence of well ordered patches of side chains at the surface is an essential prerequisite for a successful crystallization event. The present paper provides evidence in support of the approach for understanding protein crystallization as a process dependent on multiple factors, each with its relative contribution, rather than a phenomenon driven by a few dominant physicochemical characteristics. The role of the molecular shape as a factor in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis is discussed.

  20. A mutagenesis and screening strategy to generate optimally thermostabilized membrane proteins for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Francesca; Serrano-Vega, Maria J; Shibata, Yoko; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Lebon, Guillaume; Miller-Gallacher, Jennifer; Singhal, Ankita; Strege, Annette; Thomas, Jennifer A; Tate, Christopher G

    2016-08-01

    The thermostability of an integral membrane protein (MP) in detergent solution is a key parameter that dictates the likelihood of obtaining well-diffracting crystals that are suitable for structure determination. However, many mammalian MPs are too unstable for crystallization. We developed a thermostabilization strategy based on systematic mutagenesis coupled to a radioligand-binding thermostability assay that can be applied to receptors, ion channels and transporters. It takes ∼6-12 months to thermostabilize a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) containing 300 amino acid (aa) residues. The resulting thermostabilized MPs are more easily crystallized and result in high-quality structures. This methodology has facilitated structure-based drug design applied to GPCRs because it is possible to determine multiple structures of the thermostabilized receptors bound to low-affinity ligands. Protocols and advice are given on how to develop thermostability assays for MPs and how to combine mutations to make an optimally stable mutant suitable for structural studies. The steps in the procedure include the generation of ∼300 site-directed mutants by Ala/Leu scanning mutagenesis, the expression of each mutant in mammalian cells by transient transfection and the identification of thermostable mutants using a thermostability assay that is based on binding of an (125)I-labeled radioligand to the unpurified, detergent-solubilized MP. Individual thermostabilizing point mutations are then combined to make an optimally stable MP that is suitable for structural biology and other biophysical studies. PMID:27466713

  1. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P.; Morales, Ivan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Maynard, Jennifer A.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although non-complementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts. PMID:24615866

  2. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  3. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  4. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  5. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  6. Insertion Mutagenesis and Membrane Topology Model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Protein OprM

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kendy K. Y.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprM is a protein involved in multiple-antibiotic resistance as the outer membrane component for the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux system. Planar lipid bilayer experiments showed that OprM had channel-forming activity with an average single-channel conductance of only about 80 pS in 1 M KCl. The gene encoding OprM was subjected to insertion mutagenesis by cloning of a foreign epitope from the circumsporozoite form of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum into 11 sites. In Escherichia coli, 8 of the 11 insertion mutant genes expressed proteins at levels comparable to those obtained with the wild-type gene and the inserted malarial epitopes were surface accessible as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence. When moved to a P. aeruginosa OprM-deficient strain, seven of the insertion mutant genes expressed proteins at variable levels comparable to that of wild-type OprM and three of these reconstituted MIC profiles resembling those of the wild-type protein, while the other mutant forms showed variable MIC results. Utilizing the data from these experiments, in conjunction with multiple sequence alignments and structure predictions, an OprM topology model with 16 β strands was proposed. PMID:10762238

  7. RecFOR proteins are essential for Pol V-mediated translesion synthesis and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shingo; Isogawa, Asako; Fuchs, Robert P

    2006-12-13

    When the replication fork moves through the template DNA containing lesions, daughter-strand gaps are formed opposite lesion sites. These gaps are subsequently filled-in either by translesion synthesis (TLS) or by homologous recombination. RecA filaments formed within these gaps are key intermediates for both of the gap-filling pathways. For instance, Pol V, the major lesion bypass polymerase in Escherichia coli, requires a functional interaction with the tip of the RecA filament. Here, we show that all three recombination mediator proteins RecFOR are needed to build a functionally competent RecA filament that supports efficient Pol V-mediated TLS in the presence of ssDNA-binding protein (SSB). A positive contribution of RecF protein to Pol V lesion bypass is demonstrated. When Pol III and Pol V are both present, Pol III imparts a negative effect on Pol V-mediated lesion bypass that is counteracted by the combined action of RecFOR and SSB. Mutations in recF, recO or recR gene abolish induced mutagenesis in E. coli. PMID:17139245

  8. Residue proximity information and protein model discrimination using saturation-suppressor mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Anusmita; Khare, Shruti; Devanarayanan, Sivasankar; Jain, Pankaj C.; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    Identification of residue-residue contacts from primary sequence can be used to guide protein structure prediction. Using Escherichia coli CcdB as the test case, we describe an experimental method termed saturation-suppressor mutagenesis to acquire residue contact information. In this methodology, for each of five inactive CcdB mutants, exhaustive screens for suppressors were performed. Proximal suppressors were accurately discriminated from distal suppressors based on their phenotypes when present as single mutants. Experimentally identified putative proximal pairs formed spatial constraints to recover >98% of native-like models of CcdB from a decoy dataset. Suppressor methodology was also applied to the integral membrane protein, diacylglycerol kinase A where the structures determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR were significantly different. Suppressor as well as sequence co-variation data clearly point to the X-ray structure being the functional one adopted in vivo. The methodology is applicable to any macromolecular system for which a convenient phenotypic assay exists. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09532.001 PMID:26716404

  9. Structure-Based and Random Mutagenesis Approaches Increase the Organophosphate-Degrading Activity of a Phosphotriesterase Homologue from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Larsen, Sonia D.; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-11-09

    An enzyme from the amidohydrolase family from Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr-OPH) with homology to phosphotriesterase has been shown to exhibit activity against both organophosphate (OP) and lactone compounds. We have characterized the physical properties of Dr-OPH and have found it to be a highly thermostable enzyme, remaining active after 3 h of incubation at 60 C and withstanding incubation at temperatures up to 70 C. In addition, it can withstand concentrations of at least 200 mg/mL. These properties make Dr-OPH a promising candidate for development in commercial applications. However, compared to the most widely studied OP-degrading enzyme, that from Pseudomonas diminuta, Dr-OPH has low hydrolytic activity against certain OP substrates. Therefore, we sought to improve the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH, specifically toward the pesticides ethyl and methyl paraoxon, using structure-based and random approaches. Site-directed mutagenesis, random mutagenesis, and site-saturation mutagenesis were utilized to increase the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH. Out of a screen of more than 30,000 potential mutants, a total of 26 mutant enzymes were purified and characterized kinetically. Crystal structures of w.t. Dr-OPH, of Dr-OPH in complex with a product analog, and of 7 mutant enzymes were determined to resolutions between 1.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}. Information from these structures directed the design and production of 4 additional mutants for analysis. In total, our mutagenesis efforts improved the catalytic activity of Dr-OPH toward ethyl and methyl paraoxon by 126- and 322-fold and raised the specificity for these two substrates by 557- and 183-fold, respectively. Our work highlights the importance of an iterative approach to mutagenesis, proving that large rate enhancements are achieved when mutations are made in already active mutants. In addition, the relationship between the kinetic parameters and the introduced mutations has allowed us to hypothesize on those

  10. Exposing a Hidden Functional Site of C-reactive Protein by Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Hammond, David J.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Johnson, David A.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a cyclic pentameric protein whose major binding specificity, at physiological pH, is for substances bearing exposed phosphocholine moieties. Another pentameric form of CRP, which exists at acidic pH, displays binding activity for oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). The ox-LDL-binding site in CRP, which is hidden at physiological pH, is exposed by acidic pH-induced structural changes in pentameric CRP. The aim of this study was to expose the hidden ox-LDL-binding site of CRP by site-directed mutagenesis and to generate a CRP mutant that can bind to ox-LDL without the requirement of acidic pH. Mutation of Glu42, an amino acid that participates in intersubunit interactions in the CRP pentamer and is buried, to Gln resulted in a CRP mutant (E42Q) that showed significant binding activity for ox-LDL at physiological pH. For maximal binding to ox-LDL, E42Q CRP required a pH much less acidic than that required by wild-type CRP. At any given pH, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to ox-LDL. Like wild-type CRP, E42Q CRP remained pentameric at acidic pH. Also, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to several other deposited, conformationally altered proteins. The E42Q CRP mutant provides a tool to investigate the functions of CRP in defined animal models of inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis because wild-type CRP requires acidic pH to bind to deposited, conformationally altered proteins, including ox-LDL, and available animal models may not have sufficient acidosis or other possible modifiers of the pentameric structure of CRP at the sites of inflammation. PMID:22158621

  11. Chemical mutagenesis--a promising technique to increase metal concentration and extraction in sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Nehnevajova, Erika; Herzig, Rolf; Federer, Guido; Erismann, Karl-Hans; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Since most of the metal-hyperaccumulating wild plants only produce very low biomass and many high-yielding crops accumulate only moderate amounts of metals, the current research is mainly focused on overcoming these limitations and the optimization of metal phytoextraction. The main goal of the present study was the improvement of metal concentration and extraction properties of Helianthus annuus L by chemical mutagenesis (the non-GMO approach). Sunflowers--hybrid cultivar Salut and inbred lines-were treated with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). The effect of chemical mutagenesis on metal concentration in and extraction by new sunflower M1 and M2 mutants was directly assessed on a metal-contaminated field in Raft, Switzerland. Mutants of the M2 generation showed a 2-3 times higher metal shoot concentration than the control plants. The best M2 sunflower "giant mutant" 14/185/04 showed a significantly enhanced metal extraction ability: 7.5 times for Cd, 9.2 times for Zn, and 8.2 times for Pb in aboveground parts, as compared to the control plants. Theoretical calculations for the phytoextraction potential of new sunflower variants note that the best sunflower mutant can produce up to 26 t dry matter per hectare and remove 13.3 kg Zn per hectare and year at the sewage sludge contaminated site of Raft; that is a gain factor of 9 compared to Zn extraction by sunflower controls. Furthermore, the use of sunflower oil and biomass for technical purposes (lubricants, biodiesel, biogas) should produce an additional value and improve the economical balance of phytoextraction.

  12. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  13. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain.

  14. Electrostatic Interaction between Oxysterol-binding Protein and VAMP-associated Protein A Revealed by NMR and Mutagenesis Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-AMSP) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBPF) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-AMSP, OSBPF, and the complex. Our results show that OSBPF is disordered in the free state, and VAP-AMSP and OSBPF form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  15. Tailor-Made Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: In Vitro Site-Directed Mutagenesis of PTEN and PTPRZ-B.

    PubMed

    Luna, Sandra; Mingo, Janire; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Blanco, Lorena; Amo, Laura; Schepens, Jan; Hendriks, Wiljan J; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In vitro site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) is a commonly used approach to experimentally analyze PTP functions at the molecular and cellular level and to establish functional correlations with PTP alterations found in human disease. Here, using the tumor-suppressor PTEN and the receptor-type PTPRZ-B (short isoform from PTPRZ1 gene) phosphatases as examples, we provide a brief insight into the utility of specific mutations in the experimental analysis of PTP functions. We describe a standardized, rapid, and simple method of mutagenesis to perform single and multiple amino acid substitutions, as well as deletions of short nucleotide sequences, based on one-step inverse PCR and DpnI restriction enzyme treatment. This method of SDM is generally applicable to any other protein of interest. PMID:27514801

  16. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes.

  17. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  18. Generation of a fast maturating red fluorescent protein by a combined approach of elongation mutagenesis and functional salvage screening

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Sil; Han, Sang-Soo; Cheong, Dea-Eun; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be useful as indicators or reporters must have rapid maturation time, high quantum yield and photobleaching stability. A red fluorescent protein DsRed that has a high quantum yield and photostability has an innately slow maturation time when compared to other fluorescence proteins. In this study, we combined a functional salvage screen (FSS) and elongation mutagenesis to obtain a DsRed variant that maintained structural features closely linked with a high quantum yield and photostability and evolved to have a rapid maturation time. It is expected that the variant generated here, FmRed (fast maturating red fluorescent protein), will be widely used as an indicator or reporter because it maintained traits superior to that of the wild-type protein and also matured rapidly.

  19. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  20. A Protocol for Functional Assessment of Whole-Protein Saturation Mutagenesis Libraries Utilizing High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Stiffler, Michael A; Subramanian, Subu K; Salinas, Victor H; Ranganathan, Rama

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has long been used as a method to interrogate protein structure, function and evolution. Recent advances in massively-parallel sequencing technology have opened up the possibility of assessing the functional or fitness effects of large numbers of mutations simultaneously. Here, we present a protocol for experimentally determining the effects of all possible single amino acid mutations in a protein of interest utilizing high-throughput sequencing technology, using the 263 amino acid antibiotic resistance enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase as an example. In this approach, a whole-protein saturation mutagenesis library is constructed by site-directed mutagenic PCR, randomizing each position individually to all possible amino acids. The library is then transformed into bacteria, and selected for the ability to confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. The fitness effect of each mutation is then determined by deep sequencing of the library before and after selection. Importantly, this protocol introduces methods which maximize sequencing read depth and permit the simultaneous selection of the entire mutation library, by mixing adjacent positions into groups of length accommodated by high-throughput sequencing read length and utilizing orthogonal primers to barcode each group. Representative results using this protocol are provided by assessing the fitness effects of all single amino acid mutations in TEM-1 at a clinically relevant dosage of ampicillin. The method should be easily extendable to other proteins for which a high-throughput selection assay is in place. PMID:27403811

  1. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  2. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  3. Use of site-directed mutagenesis to enhance the epitope-shielding effect of covalent modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed Central

    Hershfield, M S; Chaffee, S; Koro-Johnson, L; Mary, A; Smith, A A; Short, S A

    1991-01-01

    Modification by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) can reduce the immunogenicity and prolong the circulating life of proteins, but the utility of this approach for any protein is restricted by the number and distribution of PEG attachment sites (e.g., epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues). We have developed a strategy for introducing additional sites for PEG attachment by using site-directed mutagenesis to selectively replace arginine with lysine codons and tested it with purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Escherichia coli, an extremely stable but immunogenic enzyme, that could potentially be used to treat an inherited deficiency of PNP. A triple mutant, RK3, possessing three Arg----Lys substitutions was constructed that increased the number of lysines per PNP subunit from 14 to 17, providing an additional 18 potential PEG attachment sites per hexameric enzyme molecule. The wild-type and RK3 enzymes had similar catalytic activity, antigenicity, and immunogenicity. After PEG modification, both enzymes retained catalytic activity, the plasma half-life of both enzymes in mice increased from approximately 4 hr to 4 days, and the binding of both enzymes by antisera raised against each unmodified enzyme was markedly diminished. However, antibody raised against wild-type PEG-PNP did not bind the PEG-RK3 enzyme. PEG-RK3 PNP was also substantially less immunogenic than wild-type PEG-PNP. Accelerated antibody-mediated clearance of PEG-PNP occurred in 2 of 12 mice treated with PEG-RK3 PNP, compared with 10 of 16 mice treated with the modified wild-type enzyme. This combined use of directed mutagenesis and PEG modification is aimed at permitting the widest choice of proteins, including products of genetic and chemical "engineering," to be used for therapy of inherited and acquired disorders. PMID:1714590

  4. Probing the RNA binding surface of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Okaine, Stephen; McPike, Mark P; Lin, Yong; Borer, Philip N

    2013-05-14

    The highly conserved nucleocapsid protein domain in HIV-1 recognizes and binds SL3 in genomic RNA. In this work, we used the structure of the NCp7-SL3 RNA complex to guide the construction of 16 NCp7 mutants to probe the RNA binding surface of the protein [De Guzman, R. N., et al. (1998) Science 279, 384-388]. Thirteen residues with functional or structural significance were mutated individually to Ala (Asn(5), Phe(6), Val(13), Phe(16), Asn(17), Gly(19), Glu(21), Ile(24), Gln(45), Met(46), Gly(22), Pro(31), and Gly(40)), and three salt bridge switch mutants exchanged Lys and Glu (Lys(14)-Glu(21), Lys(33)-Glu(42), and Lys(38)-Glu(51)). Dissociation constants (Kd) determined by fluorescence titration and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to compare affinities of SL3 for the variant proteins to that for the wild type. The F16A (Phe(16) to Ala) variant showed a 25-fold reduction in affinity, consistent with a loss of organized structure in f1, the protein's first zinc finger. I24A, Q45A, and M46A reduced affinity by 2-5-fold; these residues occupy nearly equivalent positions in f1 and f2. E21A increased affinity by 3-fold, perhaps because of the mutant's increased net positive charge. Among the salt bridge switch mutants, only K14E/E21K in f1 caused a substantial change in affinity (5-fold reduction), binding SL3 with a biphasic binding isotherm. Aside from these six variants, most of the mutations studied have relatively minor effects on the stability of the complex. We conclude that many side chain interactions in the wild-type complex contribute little to stability or can be compensated by new contacts in the mutants.

  5. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  6. Insights into hemoglobin assembly through in vivo mutagenesis of α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein.

    PubMed

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2012-03-30

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO(2) subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO(2) autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO(2) subunits.

  7. Site-specific incorporation of keto amino acids into functional G protein-coupled receptors using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shixin; Köhrer, Caroline; Huber, Thomas; Kazmi, Manija; Sachdev, Pallavi; Yan, Elsa C Y; Bhagat, Aditi; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2008-01-18

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous heptahelical transmembrane proteins involved in a wide variety of signaling pathways. The work described here on application of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to two GPCRs, the chemokine receptor CCR5 (a major co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus) and rhodopsin (the visual photoreceptor), adds a new dimension to studies of GPCRs. We incorporated the unnatural amino acids p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine (Acp) and p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bzp) into CCR5 at high efficiency in mammalian cells to produce functional receptors harboring reactive keto groups at three specific positions. We obtained functional mutant CCR5, at levels up to approximately 50% of wild type as judged by immunoblotting, cell surface expression, and ligand-dependent calcium flux. Rhodopsin containing Acp at three different sites was also purified in high yield (0.5-2 microg/10(7) cells) and reacted with fluorescein hydrazide in vitro to produce fluorescently labeled rhodopsin. The incorporation of reactive keto groups such as Acp or Bzp into GPCRs allows their reaction with different reagents to introduce a variety of spectroscopic and other probes. Bzp also provides the possibility of photo-cross-linking to identify precise sites of protein-protein interactions, including GPCR binding to G proteins and arrestins, and for understanding the molecular basis of ligand recognition by chemokine receptors. PMID:17993461

  8. Predictive mutagenesis of ligation-independent cloning (LIC) vectors for protein expression and site-specific chemical conjugation.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Erik; Sauer, Jørgen; Andersen, Andreas; Jensen, Knud J; Voldborg, Bjørn

    2011-07-15

    Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) allows for cloning of DNA constructs independent of insert restriction sites and ligases. However, any required mutations are typically introduced by additional, time-consuming steps. We present a rapid, inexpensive method for mutagenesis in the 5' LIC site of expression constructs and report on the construction of expression vectors with N-terminal serine, cysteine, threonine, or tyrosine residues after tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage. In a practical application, the N-terminal serine was oxidized to an aldehyde, subsequently reacted with an amino-oxy functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) ligand under aniline catalysis to provide a protein selectively modified at the N-terminus. PMID:21414287

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  10. Increasing Alfalfa Rumen Bypass Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa has one of the highest crude protein contents among forage crops, but is is rapidly and extensively degraded by rumen microorganisms. To examine differential protein digestion, three distinct varieties of alfalfa, grown from single plants, were subjected to fermentation in the rumen of a ca...

  11. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  12. Antifreeze activity enhancement by site directed mutagenesis on an antifreeze protein from the beetle Rhagium mordax.

    PubMed

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Kristiansen, Erlend; von Solms, Nicolas; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The ice binding motifs of insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs) mainly consist of repetitive TxT motifs aligned on a flat face of the protein. However, these motifs often contain non-threonines that disrupt the TxT pattern. We substituted two such disruptive amino acids located in the ice binding face of an AFP from Rhagium mordax with threonine. Furthermore, a mutant with an extra ice facing TxT motif was constructed. These mutants showed enhanced antifreeze activity compared to the wild type at low concentrations. However, extrapolating the data indicates that the wild type will become the most active at concentrations above 270 μmol.

  13. The Mutagenesis Assistant Program.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajni; Wong, Tuck Seng; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Roccatano, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenesis Assistant Program (MAP) is a web-based statistical tool to develop directed evolution strategies by investigating the consequences at the amino acid level of the mutational biases of random mutagenesis methods on any given gene. The latest development of the program, the MAP(2.0)3D server, correlates the generated amino acid substitution patterns of a specific random mutagenesis method to the sequence and structural information of the target protein. The combined information can be used to select an experimental strategy that improves the chances of obtaining functionally efficient and/or stable enzyme variants. Hence, the MAP(2.0)3D server facilitates the "in silico" prescreening of the target gene by predicting the amino acid diversity generated in a random mutagenesis library. Here, we describe the features of MAP(2.0)3D server by analyzing, as an example, the cytochrome P450BM3 monooxygenase (CYP102A1). The MAP(2.0)3D server is available publicly at http://map.jacobs-university.de/map3d.html.

  14. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  15. Knockout of an outer membrane protein operon of anaplasma marginale by transposon mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large amounts of data generated by genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics technologies have increased our understanding of the biology of Anaplasma marginale. However, these data have also led to new assumptions that require testing, ideally through classic genetic mutation. One example is the def...

  16. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  17. Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew S.; Griswold, Karl E.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (stability, activity, immunogenicity, etc.). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries - a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 107 variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  18. Increased Adipose Protein Carbonylation in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Serrot, Federico J.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Moran, Antoinette; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Choudry, Umar; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with obesity but mechanisms controlling this relationship in humans are not fully understood. Studies in animal models suggest a linkage between adipose reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin resistance. ROS oxidize cellular lipids to produce a variety of lipid hydroperoxides that in turn generate reactive lipid aldehydes that covalently modify cellular proteins in a process termed carbonylation. Mammalian cells defend against reactive lipid aldehydes and protein carbonylation by glutathionylation using glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) or carbonyl reduction/oxidation via reductases and/or dehydrogenases. Insulin resistance in mice is linked to ROS production and increased level of protein carbonylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport, and altered adipokine secretion. To assess protein carbonylation and insulin resistance in humans, eight healthy participants underwent subcutaneous fat biopsy from the periumbilical region for protein analysis and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing to measure insulin sensitivity. Soluble proteins from adipose tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the major carbonylated proteins identified as the adipocyte and epithelial fatty acid–binding proteins. The level of protein carbonylation was directly correlated with adiposity and serum free fatty acids (FFAs). These results suggest that in human obesity oxidative stress is linked to protein carbonylation and such events may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:21593812

  19. Selection of IgG Variants with Increased FcRn Binding Using Random and Directed Mutagenesis: Impact on Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Céline; Jorieux, Sylvie; Urbain, Rémi; Fournier, Nathalie; Bouayadi, Khalil; De Romeuf, Christophe; Behrens, Christian K.; Fontayne, Alexandre; Mondon, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite the reasonably long half-life of immunoglogulin G (IgGs), market pressure for higher patient convenience while conserving efficacy continues to drive IgG half-life improvement. IgG half-life is dependent on the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), which among other functions, protects IgG from catabolism. FcRn binds the Fc domain of IgG at an acidic pH ensuring that endocytosed IgG will not be degraded in lysosomal compartments and will then be released into the bloodstream. Consistent with this mechanism of action, several Fc-engineered IgG with increased FcRn affinity and conserved pH dependency were designed and resulted in longer half-life in vivo in human FcRn-transgenic mice (hFcRn), cynomolgus monkeys, and recently in healthy humans. These IgG variants were usually obtained by in silico approaches or directed mutagenesis in the FcRn-binding site. Using random mutagenesis, combined with a pH-dependent phage display selection process, we isolated IgG variants with improved FcRn-binding, which exhibited longer in vivo half-life in hFcRn mice. Interestingly, many mutations enhancing Fc/FcRn interaction were located at a distance from the FcRn-binding site validating our random molecular approach. Directed mutagenesis was then applied to generate new variants to further characterize our IgG variants and the effect of the mutations selected. Since these mutations are distributed over the whole Fc sequence, binding to other Fc effectors, such as complement C1q and FcγRs, was dramatically modified, even by mutations distant from these effectors’ binding sites. Hence, we obtained numerous IgG variants with increased FcRn-binding and different binding patterns to other Fc effectors, including variants without any effector function, providing distinct “fit-for-purpose” Fc molecules. We therefore provide evidence that half-life and effector functions should be optimized simultaneously as mutations can have unexpected effects on all Fc receptors that are critical

  20. Combining site-specific mutagenesis and seeding as a strategy to crystallize ‘difficult’ proteins: the case of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Goedele; Brosens, Elke; Wahni, Khadija; Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Wyns, Lode; Messens, Joris; Loris, Remy

    2006-12-01

    S. aureus thioredoxin was crystallized using a combination of seeding and site-specific mutagenesis. The P31T mutant of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin crystallizes spontaneously in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.7, b = 49.5, c = 55.6 Å. The crystals diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Isomorphous crystals of wild-type thioredoxin as well as of other point mutants only grow when seeded with the P31T mutant. These results suggest seeding as a valuable tool complementing surface engineering for proteins that are hard to crystallize.

  1. Increased flexibility decreases antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti N; Graether, Steffen P

    2010-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins protect several cold-blooded organisms from subzero environments by preventing death from freezing. The Type I antifreeze protein (AFP) isoform from Pseudopleuronectes americanus, named HPLC6, is a 37-residue protein that is a single α-helix. Mutational analysis of the protein showed that its alanine-rich face is important for binding to and inhibiting the growth of macromolecular ice. Almost all structural studies of HPLC6 involve the use of chemically synthesized protein as it requires a native N-terminal aspartate and an amidated C-terminus for full activity. Here, we examine the role of C-terminal amide and C-terminal arginine side chain in the activity, structure, and dynamics of nonamidated Arg37 HPLC6, nonamidated HPLC6 Ala37, amidated HPLC6 Ala37, and fully native HPLC6 using a recombinant bacterial system. The thermal hysteresis (TH) activities of the nonamidated mutants are 35% lower compared with amidated proteins, but analysis of the NMR data and circular dichroism spectra shows that they are all still α-helical. Relaxation data from the two nonamidated mutants indicate that the C-terminal residues are considerably more flexible than the rest of the protein because of the loss of the amide group, whereas the amidated Ala37 mutant has a C-terminus that is as rigid as the wild-type protein and has high TH activity. We propose that an increase in flexibility of the AFP causes it to lose activity because its dynamic nature prevents it from binding strongly to the ice surface. PMID:20936690

  2. Optimization of combinatorial mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew S; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2011-11-01

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (e.g., stability, activity, immunogenicity). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries--a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 10⁷ variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  3. Chloroacetaldehyde-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: the role of AlkB protein in repair of 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine and 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Ruszel, Karol P; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Lewicka, Joanna; Sokołowska, Beata; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2010-02-01

    Etheno (epsilon) adducts are formed in reaction of DNA bases with various environmental carcinogens and endogenously created products of lipid peroxidation. Chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), a metabolite of carcinogen vinyl chloride, is routinely used to generate epsilon-adducts. We studied the role of AlkB, along with AlkA and Mug proteins, all engaged in repair of epsilon-adducts, in CAA-induced mutagenesis. The test system used involved pIF102 and pIF104 plasmids bearing the lactose operon of CC102 or CC104 origin (Cupples and Miller (1989) [17]) which allowed to monitor Lac(+) revertants, the latter arose by GC-->AT or GC-->TA substitutions, respectively, as a result of modification of guanine and cytosine. The plasmids were CAA-damaged in vitro and replicated in Escherichia coli of various genetic backgrounds. To modify the levels of AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E. coli cells induced or not in adaptive response. Formation of varepsilonC proceeds via a relatively stable intermediate, 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine (HEC), which allowed to compare repair of both adducts. The results indicate that all three genes, alkA, alkB and microg, are engaged in alleviation of CAA-induced mutagenesis. The frequency of mutation was higher in AlkA-, AlkB- and Mug-deficient strains in comparison to alkA(+), alkB(+), and microg(+) controls. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harboring the pIF plasmids and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that AlkB protein is engaged in the repair of epsilonC and HEC in vivo. Using the modified TTCTT 5-mers as substrates, we confirmed in vitro that AlkB protein repairs epsilonC and HEC although far less efficiently than the reference adduct 3-methylcytosine. The pH optimum for repair of HEC and epsilonC is significantly different from that for 3-methylcytosine. We propose that the protonated form of adduct interact in active site of AlkB protein. PMID:19941873

  4. Variations in seed protein content of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines by in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Annamalai; Jayabalan, Narayanasamy

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the influence of gamma irradiation (GR), ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) and sodium azide (SA) treatment on yield and protein content of selected mutant lines of cotton. Seeds of MCU 5 and MCU 11 were exposed to gamma rays (GR), ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) and sodium azide (SA). Lower dose of gamma irradiation (100-500 Gy), 10-50 mM EMS and SA at lower concentration effectively influences in improving the yield and protein content. Significant increase in yield (258.9 g plant(-1)) and protein content (18.63 mg g(-1) d. wt.) as compared to parental lines was noted in M2 generations. During the subsequent field trials, number of mutant lines varied morphologically in terms of yield as well as biochemical characters such as protein. The selected mutant lines were bred true to their characters in M3 and M4 generations. The significant increase in protein content and profiles of the mutant lines with range of 10.21-18.63 mg g(-1). The SDS-PAGE analysis of mutant lines revealed 9 distinct bands of different intensities with range of 26-81 kDa. The difference in intensity of bands was more (41, 50 and 58 kDa) in the mutant lines obtained from in vitro mutation than in vivo mutation. Significance of such stimulation in protein content correlated with yielding ability of the mutant lines of cotton in terms of seed weight per plant. The results confirm that in cotton it is possible to enhance the both yield and biochemical characters by in vivo and in vitro mutagenic treatments.

  5. Sequence determinants of protein aggregation: tools to increase protein solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. However, very often the target protein accumulates into insoluble aggregates in a misfolded and biologically inactive form. Bacterial inclusion bodies are major bottlenecks in protein production and are hampering the development of top priority research areas such structural genomics. Inclusion body formation was formerly considered to occur via non-specific association of hydrophobic surfaces in folding intermediates. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that protein aggregation in bacteria resembles to the well-studied process of amyloid fibril formation. Both processes appear to rely on the formation of specific, sequence-dependent, intermolecular interactions driving the formation of structured protein aggregates. This similarity in the mechanisms of aggregation will probably allow applying anti-aggregational strategies already tested in the amyloid context to the less explored area of protein aggregation inside bacteria. Specifically, new sequence-based approaches appear as promising tools to tune protein aggregation in biotechnological processes. PMID:15847694

  6. Response of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus to Increased Mutagenesis: Influence of Viral Load and Fitness in Loss of Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Saleta; Dávila, Mercedes; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Domingo, Esteban

    2000-01-01

    Passage of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cell culture in the presence of the mutagenic base analog 5-fluorouracil or 5-azacytidine resulted in decreases of infectivity and occasional extinction of the virus. Low viral loads and low viral fitness enhanced the frequency of extinction events; this finding was shown with a number of closely related FMDV clones and populations differing by up to 106-fold in relative fitness in infections involving either single or multiple passages in the absence or presence of the chemical mutagens. The mutagenic treatments resulted in increases of 2- to 6.4-fold in mutation frequency and up to 3-fold in mutant spectrum complexity. The largest increase observed corresponded to the 3D (polymerase)-coding region, which is highly conserved in nonmutagenized FMDV populations. As a result, nucleotide sequence heterogeneity for the 3D-coding region became very similar to that for the variable VP1-coding region in FMDVs multiply passaged in the presence of chemical mutagens. The results suggest that strategies to combine reductions of viral load and viral fitness could be effectively associated with extinction mutagenesis as a potential new antiviral strategy. PMID:10954530

  7. Coupling Unbiased Mutagenesis to High-throughput DNA Sequencing Uncovers Functional Domains in the Ndc80 Kinetochore Protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jerry F.; Fong, Kimberly K.; Umbreit, Neil T.; Payen, Celia; Zelter, Alex; Asbury, Charles L.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Davis, Trisha N.

    2013-01-01

    During mitosis, kinetochores physically link chromosomes to the dynamic ends of spindle microtubules. This linkage depends on the Ndc80 complex, a conserved and essential microtubule-binding component of the kinetochore. As a member of the complex, the Ndc80 protein forms microtubule attachments through a calponin homology domain. Ndc80 is also required for recruiting other components to the kinetochore and responding to mitotic regulatory signals. While the calponin homology domain has been the focus of biochemical and structural characterization, the function of the remainder of Ndc80 is poorly understood. Here, we utilized a new approach that couples high-throughput sequencing to a saturating linker-scanning mutagenesis screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified domains in previously uncharacterized regions of Ndc80 that are essential for its function in vivo. We show that a helical hairpin adjacent to the calponin homology domain influences microtubule binding by the complex. Furthermore, a mutation in this hairpin abolishes the ability of the Dam1 complex to strengthen microtubule attachments made by the Ndc80 complex. Finally, we defined a C-terminal segment of Ndc80 required for tetramerization of the Ndc80 complex in vivo. This unbiased mutagenesis approach can be generally applied to genes in S. cerevisiae to identify functional properties and domains. PMID:23833183

  8. Protein engineering by random mutagenesis and structure-guided consensus of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Lipase T6 for enhanced stability in methanol.

    PubMed

    Dror, Adi; Shemesh, Einav; Dayan, Natali; Fishman, Ayelet

    2014-02-01

    The abilities of enzymes to catalyze reactions in nonnatural environments of organic solvents have opened new opportunities for enzyme-based industrial processes. However, the main drawback of such processes is that most enzymes have a limited stability in polar organic solvents. In this study, we employed protein engineering methods to generate a lipase for enhanced stability in methanol, which is important for biodiesel production. Two protein engineering approaches, random mutagenesis (error-prone PCR) and structure-guided consensus, were applied in parallel on an unexplored lipase gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. A high-throughput colorimetric screening assay was used to evaluate lipase activity after an incubation period in high methanol concentrations. Both protein engineering approaches were successful in producing variants with elevated half-life values in 70% methanol. The best variant of the random mutagenesis library, Q185L, exhibited 23-fold-improved stability, yet its methanolysis activity was decreased by one-half compared to the wild type. The best variant from the consensus library, H86Y/A269T, exhibited 66-fold-improved stability in methanol along with elevated thermostability (+4.3°C) and a 2-fold-higher fatty acid methyl ester yield from soybean oil. Based on in silico modeling, we suggest that the Q185L substitution facilitates a closed lid conformation that limits access for both the methanol and substrate excess into the active site. The enhanced stability of H86Y/A269T was a result of formation of new hydrogen bonds. These improved characteristics make this variant a potential biocatalyst for biodiesel production. PMID:24362426

  9. Mutagenesis and functional characterization of the RNA and protein components of the toxIN abortive infection and toxin-antitoxin locus of Erwinia.

    PubMed

    Blower, T R; Fineran, P C; Johnson, M J; Toth, I K; Humphreys, D P; Salmond, G P C

    2009-10-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophage (phage) infection and have developed multiple adaptive resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms include the abortive infection systems, which promote "altruistic suicide" of an infected cell, protecting the clonal population. A cryptic plasmid of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, pECA1039, has been shown to encode an abortive infection system. This highly effective system is active across multiple genera of gram-negative bacteria and against a spectrum of phages. Designated ToxIN, this two-component abortive infection system acts as a toxin-antitoxin module. ToxIN is the first member of a new type III class of protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin modules, of which there are multiple homologues cross-genera. We characterized in more detail the abortive infection phenotype of ToxIN using a suite of Erwinia phages and performed mutagenesis of the ToxI and ToxN components. We determined the minimal ToxI RNA sequence in the native operon that is both necessary and sufficient for abortive infection and to counteract the toxicity of ToxN. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of ToxN revealed key conserved amino acids in this defining member of the new group of toxic proteins. The mechanism of phage activation of the ToxIN system was investigated and was shown to have no effect on the levels of the ToxN protein. Finally, evidence of negative autoregulation of the toxIN operon, a common feature of toxin-antitoxin systems, is presented. This work on the components of the ToxIN system suggests that there is very tight toxin regulation prior to suicide activation by incoming phage.

  10. Mutagenesis Reveals Structure–Activity Parallels between Human A2A Adenosine Receptors and Biogenic Amine G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiaoling; Lee, Brian X.; Glashofer, Marc; van Rhee, A. Michiel; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Structure–affinity relationships for ligand binding at the human A2A adenosine receptor have been probed using site-directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane helical domains (TMs). The mutant receptors were expressed in COS-7 cells and characterized by binding of the radioligands [3H]CGS21680, [3H]NECA, and [3H]XAC. Three residues, at positions essential for ligand binding in other G protein-coupled receptors, were individually mutated. The residue V(3.32) in the A2A receptor that is homologous to the essential aspartate residue of TM3 in the biogenic amine receptors, i.e., V84(3.32), may be substituted with L (present in the A3 receptor) but not with D (in biogenic amine receptors) or A. H250(6.52), homologous to the critical N507 of rat m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, may be substituted with other aromatic residues or with N but not with A (Kim et al. J. Biol. Chem. 1995, 270, 13987–13997). H278(7.43), homologous to the covalent ligand anchor site in rhodopsin, may not be substituted with either A, K, or N. Both V84L(3.32) and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors were highly variable in their effect on ligand competition depending on the structural class of the ligand. Adenosine-5′-uronamide derivatives were more potent at the H250N(6.52) mutant receptor than at wild type receptors. Xanthines tended to be close in potency (H250N(6.52)) or less potent (V84L-(3.32)) than at wild type receptors. The affinity of CGS21680 increased as the pH was lowered to 5.5 in both the wild type and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors. Thus, protonation of H250-(6.52) is not involved in this pH dependence. These data are consistent with a molecular model predicting the proximity of bound agonist ligands to TM3, TM5, TM6, and TM7. PMID:9258366

  11. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-10-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the glycine-rich loop of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) identifies it as a key structure for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Laurie K; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Schavocky, James P; Watterson, D Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie

    2011-05-01

    Death associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a calmodulin (CaM)-regulated protein kinase that is a therapeutic target for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. We report here the results of studies that test the hypothesis of McNamara et al. (2009) that conformational selection in DAPK's glycine-rich region is key for catalytic activity. The hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-23 (Q23) in the middle of this loop. The glycine-rich loop exhibits localized differences in structure among DAPK conformations that correlate with different stages of the catalytic cycle. Changing the Q23 to a Valine (V23), found at the corresponding position in another CaM regulated protein kinase, results in a reduced catalytic efficiency. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of various conformations of the Q23V mutant DAPK and their superimposition with the corresponding conformations from wild type catalytic domain reveal localized changes in the glycine-rich region. The effect of the mutation on DAPK catalytic activity and the finding of only localized changes in the DAPK structure provide experimental evidence implicating conformational selection in this domain with activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  13. Adaptation of Very Virulent Infectious Bursal Disease Virus to Chicken Embryonic Fibroblasts by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Residues 279 and 284 of Viral Coat Protein VP2

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Boon-Leong; Cao, Yongchang; Yu, Tiffany; Mo, Chi-Wai

    1999-01-01

    The full-length RNA genomes of a chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF)-nonpermissive, very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) (strain HK46) were amplified into cDNAs by reverse transcription-PCR. The full-length cDNAs were sequenced and subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, from which point mutations were introduced into the VP2 region by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutated plasmids were transfected directly into CEFs to examine their ability to generate CEF-permissive recombinant viruses. Substitution of amino acid residues 279 (Asp→Asn) and 284 (Ala→Thr) of the VP2 protein yielded a recombinant virus which was able to be passaged in CEFs, whereas the wild-type cDNAs and an amino acid substitution at residue 330 (Ser→Arg) of the VP2 protein alone did not yield viable virus. The results indicated that mutation of other viral proteins, including VP1, VP3, VP4, and VP5, was not required for CEF adaptation of the virus. The same approach may be used to produce CEF-adapted strains from newly evolved IBDVs or to manipulate the antigenicity of the virus. PMID:10074133

  14. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  15. Mutagenesis of SNM1, Which Encodes a Protein Component of the Yeast RNase MRP, Reveals a Role for This Ribonucleoprotein Endoribonuclease in Plasmid Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ti; Reilly, Tracey R.; Cerio, Michael; Schmitt, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease that has been shown to have roles in both mitochondrial DNA replication and nuclear 5.8S rRNA processing. SNM1 encodes an essential 22.5-kDa protein that is a component of yeast RNase MRP. It is an RNA binding protein that binds the MRP RNA specifically. This 198-amino-acid protein can be divided into three structural regions: a potential leucine zipper near the amino terminus, a binuclear zinc cluster in the middle region, and a serine- and lysine-rich region near the carboxy terminus. We have performed PCR mutagenesis of the SNM1 gene to produce 17 mutants that have a conditional phenotype for growth at different temperatures. Yeast strains carrying any of these mutations as the only copy of snm1 display an rRNA processing defect identical to that in MRP RNA mutants. We have characterized these mutant proteins for RNase MRP function by examining 5.8S rRNA processing, MRP RNA binding in vivo, and the stability of the RNase MRP RNA. The results indicate two separate functional domains of the protein, one responsible for binding the MRP RNA and a second that promotes substrate cleavage. The Snm1 protein appears not to be required for the stability of the MRP RNA, but very low levels of the protein are required for processing of the 5.8S rRNA. Surprisingly, a large number of conditional mutations that resulted from nonsense and frameshift mutations throughout the coding regions were identified. The most severe of these was a frameshift at amino acid 7. These mutations were found to be undergoing translational suppression, resulting in a small amount of full-length Snm1 protein. This small amount of Snm1 protein was sufficient to maintain enough RNase MRP activity to support viability. Translational suppression was accomplished in two ways. First, CEN plasmid missegregation leads to plasmid amplification, which in turn leads to SNM1 mRNA overexpression. Translational suppression of a small amount of the superabundant

  16. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Tatjana P.; Maria Cherian, Reeja; Gray, Fiona C.; MacNeill, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural studies. PMID:24723920

  17. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections

    PubMed Central

    Mingo, Janire; Erramuzpe, Asier; Luna, Sandra; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Amo, Laura; Diez, Ibai; Schepens, Jan T. G.; Hendriks, Wiljan J. A. J.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis. PMID:27548698

  18. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections.

    PubMed

    Mingo, Janire; Erramuzpe, Asier; Luna, Sandra; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Amo, Laura; Diez, Ibai; Schepens, Jan T G; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Cortés, Jesús M; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis. PMID:27548698

  19. Combined mutagenesis and kinetics characterization of the bilin-binding GAF domain of the protein Slr1393 from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-Ling; Gutt, Alexander; Mechelke, Jonas; Raffelberg, Sarah; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Valle, Lorena; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-26

    The gene slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a protein composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase domain. GAF3 is the sole domain able to bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) as chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry: switching between a red-absorbing parental and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (λmax =649 and 536 nm, respectively). Conversions in both directions were followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with the separately expressed GAF3 domain of Slr1393. Global fit analysis of the recorded absorbance changes yielded three lifetimes (3.2 μs, 390 μs, and 1.5 ms) for the red-to-green conversion, and 1.2 μs, 340 μs, and 1 ms for the green-to-red conversion. In addition to the wild-type (WT) protein, 24 mutated proteins were studied spectroscopically. The design of these site-directed mutations was based on sequence alignments with related proteins and by employing the crystal structure of AnPixJg2 (PDB ID: 3W2Z), a Slr1393 orthologous from Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The structure of AnPixJg2 was also used as template for model building, thus confirming the strong structural similarity between the proteins, and for identifying amino acids to target for mutagenesis. Only amino acids in close proximity to the chromophore were exchanged, as these were considered likely to have an impact on the spectral and dynamic properties. Three groups of mutants were found: some showed absorption features similar to the WT protein, a second group showed modified absorbance properties, and the third group had lost the ability to bind the chromophore. The most unexpected result was obtained for the exchange at residue 532 (N532Y). In vivo assembly yielded a red-absorbing, WT-like protein. Irradiation, however, not only converted it into the green-absorbing form, but also produced a 660 nm, further-red-shifted absorbance band. This photoproduct was fully reversible to the parental form upon green light irradiation. PMID:24764310

  20. Combined mutagenesis and kinetics characterization of the bilin-binding GAF domain of the protein Slr1393 from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-Ling; Gutt, Alexander; Mechelke, Jonas; Raffelberg, Sarah; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Valle, Lorena; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-26

    The gene slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a protein composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase domain. GAF3 is the sole domain able to bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) as chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry: switching between a red-absorbing parental and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (λmax =649 and 536 nm, respectively). Conversions in both directions were followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with the separately expressed GAF3 domain of Slr1393. Global fit analysis of the recorded absorbance changes yielded three lifetimes (3.2 μs, 390 μs, and 1.5 ms) for the red-to-green conversion, and 1.2 μs, 340 μs, and 1 ms for the green-to-red conversion. In addition to the wild-type (WT) protein, 24 mutated proteins were studied spectroscopically. The design of these site-directed mutations was based on sequence alignments with related proteins and by employing the crystal structure of AnPixJg2 (PDB ID: 3W2Z), a Slr1393 orthologous from Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The structure of AnPixJg2 was also used as template for model building, thus confirming the strong structural similarity between the proteins, and for identifying amino acids to target for mutagenesis. Only amino acids in close proximity to the chromophore were exchanged, as these were considered likely to have an impact on the spectral and dynamic properties. Three groups of mutants were found: some showed absorption features similar to the WT protein, a second group showed modified absorbance properties, and the third group had lost the ability to bind the chromophore. The most unexpected result was obtained for the exchange at residue 532 (N532Y). In vivo assembly yielded a red-absorbing, WT-like protein. Irradiation, however, not only converted it into the green-absorbing form, but also produced a 660 nm, further-red-shifted absorbance band. This photoproduct was fully reversible to the parental form upon green light irradiation.

  1. Analysis of active site residues of the antiviral protein from summer leaves from Phytolacca americana by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Hoeveler, A; Jongeneel, C V

    1998-12-30

    The summer leaf isoform of the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein, PAP II, was produced in high yields from inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli. On the basis of its sequence similarity with the spring leaf isoform (PAP I) and with the A chain of ricin, a three-dimensional model of the protein was constructed as an aid in the design of active site mutants. PAP II variants mutated in residues Asp 88 (D88N), Tyr 117 (Y117S), Glu 172 (E172Q), Arg 175 (R175H) and a combination of Asp 88 and Arg 175 (D88N/R175H) were produced in E. coli and assayed for their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. All of these mutations had effects deleterious to the enzymatic activity of PAP II. The results were interpreted in the light of three reaction mechanisms proposed for ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs). We conclude that none of the proposed mechanisms is entirely consistent with the data presented here.

  2. Analysis of the role of brome mosaic virus 1a protein domains in RNA replication, using linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, P A; Young, B M; Ahlquist, P

    1990-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) belongs to a "superfamily" of plant and animal positive-strand RNA viruses that share, among other features, three large domains of conserved sequence in nonstructural proteins involved in RNA replication. Two of these domains reside in the 109-kDa BMV 1a protein. To examine the role of 1a, we used biologically active cDNA clones of BMV RNA1 to construct a series of linker insertion mutants bearing two-codon insertions dispersed throughout the 1a gene. The majority of these mutations blocked BMV RNA replication in protoplasts, indicating that both intervirally conserved domains function in RNA replication. Coinoculation tests with a large number of mutant combinations failed to reveal detectable complementation between mutations in the N- and C-terminal conserved domains, implying that these two domains either function in some directly interdependent fashion or must be present in the same protein. Four widely spaced mutations with temperature-sensitive (ts) defects in RNA replication were identified, including a strongly ts insertion near the nucleotide-binding consensus of the helicaselike C-terminal domain. Temperature shift experiments with this mutant show that 1a protein is required for continued accumulation of all classes of viral RNA (positive strand, negative strand, and subgenomic) and is required for at least the first 10 h of infection. ts mutations were also identified in the 3' noncoding region of RNA1, 5' to conserved sequences previously implicated in cis for replication. Under nonpermissive conditions, the cis-acting partial inhibition of RNA1 accumulation caused by these noncoding mutations was also associated with reduced levels of the other BMV genomic RNAs. Comparison with previous BMV mutant results suggests that RNA replication is more sensitive to reductions in expression of 1a than of 2a, the other BMV-encoded protein involved in replication. Images PMID:2243389

  3. cDNA cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of a PR-10 protein SPE-16 from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Yan, Ming; Li, Yikun; Chang, Shaojie; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Zhaocai; Gong, Weimin

    2003-12-19

    SPE-16 is a new 16kDa protein that has been purified from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. It's N-terminal amino acid sequence shows significant sequence homology to pathogenesis-related class 10 proteins. cDNA encoding 150 amino acids was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE-16 to be a new member of PR-10 family. The cDNA was cloned into pET15b plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The bacterially expressed SPE-16 also demonstrated ribonuclease-like activity in vitro. Site-directed mutation of three conserved amino acids E95A, E147A, Y150A, and a P-loop truncated form were constructed and their different effects on ribonuclease activities were observed. SPE-16 is also able to bind the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) in the native state. The ANS anion is a much-utilized "hydrophobic probe" for proteins. This binding activity indicated another biological function of SPE-16. PMID:14680830

  4. Identification of structural domains within the cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein by scanning deletion mutagenesis and epitope tagging.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C L; Maule, A J

    1995-01-01

    Plant viruses encode proteins that mediate their movement from cell to cell through plasmodesmata. Currently, the mechanisms of action of these movement proteins (MPs) can be divided broadly into two types, requiring or not requiring the presence of viral capsid protein. Cauliflower mosaic virus encodes a multifunctional MP (P1) that modifies plasmodesmata through the formation of tubules that contain virus particles. To investigate the structure of P1, 26 small deletions (scanning deletions) were used to characterize regions of P1 essential for full biological activity. These deletions identified an N-terminal region and a region close to but not at the C terminus as domains that could tolerate manipulation, although gross deletions of either domain abolished infection. In sequence comparisons with other caulimovirus MPs, these regions coincided with the areas of least amino acid homology. Epitope tags inserted into either of these regions were stably maintained in systemic infections, and in extracts from infected plants, tagged P1 was detected on immunoblots. We predicted that, from the hypervariability of these regions, they would be located on the surface of the native P1 structure. Immunofluorescence of P1-specific tubules formed on the surface of infected protoplasts confirmed that the N-terminal and C terminus-proximal regions were exposed on the surface of the P1 tubule subunit. These findings establish a structure for P1 that is likely to be applicable to other tubule-forming MPs. PMID:7540082

  5. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  6. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT) protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP) methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM) and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO), 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV) for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html. PMID:20929563

  7. CryoEM and mutagenesis reveal that the smallest capsid protein cements and stabilizes Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus capsid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinghong; Gong, Danyang; Xiao, Yuchen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-02-17

    With just one eighth the size of the major capsid protein (MCP), the smallest capsid protein (SCP) of human tumor herpesviruses--Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)--is vital to capsid assembly, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Here, by cryoEM of KSHV at 6-Å resolution, we show that SCP forms a crown on each hexon and uses a kinked helix to cross-link neighboring MCP subunits. SCP-null mutation decreased viral titer by 1,000 times and impaired but did not fully abolish capsid assembly, indicating an important but nonessential role of SCP. By truncating the C-terminal half of SCP and performing cryoEM reconstruction, we demonstrate that SCP's N-terminal half is responsible for the observed structure and function whereas the C-terminal half is flexible and dispensable. Serial truncations further highlight the critical importance of the N-terminal 10 aa, and cryoEM reconstruction of the one with six residues truncated localizes the N terminus of SCP in the cryoEM density map and enables us to construct a pseudoatomic model of SCP. Fitting of this SCP model and a homology model for the MCP upper domain into the cryoEM map reveals that SCP binds MCP largely via hydrophobic interactions and the kinked helix of SCP bridges over neighboring MCPs to form noncovalent cross-links. These data support a mechanistic model that tumor herpesvirus SCP reinforces the capsid for genome packaging, thus acting as a cementing protein similar to those found in many bacteriophages.

  8. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C.; Tan, Qihua; Borst, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney transplant recipients and quantified 359 plasma proteins simultaneously using nano-Liquid-Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry in individual samples and plasma C-reactive protein on the index day and the next day. Next-day C-reactive protein increased in 59 patients whereas it decreased in 32 patients. The prediction model selected and validated 82 plasma proteins which determined increased next-day C-reactive protein (area under receiver-operator-characteristics curve, 0.772; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 0.876; P < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that 82-plex protein signature (P < 0.001) was associated with observed increased next-day C-reactive protein. The 82-plex protein signature outperformed routine clinical procedures. The category-free net reclassification index improved with 82-plex plasma protein signature (total net reclassification index, 88.3%). Using the 82-plex plasma protein signature increased net reclassification index with a clinical meaningful 10% increase of risk mainly by the improvement of reclassification of subjects in the event group. An 82-plex plasma protein signature predicts an increase of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. PMID:26445912

  9. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans.

  10. Functional and receptor binding characterization of recombinant murine macrophage inflammatory protein 2: sequence analysis and mutagenesis identify receptor binding epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Jerva, L. F.; Sullivan, G.; Lolis, E.

    1997-01-01

    Murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a member of the alpha-chemokine family, is one of several proteins secreted by cells in response to lipopolysaccharide. Many of the alpha-chemokines, such as interleukin-8, gro-alpha/MGSA, and neutrophil activating peptide-2 (NAP-2), are associated with neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. We describe the expression, purification, and characterization of murine MIP-2 from Pichia pastoris. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that MIP-2 exhibits a highly ordered secondary structure consistent with the alpha/beta structures of other chemokines. Recombinant MIP-2 is chemotactic for human and murine neutrophils and up-regulates cell surface expression of Mac-1. MIP-2 binds to human and murine neutrophils with dissociation constants of 6.4 nM and 2.9 nM, respectively. We further characterize the binding of MIP-2 to the human types A and B IL-8 receptors and the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. MIP-2 displays low-affinity binding to the type A IL-8 receptor (Kd > 120 nM) and high-affinity binding to the type B IL-8 receptor (Kd 5.7 nM) and the murine receptor (Kd 6.8 nM). The three-dimensional structure of IL-8 and sequence analysis of six chemokines (IL-8, gro-alpha, NAP-2, ENA-78, KC, and MIP-2) that display high-affinity binding to the IL-8 type B receptor are used to identify an extended N-terminal surface that interacts with this receptor. Two mutants of MIP-2 establish that this region is also involved in binding and activating the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. Differences in the sequence between IL-8 and related chemokines identify a unique hydrophobic/aromatic region surrounded by charged residues that is likely to impart specificity to IL-8 for binding to the type A receptor. PMID:9260277

  11. REPLACR-mutagenesis, a one-step method for site-directed mutagenesis by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Czapinski, Jakub; Stepulak, Andrzej; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Mutagenesis is an important tool to study gene regulation, model disease-causing mutations and for functional characterisation of proteins. Most of the current methods for mutagenesis involve multiple step procedures. One of the most accurate methods for genetically altering DNA is recombineering, which uses bacteria expressing viral recombination proteins. Recently, the use of in vitro seamless assembly systems using purified enzymes for multiple-fragment cloning as well as mutagenesis is gaining ground. Although these in vitro isothermal reactions are useful when cloning multiple fragments, for site-directed mutagenesis it is unnecessary. Moreover, the use of purified enzymes in vitro is not only expensive but also more inaccurate than the high-fidelity recombination inside bacteria. Here we present a single-step method, named REPLACR-mutagenesis (Recombineering of Ends of linearised PLAsmids after PCR), for creating mutations (deletions, substitutions and additions) in plasmids by in vivo recombineering. REPLACR-mutagenesis only involves transformation of PCR products in bacteria expressing Red/ET recombineering proteins. Modifications in a variety of plasmids up to bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs; 144 kb deletion) have been achieved by this method. The presented method is more robust, involves fewer steps and is cost-efficient. PMID:26750263

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CP 47 protein of photosystem II: alteration of conserved charged residues in the domain 364E-444R.

    PubMed

    Putnam-Evans, C; Burnap, R; Wu, J; Whitmarsh, J; Bricker, T M

    1996-04-01

    The intrinsic chlorophyll-protein CP 47 is a component of photosystem II in higher plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. We had shown previously by biochemical methods that the domain 364E-440D of CP 47 interacts with the 33 kDa extrinsic protein of photosystem II [Odom, W. R., & Bricker, T. M. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 5616-5620]. In this study, using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, mutations at 17 conserved charged residues were introduced into the domain 364E-444R of the CP 47 protein. Only mutations introduced at positions 384R and 385R led to a modified PS II phenotype. We previously described a mutation at (RR384385GG) which resulted in a mutant with a defective oxygen-evolving complex [Putnam-Evans, C., & Bricker, T. M. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 11482-11488]. An additional set of mutations, 384R to 384G, 385R to 385G, and 384,385RR to 384,385EE has now been introduced at this site yielding the mutants R384G, R385G, and RR384385EE, respectively. Steady state oxygen evolution measurements and quantum yield measurements demonstrated that these mutants exhibited significant alterations in their ability to evolve oxygen. Total fluorescence yield measurements indicated that all of these mutants contained about 85%-90% of the PS II reaction centers found in the control strain. This decrease was insufficient to explain the oxygen evolution results. Analysis of oxygen flash yield parameters indicated that there was little change in the S-state parameters alpha, beta, gamma, or delta. Measurement of the S2 lifetime, however, demonstrated that the S2 lifetime of the mutants was 2-3 times longer than that of the control. Additionally, examination of the risetime of the oxygen signal indicated that there was a significant retardation (6-7-fold) in the rate of oxygen release, suggesting a retarded S3-[S4]-S0 transition. These data reinforce our hypothesis that the positive charge density at positions 384R and 385R in the large

  13. Codon compression algorithms for saturation mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Pines, Assaf; Garst, Andrew D; Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Lynch, Sean A; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-05-15

    Saturation mutagenesis is employed in protein engineering and genome-editing efforts to generate libraries that span amino acid design space. Traditionally, this is accomplished by using degenerate/compressed codons such as NNK (N = A/C/G/T, K = G/T), which covers all amino acids and one stop codon. These solutions suffer from two types of redundancy: (a) different codons for the same amino acid lead to bias, and (b) wild type amino acid is included within the library. These redundancies increase library size and downstream screening efforts. Here, we present a dynamic approach to compress codons for any desired list of amino acids, taking into account codon usage. This results in a unique codon collection for every amino acid to be mutated, with the desired redundancy level. Finally, we demonstrate that this approach can be used to design precise oligo libraries amendable to recombineering and CRISPR-based genome editing to obtain a diverse population with high efficiency.

  14. Transforming a Blue Copper into a Red Copper Protein: Engineering Cysteine and Homocysteine into the Axial Position of Azurin using Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Expressed Protein Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kevin M.; Yu, Yang; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Sieracki, Nathan A.; Nilges, Mark J.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; van der Donk, Wilfred; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The interactions of the axial ligands with copper are known to be important in tuning spectroscopic and redox properties of cupredoxins. While conversion of blue copper sites with a weak axial ligand to green copper sites containing a medium strength axial ligand has been demonstrated in cupredoxins, converting blue copper sites to a red copper site with a strong axial ligand has not been reported. Here we show that replacing Met121 in azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Cys caused an increased ratio (RL) of absorption at 447 nm over that at 621 nm. While no axial Cu-S(Cys121) interaction in Met121Cys was detectable by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at pH 5, similar to what was observed in WT azurin with Met121 as the axial ligand, the Cu-S(Cys121) interaction at 2.74 Å is clearly visible at higher pH. Despite the higher RL and stronger axial Cys121 interaction with Cu(II) ion, the Met121Cys variant remains largely a type 1 copper protein at low pH (with hyperfine coupling constant A|| = 54 × 10−4 cm−1 at pH 4 and 5), or distorted type 1 or green copper protein at high pH (A|| = 87 × 10−4 cm−1 at pH 8 and 9), attributable to the relatively long distance between the axial ligand and copper and the constraint placed by the protein scaffold. To shorten the distance between axial ligand and copper, we replaced Met121 with the nonproteinogenic amino acid homocysteine that contains an extra methylene group, resulting in a variant whose spectra (RL= 1.5, and A|| = 180 × 10−4 cm−1) and Cu-S(Cys) distance (2.22 Å) are very similar to those of the red copper protein nitrosocyanin. Replacing Met121 with Cys resulted in lowering of the reduction potential from 222 mV in the native azurin to 95 ± 3 mV for Met121Cys azurin and 113 ± 6 mV for Met121Hcy at pH 7. The results strongly support the “coupled distortion” model that helps explain axial ligand tuning of spectroscopic properties in cupredoxins, and demonstrate the power of

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis of an energy transducing protein: Bacteriorhodopsin. Final report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Needleman, R.

    1998-05-01

    The objective was to understand at the molecular level how bacteriorhodopsin (BR) transports protons. The work involves the synthesis of mutant BRs, their expression in the natural host, H. halobium, and an investigation of their photocycles. This final report has led to the development of a greatly improved expression system and to an increased understanding of the mechanism of proton transport. At the beginning of the award period a central concern was establishing the details of the photocycle. This phase was essentially complete by mid 1994. The author then investigated the energy coupling mechanism which allows uni-directional proton transfer and found that a major determinant was the coupling of the proton release to changes in the pKa of D85.

  16. Systematic Mutagenesis of Genes Encoding Predicted Autotransported Proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei Identifies Factors Mediating Virulence in Mice, Net Intracellular Replication and a Novel Protein Conferring Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Natalie R. Lazar; Stevens, Mark P.; Dean, Rachel E.; Saint, Richard J.; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  17. Systematic mutagenesis of genes encoding predicted autotransported proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei identifies factors mediating virulence in mice, net intracellular replication and a novel protein conferring serum resistance.

    PubMed

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Stevens, Mark P; Dean, Rachel E; Saint, Richard J; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L; Atkins, Timothy P; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  18. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  19. Economical analysis of saturation mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Reetz, Manfred T; Nov, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Saturation mutagenesis is a powerful technique for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and genomes. In spite of its numerous applications, creating high-quality saturation mutagenesis libraries remains a challenge, as various experimental parameters influence in a complex manner the resulting diversity. We explore from the economical perspective various aspects of saturation mutagenesis library preparation: We introduce a cheaper and faster control for assessing library quality based on liquid media; analyze the role of primer purity and supplier in libraries with and without redundancy; compare library quality, yield, randomization efficiency, and annealing bias using traditional and emergent randomization schemes based on mixtures of mutagenic primers; and establish a methodology for choosing the most cost-effective randomization scheme given the screening costs and other experimental parameters. We show that by carefully considering these parameters, laboratory expenses can be significantly reduced. PMID:26190439

  20. Economical analysis of saturation mutagenesis experiments

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G.; Reetz, Manfred T.; Nov, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Saturation mutagenesis is a powerful technique for engineering proteins, metabolic pathways and genomes. In spite of its numerous applications, creating high-quality saturation mutagenesis libraries remains a challenge, as various experimental parameters influence in a complex manner the resulting diversity. We explore from the economical perspective various aspects of saturation mutagenesis library preparation: We introduce a cheaper and faster control for assessing library quality based on liquid media; analyze the role of primer purity and supplier in libraries with and without redundancy; compare library quality, yield, randomization efficiency, and annealing bias using traditional and emergent randomization schemes based on mixtures of mutagenic primers; and establish a methodology for choosing the most cost-effective randomization scheme given the screening costs and other experimental parameters. We show that by carefully considering these parameters, laboratory expenses can be significantly reduced. PMID:26190439

  1. Therapeutically targeting RNA viruses via lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Graci, Jason D; Cameron, Craig E

    2008-11-01

    RNA viruses exhibit increased mutation frequencies relative to other organisms. Recent work has attempted to exploit this unique feature by increasing the viral mutation frequency beyond an extinction threshold, an antiviral strategy known as lethal mutagenesis. A number of novel nucleoside analogs have been designed around this premise. Herein, we review the quasispecies nature of RNA viruses and survey the antiviral, biological and biochemical characteristics of mutagenic nucleoside analogs, including clinically-used ribavirin. Biological implications of modulating viral replication fidelity are discussed in the context of translating lethal mutagenesis into a clinically-useful antiviral strategy.

  2. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  3. Lethal mutagenesis and evolutionary epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guillaume; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-06-27

    The lethal mutagenesis hypothesis states that within-host populations of pathogens can be driven to extinction when the load of deleterious mutations is artificially increased with a mutagen, and becomes too high for the population to be maintained. Although chemical mutagens have been shown to lead to important reductions in viral titres for a wide variety of RNA viruses, the theoretical underpinnings of this process are still not clearly established. A few recent models sought to describe lethal mutagenesis but they often relied on restrictive assumptions. We extend this earlier work in two novel directions. First, we derive the dynamics of the genetic load in a multivariate Gaussian fitness landscape akin to classical quantitative genetics models. This fitness landscape yields a continuous distribution of mutation effects on fitness, ranging from deleterious to beneficial (i.e. compensatory) mutations. We also include an additional class of lethal mutations. Second, we couple this evolutionary model with an epidemiological model accounting for the within-host dynamics of the pathogen. We derive the epidemiological and evolutionary equilibrium of the system. At this equilibrium, the density of the pathogen is expected to decrease linearly with the genomic mutation rate U. We also provide a simple expression for the critical mutation rate leading to extinction. Stochastic simulations show that these predictions are accurate for a broad range of parameter values. As they depend on a small set of measurable epidemiological and evolutionary parameters, we used available information on several viruses to make quantitative and testable predictions on critical mutation rates. In the light of this model, we discuss the feasibility of lethal mutagenesis as an efficient therapeutic strategy.

  4. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  5. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  6. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  7. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Whittle, Edward J.

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  8. Macromolecular crowding increases structural content of folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Perham, Michael; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2007-10-30

    Here we show that increased amount of secondary structure is acquired in the folded states of two structurally-different proteins (alpha-helical VlsE and alpha/beta flavodoxin) in the presence of macromolecular crowding agents. The structural content of flavodoxin and VlsE is enhanced by 33% and 70%, respectively, in 400 mg/ml Ficoll 70 (pH 7, 20 degrees C) and correlates with higher protein-thermal stability. In the same Ficoll range, there are only small effects on the unfolded-state structures of the proteins. This is the first in vitro assessment of crowding effects on the native-state structures at physiological conditions. Our findings imply that for proteins with low intrinsic stability, the functional structures in vivo may differ from those observed in dilute buffers. PMID:17919600

  9. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  10. Increased phosphate transport of Arabidopsis thaliana Pht1;1 by site-directed mutagenesis of tyrosine 312 may be attributed to the disruption of homomeric interactions.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Elena B; Ditusa, Sandra Feuer; Kato, Naohiro; Olivier, Danielle M; Dale, Renee; Lin, Wei-Yi; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen; Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P

    2015-10-01

    Members of the Pht1 family of plant phosphate (Pi) transporters play vital roles in Pi acquisition from soil and in planta Pi translocation to maintain optimal growth and development. The study of the specificities and biochemical properties of Pht1 transporters will contribute to improving the current understanding of plant phosphorus homeostasis and use-efficiency. In this study, we show through split in vivo interaction methods and in vitro analysis of microsomal root tissues that Arabidopsis thaliana Pht1;1 and Pht1;4 form homomeric and heteromeric complexes. Transient and heterologous expression of the Pht1;1 variants, Pht1;1(Y312D), Pht1;1(Y312A) and Pht1;1(Y312F), was used to analyse the role of a putative Pi binding residue (Tyr 312) in Pht1;1 transporter oligomerization and function. The homomeric interaction among Pht1;1 proteins was disrupted by mutation of Tyr 312 to Asp, but not to Ala or Phe. In addition, the Pht1;1(Y312D) variant conferred enhanced Pi transport when expressed in yeast cells. In contrast, mutation of Tyr 312 to Ala or Phe did not affect Pht1;1 transport kinetics. Our study demonstrates that modifications to the Pht1;1 higher-order structure affects Pi transport, suggesting that oligomerization may serve as a regulatory mechanism for modulating Pi uptake. PMID:25754174

  11. Wisconsin - Increased corn silage protein with intercropped lablab bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein supplements for livestock are costly. In recent research in southern WI, lablab bean grown with corn increased forage CP concentration over monoculture corn without compromising forage yield or potential milk production per acre. Corn was intercropped with each of three climbing beans: lab...

  12. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  13. Codon compression algorithms for saturation mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Pines, Assaf; Garst, Andrew D; Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Lynch, Sean A; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-05-15

    Saturation mutagenesis is employed in protein engineering and genome-editing efforts to generate libraries that span amino acid design space. Traditionally, this is accomplished by using degenerate/compressed codons such as NNK (N = A/C/G/T, K = G/T), which covers all amino acids and one stop codon. These solutions suffer from two types of redundancy: (a) different codons for the same amino acid lead to bias, and (b) wild type amino acid is included within the library. These redundancies increase library size and downstream screening efforts. Here, we present a dynamic approach to compress codons for any desired list of amino acids, taking into account codon usage. This results in a unique codon collection for every amino acid to be mutated, with the desired redundancy level. Finally, we demonstrate that this approach can be used to design precise oligo libraries amendable to recombineering and CRISPR-based genome editing to obtain a diverse population with high efficiency. PMID:25303315

  14. Improvement of Biocatalysts for Industrial and Environmental Purposes by Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valetti, Francesca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evolution techniques are becoming increasingly widespread among protein engineers for the development of novel and designed biocatalysts. The palette of different approaches ranges from complete randomized strategies to rational and structure-guided mutagenesis, with a wide variety of costs, impacts, drawbacks and relevance to biotechnology. A technique that convincingly compromises the extremes of fully randomized vs. rational mutagenesis, with a high benefit/cost ratio, is saturation mutagenesis. Here we will present and discuss this approach in its many facets, also tackling the issue of randomization, statistical evaluation of library completeness and throughput efficiency of screening methods. Successful recent applications covering different classes of enzymes will be presented referring to the literature and to research lines pursued in our group. The focus is put on saturation mutagenesis as a tool for designing novel biocatalysts specifically relevant to production of fine chemicals for improving bulk enzymes for industry and engineering technical enzymes involved in treatment of waste, detoxification and production of clean energy from renewable sources. PMID:24970191

  15. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A.; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E.; Kidman, Amanda A.; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A.

    2016-01-01

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu+ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu+ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome. PMID:27399782

  16. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E; Kidman, Amanda A; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A

    2016-01-01

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu⁺ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu⁺ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome. PMID:27399782

  17. Limited mutagenesis increases the stability of human carboxypeptidase U (TAFIa) and demonstrates the importance of CPU stability over proCPU concentration in down-regulating fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Willemse, Johan; Stenhamre, Hanna; Andersson, Mats; Berntsson, Pia; Furebring, Christina; Harrysson, Anna; Hager, Ann-Christin Malmborg; Wissing, Britt-Marie; Hendriks, Dirk; Cronet, Philippe

    2006-02-01

    Procarboxypeptidase U [proCPU, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), EC 3.4.17.20] belongs to the metallocarboxypeptidase family and is a zymogen found in human plasma. ProCPU has been proposed to be a molecular link between coagulation and fibrinolysis. Upon activation of proCPU, the active enzyme (CPU) rapidly becomes inactive due to its intrinsic instability. The inherent instability of CPU is likely to be of major importance for the in vivo down-regulation of its activity, but the underlying structural mechanisms of this fast and spontaneous loss of activity of CPU have not yet been explained, and they severely inhibit the structural characterization of CPU. In this study, we screened for more thermostable versions of CPU to increase our understanding of the mechanism underlying the instability of CPU's activity. We have shown that single as well as a few 2-4 mutations in human CPU can prolong the half-life of CPU's activity at 37 degrees C from 0.2 h of wild-type CPU to 0.5-5.5 h for the mutants. We provide evidence that the gain in stable activity is accompanied by a gain in thermostability of the enzyme and increased resistance to proteolytic digest by trypsin. Using one of the stable mutants, we demonstrate the importance of CPU stability over proCPU concentration in down-regulating fibrinolysis.

  18. Increasing Protein Charge State When Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Santosh; Flanigan, Paul M.; Perez, Johnny J.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser vaporization is used to transfer cytochrome c, myoglobin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin from the condensed phase into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a mixture of a supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), acetic acid (AA), or formic acid (FA). Interaction of acid-sensitive proteins like cytochrome c and myoglobin with the highly charged ES droplets resulted in a shift to higher charge states in comparison with acid-stable proteins like lysozyme and ubiquitin. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurements showed an increase in both the average charge states (Zavg) and the charge state with maximum intensity (Zmode) for acid-sensitive proteins compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under equivalent solvent conditions. A marked increase in ion abundance of higher charge states was observed for LEMS in comparison with conventional electrospray for cytochrome c (ranging from 19+ to 21+ versus 13+ to 16+) and myoglobin (ranging from 19+ to 26+ versus 18+ to 21+) using an ES solution containing m-NBA and TFA. LEMS measurements as a function of electrospray flow rate yielded increasing charge states with decreasing flow rates for cytochrome c and myoglobin.

  19. A mutant trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae, created by site-directed mutagenesis, improves affinity chromatography for protein trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Kikuchi, N; Nagata, K; Yoshida, N

    1996-08-01

    The Ser-170 residue of a trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae (SFT), which is considered to be the active-site serine, was replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the affinity chromatography step for a Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). The resulting mutant SFT, designated as [S170A]SFT, was expressed in Streptomyces lividans and purified to homogeneity. [S170A]SFT was catalytically inactive, but still had the ability to bind tightly to PSTI and to soybean trypsin inhibitor with dissociation constants of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and 1.9 x 10(-8) M respectively. We further demonstrated that recombinant human PSTI secreted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture broth could be purified to homogeneity with a one-step [S170A]SFT-affinity column. The purified PSTI contained no molecules intramolecularly cleaved by active trypsin, which are found when trypsin-affinity chromatography is used for the purification. This eliminated the need for further separation of intact PSTI from intramolecularly cleaved PSTI by high-performance liquid chromatography, thus simplifying and improving its purification process.

  20. Protein Subcellular Relocalization Increases the Retention of Eukaryotic Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Byun, S. Ashley; Singh, Sarabdeep

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is widely accepted as a key evolutionary process, leading to new genes and novel protein functions. By providing the raw genetic material necessary for functional expansion, the mechanisms that involve the retention and functional diversification of duplicate genes are one of the central topics in evolutionary and comparative genomics. One proposed source of retention and functional diversification is protein subcellular relocalization (PSR). PSR postulates that changes in the subcellular location of eukaryotic duplicate proteins can positively modify function and therefore be beneficial to the organism. As such, PSR would promote retention of those relocalized duplicates and result in significantly lower death rates compared with death rates of nonrelocalized duplicate pairs. We surveyed both relocalized and nonrelocalized duplicate proteins from the available genomes and proteomes of 59 eukaryotic species and compared their relative death rates over a Ks range between 0 and 1. Using the Cox proportional hazard model, we observed that the death rates of relocalized duplicate pairs were significantly lower than the death rates of the duplicates without relocalization in most eukaryotic species examined in this study. These observations suggest that PSR significantly increases retention of duplicate genes and that it plays an important, but currently underappreciated, role in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:24265504

  1. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  2. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  3. Heterologous expression of the lipid transfer protein CERT increases therapeutic protein productivity of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Florin, Lore; Pegel, Antje; Becker, Eric; Hausser, Angelika; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kaufmann, Hitto

    2009-04-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the introduction of transgenes regulating protein transport or affecting post-translational modifications can further improve industrial processes for the production of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cells. Our study on improving therapeutic protein production in CHO cells by heterologous expression of the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) was initiated by the recent discovery that CERT is involved in protein kinase D (PKD)-dependent protein transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. We generated a set of CHO DG44 cell lines by stable integration of constructs expressing either CERT wild-type or CERT S132A, a mutant conferring increased lipid transfer activity, or a mock plasmid. CHO cells expressing heterologous CERT demonstrated significantly higher specific productivities of the therapeutic protein HSA when grown in inoculum suspension cultures. This effect translated into significantly increased overall HSA titers in a fed-batch format where cells are grown in chemically defined serum-free media. Furthermore, we could show that CERT also enhanced monoclonal antibody secretion in two IgG production cell lines with different basal productivities. The data demonstrate the potential of CERT engineering to improve mammalian cell culture production processes to yield high amounts of a therapeutic protein product of desired quality. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a bottle neck in recombinant protein secretion at the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. PMID:19428735

  4. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  5. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  6. Sildenafil increases muscle protein synthesis and reduces muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Wiktorowicz, John E; Soman, Kizhake V; Danesi, Christopher P; Kinsky, Michael P; Dillon, Edgar L; Randolph, Kathleen M; Casperson, Shannon L; Gore, Dennis C; Horstman, Astrid M; Lynch, James P; Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Hsu, Jean W; Jahoor, Farook; Jennings, Kristofer; White, Gregory R; McCammon, Susan D; Durham, William J

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in skeletal muscle function occur during the course of healthy aging as well as with bed rest or diverse diseases such as cancer, muscular dystrophy, and heart failure. However, there are no accepted pharmacologic therapies to improve impaired skeletal muscle function. Nitric oxide may influence skeletal muscle function through effects on excitation-contraction coupling, myofibrillar function, perfusion, and metabolism. Here we show that augmentation of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling by short-term daily administration of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increases protein synthesis, alters protein expression and nitrosylation, and reduces fatigue in human skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors represent viable pharmacologic interventions to improve muscle function. PMID:24330691

  7. Mutagenesis of Surfactant Protein D Informed by Evolution and X-ray Crystallography Enhances Defenses against Influenza A Virus in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Erika; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; McCormack, Francis X.; McDonald, Barbara; Allen, Kimberly; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Cafarella, Tanya M.; White, Mitchell; Lewnard, Kara; Leymarie, Nancy; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of influenza A virus (IAV) by surfactant protein D (SP-D) is mediated by interactions between the SP-D carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) and glycans displayed on envelope glycoproteins. Although native human SP-D shows potent antiviral and aggregating activity, trimeric recombinant neck+CRDs (NCRDs) show little or no capacity to influence IAV infection. A mutant trimeric NCRD, D325A/R343V, showed marked hemagglutination inhibition and viral neutralization, with viral aggregation and aggregation-dependent viral uptake by neutrophils. D325A/R343V exhibited glucose-sensitive binding to Phil82 hemagglutinin trimer (HA) by surface plasmon resonance. By contrast, there was very low binding to the HA trimer from another virus (PR8) that lacks glycans on the HA head. Mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of high mannose glycans on the Phil82 HA at positions known to contribute to IAV binding. Molecular modeling predicted an enhanced capacity for bridging interactions between HA glycans and D325A/R343V. Finally, the trimeric D325A/R343V NCRD decreased morbidity and increased viral clearance in a murine model of IAV infection using a reassortant A/WSN/33 virus with a more heavily glycosylated HA. The combined data support a model in which altered binding by a truncated mutant SP-D to IAV HA glycans facilitates viral aggregation, leading to significant viral neutralization in vitro and in vivo. These studies demonstrate the potential utility of homology modeling and protein structure analysis for engineering effective collectin antivirals as in vivo therapeutics. PMID:21965658

  8. Arenavirus extinction through lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2005-02-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers represent serious human public health problems causing devastating and often lethal disease. Several hemorrhagic fevers are caused by arenaviruses including Lassa fever virus (LFV) and the South American viral hemorrhagic fevers (SAHF). In recent years, increased air travel between Africa and other areas has led to the importation of LFV into the US, Europe, Japan, and Canada. This has raised awareness about arenaviruses as potential emerging viruses. Moreover, because of its severe morbidity and high mortality, and transmissibility from human to human, weaponized forms of LFV poses a real threat as agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is available in the US, and currently there is not efficacious therapy to treat these infections. Therefore, the importance of developing novel effective antiviral drugs to combat HF arenaviruses, for which the prototypic Arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provides us with an excellent model system. Recent findings have shown that LCMV multiplication both in cultured cells and in vivo is highly susceptible to the mutagenic agent 5-fluorouracil (FU). FU-mediated extinction of LCMV was associated with only modest increases in virus mutation frequencies, but did not significantly affect virus replication and transcription, or virus particle formation. These findings indicate that, as with other riboviruses, lethal mutagenesis is effective also against LCMV raising the possibility of using this novel antiviral strategy to combat pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:15649566

  9. Increased capillary permeability for plasma proteins in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Tollan, A; Kvenild, K; Strand, H; Oian, P; Maltau, J M

    1992-05-01

    The transcapillary fluid balance was examined in eleven women before administration of a monophasic oral contraceptive (desogestrel 0.15 mg, ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg), and after three and six months of use. The interstitial colloid osmotic pressure was measured by the "wick" method, and the interstitial hydrostatic pressure by the "wick-in-needle" method in subcutaneous tissue on thorax and leg. During the six-month observation period, the following changes were observed: Plasma colloid osmotic pressure decreased (mean 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.047), as well as serum albumin (mean 5.1 g/l, p = 0.0006), total protein concentration (mean 2.8 g/l, p = 0.0006), hemoglobin (mean 0.5 g/dl, p = 0.014) and hematocrit (mean 1.8%, p = 0.047). Blood pressure and body weight remained unchanged, but foot volume showed a significant increase. The colloid osmotic pressure gradient (plasma-interstitium) was significantly reduced. The results indicate an increase in plasma volume in addition to an increased capillary permeability to plasma proteins during oral contraceptive use. We suggest that the observed changes in transcapillary fluid balance is caused by the estrogen component of the oral contraceptive pill.

  10. Codon Optimizing for Increased Membrane Protein Production: A Minimalist Approach.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Kiavash; Toddo, Stephen; Nørholm, Morten H H; Daley, Daniel O

    2016-01-01

    Reengineering a gene with synonymous codons is a popular approach for increasing production levels of recombinant proteins. Here we present a minimalist alternative to this method, which samples synonymous codons only at the second and third positions rather than the entire coding sequence. As demonstrated with two membrane-embedded transporters in Escherichia coli, the method was more effective than optimizing the entire coding sequence. The method we present is PCR based and requires three simple steps: (1) the design of two PCR primers, one of which is degenerate; (2) the amplification of a mini-library by PCR; and (3) screening for high-expressing clones. PMID:27485329

  11. The Parasol Protocol for computational mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Aronica, P G A; Verma, C; Popovic, B; Leatherbarrow, R J; Gould, I R

    2016-07-01

    To aid in the discovery and development of peptides and proteins as therapeutic agents, a virtual screen can be used to predict trends and direct workflow. We have developed the Parasol Protocol, a dynamic method implemented using the AMBER MD package, for computational site-directed mutagenesis. This tool can mutate between any pair of amino acids in a computationally expedient, automated manner. To demonstrate the potential of this methodology, we have employed the protocol to investigate a test case involving stapled peptides, and have demonstrated good agreement with experiment. PMID:27255759

  12. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process. PMID:26968261

  13. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  14. Crystal structures and mutagenesis of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases elucidate the selectivity of cantharidin and novel norcantharidin-based inhibitors of PP5C.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debasish; Swingle, Mark R; Salter, Edward A; Wood, Eric; D'Arcy, Brandon; Zivanov, Catherine; Abney, Kevin; Musiyenko, Alla; Rusin, Scott F; Kettenbach, Arminja; Yet, Larry; Schroeder, Chad E; Golden, Jennifer E; Dunham, Wade H; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Banerjee, Surajit; Forbes, David; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Honkanen, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Cantharidin is a natural toxin and an active constituent in a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat tumors. Cantharidin acts as a semi-selective inhibitor of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases. Despite sharing a common catalytic mechanism and marked structural similarity with PP1C, PP2AC and PP5C, human PP4C was found to be insensitive to the inhibitory activity of cantharidin. To explore the molecular basis for this selectivity, we synthesized and tested novel C5/C6-derivatives designed from quantum-based modeling of the interactions revealed in the co-crystal structures of PP5C in complex with cantharidin. Structure-activity relationship studies and analysis of high-resolution (1.25Å) PP5C-inhibitor co-crystal structures reveal close contacts between the inhibitor bridgehead oxygen and both a catalytic metal ion and a non-catalytic phenylalanine residue, the latter of which is substituted by tryptophan in PP4C. Quantum chemistry calculations predicted that steric clashes with the bulkier tryptophan side chain in PP4C would force all cantharidin-based inhibitors into an unfavorable binding mode, disrupting the strong coordination of active site metal ions observed in the PP5C co-crystal structures, thereby rendering PP4C insensitive to the inhibitors. This prediction was confirmed by inhibition studies employing native human PP4C. Mutation of PP5C (F446W) and PP1C (F257W), to mimic the PP4C active site, resulted in markedly suppressed sensitivity to cantharidin. These observations provide insight into the structural basis for the natural selectivity of cantharidin and provide an avenue for PP4C deselection. The novel crystal structures also provide insight into interactions that provide increased selectivity of the C5/C6 modifications for PP5C versus other PPP-family phosphatases.

  15. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  16. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the methionine requirement in kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Kass, P H; Rogers, Q R

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the methionine (met) requirement of kittens is correlated with the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). The study used 48 male kittens in two replications of six 4 x 4 Latin squares, each representing one concentration of met (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 6.0 or 9.0 g/kg diet) with four CP concentrations (150, 200, 300 and 500 g/kg diet) in 2-week periods. Cystine was present in the lowest CP diet at 5.3 g/kg diet and increased as dietary CP increased. Body weight gain, food intake, nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids, glucose, insulin, cortisol, somatomedin C, T(3) and T(4) concentrations on day 12 were measured. From breakpoint analysis of the nitrogen retention curves, the met requirement of kittens was found to be 3.1, 3.8, 3.1 and 2.4 g met/kg for the 150, 200, 300 and 500 g CP/kg diets, respectively. When met was limiting (1.5 or 2.5 g/kg diet), increasing dietary CP did not decrease, but rather increased food intake, body weight gain and nitrogen retention. Plasma met concentrations increased as dietary met increased and at 2.5-3.5 g met/kg diet were not different among kittens fed the various CP diets. Total plasma T(3) and T(4) increased significantly as dietary CP increased in kittens given the 2.5 and 4.5 g met/kg diets. Results indicate that food intake and possibly altered hormonal secretion play a role in this growth response. In conclusion, the met requirement of growing kittens, unlike omnivores and herbivores studied, was not positively correlated with the concentration of dietary CP.

  17. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jungwoo; Bae, Ju Yun; Lee, Young Mi; Kwon, Hyeji; Moon, Hye-Yun; Kang, Hyun Ah; Yee, Su-Bog; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2011-08-01

    Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by

  18. Protein Structure, Function Set for Explosive Increase in Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Cites advances in x-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, computer modeling, and display to guide the design and analysis of protein structures. Reviews recent advances in knowledge, synthesis techniques, and theory of proteins. (JM)

  19. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the predicted rRNA-binding domain of ErmC' redefines the substrate-binding site and suggests a model for protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna

    2003-08-15

    The Erm family of adenine-N(6) methyltransferases (MTases) is responsible for the development of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics through the methylation of 23S ribosomal RNA. Hence, these proteins are important potential drug targets. Despite the availability of the NMR and crystal structures of two members of the family (ErmAM and ErmC', respectively) and extensive studies on the RNA substrate, the substrate-binding site and the amino acids involved in RNA recognition by the Erm MTases remain unknown. It has been proposed that the small C-terminal domain functions as a target-binding module, but this prediction has not been tested experimentally. We have undertaken structure-based mutational analysis of 13 charged or polar residues located on the predicted rRNA-binding surface of ErmC' with the aim to identify the area of protein-RNA interactions. The results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of mutant protein suggest that the key RNA-binding residues are located not in the small domain, but in the large catalytic domain, facing the cleft between the two domains. Based on the mutagenesis data, a preliminary three-dimensional model of ErmC' complexed with the minimal substrate was constructed. The identification of the RNA-binding site of ErmC' may be useful for structure-based design of novel drugs that do not necessarily bind to the cofactor-binding site common to many S-adenosyl-L- methionine-dependent MTases, but specifically block the substrate-binding site of MTases from the Erm family. PMID:12907737

  20. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the predicted rRNA-binding domain of ErmC' redefines the substrate-binding site and suggests a model for protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna

    2003-08-15

    The Erm family of adenine-N(6) methyltransferases (MTases) is responsible for the development of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics through the methylation of 23S ribosomal RNA. Hence, these proteins are important potential drug targets. Despite the availability of the NMR and crystal structures of two members of the family (ErmAM and ErmC', respectively) and extensive studies on the RNA substrate, the substrate-binding site and the amino acids involved in RNA recognition by the Erm MTases remain unknown. It has been proposed that the small C-terminal domain functions as a target-binding module, but this prediction has not been tested experimentally. We have undertaken structure-based mutational analysis of 13 charged or polar residues located on the predicted rRNA-binding surface of ErmC' with the aim to identify the area of protein-RNA interactions. The results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of mutant protein suggest that the key RNA-binding residues are located not in the small domain, but in the large catalytic domain, facing the cleft between the two domains. Based on the mutagenesis data, a preliminary three-dimensional model of ErmC' complexed with the minimal substrate was constructed. The identification of the RNA-binding site of ErmC' may be useful for structure-based design of novel drugs that do not necessarily bind to the cofactor-binding site common to many S-adenosyl-L- methionine-dependent MTases, but specifically block the substrate-binding site of MTases from the Erm family.

  1. Optogenetic mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Noma, Kentaro; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify and damage DNA. Here we report an optogenetic mutagenesis approach that is free of toxic chemicals and easy to perform by taking advantage of a genetically encoded ROS generator. This method relies on the potency of ROS generation by His-mSOG, the mini singlet oxygen generator, miniSOG, fused to a histone. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing His-mSOG in the germline behave and reproduce normally, without photoinduction. Following exposure to blue light, the His-mSOG animals produce progeny with a wide range of heritable phenotypes. We show that optogenetic mutagenesis by His-mSOG induces a broad spectrum of mutations including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), chromosomal deletions, as well as integration of extrachromosomal transgenes, which complements those derived from traditional chemical or radiation mutagenesis. The optogenetic mutagenesis expands the toolbox for forward genetic screening and also provides direct evidence that nuclear ROS can induce heritable and specific genetic mutations. PMID:26632265

  2. Random tag insertions by Transposon Integration mediated Mutagenesis (TIM).

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Brigitte M; Reiter, Birgit; Abad, Sandra; Graze, Ina; Glieder, Anton

    2008-10-01

    Transposon Integration mediated Mutagenesis (TIM) is a broadly applicable tool for protein engineering. This method combines random integration of modified bacteriophage Mu transposons with their subsequent defined excision employing type IIS restriction endonuclease AarI. TIM enables deletion or insertion of an arbitrary number of bases at random positions, insertion of functional sequence tags at random positions, replacing randomly selected triplets by a specific codon (e.g. scanning) and site-saturation mutagenesis. As a proof of concept a transposon named GeneOpenerAarIKan was designed and employed to introduce 6xHis tags randomly into the esterase EstC from Burkholderia gladioli. A TIM library was screened with colony based assays for clones with an integrated 6xHis tag and for clones exhibiting esterase activity. The employed strategy enables the isolation of randomly tagged active enzymes in single mutagenesis experiments.

  3. Fusing two cytochromes b of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1 using various linkers defines a set of protein templates for asymmetric mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Monika; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome bc(1) (mitochondrial complex III), one of the key enzymes of biological energy conversion, is a functional homodimer in which each monomer contains three catalytic subunits: cytochrome c(1), the iron-sulfur subunit and cytochrome b. The latter is composed of eight transmembrane α-helices which, in duplicate, form a hydrophobic core of a dimer. We show that two cytochromes b can be fused into one 16-helical subunit using a number of different peptide linkers that vary in length but all connect the C-terminus of one cytochrome with the N-terminus of the other. The fusion proteins replace two cytochromes b in the dimer defining a set of available protein templates for introducing mutations that allow breaking symmetry of a dimer. A more detailed comparison of the form with the shortest, 3 amino acid, linker to the form with 12 amino acid linker established that both forms display similar level of structural plasticity to accommodate several, but not all, asymmetric patterns of mutations that knock out individual segments of cofactor chains. While the system based on a fused gene does not allow for the assessments of the functionality of electron-transfer paths in vivo, the family of proteins with fused cytochrome b offers attractive model for detailed investigations of molecular mechanism of catalysis at in vitro/reconstitution level.

  4. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-01

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  5. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the essential amino acid requirements of kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2006-08-01

    Essential amino acid (EAA) requirements of omnivores and herbivores (e.g. chicks, lambs, pigs and rats) are directly related to the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). When an EAA is limiting in the diet, addition of a mixture of EAA lacking the limiting one (which increases dietary CP) results in a decrease in food intake and weight gain. This interaction has been referred to as an AA imbalance and has not been studied in depth in strict carnivores. The objectives of these experiments were to examine the effects on growing kittens (2-week periods) of the addition to diets of a mixture of AA lacking the limiting one. The control diets were at the requirement of the respective limiting EAA (or about 85% of the 1986 National Research Council requirement). In experiment 1, with the dietary EAAs at the minimally determined requirements, the concentration of the essential or dispensable amino acids was increased to determine if CP or an EAA was limiting. Results of growth rates (n = 12) and plasma AA concentrations indicated that tryptophan was limiting, but increased body weight gain also occurred when the concentration of CP was increased as dispensable amino acids without additional tryptophan. Experiment 1 was repeated in experiment 2 using a crossover design. Again, when tryptophan was limiting additional concentrations of dispensable AAs increased body weight gain. This response is the opposite of that in herbivores and omnivores. Experiment 3 consisted of 10 separate crossover trials, one for each of the 10 EAA and examined the effect of two concentrations of dietary CP (200 and 300 g CP/kg diet) on body weight gain of kittens (n = 8) offered diets limiting in each respective EAA. Body weight gain was numerically greater when diets contained 300 g CP/kg than 200 g CP/kg for eight of 10 EAAs (p < 0.05 for only isoleucine and threonine) when each amino acid was limiting. This response is the reverse of that which occurs in chicks, lambs, pigs and rats when

  6. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  7. Increased coverage of protein families with the blocks database servers.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Greene, E A; Pietrokovski, S; Henikoff, S

    2000-01-01

    The Blocks Database WWW (http://blocks.fhcrc.org ) and Email (blocks@blocks.fhcrc.org ) servers provide tools to search DNA and protein queries against the Blocks+ Database of multiple alignments, which represent conserved protein regions. Blocks+ nearly doubles the number of protein families included in the database by adding families from the Pfam-A, ProDom and Domo databases to those from PROSITE and PRINTS. Other new features include improved Block Searcher statistics, searching with NCBI's IMPALA program and 3D display of blocks on PDB structures.

  8. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 83, 127 and 128 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E J; Glasgow, J; Leu, S F; Belduz, A O; Harman, J G

    1994-01-01

    The cyclic 3', 5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute cysteine or glycine for serine 83; cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine for threonine 127; and threonine or alanine for serine 128. Cells that expressed the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. Purified wild-type and mutant CRP preparations were characterized by measurement of cAMP binding activity and by their capacity to support lacP activation in vitro. CRP structure was assessed by measurement of sensitivity to protease and DTNB-mediated subunit crosslinking. The results of this study show that cAMP interactions with serine 83, threonine 127 and serine 128 contribute to CRP activation and have little effect on cAMP binding. Amino acid substitutions that introduce hydrophobic amino acid side chain constituents at either position 127 or 128 decrease CRP discrimination of cAMP and cGMP. Finally, cAMP-induced CRP structural change(s) that occur in or near the CRP hinge region result from cAMP interaction with threonine 127; substitution of threonine 127 by cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine produced forms of CRP that contained, independently of cAMP binding, structural changes similar to those of the wild-type CRP:cAMP complex. Images PMID:8065899

  9. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics in the Green Fluorescent Protein Variant S65T/H148D 1. Mutagenesis and Structural Studies†

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaokun; Kallio, Karen; Shi, Xinghua; Abbyad, Paul; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Childs, William; Boxer, Steven G.; Remington, S. James

    2008-01-01

    Wild type green fluorescent protein (wt-GFP) and the variant S65T/H148D each exhibit two absorption bands, A and B, which are associated with the protonated and deprotonated chromophores respectively. Excitation of either band leads to green emission. In wt-GFP, excitation of band A (~390 nm) leads to green emission with a rise time of 10–15 picoseconds, due to excited state proton transfer (ESPT) from the chromophore hydroxyl group to an acceptor. This process produces an anionic excited state intermediate I* that subsequently emits a green photon. In the variant S65T/H148D, the A band absorbance maximum is red-shifted to ~415 nm and as detailed in the accompanying papers (1, 2), when the A band is excited, green fluorescence appears with rise time shorter than the instrument time resolution (~170 fs). Based on steady state spectroscopy and high resolution crystal structures of several variants described herein, we propose that in S65T/H148D, the red shift of absorption band A and the ultrafast appearance of green fluorescence upon excitation of band A is due to a very short (≤ 2.4 Å), and possibly low barrier, hydrogen bond between the chromophore hydroxyl and introduced Asp148. PMID:17918959

  10. Theories of Lethal Mutagenesis: From Error Catastrophe to Lethal Defection.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Héctor; Montero, Francisco; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses get extinct in a process called lethal mutagenesis when subjected to an increase in their mutation rate, for instance, by the action of mutagenic drugs. Several approaches have been proposed to understand this phenomenon. The extinction of RNA viruses by increased mutational pressure was inspired by the concept of the error threshold. The now classic quasispecies model predicts the existence of a limit to the mutation rate beyond which the genetic information of the wild type could not be efficiently transmitted to the next generation. This limit was called the error threshold, and for mutation rates larger than this threshold, the quasispecies was said to enter into error catastrophe. This transition has been assumed to foster the extinction of the whole population. Alternative explanations of lethal mutagenesis have been proposed recently. In the first place, a distinction is made between the error threshold and the extinction threshold, the mutation rate beyond which a population gets extinct. Extinction is explained from the effect the mutation rate has, throughout the mutational load, on the reproductive ability of the whole population. Secondly, lethal defection takes also into account the effect of interactions within mutant spectra, which have been shown to be determinant for the understanding the extinction of RNA virus due to an augmented mutational pressure. Nonetheless, some relevant issues concerning lethal mutagenesis are not completely understood yet, as so survival of the flattest, i.e. the development of resistance to lethal mutagenesis by evolving towards mutationally more robust regions of sequence space, or sublethal mutagenesis, i.e., the increase of the mutation rate below the extinction threshold which may boost the adaptability of RNA virus, increasing their ability to develop resistance to drugs (including mutagens). A better design of antiviral therapies will still require an improvement of our knowledge about lethal

  11. Human Serotonin 5-HT2C G Protein-Coupled Receptor Homology Model from the β2 Adrenoceptor Structure: Ligand Docking and Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    RDOVA-SINTJAGO, TANIA CÓ; VILLA, NANCY; CANAL, CLINTON; BOOTH, RAYMOND

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is proposed as novel pharmacotherapy for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast, activation of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B GPCRs is associated with untoward hallucinogenic and cardiopulmonary effects, respectively. There is no crystal structure available to guide design of 5-HT2C receptor-specific ligands. For this reason, a homology model of the 5-HT2C receptor was built based on the crystal structure of the human β2 adrenoceptor GPCR to delineate molecular determinants of ligand–receptor interactions for drug design purposes. Computational and experimental studies were carried out to validate the model. Binding of N(CH3)2-PAT [(1R, 3S)-(−)-trans-1-phenyl-3-N,N-dimethylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene], a novel 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A/2B inverse agonist, and its secondary [NH(CH3)-PAT] and primary (NH2-PAT) amine analogs were studied at the 5-HT2C wild type (WT) and D3.32A, S3.36A, and Y7.43A 5-HT2C point-mutated receptors. Reference ligands included the tertiary amines lisuride and mesulergine and the primary amine 5-HT. Modeling results indicated that 5-HT2C residues D3.32, S3.36, and Y7.43 play a role in ligand binding. Experimental ligand binding results with WT and point-mutated receptors confirmed the impact of D3.32, S3.36, and Y7.43 on ligand affinity. PMID:24244046

  12. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  13. Activity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fusion peptide in an experimental model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Opal, S M; Palardy, J E; Jhung, J W; Donsky, C; Romulo, R L; Parejo, N; Marra, M N

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of the N-terminal domain of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and the C-terminal domain of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit (P = 0.001) and reduced endotoxin levels (P < 0.01) in neutropenic rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. This lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/ permeability-increasing peptide has favorable pharmacokinetics and antiendotoxin properties which may be of value for human sepsis. PMID:8593028

  14. The Single T65S Mutation Generates Brighter Cyan Fluorescent Proteins with Increased Photostability and pH Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fredj, Asma; Pasquier, Hélène; Demachy, Isabelle; Jonasson, Gabriella; Levy, Bernard; Derrien, Valérie; Bousmah, Yasmina; Manoussaris, Gallia; Wien, Frank; Ridard, Jacqueline; Erard, Marie; Merola, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Cyan fluorescent proteins (CFP) derived from Aequorea victoria GFP, carrying a tryptophan-based chromophore, are widely used as FRET donors in live cell fluorescence imaging experiments. Recently, several CFP variants with near-ultimate photophysical performances were obtained through a mix of site-directed and large scale random mutagenesis. To understand the structural bases of these improvements, we have studied more specifically the consequences of the single-site T65S mutation. We find that all CFP variants carrying the T65S mutation not only display an increased fluorescence quantum yield and a simpler fluorescence emission decay, but also show an improved pH stability and strongly reduced reversible photoswitching reactions. Most prominently, the Cerulean-T65S variant reaches performances nearly equivalent to those of mTurquoise, with QY  = 0.84, an almost pure single exponential fluorescence decay and an outstanding stability in the acid pH range (pK1/2 = 3.6). From the detailed examination of crystallographic structures of different CFPs and GFPs, we conclude that these improvements stem from a shift in the thermodynamic balance between two well defined configurations of the residue 65 hydroxyl. These two configurations differ in their relative stabilization of a rigid chromophore, as well as in relaying the effects of Glu222 protonation at acid pHs. Our results suggest a simple method to greatly improve numerous FRET reporters used in cell imaging, and bring novel insights into the general structure-photophysics relationships of fluorescent proteins. PMID:23133673

  15. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  16. Mutagenesis assays of human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.; Milne, K.L.; Warbuton, D.; McClamrock, H.D.; Buchanan, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of amniocentesis samples from 144 women were tested for the presence of mutagenic substances using tester strain TA1538 in the Ames Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. Because the volume of amniotic fluid in these samples was limited (generally less than 10 ml), the authors investigated modifications of this mutagenesis assay that could increase its ability to detect effects from small quantities of test material. Using mutagenicity in samples of urine from smokers as a model, it appeared that improved ability to detect small amounts of mutagen could be obtained by reducing volumes of media and reagents while keeping the amount of test sample constant. Tests of amniotic fluid extracts by this modified procedure showed small increases in revertants, about 50% above dimethylsulfoxide solvent control values. The increases suggest the presence of small amounts of mutagenic material in many of the amniotic fluid samples. At the doses employed, mutagenic activity in these samples was not associated with maternal smoking.

  17. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  18. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palacín, Manuel; Vázquez-Ibar, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis L-serine/L-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian L-amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT's lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. PMID:26976827

  19. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  20. Stress-induced mutagenesis and complex adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Yoav; Hadany, Lilach

    2014-01-01

    Because mutations are mostly deleterious, mutation rates should be reduced by natural selection. However, mutations also provide the raw material for adaptation. Therefore, evolutionary theory suggests that the mutation rate must balance between adaptability—the ability to adapt—and adaptedness—the ability to remain adapted. We model an asexual population crossing a fitness valley and analyse the rate of complex adaptation with and without stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM)—the increase of mutation rates in response to stress or maladaptation. We show that SIM increases the rate of complex adaptation without reducing the population mean fitness, thus breaking the evolutionary trade-off between adaptability and adaptedness. Our theoretical results support the hypothesis that SIM promotes adaptation and provide quantitative predictions of the rate of complex adaptation with different mutational strategies. PMID:25143032

  1. Transcriptional mutagenesis: causes and involvement in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Brégeon, Damien; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of normal cells in a human do not multiply continuously but are quiescent and devote most of their energy to gene transcription. When DNA damages in the transcribed strand of an active gene are bypassed by an RNA polymerase, they can miscode at the damaged site and produce mutant transcripts. This process known as transcriptional mutagenesis can lead to the production of mutant proteins that could be important in tumor development. PMID:21346784

  2. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  3. Lower Protein Stability Does Not Necessarily Increase Local Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-17

    Overall protein stability is thought to have an important impact on the millisecond time scale dynamics modulating enzyme function. In order to better understand the effects of overall stability on the substructure dynamics of mitochondrial cytochrome c, we test the effect of a destabilizing L85A mutation on the kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics of the alkaline conformational transition. The alkaline conformational transition replaces the Met80 ligand of the heme with a lysine residue from Ω-loop D, the heme crevice loop, consisting of residues 70-85. Residues 67-87 are the most conserved portion of the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c, suggesting that this region is of prime importance for function. Mutations to Ω-loop D affect the stability of the heme crevice directly, modulating the pKapp of the alkaline transition. Two variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c, WT*/L85A and WT*/K73H/L85A, were prepared for these studies. Guanidine-HCl unfolding monitored by circular dichroism and pH titrations at 695 nm, respectively, were used to study the thermodynamics of global and local unfolding of these variants. The kinetics of the alkaline transition were measured by pH-jump stopped-flow methods. Gated electron transfer techniques using bis(2,2',2″-terpyridine)cobalt(II) as a reducing reagent were implemented to measure the heme crevice dynamics for the WT*/K73H/L85A variant. Contrary to the expectation that dynamics around the heme crevice would be faster for the less stable WT*/K73H/L85A variant, based on the behavior of psychrophilic versus mesophilic enzymes, they were similar to those for a variant without the L85A mutation. In fact, below pH 7, the dynamics of the WT*/K73H/L85A variant were slower. PMID:27104373

  4. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called “Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis” (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states. PMID:25611189

  5. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  6. TET2-mediated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine induces genetic instability and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Emna; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Cabagnols, Xenia; Della Valle, Véronique; Secardin, Lise; Rameau, Philippe; Bernard, Olivier A; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Abbes, Salem; Vainchenker, William; Saparbaev, Murat; Plo, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    The family of Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins is implicated in the process of active DNA demethylation and thus in epigenetic regulation. TET 1, 2 and 3 proteins are oxygenases that can hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and further oxidize 5-hmC into 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). The base excision repair (BER) pathway removes the resulting 5-fC and 5-caC bases paired with a guanine and replaces them with regular cytosine. The question arises whether active modification of 5-mC residues and their subsequent elimination could affect the genomic DNA stability. Here, we generated two inducible cell lines (Ba/F3-EPOR, and UT7) overexpressing wild-type or catalytically inactive human TET2 proteins. Wild-type TET2 induction resulted in an increased level of 5-hmC and a cell cycle defect in S phase associated with higher level of phosphorylated P53, chromosomal and centrosomal abnormalities. Furthermore, in a thymine-DNA glycosylase (Tdg) deficient context, the TET2-mediated increase of 5-hmC induces mutagenesis characterized by GC>AT transitions in CpG context suggesting a mutagenic potential of 5-hmC metabolites. Altogether, these data suggest that TET2 activity and the levels of 5-hmC and its derivatives should be tightly controlled to avoid genetic and chromosomal instabilities. Moreover, TET2-mediated active demethylation might be a very dangerous process if used to entirely demethylate the genome and might rather be used only at specific loci. PMID:27289557

  7. Cryptococcus neoformans virulence gene discovery through insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Idnurm, Alexander; Reedy, Jennifer L; Nussbaum, Jesse C; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-04-01

    Insertional mutagenesis was applied to Cryptococcus neoformans to identify genes associated with virulence attributes. Using biolistic transformation, we generated 4,300 nourseothricin (NAT)-resistant strains, of which 590 exhibited stable resistance. We focused on mutants with defects in established virulence factors and identified two with reduced growth at 37 degrees C, four with reduced production of the antioxidant pigment melanin, and two with an increased sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO). The NAT insertion and mutant phenotypes were genetically linked in five of eight mutants, and the DNA flanking the insertions was characterized. For the strains with altered growth at 37 degrees C and altered melanin production, mutations were in previously uncharacterized genes, while the two NO-sensitive strains bore insertions in the flavohemoglobin gene FHB1, whose product counters NO stress. Because of the frequent instability of nourseothricin resistance associated with biolistic transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was tested. This transkingdom DNA delivery approach produced 100% stable nourseothricin-resistant transformants, and three melanin-defective strains were identified from 576 transformants, of which 2 were linked to NAT in segregation analysis. One of these mutants contained a T-DNA insertion in the promoter of the LAC1 (laccase) gene, which encodes a key enzyme required for melanin production, while the second contained an insertion in the promoter of the CLC1 gene, encoding a voltage-gated chloride channel. Clc1 and its homologs are required for ion homeostasis, and in their absence Cu+ transport into the secretory pathway is compromised, depriving laccase and other Cu(+)-dependent proteins of their essential cofactor. The NAT resistance cassette was optimized for cryptococcal codon usage and GC content and was then used to disrupt a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, a predicted gene, and two putative chloride channel genes to

  8. Theory of lethal mutagenesis for viruses.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Sanjuán, R; Wilke, C O

    2007-03-01

    Mutation is the basis of adaptation. Yet, most mutations are detrimental, and elevating mutation rates will impair a population's fitness in the short term. The latter realization has led to the concept of lethal mutagenesis for curing viral infections, and work with drugs such as ribavirin has supported this perspective. As yet, there is no formal theory of lethal mutagenesis, although reference is commonly made to Eigen's error catastrophe theory. Here, we propose a theory of lethal mutagenesis. With an obvious parallel to the epidemiological threshold for eradication of a disease, a sufficient condition for lethal mutagenesis is that each viral genotype produces, on average, less than one progeny virus that goes on to infect a new cell. The extinction threshold involves an evolutionary component based on the mutation rate, but it also includes an ecological component, so the threshold cannot be calculated from the mutation rate alone. The genetic evolution of a large population undergoing mutagenesis is independent of whether the population is declining or stable, so there is no runaway accumulation of mutations or genetic signature for lethal mutagenesis that distinguishes it from a level of mutagenesis under which the population is maintained. To detect lethal mutagenesis, accurate measurements of the genome-wide mutation rate and the number of progeny per infected cell that go on to infect new cells are needed. We discuss three methods for estimating the former. Estimating the latter is more challenging, but broad limits to this estimate may be feasible.

  9. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  10. Increasing discordant antioxidant protein levels and enzymatic activities contribute to increasing redox imbalance observed during human prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Chaiswing, Luksana; Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D.

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomics study demonstrated a decrease in glutathione and an increase in cysteine (Cys) levels in human prostate cancer (PCa) tissues as Gleason scores increased, indicating redox imbalance with PCa progression. These results were extended in the present study by analyzing redox state of the protein thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and sulfinylation (SO3) of peroxiredoxins (Prxs) (PrxsSO3) in PCa tissues and cell lines. Lysates of paired human PCa tissues with varying degree of aggressiveness and adjacent benign (BN) tissues were used for analysis. Redox western blot analysis of Trx1 demonstrated low levels of reduced and high levels of oxidized Trx1 (functional and non-functional, respectively) in high grade PCa (Gleason scores 4+4 to 4+5) in comparison to intermediate grade PCa (Gleason scores 3+3 to 3+4) or BN tissues. PrxsSO3 were increased in high grade PCa. Oxidized Trx1 and PrxsSO3 are indicators of oxidative stress. To study whether redox imbalance may potentially affect enzyme activities of antioxidant proteins (AP), we determined levels of selected AP in PCa tissues by western blot analysis and found that mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Prx 3, and Trx1 were increased in high grade PCa tissues when compared with BN tissues. Enzyme activities of MnSOD in high grade PCa tissues were significantly increased but at a lower magnitude when compared with the levels of MnSOD protein (0.5 folds vs. 2 folds increase). Trx1 activity was not changed in high grade PCa tissues despite a large increase in Trx1 protein expression. Further studies demonstrated a significant increase in posttranslational modifications of tyrosine and lysine residues in MnSOD protein and oxidation of Cys at active site (Cys 32 and Cys 35) and regulatory site (Cys 62 and Cys 69) of Trx1 in high grade PCa compared to BN tissues. These discordant changes between protein levels and enzyme activities are consistent with protein inactivation by redox imbalance and

  11. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  12. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction. PMID:26298568

  13. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  14. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kentaro; Gee, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9), hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9. PMID:26501275

  15. Multiplex conditional mutagenesis in zebrafish using the CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Maddison, L A; Chen, W

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system is a powerful tool for genome editing in numerous organisms. However, the system is typically used for gene editing throughout the entire organism. Tissue and temporal specific mutagenesis is often desirable to determine gene function in a specific stage or tissue and to bypass undesired consequences of global mutations. We have developed the CRISPR/Cas system for conditional mutagenesis in transgenic zebrafish using tissue-specific and/or inducible expression of Cas9 and U6-driven expression of sgRNA. To allow mutagenesis of multiple targets, we have isolated four distinct U6 promoters and designed Golden Gate vectors to easily assemble transgenes with multiple sgRNAs. We provide experimental details on the reagents and applications for multiplex conditional mutagenesis in zebrafish. PMID:27443918

  16. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis.

  17. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  18. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-12-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  19. Whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake but not homocysteine plasma concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Comparotto, Hugo; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whey protein supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) to receive one of the following diets for 4 weeks: control diet (C), whey protein-composed diet (WP), and whey protein-supplemented diet (WPS). The C and WP diets consisted of AIN-93 with 20% casein and 20% whey protein as protein source, respectively. WPS was AIN-93 (20% casein) supplemented by the addition of 20% (w/w) whey protein. Four weeks of ingesting a WPS diet resulted in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total protein and methionine intakes. Although a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels occurred in WPS group compared with C and WP, no significant change was observed in plasma Hcy concentration between groups. Furthermore, the levels of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced oxidation protein products, known liver oxidative stress markers, were increased in the WPS group compared with the C group. In addition, no change in glutathione liver concentration was observed in any of the groups studied. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake substantially; however, it does not change plasma Hcy concentrations. On the other hand, increased hepatic oxidative stress markers were observed in whey protein supplemented rats were probably due to high protein intake.

  20. An enhanced system for unnatural amino acid mutagenesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Young, Travis S; Ahmad, Insha; Yin, Jun A; Schultz, Peter G

    2010-01-15

    We report a new vector, pEVOL, for the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins in Escherichia coli using evolved Methanocaldococcus jannaschii aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase(s) (aaRS)/suppressor tRNA pairs. This new system affords higher yields of mutant proteins through the use of both constitutive and inducible promoters to drive the transcription of two copies of the M. jannaschii aaRS gene. Yields were further increased by coupling the dual-aaRS promoter system with a newly optimized suppressor tRNA(CUA)(opt) in a single-vector construct. The optimized suppressor tRNA(CUA)(opt) afforded increased plasmid stability compared with previously reported vectors for unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. To demonstrate the utility of this new system, we introduced 14 mutant aaRS into pEVOL and compared their ability to insert unnatural amino acids in response to three independent amber nonsense codons in sperm whale myoglobin or green fluorescent protein. When cultured in rich media in shake flasks, pEVOL was capable of producing more than 100 mg/L mutant GroEL protein. The versatility, increased yields, and increased stability of the pEVOL vector will further facilitate the expression of proteins with unnatural amino acids. PMID:19852970

  1. Mitochondrial stress causes increased succination of proteins in adipocytes in response to glucotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Thomas, Sonia A; Carson, James A; Baynes, John W

    2012-07-15

    2SC [S-(2-succino)-cysteine] is a chemical modification formed by a Michael addition reaction of fumarate with cysteine residues in proteins. Formation of 2SC, termed 'succination' of proteins, increases in adipocytes grown in high-glucose medium and in adipose tissues of Type 2 diabetic mice. However, the metabolic mechanisms leading to increased fumarate and succination of protein in the adipocyte are unknown. Treatment of 3T3 cells with high glucose (30 mM compared with 5 mM) caused a significant increase in cellular ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and Δψm (mitochondrial membrane potential). There was also a significant increase in the cellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins, which may be attributed to the increase in NADH/NAD+ and subsequent inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases. Chemical uncouplers, which dissipated Δψm and reduced the NADH/NAD+ ratio, also decreased the fumarate concentration and protein succination. High glucose plus metformin, an inhibitor of complex I in the electron transport chain, caused an increase in fumarate and succination of protein. Thus excess fuel supply (glucotoxicity) appears to create a pseudohypoxic environment (high NADH/NAD+ without hypoxia), which drives the increase in succination of protein. We propose that increased succination of proteins is an early marker of glucotoxicity and mitochondrial stress in adipose tissue in diabetes.

  2. Mutagenesis of the Agrobacterium VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein identifies regions required for self-association and interaction with VirE1 and a permissive site for hybrid protein construction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X R; Christie, P J

    1999-07-01

    The VirE2 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is required for delivery of T-DNA to the nuclei of susceptible plant cells. By yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation analyses, VirE2 was shown to self-associate and to interact with VirE1. VirE2 mutants with small deletions or insertions of a 31-residue oligopeptide (i31) at the N or C terminus or with an i31 peptide insertion at Leu236 retained the capacity to form homomultimers. By contrast, VirE2 mutants with modifications outside a central region located between residues 320 and 390 retained the capacity to interact with VirE1. These findings suggest the tertiary structure of VirE2 is important for homomultimer formation whereas a central domain mediates formation of a complex with VirE1. The capacity of VirE2 mutants to interact with full-length VirE2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae correlated with the abundance of the mutant proteins in A. tumefaciens, suggesting that VirE2 is stabilized by homomultimerization in the bacterium. We further characterized the promoter and N- and C-terminal sequence requirements for synthesis of functional VirE2. A PvirB::virE2 construct yielded functional VirE2 protein as defined by complementation of a virE2 null mutation. By contrast, PvirE or Plac promoter constructs yielded functional VirE2 only if virE1 was coexpressed with virE2. Deletion of 10 or 9 residues from the N or C terminus of VirE2, respectively, or addition of heterologous peptides or proteins to either terminus resulted in a loss of protein function. However, an i31 peptide insertion at Tyr39 had no effect on protein function as defined by the capacity of the mutant protein to (i) interact with native VirE2, (ii) interact with VirE1, (iii) accumulate at abundant levels in A. tumefaciens, and (iv) restore wild-type virulence to a virE2 null mutant. We propose that Tyr39 of VirE2 corresponds to a permissive site for insertion of heterologous peptides or proteins of interest

  3. The rate of synthesis and decomposition of tissue proteins in hypokinesia and increased muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, I. V.; Chernyy, A. V.; Fedorov, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    During hypokinesia and physical loading (swimming) of rats, the radioactivity of skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, and blood proteins was determined after administration of radioactive amino acids. Tissue protein synthesis decreased during hypokinesia, and decomposition increased. Both synthesis and decomposition increased during physical loading, but anabolic processes predominated in the total tissue balance. The weights of the animals decreased in hypokinesia and increased during increased muscle activity.

  4. Random mutagenesis by error-prone pol plasmid replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David L; Lilly, Joshua; Hernandez, Jaime; Romsdahl, Jillian; Troll, Christopher J; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Directed evolution is an approach that mimics natural evolution in the laboratory with the goal of modifying existing enzymatic activities or of generating new ones. The identification of mutants with desired properties involves the generation of genetic diversity coupled with a functional selection or screen. Genetic diversity can be generated using PCR or using in vivo methods such as chemical mutagenesis or error-prone replication of the desired sequence in a mutator strain. In vivo mutagenesis methods facilitate iterative selection because they do not require cloning, but generally produce a low mutation density with mutations not restricted to specific genes or areas within a gene. For this reason, this approach is typically used to generate new biochemical properties when large numbers of mutants can be screened or selected. Here we describe protocols for an advanced in vivo mutagenesis method that is based on error-prone replication of a ColE1 plasmid bearing the gene of interest. Compared to other in vivo mutagenesis methods, this plasmid-targeted approach allows increased mutation loads and facilitates iterative selection approaches. We also describe the mutation spectrum for this mutagenesis methodology in detail, and, using cycle 3 GFP as a target for mutagenesis, we illustrate the phenotypic diversity that can be generated using our method. In sum, error-prone Pol I replication is a mutagenesis method that is ideally suited for the evolution of new biochemical activities when a functional selection is available.

  5. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  6. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: Analysis through the use of alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sofer, W.H.

    1986-12-01

    Our original objective was to understand the mechanism of mutagenesis of several important mutagens in higher organisms. Our approach was to try to deduce this mechanism by working backwards from its final effects. The strategy that we used in an effort to carry out our studies was to make mutations in the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Drosophila melanogaster and sequence the modified genes. Most of our work was focused on an array of mutants that we had induced with formaldehyde, a potent mutagen in Drosophila, and with ethyl methane sulfonate. Over the course of the project period we cloned and sequenced the ADH gene from four formalde-induced mutants and from one EMS mutant. We showed that the four formaldehyde-induced mutants contained small deletions within the protein-coding region of their ADH genes ranging in size from between 6 and 34 bp. The one EMS-induced mutant was shown by DNA sequencing to bear an AT to GC sequence change at a tryptophan codon near the c-terminal coding portion of the gene. These results have significantly increased our understanding of the mechanism(s) of mutagenesis in higher organisms. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  8. Application of XeCl308 nm excimer laser radiation to mutagenesis of industrial microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifano, P.; Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S. M.

    (UV) lamps are widely used in mutagenesis-selection protocols. Nevertheless, since the eighties, due to the development of excimer lasers, new frontiers in the study of UV applications have been opened. It has been established that the presence of an intact SOS response system is required for the mutagenic effect of UV254 nm. The exposure to UV254 nm radiation is not mutagenic for Escherichia coli mutants lacking the RecA protein, the regulator of the SOS response. We have recently demonstrated that at variance with the UV254 nm mutagenesis, the UV308 nm mutagenesis by XeCl308 nm excimer laser is RecA-independent. This suggests that the UV308 nm might be mutagenic also in microorganisms naturally lacking the SOS response. In this study, we have developed an innovative mutagenesis protocol based on a homemade XeCl308 nm excimer laser and have demonstrated its efficiency on mutagenesis of Nonomuraea American type culture collection 39727, an industrial strain producing an antibiotic, which is relatively refractory to UV254 nm radiation-induced mutagenesis.

  9. Dexamethasone increases aquaporin-2 protein expression in ex vivo inner medullary collecting duct suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minguang; Cai, Hui; Klein, Janet D; Laur, Oskar; Chen, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is the vasopressin-regulated water channel that controls renal water reabsorption and plays an important role in the maintenance of body water homeostasis. Excessive glucocorticoid as often seen in Cushing's syndrome causes water retention. However, whether and how glucocorticoid regulates AQP2 remains unclear. In this study, we examined the direct effect of dexamethasone on AQP2 protein expression and activity. Dexamethasone increased AQP2 protein abundance in rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) suspensions. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells transfected with AQP2 cDNA. Cell surface protein biotinylation showed an increase of dexamethasone-induced cell membrane AQP2 expression and this effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Functionally, dexamethasone treatment of oocytes injected with an AQP2 cRNA increased water transport activity as judged by cell rupture time in a hypo-osmotic solution (66 ± 13 s in dexamethasone vs. 101 ± 11 s in control, n = 15). We further found that dexamethasone treatment reduced AQP2 protein degradation, which could result in an increase of AQP2 protein. Interestingly, dexamethasone promoted cell membrane AQP2 moving to less buoyant lipid raft submicrodomains. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dexamethasone promotes AQP2 protein expression and increases water permeability mainly via inhibition of AQP2 protein degradation. The increase in AQP2 activity promotes water reabsorption, which may contribute to glucocorticoid-induced water retention and hypertension. PMID:26578982

  10. [Effect of increased protein content on nutritional and sensory quality of cookies].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Santiago Rafael; Osella, Carlos Alberto; Torre, Maria Adela de la; Sánchez, Hugo Diego

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of soy flour and whey protein concentrate (WPC) on cookies quality. An optimal recipe showing improved protein quality and content as well as acceptable sensory quality was defined taking into account the results obtained. Rotary moulded cookie formulation adaptable to lamination and cutting in pilot plant was used. Wheat flour from this formulation was partially replaced by whey protein concentrate and full fat soy flour. Second order models were employed to generate response surfaces for: total protein, lysine by 16 grams of total nitrogen, lysine by 100 grams of sample, loss of lysine during processing and sensory evaluation of cookies. We could obtain an effect on available lysine value when water content was increased in the formulation because a delay in the Maillard reaction. The optimal formulation contains 13% of full fat soy flour, 3% of whey protein concentrate and 23% of water. The results demonstrated that the protein content and the protein quality of the supplemented flours were increased when soy flour was added in the formulation of cookies. On other hand, protein content was increased but protein quality was decreased when WPC was used, because of available lysine loss.

  11. Relating the effects of protein type and content in increased-protein cheese pies to consumers' perception of satiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Marcano, J; Varela, P; Fiszman, S

    2015-02-01

    Since proteins have been shown to have the highest satiation-inducing effects of all the macronutrients, increasing the protein level is one of the main strategies for designing foods with enhanced satiating capacity. However, few studies analyze the effect that protein addition has on the texture and flavor characteristics of the target food item to relate it to the expected satiating capacity it elicits. The present work studied cheese pies with three levels of soy and whey proteins. Since the protein level altered the rheological behavior of the batters before baking and the texture of the baked pies, the feasibility of adding several protein levels for obtaining a range of final products was investigated. A check-all-that-apply questionnaire containing 32 sensory and non-sensory characteristics of the samples was given to consumers (n = 131) who also scored the perceived samples' satiating capacity. The results showed that the type and content of protein contributed distinctive sensory characteristics to the samples that could be related to their satiating capacity perception. Harder and drier samples (high protein levels) were perceived as more satiating with less perceptible sweet and milky cheese pie characteristic flavors. Soy contributed an off-flavour. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the interrelation of all these factors, aiding the development of highly palatable solid foods with enhanced satiating capacities.

  12. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  13. Nonrandom mutagenesis. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ultimate goal is the development of tools, approaches and systems which will increase our ability to detect and control mutagenesis. We have continued to develop hybrid cell lines suited to the investigation of the expression and mutagenesis of human cell surface markers. The development and characterization of the monoclonal antibody probes to identify and characterize variation in selected human cell surface antigens has continued. Human X mouse T lymphoma hybrids have proven valuable in obtaining clonal populations expressing cell surface determinants characteristic of particular differentiated cell types. We have constructed a set of human lymphocyte X mouse T lymphoma hybrids which have proven useful for the mapping of cell surface determinants to particular chromosomes.

  14. A method to rationally increase protein stability based on the charge–charge interaction, with application to lipase LipK107

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lujia; Tang, Xiaomang; Cui, Dongbing; Yao, Zhiqiang; Gao, Bei; Jiang, Shuiqin; Yin, Bo; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-01-01

    We report a suite of enzyme redesign protocol based on the surface charge–charge interaction calculation, which is potentially applied to improve the stability of an enzyme without compromising its catalytic activity. Together with the experimental validation, we have released a suite of enzyme redesign algorithm Enzyme Thermal Stability System, written based on our model, for open access to meet the needs in wet labs. Lipk107, a lipase of a versatile industrial use, was chosen to test our software. Our calculation determined that four residues, D113, D149, D213, and D253, located on the surface of LipK107 were critical to the stability of the enzyme. The model was validated with mutagenesis at these four residues followed by stability and activity tests. LipK107 mutants D113A and D149K were more resistant to thermal inactivation with ∼10°C higher half-inactivation temperature than wild-type LipK107. Moreover, mutant D149K exhibited significant retention in residual activity under constant heat, showing a 14-fold increase in the half-inactivation time at 50°C. Activity tests showed that these mutants retained the equal or higher specific activity, among which noteworthy was the mutant D253A with as much as 20% higher activity. We suggest that our protocol could be used as a general guideline to redesign protein enzymes with increased stabilities and enhanced activities. PMID:24353171

  15. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  16. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function.

  17. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-06-01

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from ~2 μM to ~1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K ( D )) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K ( D ), and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K ( D ) and the maximum chemical shift change (Δδ(max)). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P (0)], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K ( D ) and Δδ(max) from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are ~0.5 × K ( D ), and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of ~10 × [P (0)]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K ( D ) and Δδ(max) values when [P (0)] > K ( D ). Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K ( D ) and Δδ(max)) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  18. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  19. An Extensive Study of Protein Phase Diagram Modification: Increasing Macromolecular Crystallizability by Temperature Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Bin; Zhu, Dao-Wei; Wang, Tao; Song, Jian; Zou, Yong-Shui; Zhang, Yong-Lian; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2009-02-23

    A new parameter 'relative crystallizability' for protein crystallization has been proposed, and its relationship with protein solubility and crystallization success has been studied (Zhu et al. J. Struct. Biol. 2006, 154, 297). Here we further construct the phase diagrams of a larger number of proteins, study the phase modification as a function of temperature, and establish the relationship between the nucleation zone area (S{sub N}) and crystallization success. The phase diagrams of 10 proteins were constructed and their S{sub N} were compared, demonstrating that temperature modifies the protein nucleation zone. Such modification can significantly enlarge the S{sub N} and increase protein crystallizability. For example, the S{sub N} of ribonuclease S and trypsin increases by 2.4- and 1.6-fold when the temperature moves to 277 K from 295 K, while at the same time the crystallization hits increase from 20.8% to 42.9% and 12.5% to 25%, respectively. S{sub N} of chymotrypsinogen A and concanavalin A increases by 1.6- and 1.7-fold (277 to 295 K), while the hits increase from 37.5% to 54.2% and 43.3% to 73.4%, respectively. Such an excellent agreement strongly supports the validity of protein 'relative crystallizability', and crystallization screening at several temperatures can significantly increase the success for most proteins. A new protein epididymal-specific lipocalin was crystallized by varying temperature, yielding quickly the first crystals, and complete data sets have been collected at 1.97 {angstrom}.

  20. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  1. An unknown genetic defect increases venous thrombosis risk, through interaction with protein C deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Bovill, E G; Callas, P W; Long, G L

    1998-01-01

    We used two-locus segregation analysis to test whether an unknown genetic defect interacts with protein C deficiency to increase susceptibility to venous thromboembolic disease in a single large pedigree. Sixty-seven pedigree members carry a His107Pro mutation in the protein C gene, which reduces protein C levels to a mean of 46% of normal. Twenty-one carriers of the mutation and five other pedigree members had verified thromboembolic disease. We inferred the presence in this pedigree of a thrombosis-susceptibility gene interacting with protein C deficiency, by rejecting the hypothesis that the cases of thromboembolic disease resulted from protein C deficiency alone and by not rejecting Mendelian transmission of the interacting gene. When coinherited with protein C deficiency, the interacting gene conferred a probability of a thrombotic episode of approximately 79% for men and approximately 99% for women, before age 60 years. PMID:9683579

  2. Highly mutagenic replication by DNA polymerase V (UmuC) provides a mechanistic basis for SOS untargeted mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maor-Shoshani, Ayelet; Reuven, Nina Bacher; Tomer, Guy; Livneh, Zvi

    2000-01-01

    When challenged by DNA-damaging agents, Escherichia coli cells respond by inducing the SOS stress response, which leads to an increase in mutation frequency by two mechanisms: translesion replication, a process that causes mutations because of misinsertion opposite the lesions, and an inducible mutator activity, which acts at undamaged sites. Here we report that DNA polymerase V (pol V; UmuC), which previously has been shown to be a lesion-bypass DNA polymerase, was highly mutagenic during in vitro gap-filling replication of a gapped plasmid carrying the cro reporter gene. This reaction required, in addition to pol V, UmuD′, RecA, and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein. pol V produced point mutations at a frequency of 2.1 × 10−4 per nucleotide (2.1% per cro gene), 41-fold higher than DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. The mutational spectrum of pol V was dominated by transversions (53%), which were formed at a frequency of 1.3 × 10−4 per nucleotide (1.1% per cro gene), 74-fold higher than with pol III holoenzyme. The prevalence of transversions and the protein requirements of this system are similar to those of in vivo untargeted mutagenesis (SOS mutator activity). This finding suggests that replication by pol V, in the presence of UmuD′, RecA, and ssDNA-binding protein, is the basis of chromosomal SOS untargeted mutagenesis. PMID:10639119

  3. Protein Targeting and Transport as a Necessary Consequence of Increased Cellular Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    With increasing intracellular complexity, a new cell-biological problem that is the allocation of cytoplasmically synthesized proteins to their final destinations within the cell emerged. A special challenge is thereby the translocation of proteins into or across cellular membranes. The underlying mechanisms are only in parts well understood, but it can be assumed that the course of cellular evolution had a deep impact on the design of the required molecular machines. In this article, we aim to summarize the current knowledge and concepts of the evolutionary development of protein trafficking as a necessary premise and consequence of increased cellular complexity. PMID:25085907

  4. Conjugation of type I antifreeze protein to polyallylamine increases thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Ozge; Holland, Nolan B

    2011-10-19

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice binding proteins found in some plants, insects, and Antarctic fish allowing them to survive at subzero temperatures by inhibiting ice crystal growth. The interaction of AFPs with ice crystals results in a difference between the freezing and melting temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis, which is the most common measure of AFP activity. Creating antifreeze protein constructs that reduce the concentration of protein needed to observe thermal hysteresis activities would be beneficial for diverse applications including cold storage of cells or tissues, ice slurries used in refrigeration systems, and food storage. We demonstrate that conjugating multiple type I AFPs to a polyallylamine chain increases thermal hysteresis activity compared to the original protein. The reaction product is approximately twice as active when compared to the same concentration of free proteins, yielding 0.5 °C thermal hysteresis activity at 0.3 mM protein concentration. More impressively, the amount of protein required to achieve a thermal hysteresis of 0.3 °C is about 100 times lower when conjugated to the polymer (3 μM) compared to free protein (300 μM). Ice crystal morphologies observed in the presence of the reaction product are comparable to those of the protein used in the conjugation reaction. PMID:21905742

  5. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  6. Increased production of penicillin-binding protein 2, increased detection of other penicillin-binding proteins, and decreased coagulase activity associated with glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, B; Boyle-Vavra, S; deJonge, B L; Daum, R S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of glycopeptide resistance in the genus Staphylococcus is unknown. Since these antimicrobial compounds act by binding the peptidoglycan precursor terminus, the target of transglycosylase and transpeptidase enzymes, it was hypothesized that resistance might be mediated in Staphylococcus aureus by increased production or activity of these enzymes, commonly called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). To evaluate this possibility, glycopeptide-resistant mutants were prepared by passage of several clinical isolates of this species in nutrient broth containing successively increasing concentrations of the glycopeptide vancomycin or teicoplanin. Decreased coagulase activity and increased resistance to lysostaphin were uniformly present in the vancomycin-resistant mutants. Peptidoglycan cross-linking increased in one resistant isolate and decreased in two resistant isolates. The amounts of radioactive penicillin that bound to each PBP in susceptible and resistant strains were compared; PBP2 production was also evaluated by Western blotting. Increased penicillin labeling and production of PBP2 were found in all resistant derivatives selected by either vancomycin or teicoplanin. Moreover, the increase in PBP2 penicillin labeling occurred early in a series of vancomycin-selected derivatives and was strongly correlated (r > 0.9) with the increase in vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC. An increase in penicillin labeling also occurred, variably, in PBP1, PBP3, and/or PBP4. These data demonstrate a strong correlation between resistance to glycopeptides and increased PBP activity and/or production in S. aureus. Such an increase could allow PBPs to better compete with glycopeptides for the peptidoglycan precursor. PMID:9257762

  7. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  8. Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice Using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs), such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system, are powerful tools for understanding gene function and for developing novel traits in plants. In plant species for which transformation and regeneration systems using protoplasts are not yet established, direct delivery to nuclei of SSNs either in the form of RNA or protein is difficult. Thus, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of SSN expression constructs in cultured cells is a practical means of delivering targeted mutagenesis in some plant species including rice. Because targeted mutagenesis occurs stochastically in transgenic cells and SSN-mediated targeted mutagenesis often leads to no selectable phenotype, identification of highly mutated cell lines is a critical step in obtaining regenerated plants with desired mutations. PMID:27557690

  9. Spontaneous mutagenesis: experimental, genetic and other factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C

    1992-08-01

    Spontaneous mutations are "the net result of all that can go wrong with DNA during the life cycle of an organism" (Glickman et al., 1986). Thus, the types and amounts of spontaneous mutations produced are the resultant of all the cellular processes that are mutagenic and those that are antimutagenic. It is not widely appreciated that the types and frequencies of spontaneous mutations change markedly with subtle changes in experimental conditions. All types of mutations are produced spontaneously, i.e., base substitutions, frameshifts, insertions and deletions. However, very few papers have appeared that are devoted exclusively to the study of the mechanisms of spontaneous mutagenesis, and of the subtle experimental factors that affect the types and frequencies of spontaneous mutations. This is unfortunate because spontaneous mutagenesis appears to play a major role in evolution, aging, and carcinogenesis. This review emphasizes subtle experimental variables that markedly affect the results of a spontaneous mutation experiment. A thorough understanding of these variables eliminates the need for a theory of "directed" mutagenesis. The intrinsic instability of DNA, and the types of normal metabolic lesions that are produced in DNA that lead to mutations via errors made in replication, repair, and recombination are reviewed, as is the genetic control of spontaneous mutagenesis. As with spontaneous mutagenesis, spontaneous carcinogenesis can also be considered to be the net result of all that can go wrong with DNA during the life of an organism. PMID:1378531

  10. Mutagenesis by the autoxidation of iron with isolated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, L.A.; James, E.A.; Waltersdorph, A.M.; Klebanoff, S.J. )

    1988-06-01

    Oxygen free radicals are highly reactive species generated by many cellular oxidation-reduction processes. These radicals damage cellular constituents and have been casually implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. The authors report here that oxygen free radicals generated by Fe{sup 2+} in aqueous solution are mutagenic. Aerobic incubation of {phi}X174 am3 (amber 3 mutation) DNA with Fe{sup 2+} results in decreased phage survival when the treated DNA is transfected into Escherichia coli spheroplasts. Transfection of the treated DNA into SOS-induced spheroplasts results in an increase in mutagenesis as great as 50-fold. Both killing and mutagenesis can be prevented by binding of Fe{sup 2+} with deferoxamine or by the addition of catalase or mannitol. These results suggest that DNA damage and mutagenesis brought about by Fe{sup 2+} are likely to occur by a Fenton-type mechanism. DNA sequence analysis of the Fe{sup 2+}-induced mutants indicates that reversion of the phage phenotype to wild type occurs largely by a transversion type of mutation involving substitution of deoxyadenosine for thymidine opposite a template deoxyadenosine. These findings raise the possibility that free iron localized in cellular DNA may cause mutations by the generation of oxygen free radicals.

  11. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography in dual salt system increases protein binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Senczuk, Anna M; Klinke, Ralph; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Vedantham, Ganesh; Yigzaw, Yinges

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uses weakly hydrophobic resins and requires a salting-out salt to promote protein-resin interaction. The salting-out effects increase with protein and salt concentration. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) is dependent on the binding constant, as well as on the flow characteristics during sample loading. DBC increases with the salt concentration but decreases with increasing flow rate. Dynamic and operational binding capacity have a major raw material cost/processing time impact on commercial scale production of monoclonal antibodies. In order to maximize DBC the highest salt concentration without causing precipitation is used. We report here a novel method to maintain protein solubility while increasing the DBC by using a combination of two salting-out salts (referred to as dual salt). In a series of experiments, we explored the dynamic capacity of a HIC resin (TosoBioscience Butyl 650M) with combinations of salts. Using a model antibody, we developed a system allowing us to increase the dynamic capacity up to twofold using the dual salt system over traditional, single salt system. We also investigated the application of this novel approach to several other proteins and salt combinations, and noted a similar protein solubility and DBC increase. The observed increase in DBC in the dual salt system was maintained at different linear flow rates and did not impact selectivity.

  12. Bactericidal Permeability Increasing Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T.; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods: The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Results: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease. PMID:26228368

  13. Systematic Mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yisheng; Durfee, Tim; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Qiu, Yu; Frisch, David; Winterberg, Kelly M.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput method has been developed for the systematic mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli genome. The system is based on in vitro transposition of a modified Tn5 element, the Sce-poson, into linear fragments of each open reading frame. The transposon introduces both positive (kanamycin resistance) and negative (I-SceI recognition site) selectable markers for isolation of mutants and subsequent allele replacement, respectively. Reaction products are then introduced into the genome by homologous recombination via the λRed proteins. The method has yielded insertion alleles for 1976 genes during a first pass through the genome including, unexpectedly, a number of known and putative essential genes. Sce-poson insertions can be easily replaced by markerless mutations by using the I-SceI homing endonuclease to select against retention of the transposon as demonstrated by the substitution of amber and/or in-frame deletions in six different genes. This allows a Sce-poson-containing gene to be specifically targeted for either designed or random modifications, as well as permitting the stepwise engineering of strains with multiple mutations. The promiscuous nature of Tn5 transposition also enables a targeted gene to be dissected by using randomly inserted Sce-posons as shown by a lacZ allelic series. Finally, assessment of the insertion sites by an iterative weighted matrix algorithm reveals that these hyperactive Tn5 complexes generally recognize a highly degenerate asymmetric motif on one end of the target site helping to explain the randomness of Tn5 transposition. PMID:15262929

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase pancreatic mass by induction of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacqueline A; Baggio, Laurie L; Cao, Xiemin; Abdulla, Tahmid; Campbell, Jonathan E; Secher, Thomas; Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Brett; Drucker, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) controls glucose homeostasis by regulating secretion of insulin and glucagon through a single GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1R agonists also increase pancreatic weight in some preclinical studies through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the increase in pancreatic weight following activation of GLP-1R signaling in mice reflects an increase in acinar cell mass, without changes in ductal compartments or β-cell mass. GLP-1R agonists did not increase pancreatic DNA content or the number of Ki67(+) cells in the exocrine compartment; however, pancreatic protein content was increased in mice treated with exendin-4 or liraglutide. The increased pancreatic mass and protein content was independent of cholecystokinin receptors, associated with a rapid increase in S6 phosphorylation, and mediated through the GLP-1R. Rapamycin abrogated the GLP-1R-dependent increase in pancreatic mass but had no effect on the robust induction of Reg3α and Reg3β gene expression. Mass spectrometry analysis identified GLP-1R-dependent upregulation of Reg family members, as well as proteins important for translation and export, including Fam129a, eIF4a1, Wars, and Dmbt1. Hence, pharmacological GLP-1R activation induces protein synthesis, leading to increased pancreatic mass, independent of changes in DNA content or cell proliferation in mice.

  15. Posttranslational arginylation enzyme Ate1 affects DNA mutagenesis by regulating stress response

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Birnbaum, Michael D; Patel, Devang M; Morgan, William M; Singh, Jayanti; Barrientos, Antoni; Zhang, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Arginyltransferase 1 (Ate1) mediates protein arginylation, a poorly understood protein posttranslational modification (PTM) in eukaryotic cells. Previous evidence suggest a potential involvement of arginylation in stress response and this PTM was traditionally considered anti-apoptotic based on the studies of individual substrates. However, here we found that arginylation promotes cell death and/or growth arrest, depending on the nature and intensity of the stressing factor. Specifically, in yeast, mouse and human cells, deletion or downregulation of the ATE1 gene disrupts typical stress responses by bypassing growth arrest and suppressing cell death events in the presence of disease-related stressing factors, including oxidative, heat, and osmotic stresses, as well as the exposure to heavy metals or radiation. Conversely, in wild-type cells responding to stress, there is an increase of cellular Ate1 protein level and arginylation activity. Furthermore, the increase of Ate1 protein directly promotes cell death in a manner dependent on its arginylation activity. Finally, we found Ate1 to be required to suppress mutation frequency in yeast and mammalian cells during DNA-damaging conditions such as ultraviolet irradiation. Our study clarifies the role of Ate1/arginylation in stress response and provides a new mechanism to explain the link between Ate1 and a variety of diseases including cancer. This is also the first example that the modulation of the global level of a PTM is capable of affecting DNA mutagenesis. PMID:27685622

  16. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  17. DinB upregulation is the sole role of the SOS response in stress-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Rodrigo S; Do, Robert; Yamada, Masami; Friedberg, Errol C; Hastings, P J; Nohmi, Takehiko; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2009-05-01

    Stress-induced mutagenesis is a collection of mechanisms observed in bacterial, yeast, and human cells in which adverse conditions provoke mutagenesis, often under the control of stress responses. Control of mutagenesis by stress responses may accelerate evolution specifically when cells are maladapted to their environments, i.e., are stressed. It is therefore important to understand how stress responses increase mutagenesis. In the Escherichia coli Lac assay, stress-induced point mutagenesis requires induction of at least two stress responses: the RpoS-controlled general/starvation stress response and the SOS DNA-damage response, both of which upregulate DinB error-prone DNA polymerase, among other genes required for Lac mutagenesis. We show that upregulation of DinB is the only aspect of the SOS response needed for stress-induced mutagenesis. We constructed two dinB(o(c)) (operator-constitutive) mutants. Both produce SOS-induced levels of DinB constitutively. We find that both dinB(o(c)) alleles fully suppress the phenotype of constitutively SOS-"off" lexA(Ind(-)) mutant cells, restoring normal levels of stress-induced mutagenesis. Thus, dinB is the only SOS gene required at induced levels for stress-induced point mutagenesis. Furthermore, although spontaneous SOS induction has been observed to occur in only a small fraction of cells, upregulation of dinB by the dinB(o(c)) alleles in all cells does not promote a further increase in mutagenesis, implying that SOS induction of DinB, although necessary, is insufficient to differentiate cells into a hypermutable condition. PMID:19270270

  18. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  19. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  20. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  1. Deletion mutagenesis identifies a haploinsufficient role for gamma-zein in opaque-2 endosperm modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard kernel variant of the high-lysine mutant, opaque-2. Using gamma irradiation, we created opaque QPM variants to identify opaque-2 modifier genes and to investigate deletion mutagenesis combined with Illumina sequencing as a maize functional genomics tool. A K0326...

  2. Estrogen down-regulates uncoupling proteins and increases oxidative stress in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Company, Maria Margarita; Garau, Isabel; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2010-02-15

    Oxidative stress has been postulated as one of the mechanisms underlying the estrogen carcinogenic effect in breast cancer. Estrogens are known to increase mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) by an unknown mechanism. Given that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are key regulators of mitochondrial energy efficiency and ROS production, our aim was to check the presence and activity of UCPs in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells and tumors, as well as their relation to oxidative stress. Estrogen (1 nM) induced higher oxidative stress in the ER-positive MCF-7 cell line, showing increased mitochondrial membrane potential, H(2)O(2) levels, and DNA and protein damage compared to ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. All isoforms of uncoupling proteins were highly expressed in ER-positive breast cancer cells and tumors compared to negative ones. ROS production in mitochondria isolated from MCF-7 was increased by inhibition of UCPs with GDP, but not in mitochondria from MDA-MB-231. Estrogen treatment decreased uncoupling protein and catalase levels in MCF-7 and decreased GDP-dependent ROS production in isolated mitochondria. On the whole, these results suggest that estrogens, through an ER-dependent mechanism, may increase mitochondrial ROS production by repressing uncoupling proteins, which offers a new perspective on the understanding of why estrogens are a risk factor for breast cancer.

  3. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  4. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G.; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P.; Oakeley, Edward J.; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  5. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P; Oakeley, Edward J; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  6. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein's adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the "fossils" of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment. PMID

  7. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  8. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein's adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the "fossils" of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment.

  9. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  10. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  11. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected. PMID:14641959

  12. Increased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase (GRK) Expression in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Adam J.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors. Ligand bound GPCRs are regulated by a family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), members of which uncouple the receptor from heterotrimeric G proteins, desensitize the receptor, and induce receptor internalization via the arrestin family of scaffolding and signaling molecules. GRKs initiate the activation of downstream signaling pathways, can regulate receptors and signaling molecules independent of GPCR phosphorylation, and modulate epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (HDACs). We hypothesize that expression of GRK proteins are altered in schizophrenia, consistent with previous findings of alterations up and downstream from this family of molecules that facilitate intracellular signaling processes. Methods In this study we measured protein expression via Western blot analysis for GRKs 2, 3, 5, and 6 in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia (N = 36) and a comparison group (N = 33). To control for antipsychotic treatment we measured these same targets in haloperidol treated vs. untreated rats (N = 10 for both). Results We found increased levels of GRK5 in schizophrenia. No changes were detected in GRK protein expression in rats treated with haloperidol decanoate for 9 months. Conclusion These data suggest that increased GRK5 expression may contribute the the pathophysiology of schizophrenia via abnormal regulation of the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, signaling, GPCRs, and histone modification. PMID:25153362

  13. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected.

  14. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  15. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P < 0.05). The changes in the mRNA levels of O-GlcNAc enzymes were different in the two muscles, potentially resulting from different rates of oxidative stress and metabolic demands between the muscle types. These findings indicate that oxidative environment promotes O-GlcNAcylation in skeletal muscle and suggest an interrelationship between cellular redox state and O-GlcNAc protein modification. This could represent one mechanism underlying cellular adaptation to oxidative stress and health benefits of exercise. PMID:25416863

  16. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS
    Michael D. Waters
    US Environmental Protection Agency, MD-51A, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA

    Our rapidly growing understanding of the structure of the human genome is forming the basis for numerous new...

  17. Faux Mutagenesis: Teaching Troubleshooting through Controlled Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartberg, Yasha

    2006-01-01

    By shifting pedagogical goals from obtaining successful mutations to teaching students critical troubleshooting skills, it has been possible to introduce site-directed mutagenesis into an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Described in this study is an inexpensive laboratory exercise in which students follow a slightly modified version of…

  18. Special Enrichment Strategies Greatly Increase the Efficiency of Missing Proteins Identification from Regular Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Na; Zhang, Chengpu; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Fengxu; Zhao, Mingzhi; Wu, Feilin; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yanchang; Chen, Lingsheng; Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Tao; Wen, Bo; Sensang, Na; Xiong, Zhi; Wu, Songfeng; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhen, Bei; Zhu, Yunping; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    As part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) mission, laboratories all over the world have tried to map the entire missing proteins (MPs) since 2012. On the basis of the first and second Chinese Chromosome Proteome Database (CCPD 1.0 and 2.0) studies, we developed systematic enrichment strategies to identify MPs that fell into four classes: (1) low molecular weight (LMW) proteins, (2) membrane proteins, (3) proteins that contained various post-translational modifications (PTMs), and (4) nucleic acid-associated proteins. Of 8845 proteins identified in 7 data sets, 79 proteins were classified as MPs. Among data sets derived from different enrichment strategies, data sets for LMW and PTM yielded the most novel MPs. In addition, we found that some MPs were identified in multiple-data sets, which implied that tandem enrichments methods might improve the ability to identify MPs. Moreover, low expression at the transcription level was the major cause of the "missing" of these MPs; however, MPs with higher expression level also evaded identification, most likely due to other characteristics such as LMW, high hydrophobicity and PTM. By combining a stringent manual check of the MS2 spectra with peptides synthesis verification, we confirmed 30 MPs (neXtProt PE2 ∼ PE4) and 6 potential MPs (neXtProt PE5) with authentic MS evidence. By integrating our large-scale data sets of CCPD 2.0, the number of identified proteins has increased considerably beyond simulation saturation. Here, we show that special enrichment strategies can break through the data saturation bottleneck, which could increase the efficiency of MP identification in future C-HPP studies. All 7 data sets have been uploaded to ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD002255.

  19. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein’s adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the “fossils” of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment. PMID

  20. Synaptic Proteins In Schizophrenia Hippocampus Indicate Increased Neuronal Activity in CA3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ghose, Subroto; Gleason, Kelly; Begovic’, Anita; Perez, Jessica; Bartko, John; Russo, Scott; Wagner, Anthony D.; Selemon, Lynn; Tamminga, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia, hippocampal perfusion is increased and declarative memory function is degraded. Based on a model of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenic psychosis, we postulated increased NMDA receptor signaling in CA3. Here we demonstrate that the GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B/GluN1) and its associated postsynaptic membrane protein PSD95 are both increased in human hippocampal CA3 from schizophrenia cases, but not in CA1 tissue. Quantitative analyses of Golgi-stained hippocampal neurons show an increase in spine density on CA3 pyramidal cell apical dendrites (stratum radiatum) and an increase in the number of thorny excrescences. AMPA receptor subunit proteins are not altered in CA3 or CA1 subfields, nor are several additional related signaling proteins. These hippocampal data are consistent with increased excitatory signaling in CA3 and/or with an elevation in silent synapses in CA3, a state which may contribute to development of long term potentiation with subsequent stimulation and ‘un-silencing’. These changes are plausibly associated with increased associational activity in CA3, degraded declarative memory function and with psychotic manifestations in schizophrenia. The influence of these hyperactive hippocampal projections onto targets in limbic neocortex could contribute to components of schizophrenia manifestations in other cerebral regions. PMID:25585032

  1. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  2. Supplementation of cattle fed tropical grasses with microalgae increases microbial protein production and average daily gain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D F A; Quigley, S P; Isherwood, P; McLennan, S R; Poppi, D P

    2016-05-01

    A series of 3 experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of microalgae as supplements for ruminants consuming low-CP tropical grasses. In Exp. 1, the chemical composition and in vitro protein degradability of 9 algae species and 4 protein supplements were determined. In Exp. 2, rumen function and microbial protein (MCP) production were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with , , , or cottonseed meal (CSM). In Exp. 3, DMI and ADG were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with increasing amounts of NPN (urea combined with ammonia sulfate), CSM, or . In Exp. 1, the CP content of and (675 and 580 g/kg DM) was highest among the algae species and higher than the other protein supplements evaluated, and sp. had the highest crude lipid (CL) content (198 g/kg DM). In Exp. 2, supplementation increased speargrass hay intake, the efficiency of MCP production, the fractional outflow rate of digesta from the rumen, the concentration of NHN, and the molar proportion of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen fluid of steers above all other treatments. acceptance by steers was low and this resulted in no significant difference to unsupplemented steers for all parameters measured for this algae supplement. In Exp. 3, ADG linearly increased with increasing supplementary N intake from both and NPN, with no difference between the 2 supplements. In contrast, ADG quadratically increased with increasing supplementary N intake from CSM. It was concluded that and may potentially be used as protein sources for cattle grazing low-CP pastures. PMID:27285702

  3. Ligands for FKBP12 Increase Ca2+ Influx and Protein Synthesis to Improve Skeletal Muscle Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Seok; Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Xu, Jianjun; Ismailov, Iskander I.; Knoblauch, Mark; Monroe, Tanner O.; Ji, RuiRui; Hanna, Amy D.; Joshi, Aditya D.; Long, Cheng; Oakes, Joshua; Tran, Ted; Corona, Benjamin T.; Lorca, Sabina; Ingalls, Christopher P.; Narkar, Vihang A.; Lanner, Johanna T.; Bayle, J. Henri; Durham, William J.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin at high doses (2–10 mg/kg body weight) inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and protein synthesis in mice. In contrast, low doses of rapamycin (10 μg/kg) increase mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Similar changes are found with SLF (synthetic ligand for FKBP12, which does not inhibit mTORC1) and in mice with a skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12 deficiency. These interventions also increase Ca2+ influx to enhance refilling of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores, slow muscle fatigue, and increase running endurance without negatively impacting cardiac function. FKBP12 deficiency or longer treatments with low dose rapamycin or SLF increase the percentage of type I fibers, further adding to fatigue resistance. We demonstrate that FKBP12 and its ligands impact multiple aspects of muscle function. PMID:25053409

  4. The effect of adaptive mutagenesis on genetic variation at a linked, neutral locus

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, C.; Williams, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Based on recent studies in single-celled organisms, it has been argued that a fitness benefit associated with a mutation will increase the probability of that mutation occurring. This increase is independent of mutation rates at other loci and is called adaptive mutagenesis. We modeled the effect of adaptive mutagenesis on populations of haploid organisms with adaptive mutation rates ranging from 0 to 1 x 10{sup -5}. Allele frequencies at the selected locus and a neutral linked locus were tracked. We also observed the amount of linkage disequilibrium during the selective sweep and the final heterozygosity after the sweep. The presence of adaptive mutagenesis increases the number of genetic backgrounds carrying the new fitter allele, making the outcomes more representative of the population before the selection. Therefore, more neutral genetic variation is preserved in simulations with adaptive mutagenesis than in those without it due to hitchhiking. Since adaptive mutagensis is time-dependent, it can generate mutants when other mechanisms of mutation cannot. In addition, adaptive mutagenesis has the potential to confound both phylogeny construction and the detection of natural selection from patterns of nucleotide variation. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Cold acclimation increases levels of some heat shock protein and sirtuin isoforms in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Laura E; Orczewska, Julieanna I; McLaughlin, Jessica; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] increase in response to rapid changes in temperatures, but long-term acclimation to cold temperature may also warrant elevations in HSPs. In fishes, cold acclimation increases mitochondrial density and oxidative stress in some tissues, which may increase demand for HSPs. We hypothesized that levels of HSPs, as well as sirtuins (SIRTs), NAD-dependent deacetylases that mediate changes in metabolism and responses to oxidative stress (including increases in HSPs), would increase during cold acclimation of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Transcript levels of hsp70, hsc70, hsp60 and hsp90-α, sirts1-4, as well as protein levels of HSP60, HSP90 and HSC70 were quantified in liver and pectoral adductor muscle of stickleback during cold acclimation from 20 °C to 8 °C. In liver, cold acclimation stimulated a transient increase in mRNA levels of hsp60 and hsc70. Transcript levels of sirt1 and sirt2 also increased in response to cold acclimation and remained elevated. In pectoral muscle, mRNA levels of hsp60, hsp90-α, hsc70 and sirt1 all transiently increased in response to cold acclimation, while levels of sirts2-4 remained constant or declined. Similar to transcript levels, protein levels of HSC70 increased in both liver and pectoral muscle. Levels of HSP90 also increased in liver after 4 weeks at 8 °C. HSP60 remained unchanged in both tissues, as did HSP90 in pectoral muscle. Our results indicate that while both HSPs and SIRTs increase in response to cold acclimation in stickleback, the response is tissue and isoform specific, likely reflecting differences in metabolism and oxidative stress.

  6. Tresyl-based conjugation of protein antigen to lipid nanoparticles increases antigen immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-11-30

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  7. Protein co-ingestion strongly increases postprandial insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Manders, Ralph J F; Hansen, Dominique; Zorenc, Antoine H G; Dendale, Paul; Kloek, Joris; Saris, Wim H M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-07-01

    The capacity of nutritional protein to induce endogenous insulin secretion has been well established. However, it is not known whether such a response is applicable in a diverse population of type 2 diabetes patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of co-ingesting either intact or hydrolyzed protein with carbohydrate on postprandial plasma insulin and glucose responses in type 2 diabetes patients. Sixty longstanding, male, type 2 diabetes patients participated in a study in which we determined postprandial plasma insulin and glucose responses after ingesting a single bolus of carbohydrate (0.7 g/kg: CHO) with or without an intact protein (0.3 g/kg: PRO) or its hydrolysate (0.3 g/kg: PROh). Results showed that protein co-ingestion strongly increased postprandial insulin release, with the insulin response +99 ± 41 and +110 ± 10% greater in the CHO+PRO and CHO+PROh experiments when compared with the CHO experiment. The insulinotropic properties of protein co-ingestion were evident in nearly all patients, with 58 out of 60 patients responding >10% when compared with the insulin response following carbohydrate ingestion only (CHO). The concomitant plasma glucose responses were 22 ± 32 and 23 ± 36% lower in the CHO+PRO and CHO+PROh experiments, respectively. We conclude that protein co-ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to strongly augment postprandial insulin release and attenuate the postprandial rise in glucose concentration in type 2 diabetes patients.

  8. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  9. Age-Induced Protein Modifications and Increased Proteolysis in Potato Seed-Tubers1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G.N. Mohan; Houtz, Robert L.; Knowles, N. Richard

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin (40 kD) and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as an increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases (75, 90, and 100 kD) appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed “daughter” tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than “mother” tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Our results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; we also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers. PMID:9880350

  10. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R.; Houtz, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  11. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  12. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  13. Enteral β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Kao, Michelle; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Nguyen, Hanh V; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2016-06-01

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) on protein synthesis and the regulation of translation initiation and degradation pathways, overnight-fasted neonatal pigs were studied immediately (F) or fed one of five diets for 24 h: low-protein (LP), high-protein (HP), or LP diet supplemented with 4 (HMB4), 40 (HMB40), or 80 (HMB80) μmol HMB·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) Cell replication was assessed from nuclear incorporation of BrdU in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle and jejunum crypt cells. Protein synthesis rates in LD, gastrocnemius, rhomboideus, and diaphragm muscles, lung, and brain were greater in HMB80 and HP and in brain were greater in HMB40 compared with LP and F groups. Formation of the eIF4E·eIF4G complex and S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in LD, gastrocnemius, and rhomboideus muscles were greater in HMB80 and HP than in LP and F groups. Phosphorylation of eIF2α and eEF2 and expression of SNAT2, LAT1, MuRF1, atrogin-1, and LC3-II were unchanged. Numbers of BrdU-positive myonuclei in the LD were greater in HMB80 and HP than in the LP and F groups; there were no differences in jejunum. The results suggest that enteral supplementation with HMB increases skeletal muscle protein anabolism in neonates by stimulation of protein synthesis and satellite cell proliferation.

  14. Heparin treatment increases thioredoxin interacting protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Aysim; Iscan, Evin; Topel, Hande; Avci, Sanem Tercan; Gumustekin, Mukaddes; Erdal, Esra; Atabey, Nese

    2015-08-01

    Heparins play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, migration and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms of heparin mediated cellular behaviors are not well defined. To determine the effect of heparin on gene expression, we performed a cDNA microarray in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and found that heparin regulates transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism. In this study, we showed a new role of heparin in the regulation of thioredoxin interacting protein, which is a major regulator of glucose metabolism, in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We determined the importance of a unique carbohydrate response element located on its promoter for the heparin-induced activation of thioredoxin-interacting protein and the modulatory role of heparin on nuclear accumulation of carbohydrate response element associated proteins. We showed the importance of heparin mediated histone modifications and down-regulation of Enhancer of zeste 2 polycomb repressive complex 2 expression for heparin mediated overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein. When we tested biological significance of these data; we observed that cells overexpressing thioredoxin-interacting protein are less adhesive and proliferative, however they have a higher migration and invasion ability. Interestingly, heparin treatment increased thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver of diabetic rats. In conclusion, our results show that heparin activates thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver and hepatocellular carcinoma cells and provide the first evidences of regulatory roles of heparin on carbohydrate response element associated factors. This study will contribute future understanding of the effect of heparin on glucose metabolism and glucose independent overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  15. Sleeping beauty-mediated somatic mutagenesis implicates CSF1 in the formation of high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bender, Aaron M; Collier, Lara S; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Tieu, Christina; Larson, Jon D; Halder, Chandralekha; Mahlum, Eric; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Akagi, Keiko; Sarkar, Gobinda; Largaespada, David A; Jenkins, Robert B

    2010-05-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been used as an insertional mutagenesis tool to identify novel cancer genes. To identify glioma-associated genes, we evaluated tumor formation in the brain tissue from 117 transgenic mice that had undergone constitutive SB-mediated transposition. Upon analysis, 21 samples (18%) contained neoplastic tissue with features of high-grade astrocytomas. These tumors expressed glial markers and were histologically similar to human glioma. Genomic DNA from SB-induced astrocytoma tissue was extracted and transposon insertion sites were identified. Insertions in the growth factor gene Csf1 were found in 13 of the 21 tumors (62%), clustered in introns 5 and 8. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we documented increased Csf1 RNAs in tumor versus adjacent normal tissue, with the identification of transposon-terminated Csf1 mRNAs in astrocytomas with SB insertions in intron 8. Analysis of human glioblastomas revealed increased levels of Csf1 RNA and protein. Together, these results indicate that SB-insertional mutagenesis can identify high-grade astrocytoma-associated genes and they imply an important role for CSF1 in the development of these tumors. PMID:20388773

  16. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, M.; Guida, G.; Perlino, E.; Marra, E.; Quagliariello, E. )

    1989-09-29

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm{sup 2}). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-({sup 32}P)UTP and L-({sup 35}S)methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products.

  17. Enhanced heterologous protein production in Pichia pastoris under increased air pressure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene; Oliveira, Carla; Domingues, Lucília; Mota, Manuel; Belo, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is a widely used host for the production of heterologous proteins. In this case, high cell densities are needed and oxygen is a major limiting factor. The increased air pressure could be used to improve the oxygen solubility in the medium and to reach the high oxygen demand of methanol metabolism. In this study, two P. pastoris strains producing two different recombinant proteins, one intracellular (β-galactosidase) and other extracellular (frutalin), were used to investigate the effect of increased air pressure on yeast growth in glycerol and heterologous protein production, using the methanol AOX1-inducible system. Experiments were carried out in a stainless steel bioreactor under total air pressure of 1 bar and 5 bar. The use of an air pressure raise of up to 5 bar proved to be applicable for P. pastoris cultivation. Moreover, no effects on the kinetic growth parameters and methanol utilization (Mut) phenotype of strains were found, while an increase in recombinant β-galactosidase-specific activity (ninefold) and recombinant frutalin production was observed. Furthermore, the air pressure raise led to a reduction in the secreted protease specific activity. This work shows for the first time that the application of an air pressure of 5 bar may be used as a strategy to decrease protease secretion and improve recombinant protein production in P. pastoris.

  18. Increased Asynchronous Release and Aberrant Calcium Channel Activation in Amyloid Precursor Protein Deficient Neuromuscular Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Baiping; Long, Cheng; Wu, Gangyi; Zheng, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca2+ channel function. PMID:17919826

  19. Intense exercise increases protein oxidation in spleen and liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukiko; Nakatsuji, Aki; Aoi, Wataru; Wada, Sayori; Kuwahata, Masashi; Kido, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that sports anemia is mainly associated with intravascular hemolysis induced by exercise. We hypothesized that such exercise-induced hemolysis leads to oxidative damage due to an increase in free iron caused by hematocyte destruction. Thirty-one male ICR mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: a rested control group, an intense-exercise group, and a group rested for 24 hours after intense exercise. The serum haptoglobin level of the intense-exercise group decreased compared with that of the rested control group, suggesting hemolysis. Tissue iron and protein carbonyl levels in the liver were increased after exercise, and the protein carbonyl level in the spleen on the day after exercise was significantly increased compared with that of the resting state. These results suggest that the spleen and liver, where extravascular hemolysis occurs, were subjected to oxidative modification by the free iron, which was released from large numbers of hemocytes that were destroyed due to the intense exercise.

  20. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  1. Self-cycling operation increases productivity of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Brown, Tobin; Sauvageau, Dominic; Cooper, David G

    2012-09-01

    Self-cycling fermentation (SCF), a cyclical, semi-continuous process that induces cell synchrony, was incorporated into a recombinant protein production scheme. Escherichia coli CY15050, a lac(-) mutant lysogenized with temperature-sensitive phage λ modified to over-express β-galactosidase, was used as a model system. The production scheme was divided into two de-coupled stages. The host cells were cultured under SCF operation in the first stage before being brought to a second stage where protein production was induced. In the first stage, the host strain demonstrated a stable cycling pattern immediately following the first cycle. This reproducible pattern was maintained over the course of the experiments and a significant degree of cell synchrony was obtained. By growing cells using SCF, productivity increased 50% and production time decreased by 40% compared to a batch culture under similar conditions. In addition, synchronized cultures induced from the end of a SCF cycle displayed shorter lysis times and a more complete culture-wide lysis than unsynchronized cultures. Finally, protein synthesis was influenced by the time at which the lytic phase was induced in the cell life cycle. For example, induction of a synchronized culture immediately prior to cell division resulted in the maximum protein productivity, suggesting protein production can be optimized with respect to the cell life cycle using SCF. PMID:22407770

  2. Identification and expression analysis on bactericidal permeability-increasing protein/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein of blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Tang, Leilei; Liang, Yinhua; Jiang, Yuhong; Liu, Shaojun; Zhang, Fuyun; He, Xia; Wang, Tianyi; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Yan, Jinpeng

    2015-08-01

    Bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI) and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) belong to the lipid transfer protein/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein family and play a critical role in the innate immune response to Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, a novel BPI/LBP from blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala (maBPI/LBP) was isolated by RACE techniques. The open reading frame (ORF) of maBPI/LBP gene encoded a polypeptide of 474 amino acids with a putative 18-aa hydrophobic signal peptide. Structurally, the maBPI/LBP showed highly similar to those of BPI/LBPs from invertebrate and teleost, LBPs and BPIs from mammal, which contained an N-terminal BPI/LBP/CETP domain BPI1 with a LPS-binding domain, a C-terminal BPI/LBP/CETP domain BPI2, and proline-rich domain. The homologous identities of deduced amino acid sequences displayed that the maBPI/LBP possessed significant similarity (96.61% and 90.07%) with those of grass carp and common carp, respectively. The recombinant protein of maBPI/LBP showed effectively kill Gram-negative bacteria. The maBPI/LBP gene was expressed in a wide range of normal tested tissues, with the highest expression levels in the kidney. The experiments revealed that the mRNA expression of maBPI/LBP in spleen considerably up-regulated from 2 h to 8 h post LPS stimulation, and peaked rapidly at 2 h (7.40-fold, P < 0.05), which confirmed that maBPI/LBP was the absolute sensitive to LPS stimulation. Furthermore, the level of maBPI/LBP mRNA expression reached the maximum for a second time at 24 h after LPS stimulation. These results suggested that maBPI/LBP was a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein contributing to the host immune defense against pathogenic bacterial infection in M. amblycephala. This study will further our understanding of the function of BPI/LBP and the molecular mechanism of innate immunity in teleost.

  3. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  4. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Højlund, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO(2) phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number of different mitochondrial phosphopeptides (87 ± 7 vs 40 ± 7, p = 0.015) and phosphoproteins (46 ± 2 vs 26 ± 3, p = 0.005) identified in each mitochondrial preparation. Almost half of the mitochondrial phosphorylation sites (n = 94) were exclusively identified in the insulin-stimulated state and included the majority of novel sites. Phosphorylation sites detected more often or exclusively in insulin-stimulated samples include multiple sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism, as well as several components of the newly defined mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial processes by phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms.

  5. Deletion of the membrane protein Lmo0412 increases the virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan José; Pucciarelli, María Graciela

    2014-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis and maternofetal infections. 20-30% of eubacterial ORFs are predicted to encode membrane proteins. The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a macromolecular structure, which plays a key role for the pathogenesis. Despite this, little knowledge exists regarding the function of cytoplasmic membrane proteins of Listeria during infection. Here, we investigated a predicted membrane protein of the pathogen L. monocytogenes, Lmo0412, of unknown function. Lmo0412 is only present in the Listeria genus and low conserved in the non-pathogenic species L. innocua. Bacterial fractionation and western blot analyses showed that Lmo0412 was only detectable in the membrane of L. monocytogenes EGDe during logarithmic growth phase. lmo0412 expression in L. monocytogenes was down-regulated during in vitro infection of JEG-3 epithelial cells. An L. monocytogenes mutant deficient in this membrane protein showed increased invasion of Caco-2 and NRK-49F host cells using in vitro infection models. Moreover, the lack of Lmo0412 in this deletion mutant increased the viable bacteria counts in the spleen and liver of mice compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, these data suggest a selective advantage conferred by the absence of Lmo0412 for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.

  6. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  7. Hypoxia stimulates prostacyclin synthesis in newborn pulmonary artery endothelium by increasing cyclooxygenase-1 protein.

    PubMed

    North, A J; Brannon, T S; Wells, L B; Campbell, W B; Shaul, P W

    1994-07-01

    In newborn lambs, pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) production increases acutely in response to low oxygen. We tested the hypothesis that decreased oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 synthesis in arterial segments and cultured endothelial cells from newborn lamb intrapulmonary arteries. In segments studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by 73%. Endothelium removal lowered PGI2 by 77% and PGE2 by 66%. At low oxygen tension (PO2, 40 mm Hg), PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis rose by 96% and 102%, respectively. Similarly, in endothelial cells studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded PGE2 by 50%, and at low oxygen tension both PGI2 and PGE2 increased (89% and 64%, respectively). Endothelial cell PGI2 synthesis maximally stimulated by bradykinin, A23187, or arachidonic acid was also increased at low PO2 by 50%, 66%, and 48%, respectively. PGE2 synthesis was similarly altered, increasing by 33%, 37%, and 41%, respectively. In contrast, lowering oxygen had minimal effect on PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis with exogenous PGH2, which is the product of cyclooxygenase. Immunoblot analyses revealed that there was a 2.6-fold greater abundance of cyclooxygenase-1 protein at PO2 of 40 versus 680 mm Hg, and the increase at lower oxygen tension was inhibited by cycloheximide. The cyclooxygenase-2 isoform was not detected. Thus, attenuated oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis in intrapulmonary arterial segments and endothelial cells from newborn lambs. This process is due to enhanced cyclooxygenase activity related to increased abundance of the cyclooxygenase-1 protein, and this effect may be due to increased synthesis of the enzyme protein.

  8. Construction of "small-intelligent" focused mutagenesis libraries using well-designed combinatorial degenerate primers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lixia; Gao, Hui; Zhu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Ming; Jiang, Rongxiang

    2012-03-01

    Site-saturation mutagenesis is a powerful tool for protein optimization due to its efficiency and simplicity. A degenerate codon NNN or NNS (K) is often used to encode the 20 standard amino acids, but this will produce redundant codons and cause uneven distribution of amino acids in the constructed library. Here we present a novel "small-intelligent" strategy to construct mutagenesis libraries that have a minimal gene library size without inherent amino acid biases, stop codons, or rare codons of Escherichia coli by coupling well-designed combinatorial degenerate primers with suitable PCR-based mutagenesis methods. The designed primer mixture contains exactly one codon per amino acid and thus allows the construction of small-intelligent mutagenesis libraries with one gene per protein. In addition, the software tool DC-Analyzer was developed to assist in primer design according to the user-defined randomization scheme for library construction. This small-intelligent strategy was successfully applied to the randomization of halohydrin dehalogenases with one or two randomized sites. With the help of DC-Analyzer, the strategy was proven to be as simple as NNS randomization and could serve as a general tool to efficiently randomize target genes at positions of interest.

  9. Increased expression of the antiapoptotic protein MCL1 in canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Oida, Kumiko; Jung, Kyungsook; Nishikawa, Sho; Jang, Hyosun; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-07-31

    Myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL1) is a potent antiapoptotic protein that plays a critical role in cell survival and drug resistance in various cancers. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of MCL1 in mast cell tumors (MCTs) has not been investigated in dogs. Here, we detected increased MCL1 expression in MCT cell lines, regardless of the presence of a c-kit mutation. MCL1 expression increased when the cells were exposed to specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase or Janus kinase-signaling pathways, thus protecting the cells from apoptosis, but not when KIT or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling cascades were inhibited. These results indicate that MCL1 expression may contribute to MCT survival and confer drug resistance. PMID:23428776

  10. Increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Vitaioli, Lucia; Amenta, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    Astrogliosis, consisting in astroglial proliferation and increased expression of the specific cytoskeletal protein glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) is common in several situations of brain damage. Arterial hypertension, which induces cerebrovascular changes, can cause also brain damage, neurodegeneration and dementia (vascular dementia). This study was designed to assess astroglial reaction in different brain areas (frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus and striatum) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) in the pre-hypertensive phase (2 months of age), in the developing phase of hypertension (4 months of age) and in established hypertension (6 months of age). SHR were compared to age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Analysis included reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of GFAP mRNA, GFAP immunochemistry (Western blot analysis) and immunohistochemistry. A significant increase of GFAP mRNA and an increase of GFAP immunoreactivity were noticeable in different brain areas of SHR compared to normotensive WKY rats at 6, but not at 2 or 4 months of age. Immunohistochemistry revealed a numerical augmentation (hyperplasia) and an increase in size (hypertrophy) of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in frontal cortex, occipital cortex and striatum of SHR. In the hippocampus of SHR only a numerical increase of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes was found. These finding demonstrating the occurrence of astrogliosis in the brain of SHR with established hypertension suggest that hypertension induces a condition of brain suffering enough to increase biosynthesis and expression of GFAP similarly as reported in several neurodegenerative disorders and in brain ischemia.

  11. Expression of a Truncated ATHB17 Protein in Maize Increases Ear Weight at Silking

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Griffith, Cara; Ahrens, Jeffrey E.; Taylor, J. Philip; Murphy, Lesley R.; Manjunath, Siva; Thompson, Rebecca L.; Lingard, Matthew J.; Back, Stephanie L.; Larue, Huachun; Brayton, Bonnie R.; Burek, Amanda J.; Tiwari, Shiv; Adam, Luc; Morrell, James A.; Caldo, Rico A.; Huai, Qing; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K.; Kuehn, Rosemarie; Sant, Anagha M.; Wingbermuehle, William J.; Sala, Rodrigo; Foster, Matt; Kinser, Josh D.; Mohanty, Radha; Jiang, Dongming; Ziegler, Todd E.; Huang, Mingya G.; Kuriakose, Saritha V.; Skottke, Kyle; Repetti, Peter P.; Reuber, T. Lynne; Ruff, Thomas G.; Petracek, Marie E.; Loida, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    ATHB17 (AT2G01430) is an Arabidopsis gene encoding a member of the α-subclass of the homeodomain leucine zipper class II (HD-Zip II) family of transcription factors. The ATHB17 monomer contains four domains common to all class II HD-Zip proteins: a putative repression domain adjacent to a homeodomain, leucine zipper, and carboxy terminal domain. However, it also possesses a unique N-terminus not present in other members of the family. In this study we demonstrate that the unique 73 amino acid N-terminus is involved in regulation of cellular localization of ATHB17. The ATHB17 protein is shown to function as a transcriptional repressor and an EAR-like motif is identified within the putative repression domain of ATHB17. Transformation of maize with an ATHB17 expression construct leads to the expression of ATHB17Δ113, a truncated protein lacking the first 113 amino acids which encodes a significant portion of the repression domain. Because ATHB17Δ113 lacks the repression domain, the protein cannot directly affect the transcription of its target genes. ATHB17Δ113 can homodimerize, form heterodimers with maize endogenous HD-Zip II proteins, and bind to target DNA sequences; thus, ATHB17Δ113 may interfere with HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional activity via a dominant negative mechanism. We provide evidence that maize HD-Zip II proteins function as transcriptional repressors and that ATHB17Δ113 relieves this HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional repression activity. Expression of ATHB17Δ113 in maize leads to increased ear size at silking and, therefore, may enhance sink potential. We hypothesize that this phenotype could be a result of modulation of endogenous HD-Zip II pathways in maize. PMID:24736658

  12. Combinatorial mutagenesis to restrict amino acid usage in an enzyme to a reduced set

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Satoshi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We developed an effective strategy to restrict the amino acid usage in a relatively large protein to a reduced set with conservation of its in vivo function. The 213-residue Escherichia coli orotate phosphoribosyltransferase was subjected to 22 cycles of segment-wise combinatorial mutagenesis followed by 6 cycles of site-directed random mutagenesis, both coupled with a growth-related phenotype selection. The enzyme eventually tolerated 73 amino acid substitutions: In the final variant, 9 amino acid types (A, D, G, L, P, R, T, V, and Y) occupied 188 positions (88%), and none of 7 amino acid types (C, H, I, M, N, Q, and W) appeared. Therefore, the catalytic function associated with a relatively large protein may be achieved with a subset of the 20 amino acid. The converged sequence also implies simpler constituents for proteins in the early stage of evolution. PMID:12361984

  13. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-04-28

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology.

  14. Blood parameters in growing pigs fed increasing levels of bacterial protein meal

    PubMed Central

    Hellwing, Anne Louise F; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The experiment investigated the effects of increasing dietary levels of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on various blood parameters reflecting protein and fat metabolism, liver function, and purine base metabolism in growing pigs. Sixteen barrows were allocated to four different experimental diets. The control diet was based on soybean meal. In the other three diets soybean meal was replaced with increasing levels of BPM, approximately 17%, 35%, and 50% of the nitrogen being derived from BPM. Blood samples from the jugular vein were taken when the body weights of the pigs were approximately 10 kg, 21 kg, 45 kg, and 77 kg. The blood parameters reflecting fat metabolism and liver function were not affected by diet. Both the plasma albumin and uric acid concentrations tended to decrease (P = 0.07 and 0.01, respectively) with increasing dietary BPM content, whereas the plasma glucose concentration tended to increase (P = 0.07) with increasing dietary BPM content. It was concluded that up to 50% of the nitrogen could be derived from BPM without affecting metabolic function, as reflected in the measured blood parameters. PMID:17996082

  15. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  16. RNA-Seq analysis and targeted mutagenesis for improved free fatty acid production in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-energy-density biofuels are typically derived from the fatty acid pathway, thus establishing free fatty acids (FFAs) as important fuel precursors. FFA production using photosynthetic microorganisms like cyanobacteria allows for direct conversion of carbon dioxide into fuel precursors. Recent studies investigating cyanobacterial FFA production have demonstrated the potential of this process, yet FFA production was also shown to have negative physiological effects on the cyanobacterial host, ultimately limiting high yields of FFAs. Results Cyanobacterial FFA production was shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lead to increased cell membrane permeability. To identify genetic targets that may mitigate these toxic effects, RNA-seq analysis was used to investigate the host response of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Stress response, nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding genes were up-regulated during FFA production while genes involved in carbon and hydrogen metabolisms were down-regulated. Select genes were targeted for mutagenesis to confirm their role in mitigating FFA toxicity. Gene knockout of two porins and the overexpression of ROS-degrading proteins and hypothetical proteins reduced the toxic effects of FFA production, allowing for improved growth, physiology, and FFA yields. Comparative transcriptomics, analyzing gene expression changes associated with FFA production and other stress conditions, identified additional key genes involved in cyanobacterial stress response. Conclusions A total of 15 gene targets were identified to reduce the toxic effects of FFA production. While single-gene targeted mutagenesis led to minor increases in FFA production, the combination of these targeted mutations may yield additional improvement, advancing the development of high-energy-density fuels derived from cyanobacteria. PMID:23919451

  17. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  18. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  19. Double-strand break-induced targeted mutagenesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Lyznik, L Alexander; Djukanovic, Vesna; Yang, Meizhu; Jones, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Double-strand breaks are very potent inducers of DNA recombination. There is no recombination between DNA molecules unless one or two DNA strands are broken. It has become feasible to introduce double-strand breaks at specific chromosomal loci by using dedicated, redesigned endonucleases with altered DNA-binding specificities. Such breaks are mainly repaired by error-prone nonhomologous recombination pathways in somatic cells, thus frequently producing mutations at the preselected chromosomal sites. Although the art and science of reengineering protein properties have been advancing quickly, an empirical validation of new endonucleases in a particular experimental environment is essential for successful targeted mutagenesis experiments. This chapter presents methods that were developed for a comprehensive evaluation of the DNA-binding and DNA-cutting activities of homing endonucleases in maize cells; however, they can be adopted for similar evaluation studies of other endonucleases and other plant species that are amenable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:22351025

  20. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types. PMID:26568031

  1. Increasing pentose phosphate pathway flux enhances recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Nocon, Justyna; Steiger, Matthias; Mairinger, Teresa; Hohlweg, Jonas; Rußmayer, Hannes; Hann, Stephan; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2016-07-01

    Production of heterologous proteins in Pichia pastoris (syn. Komagataella sp.) has been shown to exert a metabolic burden on the host metabolism. This burden is associated with metabolite drain, which redirects nucleotides and amino acids from primary metabolism. On the other hand, recombinant protein production affects energy and redox homeostasis of the host cell. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that overexpression of single genes of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) had a positive influence on recombinant production of cytosolic human superoxide dismutase (hSOD). In this study, different combinations of these genes belonging to the oxidative PPP were generated and analyzed. Thereby, a 3.8-fold increase of hSOD production was detected when glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (ZWF1) and 6-gluconolactonase (SOL3) were simultaneously overexpressed, while the combinations of other genes from PPP had no positive effect on protein production. By measuring isotopologue patterns of (13)C-labelled metabolites, we could detect an upshift in the flux ratio of PPP to glycolysis upon ZWF1 and SOL3 co-overexpression, as well as increased levels of 6-phosphogluconate. The substantial improvement of hSOD production by ZWF1 and SOL3 co-overexpression appeared to be connected to an increase in PPP flux. In conclusion, we show that overexpression of SOL3 together with ZWF1 enhanced both the PPP flux ratio and hSOD accumulation, providing evidence that in P. pastoris Sol3 limits the flux through PPP and recombinant protein production.

  2. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  3. Inflammatory Eicosanoids Increase Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression via Activation of Multiple Neuronal Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Herbst-Robinson, Katie J.; Liu, Li; James, Michael; Yao, Yuemang; Xie, Sharon X.; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Senile plaques comprised of Aβ peptides are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, as are activated glia that release inflammatory molecules, including eicosanoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ levels can be increased through activation of thromboxane A2-prostanoid (TP) receptors on neurons. We demonstrate that TP receptor regulation of APP expression depends on Gαq-signaling and conventional protein kinase C isoforms. Importantly, we discovered that Gαq-linked prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene D4 receptors also regulate APP expression. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2, as well as total APP levels, were found to be elevated in the brains of aged 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring Aβ plaques and activated glia, suggesting that increased APP expression resulted from eicosanoid binding to Gαq-linked neuronal receptors. Notably, inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis significantly lowered brain APP protein levels in aged 5XFAD mice. These results provide new insights into potential AD therapeutic strategies. PMID:26672557

  4. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-06-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. PMID:10856027

  5. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-01-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10856027

  6. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein (BPI) Inhibits the Infectivity of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pinkenburg, Olaf; Meyer, Torben; Bannert, Norbert; Norley, Steven; Bolte, Kathrin; Czudai-Matwich, Volker; Herold, Susanne; Gessner, André; Schnare, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their well-known antibacterial activity some antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) display also antiviral effects. A 27 aa peptide from the N-terminal part of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) previously shown to harbour antibacterial activity inhibits the infectivity of multiple Influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1) the causing agent of the Influenza pneumonia. In contrast, the homologous murine BPI-peptide did not show activity against Influenza A virus. In addition human BPI-peptide inhibits the activation of immune cells mediated by Influenza A virus. By changing the human BPI-peptide to the sequence of the mouse homologous peptide the antiviral activity was completely abolished. Furthermore, the human BPI-peptide also inhibited the pathogenicity of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but failed to interfere with HIV and measles virus. Electron microscopy indicate that the human BPI-peptide interferes with the virus envelope and at high concentrations was able to destroy the particles completely. PMID:27273104

  7. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  8. A practical teaching course in directed protein evolution using the green fluorescent protein as a model.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain reaction. Screening of bacterial colonies transformed with random mutant libraries identified GFP variants with increased fluorescence yields. Mapping the three-dimensional structure of these mutants demonstrated how alterations in structural features such as the environment around the fluorophore and properties of the protein surface can influence functional properties such as the intensity of fluorescence and protein solubility.

  9. Contribution of increased VEGF receptors to hypoxic changes in fetal ovine carotid artery contractile proteins.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Butler, Stacy M; Hubbell, Margaret C; Semotiuk, Andrew; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can modulate smooth muscle phenotype and, consequently, the composition and function of arteries upstream from the microcirculation, where angiogenesis occurs. Given that hypoxia potently induces VEGF, the present study explores the hypothesis that, in fetal arteries, VEGF contributes to hypoxic vascular remodeling through changes in abundance, organization, and function of contractile proteins. Pregnant ewes were acclimatized at sea level or at altitude (3,820 m) for the final 110 days of gestation. Endothelium-denuded carotid arteries from full-term fetuses were used fresh or after 24 h of organ culture in a physiological concentration (3 ng/ml) of VEGF. After 110 days, hypoxia had no effect on VEGF abundance but markedly increased abundance of the Flk-1 (171%) and Flt-1 (786%) VEGF receptors. Hypoxia had no effect on smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA), decreased myosin light chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK), and increased 20-kDa regulatory MLC (MLC(20)) abundances. Hypoxia also increased MLCK-SMαA, MLC(20)-SMαA, and MLCK-MLC(20) colocalization. Compared with hypoxia, organ culture with VEGF produced the same pattern of changes in contractile protein abundance and colocalization. Effects of VEGF on colocalization were blocked by the VEGF receptor antagonists vatalanib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). Thus, through increases in VEGF receptor density, hypoxia can recruit VEGF to help mediate remodeling of fetal arteries upstream from the microcirculation. The results support the hypothesis that VEGF contributes to hypoxic vascular remodeling through changes in abundance, organization, and function of contractile proteins. PMID:23325408

  10. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  11. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross).

  12. Extending CATH: increasing coverage of the protein structure universe and linking structure with function.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Alison L; Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Clegg, Andrew B; Rentzsch, Robert; Furnham, Nicholas; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Jones, David; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    CATH version 3.3 (class, architecture, topology, homology) contains 128,688 domains, 2386 homologous superfamilies and 1233 fold groups, and reflects a major focus on classifying structural genomics (SG) structures and transmembrane proteins, both of which are likely to add structural novelty to the database and therefore increase the coverage of protein fold space within CATH. For CATH version 3.4 we have significantly improved the presentation of sequence information and associated functional information for CATH superfamilies. The CATH superfamily pages now reflect both the functional and structural diversity within the superfamily and include structural alignments of close and distant relatives within the superfamily, annotated with functional information and details of conserved residues. A significantly more efficient search function for CATH has been established by implementing the search server Solr (http://lucene.apache.org/solr/). The CATH v3.4 webpages have been built using the Catalyst web framework.

  13. Increased expression of Dock180 protein in the noninfarcted myocardium in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Lan; Li, Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Wen-Ju; Wang, Li-Ping

    2013-03-01

    The integrin β1 subunit and its downstream molecule focal adhesion kinase have been identified as critical molecules for the inhibition of postinfarction cardiac remodeling, ischemic cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. However, as a component of the integrin pathway, it is still unclear whether Dock180 (dedicator of cytokinesis 1) protein is expressed in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones. In this study, experimental myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operation (sham) models were established in Sprague Dawley rats and the expression of Dock180 protein in the myocardium of the sham group and in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones of the MI group was detected by Western blot technique. The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium was as follows: postsham 24-hour group, 0.10 ± 0.04 (n = 8); post-MI 24-hour group, 0.13 ± 0.03 (n = 8); postsham 12-week group, 0.11 ± 0.05 (n = 8); and post-MI 12-week group 0.17 ± 0.04 (n = 8). The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium in the post-MI 12-week group was significantly higher than that in the postsham 12-week group (p = 0.019), in the postsham 24-hour group (p = 0.004), and in the post-MI 24-hour group (p = 0.040). We conclude that Dock180 protein is expressed in the myocardium in rats. Furthermore, its expression is significantly increased in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones.

  14. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  15. Comparative biology and expression of TENP, an egg protein related to the bacterial permeability-increasing family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, Lynn; Dunn, Ian C

    2014-03-15

    The 'transiently expressed in neural precursors' (TENP) gene product is a member of the bacterial/permeability-increasing (BPI) family of antimicrobial proteins but was first identified as having a role in an early neurological event occurring in post-mitotic cells. However, recent characterisation of the egg white proteome has shown that TENP is an important egg component constituting ~0.1-0.5% of the total protein and suggesting it is expressed in the adult oviduct. In this study we confirmed quantitatively that the expression of TENP is largely confined to the tubular glands of the magnum of the oviduct, where egg white synthesis occurs, with around 10,000 times more expression than in the embryo where TENP was first identified. TENP expression is significantly increased with the administration of oestrogen or progesterone (P<0.001) and is reduced in regressed oviducts (P<0.001) demonstrating gonadal steroid control, typical of an oviduct and egg specific gene. A putative translational start site for TENP has been characterised and the evidence indicates that it is expressed as one predominant transcript. In comparison with the published sequence, insertion and deletion events have been identified causing a partial frame-shift that results in an altered amino acid sequence to that previously documented. TENP is conserved across divergent avian species being found in chicken, turkey, duck and zebra finch and its expression profile confirmed in both chicken and duck. Similarity searches have shown homology with the BPI-like family of innate immune genes, particularly with palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone (PLUNC) members of this family. We therefore believe that at least in adults the role of TENP is as a major component of egg, particularly the white and it is probable that it contributes to its antimicrobial function.

  16. Intensive insulin treatment increases donor site wound protein synthesis in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L.; Aarsland, Asle; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of burns, patients’ own skin is the preferred material to cover burn wounds, resulting in the need to create a donor site wound. Enhancement of healing of the donor site wound would be beneficial in burn patients. Insulin, an anabolic agent, is routinely used to treat hyperglycemia after injury. We investigated whether intensive insulin treatment (INS) increases fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of the donor site wound protein and decreases the length of hospitalization normalized for total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA). Methods FSR of the donor site wound protein was measured in pediatric patients randomized to control (CNT) (n = 13) and INS (n = 10) treatments. Depending on the postoperative day when the tracer study was done studies were divided into “Early” (days < 5) and “Late” (days >=5) periods. Results FSR of the donor site wound protein was greater in the INS group at the “Early” period of wound healing (CNT vs. INS, 8.2±3.8 vs. 13.1±6.9 %/day, p: < 0.05); but not at the “Late” (CNT vs. INS, 19.7±4.6 vs. 16.6±4.0 %/day, p > 0.05). Despite these differences LOS/TBSA was not decreased in the INS group. Correlation analyses demonstrated that independently of the treatment regimen FSR positively correlated (p < 0.05) with time post creation of the donor site and negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with LOS/TBSA. Conclusions Insulin treatment increased FSR of the donor site wound protein in the early period of wound healing; FSR correlated with LOS/TBSA independently of the treatment regimen. PMID:21236451

  17. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  18. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  19. Pregnancy Zone Protein is Increased in the Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Associates with Senile Plaques.

    PubMed

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Ijsselstijn, Linda; van der Weiden, Marcel M; Zheng, Ping-Pin; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Koudstaal, Peter J; Luider, Theo M; Kros, Johan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of pregnancy zone protein (PZP) were found in the serum of persons who later developed Alzheimer's disease (AD) in comparison to controls who remained dementia free. We suggested that this increase is due to brain derived PZP entering the blood stream during the early phase of the disease. Here we investigate the possible involvement of PZP in human AD pathogenesis. We observed increased PZP immunoreactivity in AD postmortem brain cortex compared to non-demented controls. In the AD cortex, PZP immunoreactivity localized to microglial cells that interacted with senile plaques and was occasionally observed in neurons. Our data link the finding of elevated serum PZP levels with the characteristic AD pathology and identify PZP as a novel component in AD.

  20. Oral supplementation with whey proteins increases plasma glutathione levels of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Micke, P; Beeh, K M; Schlaak, J F; Buhl, R

    2001-02-01

    HIV infection is characterized by an enhanced oxidant burden and a systemic deficiency of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant. The semi-essential amino acid cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and limits its synthesis. Therefore, different strategies to supplement cysteine supply have been suggested to increase glutathione levels in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with two different cysteine-rich whey protein formulas on plasma GSH levels and parameters of oxidative stress and immune status in HIV-infected patients. In a prospective double blind clinical trial, 30 patients (25 male, 5 female; mean age (+/- SD) 42 +/- 9.8 years) with stable HIV infection (221 +/- 102 CD4 + lymphocytes L-1) were randomized to a supplemental diet with a daily dose of 45 g whey proteins of either Protectamin (Fresenius Kabi, Bad Hamburg, Germany) or Immunocal (Immunotec, Vandreuil, Canada) for two weeks. Plasma concentrations of total, reduced and oxidized GSH, superoxide anion (O2-) release by blood mononuclear cells, plasma levels of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and 12 were quantified with standard methods at baseline and after therapy. Pre-therapy, plasma GSH levels (Protectamin: 1.92 +/- 0.6 microM; Immunocal: 1.98 +/- 0.9 microM) were less than normal (2.64 +/- 0.7 microM, P = 0.03). Following two weeks of oral supplementation with whey proteins, plasma GSH levels increased in the Protectamin group by 44 +/- 56% (2.79 +/- 1.2 microM, P = 0.004) while the difference in the Immunocal group did not reach significance (+ 24.5 +/- 59%, 2.51 +/- 1.48 microM, P = 0.43). Spontaneous O2- release by blood mononuclear cells was stable (20.1 +/- 14.2 vs. 22.6 +/- 16.1 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.52) whereas PMA-induced O2- release decreased in the Protectamin group (53.7 +/- 19 vs. 39.8 +/- 18 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and

  1. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  2. Dry Eye Symptoms Are Increased in Mice Deficient in Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP)

    PubMed Central

    Setälä, Niko L.; Metso, Jari; Jauhiainen, Matti; Sajantila, Antti; Holopainen, Juha M.

    2011-01-01

    In the tear fluid the outermost part facing the tear–air interface is composed of lipids preventing evaporation of the tears. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) mediates phospholipid transfer processes between serum lipoproteins and is also a normal component of human tears. To study whether PLTP plays any functional role in tear fluid we investigated PLTP-deficient mice, applying functional and morphologic analyses under normal housing and experimentally induced dry eye conditions. Aqueous tear fluid production, corneal epithelial morphology, barrier function, and occludin expression were assessed. In mice with a full deficiency of functional PLTP enhanced corneal epithelial damage, increased corneal permeability to carboxyfluorescein, and decreased corneal epithelial occludin expression were shown. These pathologic signs were worsened by experimentally induced dry eye both in wild-type and PLTP knock-out mice. Deficiency in the production of tear PLTP in mice is accompanied by corneal epithelial damage, a feature that is typical in human dry eye syndrome (DES). To complement animal experiments we collected tear fluid from human dry eye patients as well as healthy control subjects. Increased tear fluid PLTP activity was observed among DES patients. In conclusion, the presence of PLTP in tear fluid appears to be essential for maintaining a healthy and functional ocular surface. Increased PLTP activity in human tear fluid in DES patients suggests an ocular surface protective role for this lipid transfer protein. PMID:21514421

  3. Halobacterial nano vesicles displaying murine bactericidal permeability-increasing protein rescue mice from lethal endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; DasSarma, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Oindrilla; Kim, Jong Myoung; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) had been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and endotoxin neutralizing activity by interacting with LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The current study examines the feasibility of using murine BPI (mBPI) expressed on halophilic Archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) for the treatment of endotoxemia in high-risk patients, using a murine model of D-galactosamine-induced endotoxic shock. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1was used to express the N-terminal 199 amino acid residues of mBPI fused to the GVNP GvpC protein, and bound to the surface of the haloarchaeal GVNPs. Our results indicate that delivery of mBPIN-GVNPs increase the survival rate of mice challenged with lethal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Additionally, the mBPIN-GVNP-treated mice displayed reduced symptoms of inflammation, including inflammatory anemia, recruitment of neutrophils, liver apoptosis as well as increased pro-inflammatory serum cytokine levels. PMID:27646594

  4. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  5. Halobacterial nano vesicles displaying murine bactericidal permeability-increasing protein rescue mice from lethal endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; DasSarma, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Oindrilla; Kim, Jong Myoung; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) had been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and endotoxin neutralizing activity by interacting with LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The current study examines the feasibility of using murine BPI (mBPI) expressed on halophilic Archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) for the treatment of endotoxemia in high-risk patients, using a murine model of D-galactosamine-induced endotoxic shock. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1was used to express the N-terminal 199 amino acid residues of mBPI fused to the GVNP GvpC protein, and bound to the surface of the haloarchaeal GVNPs. Our results indicate that delivery of mBPIN-GVNPs increase the survival rate of mice challenged with lethal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Additionally, the mBPIN-GVNP-treated mice displayed reduced symptoms of inflammation, including inflammatory anemia, recruitment of neutrophils, liver apoptosis as well as increased pro-inflammatory serum cytokine levels. PMID:27646594

  6. 1,25(OH)2D3 increases membrane associated protein kinase C in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] affects protein kinase C (PKC) activity in kidney, as has been demonstrated in HL-60 cells we measured 1,25(OH)2D3 binding, PKC activity and PKC immunoreactivity in Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, a normal renal epithelial cell line derived from bovine kidney. Our data demonstrate that MDBK cells exhibit specific high affinity binding for 1,25(OH)2D3, indicating the presence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment of MDBK cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 for 24 h increased membrane PKC activity and immunoreactivity. The effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was dose-dependent, with a peak effect observed at 10(-7)M 1,25(OH)2D3. The 1,25(OH)2D3 induced increase in membrane PKC was paralleled by a comparable decrease in cytosolic PKC activity and amount. Although time course studies were consistent with a VDR mediated effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on PKC protein synthesis, total PKC activity was not increased by 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting an effect on PKC translocation or localization. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 modulates PKC mediated events in kidney, a classic target for this steroid hormone.

  7. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile. PMID:25752767

  8. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile.

  9. HIV-1 Tat Protein Increases Microglial Outward K+ Current and Resultant Neurotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianuo; Xu, Peng; Collins, Cory; Liu, Han; Zhang, Jingdong; Keblesh, James P.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Microglia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Increasing evidence indicates the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are involved in the regulation of microglia function, prompting us to hypothesize Kv channels may also be involved in microglia-mediated neurotoxic activity in HIV-1-infected brain. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the involvement of Kv channels in the response of microglia to HIV-1 Tat protein. Treatment of rat microglia with HIV-1 Tat protein (200 ng/ml) resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation, as indicated by increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide, which were accompanied by enhanced outward K+ current and Kv1.3 channel expression. Suppression of microglial Kv1.3 channel activity, either with Kv1.3 channel blockers Margatoxin, 5-(4-Phenoxybutoxy)psoralen, or broad-spectrum K+ channel blocker 4-Aminopyridine, or by knockdown of Kv1.3 expression via transfection of microglia with Kv1.3 siRNA, was found to abrogate the neurotoxic activity of microglia resulting from HIV-1 Tat exposure. Furthermore, HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated with the application of supernatant collected from K+ channel blocker-treated microglia. Lastly, the intracellular signaling pathways associated with Kv1.3 were investigated and enhancement of microglial Kv1.3 was found to correspond with an increase in Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. These data suggest targeting microglial Kv1.3 channels may be a potential new avenue of therapy for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:23738010

  10. groE mutants of Escherichia coli are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, C.E.; Walker, G.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Overexpression of the SOS-inducible umuDC operon of Escherichia coli results in the inability of these cells to grow at 30 degrees C. Mutations in several heat shock genes suppress this cold sensitivity. Suppression of umuD+C+-dependent cold sensitivity appears to occur by two different mechanisms. We show that mutations in lon and dnaK heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity in a lexA-dependent manner. In contrast, mutations in groES, groEL, and rpoH heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity regardless of the transcriptional regulation of the umuDC genes. We have also found that mutations in groES and groEL genes are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis. This defect can be suppressed by increased expression of the umuDC operon. The mechanism by which groE mutations affect umuDC gene product function may be related to the stability of the UmuC protein, since the half-life of this protein is shortened because of mutations at the groE locus.

  11. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  12. Novel proteins associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy: selective reduction in α(1A)-adrenergic receptors and increased desensitization proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Moravec, Christine S; Perez, Dianne M

    2013-04-01

    Abstract Therapeutics to treat human heart failure (HF) and the identification of proteins associated with HF are still limited. We analyzed α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes in human HF and performed proteomic analysis on more uniform samples to identify novel proteins associated with human HF. Six failing hearts with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and four non-failing heart controls were subjected to proteomic analysis. Out of 48 identified proteins, 26 proteins were redundant between samples. Ten of these 26 proteins were previously reported to be associated with HF. Of the newly identified proteins, we found several muscle proteins and mitochondrial/electron transport proteins, while novel were functionally similar to previous reports. However, we also found novel proteins involved in functional classes such as β-oxidation and G-protein coupled receptor signaling and desensitization not previously associated with HF. We also performed radioligand-binding studies on the heart samples and not only confirmed a large loss of β(1)-ARs in end-stage DCM, but also found a selective decrease in the α(1A)-AR subtype not previously reported. We have identified new proteins and functional categories associated with end-stage DCM. We also report that similar to the previously characterized loss of β(1)-AR in HF, there is also a concomitant loss of α(1A)-ARs, which are considered cardioprotective proteins.

  13. Microtubule-Associated Protein SBgLR Facilitates Storage Protein Deposition and Its Expression Leads to Lysine Content Increase in Transgenic Maize Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Li, Shixue; Yue, Jing; Xiao, Wenhan; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) seed is deficient in protein and lysine content. Many studies have been made to improve the nutritional quality of maize seeds. Previously, we reported the role of a natural lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR in increasing protein and lysine content. However, how the SBgLR improves lysine and protein content remains unclear. Here, the reasons and possible mechanism for SBgLR in protein and lysine improvement have been analyzed and discussed. Through seed-specific expression of SBgLR, we obtained transgenic maize with the simultaneously increased lysine and protein contents. High-protein and high-lysine characters were stably inherited across generations. The expression of SBgLR in maize kernels increased the accumulation of both zeins and non-zein proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the number of protein bodies (PBs) was increased obviously in SBgLR transgenic immature endosperms with the morphology and structure of PBs unchanged. The proteinaceous matrix was more abundant in transgenic mature endosperms under scanning electron microscopy. The stabilities of zein and lysine-rich non-zein genes were also increased in transgenic endosperms. Finally, the potential application of SBgLR in maize nutrient improvement was evaluated. This study shows that a cytoskeleton-associated protein has potential applicable value in crop nutrient improving, and provided a feasible strategy for improvement of maize grain quality. PMID:26703573

  14. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  15. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  16. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  17. Single amino acid substitutions on the needle tip protein IpaD increased Shigella virulence.

    PubMed

    Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Schiavolin, Lionel; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2014-07-01

    Infection of colonic epithelial cells by Shigella is associated with the type III secretion system, which serves as a molecular syringe to inject effectors into host cells. This system includes an extracellular needle used as a conduit for secreted proteins. Two of these proteins, IpaB and IpaD, dock at the needle tip to control secretion and are also involved in the insertion of a translocation pore into host cell membrane allowing effector delivery. To better understand the function of IpaD, we substituted thirteen residues conserved among homologous proteins in other bacterial species. Generated variants were tested for their ability to surface expose IpaB and IpaD, to control secretion, to insert the translocation pore, and to invade host cells. In addition to a first group of seven ipaD variants that behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, we identified a second group with mutations V314D and I319D that deregulated secretion of all effectors, but remained fully invasive. Moreover, we identified a third group with mutations Y153A, T161D, Q165L and Y276A, that exhibited increased levels of translocators secretion, pore formation, and cell entry. Altogether, our results offer a better understanding of the role of IpaD in the control of Shigella virulence.

  18. Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Increases Protein Acetylation and Accelerates Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karamanlidis, Georgios; Lee, Chi Fung; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Suthammarak, Wichit; Gong, Guohua; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.; Wang, Wang; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including heart failure but the specific mechanisms for this link remain largely elusive. We modeled the impairment of mitochondrial respiration by inactivation of the Ndufs4 gene, a protein critical for Complex I (C-I) assembly, in the mouse heart (cKO). While C-I supported respiration decreased by >40%, the cKO mice maintained normal cardiac function in vivo and high-energy phosphate content in isolated perfused hearts. However, the cKO mice developed accelerated heart failure after pressure overload or repeated pregnancy. Decreased NAD+/NADH ratio by C-I deficiency inhibited Sirt3 activity, leading to increase in protein acetylation, and sensitization of the permeability transition in mitochondria (mPTP). NAD+ precursor supplementation to cKO mice partially normalized the NAD+/NADH ratio, protein acetylation and mPTP sensitivity. These findings describe a mechanism connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to the susceptibility to diseases and propose a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23931755

  19. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  20. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbeare, F.A.

    1982-08-17

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  1. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-12-12

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  2. Increased expression of extracellular proteins as a hallmark of human endothelial cell in vitro senescence.

    PubMed

    Hampel, B; Fortschegger, K; Ressler, S; Chang, M W; Unterluggauer, H; Breitwieser, A; Sommergruber, W; Fitzky, B; Lepperdinger, G; Jansen-Dürr, P; Voglauer, R; Grillari, J

    2006-05-01

    A convenient way to study processes of aging in distinct human tissues consists of a molecular analysis of cells from the tissue in question, that were explanted and grown in vitro until they reach senescence. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), we have established an in vitro senescence model for human endothelial cells. A major hallmark of HUVEC in vitro senescence is the increased frequency of apoptotic cell death, which occurs as a determining feature of HUVEC senescence. Senescent endothelial cells are also found in vivo in atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that the presence of such cells may contribute to the development of vascular pathology. To elucidate mechanisms underlying endothelial cell senescence and age-associated apoptosis, gene expression analyses were carried out. In these experiments, we observed the up-regulation of genes coding for extracellular proteins in senescent HUVEC. In particular, a significant upregulation of interleukin-8, VEGI, and the IGF-binding proteins 3 and 5 was observed. Upregulation of these genes was confirmed by both RT-PCR and Western blot. In the case of interleukin-8, a roughly 50-fold upregulation of the protein was also found in cellular supernatants. The extracellular proteins encoded by these genes are well known for their ability to modulate the apoptotic response of human cells, and in the case of interleukin-8, clear links to the establishment of atherosclerotic lesions have been defined. The results described here support a new model, where changes in the secretome of human endothelial cells contribute to vascular aging and vascular pathology. PMID:16626901

  3. Functional Dissection of an Alternatively Spliced Herpesvirus Gene by Splice Site Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schommartz, Tim; Loroch, Stefan; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam; Sickmann, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses have large and complex DNA genomes. The largest among the herpesviruses, those of the cytomegaloviruses, include over 170 genes. Although most herpesvirus gene products are expressed from unspliced transcripts, a substantial number of viral transcripts are spliced. Some viral transcripts are subject to alternative splicing, which leads to the expression of several proteins from a single gene. Functional analysis of individual proteins derived from an alternatively spliced gene is difficult, as deletion and nonsense mutagenesis, both common methods used in the generation of viral gene knockout mutants, affect several or all gene products at the same time. Here, we show that individual gene products of an alternatively spliced herpesvirus gene can be inactivated selectively by mutagenesis of the splice donor or acceptor site and by intron deletion or substitution mutagenesis. We used this strategy to dissect the essential M112/113 gene of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), which encodes the MCMV Early 1 (E1) proteins. The expression of each of the four E1 protein isoforms was inactivated individually, and the requirement for each isoform in MCMV replication was analyzed in fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. We show that the E1 p87 isoform, but not the p33, p36, and p38 isoforms, is essential for viral replication in cell culture. Moreover, the presence of one of the two medium-size isoforms (p36 or p38) and the presence of intron 1, but not its specific sequence, are required for viral replication. This study demonstrates the usefulness of splice site mutagenesis for the functional analysis of alternatively spliced herpesvirus genes. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses include up to 170 genes in their DNA genomes. The functions of most viral gene products remain poorly defined. The construction of viral gene knockout mutants has thus been an important tool for functional analysis of viral proteins. However, this strategy is of limited use when

  4. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/. PMID:24847672

  5. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  6. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  7. Nanospray FAIMS fractionation provides significant increases in proteome coverage of unfractionated complex protein digests.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Hoopmann, Michael R; Johnson, Richard S; Saleem, Ramsey A; Aitchison, John D; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that can be used to reduce sample complexity and increase dynamic range in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. FAIMS fractionates ions in the gas-phase according to characteristic differences in mobilities in electric fields of different strengths. Undesired ion species such as solvated clusters and singly charged chemical background ions can be prevented from reaching the mass analyzer, thus decreasing chemical noise. To date, there has been limited success using the commercially available Thermo Fisher FAIMS device with both standard ESI and nanoLC-MS. We have modified a Thermo Fisher electrospray source to accommodate a fused silica pulled tip capillary column for nanospray ionization, which will enable standard laboratories access to FAIMS technology. Our modified source allows easily obtainable stable spray at flow rates of 300 nL/min when coupled with FAIMS. The modified electrospray source allows the use of sheath gas, which provides a fivefold increase in signal obtained when nanoLC is coupled to FAIMS. In this work, nanoLC-FAIMS-MS and nanoLC-MS were compared by analyzing a tryptic digest of a 1:1 mixture of SILAC-labeled haploid and diploid yeast to demonstrate the performance of nanoLC-FAIMS-MS, at different compensation voltages, for post-column fractionation of complex protein digests. The effective dynamic range more than doubled when FAIMS was used. In total, 10,377 unique stripped peptides and 1649 unique proteins with SILAC ratios were identified from the combined nanoLC-FAIMS-MS experiments, compared with 6908 unique stripped peptides and 1003 unique proteins with SILAC ratios identified from the combined nanoLC-MS experiments. This work demonstrates how a commercially available FAIMS device can be combined with nanoLC to improve proteome coverage in shotgun and targeted type proteomics experiments. PMID:22186714

  8. Pomegranate juice consumption increases GSH levels and reduces lipid and protein oxidation in human blood.

    PubMed

    Matthaiou, Chrysoula M; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Sarafoglou, Eleni; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Koulocheri, Sofia D; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of pomegranate juice (PJ) consumption in humans. Thus, 14 healthy volunteers consumed PJ daily for a period of 15days and the changes of oxidative stress markers in their blood were assessed at four different time points, immediately before the experiment (T1), after 15days of juice administration (T2), one (T3) and three weeks (T4) after the interruption of PJ administration. The markers studied were total antioxidant capacity (TAC), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (CARB) measured in plasma, as well as reduced glutathione (GSH), and catalase activity (CAT) measured in erythrocytes. The MDA was reduced by 24.4% at T3 and CARB were reduced by 19.6% and 17.7% at T2 and T3, respectively, supporting the evidence that PJ consumption enhances the antioxidant status in humans by decreasing lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Moreover, GSH levels were significantly increased (22.6%) at T2, indicating that PJ consumption improves the antioxidant mechanisms in erythrocytes by increasing GSH levels. Finally, it was shown that even a week after stopping PJ consumption some of its beneficial effects on antioxidant status still remained in the organism.

  9. Overexpression of YY1 increases the protein production in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tastanova, Aizhan; Schulz, Alexandra; Folcher, Marc; Tolstrup, Anne; Puklowski, Anja; Kaufmann, Hitto; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-10

    The production of therapeutic antibodies using mammalian cells remains a high-priority in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Bioengineers have targeted different cellular processes, including transcription, translation, secretion and post-translational modifications, to overcome the metabolic bottlenecks limiting production capacity and create high-producing mammalian cell lines. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins belong to a family of chromatin regulators with important roles in multicellular development. By overexpressing and screening genes from the PcG family, we have identified an epigenetic key player for biopharmaceutical manufacturing enhancement: the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). The overexpression of YY1 led to an increase in the production of several product genes (SEAP, VEGF165, IgG including Rituximab), provided that human YY1 (hYY1) was expressed in human cells (HeLa, HT-1080, HEK-293T, FreeStyle™ 293-F) and Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived YY1 (cYY1) was expressed in CHO cells (CHO-K1, CHO-easyC, FreeStyle™ CHO-S, CHO-B13-24, CHO-IgG1). Ectopic expression of cYY1 in the stable CHO-derived IgG producer cell lines CHO-B13-24 and CHO-IgG1 increased the antibody titer up to 6-fold, suggesting that epigenetic engineering of mammalian production cell lines could become a new strategy to improve the manufacturing of complex protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:26686315

  10. Memantine increases brain production of kynurenic acid via protein kinase A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Renata; Luchowska, Elzbieta; Wielosz, Marian; Owe-Larsson, Bjorn; Urbanska, Ewa M

    2008-04-18

    We describe a novel aspect of action of memantine ex vivo, in the brain cortical slices and in vitro, in mixed glial cultures. The drug potently increased the production of kynurenic acid, an endogenous tryptophan metabolite blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and nicotinic alpha7 receptors. In cortical slices memantine, an open-channel NMDA blocker (100-150 microM), but not the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, LY235959 increased the production of kynurenic acid. Neither SCH23390, D1 receptor antagonist (50 microM) nor raclopride, D2 receptor antagonist (10 microM) changed the memantine-induced effects. Propranolol (100 microM) has partially reduced its action. Selective cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 (1 microM), but not selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, NPC15437 (30 microM) totally reversed the action of memantine. In mixed glial cultures, 2-24 h incubation with memantine (2-50 microM) enhanced the production of kynurenic acid. Memantine (up to 0.5 mM) has not affected the activity of kynurenic acid biosynthetic enzymes. The obtained data suggest that memantine enhances the production of kynurenic acid in PKA-mediated way. This effect may partially contribute to the therapeutic actions of memantine and be of a potential clinical importance.

  11. Agouti-related protein increases food hoarding more than food intake in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Day, Diane E; Bartness, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Agouti-related protein (AgRP), an endogenous melanocortin 3/4 receptor antagonist, appears to play an important role in the control of food intake and energy balance because exogenous administration in rats and overexpression in mice result in hyperphagia and body mass gain. Furthermore, arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA is increased with fasting in laboratory rats and mice and is decreased with refeeding. In Siberian hamsters, fasting also increases arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA, but these animals increase food hoarding, rather than food intake with refeeding. Therefore, we tested whether exogenous AgRP increased food hoarding in this species. Hamsters were trained in a hoarding/foraging apparatus to run a programmed number of wheel revolutions to earn food pellets. Four doses of AgRP-(83-132) or vehicle were injected into the third ventricle at the beginning of the dark phase, and food hoarding, food intake, and foraging were measured at various time points subsequently. Overall, food hoarding was stimulated as much as 10 times more than food intake, and both responses occurred as early as 1 h after injection. Food hoarding was increased the greatest at the lowest dose (0.1 nmol), whereas food intake was increased the greatest at the second lowest dose (1 nmol). Food intake and especially food hoarding were increased up to seven days after the AgRP injections. Foraging was increased at all AgRP doses except the highest dose (100 nmol). These results suggest that AgRP triggers the search for food in this species, and once they find it, hoarding predominates over eating.

  12. Energy Dense, Protein Restricted Diet Increases Adiposity and Perturbs Metabolism in Young, Genetically Lean Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kimberly D.; Scheffler, Tracy L.; Kasten, Steven C.; Reinholt, Brad M.; van Eyk, Gregory R.; Escobar, Jeffery; Scheffler, Jason M.; Gerrard, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood) are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12), containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1–12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11) with 12.2–19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001) energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); blood glucose increased (P<0.05) in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01), even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001). Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05) subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7) was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs. PMID:23991090

  13. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  14. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  15. Cancer gene discovery: exploiting insertional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Annunziato, Stefano; Adams, David J.; Montini, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis has been utilized as a functional forward genetics screen for the identification of novel genes involved in the pathogenesis of human cancers. Different insertional mutagens have been successfully used to reveal new cancer genes. For example, retroviruses (RVs) are integrating viruses with the capacity to induce the deregulation of genes in the neighborhood of the insertion site. RVs have been employed for more than 30 years to identify cancer genes in the hematopoietic system and mammary gland. Similarly, another tool that has revolutionized cancer gene discovery is the cut-and-paste transposons. These DNA elements have been engineered to contain strong promoters and stop cassettes that may function to perturb gene expression upon integration proximal to genes. In addition, complex mouse models characterized by tissue-restricted activity of transposons have been developed to identify oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that control the development of a wide range of solid tumor types, extending beyond those tissues accessible using RV-based approaches. Most recently, lentiviral vectors (LVs) have appeared on the scene for use in cancer gene screens. LVs are replication defective integrating vectors that have the advantage of being able to infect non-dividing cells, in a wide range of cell types and tissues. In this review, we describe the various insertional mutagens focusing on their advantages/limitations and we discuss the new and promising tools that will improve the insertional mutagenesis screens of the future. PMID:23928056

  16. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  17. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Avanish S.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Aguirre, Adan; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2−/− mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2−/− SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration. PMID:24391977

  18. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  19. Glucose deprivation increases tau phosphorylation via P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Elisabetta; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation increases amyloidogenesis via a BACE-1-dependent mechanism. However, no data are available on the effect that this condition may have on tau phosphorylation. In this study, we exposed neuronal cells to a glucose-free medium and investigated the effect on tau phosphorylation. Compared with controls, cells incubated in the absence of glucose had a significant increase in tau phosphorylation at epitopes Ser202/Thr205 and Ser404, which was associated with a selective activation of the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase prevented the increase in tau phosphorylation, while fluorescence studies revealed its co-localization with phosphorylated tau. The activation of P38 was secondary to the action of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, as its down-regulation prevented it. Finally, glucose deprivation induced cell apoptosis, which was associated with a significant increase in both caspase 3 and caspase 12 active forms. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism whereby glucose deprivation can modulate AD pathogenesis by influencing tau phosphorylation and suggest that this pathway may be a new therapeutic target for AD.

  20. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  1. Lack of Plasma Protein Hemopexin Results in Increased Duodenal Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Veronica; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Silengo, Lorenzo; Aime, Silvio; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The body concentration of iron is regulated by a fine equilibrium between absorption and losses of iron. Iron can be absorbed from diet as inorganic iron or as heme. Hemopexin is an acute phase protein that limits iron access to microorganisms. Moreover, it is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for heme and thus it mediates heme-iron recycling. Considering its involvement in iron homeostasis, it was postulated that hemopexin may play a role in the physiological absorption of inorganic iron. Methods and Results Hemopexin-null mice showed elevated iron deposits in enterocytes, associated with higher duodenal H-Ferritin levels and a significant increase in duodenal expression and activity of heme oxygenase. The expression of heme-iron and inorganic iron transporters was normal. The rate of iron absorption was assessed by measuring the amount of 57Fe retained in tissues from hemopexin-null and wild-type animals after administration of an oral dose of 57FeSO4 or of 57Fe-labelled heme. Higher iron retention in the duodenum of hemopexin-null mice was observed as compared with normal mice. Conversely, iron transfer from enterocytes to liver and bone marrow was unaffected in hemopexin-null mice. Conclusions The increased iron level in hemopexin-null duodenum can be accounted for by an increased iron uptake by enterocytes and storage in ferritins. These data indicate that the lack of hemopexin under physiological conditions leads to an enhanced duodenal iron uptake thus providing new insights to our understanding of body iron homeostasis. PMID:23826373

  2. Vitamin A deficiency increases protein catabolism and induces urea cycle enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, M Pilar; Cabezuelo, Francisco; Moreno, Verónica; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Timoneda, Joaquín; Barber, Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Chronic vitamin A deficiency induces a substantial delay in the rates of weight and height gain in both humans and experimental animals. This effect has been associated with an impaired nutrient metabolism and loss of body protein. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of vitamin A deficiency on endogenous proteolysis and nitrogen metabolism and its reversibility with all-trans retinoic acid (RA). Male weanling rats, housed in pairs, were pair-fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD) or control diet until they were 60 d old. A group of deficient rats were further treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of all-trans RA for 10 d. Final body and tissue (i.e. liver and heart) weights were significantly lower and tissue:body weight ratios were similar in VAD rats and in controls. Conversely, the epididymal white fat:body weight ratio and the plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and adiponectin were significantly higher in VAD rats, which also had hepatic macrovesicular lipid accumulations. Plasma and gastrocnemius muscle 3-methylhistidine, urine nitrogen, and plasma and urine urea concentrations were all significantly higher in the VAD group. The expression of the genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and their activities increased in VAD livers. These changes were partially reverted by all-trans RA. We propose that fuel partitioning in vitamin A deficiency may shift from fatty acids to protein catabolism as an energy source. Our results emphasize the importance of vitamin A on the energy balance control system and they provide an explanation for the role of vitamin A in protein turnover, development, and growth.

  3. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  4. Development of a cell sorting procedure to increase the sensitivity of detection of protein-protein interactions in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wong, Sek Man

    2011-05-01

    To visualize subcellular localization of viral proteins and interactions between viral proteins and host proteins in vivo, transfection of plasmids into protoplasts to over-express transiently fusion proteins with a fluorescent tag is a common method. However, due to the low efficiency (0.1-3.0%) of plasmid transfection into protoplasts, it is difficult to identify protoplasts that emit fluorescence using confocal microscopy. A flow cytometry sorting protocol was developed for separating kenaf protoplasts that emit yellow fluorescence. The sorted protoplasts showed strong fluorescence and the protoplasts were intact. This will improve the use of confocal microscopy for studying subcellular localization and protein interactions in protoplasts isolated from plants with low transfection efficiency.

  5. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  6. IκB kinases increase Myc protein stability and enhance progression of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both IκB kinase (IKK) complex and oncgenic protein Myc play important roles in cancer progression, including cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis. The levels of Myc is regulated by the phosphorylation of Myc at Thr58 and Ser62. Results In this study, we show that the expression of Myc is associated with IKKα and IKKβ in breast cancers and that Myc is an IKKs substrate. Suppression of IKK activity by either chemical inhibitor or transfection of kinase-dead mutants decreases the phosphorylation of Myc at Ser62 and enhances the degradation of Myc. Consequently, these treatments decrease the tumorigenic and invasive ability of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, doxorubicin, a frequently used anticancer drug in breast cancer, activates IKKs and Myc, thereby increasing invasiveness and tumorigenesis of breast carcinoma MCF7 cells. Inhibition of IKKs prevents these doxorubicin-induced effects. Conclusions Our study indicates that IKKs tightly regulate Myc expression through prolonging protein stability, and suggests that IKKs are potentially therapeutic targets and that suppression of IKKs may be used following chemotherapy to reduce the risk of treatment-induced tumor progression. PMID:21575199

  7. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Christina; Hosseini, Afshin; Singh, Shiva P.; Regenhard, Petra; Khalilvandi-Behroozyar, Hamed; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum) is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA) is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX) to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001) and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05) and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01). Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001). The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:25411802

  8. Environmental mutagenesis during the end-Permian ecological crisis

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Henk; Looy, Cindy V.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Brinkhuis, Henk; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H. A.; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    During the end-Permian ecological crisis, terrestrial ecosystems experienced preferential dieback of woody vegetation. Across the world, surviving herbaceous lycopsids played a pioneering role in repopulating deforested terrain. We document that the microspores of these lycopsids were regularly released in unseparated tetrads indicative of failure to complete the normal process of spore development. Although involvement of mutation has long been hinted at or proposed in theory, this finding provides concrete evidence for chronic environmental mutagenesis at the time of global ecological crisis. Prolonged exposure to enhanced UV radiation could account satisfactorily for a worldwide increase in land plant mutation. At the end of the Permian, a period of raised UV stress may have been the consequence of severe disruption of the stratospheric ozone balance by excessive emission of hydrothermal organohalogens in the vast area of Siberian Traps volcanism. PMID:15282373

  9. Environmental mutagenesis during the end-Permian ecological crisis.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Henk; Looy, Cindy V; Collinson, Margaret E; Brinkhuis, Henk; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H A; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Sephton, Mark A

    2004-08-31

    During the end-Permian ecological crisis, terrestrial ecosystems experienced preferential dieback of woody vegetation. Across the world, surviving herbaceous lycopsids played a pioneering role in repopulating deforested terrain. We document that the microspores of these lycopsids were regularly released in unseparated tetrads indicative of failure to complete the normal process of spore development. Although involvement of mutation has long been hinted at or proposed in theory, this finding provides concrete evidence for chronic environmental mutagenesis at the time of global ecological crisis. Prolonged exposure to enhanced UV radiation could account satisfactorily for a worldwide increase in land plant mutation. At the end of the Permian, a period of raised UV stress may have been the consequence of severe disruption of the stratospheric ozone balance by excessive emission of hydrothermal organohalogens in the vast area of Siberian Traps volcanism.

  10. Environmental mutagenesis during the end-Permian ecological crisis.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Henk; Looy, Cindy V; Collinson, Margaret E; Brinkhuis, Henk; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H A; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Sephton, Mark A

    2004-08-31

    During the end-Permian ecological crisis, terrestrial ecosystems experienced preferential dieback of woody vegetation. Across the world, surviving herbaceous lycopsids played a pioneering role in repopulating deforested terrain. We document that the microspores of these lycopsids were regularly released in unseparated tetrads indicative of failure to complete the normal process of spore development. Although involvement of mutation has long been hinted at or proposed in theory, this finding provides concrete evidence for chronic environmental mutagenesis at the time of global ecological crisis. Prolonged exposure to enhanced UV radiation could account satisfactorily for a worldwide increase in land plant mutation. At the end of the Permian, a period of raised UV stress may have been the consequence of severe disruption of the stratospheric ozone balance by excessive emission of hydrothermal organohalogens in the vast area of Siberian Traps volcanism. PMID:15282373

  11. Increased reliability of nuclear magnetic resonance protein structures by consensus structure bundles.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Lena; Güntert, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures are represented by bundles of conformers calculated from different randomized initial structures using identical experimental input data. The spread among these conformers indicates the precision of the atomic coordinates. However, there is as yet no reliable measure of structural accuracy, i.e., how close NMR conformers are to the "true" structure. Instead, the precision of structure bundles is widely (mis)interpreted as a measure of structural quality. Attempts to increase precision often overestimate accuracy by tight bundles of high precision but much lower accuracy. To overcome this problem, we introduce a protocol for NMR structure determination with the software package CYANA, which produces, like the traditional method, bundles of conformers in agreement with a common set of conformational restraints but with a realistic precision that is, throughout a variety of proteins and NMR data sets, a much better estimate of structural accuracy than the precision of conventional structure bundles.

  12. Improved MALDI-TOF Imaging Yields Increased Protein Signals at High Molecular Mass *

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, Barbara D.; Tsaprailis, George; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrum images are created from an array of mass spectra collected over a tissue surface. We have increased the mass range of proteins that can be detected in tissue sections from kidneys of different rodent species, by a modification of the sandwich technique which involves co-crystallizing matrix with analyte. A tissue section is placed upon a drop of sinapinic acid matrix dissolved in 90% ethanol and 0.5% Triton X-100. Once the matrix has dried, a seed layer of sinapinic crystals is added as a dispersion in xylene. Additional layers of sinapinic acid are added as solutions in 90% ethanol followed by 50% acetonitrile. Numerous peaks with signal to noise ratio of four or greater are observed between 25 kDa to 50 kDa. This represents approximately 10 times as many peaks as are detected using traditional matrix spotting and spraying. PMID:18926723

  13. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  14. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  15. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-05-15

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu{sup 2+} binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu{sup 2+} reduction and {sup 64}Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu{sup 2+} reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu{sup 2+} ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu{sup 2+} reductase activity and increased {sup 64}Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu{sup 2+} reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  16. Neutrophil-derived heparin binding protein--a mediator of increased vascular permeability after burns?

    PubMed

    Johansson, Joakim; Lindbom, Lennart; Herwald, Heiko; Sjöberg, Folke

    2009-12-01

    Increased vascular permeability and oedema formation constitute a major clinical challenge following burns. Several clinical studies show that leukocytes are systemically activated following burns. Neutrophils have the capability to increase vascular permeability via mechanisms thought to involve the release of heparin binding protein (HBP). We hypothesised that HBP is elevated in plasma after major burns due to a systemic inflammatory response and investigated plasma-HBP concentrations in 10 severely burned patients daily for 1 week following the burn. Five-fold higher levels in plasma-HBP concentration compared to a control group were detected on the first day after injury, followed by a steep reduction in the time-period that corresponds to the last part of the hyperpermeability phase. These data are in accordance with the hypothesis that HBP may function as a mediator of the early burn-induced increase in vascular permeability, and call for further studies to confirm a possible cause-and-effect relationship between HBP and oedema formation following burns.

  17. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  18. Oxidized Docosahexaenoic Acid Species and Lipid Peroxidation Products Increase Amyloidogenic Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Haupenthal, Viola J; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P; Blümel, Tamara; Mylonas, Nadine T; Endres, Kristina; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously it has been demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with a reduced risk of AD caused by decreased Aβ production. However, in epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches, the outcomes of DHA-dependent treatment were partially controversial. PUFAs are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are increased during disease pathology. In line with published results, lipid peroxidation was elevated in human postmortem AD brains; especially 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE) was increased. To investigate whether lipid peroxidation is only a consequence or might also influence the processes leading to AD, we analyzed 7 different oxidized lipid species including 5 oxidized DHA derivatives and the lipid peroxidation products of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs, HNE and 4-hydroxy-hexenal, in human neuroblastoma cells and mouse mixed cortical neurons. In the presence of oxidized lipids Aβ and soluble β-secreted APP levels were elevated, whereas soluble α-secreted APP was decreased, suggesting a shift from the nonamyloidogenic to the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing. Furthermore, β- and γ-secretase activity was increased by oxidized lipids via increased gene expression and additionally by a direct effect on β-secretase activity. Importantly, only 1% oxidized DHA was sufficient to revert the protective effect of DHA and to significantly increase Aβ production. Therefore, our results emphasize the need to prevent DHA from oxidation in nutritional approaches and might help explain the divergent results of clinical DHA studies. PMID:26642316

  19. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  20. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  1. An amino acid substitution in the human intestinal fatty acid binding protein is associated with increased fatty acid binding, increased fat oxidation, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Baier, L J; Sacchettini, J C; Knowler, W C; Eads, J; Paolisso, G; Tataranni, P A; Mochizuki, H; Bennett, P H; Bogardus, C; Prochazka, M

    1995-03-01

    The intestinal fatty acid binding protein locus (FABP2) was investigated as a possible genetic factor in determining insulin action in the Pima Indian population. A polymorphism at codon 54 of FABP2 was identified that results in an alanine-encoding allele (frequency 0.71) and a threonine-encoding allele (frequency 0.29). Pimas who were homozygous or heterozygous for the threonine-encoding allele were found to have a higher mean fasting plasma insulin concentration, a lower mean insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rate, a higher mean insulin response to oral glucose and a mixed meal, and a higher mean fat oxidation rate compared with Pimas who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele. Since the FABP2 threonine-encoding allele was found to be associated with insulin resistance and increased fat oxidation in vivo, we further analyzed the FABP2 gene products for potential functional differences. Titration microcalorimetry studies with purified recombinant protein showed that the threonine-containing protein had a twofold greater affinity for long-chain fatty acids than the alanine-containing protein. We conclude that the threonine-containing protein may increase absorption and/or processing of dietary fatty acids by the intestine and thereby increase fat oxidation, which has been shown to reduce insulin action. PMID:7883976

  2. Accelerated Growth Rate Induced by Neonatal High-Protein Milk Formula Is Not Supported by Increased Tissue Protein Synthesis in Low-Birth-Weight Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, Agnès; Sève, Bernard; Thibault, Jean-Noël; Floc'h, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Low-birth-weight neonates are routinely fed a high-protein formula to promote catch-up growth and antibiotics are usually associated to prevent infection. Yet the effects of such practices on tissue protein metabolism are unknown. Baby pigs were fed from age 2 to 7 or 28 d with high protein formula with or without amoxicillin supplementation, in parallel with normal protein formula, to determine tissue protein metabolism modifications. Feeding high protein formula increased growth rate between 2 and 28 days of age when antibiotic was administered early in the first week of life. This could be explained by the occurrence of diarrhea when piglets were fed the high protein formula alone. Higher growth rate was associated with higher feed conversion and reduced protein synthesis rate in the small intestine, muscle and carcass, whereas proteolytic enzyme activities measured in these tissues were unchanged. In conclusion, accelerated growth rate caused by high protein formula and antibiotics was not supported by increased protein synthesis in muscle and carcass. PMID:22315674

  3. Natural selection underlies apparent stress-induced mutagenesis in a bacteriophage infection model.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Edgar, Rotem; Levy, Asaf; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem; Munitz, Ariel; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of mutations following growth-limiting conditions underlies bacterial drug resistance, viral escape from the immune system and fundamental evolution-driven events. Intriguingly, whether mutations are induced by growth limitation conditions or are randomly generated during growth and then selected by growth limitation conditions remains an open question(1). Here, we show that bacteriophage T7 undergoes apparent stress-induced mutagenesis when selected for improved recognition of its host's receptor. In our unique experimental set-up, the growth limitation condition is physically and temporally separated from mutagenesis: growth limitation occurs while phage DNA is outside the host, and spontaneous mutations occur during phage DNA replication inside the host. We show that the selected beneficial mutations are not pre-existing and that the initial slow phage growth is enabled by the phage particle's low-efficiency DNA injection into the host. Thus, the phage particle allows phage populations to initially extend their host range without mutagenesis by virtue of residual recognition of the host receptor. Mutations appear during non-selective intracellular replication, and the frequency of mutant phages increases by natural selection acting on free phages, which are not capable of mutagenesis. PMID:27572836

  4. Insertion mutagenesis of the yeast Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) by random integration of linear DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of using random insertional mutagenesis to isolate mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata was explored. Mutagenesis was performed by transformation of the yeast with an integrative plasmid containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. The addition of restriction enzyme together with the plasmid (restriction enzyme-mediated integration, REMI) increased the transformation frequency only slightly. Integration of the linearized plasmid occurred randomly in the C. famata genome. To investigate the potential of insertional mutagenesis, it was used for tagging genes involved in positive regulation of riboflavin synthesis in C. famata. Partial DNA sequencing of tagged genes showed that they were homologous to the S. cerevisiae genes RIB1, MET2, and SEF1. Intact orthologs of these genes isolated from Debaryomyces hansenii restored the wild phenotype of the corresponding mutants, i.e., the ability to overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. The Staphylococcus aureus ble gene conferring resistance to phleomycin was used successfully in the study as a dominant selection marker for C. famata. The results obtained indicate that insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for tagging genes in C. famata. PMID:16770625

  5. Insertion mutagenesis of the yeast Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) by random integration of linear DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of using random insertional mutagenesis to isolate mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata was explored. Mutagenesis was performed by transformation of the yeast with an integrative plasmid containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. The addition of restriction enzyme together with the plasmid (restriction enzyme-mediated integration, REMI) increased the transformation frequency only slightly. Integration of the linearized plasmid occurred randomly in the C. famata genome. To investigate the potential of insertional mutagenesis, it was used for tagging genes involved in positive regulation of riboflavin synthesis in C. famata. Partial DNA sequencing of tagged genes showed that they were homologous to the S. cerevisiae genes RIB1, MET2, and SEF1. Intact orthologs of these genes isolated from Debaryomyces hansenii restored the wild phenotype of the corresponding mutants, i.e., the ability to overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. The Staphylococcus aureus ble gene conferring resistance to phleomycin was used successfully in the study as a dominant selection marker for C. famata. The results obtained indicate that insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for tagging genes in C. famata.

  6. Analysis of HIV-2 Vpx by modeling and insertional mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnke, Lisa A. . E-mail: lmahnke@im.wustl.edu; Belshan, Michael; Ratner, Lee . E-mail: lratner@im.wustl.edu

    2006-04-25

    Vpx facilitates HIV-2 nuclear localization by a poorly understood mechanism. We have compared Vpx to an NMR structure HIV-1 Vpr in a central helical domain and probed regions of Vpx by insertional mutagenesis. A predicted loop between helices two and three appears to be unique, overlapping with a known novel nuclear localization signal. Overall, Vpx was found to be surprisingly flexible, tolerating a series of large insertions. We found that insertion within the polyproline-containing C-terminus destabilizes nuclear localization, whereas mutating a second helix in the central domain disrupts viral packaging. Other insertional mutants in the predicted loop and in a linker region between the central domain and the C-terminus may be useful as sites of intramolecular tags as they could be packaged adequately and retained preintegration complex associated integration activity in a serum starvation assay. An unexpected result was found within a previously defined nuclear localization motif near aa 71. This mutant retained robust nuclear localization in a GFP fusion assay and was competent for preintegration complex associated nuclear import. In summary, we have modeled helical content in Vpx and assessed potential sites of intramolecular tags which may prove useful for protein-protein interactions studies.

  7. Protein-enhanced soups: a consumer-accepted food for increasing dietary protein provision among older adults.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Elizabeth; Crowe, Kristi Michele; Lawrence, Jeannine

    2015-02-01

    Protein-enhanced soups (PES) may improve protein intake among older adults. This study examined sensory attributes (aroma, texture, taste, and overall acceptability) and preferences of PES (chicken noodle and cheddar broccoli) compared with flavor-matched control soups (FCS) among older adults (≥65 years) and evaluated dietary profile changes of a standard menu based on the substitution of one PES serving/d for a standard soup. Modified paired preference tests and 5-point facial hedonic scales were administered to participants (n = 44). No significant differences in sensory attributes between either PES compared with FCS were identified, but significant gender- and age-related differences (p < 0.05) were observed. About Sixty-one percent of participants preferred protein-enhanced chicken noodle soup while only 38% preferred protein-enhanced cheddar broccoli soup to their respective FCS. Substituting one PES serving for one non-fortified soup serving per day resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.001) protein profile. Results suggest that all attributes of PES were consistent with sensory expectations and PES substitution could improve protein provision.

  8. Mutagenesis as a Genetic Research Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Morgan's three students (Muller, Sturtevant, and Bridges) introduced reductionist empirical methods to the study of the chromosomal theory of heredity. Herman J. Muller concentrated on mutations, namely changes in the heterocatalytic properties of genes, without losing their autocatalytic (self-replication) properties. Experimental induction of mutations allowed quantitative analyses of genes' parameters, but hopes to deduce their chemicophysical character were never fulfilled. Once the model for DNA structure was proposed, the reductionist notions of mutation analysis were successfully applied to the molecular genes. However, it was soon realized that the concept of the particulate gene was inadequate. The more the molecular analysis of the genome advanced, the clearer it became that the entities of heredity must be conceived within systems' perspectives, for which special tools for handling large number of variables were developed. Analytic mutagenesis, however, continues to be a major strategy for the study of the cellular and chromosomal mechanisms that control mutation inductions. PMID:20713742

  9. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A.; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M.; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W.; Cang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele–alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  10. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W; Cang, Yong

    2015-07-21

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele-alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  11. Increased liver pathology in hepatitis C virus transgenic mice expressing the hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, Victor V.; Lerat, Herve; Madden, Charles R.; Finegold, Milton J.; McGarvey, Michael J.; Mohammed, Essam M.A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Grona, Shala J.; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Slagle, Betty L. . E-mail: bslagle@bcm.edu

    2006-04-10

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was identified in 21% of HCV/ATX mice, but in none of the single transgenic animals. Analysis of 8-mo animals revealed that, relative to HCV/WT mice, HCV/ATX mice had more severe steatosis, greater liver-to-body weight ratios, and a significant increase in the percentage of hepatocytes staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, primary hepatocytes from HCV, ATX, and HCV/ATX transgenic mice were more resistant to fas-mediated apoptosis than hepatocytes from nontransgenic littermates. These results indicate that HBx expression contributes to increased liver pathogenesis in HCV transgenic mice by a mechanism that involves an imbalance in hepatocyte death and regeneration within the context of severe steatosis.

  12. Mammary gland development of dairy heifers fed diets containing increasing levels of metabolisable protein: metabolisable energy.

    PubMed

    Albino, Ronan L; Marcondes, Marcos I; Akers, Robert M; Detmann, Edenio; Carvalho, Bruno C; Silva, Tadeu E

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the development of the mammary gland in Holstein heifers subjected to different dietary metabolisable protein (MP): metabolisable energy (ME) ratios. Twenty-five Holstein heifers (initial body weight (BW) 213±13·5 kg and initial average age 7·8±0·5 months) were divided into five treatments. The treatments were designed to provide MP:ME ratios equal to 33, 38, 43, 48, and 53 g of MP per Mcal of ME. All diets were formulated to have the same energy content (2·6 Mcal ME/kg dry matter). Actual MP:ME ratios were 36·2, 40·2, 46·2, 47·1, and 50·8 g MP/Mcal ME. The experiment was conducted in a randomised block design, while considering initial BW as a blocking factor to evaluate pre- and post-pubertal periods. Block effect was not observed for all variables evaluated; hence it was considered that the diets had the same influence both on pre- and post-pubertal phases. Dry matter and nutrient intake did not change between treatments, excepting protein intake and digestibility. Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 increased linearly across treatments. Changes in the pixel brightness of mammary gland ultrasound images, which are associated with lipid content, were significantly influenced by MP:ME ratios in the diet of heifers that were subjected to accelerated growth rates. It is not recommended to use diets of less than 38 g MP/Mcal ME in diets to heifers allowed to gain more than 1 kg/d. PMID:25592631

  13. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  14. Increased Infectivity of Anchorless Mouse Scrapie Prions in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katie; Meade-White, Kimberly; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, mostly as a glycoprotein anchored to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Following prion infection, host protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPsen or PrPC) is converted into an abnormal, disease-associated, protease-resistant form (PrPres). Biochemical characteristics, such as the PrP amino acid sequence, and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and GPI anchoring, can affect the transmissibility of prions as well as the biochemical properties of the PrPres generated. Previous in vivo studies on the effects of GPI anchoring on prion infectivity have not examined cross-species transmission. In this study, we tested the effect of lack of GPI anchoring on a species barrier model using mice expressing human PrP. In this model, anchorless 22L prions derived from tg44 mice were more infectious than 22L prions derived from C57BL/10 mice when tested in tg66 transgenic mice, which expressed wild-type anchored human PrP at 8- to 16-fold above normal. Thus, the lack of the GPI anchor on the PrPres from tg44 mice appeared to reduce the effect of the mouse-human PrP species barrier. In contrast, neither source of prions induced disease in tgRM transgenic mice, which expressed human PrP at 2- to 4-fold above normal. IMPORTANCE Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, usually attached to cells by an anchor molecule called GPI. Following prion infection, PrP is converted into a disease-associated form (PrPres). While most prion diseases are species specific, this finding is not consistent, and species barriers differ in strength. The amino acid sequence of PrP varies among species, and this variability affects prion species barriers. However, other PrP modifications, including glycosylation and GPI anchoring, may also influence cross-species infectivity. We studied the effect of PrP GPI anchoring using a mouse-to-human species barrier model. Experiments showed that

  15. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-07-11

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [(3)H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses.

  16. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  17. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Makarova, Olga; Müller, Uta; Rolff, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection. PMID:26430769

  18. Seed-specific expression of the lysine-rich protein gene sb401 significantly increases both lysine and total protein content in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjuan; Peng, Peng; Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Sun, Xuehui; Liu, Junqi; Ao, Guangming

    2005-12-01

    The sb401 gene from potato (Solanum berthaultii) encoding a pollen-specific protein with high lysine content was successfully integrated into the genome of maize plants, and its expression was correlated with increased levels of lysine and total protein content in maize seeds. A plasmid vector containing the sb401 gene under the control of a maize seed-specific expression storage protein promoter (P19z) was constructed and introduced into maize calli by microprojectile bombardment. The integration of the sb401 gene into the maize genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis, and its expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Quantification of the lysine and protein contents in R1 maize seeds showed that, compared with the nontransgenic maize control, the lysine content increased by 16.1% to 54.8% and the total protein content increased by 11.6% to 39.0%. There were no visible morphological changes in the vegetative parts and seeds of the transgenic maize plants. Lysine and protein analysis of the transgenic maize grains showed that the levels of lysine and total protein remained high for six continuous generations, indicating that the elevated lysine and total protein levels were heritable. These results indicate that the sb401 gene could be successfully employed in breeding programs aimed at improving the nutritional value of maize.

  19. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  20. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  1. Conversion of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist into an agonist by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ju, G; Labriola-Tompkins, E; Campen, C A; Benjamin, W R; Karas, J; Plocinski, J; Biondi, D; Kaffka, K L; Kilian, P L; Eisenberg, S P

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) is a naturally occurring protein that binds to the IL-1 receptor present on T cells, fibroblasts, and other cell types and acts to block IL-1-induced responses. IL-1ra is a pure antagonist and has no agonist activity in in vitro or in vivo systems. By site-specific mutagenesis, an analog of IL-1ra was created that contained a substitution of a single amino acid, Lys-145----Asp. This analog, IL-1ra K145D, exhibited partial agonist activity in the D10.G4.1 cell proliferation assay. The newly acquired agonist activity could not be neutralized by antisera to IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta, but it could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody to the T-cell IL-1 receptor. The analog also showed agonist activity as assayed by increased prostaglandin E2 synthesis from CHO cells expressing recombinant mouse IL-1 receptor. These results with IL-1ra K145D demonstrate the importance of the region surrounding the corresponding Asp-145 residue in IL-1 beta for triggering the biological response to IL-1. Images PMID:1826365

  2. An efficient method for multiple site-directed mutagenesis using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) methods are very important in modern molecular biology, biochemistry, and protein engineering. Here, we present a novel SDM method that can be used for multiple mutation generation using type IIs restriction enzymes. This approach is faster and more convenient than the overlap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method due to its having fewer reaction steps and being cheaper than, but as convenient as, enzymatic assembly. We illustrate the usefulness of our method by introducing three mutations into the bacterial Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (bStCas9) gene, converting the humanized S. thermophilus Cas9 (hStCas9) gene into nuclease dead or H847A nickase mutants and generating sunnyTALEN mutagenesis from a wild-type TALEN backbone.

  3. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John E.; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  4. Increased rewarding properties of morphine in perinatally protein-malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Valdomero, A; Velazquez, E E; de Olmos, S; de Olmos, J S; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2007-12-01

    In the current research, we assessed the influence of a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 40 days of age (D-rats) on the rewarding properties of morphine in adult rats by means of the conditioned place preference paradigm. Well-nourished animals (C-rats) administered with different doses of morphine (0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 or 24 mg/kg i.p.) exhibited a conditioning place preference with doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg, whereas in D-rats such a conditioning effect was observed with doses of 1.5 and 3 mg/kg. No adverse effects were observed in either C- or D-rats for the higher doses of morphine. In addition, when animals of both groups were pretreated twice a day for 3 days with increasing doses of morphine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg s.c.), only D-rats elicited sensitization to the conditioning effect with the lowest dose of morphine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, sensitized D-rats showed a selective and significant increase in FosB expression in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), basolateral amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, brain areas that are functionally related to the rewarding neural circuit. These results demonstrate that a deficient nutritional status during the perinatal period results in adult subjects having neural alterations, leading to an increased responsiveness to morphine and/or enhanced reinforcement effects, which correlates with an overexpression of FosB in selective brain areas related to the rewarding network.

  5. Raised FGF-21 and Triglycerides Accompany Increased Energy Intake Driven by Protein Leverage in Lean, Healthy Individuals: A Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gosby, Alison K.; Lau, Namson S.; Tam, Charmaine S.; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Caterson, Ian D.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    A dominant appetite for protein drives increased energy intake in humans when the proportion of protein in the diet is reduced down to approximately 10% of total energy. Compensatory feeding for protein is apparent over a 1–2 d period but the mechanisms driving this regulation are not fully understood. Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) has been identified as a candidate protein signal as levels increase in the circulation when dietary protein is low. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to assess whether changes in percent dietary protein over a 4 d ad libitum experimental period in lean, healthy participants influenced energy intake, metabolic health, circulating FGF-21 and appetite regulating hormones including ghrelin, glucagon like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin. Twenty-two lean, healthy participants were fed ad libitum diets containing 10, 15 and 25% protein, over three, 4 d controlled, in-house experimental periods. Reduced dietary protein intake from 25% to 10% over a period of 4 d was associated with 14% increased energy intake (p = 0.02) as previously reported, and a 6-fold increase in fasting circulating plasma FGF-21 levels (p<0.0001), a 1.5-fold increase in serum triglycerides (p<0.0001), and a 0.9-fold decrease in serum total cholesterol (p = 0.02). Serum HDL cholesterol was reduced with a reduction in dietary protein from 15% to 10% (p = 0.01) over 4 d but not from 25% to 10% (p = 0.1) and the change from baseline was not different between diets. Plasma fasting insulin levels following the 4 d study period were significantly lower following the 25% ad libitum study period compared to the 15% protein period (p = 0.014) but not the 10% protein period (p = 0.2). Variability in interstitial glucose during each study period increased with a decrease in dietary protein from 25% to 15% and 10% (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin were unchanged. Increases in energy intake, plasma FGF-21

  6. Random mutagenesis strategies for construction of large and diverse clone libraries of mutated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2004-01-01

    The first important step toward a successful preparation of large and diverse DNA libraries with desired complexity is to select a suitable mutagenesis strategy. This chapter describes three different methods for random mutagenesis, the use of XL1-red cells, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and degenerate oligonucleotides-Pfu (DOP). These mutagenesis strategies possess different benefits and pitfalls; thus, they are differentially useful for production of DNA libraries with different density and complexity. The use of XL1-red, an engineered Escherichia coli with DNA repair deficiency, is one of the simplest mutagenesis and requires no subcloning step. After plasmid encoding DNA of inter-est is transformed into the cells, the mutations are simply generated during each round of DNA replication. The mutation frequency of this method is reported to be 1 base change per 2000 nucleotides; however, it can be slightly increased by extending the culture period to allow the accumulation of more mutations. This strategy is suitable for generation of random mutations with low frequency in a large target DNA. Error-prone PCR is one of the most widely used random mutagenesis. During DNA amplification, misincorporation of nucleotides can be promoted by altering the nucleotide ratio and the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction. We discovered that, by adjusting template concentration, frequency of mutation could be controlled easily and a library with desired mutation rate could be obtained. Additionally, efficiency of subsequent cloning steps to insert the PCR product into plasmid DNA is also a key factor determining size and complexity of the libraries. DOP mutagenesis is a rapid and effective method for random mutagenesis of small DNA and peptides. This strategy uses two chemically synthesized degenerate oligonucleotides as primers. By controlling the positions and ratios of degenerate nucleotides used during oligonucleotide synthesis, it is possible to

  7. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  8. Transplacental teratogenesis and mutagenesis in mouse fetuses treated with cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Porter, A J; Singh, S M

    1988-01-01

    We studied transplacental fetotoxicity, teratogenicity, and mutagenicity in Swiss Webster mice following different doses of cyclophosphamide (CP; 0, 5, 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg), a well-known mutagen/teratogen, on day 12 of gestation. The fetal survival and weight on day 18 of gestation decreased significantly with increasing CP dose (P less than 0.01). The CP-treated fetuses were also dysmorphic (e.g., shortened limbs, digital defects, cleft palate, open eyes, and hydrocephaly) and the percentage of dysmorphology increased with increasing CP doses (P less than 0.01). To evaluate mutagenesis, a separate group of females received 5-bromodeoxyuridine tablet (50-mg) implants on day 12 of gestation and a CP treatment 8 h later. Fetal liver cells were harvested 24 h post-BrdU implant to analyze sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency and micronuclei. CP caused a significant increase in the SCEs per fetal liver cell from 3.4 +/- 0.02 (control) to 90.0 +/- 0.04 (20 mg/kg CP) (P less than 0.01). The increasing CP dose was also related to an increase in micronuclei. The data suggest that CP is transplacentally toxic, teratogenic, and mutagenic. Further analyses of the data suggest that the mutagenic effects of CP may in fact contribute indirectly to the CP-related teratogenic effects. Such conclusions are based on path analysis with directional causations associated with SCEs per cell and the dysmorphic features studied.

  9. Engineering Protein Farnesyltransferase for Enzymatic Protein Labeling Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Creating covalent protein conjugates is an active area of research due to the wide range of uses for protein conjugates spanning everything from biological studies to protein therapeutics. Protein Farnesyltransferase (PFTase) has been used for the creation of site-specific protein conjugates, and a number of PFTase substrates have been developed to facilitate that work. PFTase is an effective catalyst for protein modification because it transfers Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) analogues to protein substrates on a cysteine four residues from the C-terminus. While much work has been done to synthesize various FPP analogues, there are few reports investigating how mutations in PFTase alter the kinetics with these unnatural analogues. Herein we examined how different mutations within the PFTase active site alter the kinetics of the PFTase reaction with a series of large FPP analogues. We found that mutating either a single tryptophan or tyrosine residue to alanine results in greatly improved catalytic parameters, particularly in kcat. Mutation of tryptophan 102β to alanine caused a 4-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a benzaldehyde-containing FPP analogue resulting in an overall 40-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Similarly, mutation of tyrosine 205β to alanine caused a 25-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a coumarin-containing analogue leading to a 300-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Smaller but significant changes in catalytic parameters were also obtained for cyclo-octene- and NBD-containing FPP analogues. The latter compound was used to create a fluorescently labeled form of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), a protein of therapeutic importance. Additionally, computational modeling was performed to study how the large non-natural isoprenoid analogues can fit into the active sites enlarged via mutagenesis. Overall, these results demonstrate that PFTase can be improved via mutagenesis in ways that will be useful

  10. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  11. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo.

  12. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%. PMID:27165502

  13. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila. PMID:27388939

  14. Increased protein-coding mutations in the mitochondrial genome of African American women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ding, David; Scott, Nicole M; Thompson, Emma E; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Torres, Raul; Billstrand, Christine; Murray, Kathleen; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Ismail, Mahmoud; Kay, Helen; Levy, Shawn; Romero, Roberto; Lindheimer, Marshall D; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole

    2012-12-01

    Preeclampsia occurs more frequently in women of African ancestry. The cause of this hypertensive complication is unclear, but placental oxidative stress may play a role. Because mitochondria are the major sites of oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that placentas of preeclamptic pregnancies harbor mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. Next-generation sequencing of placental mtDNA in African American preeclamptics (N = 30) and controls (N = 38) from Chicago revealed significant excesses in preeclamptics of nonsynonymous substitutions in protein-coding genes and mitochondrially encoded nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 5 gene and an increase in the substitution rate (P = .0001). Moreover, 88% of preeclamptics and 53% of controls carried at least one nonsynonymous substitution (P = .005; odds ratio [OR] = 6.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-39.1). These results were not replicated in a sample of African American preeclamptics (N = 162) and controls (N = 171) from Detroit. Differences in study design and heterogeneity may account for this lack of replication. Nonsynonymous substitutions in mtDNA may be risk factors for preeclampsia in some African American women, but additional studies are required to establish this relationship. PMID:22902742

  15. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila.

  16. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  17. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  18. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries.

  19. The vitamin E-binding protein afamin increases in maternal serum during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hubalek, Michael; Buchner, Hannes; Mörtl, Manfred G.; Schlembach, Dietmar; Huppertz, Berthold; Firulovic, Branka; Köhler, Wolfgang; Hafner, Erich; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Wildt, Ludwig; Dieplinger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background Afamin is a liver-derived plasma glycoprotein with vitamin E-binding properties and a putative function in fertility. This study evaluated serum afamin concentrations during and postpartum to uncomplicated pregnancies and investigated a potential association between afamin concentrations and pregnancy outcome. Methods Afamin serum concentrations were measured in women with uncomplicated pregnancies in a retrospective cohort (n = 466) at different gestational ages and a prospective observational study (n = 76) in the first, second and third trimester. Furthermore, afamin was determined in the first trimester in a cross-sectional pilot study including women with preeclampsia (PE), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and women without pregnancy complications (n = 13 each). Finally, expression of afamin was investigated in human placental tissue by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Afamin concentrations increased linearly almost two-fold during pregnancy in both retrospective and prospective studies in women without pregnancy complications with median afamin serum concentrations of 61.9 mg/l, 79.6 mg/l, and 98.6 mg/l in the first, second, and third trimester, respectively. After delivery, median afamin concentrations decreased to baseline values of 54.6 mg/l. In the pilot study with pregnancy complications, women with PE displayed significantly higher median afamin concentrations than did women with uncomplicated pregnancy (70.0 mg/l vs. 55.4 mg/l, P = 0.007). Expression analyses revealed no placental afamin expression at either mRNA or protein level in uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusion A linear increase in the maternally expressed glycoprotein afamin during pregnancy may serve as basic reference for subsequent investigations of afamin in pregnancy-related disorders. PMID:24768783

  20. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries. PMID:26016598

  1. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  2. Increased intramuscular fat induced by reduced dietary protein in finishing pigs: effects on the longissimus lumborum muscle proteome.

    PubMed

    Pires, V M R; Madeira, M S; Dowle, A A; Thomas, J; Almeida, A M; Prates, J A M

    2016-07-19

    Due to genetic selection towards reduced subcutaneous fat, the amount of intramuscular fat (IMF) in commercial pigs has been reduced (<2.5%), compromising pork quality. The use of reduced protein diets (RPD) is a good strategy to increase IMF in pigs. We have previously shown that increased IMF promoted by RPD is mediated by lysine restriction. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we performed a proteomics study to quantify differentially regulated proteins in the longissimus lumborum muscle of pigs (n = 4) fed a normal protein diet (NPD) (16.0% CP) or a reduced protein diet (RPD) (13.0% CP). Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and label-free methods were used. Glycolysis, Krebs cycle, mitochondrion, contractile proteins, respiratory chain, and calcium signalling were significantly enriched in muscle samples. Thirty five proteins shown to be differentially expressed and were classified using gene ontology (GO) terms and functional annotation clustering, highlighting main relevant biological networks and proteins associated with muscle physiology and meat quality. Members of GO categories "muscle contraction" and "structural constituents of cytoskeleton", were the most significantly up-regulated proteins in muscle from pigs fed RPD. Conversely, in animals fed NPD most up-regulated proteins were enzymes involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our data revealed that RPD affects the amounts of proteins related to fibre type and structure, and energy metabolism. It is suggested that the increased IMF promoted by dietary protein reduction in growing-finishing pigs is mediated by shifting the metabolic properties of fibres from glycolytic to oxidative. PMID:27279257

  3. Neurofilament architecture combines structural principles of intermediate filaments with carboxy-terminal extensions increasing in size between triplet proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Kaufmann, E; Fischer, S; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1983-01-01

    Mammalian neurofilament triplet proteins (68 K, 160 K and 200 K) have been correlated by a biochemical, immunological and protein chemical study. The 160 K and 200 K triplet proteins are intermediate filament proteins in their own right, since they reveal the alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain analyzed in detail for the 68 K protein. Triplet proteins display two distinct arrays. Their amino-terminal region built analogously to non-neuronal intermediate filament proteins should allow a co-polymerization process via the interaction of coiled-coil domains. The extra mass of all triplet proteins is allocated to carboxy-terminally located extensions of increasing size and unique amino acid sequences. These may provide highly charged scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components. Such a domain of 68 K reveals, in sequence analysis, 47 glutamic acids within 106 residues. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody reacting probably with all intermediate filament proteins has been mapped. It is located within the last 20 residues of the rods, where six distinct intermediate filament proteins point to a consensus sequence. Images Fig. 1. PMID:10872323

  4. Short-term, increasing dietary protein and fat moderately affect energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and uncoupling protein gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Riese, Cornelia; Klaus, Susanne

    2007-06-01

    Macronutrient composition of diets can influence body-weight development and energy balance. We studied the short-term effects of high-protein (HP) and/or high-fat (HF) diets on energy expenditure (EE) and uncoupling protein (UCP1-3) gene expression. Adult male rats were fed ad libitum with diets containing different protein-fat ratios: adequate protein-normal fat (AP-NF): 20% casein, 5% fat; adequate protein-high fat (AP-HF): 20% casein, 17% fat; high protein-normal fat (HP-NF): 60% casein, 5% fat; high protein-high fat (HP-HF): 60% casein, 17% fat. Wheat starch was used for adjustment of energy content. After 4 days, overnight EE and oxygen consumption, as measured by indirect calorimetry, were higher and body-weight gain was lower in rats fed with HP diets as compared with rats fed diets with adequate protein content (P<.05). Exchanging carbohydrates by protein increased fat oxidation in HF diet fed groups. The UCP1 mRNA expression in brown adipose tissue was not significantly different in HP diet fed groups as compared with AP diet fed groups. Expression of different homologues of UCPs positively correlated with nighttime oxygen consumption and EE. Moreover, dietary protein and fat distinctly influenced liver UCP2 and skeletal muscle UCP3 mRNA expressions. These findings demonstrated that a 4-day ad libitum high dietary protein exposure influences energy balance in rats. A function of UCPs in energy balance and dissipating food energy was suggested. Future experiments are focused on the regulation of UCP gene expression by dietary protein, which could be important for body-weight management.

  5. Enteral B-hydroxy-B-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite B-hydr...

  6. DECREASED PRODUCTION OF SURFACTANT PROTEINS AFTER DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE INCREASES SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFLUENZA INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), termed collectins, enhance the opsonization of foreign particles and pathogens by phagocytic cells. Inhaled pollutants such as diesel exhaust (DE) have a possible role in suppressing the production of surfactant proteins whic...

  7. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-01-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  8. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-03-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  9. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic Leptospira species.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gerald L; Morel, Viviane; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Croda, Julio; Srikram, Amporn; Henry, Rebekah; Ko, Albert I; Dellagostin, Odir A; Bulach, Dieter M; Sermswan, Rasana W; Adler, Ben; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2009-02-01

    Leptospira interrogans is the most common cause of leptospirosis in humans and animals. Genetic analysis of L. interrogans has been severely hindered by a lack of tools for genetic manipulation. Recently we developed the mariner-based transposon Himar1 to generate the first defined mutants in L. interrogans. In this study, a total of 929 independent transposon mutants were obtained and the location of insertion determined. Of these mutants, 721 were located in the protein coding regions of 551 different genes. While sequence analysis of transposon insertion sites indicated that transposition occurred in an essentially random fashion in the genome, 25 unique transposon mutants were found to exhibit insertions into genes encoding 16S or 23S rRNAs, suggesting these genes are insertional hot spots in the L. interrogans genome. In contrast, loci containing notionally essential genes involved in lipopolysaccharide and heme biosynthesis showed few transposon insertions. The effect of gene disruption on the virulence of a selected set of defined mutants was investigated using the hamster model of leptospirosis. Two attenuated mutants with disruptions in hypothetical genes were identified, thus validating the use of transposon mutagenesis for the identification of novel virulence factors in L. interrogans. This library provides a valuable resource for the study of gene function in L. interrogans. Combined with the genome sequences of L. interrogans, this provides an opportunity to investigate genes that contribute to pathogenesis and will provide a better understanding of the biology of L. interrogans. PMID:19047402

  10. Insertion and deletion mutagenesis of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Spaete, R.R.; Mocarski, E.S.

    1987-10-01

    Studies on human cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been limited by a paucity of molecular genetic techniques available for manipulating the viral genome. The authors have developed methods for site-specific insertion and deletion mutagenesis of CMV utilizing a modified Escherichia coli lacZ gene as a genetic marker. The lacZ gene was placed under the control of the major ..beta.. gene regulatory signals and inserted into the viral genome by homologous recombination, disrupting one of two copies of this ..beta.. gene within the L-component repeats of CMV DNA. They observed high-level expression of ..beta..-galactosidase by the recombinant in a temporally authentic manner, with levels of this enzyme approaching 1% of total protein in infected cells. Thus, CMV is an efficient vector for high-level expression of foreign gene products in human cells. Using back selection of lacZ-deficient virus in the presence of the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl ..beta..-D-galactoside, they generated random endpoint deletion mutants. Analysis of these mutant revealed that CMV DNA sequences flanking the insert had been removed, thereby establishing this approach as a means of determining whether sequences flanking a lacZ insertion are dispensable for viral growth. In an initial test of the methods, they have shown that 7800 base pairs of one copy of L-component repeat sequences can be deleted without affecting viral growth in human fibroblasts.

  11. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  12. Effects of mutagenesis of murine hepatitis virus nsp1 and nsp14 on replication in culture.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, Lance D; Brockway, Sarah M; Sperry, Steven M; Lu, Xiaotao; Denison, Mark R

    2006-01-01

    For nsp1, the fact that the carboxy-terminal but not the amino-terminal half of the protein can be deleted suggests that there may be specific and distinct domains within the protein or that the entire protein is dispensable but that the RNA encoding the amino-terminal half of nsp1 cannot be deleted. The identification of specific required residues support the conclusion that it is the portion of the protein that is required for replication. The results of mutagenesis of the nsp14 coding region and flanking cleavage sites also provided important new insights into this protein and its requirements. Our previous study raised the question as to the essential nature of nsp14 in replication. The results of this study show that putative active site residues cannot be substituted without loss of replication in culture. Interestingly, mutagenesis of Tyr414 showed that while this residue can tolerate a number of substitutions, it was intolerant of Lysine or deletion. The results suggest that nsp14 is required for replication. However, whatever functions nsp14 serves appear to be retained by noncleaved or partially processed nsp14, since abolition of either the amino-terminal or carboxy-terminal cleavage site allowed recovery of viable virus. PMID:17037504

  13. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  14. Cardiac-specific deletion of protein phosphatase 1β promotes increased myofilament protein phosphorylation and contractile alterations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Correll, Robert N.; Davis, Jennifer; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; York, Allen J.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2015-01-01

    There are 3 protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic isoforms (α, β and γ) encoded within the mammalian genome. These 3 gene products share ~90% amino acid homology within their catalytic domains but each has unique N- and C-termini that likely underlie distinctive subcellular localization or functionality. In this study, we assessed the effect associated with loss of each PP1 isoform in the heart using a conditional Cre-loxP targeting approach in mice. Ppp1ca-loxP, Ppp1cb-loxP and Ppp1cc-oxP alleles were crossed with either an Nkx2.5-Cre knock-in containing allele for early embryonic deletion or a tamoxifen inducible α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC)-MerCreMer transgene for adult and cardiac-specific deletion. We determined that while deletion of Ppp1ca (PP1α) or Ppp1cc (PP1γ) had little effect on the whole heart, deletion of Ppp1cb (PP1β) resulted in concentric remodeling of the heart, interstitial fibrosis and contractile dysregulation, using either the embryonic or adult-specific Cre-expressing alleles. However, myocytes isolated from Ppp1cb deleted hearts surprisingly showed enhanced contractility. Mechanistically we found that deletion of any of the 3 PP1 gene-encoding isoforms had no effect on phosphorylation of phospholamban, nor were Ca2+ handling dynamics altered in adult myocytes from Ppp1cb deleted hearts. However, loss of Ppp1cb from the heart, but not Ppp1ca or Ppp1cc, resulted in elevated phosphorylation of myofilament proteins such as myosin light chain 2 and cardiac myosin binding protein C, consistent with an enriched localization profile of this isoform to the sarcomeres. These results suggest a unique functional role for the PP1β isoform in affecting cardiac contractile function. PMID:26334248

  15. History of attempts to quantify environmental mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollaender, A.

    1981-01-01

    It became obvious in the early 1960's that the ready recognition of mutations produced by chemicals could have a profound influence on the refinement of methods to detect environmental mutagens. The experience derived over the previous 30 years in characterizing the effects of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation on the genetic mechanism came to serve us in good stead. Although the effects of chemicals are considerably more complicated and often require the analysis of individual substances, nonetheless, the area has developed rapidly in recent decades. The establishment and historical background of the International Association of Environmental Mutagen Societies (IAEMS) will be discussed. An attempt at the quantitation of chemical effects has been developed in comparison with radiation mutagenesis. As a first step, a definition of the Mutagen Burden or unavoidable exposure to chemicals will be discussed. A mathematical approach (Haynes/Eckhardt) will be considered and finally an outline for the comprehensive investigation of detailed interscience study will be made of less than six chemicals.

  16. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER).

  17. Targeted mutagenesis tools for modelling psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Deussing, Jan M

    2013-10-01

    In the 1980s, the basic principles of gene targeting were discovered and forged into sharp tools for efficient and precise engineering of the mouse genome. Since then, genetic mouse models have substantially contributed to our understanding of major neurobiological concepts and are of utmost importance for our comprehension of neuropsychiatric disorders. The "domestication" of site-specific recombinases and the continuous creative technological developments involving the implementation of previously identified biological principles such as transcriptional and posttranslational control now enable conditional mutagenesis with high spatial and temporal resolution. The initiation and successful accomplishment of large-scale efforts to annotate functionally the entire mouse genome and to build strategic resources for the research community have significantly accelerated the rapid proliferation and broad propagation of mouse genetic tools. Addressing neurobiological processes with the assistance of genetic mouse models is a routine procedure in psychiatric research and will be further extended in order to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms. In light of the highly complex nature of psychiatric disorders and the current lack of strong causal genetic variants, a major future challenge is to model of psychiatric disorders more appropriately. Humanized mice, and the recently developed toolbox of site-specific nucleases for more efficient and simplified tailoring of the genome, offer the perspective of significantly improved models. Ultimately, these tools will push the limits of gene targeting beyond the mouse to allow genome engineering in any model organism of interest.

  18. Protein Engineering and Selection Using Yeast Surface Display.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Alessandro; Chen, Tiffany F; de Picciotto, Seymour; Yang, Nicole J; Tzeng, Alice; Santos, Michael S; Van Deventer, James A; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Wittrup, K Dane

    2015-01-01

    Yeast surface display is a powerful technology for engineering a broad range of protein scaffolds. This protocol describes the process for de novo isolation of protein binders from large combinatorial libraries displayed on yeast by using magnetic bead separation followed by flow cytometry-based selection. The biophysical properties of isolated single clones are subsequently characterized, and desired properties are further enhanced through successive rounds of mutagenesis and flow cytometry selections, resulting in protein binders with increased stability, affinity, and specificity for target proteins of interest. PMID:26060067

  19. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato.

  1. Integrated Mimicry of B Cell Antibody Mutagenesis Using Yeast Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wittrup, K. Dane

    2014-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies. PMID:20645027

  2. Integrated mimicry of B cell antibody mutagenesis using yeast homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Swers, Jeffrey S; Yeung, Yik A; Wittrup, K Dane

    2011-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies.

  3. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Caignard, Grégory; Eva, Megan M; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Malo, Danielle; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia M

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  4. Does dimethyl sulfoxide increase protein immunomarking efficiency for dispersal and predation studies?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marking biological control agents facilitates studies of dispersal and predation. This study examines the effect of a biological solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), on retention of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein solutions applied to Diorhabda carinulata (Desbrochers) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) eit...

  5. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  6. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Carvalho, Ana F. U.; Oliveira, José Tadeu A.; Farias, Davi F.; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  7. Characterization and Transposon Mutagenesis of the Maize (Zea mays) Pho1 Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vidal, M Nancy; Acosta-Segovia, Edith; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Ahern, Kevin R; Brutnell, Thomas P; Sawers, Ruairidh J H

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all plants, but also one of the least mobile, and consequently least available, in the soil. Plants have evolved a series of molecular, metabolic and developmental adaptations to increase the acquisition of phosphorus and to maximize the efficiency of use within the plant. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the AtPHO1 protein regulates and facilitates the distribution of phosphorus. To investigate the role of PHO1 proteins in maize (Zea mays), the B73 reference genome was searched for homologous sequences, and four genes identified that were designated ZmPho1;1, ZmPho1;2a, ZmPho1;2b and ZmPho1;3. ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b are the most similar to AtPHO1, and represent candidate co-orthologs that we hypothesize to have been retained following whole genome duplication. Evidence was obtained for the production of natural anti-sense transcripts associated with both ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, suggesting the possibility of regulatory crosstalk between paralogs. To characterize functional divergence between ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, a program of transposon mutagenesis was initiated using the Ac/Ds system, and, here, we report the generation of novel alleles of ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b. PMID:27648940

  8. Characterization and Transposon Mutagenesis of the Maize (Zea mays) Pho1 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Vidal, M. Nancy; Acosta-Segovia, Edith; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Ahern, Kevin R.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all plants, but also one of the least mobile, and consequently least available, in the soil. Plants have evolved a series of molecular, metabolic and developmental adaptations to increase the acquisition of phosphorus and to maximize the efficiency of use within the plant. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the AtPHO1 protein regulates and facilitates the distribution of phosphorus. To investigate the role of PHO1 proteins in maize (Zea mays), the B73 reference genome was searched for homologous sequences, and four genes identified that were designated ZmPho1;1, ZmPho1;2a, ZmPho1;2b and ZmPho1;3. ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b are the most similar to AtPHO1, and represent candidate co-orthologs that we hypothesize to have been retained following whole genome duplication. Evidence was obtained for the production of natural anti-sense transcripts associated with both ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, suggesting the possibility of regulatory crosstalk between paralogs. To characterize functional divergence between ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b, a program of transposon mutagenesis was initiated using the Ac/Ds system, and, here, we report the generation of novel alleles of ZmPho1;2a and ZmPho1;2b. PMID:27648940

  9. Spaceflight results in increase of thick filament but not thin filament proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, R.; Takaya, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Higashibata, A.; Ishioka, N.; Kagawa, H.

    We have investigated the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on body-wall muscle fiber size and muscle proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both mutant and wild-type strains were subjected to 10 days of microgravity during spaceflight and compared to ground control groups. No significant change in muscle fiber size or quantity of the protein was observed in wild-type worms; where as atrophy of body-wall muscle and an increase in thick filament proteins were observed in the paramyosin mutant unc-15(e73) animals after spaceflight. We conclude that the mutant with abnormal muscle responded to microgravity by increasing the total amount of muscle protein in order to compensate for the loss of muscle function.

  10. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6–7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis. PMID:24363725

  11. Betulinic Acid Selectively Increases Protein Degradation and Enhances Prostate Cancer-Specific Apoptosis: Possible Role for Inhibition of Deubiquitinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; Parrondo, Ricardo; de las Pozas, Alicia; Palenzuela, Deanna; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation is a valid anti-cancer strategy and has led to the approval of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma. However, the alternative approach of enhancing the degradation of oncoproteins that are frequently overexpressed in cancers is less developed. Betulinic acid (BA) is a plant-derived small molecule that can increase apoptosis specifically in cancer but not in normal cells, making it an attractive anti-cancer agent. Our results in prostate cancer suggested that BA inhibited multiple deubiquitinases (DUBs), which resulted in the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, decreased levels of oncoproteins, and increased apoptotic cell death. In normal fibroblasts, however, BA did not inhibit DUB activity nor increased total poly-ubiquitinated proteins, which was associated with a lack of effect on cell death. In the TRAMP transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer, treatment with BA (10 mg/kg) inhibited primary tumors, increased apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and proliferation, and lowered androgen receptor and cyclin D1 protein. BA treatment also inhibited DUB activity and increased ubiquitinated proteins in TRAMP prostate cancer but had no effect on apoptosis or ubiquitination in normal mouse tissues. Overall, our data suggests that BA-mediated inhibition of DUBs and induction of apoptotic cell death specifically in prostate cancer but not in normal cells and tissues may provide an effective non-toxic and clinically selective agent for chemotherapy. PMID:23424652

  12. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from olive flounder lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI).

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-10-17

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Peptides Derived from Olive Flounder Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein/Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein (LBP/BPI)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase. PMID:25329706

  15. Bile-pancreatic juice-independent increases in pancreatic proteases and intestinal cholecystokinin by dietary protein in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1998-02-01

    Luminal bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ) is involved in the induction of pancreatic proteases in rats fed a high-protein diet. Recently, we have demonstrated that a BPJ-independent mechanism is responsible for enhancement of pancreatic secretion after feeding of a dietary protein in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. The aim of the present study was to explore the existence of a BPJ-independent mechanism during adaptation of the exocrine pancreas to dietary protein. Rats, whose BPJ was diverted into the ileum through a common bile-pancreatic duct catheter for 5 days (PBD rat), were fed a fat-free diet containing 25% or 60% casein for 3 days. Messenger RNA levels for pancreatic enzymes, cholecystokinin, and secretin in the jejunal mucosa were evaluated by northern blotting method. Pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities and mRNA levels of their zymogens were higher in PBD rats than in rats whose diverted BPJ was returned into the duodenum (PBD returned rat). In the PBD groups, pancreatic protease activities were further increased by 3-day feeding of a high-protein diet without changes in mRNA levels of these proteases. Cholecystokinin mRNA was increased after feeding of a high-protein diet in the PBD rats. These results indicate that pancreatic proteases are induced by feeding a high-protein diet by a mechanism independent of luminal BPJ, which is associated with an increase in intestinal cholecystokinin mRNA level.

  16. Serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) increases the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells by phosphorylating Shank2E protein.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Katja; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Madden, Dean R; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-06-13

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone increases cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) abundance in human airway epithelial cells by a mechanism that requires serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether SGK1 increases CFTR abundance by phosphorylating Shank2E, a PDZ domain protein that contains two SGK1 phosphorylation consensus sites. We found that SGK1 phosphorylates Shank2E as well as a peptide containing the first SGK1 consensus motif of Shank2E. The dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance was diminished by overexpression of a dominant-negative Shank2E in which the SGK1 phosphorylation sites had been mutated. siRNA-mediated reduction of Shank2E also reduced the dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the glucocorticoid-induced increase in CFTR abundance requires phosphorylation of Shank2E at an SGK1 consensus site.

  17. Lack of mutational hot spots during decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2015-11-01

    Decitabine has previously been shown to induce lethal mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, the factors that determine the susceptibilities of individual sequence positions in HIV-1 to decitabine have not yet been defined. To investigate this, we performed Illumina high-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons prepared from proviral DNA that was recovered from decitabine-treated cells infected with HIV-1. We found that decitabine induced an ≈4.1-fold increase in the total mutation frequency of HIV-1, primarily due to a striking ≈155-fold increase in the G-to-C transversion frequency. Intriguingly, decitabine also led to an ≈29-fold increase in the C-to-G transversion frequency. G-to-C frequencies varied substantially (up to ≈80-fold) depending upon sequence position, but surprisingly, mutational hot spots (defined as upper outliers within the mutation frequency distribution) were not observed. We further found that every single guanine position examined was significantly susceptible to the mutagenic effects of decitabine. Taken together, these observations demonstrate for the first time that decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis is promiscuous and occurs in the absence of a clear bias for mutational hot spots. These data imply that decitabine-mediated G-to-C mutagenesis is a highly effective antiviral mechanism for extinguishing HIV-1 infectivity.

  18. Lack of Mutational Hot Spots during Decitabine-Mediated HIV-1 Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jonathan M. O.; Landman, Sean R.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Decitabine has previously been shown to induce lethal mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, the factors that determine the susceptibilities of individual sequence positions in HIV-1 to decitabine have not yet been defined. To investigate this, we performed Illumina high-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons prepared from proviral DNA that was recovered from decitabine-treated cells infected with HIV-1. We found that decitabine induced an ≈4.1-fold increase in the total mutation frequency of HIV-1, primarily due to a striking ≈155-fold increase in the G-to-C transversion frequency. Intriguingly, decitabine also led to an ≈29-fold increase in the C-to-G transversion frequency. G-to-C frequencies varied substantially (up to ≈80-fold) depending upon sequence position, but surprisingly, mutational hot spots (defined as upper outliers within the mutation frequency distribution) were not observed. We further found that every single guanine position examined was significantly susceptible to the mutagenic effects of decitabine. Taken together, these observations demonstrate for the first time that decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis is promiscuous and occurs in the absence of a clear bias for mutational hot spots. These data imply that decitabine-mediated G-to-C mutagenesis is a highly effective antiviral mechanism for extinguishing HIV-1 infectivity. PMID:26282416

  19. Fasted Exercise and Increased Dietary Protein Reduces Body Fat and Improves Strength in Jockeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G; Pritchard, P P; Papageorgiou, C; Phillips, S; Kumar, P; Langan-Evans, C; Routledge, H; Owens, D J; Morton, J P; Close, G L

    2015-11-01

    The present study assessed the effects of a diet and exercise intervention in jockeys on body composition, metabolism, bone and mental health. 10 jockeys followed an individually prescribed 6-wk diet (Carbohydrate=2.5-3.5 g/kg, Protein=2.5 g/kg, Fat=1.0 g/kg). Body mass (59.2±4.6 vs. 57.6±4.5 kg), fat mass (7.5±3.5 vs. 6.2±2.6) and body fat (13.1±5.9 vs. 11.5±4.9%) all decreased (P<0.05) from pre to post-intervention whilst lean mass (47.1±5.3 vs. 47.0±5.5 kg) was maintained (P=0.80). RMR (1703±329 vs. 1975±313 kcal.d(-1)), VO2max (3.8±0.8 vs. 4.1±0.7 L/min(- 1)) chest strength (65±11 vs. 71±13 kg), leg strength (160±28 vs. 175±29 kg) and jumping height (40±6 vs. 48±5 cm) significantly increased (P<0.05). Bone health (DXA) did not change (P>0.05) at hip (-1.04±1.29 vs. - 0.76±0.71) or lumbar sites (-1.32±0.76 vs. - 1.31±0.77). Psychometrics (GHQ-12 and EAT-26) remained unchanged (10.3±4.3 vs. 8.9±3.8 and 14.8±9.6 vs. 11.0±5.6, P>0.05, respectively). This approach represents a marked difference from jockeys' habitual weight-making that largely involves dehydration and food deprivation.

  20. N-epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine, a product of the chemical modification of proteins by methylglyoxal, increases with age in human lens proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M U; Brinkmann Frye, E; Degenhardt, T P; Thorpe, S R; Baynes, J W

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products and glycoxidation products, such as Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and pentosidine, accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins with age and are implicated in the aging of tissue proteins and in the development of pathology in diabetes, atherosclerosis and other diseases. In this paper we describe a new advanced glycation end-product, Nepsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), which is formed during the reaction of methylglyoxal with lysine residues in model compounds and in the proteins RNase and collagen. CEL was also detected in human lens proteins at a concentration similar to that of CML, and increased with age in parallel with the concentration of CML. Although CEL was formed in highest yields during the reaction of methylglyoxal and triose phosphates with lysine and protein, it was also formed in reactions of pentoses, ascorbate and other sugars with lysine and RNase. We propose that levels of CML and CEL and their ratio to one another in tissue proteins and in urine will provide an index of glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations in tissues, alterations in glutathione homoeostasis and dicarbonyl metabolism in disease, and sources of advanced glycation end-products in tissue proteins in aging and disease. PMID:9182719

  1. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  2. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  3. Genetic control of soybean seed oil: II. QTL and genes that increase oil concentration without decreasing protein or with increased seed yield.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-06-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed oil is the primary global source of edible oil and a major renewable and sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production. Therefore, increasing the relative oil concentration in soybean is desirable; however, that goal is complex due to the quantitative nature of the oil concentration trait and possible effects on major agronomic traits such as seed yield or protein concentration. The objectives of the present study were to study the relationship between seed oil concentration and important agronomic and seed quality traits, including seed yield, 100-seed weight, protein concentration, plant height, and days to maturity, and to identify oil quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are co-localized with the traits evaluated. A population of 203 F4:6 recombinant inbred lines, derived from a cross between moderately high oil soybean genotypes OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe, was developed and grown across multiple environments in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. Among the 11 QTL associated with seed oil concentration in the population, which were detected using either single-factor ANOVA or multiple QTL mapping methods, the number of QTL that were co-localized with other important traits QTL were six for protein concentration, four for seed yield, two for 100-seed weight, one for days to maturity, and one for plant height. The oil-beneficial allele of the QTL tagged by marker Sat_020 was positively associated with seed protein concentration. The oil favorable alleles of markers Satt001 and GmDGAT2B were positively correlated with seed yield. In addition, significant two-way epistatic interactions, where one of the interacting markers was solely associated with seed oil concentration, were identified for the selected traits in this study. The number of significant epistatic interactions was seven for yield, four for days to maturity, two for 100-seed weight, one for protein concentration, and one for plant height. The identified molecular

  4. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  5. Segment-specific mutagenesis: extensive mutagenesis of a lac promoter/operator element.

    PubMed

    Weiher, H; Schaller, H

    1982-03-01

    A method for highly efficient segment-specific mutagenesis is described. The method uses as target for sodium bisulfite mutagenesis the DNA single strands of a DNA restriction fragment that had been separated by cloning into base-complementary regions of a pair of phage fd vectors. After repair synthesis in vitro, the mutagenized DNA fragment is recovered by cloning into a nonmutated plasmid vector and analyzed for sequence and by functional tests. By using this method, the nucleotide sequence of a 109-base pair restriction fragment containing the lac promoter/operator from Escherichia coli was extensively modified. More than 90% of the 235 isolates obtained showed a change in phenotype; all of 22 analyzed for their nucleotide sequence were found to carry multiple C leads to T point mutations in up to 60% of the possible target positions. Nevertheless, few isolates showed major changes in promoter activity relative to the nonmutated promoter element, which indicates a high degree of flexibility in the promoter sequence. PMID:7041119

  6. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  7. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-03-03

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

  8. Increased production of low molecular weight recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Belagaje, R M; Reams, S G; Ly, S C; Prouty, W F

    1997-09-01

    A general method for obtaining high-level production of low molecular weight proteins in Escherichia coli is described. This method is based on the use of a novel Met-Xaa-protein construction which is formed by insertion of a single amino acid residue (preferably Arginine or Lysine) between the N-terminal methionine and the protein of interest. The utility of this method is illustrated by examples for achieving high-level production of human insulin-like growth factor-1, human proinsulin, and their analogs. Furthermore, highly produced insulin-like growth factor-1 derivatives and human proinsulin analogs are converted to their natural sequences by removal of dipeptides with cathepsin C.

  9. Use of a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector to analyze enhanced mutagenesis in mitomycin C-treated monkey cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roilides, E.; Munson, P.J.; Levine, A.S.; Dixon, K.

    1988-09-01

    When monkey cells were treated with mitomycin C 24 h before transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 (a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector), there was a twofold increase in the frequency of mutations in the supF gene of the vector. These results suggest the existence of an enhancible mutagenesis pathway in mammalian cells. However, DNA sequence analysis of the SupF- mutants suggested no dramatic changes in the mechanisms of mutagenesis due to mitomycin C treatment of the cells.

  10. Dietary supplementation with aromatic amino acids increases protein synthesis in children with severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jean W; Badaloo, Asha; Wilson, Lorraine; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Chambers, Bentley; Reid, Marvin; Forrester, Terrence; Jahoor, Farook

    2014-05-01

    Although 2 earlier studies reported that aromatic amino acid (AAA) supplementation of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) improved whole-body protein anabolism during the early postadmission (maintenance) phase of rehabilitation, it is not known whether this positive effect was maintained during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment. This study aimed to determine whether supplementation with an AAA cocktail (330 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)) vs. isonitrogenous Ala would improve measures of protein kinetics in 22 children, aged 4-31 mo, during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment for SAM. Protein kinetics were assessed by measuring leucine, phenylalanine, and urea kinetics with the use of standard stable isotope tracer methods in the fed state. Supplementation started at the end of the maintenance period when the children were clinically/metabolically stable and continued up to full nutritional recovery. Three experiments were performed: at the end of maintenance (at ∼13 d postadmission), at mid-catch-up growth (at ∼23 d post- admission when the children had replenished 50% of their weight deficit), and at recovery (at ∼48 d postadmission when they had achieved at least 90% weight for length). Children in the AAA group had significantly faster protein synthesis compared with those in the Ala group at mid-catch-up growth (101 ± 10 vs. 72 ± 7 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and better protein balance at mid-catch-up growth (49 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 2 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and at recovery (37 ± 8 vs. 11 ± 3 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05). We conclude that dietary supplementation with AAA accelerates net protein synthesis in children during nutritional rehabilitation for SAM.

  11. Conditioned medium from irradiated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells stimulates increased protein synthesis by irradiated bovine lung fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, M.P.; Parton, L.A.; Bowman, C.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis, a potentially fatal consequence of radiation exposure, occurs by unknown mechanisms. The hypothesis that endothelial cells, injured by radiation, could alter the biochemical function of lung fibroblasts, was tested by exposing cultures of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells to 0 or 5 Gy radiation and then incubating them in fresh medium for 48 h. This endothelial cell conditioned medium (ECCM) was then applied to irradiated or nonirradiated cultures of bovine lung fibroblasts. Forty-eight hours later the fibroblasts were analyzed for their ability to synthesize DNA and protein. The ECCM from injured cells stimulated fibroblast protein synthesis twofold to threefold in irradiated fibroblasts without increasing DNA synthesis. It also stimulated a significant but less marked increase in protein synthesis in nonirradiated fibroblasts. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed this increased synthesis to be expressed in less than 10% of the 1100 separable fibroblast proteins. This study shows that endothelial cells injured by radiation produce factors that stimulate injured fibroblasts to markedly increase their synthesis of certain intracellular proteins, while not stimulating fibroblast replication.

  12. Copper uptake is required for pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidation and protein level increase of p53 in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Saori; Ortiz, Fausto; Zhu Sun, Xiu; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Mason, Andrew; Momand, Jamil

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumour-suppressor protein is a transcription factor that activates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. The p53 protein is vulnerable to oxidation at cysteine thiol groups. The metal-chelating dithiocarbamates, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate, ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate and H(2)O(2) were tested for their oxidative effects on p53 in cultured human breast cancer cells. Only PDTC oxidized p53, although all oxidants tested increased the p53 level. Inductively coupled plasma MS analysis indicated that the addition of 60 microM PDTC increased the cellular copper concentration by 4-fold, which was the highest level of copper accumulated amongst all the oxidants tested. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid, a membrane-impermeable Cu(I) chelator inhibited the PDTC-mediated copper accumulation. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid as well as the hydroxyl radical scavenger d-mannitol inhibited the PDTC-dependent increase in p53 protein and oxidation. Our results show that a low level of copper accumulation in the range of 25-40 microg/g of cellular protein increases the steady-state levels of p53. At copper accumulation levels higher than 60 microg/g of cellular protein, p53 is oxidized. These results suggest that p53 is vulnerable to free radical-mediated oxidation at cysteine residues. PMID:11964141

  13. [Rapid site-directed mutagenesis on full-length plasmid DNA by using designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhong; Ran, Duoliang; Zhang, Xin; An, Xiaoping; Shan, Yunzhu; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2009-02-01

    To use the designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis technique to perform rapid site-directed mutagenesis on double-stranded plasmid DNA. The target amino acid sequence was reversely translated into DNA sequences with degenerate codons, resulting in large amount of silently mutated sequences containing various restriction endonucleases (REs). Certain mutated sequence with an appropriate RE was selected as the target DNA sequence for designing mutation primers. The full-length plasmid DNA was amplified with high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase and the amplified product was 5' phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and then self-ligated. After transformation into an E. coli host the transformants were rapidly screened by cutting with the designed RE. With this strategy we successfully performed the site-directed mutagenesis on an 8 kb plasmid pcDNA3.1-pIgR and recovered the wild-type amino acid sequence of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). A novel site-directed mutagenesis strategy based on DREAM was developed which exploited RE as a rapid screening measure. The highly efficient, high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase was applied to ensure the efficient and faithful amplification of the full-length sequence of a plasmid of up to 8 kb. This rapid mutagenesis strategy avoids using any commercial site-directed mutagenesis kits, special host strains or isotopes. PMID:19459340

  14. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  15. Mutagenesis at the ouabain-resistance locus in human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, M

    1977-09-01

    The variables affecting the frequency of ouabain-resistant mutant clones have been studied in a strain of foetal lung fibroblasts. Optimum mutant recovery was obtained when cells were selected in 10(-6) M ouabain at a cell density of 2 X 10(4) cells/cm 2 (10(6) cell per 100-mm dish). The spontaneous mutation rate was estimated to be 4 X 10(-8) per cell generation. Treatment with the mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), N-methyl-N' -nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and UV light increased the frequency of mutant colonies by an order of magnitude. The maximum number of mutants after mutagenesis with EMS occurred after two population doublings of growth in non-selective medium prior to selection and depended on the dose of EMS. Ouabain-resistance is a useful marker for studies of quantitative mutagenesis in human cells. PMID:904650

  16. [Evaluation of induced mutagenesis in workers engaged into chrysotile asbestos production].

    PubMed

    Zhumabekova, G S; Amanbekova, A U; Ibraeva, L K; Azhimetova, G N

    2014-01-01

    The authors present data of cytogenetic study of workers engaged into chrysotile asbestos industry. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of workers in main workshops of "Kustanaiskie mineral" JSC revealed reliable increase in chromosomal aberrations level. Structural chromosomal abnormalities in main groups were presented by chromosome and chromatide type aberrations with latter prevelent--that can prove chemical mutagenesis. Chromosome type aberrations were presented by paired fragments and centromere rupture, those of chromatide type--by deletions, single fragments and chromatide ruptures. Higher values of induced mutagenesis were revealed in workers of chrysotile asbestos ore concentration workshop, in workers of ore-preparation workshop, and in individuals with over 25 years of work at chrysotile asbestos production.

  17. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  18. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.