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Sample records for mutagenesis increases protein

  1. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts.

  2. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wassman, Christopher D.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lathrop, Richard H.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed ‘cross-hybridization’, as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries. PMID:15585664

  3. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  4. Specific mutagenesis of a chlorophyll-binding protein. Progress report.

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton-Rye, Dr., Julian; Shen, Gaozhong

    1990-01-01

    During the first phase of the project regarding specific mutagenesis of the chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in photosystem II (PS II) most of the time has been devoted to (1) establishment of an optimal procedure for the reintroduction of psbB (the gene encoding CP47) carrying a site-directed mutation into the experimental organism, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, (2) preparations for site-directed mutagenesis, and (3) creation and analysis of chimaeric spinach/cyanobacterial CP47 mutants of Synechocystis. In the coming year, psbB constructs with site-directed mutations in potential chlorophyll-binding regions of CP47 will be introduced into the Synechocystis genome, and site-directed mutants will be characterized according to procedures described in the original project description. In addition, analysis of chimaeric CP47 mutants will be continued.

  5. Efficient mutagenesis by Cas9 protein-mediated oligonucleotide insertion and large-scale assessment of single-guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, James A; Valen, Eivind; Thyme, Summer B; Huang, Peng; Akhmetova, Laila; Ahkmetova, Laila; Pauli, Andrea; Montague, Tessa G; Zimmerman, Steven; Richter, Constance; Schier, Alexander F

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been implemented in a variety of model organisms to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. A wide range of mutation rates has been reported, but at a limited number of genomic target sites. To uncover the rules that govern effective Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in zebrafish, we targeted over a hundred genomic loci for mutagenesis using a streamlined and cloning-free method. We generated mutations in 85% of target genes with mutation rates varying across several orders of magnitude, and identified sequence composition rules that influence mutagenesis. We increased rates of mutagenesis by implementing several novel approaches. The activities of poor or unsuccessful single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) initiating with a 5' adenine were improved by rescuing 5' end homogeneity of the sgRNA. In some cases, direct injection of Cas9 protein/sgRNA complex further increased mutagenic activity. We also observed that low diversity of mutant alleles led to repeated failure to obtain frame-shift mutations. This limitation was overcome by knock-in of a stop codon cassette that ensured coding frame truncation. Our improved methods and detailed protocols make Cas9-mediated mutagenesis an attractive approach for labs of all sizes.

  6. Biophysical Optimization of a Therapeutic Protein by Nonstandard Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pandyarajan, Vijay; Phillips, Nelson B.; Cox, Gabriela P.; Yang, Yanwu; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Weiss, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin provides a model for the therapeutic application of protein engineering. A paradigm in molecular pharmacology was defined by design of rapid-acting insulin analogs for the prandial control of glycemia. Such analogs, a cornerstone of current diabetes regimens, exhibit accelerated subcutaneous absorption due to more rapid disassembly of oligomeric species relative to wild-type insulin. This strategy is limited by a molecular trade-off between accelerated disassembly and enhanced susceptibility to degradation. Here, we demonstrate that this trade-off may be circumvented by nonstandard mutagenesis. Our studies employed LysB28, ProB29-insulin (“lispro”) as a model prandial analog that is less thermodynamically stable and more susceptible to fibrillation than is wild-type insulin. We have discovered that substitution of an invariant tyrosine adjoining the engineered sites in lispro (TyrB26) by 3-iodo-Tyr (i) augments its thermodynamic stability (ΔΔGu 0.5 ±0.2 kcal/mol), (ii) delays onset of fibrillation (lag time on gentle agitation at 37 °C was prolonged by 4-fold), (iii) enhances affinity for the insulin receptor (1.5 ± 0.1-fold), and (iv) preserves biological activity in a rat model of diabetes mellitus. 1H NMR studies suggest that the bulky iodo-substituent packs within a nonpolar interchain crevice. Remarkably, the 3-iodo-TyrB26 modification stabilizes an oligomeric form of insulin pertinent to pharmaceutical formulation (the R6 zinc hexamer) but preserves rapid disassembly of the oligomeric form pertinent to subcutaneous absorption (T6 hexamer). By exploiting this allosteric switch, 3-iodo-TyrB26-lispro thus illustrates how a nonstandard amino acid substitution can mitigate the unfavorable biophysical properties of an engineered protein while retaining its advantages. PMID:24993826

  7. Increase in UV mutagenesis by heat stress on UV-irradiated E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Swati; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    When leu- auxotrophs of Escherichia coli, after UV irradiation, were grown at temperatures between 30 and 47°C, the frequency of UV-induced mutation from leu- to leu+ revertant increased as the UV dose and the temperature increased. For cells exposed to a UV dose of 45 J/m2, the mutation frequency at 47°C was 1.9 times that at 30°C; for a dose of 90 J/m2, it was 3.25 times; and for 135 J/m2, it was 4.8 times. Similar enhancement of reversion frequency was observed when the irradiated cells were grown at 30°C in the presence of a heat shock inducer, ethanol (8% v/v). Heat shock-mediated enhancement of UV mutagenesis did not occur in an E. coli mutant sigma 32 (heat shock regulator protein), but sigma 32 overexpression in the mutant strain (transformed with a sigma 32-bearing plasmid) increased the UV-induced mutation frequency. These results suggest that heat stress alone has no mutagenic property, but when applied to UV-damaged cells, it enhances the UV-induced frequency of cell mutation.

  8. Viable transmembrane region mutants of bacteriophage M13 coat protein prepared by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Deber, C M

    1991-10-31

    Bacteriophage M13 coat protein - a 50-residue protein located at the E. coli host membrane during phage reproduction - is subjected to cytoplasmic, membrane-bound, and DNA-interactive environments during the phage life cycle. In research to examine the specific features of primary/secondary structure in the effective transmembrane (TM) region of the protein (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI) which modulate its capacity to respond conformationally to the progressive influences of these varying environments, we have prepared over two dozen viable mutant phages with alterations in their coat protein TM regions. Mutants were obtained through use of site-directed mutagenesis techniques in combination with three "randomized" oligonucleotides which spanned the TM region. No subcloning was required. Among mutations observed were those in which each of the four TM Val residues was changed to Ala, and several with increased Ser or Thr content, including one double Ser mutant (G23S-A25S). Polar substitutions arising at Gly23 and Tyr24-including G23D, Y24H, Y24D and Y24N-suggested that this local segment resides external to the host membrane. Milligram quantities of mutant coat proteins are obtained by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, with isotopic (e.g., 13C) labelling at desired sites, for subsequent characterization and conformational analysis in membrane-mimetic media.

  9. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  10. MMS Exposure Promotes Increased MtDNA Mutagenesis in the Presence of Replication-Defective Disease-Associated DNA Polymerase γ Variants

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.; Copeland, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  11. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  12. The paramyxovirus fusion protein C-terminal region: mutagenesis indicates an indivisible protein unit.

    PubMed

    Zokarkar, Aarohi; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Fusion is mediated by the viral fusion (F) protein, and it undergoes large irreversible conformational changes to cause membrane merger. The C terminus of PIV5 F contains a membrane-proximal 7-residue external region (MPER), followed by the transmembrane (TM) domain and a 20-residue cytoplasmic tail. To study the sequence requirements of the F protein C terminus for fusion, we constructed chimeras containing the ectodomain of parainfluenza virus 5 F (PIV5 F) and either the MPER, the TM domain, or the cytoplasmic tail of the F proteins of the paramyxoviruses measles virus, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus, human parainfluenza virus 3, and Nipah virus. The chimeras were expressed, and their ability to cause cell fusion was analyzed. The chimeric proteins were variably expressed at the cell surface. We found that chimeras containing the ectodomain of PIV5 F with the C terminus of other paramyxoviruses were unable to cause cell fusion. Fusion could be restored by decreasing the activation energy of refolding through introduction of a destabilizing mutation (S443P). Replacing individual regions, singly or doubly, in the chimeras with native PIV5 F sequences restored fusion to various degrees, but it did not have an additive effect in restoring activity. Thus, the F protein C terminus may be a specific structure that only functions with its cognate ectodomain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of MPER indicates that it has a regulatory role in fusion since both hyperfusogenic and hypofusogenic mutations were found.

  13. Flexibility in MuA transposase family protein structures: functional mapping with scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment of protein homologues.

    PubMed

    Rasila, Tiina S; Vihinen, Mauno; Paulin, Lars; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Savilahti, Harri

    2012-01-01

    MuA transposase protein is a member of the retroviral integrase superfamily (RISF). It catalyzes DNA cleavage and joining reactions via an initial assembly and subsequent structural transitions of a protein-DNA complex, known as the Mu transpososome, ultimately attaching transposon DNA to non-specific target DNA. The transpososome functions as a molecular DNA-modifying machine and has been used in a wide variety of molecular biology and genetics/genomics applications. To analyze structure-function relationships in MuA action, a comprehensive pentapeptide insertion mutagenesis was carried out for the protein. A total of 233 unique insertion variants were generated, and their activity was analyzed using a quantitative in vivo DNA transposition assay. The results were then correlated with the known MuA structures, and the data were evaluated with regard to the protein domain function and transpososome development. To complement the analysis with an evolutionary component, a protein sequence alignment was produced for 44 members of MuA family transposases. Altogether, the results pinpointed those regions, in which insertions can be tolerated, and those where insertions are harmful. Most insertions within the subdomains Iγ, IIα, IIβ, and IIIα completely destroyed the transposase function, yet insertions into certain loop/linker regions of these subdomains increased the protein activity. Subdomains Iα and IIIβ were largely insertion-tolerant. The comprehensive structure-function data set will be useful for designing MuA transposase variants with improved properties for biotechnology/genomics applications, and is informative with regard to the function of RISF proteins in general.

  14. Identification of the anti-inflammatory protein tristetraprolin as a hyperphosphorylated protein by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Heping; Deterding, Leesa J; Venable, John D; Kennington, Elizabeth A; Yates, John R; Tomer, Kenneth B; Blackshear, Perry J

    2006-02-15

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a zinc-finger protein that binds to AREs (AU-rich elements) within certain mRNAs and causes destabilization of those mRNAs. Mice deficient in TTP develop a profound inflammatory syndrome with erosive arthritis, autoimmunity and myeloid hyperplasia. Previous studies showed that TTP is phosphorylated extensively in intact cells. However, limited information is available about the identities of these phosphorylation sites. We investigated the phosphorylation sites in human TTP from transfected HEK-293 cells by MS and site-directed mutagenesis. A number of phosphorylation sites including Ser66, Ser88, Thr92, Ser169, Ser186, Ser197, Ser218, Ser228, Ser276 and Ser296 were identified by MS analyses using MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization)-MS, MALDI-tandem MS, LC (liquid chromatography)-tandem MS and multidimensional protein identification technology. Mutations of Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 to alanine in the human protein significantly increased TTP's gel mobility (likely to be stoichiometric), whereas mutations at the other sites had little effect on its gel mobility. Dephosphorylation and in vivo labelling studies showed that mutant proteins containing multiple mutations were still phosphorylated, and all were able to bind to RNA probes containing AREs. Confocal microscopy showed a similar cytosolic localization of TTP among the various proteins. Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 are predicted by motif scanning to be potential sites for protein kinase A, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 (both Ser218 and Ser228) respectively. The present study has identified multiple phosphorylation sites in the anti-inflammatory protein TTP in mammalian cells and should provide the molecular basis for further studies on the function and regulation of TTP in controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  15. Identification of the anti-inflammatory protein tristetraprolin as a hyperphosphorylated protein by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Deterding, Leesa J.; Venable, John D.; Kennington, Elizabeth A.; Yates, John R.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2005-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a zinc-finger protein that binds to AREs (AU-rich elements) within certain mRNAs and causes destabilization of those mRNAs. Mice deficient in TTP develop a profound inflammatory syndrome with erosive arthritis, autoimmunity and myeloid hyperplasia. Previous studies showed that TTP is phosphorylated extensively in intact cells. However, limited information is available about the identities of these phosphorylation sites. We investigated the phosphorylation sites in human TTP from transfected HEK-293 cells by MS and site-directed mutagenesis. A number of phosphorylation sites including Ser66, Ser88, Thr92, Ser169, Ser186, Ser197, Ser218, Ser228, Ser276 and Ser296 were identified by MS analyses using MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption–ionization)-MS, MALDI-tandem MS, LC (liquid chromatography)–tandem MS and multidimensional protein identification technology. Mutations of Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 to alanine in the human protein significantly increased TTP's gel mobility (likely to be stoichiometric), whereas mutations at the other sites had little effect on its gel mobility. Dephosphorylation and in vivo labelling studies showed that mutant proteins containing multiple mutations were still phosphorylated, and all were able to bind to RNA probes containing AREs. Confocal microscopy showed a similar cytosolic localization of TTP among the various proteins. Ser197, Ser218 and Ser228 are predicted by motif scanning to be potential sites for protein kinase A, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 (both Ser218 and Ser228) respectively. The present study has identified multiple phosphorylation sites in the anti-inflammatory protein TTP in mammalian cells and should provide the molecular basis for further studies on the function and regulation of TTP in controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16262601

  16. Generation of chemically engineered ribosomes for atomic mutagenesis studies on protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Chirkova, Anna; Voegele, Paul; Polacek, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The protocol describes the site-specific chemical modification of 23S rRNA of Thermus aquaticus ribosomes. The centerpiece of this 'atomic mutagenesis' approach is the site-specific incorporation of non-natural nucleoside analogs into 23S rRNA in the context of the entire 70S ribosome. This technique exhaustively makes use of the available crystallographic structures of the ribosome for designing detailed biochemical experiments aiming at unraveling molecular insights of ribosomal functions. The generation of chemically engineered ribosomes carrying a particular non-natural 23S rRNA residue at the site of interest, a procedure that typically takes less than 2 d, allows the study of translation at the molecular level and goes far beyond the limits of standard mutagenesis approaches. This methodology, in combination with the presented tests for ribosomal functions adapted to chemically engineered ribosomes, allows unprecedented molecular insight into the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

  17. Reducing codon redundancy and screening effort of combinatorial protein libraries created by saturation mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kille, Sabrina; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Parra, Loreto P; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Opperman, Diederik J; Reetz, Manfred T; Acevedo, Juan Pablo

    2013-02-15

    Saturation mutagenesis probes define sections of the vast protein sequence space. However, even if randomization is limited this way, the combinatorial numbers problem is severe. Because diversity is created at the codon level, codon redundancy is a crucial factor determining the necessary effort for library screening. Additionally, due to the probabilistic nature of the sampling process, oversampling is required to ensure library completeness as well as a high probability to encounter all unique variants. Our trick employs a special mixture of three primers, creating a degeneracy of 22 unique codons coding for the 20 canonical amino acids. Therefore, codon redundancy and subsequent screening effort is significantly reduced, and a balanced distribution of codon per amino acid is achieved, as demonstrated exemplarily for a library of cyclohexanone monooxygenase. We show that this strategy is suitable for any saturation mutagenesis methodology to generate less-redundant libraries.

  18. From green to blue: site-directed mutagenesis of the green fluorescent protein to teach protein structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Girón, María D; Salto, Rafael

    2011-07-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the site-directed mutagenesis of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The GFP is ideal because the students are able to correlate the changes introduced into the structure of the protein with the observable modification of its fluorescence properties. By using noncommercial kits, we set up a non PCR-thermocycling reaction using mutagenic primers, followed by removal of the original plasmid template by DpnI digestion. By introducing only one (Y66H) or two mutations (Y66H/Y145F) in the "cycle 3" variant of GFP (F99S, M153T, and V163A) or GFPuv, students are able to analyze the changes from green to blue in the fluorescence emission of the mutated proteins and to correlate these differences in fluorescence with the structural changes using three-dimensional structure visualization software. This inexpensive laboratory course familiarizes the students with the design of mutagenic oligonucleotides, site-directed mutagenesis, bacterial transformation, restriction analysis of the mutated plasmids, and protein characterization by SDS-PAGE and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Elevated Mutagenesis Does Not Explain the Increased Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Mutants in Starved Aging Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutants resistant to the antibiotic rifampicin has been shown to increase in aging (starved), compared to young colonies of Eschierchia coli. These increases in resistance frequency occur in the absence of any antibiotic exposure, and similar increases have also been observed in response to additional growth limiting conditions. Understanding the causes of such increases in the frequency of resistance is important for understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance emergence and spread. Increased frequency of rifampicin resistant mutants in aging colonies is cited widely as evidence of stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM), a mechanism thought to allow bacteria to increase mutation rates upon exposure to growth-limiting stresses. At the same time it has been demonstrated that some rifampicin resistant mutants are relatively fitter in aging compared to young colonies, indicating that natural selection may also contribute to increased frequency of rifampicin resistance in aging colonies. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of mutants resistant to both rifampicin and an additional antibiotic (nalidixic-acid) significantly increases in aging compared to young colonies of a lab strain of Escherichia coli. We then use whole genome sequencing to demonstrate conclusively that SIM cannot explain the observed magnitude of increased frequency of resistance to these two antibiotics. We further demonstrate that, as was previously shown for rifampicin resistance mutations, mutations conferring nalidixic acid resistance can also increase fitness in aging compared to young colonies. Our results show that increases in the frequency of antibiotic resistant mutants in aging colonies cannot be seen as evidence of SIM. Furthermore, they demonstrate that natural selection likely contributes to increases in the frequency of certain antibiotic resistance mutations, even when no selection is exerted due to the presence of antibiotics. PMID:24244205

  20. Dissecting partner recognition by an intrinsically disordered protein using descriptive random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Antoine; Dosnon, Marion; Vassena, Andrea; Lombard, Vincent; Gerlier, Denis; Bignon, Christophe; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-09-23

    In view of getting insights into the molecular determinants of the binding efficiency of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used random mutagenesis. As a proof of concept, we chose the interaction between the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein (NTAIL) and the X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein and assessed how amino acid substitutions introduced at random within NTAIL affect partner recognition. In contrast with directed evolution approaches, we did not apply any selection and used the gene library approach not for production purposes but for achieving a better understanding of the NTAIL/XD interaction. For that reason, and to differentiate our approach from similar approaches that make use of systematic (i.e., targeted) mutagenesis, we propose to call it "descriptive random mutagenesis" (DRM). NTAIL variants generated by error-prone PCR were picked at random in the absence of selection pressure and were characterized in terms of sequence and binding abilities toward XD. DRM not only identified determinants of NTAIL/XD interaction that were in good agreement with previous work but also provided new insights. In particular, we discovered that the primary interaction site is poorly evolvable in terms of binding abilities toward XD. We also identified a critical NTAIL residue whose role in stabilizing the NTAIL/XD complex had previously escaped detection, and we identified NTAIL regulatory sites that dampen the interaction while being located outside the primary interaction site. Results show that DRM is a valuable approach to study binding abilities of IDPs.

  1. The role of flexibility and molecular shape in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Devedjiev, Yancho D.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic systems and interact with their environment. The analysis of crystal contacts in the most accurately determined protein structures (d < 1.5 Å) reveals that in contrast to current views, static disorder and high side-chain entropy are common in the crystal contact area. These observations challenge the validity of the theory that presumes that the occurrence of well ordered patches of side chains at the surface is an essential prerequisite for a successful crystallization event. The present paper provides evidence in support of the approach for understanding protein crystallization as a process dependent on multiple factors, each with its relative contribution, rather than a phenomenon driven by a few dominant physicochemical characteristics. The role of the molecular shape as a factor in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis is discussed. PMID:25664789

  2. Characterisation of the Rab binding properties of Rab coupling protein (RCP) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2004-07-30

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a member of the Rab11-family of interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs). Family members are characterised by their ability to interact with Rab11. This property is mediated by a conserved Rab binding domain (RBD) located at their carboxy-termini. Several Rab11-FIPs can also interact with other small GTPases. RCP interacts with Rab4 in addition to Rab11. To dissect out the individual properties of the Rab4 and Rab11 interactions with RCP, conserved amino acids within the RBD of RCP were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of these mutations on Rab4 and Rab11 binding, and the intracellular localisation of RCP, was examined. Our results indicate that Rab11, rather than Rab4, mediates the intracellular localisation of RCP, and that the class I Rab11-FIPs compete for binding to Rab11.

  3. Iterative saturation mutagenesis: a powerful approach to engineer proteins by systematically simulating Darwinian evolution.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Hoebenreich, Sabrina; Reetz, Manfred T

    2014-01-01

    Iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM) is a widely applicable and powerful strategy for the efficient directed evolution of enzymes. First, one or more amino acid positions from the chosen enzyme are assigned to multi-residue sites (i.e., groups of amino acids or "multisites"). Then, the residues in each multisite are mutated with a user-defined randomization scheme to all canonical amino acids or a reduced amino acid alphabet. Subsequently, the genes of chosen variants (usually the best but not necessarily) are used as templates for saturation mutagenesis at other multisites, and the process is repeated until the desired degree of biocatalyst improvement has been achieved. Addressing multisites iteratively results in a so-called ISM scheme or tree with various upward branches or pathways. The systematic character of ISM simulates in vitro the natural process of Darwinian evolution: variation (library creation), selection (library screening), and amplification (template chosen for the next round of randomization). However, the main feature of ISM that distinguishes it from other directed evolution methods is the systematic probing of a defined segment of the protein sequence space, as it has been shown that ISM is much more efficient in terms of biocatalyst optimization than random methods such as error-prone PCR. In addition, ISM trees have also shed light on the emergence of epistasis, thereby rationally improving the strategies for evolving better enzymes. ISM was developed to improve catalytic properties such as rate, substrate scope, stereo- and regioselectivity using the Combinatorial Active-site Saturation Test (CAST), as well as chemical and thermal stability employing the B-Factor Iterative Test (B-FIT). However, ISM can also be invoked to manipulate such protein properties as binding affinity among other possibilities, including protein-protein interactions. Herein, we provide general guidelines for ISM, using CAST as the case study in the quest to

  4. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C; Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three-dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although noncomplementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts.

  5. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P.; Morales, Ivan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Maynard, Jennifer A.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although non-complementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts. PMID:24615866

  6. Mutagenesis and functional selection protocols for directed evolution of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Troll, Chris; Alexander, David; Allen, Jennifer; Marquette, Jacob; Camps, Manel

    2011-03-16

    The efficient generation of genetic diversity represents an invaluable molecular tool that can be used to label DNA synthesis, to create unique molecular signatures, or to evolve proteins in the laboratory. Here, we present a protocol that allows the generation of large (>10(11)) mutant libraries for a given target sequence. This method is based on replication of a ColE1 plasmid encoding the desired sequence by a low-fidelity variant of DNA polymerase I (LF-Pol I). The target plasmid is transformed into a mutator strain of E. coli and plated on solid media, yielding between 0.2 and 1 mutations/kb, depending on the location of the target gene. Higher mutation frequencies are achieved by iterating this process of mutagenesis. Compared to alternative methods of mutagenesis, our protocol stands out for its simplicity, as no cloning or PCR are involved. Thus, our method is ideal for mutational labeling of plasmids or other Pol I templates or to explore large sections of sequence space for the evolution of activities not present in the original target. The tight spatial control that PCR or randomized oligonucleotide-based methods offer can also be achieved through subsequent cloning of specific sections of the library. Here we provide protocols showing how to create a random mutant library and how to establish drug-based selections in E. coli to identify mutants exhibiting new biochemical activities.

  7. Mutagenesis breeding for increased 3-deoxyanthocyanidin accumulation in leaves of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench: a source of natural food pigment.

    PubMed

    Petti, Carloalberto; Kushwaha, Rekha; Tateno, Mizuki; Harman-Ware, Anne Elizabeth; Crocker, Mark; Awika, Joseph; Debolt, Seth

    2014-02-12

    Natural food colorants with functional properties are of increasing interest. Prior papers indicate the chemical suitability of sorghum leaf 3-deoxyanthocyanidins as natural food colorants. Via mutagenesis-assisted breeding, a sorghum variety that greatly overaccumulates 3-deoxyanthocyanidins of leaf tissue, named REDforGREEN (RG), has been isolated and characterized. Interestingly, RG not only caused increased 3-deoxyanthocyanidins but also caused increased tannins, chlorogenic acid, and total phenolics in the leaf tissue. Chemical composition of pigments was established through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) that identified luteolinidin (LUT) and apigeninidin (APG) as the main 3-deoxyanthocianidin species. Specifically, 3-deoxyanthocianidin levels were 1768 μg g⁻¹ LUT and 421 μg g⁻¹ APG in RG leaves compared with trace amounts in wild type, representing 1000-fold greater levels in the mutant leaves. Thus, RG represents a useful sorghum mutagenesis variant to develop as a functionalized food colorant.

  8. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein transmembrane domain: role of an interfacial proline residue.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1993-10-15

    The transmembrane (TM) domain of the 53-residue major coat protein of the M13-related bacteriophage IKe (residues 24-42: LISQTWPVVTTVVVAGVLI) has been subjected to randomized mutagenesis to probe the conformation and stability of the TM domain, as well as the effect of structurally-important residues such as proline. TM mutants were obtained by the Eckstein method of site-directed mutagenesis using the IKe genome as template so as to eliminate the need for subcloning. Over 40 single- and double-site viable mutants of bacteriophage IKe were isolated. Every residue in the TM segment, except the highly conserved Trp29, could be mutated to at least one other residue; polar and charged mutations occurred in the TM segment adjacent to the N-terminal domain (residues 24-28), while non-polar substitutions predominated in the C-terminal portion (residues 30-42). The Pro30 locus tolerated four mutations-Ala, Gly, Cys, and Ser- which represent the four side chains of least volume. Mutant coat proteins obtained directly from the phage in milligram quantities were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE gels. Wild type IKe coat protein solubilized in sodium deoxycholate micelles was found to occur as an alpha-helical, monomeric species which is stable at 95 degrees C, whereas the mutant Pro30-->Gly undergoes an irreversible conformational transition at ca. 90 degrees C to an aggregated beta-sheet structure. The result that Pro30 stabilizes the TM helix in the micellar membrane suggests a sterically-restricted location for the wild type Pro pyrrolidine side chain in the bulky Trp-Pro-Val triad, where it may be positioned to direct the initiation of the subsequent TM core domain helix.

  9. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  10. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  11. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  12. Modular mutagenesis of human placental ribonuclease inhibitor, a protein with leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F S; Vallee, B L

    1990-01-01

    Human placental ribonuclease inhibitor (PRI) is a potent protein inhibitor of pancreatic ribonucleases and the homologous blood vessel-inducing protein angiogenin. Although inhibition by PRI occurs with a 1:1 stoichiometry, its primary structure is composed predominantly of seven internal leucine-rich repeats. These internal repeats were systematically deleted either singly or in combination by "modular" mutagenesis. Deletion of repeat units 3 plus 4 or repeat unit 6 results in mutants that both bind to and inhibit ribonuclease A. Therefore, the angiogenin/ribonuclease binding site in PRI must reside primarily or entirely in repeats 1, 2, 5, or 7, the short N- or C-terminal segments, or a combination of these. Deletion of repeat units 3-5, 5-6, or 5 alone results in mutants that exhibit only binding activity. Hence, the binding site cannot reside exclusively in repeat 5. Other internal deletions or N- or C-terminal deletions of 6-86% of the protein all abolish activity. These results suggest that PRI has a modular structure, with one primary structural repeat constituting one module. The approach taken may be applicable to other proteins with repeat structures. Images PMID:2408043

  13. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Lukyanov, Sergey; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  14. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions.

    PubMed

    Zámborszky, J; Szikriszt, B; Gervai, J Z; Pipek, O; Póti, Á; Krzystanek, M; Ribli, D; Szalai-Gindl, J M; Csabai, I; Szallasi, Z; Swanton, C; Richardson, A L; Szüts, D

    2017-02-09

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong and specific correlation with a mutation signature associated with BRCA1/2 mutant tumours. To model endogenous alkylating damage, we determined the mutation spectrum caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed that MMS also induces more base substitution mutations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells. Spontaneously arising and MMS-induced insertion/deletion mutations and large rearrangements were also more common in BRCA1/2 mutant cells compared with the wild-type control. A difference in the short deletion phenotypes of BRCA1 and BRCA2 suggested distinct roles for the two proteins in the processing of DNA lesions, as BRCA2 mutants contained more short deletions, with a wider size distribution, which frequently showed microhomology near the breakpoints resembling repair by non-homologous end joining. An increased and prolonged gamma-H2AX signal in MMS-treated BRCA1/2 cells suggested an aberrant processing of stalled replication forks as the cause of increased mutagenesis. The high rate of base substitution mutagenesis demonstrated by our experiments is likely to significantly contribute to the oncogenic effect of the inactivation of BRCA1 or BRCA2.

  15. Structure-Based and Random Mutagenesis Approaches Increase the Organophosphate-Degrading Activity of a Phosphotriesterase Homologue from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Larsen, Sonia D.; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-11-09

    An enzyme from the amidohydrolase family from Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr-OPH) with homology to phosphotriesterase has been shown to exhibit activity against both organophosphate (OP) and lactone compounds. We have characterized the physical properties of Dr-OPH and have found it to be a highly thermostable enzyme, remaining active after 3 h of incubation at 60 C and withstanding incubation at temperatures up to 70 C. In addition, it can withstand concentrations of at least 200 mg/mL. These properties make Dr-OPH a promising candidate for development in commercial applications. However, compared to the most widely studied OP-degrading enzyme, that from Pseudomonas diminuta, Dr-OPH has low hydrolytic activity against certain OP substrates. Therefore, we sought to improve the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH, specifically toward the pesticides ethyl and methyl paraoxon, using structure-based and random approaches. Site-directed mutagenesis, random mutagenesis, and site-saturation mutagenesis were utilized to increase the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH. Out of a screen of more than 30,000 potential mutants, a total of 26 mutant enzymes were purified and characterized kinetically. Crystal structures of w.t. Dr-OPH, of Dr-OPH in complex with a product analog, and of 7 mutant enzymes were determined to resolutions between 1.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}. Information from these structures directed the design and production of 4 additional mutants for analysis. In total, our mutagenesis efforts improved the catalytic activity of Dr-OPH toward ethyl and methyl paraoxon by 126- and 322-fold and raised the specificity for these two substrates by 557- and 183-fold, respectively. Our work highlights the importance of an iterative approach to mutagenesis, proving that large rate enhancements are achieved when mutations are made in already active mutants. In addition, the relationship between the kinetic parameters and the introduced mutations has allowed us to hypothesize on those

  16. Identification of mycoplasma membrane proteins by systematic Tn phoA mutagenesis of a recombinant library.

    PubMed

    Cleavinger, C M; Kim, M F; Im, J H; Wise, K S

    1995-10-01

    Wall-less prokaryotes in the genus Mycoplasma include over 90 species of infectious agents whose pathogenicity for humans and other animals is currently being assessed. Molecular characterization of surface proteins is critical in this regard but is hampered by the lack of genetic systems in these organisms. We used TnphoA transposition to systematically mutagenize, in Escherichia coli, a genomic plasmid library constructed from Mycoplasma fermentans, a potential human pathogen. The strategy circumvented problems of expressing mycoplasma genes containing UGA (Trp) codons and relied on the construction of the vector pG7ZCW, designed to reduce TnphoA transposition into vector sequences. Functional phoA gene fusions directly identified genes encoding 19 putative membrane-associated proteins of M. fermentans. Sequences of fusion constructs defined three types of export sequence: (1) non-cleavable, membrane-spanning sequences, (2) signal peptides with signal peptidase (SPase) I-like cleavage sites, and (3) signal peptides with SPase II-like lipoprotein-cleavage sites which, like most other mycoplasmal lipoprotein signals analysed to date, differed from those in several Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria in their lack of a Leu residue at the -3 position. Antibodies to synthetic peptides that were deduced from two fusions to predicted lipoproteins, identified corresponding amphiphilic membrane proteins of 57 kDa and 78 kDa expressed in the mycoplasma. The P57 sequence contained a proline-rich N-terminal region analogous to an adhesin of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The P78 protein was identical to a serologically defined phase-variant surface lipoprotein. TnphoA mutagenesis provides an efficient means of systematically characterizing functionally diverse lipoproteins and other exported proteins in mycoplasmas.

  17. Chemical mutagenesis--a promising technique to increase metal concentration and extraction in sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Nehnevajova, Erika; Herzig, Rolf; Federer, Guido; Erismann, Karl-Hans; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Since most of the metal-hyperaccumulating wild plants only produce very low biomass and many high-yielding crops accumulate only moderate amounts of metals, the current research is mainly focused on overcoming these limitations and the optimization of metal phytoextraction. The main goal of the present study was the improvement of metal concentration and extraction properties of Helianthus annuus L by chemical mutagenesis (the non-GMO approach). Sunflowers--hybrid cultivar Salut and inbred lines-were treated with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). The effect of chemical mutagenesis on metal concentration in and extraction by new sunflower M1 and M2 mutants was directly assessed on a metal-contaminated field in Raft, Switzerland. Mutants of the M2 generation showed a 2-3 times higher metal shoot concentration than the control plants. The best M2 sunflower "giant mutant" 14/185/04 showed a significantly enhanced metal extraction ability: 7.5 times for Cd, 9.2 times for Zn, and 8.2 times for Pb in aboveground parts, as compared to the control plants. Theoretical calculations for the phytoextraction potential of new sunflower variants note that the best sunflower mutant can produce up to 26 t dry matter per hectare and remove 13.3 kg Zn per hectare and year at the sewage sludge contaminated site of Raft; that is a gain factor of 9 compared to Zn extraction by sunflower controls. Furthermore, the use of sunflower oil and biomass for technical purposes (lubricants, biodiesel, biogas) should produce an additional value and improve the economical balance of phytoextraction.

  18. Random mutagenesis of global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein for improved osmotolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Chong, Huiqing; Ching, Chi Bun; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-05-01

    The naturally existing microbial hosts can rarely satisfy industrial requirements, thus there has always been an intense effort in strain engineering to meet the needs of these bioprocesses. Here, in this work, we want to prove the concept that engineering global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli can improve cell phenotypes. CRP is one of the global regulatory proteins that can regulate the transcription of over 400 genes in E. coli. The target phenotype in this study is strain osmotolerance. Amino acid mutations were introduced to CRP by either error-prone PCR or DNA shuffling, and the random mutagenesis libraries were subjected to enrichment selection under NaCl stress. Five CRP mutants (MT1-MT5) were selected from the error-prone PCR libraries with enhanced osmotolerance. DNA shuffling technique was employed to generate mutant MT6 with MT1-MT5 as templates. All of these variants showed much better growth in the presence of NaCl compared to the wild type, and MT6 presented the best tolerance towards NaCl. In the presence of 0.9 M NaCl, the growth rate of MT6 is 0.113 h(-1), while that of WT is 0.077 h(-1). MT6 also exhibited resistance to other osmotic stressors, such as KCl, glucose, and sucrose. DNA microarray analysis showed that genes involved in colanic acid biosynthesis are up-regulated in the absence of salt stress, whereas carbohydrate metabolic genes are differentially expressed under NaCl stress when comparing MT6 to WT. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the elongation of both WT and MT6 when exposed to NaCl but the cell surface of MT6 was relatively smooth.

  19. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  20. Structure-function studies on human retinol-binding protein using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprasadarao, A; Findlay, J B

    1994-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) transports vitamin A in the plasma. It consists of eight anti-parallel beta-strands (A to H) that fold to form an orthogonal barrel. The loops connecting the strands A and B, C and D, and E and F form the entrance to the binding site in the barrel. The retinol molecule is found deep inside this barrel. Apart from its specific interaction with retinol, RBP is involved in two other molecular-recognition properties, that is it binds to transthyretin (TTR), another serum protein, and to a cell-surface receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, specific changes were made to the loop regions of human RBP and the resultant mutant proteins were tested for their ability to bind to retinol, to TTR and to the RBP receptor. While all the variants retained their ability to bind retinol, that in which residues 92 to 98 of the loop E-F were deleted completely lost its ability to interact with TTR, but retained some binding activity for the receptor. In contrast, the double mutant in which leucine residues at positions 63 and 64 of the loop C-D were changed to arginine and serine respectively partially retained its TTR-binding ability, but completely lost its affinity for the RBP receptor. Mutation of Leu-35 of loop A-B to valine revealed no apparent effect on any of the binding activities of RBP. However, substitution of leucine for proline at position 35 markedly reduced the affinity of the protein for TTR, but showed no apparent change in its receptor-binding activity. These results demonstrate that RBP interacts with both TTR and the receptor via loops C-D and E-F. The binding sites, however, are overlapping rather than identical. RBP also appears to make an additional contact with TTR via its loop A-B. A further implication of these results is that RBP, when bound to TTR, cannot bind simultaneously to the receptor. This observation is consistent with our previously proposed mechanism for delivery of retinol to target tissues [Sivaprasadarao and

  1. Generation of a fast maturating red fluorescent protein by a combined approach of elongation mutagenesis and functional salvage screening

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Sil; Han, Sang-Soo; Cheong, Dea-Eun; Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be useful as indicators or reporters must have rapid maturation time, high quantum yield and photobleaching stability. A red fluorescent protein DsRed that has a high quantum yield and photostability has an innately slow maturation time when compared to other fluorescence proteins. In this study, we combined a functional salvage screen (FSS) and elongation mutagenesis to obtain a DsRed variant that maintained structural features closely linked with a high quantum yield and photostability and evolved to have a rapid maturation time. It is expected that the variant generated here, FmRed (fast maturating red fluorescent protein), will be widely used as an indicator or reporter because it maintained traits superior to that of the wild-type protein and also matured rapidly.

  2. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  3. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  4. Increasing Leaf Vein Density by Mutagenesis: Laying the Foundations for C4 Rice

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Aryo B.; Murchie, Erik H.; Leung, Hei; Baraoidan, Marietta; Coe, Robert; Yu, Su-May; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Quick, William P.

    2014-01-01

    A high leaf vein density is both an essential feature of C4 photosynthesis and a foundation trait to C4 evolution, ensuring the optimal proportion and proximity of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells for permitting the rapid exchange of photosynthates. Two rice mutant populations, a deletion mutant library with a cv. IR64 background (12,470 lines) and a T-DNA insertion mutant library with a cv. Tainung 67 background (10,830 lines), were screened for increases in vein density. A high throughput method with handheld microscopes was developed and its accuracy was supported by more rigorous microscopy analysis. Eight lines with significantly increased leaf vein densities were identified to be used as genetic stock for the global C4 Rice Consortium. The candidate population was shown to include both shared and independent mutations and so more than one gene controlled the high vein density phenotype. The high vein density trait was found to be linked to a narrow leaf width trait but the linkage was incomplete. The more genetically robust narrow leaf width trait was proposed to be used as a reliable phenotypic marker for finding high vein density variants in rice in future screens. PMID:24760084

  5. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Douglas E. V.; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L.; Ascher, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  6. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-22

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  7. His-65 in the proton–sucrose symporter is an essential amino acid whose modification with site-directed mutagenesis increases transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jade M.-Y.; Bush, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    The proton–sucrose symporter that mediates phloem loading is a key component of assimilate partitioning in many higher plants. Previous biochemical investigations showed that a diethyl pyrocarbonate-sensitive histidine residue is at or near the substrate-binding site of the symporter. Among the proton–sucrose symporters cloned to date, only the histidine residue at position 65 of AtSUC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is conserved across species. To test whether His-65 is involved in the transport reaction, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional expression in yeast to determine the significance of this residue in the reaction mechanism. Symporters with mutations at His-65 exhibited a range of activities; for example, the H65C mutant resulted in the complete loss of transport capacity, whereas H65Q was almost as active as wild type. Surprisingly, the H65K and H65R symporters transport sucrose at significantly higher rates (increased Vmax) than the wild-type symporter, suggesting His-65 may be associated with a rate-limiting step in the transport reaction. RNA gel blot and protein blot analyses showed that, with the exception of H65C, the variation in transport activity was not because of alterations in steady-state levels of mRNA or symporter protein. Significantly, those symporters with substitutions of His-65 that remained transport competent were no longer sensitive to inactivation by diethyl pyrocarbonate, demonstrating that this is the inhibitor-sensitive histidine residue. Taken together with our previous results, these data show that His-65 is involved in sucrose binding, and increased rates of transport implicate this region of the protein in the transport reaction. PMID:9671798

  8. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis as a general and powerful method for studies of protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Dalbadie-McFarland, G; Cohen, L W; Riggs, A D; Morin, C; Itakura, K; Richards, J H

    1982-01-01

    We have used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to make a specific change in the beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) (ampicillin resistance) gene of the plasmid pBR322. Evidence suggests that the active site for this enzyme may include a serine-threonine dyad (residues 70 and 71). By priming in vitro DNA synthesis with a chemically synthesized 16-base oligodeoxyribonucleotide, we have inverted the Ser-Thr dyad to Thr-Ser and thereby generated a mutant with an ampicillin-sensitive phenotype. This "double-mismatch" method is relatively simple and also very general because detection of mutants is at the level of DNA and involves only colony hybridization. Accordingly, the procedure can be applied to any DNA sequence and does not depend on the phenotype of the mutant. Images PMID:6983070

  9. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  10. ABS-Scan: In silico alanine scanning mutagenesis for binding site residues in protein-ligand complex.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen; Nagarajan, Deepesh; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2014-01-01

    Most physiological processes in living systems are fundamentally regulated by protein-ligand interactions. Understanding the process of ligand recognition by proteins is a vital activity in molecular biology and biochemistry. It is well known that the residues present at the binding site of the protein form pockets that provide a conducive environment for recognition of specific ligands. In many cases, the boundaries of these sites are not well defined. Here, we provide a web-server to systematically evaluate important residues in the binding site of the protein that contribute towards the ligand recognition through in silico alanine-scanning mutagenesis experiments. Each of the residues present at the binding site is computationally mutated to alanine. The ligand interaction energy is computed for each mutant and the corresponding ΔΔG values are calculated by comparing it to the wild type protein, thus evaluating individual residue contributions towards ligand interaction. The server will thus provide a ranked list of residues to the user in order to obtain loss-of-function mutations. This web-tool can be freely accessed through the following address: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/abscan/.

  11. Significantly improving the yield of recombinant proteins in Bacillus subtilis by a novel powerful mutagenesis tool (ARTP): Alkaline α-amylase as a case study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Yang, Haiquan; Chen, Xianzhong; Sun, Bo; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Zhemin; Song, Jiangning; Fan, You; Shen, Wei

    2015-10-01

    In this study, atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP), a promising mutation breeding technique, was successfully applied to generate Bacillus subtilis mutants that yielded large quantities of recombinant protein. The high throughput screening platform was implemented to select those mutants with the highest yield of recombinant alkaline α-amylase (AMY), including the preferred mutant B. subtilis WB600 mut-12#. The yield and productivity of recombinant AMY in B. subtilis WB600 mut-12# increased 35.0% and 8.8%, respectively, the extracellular protein concentration of which increased 37.9%. B. subtilis WB600 mut-12# exhibited good genetic stability. Cells from B. subtilis WB600 mut-12# became shorter and wider than those from the wild-type. This study is the first to report a novel powerful mutagenesis tool (ARTP) that significantly improves the yield of recombinant proteins in B. subtilis and may therefore play an important role in the high expression level of proteins in recombinant microbial hosts.

  12. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  13. Increasing the refolding efficiency in vitro by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys383 in rat procarboxypeptidase B.

    PubMed

    Li, Suxia; Zhang, Luosheng; Wu, Qian; Xin, Aijie; Zhao, Jian; Fan, Liqiang

    2011-07-10

    This study examines a novel method to reduce the probability of disulfide mismatches during the refolding process by the replacement of cysteines within a protein. Specifically, Cys383 of recombinant rat procarboxypeptidase B was replaced by other amino acids to increase the refolding efficiency in vitro. Mutants C383G, C383A and C383S could refold successfully, but mutants C383R, C383E, C383L and C383Y failed to refold correctly. Compared with wild type, the refolding efficiencies of mutants C383G and C383A were enhanced. The Cys383 mutations changed some of the properties of rat carboxypeptidase B. Mutants C383G, C383A had higher k(cat)/K(m) values which indicated increased catalytic abilities. And both had higher thermal stability. pH had different effects on the activities and stabilities of the mutant and wild type proteins. The studies suggested that mutating Cys383 of rat procarboxypeptidase B could improve the renaturation process by increasing the refolding efficiency. This new method could be taken as a new attempt to improve the refolding efficiency of other recombinant proteins containing disulfide bonds that are expressed as inclusion bodies. While the results also claimed that the potential effects of the substituted amino acid on the protein itself should be seriously considered in addition to its ability to reduce the probability of disulfide mismatches.

  14. Kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies of the cysteine residues of bovine low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Zhou, M M; Van Etten, R L

    1994-03-25

    The roles of the 8 conserved cysteines and 1 arginine in the low molecular weight phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases were investigated using site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant bovine heart enzyme. Single mutants of cysteine to serine were studied for each cysteine; alanine replacements were also made for Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18. The CD spectra of the purified proteins were effectively superimposable, consistent with the conclusion that no major structural alterations had occurred, but 1H NMR spectroscopy did reveal some spectral shifts in the aromatic region. Kinetic analysis of the mutant proteins demonstrated that only Cys-12, Cys-17, and Arg-18 had significantly altered catalytic activity toward the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 5. The Cys-12 and Arg-18 mutants were effectively inactive. Thus, it is concluded that Cys-12 is the catalytic nucleophile, and Arg-18 presumably serves an essential function in substrate binding. The C17S mutant had 6% residual activity compared with wild type protein, whereas the C17A mutant had 37% activity. Consistent with the observed activity of the Cys-17 mutant, a covalent phosphocysteine intermediate was trapped and identified by 31P NMR. Further kinetic analysis of C17A using several aryl phosphate monoester substrates with different leaving group pK alpha values indicated that no change in the rate-determining step of the catalytic mechanism had occurred, that is, dephosphorylation of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate remains rate-limiting. The C17A mutant had a 4-fold higher phosphate Ki and slightly higher Km values for p-nitrophenyl phosphate suggesting that Cys-17 may be important for optimal positioning of the substrate phosphate moiety.

  15. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  16. Optical control of protein function through unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and other optogenetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Baker, Austin S; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-07-18

    Biological processes are naturally regulated with high spatial and temporal resolution at the molecular, cellular, and systems level. To control and study processes with the same resolution, light-sensitive groups and domains have been employed to optically activate and deactivate protein function. Optical control is a noninvasive technique in which the amplitude, wavelength, spatial location, and timing of the light illumination can be easily controlled. This review focuses on applications of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids containing light-removable protecting groups to optically trigger protein function, while also discussing select optogenetic approaches using natural light-sensitive domains to engineer optical control of biological processes.

  17. Stop codon mutagenesis for homogenous expression of human papillomavirus L1 protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daning; Fan, Fei; Li, Zhihai; Liu, Xinlin; Song, Shuo; Wei, Shuangping; He, Maozhou; Lin, Yahua; Li, Zhongyi; Wei, Minxi; Yu, Hai; Gu, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-03-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely accepted to be the major causative pathogen of cervical cancer, warts, and other epithelial tumors. Virus infection and subsequent disease development can be prevented by vaccination with HPV vaccines derived from eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we report the soluble expression of the major capsid protein L1 of HPV31, a dominant carcinogenic HPV genotype, in Escherichia coli. HPV31 L1 protein and its elongated form (L1+) were observed in SDS-PAGE and CE-SDS analysis, generated by the native HPV31 L1 gene with a TAA stop codon. Replacing the TAA with TAG but not TGA could completely terminate protein translation. Mass spectrometry sequencing showed that L1+ comprised L1 with a C-terminal extension of 38 amino acids (aa). RNA folding analysis revealed that the unfaithful L1+ expression may result from translational read-through, as TAG is more stable and accessible than the other stop codons. The 38-aa elongated fragment perturbs self-assembly of HPV31 L1+, as shown in size and morphology analyses. By 3D cryo-electron microscopy structure determination, we show self-assembly of purified HPV31 L1 (TAG) VLPs into T = 7 icosahedral symmetry particles, resembling the native HPV virion. Finally, through additional characterization and antigenicity/immunogenicity assays, we verified that the E.coli-derived HPV31 VLPs are an ideal immunogen for HPV vaccine development. Our findings outline a codon optimization stratagem for protein expression and provide a method for the in-depth investigation of prokaryotic translation regulation.

  18. Molecular scanning: combining random mutagenesis, ribosome display, and bioinformatic analysis for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; Finlay, William James Jonathan; Cunningham, Orla; Fennell, Brian Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering techniques can facilitate the direct de-convolution of specific domains, regions, and particular amino acids that contribute to protein function. Many tools are available to aid this enterprise and herein we describe one such tool, a technique we term "Molecular Scanning" (MS). MS is analogous to previously described alanine scanning in that it samples potentially functional sequence space, but differs in that it uses Error-Prone polymerase chain reaction to randomly introduce all amino acids across the sequence space, as opposed to simply introducing alanine at each desired position. We commonly use MS in conjunction with ribosome-display, selecting for specific character traits (e.g., improved affinity) which allows us to sample functionally relevant diversity on a reasonably large scale. This approach is amenable to a variety of different mutational techniques and display technologies as dictated by user requirements or needs. In this chapter we present a general outline of the process as we have previously successfully applied it.

  19. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  20. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  1. Knockout of an outer membrane protein operon of anaplasma marginale by transposon mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large amounts of data generated by genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics technologies have increased our understanding of the biology of Anaplasma marginale. However, these data have also led to new assumptions that require testing, ideally through classic genetic mutation. One example is the def...

  2. A 5000-fold increase in the specificity of a bacterial phosphotriesterase for malathion through combinatorial active site mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Tatheer; Warden, Andrew C; French, Nigel; Sugrue, Elena; Carr, Paul D; Jackson, Colin J; Scott, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases (PTEs) have been isolated from a range of bacterial species, including Agrobcaterium radiobacter (PTEAr), and are efficient enzymes with broad substrate ranges. The turnover rate of PTEAr for the common organophosphorous insecticide malathion is lower than expected based on its physical properties; principally the pka of its leaving group. In this study, we rationalise the turnover rate of PTEAr for malathion using computational docking of the substrate into a high resolution crystal structure of the enzyme, suggesting that malathion is too large for the PTEAr binding pocket. Protein engineering through combinatorial active site saturation testing (CASTing) was then used to increase the rate of malathion turnover. Variants from a CASTing library in which Ser308 and Tyr309 were mutated yielded variants with increased activity towards malathion. The most active PTEAr variant carried Ser308Leu and Tyr309Ala substitutions, which resulted in a ca. 5000-fold increase in kcat/KM for malathion. X-ray crystal structures for the PTEAr Ser308Leu\\Tyr309Ala variant demonstrate that the access to the binding pocket was enhanced by the replacement of the bulky Tyr309 residue with the smaller alanine residue.

  3. A 5000-Fold Increase in the Specificity of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase for Malathion through Combinatorial Active Site Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Tatheer; Warden, Andrew C.; French, Nigel; Sugrue, Elena; Carr, Paul D.; Jackson, Colin J.; Scott, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases (PTEs) have been isolated from a range of bacterial species, including Agrobcaterium radiobacter (PTEAr), and are efficient enzymes with broad substrate ranges. The turnover rate of PTEAr for the common organophosphorous insecticide malathion is lower than expected based on its physical properties; principally the pka of its leaving group. In this study, we rationalise the turnover rate of PTEAr for malathion using computational docking of the substrate into a high resolution crystal structure of the enzyme, suggesting that malathion is too large for the PTEAr binding pocket. Protein engineering through combinatorial active site saturation testing (CASTing) was then used to increase the rate of malathion turnover. Variants from a CASTing library in which Ser308 and Tyr309 were mutated yielded variants with increased activity towards malathion. The most active PTEAr variant carried Ser308Leu and Tyr309Ala substitutions, which resulted in a ca. 5000-fold increase in kcat/KM for malathion. X-ray crystal structures for the PTEAr Ser308Leu\\Tyr309Ala variant demonstrate that the access to the binding pocket was enhanced by the replacement of the bulky Tyr309 residue with the smaller alanine residue. PMID:24721933

  4. Effects of 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate on mutagenesis and p53 protein expression in the tongue of lacI rats treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph; Chen, Kun-Ming; Khmelnitsky, Michael; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Hennessy, Jeanine; Bruggeman, Richard; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Spratt, Tomas; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2009-01-01

    Previously we showed that the organoselenium compound, 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC)1 inhibits 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue tumorigenesis in Fisher rats. Here we investigate possible mechanisms of this inhibition by monitoring mutagenesis and p53 protein levels in lacI and conventional Fisher rats treated with: 1) a carcinogenic dose of 4-NQO for 10 weeks in drinking water, 2) 4-NQO + p-XSC (15 ppm as selenium), and 3) 4-NQO followed by p-XSC. For mutagenesis studies, rats were euthanized at 7, 12 or 23 wks after the start of 4-NQO. For studies on p53 levels, rats were euthanized at 11, 15 and 23 wks. Appropriate controls were also monitored. In the 4-NQO-alone groups, the mutant fraction (MF) in the cII gene in tongue increased at least 50 × background level. The MF (in units of mutants/105 plaque forming units) for the 7, 12 and 23 week 4-NQO groups were respectively, 184 ± 88, 237 ± 105, 329 ± 110. Thus, mutagenesis increased with length of exposure and post-treatment time. p-XSC modestly (ca. 15 - 30%) inhibited mutagenesis under all conditions. The inhibition reached significance at the last time point. When p-XSC was administered after 4-NQO, the MF was also modestly reduced. In 4-NQO-alone animals, levels of p53 in tongue (determined by Western blotting) were 1, 1.5 and 2.4 control levels at 10, 15 and 23 weeks respectively. In the p-XSC + 4-NQO group, the enhancement in p53 levels by 4-NQO treatment was decreased about 90% at 15 weeks and 45% (P < 0.05) at 23 weeks, and by slightly smaller percentages in corresponding post-treatment groups. p-XSC alone did not alter p53 levels. As p53 levels generally increase in response to DNA damage, these results suggest that p-XSC reduces 4-NQO-induced DNA damage, resulting in reduced 4-NQO-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. However, the fact that p-XSC is also effective when administered after 4-NQO, suggests additional mechanisms of inhibition exist. PMID:17720616

  5. Combining modelling and mutagenesis studies of synaptic vesicle protein 2A to identify a series of residues involved in racetam binding.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiye; Anderson, Dina; Lynch, Berkley A; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Foerch, Patrik; Lebon, Florence

    2011-10-01

    LEV (levetiracetam), an antiepileptic drug which possesses a unique profile in animal models of seizure and epilepsy, has as its unique binding site in brain, SV2A (synaptic vesicle protein 2A). Previous studies have used a chimaeric and site-specific mutagenesis approach to identify three residues in the putative tenth transmembrane helix of SV2A that, when mutated, alter binding of LEV and related racetam derivatives to SV2A. In the present paper, we report a combined modelling and mutagenesis study that successfully identifies another 11 residues in SV2A that appear to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis and modelling of SV2A suggested residues equivalent to critical functional residues of other MFS (major facilitator superfamily) transporters. Alanine scanning of these and other SV2A residues resulted in the identification of residues affecting racetam binding, including Ile273 which differentiated between racetam analogues, when mutated to alanine. Integrating mutagenesis results with docking analysis led to the construction of a mutant in which six SV2A residues were replaced with corresponding SV2B residues. This mutant showed racetam ligand-binding affinity intermediate to the affinities observed for SV2A and SV2B.

  6. Selection of IgG Variants with Increased FcRn Binding Using Random and Directed Mutagenesis: Impact on Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Céline; Jorieux, Sylvie; Urbain, Rémi; Fournier, Nathalie; Bouayadi, Khalil; De Romeuf, Christophe; Behrens, Christian K.; Fontayne, Alexandre; Mondon, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite the reasonably long half-life of immunoglogulin G (IgGs), market pressure for higher patient convenience while conserving efficacy continues to drive IgG half-life improvement. IgG half-life is dependent on the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), which among other functions, protects IgG from catabolism. FcRn binds the Fc domain of IgG at an acidic pH ensuring that endocytosed IgG will not be degraded in lysosomal compartments and will then be released into the bloodstream. Consistent with this mechanism of action, several Fc-engineered IgG with increased FcRn affinity and conserved pH dependency were designed and resulted in longer half-life in vivo in human FcRn-transgenic mice (hFcRn), cynomolgus monkeys, and recently in healthy humans. These IgG variants were usually obtained by in silico approaches or directed mutagenesis in the FcRn-binding site. Using random mutagenesis, combined with a pH-dependent phage display selection process, we isolated IgG variants with improved FcRn-binding, which exhibited longer in vivo half-life in hFcRn mice. Interestingly, many mutations enhancing Fc/FcRn interaction were located at a distance from the FcRn-binding site validating our random molecular approach. Directed mutagenesis was then applied to generate new variants to further characterize our IgG variants and the effect of the mutations selected. Since these mutations are distributed over the whole Fc sequence, binding to other Fc effectors, such as complement C1q and FcγRs, was dramatically modified, even by mutations distant from these effectors’ binding sites. Hence, we obtained numerous IgG variants with increased FcRn-binding and different binding patterns to other Fc effectors, including variants without any effector function, providing distinct “fit-for-purpose” Fc molecules. We therefore provide evidence that half-life and effector functions should be optimized simultaneously as mutations can have unexpected effects on all Fc receptors that are critical

  7. Can protein levels be economically increased?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One result from the 2010 hard red winter wheat harvest was an increase of discussions on protein values across the southern great plains. The crop garnered relatively low protein values for several reasons, many of which were directly related to the weather patterns and environmental conditions. T...

  8. Increasing the protein content of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Patel, M R; Baer, R J; Acharya, M R

    2006-05-01

    Vanilla ice cream was made with a mix composition of 10.5% milk fat, 10.5% milk SNF, 12% beet sugar, and 4% corn syrup solids. None of the batches made contained stabilizer or emulsifier. The control (treatment 1) contained 3.78% protein. Treatments 2 and 5 contained 30% more protein, treatments 3 and 6 contained 60% more protein, and treatments 4 and 7 contained 90% more protein compared with treatment 1 by addition of whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate powders, respectively. In all treatments, levels of milk fat, milk SNF, beet sugar, and corn syrup solids were kept constant at 37% total solids. Mix protein content for treatment 1 was 3.78%, treatment 2 was 4.90%, treatment 5 was 4.91%, treatments 3 and 6 were 6.05%, and treatments 4 and 7 were 7.18%. This represented a 29.89, 60.05, 89.95, 29.63, 60.05, and 89.95% increase in protein for treatment 2 through treatment 7 compared with treatment 1, respectively. Milk protein level influenced ice crystal size; with increased protein, the ice crystal size was favorably reduced in treatments 2, 4, and 5 and was similar in treatments 3, 6, and 7 compared with treatment 1. At 1 wk postmanufacture, overall texture acceptance for all treatments was more desirable compared with treatment 1. When evaluating all parameters, treatment 2 with added whey protein concentrate and treatments 5 and 6 with added milk protein concentrate were similar or improved compared with treatment 1. It is possible to produce acceptable ice cream with higher levels of protein.

  9. Combining site-specific mutagenesis and seeding as a strategy to crystallize ‘difficult’ proteins: the case of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Goedele; Brosens, Elke; Wahni, Khadija; Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Wyns, Lode; Messens, Joris; Loris, Remy

    2006-12-01

    S. aureus thioredoxin was crystallized using a combination of seeding and site-specific mutagenesis. The P31T mutant of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin crystallizes spontaneously in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.7, b = 49.5, c = 55.6 Å. The crystals diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Isomorphous crystals of wild-type thioredoxin as well as of other point mutants only grow when seeded with the P31T mutant. These results suggest seeding as a valuable tool complementing surface engineering for proteins that are hard to crystallize.

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  11. Novel induced mlo mutant alleles in combination with site-directed mutagenesis reveal functionally important domains in the heptahelical barley Mlo protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recessively inherited natural and induced mutations in the barley Mlo gene confer durable broad-spectrum resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen, Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei. Mlo codes for a member of a plant-specific family of polytopic integral membrane proteins with unknown biochemical activity. Resistant barley mlo mutant alleles identify amino acid residues that are critical for Mlo function in the context of powdery mildew susceptibility. Results We molecularly analyzed a novel set of induced barley mlo mutants and used site-directed mutagenesis in combination with transient gene expression to unravel novel amino acid residues of functional significance. We integrate these results with previous findings to map functionally important regions of the heptahelical Mlo protein. Our data reveal the second and third cytoplasmic loop as being particularly sensitive to functional impediment by mutational perturbation, suggesting that these regions are critical for the susceptibility-conferring activity of the Mlo protein. In contrast, only mutations in the second but not the third cytoplasmic loop appear to trigger the Endoplasmic Reticulum-localized quality control machinery that ensures the biogenesis of properly folded membrane proteins. Conclusion Our findings identify functionally important regions of the polytopic barley Mlo protein and reveal the differential sensitivity of individual protein domains to cellular quality control. PMID:20170486

  12. Sequence determinants of protein aggregation: tools to increase protein solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. However, very often the target protein accumulates into insoluble aggregates in a misfolded and biologically inactive form. Bacterial inclusion bodies are major bottlenecks in protein production and are hampering the development of top priority research areas such structural genomics. Inclusion body formation was formerly considered to occur via non-specific association of hydrophobic surfaces in folding intermediates. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that protein aggregation in bacteria resembles to the well-studied process of amyloid fibril formation. Both processes appear to rely on the formation of specific, sequence-dependent, intermolecular interactions driving the formation of structured protein aggregates. This similarity in the mechanisms of aggregation will probably allow applying anti-aggregational strategies already tested in the amyloid context to the less explored area of protein aggregation inside bacteria. Specifically, new sequence-based approaches appear as promising tools to tune protein aggregation in biotechnological processes. PMID:15847694

  13. Protein Engineering by Random Mutagenesis and Structure-Guided Consensus of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Lipase T6 for Enhanced Stability in Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Adi; Shemesh, Einav; Dayan, Natali

    2014-01-01

    The abilities of enzymes to catalyze reactions in nonnatural environments of organic solvents have opened new opportunities for enzyme-based industrial processes. However, the main drawback of such processes is that most enzymes have a limited stability in polar organic solvents. In this study, we employed protein engineering methods to generate a lipase for enhanced stability in methanol, which is important for biodiesel production. Two protein engineering approaches, random mutagenesis (error-prone PCR) and structure-guided consensus, were applied in parallel on an unexplored lipase gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. A high-throughput colorimetric screening assay was used to evaluate lipase activity after an incubation period in high methanol concentrations. Both protein engineering approaches were successful in producing variants with elevated half-life values in 70% methanol. The best variant of the random mutagenesis library, Q185L, exhibited 23-fold-improved stability, yet its methanolysis activity was decreased by one-half compared to the wild type. The best variant from the consensus library, H86Y/A269T, exhibited 66-fold-improved stability in methanol along with elevated thermostability (+4.3°C) and a 2-fold-higher fatty acid methyl ester yield from soybean oil. Based on in silico modeling, we suggest that the Q185L substitution facilitates a closed lid conformation that limits access for both the methanol and substrate excess into the active site. The enhanced stability of H86Y/A269T was a result of formation of new hydrogen bonds. These improved characteristics make this variant a potential biocatalyst for biodiesel production. PMID:24362426

  14. Increasing protein stability: Importance of ΔCp and the denatured state

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the conformational stability of proteins is an important goal for both basic research and industrial applications. In vitro selection has been used successfully to increase protein stability, but more often site-directed mutagenesis is used to optimize the various forces that contribute to protein stability. In previous studies, we showed that improving electrostatic interactions on the protein surface and improving the β-turn sequences were good general strategies for increasing protein stability, and used them to increase the stability of RNase Sa. By incorporating seven of these mutations in RNase Sa, we increased the stability by 5.3 kcal/mol. Adding one more mutation, D79F, gave a total increase in stability of 7.7 kcal/mol, and a melting temperature 28°C higher than the wild-type enzyme. Surprisingly, the D79F mutation lowers the change in heat capacity for folding, ΔCp, by 0.6 kcal/mol/K. This suggests that this mutation stabilizes structure in the denatured state ensemble. We made other mutants that give some insight into the structure present in the denatured state. Finally, the thermodynamics of folding of these stabilized variants of RNase Sa are compared with those observed for proteins from thermophiles. PMID:20340133

  15. Increasing protein stability: importance of DeltaC(p) and the denatured state.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the conformational stability of proteins is an important goal for both basic research and industrial applications. In vitro selection has been used successfully to increase protein stability, but more often site-directed mutagenesis is used to optimize the various forces that contribute to protein stability. In previous studies, we showed that improving electrostatic interactions on the protein surface and improving the beta-turn sequences were good general strategies for increasing protein stability, and used them to increase the stability of RNase Sa. By incorporating seven of these mutations in RNase Sa, we increased the stability by 5.3 kcal/mol. Adding one more mutation, D79F, gave a total increase in stability of 7.7 kcal/mol, and a melting temperature 28 degrees C higher than the wild-type enzyme. Surprisingly, the D79F mutation lowers the change in heat capacity for folding, DeltaC(p), by 0.6 kcal/mol/K. This suggests that this mutation stabilizes structure in the denatured state ensemble. We made other mutants that give some insight into the structure present in the denatured state. Finally, the thermodynamics of folding of these stabilized variants of RNase Sa are compared with those observed for proteins from thermophiles.

  16. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  17. Selectivity of the cleavage/attachment site of phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored membrane proteins determined by site-specific mutagenesis at Asp-484 of placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Gerber, L D; Berger, J; Kodukula, K; Udenfriend, S

    1990-01-01

    Many proteins are now known to be anchored to the plasma membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan (PI-G) moiety that is attached to their COOH termini. Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) has been used as a model for investigating mechanisms involved in the COOH-terminal processing of PI-G-tailed proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of pre-pro-PLAP provides a signal for processing during which a largely hydrophobic 29-residue COOH-terminal peptide is removed, and the PI-G moiety is added to the newly exposed Asp-484 terminus. This cleavage/attachment site was subjected to an almost saturation mutagenesis, and the enzymatic activities, COOH-terminal processing, and cellular localizations of the various mutant PLAP forms were determined. Substitution of Asp-484 by glycine, alanine, cysteine, asparagine, or serine (category I) resulted in PI-G-tailed and enzymatically active proteins. However, not all category I mutant proteins were PI-G tailed to the same extent. Pre-pro-PLAP with other substituents at position 484 (threonine, proline, methionine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, glutamic acid, and glutamine; category II) were expressed, as well as the category I amino acids, but there was little or no processing to the PI-G-tailed form, and this latter group exhibited very low enzyme activity. The bulk of the PLAP protein produced by category II mutants and some produced by category I mutants were sequestered within the cell, apparently in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Most likely, certain amino acids at residue 484 are preferred because they yield better substrates for the putative "transamidating" enzyme. In transfected COS cells, at least, posttranslational PI-G-tail processing does not go to completion even for preferred substrates. Apparently PI-G tailing is a requisite for transport from the ER and for PLAP enzyme activity. Proteins that are not transamidated are apparently retained in the ER in an inactive conformation. Images PMID:2153284

  18. Crystal structure and mutagenesis of a protein phosphatase-1:calcineurin hybrid elucidate the role of the beta12-beta13 loop in inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Jason T; Perreault, Kathleen R; Cherney, Maia M; Luu, Hue Anh; James, Michael N G; Holmes, Charles F B

    2004-10-08

    Protein phosphatase-1 and protein phosphatase-2B (calcineurin) are eukaryotic serine/threonine phosphatases that share 40% sequence identity in their catalytic subunits. Despite the similarities in sequence, these phosphatases are widely divergent when it comes to inhibition by natural product toxins, such as microcystin-LR and okadaic acid. The most prominent region of non-conserved sequence between these phosphatases corresponds to the beta12-beta13 loop of protein phosphatase-1, and the L7 loop of toxin-resistant calcineurin. In the present study, mutagenesis of residues 273-277 of the beta12-beta13 loop of the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP-1c) to the corresponding residues in calcineurin (312-316), resulted in a chimeric mutant that showed a decrease in sensitivity to microcystin-LR, okadaic acid, and the endogenous PP-1c inhibitor protein inhibitor-2. A crystal structure of the chimeric mutant in complex with okadaic acid was determined to 2.0-A resolution. The beta12-beta13 loop region of the mutant superimposes closely with that of wild-type PP-1c bound to okadaic acid. Systematic mutation of each residue in the beta12-beta13 loop of PP-1c showed that a single amino acid change (C273L) was the most influential in mediating sensitivity of PP-1c to toxins. Taken together, these data indicate that it is an individual amino acid residue substitution and not a change in the overall beta12-beta13 loop conformation of protein phosphatase-1 that contributes to disrupting important interactions with inhibitors such as microcystin-LR and okadaic acid.

  19. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    PubMed

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  20. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections

    PubMed Central

    Mingo, Janire; Erramuzpe, Asier; Luna, Sandra; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Amo, Laura; Diez, Ibai; Schepens, Jan T. G.; Hendriks, Wiljan J. A. J.; Cortés, Jesús M.; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis. PMID:27548698

  1. Probing Novel Elements for Protein Splicing in the Yeast Vma1 Protozyme: A Study of Replacement Mutagenesis and Intragenic Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Nogami, S.; Satow, Y.; Ohya, Y.; Anraku, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Protein splicing is a compelling chemical reaction in which two proteins are produced posttranslationally from a single precursor polypeptide by excision of the internal protein segment and ligation of the flanking regions. This unique autocatalytic reaction was first discovered in the yeast Vma1p protozyme where the 50-kD site-specific endonuclease (VDE) is excised from the 120-kD precursor containing the N-and C-terminal regions of the catalytic subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. In this work, we randomized the conserved valine triplet residues three amino acids upstream of the C-terminal splicing junction in the Vma1 protozyme and found that these site-specific random mutations interfere with normal protein splicing to different extents. Intragenic suppressor analysis has revealed that this particular hydrophobic triplet preceding the C-terminal splicing junction genetically interacts with three hydrophobic residues preceding the N-terminal splicing junction. This is the first evidence showing that the N-terminal portion of the V-ATPase subunit is involved in protein splicing. Our genetic evidence is consistent with a structural model that correctly aligns two parallel β-strands ascribed to the triplets. This model delineates spatial interactions between the two conserved regions both residing upstream of the splicing junctions. PMID:9286669

  2. Partial Restoration of Antibacterial Activity of the Protein Encoded by a Cryptic Open Reading Frame (cyt1Ca) from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Itsko, Mark; Manasherob, Robert; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2005-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis belong to two unrelated toxin families: receptor-specific Cry toxins against insects and Cyt toxins that lyse a broad range of cells, including bacteria, via direct binding to phospholipids. A new cyt-like open reading frame (cyt1Ca) encoding a 60-kDa protein, has recently been discovered (C. Berry et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:5082-5095, 2002). Cyt1Ca displays the structure of a two-domain fusion protein: the N-terminal moiety resembles the full-length Cyt toxins, and the C-terminal moiety is similar to the receptor-binding domains of several ricin-like toxins, such as Mtx1. Neither the larvicidal activity of cyt1Ca expressed in Escherichia coli nor the hemolytic effect of His-tagged purified Cyt1Ca has been observed (R. Manasherob et al., unpublished). This was attributed to five amino acid differences between the sequences of its N-terminal moiety and Cyt1Aa. The 3′ end of cyt1Ca was truncated (removing the ricin-binding domain of Cyt1Ca), and six single bases were appropriately changed by site-directed mutagenesis, sequentially replacing the noncharged amino acids by charged ones, according to Cyt1Aa, to form several versions. Expression of these mutated cyt1Ca versions caused loss of the colony-forming ability of the corresponding E. coli cells to different extents compared with the original gene. In some mutants this antibacterial effect was associated by significant distortion of cell morphology and in others by generation of multiple inclusion bodies spread along the cell envelope. The described deleterious effects of mutated cyt1Ca versions against E. coli may reflect an evolutionary relationship between Cyt1Aa and Cyt1Ca. PMID:16159771

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cAMP-binding sites of the recombinant type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuno, T; Shuntoh, H; Sakaue, M; Saijoh, K; Takeda, T; Fukuda, K; Tanaka, C

    1988-06-30

    The type I regulatory subunit (R-I) of rat brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase was expressed in E. coli and site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute amino acids in the putative cAMP-binding sites. The wild-type recombinant R-I bound 2 mol of cAMP/mol subunit, while two mutant R-Is with a single amino acid substitution in one of the two intrachain cAMP-binding sites (clone N153:a glutamate for Gly-200, and clone C254:an aspartate for Gly-324) bound 1 mol of cAMP/mol subunit. When these two substitutions were made in one mutant, cAMP did not bind to this mutant, indicating that binding of cAMP to N153 or C254 was to their nonmutated sites. Competition experiments with site-selective analogs and dissociation of bound cAMP from mutant R-Is provided evidence for strong intrachain interactions between the two classes of cAMP-binding sites in R-I.

  4. cDNA cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of a PR-10 protein SPE-16 from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Yan, Ming; Li, Yikun; Chang, Shaojie; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Zhaocai; Gong, Weimin

    2003-12-19

    SPE-16 is a new 16kDa protein that has been purified from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. It's N-terminal amino acid sequence shows significant sequence homology to pathogenesis-related class 10 proteins. cDNA encoding 150 amino acids was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE-16 to be a new member of PR-10 family. The cDNA was cloned into pET15b plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The bacterially expressed SPE-16 also demonstrated ribonuclease-like activity in vitro. Site-directed mutation of three conserved amino acids E95A, E147A, Y150A, and a P-loop truncated form were constructed and their different effects on ribonuclease activities were observed. SPE-16 is also able to bind the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) in the native state. The ANS anion is a much-utilized "hydrophobic probe" for proteins. This binding activity indicated another biological function of SPE-16.

  5. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  6. High-level expression and in vitro mutagenesis of a fibrillogenic 109-amino-acid C-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gardella, J E; Gorgone, G A; Candela, L; Ghiso, J; Castaño, E M; Frangione, B; Gorevic, P D

    1993-01-01

    We amplified DNA encoding the 3' 109 codons of Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) inclusive of the beta protein (A beta) and cytoplasmic domains from cDNA using oligonucleotide primers designed to facilitate cloning into the T7 expression vector pT7Ad23K13. We also modified this construct to generate recombinant molecules incorporating two recently described APP mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. Both native C109 (deletion construct inclusive of the C-terminal 109 residues of APP) and constructs with a single mutation at codon 642 (T-->G, resulting in a substitution of glycine for valine) or a double mutation at codons 595 (G-->T, substituting asparagine for lysine) and 596 (A-->C, substituting leucine for methionine) were expressed in Escherichia coli to levels of 5-20% of total bacterial protein after induction. The major constituent of expressed C109 protein had an apparent molecular mass of 16-18 kDa by SDS/PAGE and appeared to be the full-length construct by size and N-terminal microsequencing. Also present was a 4-5 kDa species that co-purified with C109, constituting only approximately 1% of expressed protein, which was revealed by Western-blot analysis with antibodies specific for A beta epitopes and after biotinylation of purified recombinant C109. This fragment shared N-terminal sequence with, and appeared to arise by proteolysis of, full-length C109 in biosynthetic labelling experiments. C109 spontaneously precipitated after dialysis against NaCl or water, and with prolonged (> 20 weeks) standing was found by electron microscopy to contain a minor (< 5%) fibrillar component that was reactive with antibodies to a C-terminal epitope of APP. Recombinant C109 appears to duplicate some of the biochemical and physicochemical properties of C-terminal A beta-inclusive fragments of APP that have been found in transfected cells, brain cortex and cerebral microvessels. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID

  7. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  8. Molecular characterization of the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthase from Ralstonia eutropha: in vitro evolution, site-specific mutagenesis and development of a PHB synthase protein model.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Bernd H A; Antonio, Regina V; Spiekermann, Patricia; Amara, Amro A; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2002-01-31

    A threading model of the Ralstonia eutropha polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was developed based on the homology to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, whose structure has been resolved by X-ray analysis. The lid-like structure in the model was discussed. In this study, various R. eutropha PHA synthase mutants were generated employing random as well as site-specific mutagenesis. Four permissive mutants (double and triple mutations) were obtained from single gene shuffling, which showed reduced activity and whose mutation sites mapped at variable surface-exposed positions. Six site-specific mutations were generated in order to identify amino acid residues which might be involved in substrate specificity. Replacement of residues T323 (I/S) and C438 (G), respectively, which are located in the core structure of the PHA synthase model, abolished PHA synthase activity. Replacement of the two amino acid residues Y445 (F) and L446 (K), respectively, which are located at the surface of the protein model and adjacent to W425, resulted in reduced activity without changing substrate specificity and indicating a functional role of these residues. The E267K mutant exhibited only slightly reduced activity with a surface-exposed mutation site. Four site-specific deletions were generated to evaluate the role of the C-terminus and variant amino acid sequence regions, which link highly conserved regions. Deleted regions were D281-D290, A372-C382, E578-A589 and V585-A589 and the respective PHA synthases showed no detectable activity, indicating an essential role of the variable C-terminus and the linking regions between conserved blocks 2 and 3 as well as 3 and 4. Moreover, the N-terminal part of the class II PHA synthase (PhaC(Pa)) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the C-terminal part of the class I PHA synthase (PhaC(Re)) from R. eutropha were fused, respectively, resulting in three fusion proteins with no detectable in vivo activity. However, the fusion protein F1 (PhaC(Pa)-1-265-Pha

  9. Signal transduction by the formyl peptide receptor. Studies using chimeric receptors and site-directed mutagenesis define a novel domain for interaction with G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, T T; Dragas-Graonic, S; Holmes, R; Perez, H D

    1995-11-24

    The binding of small peptide ligands to high affinity chemoattractant receptors on the surface of neutrophils and monocytes leads to activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequently to the inflammatory response. It was recently shown (Amatruda, T. T., Gerard, N. P., Gerard, C., and Simon, M. I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139-10144) that the receptor for the chemoattractant peptide C5a specifically interacts with G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit of the Gq class, to trigger ligand-dependent stimulation of PI-PLC in transfected cells. In order to further characterize this chemoattractant peptide signal transduction pathway, we transfected cDNAs encoding the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor (fMLPR) into COS cells and measured the production of inositol phosphates. Ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC was seen in COS cells transfected with the fMLPR and G alpha 16 and stimulated with fMLP but not in cells transfected with receptor alone or with receptor plus G alpha q. Chimeric receptors in which the N-terminal extracellular domain, the second intracellular domain, or the intracellular C-terminal tail of the fMLP receptor was replaced with C5a receptor domains (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L. R., Adams, R. R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295) were capable of ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC when co-transfected with G alpha 16. A chimeric receptor exchanging the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR was constitutively activated, stimulating PI-PLC in the absence of ligand. Constitutive activation of PI-PLC, to a level 233% of that seen in cells transfected with wild-type fMLP receptors, was dependent on G alpha 16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR (amino acids 54-62) reveals this to be a domain necessary for ligand-dependent activation of G alpha 16. These results suggest that

  10. Computer Simulation of Mutagenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, J. C.; Dent, M. T.

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is described which simulates point-substitution mutations in the DNA strands of typical organisms. Its objective is to help students to understand the significance and structure of the genetic code, and the mechanisms and effect of mutagenesis. (Author/BB)

  11. Mechanism of proflavin mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarabhai, A; Lamfrom, H

    1969-08-01

    The mutagenic action of proflavin on bacteriophage T4 is greater in the presence of defective T4 ligase than in the presence of normal T4 ligase. This suggests that the persistence of single-strand breaks in DNA enhances proflavin mutagenesis.

  12. Charged ultrafiltration membranes increase the selectivity of whey protein separations.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, S; Etzel, M R

    2009-04-01

    Ultrafiltration is widely used to concentrate proteins, but fractionation of one protein from another is much less common. This study examined the use of positively charged membranes to increase the selectivity of ultrafiltration and allow the fractionation of proteins from cheese whey. By adding a positive charge to ultrafiltration membranes, and adjusting the solution pH, it was possible to permeate proteins having little or no charge, such as glycomacropeptide, and retain proteins having a positive charge. Placing a charge on the membrane increased the selectivity by over 600% compared to using an uncharged membrane. The data were fit using the stagnant film model that relates the observed sieving coefficient to membrane parameters such as the flux, mass transfer coefficient, and membrane Peclet number. The model was a useful tool for data analysis and for the scale up of membrane separations for whey protein fractionation.

  13. Analysis of the nucleus-encoded and chloroplast-targeted rieske protein by classic and site-directed mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    de Vitry, C; Finazzi, G; Baymann, F; Kallas, T

    1999-01-01

    Three mutants of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii affected in the nuclear PETC gene encoding the Rieske iron-sulfur protein 2Fe-2S subunit of the chloroplast cytochrome b(6)f complex have been characterized. One has a stable deletion that eliminates the protein; two others carry substitutions Y87D and W163R that result in low accumulation of the protein. Attenuated expression of the stromal protease ClpP increases accumulation and assembly into b(6)f complexes of the Y87D and W163R mutant Rieske proteins in quantities sufficient for analysis. Electron-transfer kinetics of these complexes were 10- to 20-fold slower than those for the wild type. The deletion mutant was used as a recipient for site-directed mutant petC alleles. Six glycine residues were replaced by alanine residues (6G6A) in the flexible hinge that is critical for domain movement; substitutions were created near the 2Fe-2S cluster (S128 and W163); and seven C-terminal residues were deleted (G171och). Although the 6G6A and G171och mutations affect highly conserved segments in the chloroplast Rieske protein, photosynthesis in the mutants was similar to that of the wild type. These results establish the basis for mutational analysis of the nuclear-encoded and chloroplast-targeted Rieske protein of photosynthesis. PMID:10521530

  14. Analysis of the nucleus-encoded and chloroplast-targeted rieske protein by classic and site-directed mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    de Vitry, C; Finazzi, G; Baymann, F; Kallas, T

    1999-10-01

    Three mutants of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii affected in the nuclear PETC gene encoding the Rieske iron-sulfur protein 2Fe-2S subunit of the chloroplast cytochrome b(6)f complex have been characterized. One has a stable deletion that eliminates the protein; two others carry substitutions Y87D and W163R that result in low accumulation of the protein. Attenuated expression of the stromal protease ClpP increases accumulation and assembly into b(6)f complexes of the Y87D and W163R mutant Rieske proteins in quantities sufficient for analysis. Electron-transfer kinetics of these complexes were 10- to 20-fold slower than those for the wild type. The deletion mutant was used as a recipient for site-directed mutant petC alleles. Six glycine residues were replaced by alanine residues (6G6A) in the flexible hinge that is critical for domain movement; substitutions were created near the 2Fe-2S cluster (S128 and W163); and seven C-terminal residues were deleted (G171och). Although the 6G6A and G171och mutations affect highly conserved segments in the chloroplast Rieske protein, photosynthesis in the mutants was similar to that of the wild type. These results establish the basis for mutational analysis of the nuclear-encoded and chloroplast-targeted Rieske protein of photosynthesis.

  15. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Whittle, Edward J.

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  17. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  18. Binding site characterization of G protein-coupled receptor by alanine-scanning mutagenesis using molecular dynamics and binding free energy approach: application to C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2).

    PubMed

    Chavan, Swapnil; Pawar, Shirishkumar; Singh, Rajesh; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) was proved as a multidrug target in many diseases like diabetes, inflammation and AIDS, but rational drug design on this target is still lagging behind as the information on the exact binding site and the crystal structure is not yet available. Therefore, for a successful structure-based drug design, an accurate receptor model in ligand-bound state is necessary. In this study, binding-site residues of CCR2 was determined using in silico alanine scanning mutagenesis and the interactions between TAK-779 and the developed homology model of CCR2. Molecular dynamic simulation and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Solvent Area method was applied to calculate binding free energy difference between the template and mutated protein. Upon mutating 29 amino acids of template protein and comparison of binding free energy with wild type, six residues were identified as putative hot spots of CCR2.

  19. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  20. Comparing Different Strategies in Directed Evolution of Enzyme Stereoselectivity: Single- versus Double-Code Saturation Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhoutong; Lonsdale, Richard; Li, Guangyue; Reetz, Manfred T

    2016-10-04

    Saturation mutagenesis at sites lining the binding pockets of enzymes constitutes a viable protein engineering technique for enhancing or inverting stereoselectivity. Statistical analysis shows that oversampling in the screening step (the bottleneck) increases astronomically as the number of residues in the randomization site increases, which is the reason why reduced amino acid alphabets have been employed, in addition to splitting large sites into smaller ones. Limonene epoxide hydrolase (LEH) has previously served as the experimental platform in these methodological efforts, enabling comparisons between single-code saturation mutagenesis (SCSM) and triple-code saturation mutagenesis (TCSM); these employ either only one or three amino acids, respectively, as building blocks. In this study the comparative platform is extended by exploring the efficacy of double-code saturation mutagenesis (DCSM), in which the reduced amino acid alphabet consists of two members, chosen according to the principles of rational design on the basis of structural information. The hydrolytic desymmetrization of cyclohexene oxide is used as the model reaction, with formation of either (R,R)- or (S,S)-cyclohexane-1,2-diol. DCSM proves to be clearly superior to the likewise tested SCSM, affording both R,R- and S,S-selective mutants. These variants are also good catalysts in reactions of further substrates. Docking computations reveal the basis of enantioselectivity.

  1. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  2. Mutagenesis and peptide analysis of the DRY motif in the alpha2A adrenergic receptor: evidence for alternate mechanisms in G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Duane A; Wade, Susan M; Fowler, Carol B; Woods, Danielle D; Abada, Paolo B; Mosberg, Henry I; Neubig, Richard R

    2002-05-17

    In G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a conserved aspartic acid in the DRY motif at the cytoplasmic end of helix 3 regulates the transition to the active state, while the adjacent arginine is crucial for G protein activation. To examine the functions of these two residues, we made D130I and R131Q mutations in the alpha2A adrenergic receptor (AR). We demonstrate that, unlike other GPCRs, the alpha2A AR is not constitutively activated by the D130I mutation, although the mutation increases agonist affinity. While the R131Q mutation severely disrupts function, it decreases rather than increasing agonist affinity as seen in other GPCRs. We then investigated the molecular effects of the same mutations in a peptide model and showed that Arg131 is not required for peptide-mediated G protein activation. These results indicate that the alpha2A AR does not follow the conventional GPCR mechanistic paradigm with respect to the function of the DRY motif.

  3. Creation of Novel Protein Variants with CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Mutagenesis: Turning a Screening By-Product into a Discovery Tool

    PubMed Central

    Vaimberg, Emma W.; Johannessen, Cory M.; Root, David E.; Doench, John G.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 screening has proven to be a versatile tool for genomics research. Based on unexpected results from a genome-wide screen, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach to mutagenesis, exploiting the allelic diversity generated by error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) to identify novel gain-of-function and drug resistant alleles of the MAPK signaling pathway genes MEK1 and BRAF. We define the parameters of a scalable technique to easily generate cell populations containing thousands of endogenous allelic variants to map gene functions. Further, these results highlight an unexpected but important phenomenon, that Cas9-induced gain-of-function alleles are an inherent by-product of normal Cas9 loss-of-function screens and should be investigated during analysis of data from large-scale positive selection screens. PMID:28118392

  4. Novel Random Mutagenesis Method for Directed Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful strategy for gene mutagenesis, and has been used for protein engineering both in scientific research and in the biotechnology industry. The routine method for directed evolution was developed by Stemmer in 1994 (Stemmer, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91, 10747-10751, 1994; Stemmer, Nature 370, 389-391, 1994). Since then, various methods have been introduced, each of which has advantages and limitations depending upon the targeted genes and procedure. In this chapter, a novel alternative directed evolution method which combines mutagenesis PCR with dITP and fragmentation by endonuclease V is described. The kanamycin resistance gene is used as a reporter gene to verify the novel method for directed evolution. This method for directed evolution has been demonstrated to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to manipulate in practice.

  5. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  6. Improvement of Biocatalysts for Industrial and Environmental Purposes by Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valetti, Francesca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evolution techniques are becoming increasingly widespread among protein engineers for the development of novel and designed biocatalysts. The palette of different approaches ranges from complete randomized strategies to rational and structure-guided mutagenesis, with a wide variety of costs, impacts, drawbacks and relevance to biotechnology. A technique that convincingly compromises the extremes of fully randomized vs. rational mutagenesis, with a high benefit/cost ratio, is saturation mutagenesis. Here we will present and discuss this approach in its many facets, also tackling the issue of randomization, statistical evaluation of library completeness and throughput efficiency of screening methods. Successful recent applications covering different classes of enzymes will be presented referring to the literature and to research lines pursued in our group. The focus is put on saturation mutagenesis as a tool for designing novel biocatalysts specifically relevant to production of fine chemicals for improving bulk enzymes for industry and engineering technical enzymes involved in treatment of waste, detoxification and production of clean energy from renewable sources. PMID:24970191

  7. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A.; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E.; Kidman, Amanda A.; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A.

    2016-01-01

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu+ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu+ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome. PMID:27399782

  8. From Chemical Mutagenesis to Post‐Expression Mutagenesis: A 50 Year Odyssey

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Tom H.; Vallée, M. Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Site‐directed (gene) mutagenesis has been the most useful method available for the conversion of one amino acid residue of a given protein into another. Until relatively recently, this strategy was limited to the twenty standard amino acids. The ongoing maturation of stop codon suppression and related technologies for unnatural amino acid incorporation has greatly expanded access to nonstandard amino acids by expanding the scope of the translational apparatus. However, the necessity for translation of genetic changes restricts the diversity of residues that may be incorporated. Herein we highlight an alternative approach, termed post‐expression mutagenesis, which operates at the level of the very functional biomolecules themselves. Using the lens of retrosynthesis, we highlight prospects for new strategies in protein modification, alteration, and construction which will enable protein science to move beyond the constraints of the “translational filter” and lead to a true synthetic biology. PMID:27119221

  9. Wisconsin - Increased corn silage protein with intercropped lablab bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein supplements for livestock are costly. In recent research in southern WI, lablab bean grown with corn increased forage CP concentration over monoculture corn without compromising forage yield or potential milk production per acre. Corn was intercropped with each of three climbing beans: lab...

  10. Bovine plasma proteins increase virulence of Haemophilus somnus in mice.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Kimball, Richard A; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2007-01-01

    The role of bovine serum or plasma proteins in Haemophilus somnus virulence was investigated in a mouse model of septicemia. An increase in virulence was detected when the organism was pre-incubated for 5 min and inoculated with fetal calf serum. When purified bovine serum or plasma proteins were pre-incubated with H. somnus before inoculating into mice, transferrin was found to increase virulence. Bovine lactoferrin was also noted to increase virulence, but to a lesser extent and had a delayed time course when compared with transferrin. Using an ELISA assay, an increased amount of H. somnus whole cells and culture supernatant bound to bovine transferrin when the organism was grown in iron-restricted media. Lactoferrin also bound to H. somnus, but binding was not affected by growth in iron-restricted media and it was eliminated with 2M NaCl, which reversed charge mediated binding. Transferrin, but not lactoferrin, supported growth of H. somnus on iron-depleted agar based media using a disk assay. Therefore, lactoferrin increased virulence by an undetermined mechanism whereas transferrin increased virulence of H. somnus by binding to iron-regulated outer-membrane proteins (IROMPs) and providing iron to the pathogen.

  11. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  12. Transposon Mutagenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Largaespada, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the functional landscape of the mammalian genome is the next big challenge of biomedical research. The completion of the first phases of the mouse and human genome projects, and expression analyses using microarray hybridization, generate critically important questions about the functional landscape and structure of the mammalian genome: how many genes, and of what type, are there; what kind of functional elements make up a properly functioning gene? One step in this process will be to create mutations in every identifiable mouse gene and analyze the resultant phenotypes. Transposons are being considered as tools to further initiatives to create a comprehensive resource of mutant mouse strains. Also, it may be possible to use transposons in true forward genetic screens in the mouse. The “Sleeping Beauty” (SB) transposon system is one such tool. Moreover, due to its tendency for local hopping, SB has been proposed as a method for regional saturation mutagenesis of the mouse genome. In this chapter, we review the tools and methods currently available to create mutant mice using in vivo, germline transposition in mice. PMID:19266336

  13. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  14. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, mutagenesis, and mapping of the Bacillus subtilis pbpD gene, which codes for penicillin-binding protein 4.

    PubMed Central

    Popham, D L; Setlow, P

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP 4) of Bacillus subtilis, pbpD, was cloned by two independent methods. PBP 4 was purified, and the amino acid sequence of a cyanogen bromide digestion product was used to design an oligonucleotide probe for identification of the gene. An oligonucleotide probe designed to hybridize to genes encoding class A high-molecular-weight PBPs also identified this gene. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed that (i) the amino acid sequence of PBP 4 was similar to those of other class A high-molecular-weight PBPs and (ii) pbpD appeared to be cotranscribed with a downstream gene (termed orf2) of unknown function. The orf2 gene is followed by an apparent non-protein-coding region which exhibits nucleotide sequence similarity with at least two other regions of the chromosome and which has a high potential for secondary structure formation. Mutations in pbpD resulted in the disappearance of PBP 4 but had no obvious effect on growth, cell division, sporulation, spore heat resistance, or spore germination. Expression of a transcriptional fusion of pbpD to lacZ increased throughout growth, decreased during sporulation, and was induced approximately 45 min into spore germination. A single transcription start site was detected just upstream of pbpD. The pbpD locus was mapped to the 275 to 280 degrees region of the chromosomal genetic map. Images PMID:7961491

  15. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-10-21

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  16. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  17. Increasing Protein Charge State When Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Santosh; Flanigan, Paul M.; Perez, Johnny J.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser vaporization is used to transfer cytochrome c, myoglobin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin from the condensed phase into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a mixture of a supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), acetic acid (AA), or formic acid (FA). Interaction of acid-sensitive proteins like cytochrome c and myoglobin with the highly charged ES droplets resulted in a shift to higher charge states in comparison with acid-stable proteins like lysozyme and ubiquitin. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurements showed an increase in both the average charge states (Zavg) and the charge state with maximum intensity (Zmode) for acid-sensitive proteins compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under equivalent solvent conditions. A marked increase in ion abundance of higher charge states was observed for LEMS in comparison with conventional electrospray for cytochrome c (ranging from 19+ to 21+ versus 13+ to 16+) and myoglobin (ranging from 19+ to 26+ versus 18+ to 21+) using an ES solution containing m-NBA and TFA. LEMS measurements as a function of electrospray flow rate yielded increasing charge states with decreasing flow rates for cytochrome c and myoglobin.

  18. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification to improve diastereopreference of Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Lirong; Xu, Gang

    2013-12-01

    A combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification was employed to alter protein structure with the objective of improving diastereopreference over that achieved by simple site-directed mutagenesis. Conformational analysis using molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipase (PAL) indicated that stronger steric exclusion and structural rigidity facilitated diastereopreference. A cysteine (Cys) residue was introduced using site-directed mutagenesis to construct variant A272C. The modifier 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) was then reacted with the introduced Cys residue to provide stronger steric exclusion and structural rigidity. The modification was verified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Diastereopreference was improved significantly. The diastereomeric excess (dep) of l-menthol increased from 35% with wild type PAL to 90% with A272C-DTNB modified PAL when the conversion ratio of l-menthyl propionate was nearly 100%. Conformation and kinetic parameter analysis showed that A272C-DTNB modified PAL exhibited stronger steric exclusion and increased structural rigidity around the modification site that inhibited the hydrolysis of non-targeted substrates. The combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification could be an effective method to alter protein properties and enhance diastereopreference through the combined effect of steric exclusion and structural rigidity.

  19. Protein and carbohydrate supplementation increases aerobic and thermoregulatory capacities

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kazunobu; Goto, Masaki; Nose, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of heat illness and heat stroke is greater in older than younger people. In this context, exercise training regimens to increase heat tolerance in older people may provide protection against heat illness. Acute increases in plasma volume (PV) improve thermoregulation during exercise in young subjects, but there is some evidence that changes in PV in response to acute exercise are blunted in older humans. We recently demonstrated that protein–carbohydrate (Pro-CHO) supplementation immediately after a bout of exercise increased PV and plasma albumin content (Albcont) after 23 h in both young and older subjects. We also examined whether Pro-CHO supplementation during aerobic training enhanced thermoregulation by increasing PV and Albcont in older subjects. Older men aged ∼68 years exercised at moderate intensity, 60 min day−1, 3 days week−1, for 8 weeks, at ∼19°C, and took either placebo (CNT; 0.5 kcal, 0 g protein kg−1) or Pro-CHO supplement (Pro-CHO; 3.2 kcal, 0.18 g protein kg−1) immediately after exercise. After training, we found during exercise at 30°C that increases in oesophageal temperature (Tes) were attenuated more in Pro-CHO than CNT and associated with enhanced cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating. We also confirmed similar results in young subjects after 5 days of training. These results demonstrate that post-exercise protein and CHO consumption enhance thermoregulatory adaptations especially in older subjects and provide insight into potential strategies to improve cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations to exercise in both older and younger subjects. PMID:19752117

  20. Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Proteins Shape Host-Microbe Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangmin; Krasity, Benjamin C.; Peyer, Suzanne M.; Koehler, Sabrina; Ruby, Edward G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins (BPIs) of the squid Euprymna scolopes, EsBPI2 and EsBPI4. They have molecular characteristics typical of other animal BPIs, are closely related to one another, and nest phylogenetically among invertebrate BPIs. Purified EsBPIs had antimicrobial activity against the squid’s symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, which colonizes light organ crypt epithelia. Activity of both proteins was abrogated by heat treatment and coincubation with specific antibodies. Pretreatment under acidic conditions similar to those during symbiosis initiation rendered V. fischeri more resistant to the antimicrobial activity of the proteins. Immunocytochemistry localized EsBPIs to the symbiotic organ and other epithelial surfaces interacting with ambient seawater. The proteins differed in intracellular distribution. Further, whereas EsBPI4 was restricted to epithelia, EsBPI2 also occurred in blood and in a transient juvenile organ that mediates hatching. The data provide evidence that these BPIs play different defensive roles early in the life of E. scolopes, modulating interactions with the symbiont. PMID:28377525

  1. Large Ribosomal Protein 4 Increases Efficiency of Viral Recoding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lisa; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Yueh, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Expression of retroviral replication enzymes (Pol) requires a controlled translational recoding event to bypass the stop codon at the end of gag. This recoding event occurs either by direct suppression of termination via the insertion of an amino acid at the stop codon (readthrough) or by alteration of the mRNA reading frame (frameshift). Here we report the effects of a host protein, large ribosomal protein 4 (RPL4), on the efficiency of recoding. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that transfection of cells with a plasmid encoding RPL4 cDNA increases recoding efficiency in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal enhancement of nearly twofold. Expression of RPL4 increases recoding of reporters containing retroviral readthrough and frameshift sequences, as well as the Sindbis virus leaky termination signal. RPL4-induced enhancement of recoding is cell line specific and appears to be specific to RPL4 among ribosomal proteins. Cotransfection of RPL4 cDNA with Moloney murine leukemia proviral DNA results in Gag processing defects and a reduction of viral particle formation, presumably caused by the RPL4-dependent alteration of the Gag-to-Gag-Pol ratio required for virion assembly and release. PMID:22718819

  2. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  3. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  4. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  5. Compound Pollen Protein Nutrient Increases Serum Albumin in Cirrhotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong Bo; Kong, Ming; Chen, Gong; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Hong Lin; Chen, Yu; Rowan, Frank G

    2010-01-01

    Background Malnutrition, especially protein-calorie malnutrition, is common in patients with liver cirrhosis. When in the status of malnutrition, the complications increase, liver function deteriorates, and the prognosis of patients with liver cirrhosis worsens. Hence, nutritional support and treatment is essential in patients with liver cirrhosis. Previous studies suggested that compound nutrition based on pollen can improve liver function, and can be a basic nutrient for patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the nutritional support based on pollen for malnutrition of cirrhotic patients needs to be further evaluated. In this study, we investigated the nutritional support of Noveliver, a new compound pollen protein nutrient, in the cirrhotic rats induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Methods The cirrhotic rats induced by CCl4 were treated with Noveliver in different doses, and treated with a regular compound pollen nutrient, untreated cirrhotic rats and normal rats were used as controls. Serum albumin were measured before and after the nutritional treatment in each group. At the same time, liver function, cytokines and pathological changes were also determined. Results In the second week of nutritional treatment, the levels of serum albumin in normal control group, low dose noveliver group, high dose noveliver group, compound protein pollen group and spontaneous recovery group were 35.67 ± 1.42, 33.07 ± 1.27, 32.27 ± 1.50, 30.53 ± 0.25, 24.53 ± 3.56 (g/L), respectively, the differences among the groups were significant (F = 14.007, P = 0.000); The levels of serum albumin in low dose Noveliver group, high dose Noveliver group and the compound protein pollen group were higher than that in the spontaneous recovery group (P = 0.000, 0.001, 0.003, respectively). In the second week of nutritional treatment, the serum levels of HGF in normal control group, low dose Noveliver group, high dose Noveliver group, compound protein pollen group and spontaneous recovery

  6. Crystal structures and mutagenesis of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases elucidate the selectivity of cantharidin and novel norcantharidin-based inhibitors of PP5C.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debasish; Swingle, Mark R; Salter, Edward A; Wood, Eric; D'Arcy, Brandon; Zivanov, Catherine; Abney, Kevin; Musiyenko, Alla; Rusin, Scott F; Kettenbach, Arminja; Yet, Larry; Schroeder, Chad E; Golden, Jennifer E; Dunham, Wade H; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Banerjee, Surajit; Forbes, David; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Honkanen, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Cantharidin is a natural toxin and an active constituent in a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat tumors. Cantharidin acts as a semi-selective inhibitor of PPP-family ser/thr protein phosphatases. Despite sharing a common catalytic mechanism and marked structural similarity with PP1C, PP2AC and PP5C, human PP4C was found to be insensitive to the inhibitory activity of cantharidin. To explore the molecular basis for this selectivity, we synthesized and tested novel C5/C6-derivatives designed from quantum-based modeling of the interactions revealed in the co-crystal structures of PP5C in complex with cantharidin. Structure-activity relationship studies and analysis of high-resolution (1.25Å) PP5C-inhibitor co-crystal structures reveal close contacts between the inhibitor bridgehead oxygen and both a catalytic metal ion and a non-catalytic phenylalanine residue, the latter of which is substituted by tryptophan in PP4C. Quantum chemistry calculations predicted that steric clashes with the bulkier tryptophan side chain in PP4C would force all cantharidin-based inhibitors into an unfavorable binding mode, disrupting the strong coordination of active site metal ions observed in the PP5C co-crystal structures, thereby rendering PP4C insensitive to the inhibitors. This prediction was confirmed by inhibition studies employing native human PP4C. Mutation of PP5C (F446W) and PP1C (F257W), to mimic the PP4C active site, resulted in markedly suppressed sensitivity to cantharidin. These observations provide insight into the structural basis for the natural selectivity of cantharidin and provide an avenue for PP4C deselection. The novel crystal structures also provide insight into interactions that provide increased selectivity of the C5/C6 modifications for PP5C versus other PPP-family phosphatases.

  7. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process.

  8. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  9. Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein: a multifaceted protein with functions beyond LPS neutralization.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Marathe, Sandhya A; Joglekar, Madhura; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2013-01-01

    Bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI), a 55-60 kDa protein, first reported in 1975, has gone a long way as a protein with multifunctional roles. Its classical role in neutralizing endotoxin (LPS) raised high hopes among septic shock patients. Today, BPI is not just a LPS-neutralizing protein, but a protein with diverse functions. These functions can be as varied as inhibition of endothelial cell growth and inhibition of dendritic cell maturation, or as an anti-angiogenic, chemoattractant or opsonization agent. Though the literature available is extremely limited, it is fascinating to look into how BPI is gaining major importance as a signalling molecule. In this review, we briefly summarize the recent research focused on the multiple roles of BPI and its use as a therapeutic.

  10. New reagents for increasing ESI multiple charging of proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Lomeli, Shirley H; Peng, Ivory X; Yin, Sheng; Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    The addition of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) was shown previously (Lomeli et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2009, 20, 593-596) to enhance multiple charging of native proteins and noncovalent protein complexes in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra. Additional new reagents have been found to "supercharge" proteins from nondenaturing solutions; several of these reagents are shown to be more effective than m-NBA for increasing positive charging. Using the myoglobin protein-protoporphyrin IX (heme) complex, the following reagents were shown to increase ESI charging: benzyl alcohol, m-nitroacetophenone, m-nitrobenzonitrile, o-NBA, m-NBA, p-NBA, m-nitrophenyl ethanol, sulfolane (tetramethylene sulfone), and m-(trifluoromethyl)-benzyl alcohol. Based on average charge state, sulfolane displayed a greater charge increase (61%) than m-NBA (21%) for myoglobin in aqueous solutions. The reagents that promote higher ESI charging appear to have low solution-phase basicities and relatively low gas-phase basicities, and are less volatile than water. Another feature of mass spectra from some of the active reagents is that adducts are present on higher charge states, suggesting that a mechanism by which proteins acquire additional charge involves direct interaction with the reagent, in addition to other factors such as surface tension and protein denaturation.

  11. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jungwoo; Bae, Ju Yun; Lee, Young Mi; Kwon, Hyeji; Moon, Hye-Yun; Kang, Hyun Ah; Yee, Su-Bog; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2011-08-01

    Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by

  12. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the methionine requirement in kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Kass, P H; Rogers, Q R

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the methionine (met) requirement of kittens is correlated with the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). The study used 48 male kittens in two replications of six 4 x 4 Latin squares, each representing one concentration of met (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 6.0 or 9.0 g/kg diet) with four CP concentrations (150, 200, 300 and 500 g/kg diet) in 2-week periods. Cystine was present in the lowest CP diet at 5.3 g/kg diet and increased as dietary CP increased. Body weight gain, food intake, nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids, glucose, insulin, cortisol, somatomedin C, T(3) and T(4) concentrations on day 12 were measured. From breakpoint analysis of the nitrogen retention curves, the met requirement of kittens was found to be 3.1, 3.8, 3.1 and 2.4 g met/kg for the 150, 200, 300 and 500 g CP/kg diets, respectively. When met was limiting (1.5 or 2.5 g/kg diet), increasing dietary CP did not decrease, but rather increased food intake, body weight gain and nitrogen retention. Plasma met concentrations increased as dietary met increased and at 2.5-3.5 g met/kg diet were not different among kittens fed the various CP diets. Total plasma T(3) and T(4) increased significantly as dietary CP increased in kittens given the 2.5 and 4.5 g met/kg diets. Results indicate that food intake and possibly altered hormonal secretion play a role in this growth response. In conclusion, the met requirement of growing kittens, unlike omnivores and herbivores studied, was not positively correlated with the concentration of dietary CP.

  13. Erythropoietin administration increases splenic erythroferrone protein content and liver TMPRSS6 protein content in rats.

    PubMed

    Gurieva, Iuliia; Frýdlová, Jana; Rychtarčíková, Zuzana; Vokurka, Martin; Truksa, Jaroslav; Krijt, Jan

    2017-02-28

    Erythroferrone (ERFE) and TMPRSS6 are important proteins in the regulation of iron metabolism. The objective of the study was to examine splenic ERFE and liver TMPRSS6 synthesis in rats treated with a combination of iron and erythropoietin (EPO). EPO was administered to female Wistar rats at 600U/day for four days, iron-pretreated rats received 150mg of iron before EPO treatment. Content of ERFE and TMPRSS6 proteins was determined by commercial antibodies. Iron pretreatment prevented the EPO-induced decrease in hepcidin expression. Content of phosphorylated SMAD 1,5,8 proteins was decreased in the liver by both EPO and iron plus EPO treatment. Fam132b expression in the spleen was increased both by EPO and iron plus EPO treatments; these treatments also significantly induced splenic Fam132a expression. ERFE protein content in the spleen was increased both by EPO and iron plus EPO to a similar extent. EPO administration increased TMPRSS6 content in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction of liver homogenate; in iron-pretreated rats, this increase was abolished. The results confirm that iron pretreatment prevents the EPO-induced decrease in liver Hamp expression. This effect probably occurs despite high circulating ERFE levels, since EPO-induced ERFE protein synthesis is not influenced by iron pretreatment.

  14. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  15. The interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor accessory protein Toll/IL-1 receptor domain: analysis of putative interaction sites in vitro mutagenesis and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Radons, Jurgen; Dove, Stefan; Neumann, Detlef; Altmann, Reinhold; Botzki, Alexander; Martin, Michael U; Falk, Werner

    2003-12-05

    The Toll/interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor family plays an important role in both innate and adaptive immunity. These receptors are characterized by a C-terminal homology motif called the Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. A principal function of the TIR domain is mediating homotypic protein-protein interactions in the signal transduction pathway. To suggest interaction sites of TIR domains in the IL-1 receptor complex, we modeled the putative three-dimensional structure of the TIR domain within the co-receptor chain, IL-1 receptor accessory protein. The model was based on homology with the crystal structures of human TLR1 and TLR2. The final structure of the IL-1 receptor accessory protein TIR domain suggests the conserved regions box 1 and 2, including Pro-446, as well as box 3 within the C-terminal alpha-helix as possible protein-protein interaction sites due to their exposure and their electrostatic potential. Pro-446, corresponding to the Pro/His mutation in dominant negative TLR4, is located in the third loop at the outmost edge of the TIR domain and does not play any structural role. Inhibition of IL-1 responsiveness seen after substitution of Pro-446 by charged amino acids is due to the loss of an interaction site for other TIR domains. Amino acids 527-534 as part of the loop close to the conserved box 3 are critical for recruitment of myeloid differentiation factor 88 and to a lesser extent for IL-1 responsiveness. Modeling suggests that native folding of the TIR domain may be approached by the responsive deletion mutants delta528-534 and delta527-533, whereas the C-terminal beta-strand and/or alpha-helix is displaced in the nonresponsive mutant delta527-534.

  16. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori CagL protein of the Cag type IV secretion system identifies novel functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bönig, Tobias; Olbermann, Patrick; Bats, Simon H.; Fischer, Wolfgang; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Cag Type IV secretion system, which contributes to inflammation and cancerogenesis during chronic infection, is one of the major virulence factors of the bacterial gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We have generated and characterized a series of non-marked site-directed chromosomal mutants in H. pylori to define domains of unknown function of the essential tip protein CagL of the Cag secretion system. Characterizing the CagL mutants, we determined that their function to activate cells and transport the effector CagA was reduced to different extents. We identified three novel regions of the CagL protein, involved in its structural integrity, its possible interaction with the CagPAI T4SS pilus protein CagI, and in its binding to integrins and other host cell ligands. In particular two novel variable CagL motifs were involved in integrin binding, TSPSA, and TASLI, which is located opposite of its integrin binding motif RGD. We thereby defined functionally important subdomains within the CagL structure, which can be used to clarify CagL contributions in the context of other CagPAI proteins or for inhibition of the CagT4SS. This structure-function correlation of CagL domains can also be instructive for the functional characterization of other potential VirB5 orthologs whose structure is not yet known. PMID:27922023

  17. Protein Structure, Function Set for Explosive Increase in Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Cites advances in x-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, computer modeling, and display to guide the design and analysis of protein structures. Reviews recent advances in knowledge, synthesis techniques, and theory of proteins. (JM)

  18. Sequence analysis and interposon mutagenesis of the hupT gene, which encodes a sensor protein involved in repression of hydrogenase synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Elsen, S; Richaud, P; Colbeau, A; Vignais, P M

    1993-01-01

    The hupT gene, which represses hydrogenase gene expression in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, has been identified and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of hupT and of the contiguous downstream open reading frame, hupU, is reported. The HupT protein of 456 amino acids (48,414 Da) has sequence similarity with the FixL, DctB, NtrB, and ArcB proteins and is predicted to be a soluble sensor kinase. Insertional inactivation of the hupT gene led to deregulation of transcriptional control, so that the hydrogenase structural operon hupSLC became overexpressed in cells grown anaerobically or aerobically. The HupT- mutants were complemented in trans by a plasmid containing an intact copy of the hupT gene. The hupU open reading frame, capable of encoding a protein of 84,879 Da, shared identity with [NiFe]hydrogenase subunits; the strongest similarity was observed with the periplasmic hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio baculatus. Images PMID:8226687

  19. Combining site-specific mutagenesis and seeding as a strategy to crystallize ‘difficult’ proteins: the case of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Goedele; Brosens, Elke; Wahni, Khadija; Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Wyns, Lode; Messens, Joris; Loris, Remy

    2006-01-01

    The P31T mutant of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin crystallizes spontaneously in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.7, b = 49.5, c = 55.6 Å. The crystals diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Isomorphous crystals of wild-type thioredoxin as well as of other point mutants only grow when seeded with the P31T mutant. These results suggest seeding as a valuable tool complementing surface engineering for proteins that are hard to crystallize. PMID:17142910

  20. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Assess the Binding Capacity of Class S Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Leucotoxins to the Surface of Polymorphonuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, L. Baba; Werner, S.; Coraiola, M.; Colin, D. A.; Keller, D.; Sanni, A.; Serra, M. Dalla; Monteil, H.; Prévost, G.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal leucotoxins result from the association of class S components and class F component inducing the activation and the permeabilization of the target cells. Like α-toxin, the leucotoxins are pore-forming toxins with more than 70% β-sheet. This was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In addition, threonine 28 of a predicted and conserved β-sheet at the N-terminal extremity of class S proteins composing leucotoxins aligns with histidine 35 of α-toxin, which has a key role in oligomerization of the final pore. Flow cytometry was used to study different aminoacid substitutions of the threonine 28 in order to evaluate its role in the biological activity of these class S proteins. Finally, results show that threonine 28 of the leucotoxin probably plays a role similar to that of histidine 35 of α-toxin. Mutations on this threonin largely influenced the secondary interaction of the class F component and led to inactive toxin. PMID:16883055

  1. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the essential amino acid requirements of kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2006-08-01

    Essential amino acid (EAA) requirements of omnivores and herbivores (e.g. chicks, lambs, pigs and rats) are directly related to the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). When an EAA is limiting in the diet, addition of a mixture of EAA lacking the limiting one (which increases dietary CP) results in a decrease in food intake and weight gain. This interaction has been referred to as an AA imbalance and has not been studied in depth in strict carnivores. The objectives of these experiments were to examine the effects on growing kittens (2-week periods) of the addition to diets of a mixture of AA lacking the limiting one. The control diets were at the requirement of the respective limiting EAA (or about 85% of the 1986 National Research Council requirement). In experiment 1, with the dietary EAAs at the minimally determined requirements, the concentration of the essential or dispensable amino acids was increased to determine if CP or an EAA was limiting. Results of growth rates (n = 12) and plasma AA concentrations indicated that tryptophan was limiting, but increased body weight gain also occurred when the concentration of CP was increased as dispensable amino acids without additional tryptophan. Experiment 1 was repeated in experiment 2 using a crossover design. Again, when tryptophan was limiting additional concentrations of dispensable AAs increased body weight gain. This response is the opposite of that in herbivores and omnivores. Experiment 3 consisted of 10 separate crossover trials, one for each of the 10 EAA and examined the effect of two concentrations of dietary CP (200 and 300 g CP/kg diet) on body weight gain of kittens (n = 8) offered diets limiting in each respective EAA. Body weight gain was numerically greater when diets contained 300 g CP/kg than 200 g CP/kg for eight of 10 EAAs (p < 0.05 for only isoleucine and threonine) when each amino acid was limiting. This response is the reverse of that which occurs in chicks, lambs, pigs and rats when

  2. Protein Primary Structure of the Vaccinia Virion at Increased Resolution

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tuan; Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Moussatche, Nissin; Gershon, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    Here we examine the protein covalent structure of the vaccinia virus virion. Within two virion preparations, >88% of the theoretical vaccinia virus-encoded proteome was detected with high confidence, including the first detection of products from 27 open reading frames (ORFs) previously designated "predicted," "uncharacterized," "inferred," or "hypothetical" polypeptides containing as few as 39 amino acids (aa) and six proteins whose detection required nontryptic proteolysis. We also detected the expression of four short ORFs, each of which was located within an ORF ("ORF-within-ORF"), including one not previously recognized or known to be expressed. Using quantitative mass spectrometry (MS), between 58 and 74 proteins were determined to be packaged. A total of 63 host proteins were also identified as candidates for packaging. Evidence is provided that some portion of virion proteins are "nicked" via a combination of endoproteolysis and concerted exoproteolysis in a manner, and at sites, independent of virus origin or laboratory procedures. The size of the characterized virion phosphoproteome was doubled from 189 (J. Matson, W. Chou, T. Ngo, and P. D. Gershon, Virology 452-453:310-323, 2014, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2014.01.012) to 396 confident, unique phosphorylation sites, 268 of which were within the packaged proteome. This included the unambiguous identification of phosphorylation "hot spots" within virion proteins. Using isotopically enriched ATP, 23 sites of intravirion kinase phosphorylation were detected within nine virion proteins, all at sites already partially occupied within the virion preparations. The clear phosphorylation of proteins RAP94 and RP19 was consistent with the roles of these proteins in intravirion early gene transcription. In a blind search for protein modifications, cysteine glutathionylation and O-linked glycosylation featured prominently. We provide evidence for the phosphoglycosylation of vaccinia virus proteins.

  3. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-07

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  4. Bioassaying Putative RNA-Binding Motifs in a Protein Encoded by a Gene That Influences Courtship and Visually Mediated Behavior in Drosophila: In Vitro Mutagenesis of Nona

    PubMed Central

    Stanewsky, R.; Fry, T. A.; Reim, I.; Saumweber, H.; Hall, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The no-on-transient-A (nonA) gene of Drosophila melanogaster influences vision, courtship song, and viability. The nonA-encoded polypeptide is inferred to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Although sequence-analysis of NONA implies that it belongs to a special interspecific family of this protein type, it does contain two classical RNA recognition motifs (RRM). Their behavioral significance was assayed by generating transgenic strains that were singly or multiply mutated within the relatively N-terminal motif (RRM1) or within RRM2. Neither class of mutation affected NONA binding to polytene chromosomes. The former mutations led to extremely low viability, accompanied by diminished adult longevities that were much worse than for a nonA-null mutant, implying that faulty interpolypeptide interactions might accompany the effects of the amino-acid substitutions within RRM1. All in vitro-mutated types caused optomotor blindness and an absence of transient spikes in the electroretinogram. Courtship analysis discriminated between the effects of the mutations: the RRM2-mutated type generated song pulses and trains that tended to be mildly mutant. These phenotypic abnormalities reinforce the notion that nonA's ubiquitous expression has its most important consequences in the optic lobes, the thoracic ganglia, or both, depending in part on the nonA allele. PMID:8722780

  5. Protein consumption following aerobic exercise increases whole-body protein turnover in older adults.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Cheryl; Miller, Benjamin F

    2010-10-01

    Research measuring whole-body protein turnover (WBPT) after both exercise and nutrition has generally focused on resistance exercise; however, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of postaerobic exercise nutrition, especially in older adults. It is not known if postexercise protein feeding has a beneficial effect on protein turnover after low- to moderate-intensity exercise. We investigated whether consuming protein plus carbohydrate (PRO) immediately after an acute bout of aerobic exercise has an additive effect over carbohydrate alone (CHO) on WBPT in older individuals. Twelve healthy older adults (age, 59 ± 4 years) were studied on 2 separate occasions after 1 h of exercise at approximately 50% of maximal rate of oxygen uptake, followed by 4 h of recovery. Immediately following exercise, subjects ingested a CHO (60 g) or an isocaloric PRO beverage (40 g carbohydrate, 20 g whey protein). Whole-body protein metabolism was determined using [1-13C]leucine infusion (60 mg prime; 75 mgh(-1) continuous), and sampling blood and expired breath. Rates of whole-body leucine appearance and oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal during the third and fourth hours of postexercise recovery were higher in the PRO group (2.51 ± 0.55, 0.78 ± 0.37, and 1.71 ± 0.44 micromol kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively) than in the CHO group (1.81 ± 0.27, 0.33 ± 0.14, and 1.47 ± 0.25 micromol kg(-1)·min-1, respectively; p = 0.001). Our results indicate that consumption of a PRO beverage after aerobic exercise increased WBPT to a greater extent than a CHO beverage.

  6. Mutagenesis of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Capsid Protein VP1 Uncovers New Roles for Basic Amino Acids in Trafficking and Cell-Specific Transduction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jarrod S.; Li, Chengwen; DiPrimio, Nina; Weinberg, Marc S.; McCown, Thomas J.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2010-01-01

    The N termini of the capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 of adeno-associated virus (AAV) play important roles in subcellular steps of infection and contain motifs that are highly homologous to a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) domain and nuclear localization signals (NLSs). To more clearly understand how virion components influence infection, we have generated mutations in these regions and examined their effects on subcellular trafficking, capsid stability, transduction, and sensitivity to pharmacological enhancement. All mutants tested assembled into capsids; retained the correct ratio of VP1, VP2, and VP3; packaged DNA similarly to recombinant AAV2 (rAAV2); and displayed similar stability profiles when heat denatured. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that these mutants trafficked through a perinuclear region in the vicinity of the Golgi apparatus, with a subset of mutants displaying more-diffuse localization consistent with an NLS-deficient phenotype. When tested for viral transduction, two mutant classes emerged. Class I (BR1−, BR2−, and BR2+K) displayed partial transduction, whereas class II (VP3only, 75HD/AN, BR3−, and BR3+K) were severely defective. Surprisingly, one class II mutant (BR3+K) trafficked identically to rAAV2 and accumulated in the nucleolus, a step recently described by our laboratory that occurs with wild-type infection. The BR3+K mutant, containing an alanine-to-lysine substitution in the third basic region of VP1, was 10- to 100-fold-less infectious than rAAV2 in transformed cell lines (such as HEK-293, HeLa, and CV1-T cells), but in contrast, it was indistinguishable from rAAV2 in several nontransformed cell lines, as well as in tissues (liver, brain, and muscle) in vivo. Complementation studies with pharmacological adjuvants or adenovirus coinfection suggested that additional positive charges in NLS regions restrict mobilization in the nucleus and limit transduction in a transformed-cell-specific fashion. Remarkably, besides displaying cell

  7. Mutagenesis assays of human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.; Milne, K.L.; Warbuton, D.; McClamrock, H.D.; Buchanan, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of amniocentesis samples from 144 women were tested for the presence of mutagenic substances using tester strain TA1538 in the Ames Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. Because the volume of amniotic fluid in these samples was limited (generally less than 10 ml), the authors investigated modifications of this mutagenesis assay that could increase its ability to detect effects from small quantities of test material. Using mutagenicity in samples of urine from smokers as a model, it appeared that improved ability to detect small amounts of mutagen could be obtained by reducing volumes of media and reagents while keeping the amount of test sample constant. Tests of amniotic fluid extracts by this modified procedure showed small increases in revertants, about 50% above dimethylsulfoxide solvent control values. The increases suggest the presence of small amounts of mutagenic material in many of the amniotic fluid samples. At the doses employed, mutagenic activity in these samples was not associated with maternal smoking.

  8. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis l-serine/l-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian l–amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT’s lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. PMID:26976827

  9. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C.; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95pdz3) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo. This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. PMID:27563054

  10. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  11. The Single T65S Mutation Generates Brighter Cyan Fluorescent Proteins with Increased Photostability and pH Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fredj, Asma; Pasquier, Hélène; Demachy, Isabelle; Jonasson, Gabriella; Levy, Bernard; Derrien, Valérie; Bousmah, Yasmina; Manoussaris, Gallia; Wien, Frank; Ridard, Jacqueline; Erard, Marie; Merola, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Cyan fluorescent proteins (CFP) derived from Aequorea victoria GFP, carrying a tryptophan-based chromophore, are widely used as FRET donors in live cell fluorescence imaging experiments. Recently, several CFP variants with near-ultimate photophysical performances were obtained through a mix of site-directed and large scale random mutagenesis. To understand the structural bases of these improvements, we have studied more specifically the consequences of the single-site T65S mutation. We find that all CFP variants carrying the T65S mutation not only display an increased fluorescence quantum yield and a simpler fluorescence emission decay, but also show an improved pH stability and strongly reduced reversible photoswitching reactions. Most prominently, the Cerulean-T65S variant reaches performances nearly equivalent to those of mTurquoise, with QY  = 0.84, an almost pure single exponential fluorescence decay and an outstanding stability in the acid pH range (pK1/2 = 3.6). From the detailed examination of crystallographic structures of different CFPs and GFPs, we conclude that these improvements stem from a shift in the thermodynamic balance between two well defined configurations of the residue 65 hydroxyl. These two configurations differ in their relative stabilization of a rigid chromophore, as well as in relaying the effects of Glu222 protonation at acid pHs. Our results suggest a simple method to greatly improve numerous FRET reporters used in cell imaging, and bring novel insights into the general structure-photophysics relationships of fluorescent proteins. PMID:23133673

  12. A signature motif in LIM proteins mediates binding to checkpoint proteins and increases tumour radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Fan, Zhongyi; Liang, Chaoyang; Li, Ling; Wang, Lili; Liang, Yingchun; Wu, Jun; Chang, Shaohong; Yan, Zhifeng; Lv, Zhaohui; Fu, Jing; Liu, Yang; Jin, Shuai; Wang, Tao; Hong, Tian; Dong, Yishan; Ding, Lihua; Cheng, Long; Liu, Rui; Fu, Shenbo; Jiao, Shunchang; Ye, Qinong

    2017-01-01

    Tumour radiotherapy resistance involves the cell cycle pathway. CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators. However, how CDC25 activity is precisely controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we show that LIM domain-containing proteins, such as FHL1, increase inhibitory CDC25 phosphorylation by forming a complex with CHK2 and CDC25, and sequester CDC25 in the cytoplasm by forming another complex with 14-3-3 and CDC25, resulting in increased radioresistance in cancer cells. FHL1 expression, induced by ionizing irradiation in a SP1- and MLL1-dependent manner, positively correlates with radioresistance in cancer patients. We identify a cell-penetrating 11 amino-acid motif within LIM domains (eLIM) that is sufficient for binding CHK2 and CDC25, reducing the CHK2–CDC25 and CDC25–14-3-3 interaction and enhancing CDC25 activity and cancer radiosensitivity accompanied by mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis. Our results provide novel insight into molecular mechanisms underlying CDC25 activity regulation. LIM protein inhibition or use of eLIM may be new strategies for improving tumour radiosensitivity. PMID:28094252

  13. Human lipopolysaccharide-binding protein potentiates bactericidal activity of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, A H; Williams, R E; Nowakowski, G

    1995-01-01

    Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) from neutrophils and a recombinant amino-terminal fragment, rBPI23, bind to and are cytotoxic for gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and ex vivo in plasma or whole blood. To function in vivo as an extracellular bactericidal agent, rBPI23 must act in the presence of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), which also binds to but has no reported cytotoxicity for gram-negative bacteria. LBP, which is present at 5 to 10 micrograms/ml in healthy humans and at much higher levels in septic patients, mediates proinflammatory host responses to gram-negative infection. On the basis of these previous observations, we have examined the effect of recombinant LBP (rLBP) on the bactericidal activity of rBPI23 against Escherichia coli J5 in vitro. Physiological concentrations of rLBP (5 to 20 micrograms/ml) had little or no bactericidal activity but reduced by up to approximately 10,000-fold the concentration of BPI required for bactericidal or related activities in assays which measure (i) cell viability as CFUs on solid media or growth in broth culture and (ii) protein synthesis following treatment with BPI. LBP also potentiated BPI-mediated permeabilization of the E. coli outer membrane to actinomycin D by about 100-fold but had no permeabilizing activity of its own. Under optimal conditions for potentiation, fewer than 100 BPI molecules were required to kill a single E. coli J5 bacterium. PMID:7822017

  14. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  15. The increasing value of plant-made proteins.

    PubMed

    Sack, Markus; Hofbauer, Anna; Fischer, Rainer; Stoger, Eva

    2015-04-01

    The production of high-value proteins in plants is maturing, as shown by the recent approval of innovative products and the latest studies that showcase plant-based production systems using technologies and approaches that are well established in other fields. These include host cell engineering, medium optimization, scalable unit operations for downstream processing (DSP), bioprocess optimization and detailed cost analysis. Product-specific benefits of plant-based systems have also been exploited, including bioencapsulation and the mucosal delivery of minimally processed topical and oral products with a lower entry barrier than pharmaceuticals for injection. Success stories spearheaded by the FDA approval of Elelyso developed by Protalix have revitalized the field and further interest has been fueled by the production of experimental Ebola treatments in plants.

  16. Manipulating corn germplasm to increase recombinant protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hood, Elizabeth E; Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Fake, Gina; Egelkrout, Erin; Teoh, Keat Thomas; Requesens, Deborah Vicuna; Hayden, Celine; Hood, Kendall R; Pappu, Kameshwari M; Carroll, Jennifer; Howard, John A

    2012-01-01

    Using plants as biofactories for industrial enzymes is a developing technology. The application of this technology to plant biomass conversion for biofuels and biobased products has potential for significantly lowering the cost of these products because of lower enzyme production costs. However, the concentration of the enzymes in plant tissue must be high to realize this goal. We describe the enhancement of the accumulation of cellulases in transgenic maize seed as a part of the process to lower the cost of these dominant enzymes for the bioconversion process. We have used breeding to move these genes into elite and high oil germplasm to enhance protein accumulation in grain. We have also explored processing of the grain to isolate the germ, which preferentially contains the enzymes, to further enhance recovery of enzyme on a dry weight basis of raw materials. The enzymes are active on microcrystalline cellulose to release glucose and cellobiose.

  17. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  18. Cryptococcus neoformans Virulence Gene Discovery through Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis was applied to Cryptococcus neoformans to identify genes associated with virulence attributes. Using biolistic transformation, we generated 4,300 nourseothricin (NAT)-resistant strains, of which 590 exhibited stable resistance. We focused on mutants with defects in established virulence factors and identified two with reduced growth at 37°C, four with reduced production of the antioxidant pigment melanin, and two with an increased sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO). The NAT insertion and mutant phenotypes were genetically linked in five of eight mutants, and the DNA flanking the insertions was characterized. For the strains with altered growth at 37°C and altered melanin production, mutations were in previously uncharacterized genes, while the two NO-sensitive strains bore insertions in the flavohemoglobin gene FHB1, whose product counters NO stress. Because of the frequent instability of nourseothricin resistance associated with biolistic transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was tested. This transkingdom DNA delivery approach produced 100% stable nourseothricin-resistant transformants, and three melanin-defective strains were identified from 576 transformants, of which 2 were linked to NAT in segregation analysis. One of these mutants contained a T-DNA insertion in the promoter of the LAC1 (laccase) gene, which encodes a key enzyme required for melanin production, while the second contained an insertion in the promoter of the CLC1 gene, encoding a voltage-gated chloride channel. Clc1 and its homologs are required for ion homeostasis, and in their absence Cu+ transport into the secretory pathway is compromised, depriving laccase and other Cu+-dependent proteins of their essential cofactor. The NAT resistance cassette was optimized for cryptococcal codon usage and GC content and was then used to disrupt a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, a predicted gene, and two putative chloride channel genes to analyze their

  19. In vitro models of mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B S; Larson, K; Sagher, D; Rabkin, S; Shenkar, R; Sahm, J

    1985-01-01

    The bypass of lesions in DNA with insertion of nucleotides opposite damaged bases has been studied as a model for mutagenesis in an in vitro system. Lesions introduced by dimethyl sulfate at adenines and by ultraviolet light at pyrimidine dimers act as termination sites on both double- and single-stranded DNA templates. Base selection opposite noninformational lesions is, in part, a property of the polymerases: different polymerases have different selectivities although all polymerases tested seem to prefer purines. The ability to insert "incorrect" bases is determined in part by the sequence 5' to the lesion on the template strand. The hypothesis that damaged purines tend to result in transversions can be applied to published data on activation of the c-ras oncogene.

  20. Mutagenesis of Dengue Virus Protein NS2A Revealed a Novel Domain Responsible for Virus-Induced Cytopathic Effect and Interactions Between NS2A and NS2B Transmembrane Segments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Tian, Jia Ni; Wu, Jian-Sung; Wu, Su-Ying; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Chen, Chun-Hong; Yueh, Andrew

    2017-04-05

    The NS2A protein of Dengue virus (DENV) has eight predicted transmembrane segments (pTMS1-8) and participates in RNA replication, virion assembly, and host antiviral response. However, the roles of specific amino acid residues within the pTMS regions of NS2A during the viral life cycle are not clear. Here, we explored the function of DENV NS2A by introducing a series of alanine substitutions into the N-terminal half (pTMS1-4) of the protein in the context of a DENV infectious clone or subgenomic replicon. Six NS2A mutants (NM5, 7, 9, and 17-19) around pTMS1-2 displayed a novel phenotype showing a >1000-fold reduction in virus yield, an absence of plaque formation despite wild-type-like replicon activity, and infectious virus-like particle yields. The HEK293 cells infected with those six NS2A mutant viruses failed to cause a virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) by MitoCapture staining, cell proliferation, and lactate dehydrogenase release assays. Sequencing analyses of pseudorevertant viruses derived from lethal mutant viruses revealed two consensus reversion mutations, leucine-to-phenylalanine at codon 181 (L181F) within the pTMS7 of NS2A and isoleucine-to-threonine at codon 114 (I114T) within NS2B. The introduction of NS2A-L181F mutation into the lethal (NM15, 16, 25, and 33) and CPE-defective (NM7, 9, and 19) mutants substantially rescued virus infectivity and virus-induced CPE, respectively, whereas NS2B-L114T mutation rescued NM16, 25, and 33 mutants. In conclusion, the results revealed the essential roles of the N-terminal half of NS2A in RNA replication and virus-induced CPE. Intramolecular interactions between pTMSs of NS2A and intermolecular interactions between NS2A and NS2B protein were also implicated.Importance: The characterization of the N-terminal (current study) and C-terminal half of DENV NS2A is the most comprehensive mutagenesis study to date to investigate the function of NS2A during the flaviviral life cycle. A novel region responsible for

  1. Site directed mutagenesis of StSUT1 reveals target amino acids of regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Undine; Wiederhold, Elena; Pustogowa, Jelena; Hackel, Aleksandra; Grimm, Bernhard; Kühn, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Plant sucrose transporters (SUTs) are functional as sucrose-proton-cotransporters with an optimal transport activity in the acidic pH range. Recently, the pH optimum of the Solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter StSUT1 was experimentally determined to range at an unexpectedly low pH of 3 or even below. Various research groups have confirmed these surprising findings independently and in different organisms. Here we provide further experimental evidence for a pH optimum at physiological extrema. Site directed mutagenesis provides information about functional amino acids, which are highly conserved and responsible for this extraordinary increase in transport capacity under extreme pH conditions. Redox-dependent dimerization of the StSUT1 protein was described earlier. Here the ability of StSUT1 to form homodimers was demonstrated by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis and Xenopus leavis using Western blots, and in plants by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Mutagenesis of highly conserved cysteine residues revealed their importance in protein stability. The accessibility of regulatory amino acid residues in the light of StSUT1's compartmentalization in membrane microdomains is discussed.

  2. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kentaro; Gee, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9), hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9. PMID:26501275

  3. Insertional mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Labarre, C; Schirawski, J; van der Zwet, A; Fitzgerald, G F; van Sinderen, D

    2001-06-12

    Random mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was achieved through an adapted version of a two-plasmid system. The mutagenesis strategy is based on random integration of derivatives of the non-replicative (Rep(-)) plasmid pORI19 by means of homologous recombination following a temperature shift that eliminates replication of the temperature-sensitive (Rep(ts)) helper plasmid pVE6007. In this way mutants were generated which were affected in bacteriophage sensitivity or sucrose metabolism. Homologues were identified of a protein related to folate metabolism from a bacteriophage-resistant mutant and of two subunits of an oligopeptide transport system from a mutant deficient in sucrose utilisation.

  4. Menopause increases the iron storage protein ferritin in skin.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Edward; Jian, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi; Muizzuddin, Neelam; Yang, Qing; Dai, Jisen; Maes, Daniel; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Frenkel, Krystyna; Huang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation and desquamation are important routes for humans to excrete iron. Because menstruation is no longer available in postmenopausal women, in the present study, we examined whether iron accumulates more in postmenopausal skin than in premenopausal skin. Skin biopsy samples were obtained from six pre- and six postmenopausal Caucasian women. Iron levels in the form of ferritin were 42% higher, but vascular endothelial growth factor and total antioxidant capacity were 45% and 34% lower in postmenopausal skin (58.8 ± 1.3 years old) than in premenopausal skin (41.6 ± 1.7 years old), respectively. Moreover, in vitro cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes had surprisingly high levels of ferritin when compared to immortalized human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells or human liver HepG2 cancer cells. Our results indicate that skin is a cellular repository of iron and that menopause increases iron in skin and, thus, may contribute to the manifestation of accelerated skin aging and photo aging after menopause.

  5. [Increased fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by activated protein C system].

    PubMed

    Gando, S; Tedo, I; Masio, H; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H

    1994-06-01

    To examine the hypothesis that activated protein C system during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery may increase fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass, protein C activity, protein C antigen and thrombomodulin of sixteen patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery were investigated after induction of anesthesia, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, and at the end of operation. Protein C activity decreased and thrombomodulin increased significantly after the cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no significant correlations of thrombomodulin with protein C activity and protein C antigen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that protein C system is activated and circulating thrombomodulin appears in the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery and this enhanced activation of protein C system is possibly related to the reported increase of fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  6. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  7. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  8. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  9. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction.

  10. Tnt1 Retrotransposon Mutagenesis: A Tool for Soybean Functional Genomics1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yaya; Barampuram, Shyam; Stacey, Minviluz G.; Hancock, C. Nathan; Findley, Seth; Mathieu, Melanie; Zhang, Zhanyuan; Parrott, Wayne A.; Stacey, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for determining gene function in both model and crop plant species. Tnt1, the transposable element of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell type 1, is a retrotransposon that replicates via an RNA copy that is reverse transcribed and integrated elsewhere in the plant genome. Based on studies in a variety of plants, Tnt1 appears to be inactive in normal plant tissue but can be reactivated by tissue culture. Our goal was to evaluate the utility of the Tnt1 retrotransposon as a mutagenesis strategy in soybean (Glycine max). Experiments showed that the Tnt1 element was stably transformed into soybean plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Twenty-seven independent transgenic lines carrying Tnt1 insertions were generated. Southern-blot analysis revealed that the copy number of transposed Tnt1 elements ranged from four to 19 insertions, with an average of approximately eight copies per line. These insertions showed Mendelian segregation and did not transpose under normal growth conditions. Analysis of 99 Tnt1 flanking sequences revealed insertions into 62 (62%) annotated genes, indicating that the element preferentially inserts into protein-coding regions. Tnt1 insertions were found in all 20 soybean chromosomes, indicating that Tnt1 transposed throughout the soybean genome. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments validated that Tnt1 inserted into multiple chromosomes. Passage of transgenic lines through two different tissue culture treatments resulted in Tnt1 transposition, significantly increasing the number of insertions per line. Thus, our data demonstrate the Tnt1 retrotransposon to be a powerful system that can be used for effective large-scale insertional mutagenesis in soybean. PMID:23124322

  11. Signature-tagged mutagenesis of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Mai; KASHIMOTO, Takashige; TONG, Ping; XIAO, Jianbo; SUGIYAMA, Michiko; INOUE, Miyuki; MATSUNAGA, Rie; HOSOHARA, Kohei; NAKATA, Kazue; YOKOTA, Kenji; OGUMA, Keiji; YAMAMOTO, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is the causative agent of primary septicemia, wound infection and gastroenteritis in immunocompromised people. In this study, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to identify the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. Using STM, 6,480 mutants in total were constructed and divided into 81 sets (INPUT pools); each mutant in a set was assigned a different tag. Each INPUT pool was intraperitoneally injected into iron-overloaded mice, and in vivo surviving mutants were collected from blood samples from the heart (OUTPUT pools). From the genomic DNA of mixed INPUT or OUTPUT pools, digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes against the tagged region were prepared and used for dot hybridization. Thirty tentatively attenuated mutants, which were hybridized clearly with INPUT probes but barely with OUTPUT probes, were negatively selected. Lethal doses of 11 of the 30 mutants were reduced to more than 1/100; of these, the lethal doses of 2 were reduced to as low as 1/100,000. Transposon-inserted genes in the 11 attenuated mutants were those for IMP dehydrogenase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase, aspartokinase, phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine cyclo-ligase, malate Na (+) symporter and hypothetical protein. When mice were immunized with an attenuated mutant strain into which IMP dehydrogenase had been inserted with a transposon, they were protected against V. vulnificus infection. In this study, we demonstrated that the STM method can be used to search for the virulence genes of V. vulnificus. PMID:25755021

  12. Increased expression of the maize immunoglobulin binding protein homolog b-70 in three zein regulatory mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boston, R S; Fontes, E B; Shank, B B; Wrobel, R L

    1991-01-01

    Plants carrying floury-2, Defective endosperm-B30, or Mucronate mutations overproduce b-70, a maize homolog of the mammalian immunoglobulin binding protein. During endosperm development in these mutants, levels of both b-70 protein and RNA increase dramatically between 14 days and 20 days after pollination. At later stages, b-70 RNA levels decline while protein levels remain high. The increase in b-70 RNA levels is endosperm specific and dependent on gene dosage in the floury-2 mutant. In all three mutants, the increases in b-70 RNA and protein levels are inversely proportional to changes in zein synthesis. Although b-70 polypeptides can be extracted from purified protein bodies, they carry a carboxy-terminal endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, HDEL. We propose that induction of b-70 in these mutants is a cellular response to abnormally folded or improperly assembled storage proteins and probably reflects its role as a polypeptide chain binding protein. PMID:1840924

  13. Random mutagenesis by error-prone pol plasmid replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David L; Lilly, Joshua; Hernandez, Jaime; Romsdahl, Jillian; Troll, Christopher J; Camps, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Directed evolution is an approach that mimics natural evolution in the laboratory with the goal of modifying existing enzymatic activities or of generating new ones. The identification of mutants with desired properties involves the generation of genetic diversity coupled with a functional selection or screen. Genetic diversity can be generated using PCR or using in vivo methods such as chemical mutagenesis or error-prone replication of the desired sequence in a mutator strain. In vivo mutagenesis methods facilitate iterative selection because they do not require cloning, but generally produce a low mutation density with mutations not restricted to specific genes or areas within a gene. For this reason, this approach is typically used to generate new biochemical properties when large numbers of mutants can be screened or selected. Here we describe protocols for an advanced in vivo mutagenesis method that is based on error-prone replication of a ColE1 plasmid bearing the gene of interest. Compared to other in vivo mutagenesis methods, this plasmid-targeted approach allows increased mutation loads and facilitates iterative selection approaches. We also describe the mutation spectrum for this mutagenesis methodology in detail, and, using cycle 3 GFP as a target for mutagenesis, we illustrate the phenotypic diversity that can be generated using our method. In sum, error-prone Pol I replication is a mutagenesis method that is ideally suited for the evolution of new biochemical activities when a functional selection is available.

  14. A protein disulfide isomerase gene fusion expression system that increases the extracellular productivity of Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Ohto, C; Muramatsu, M; Obata, S; Udaka, S; Yamada, Y; Takahashi, H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system.

  15. Whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake but not homocysteine plasma concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Comparotto, Hugo; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whey protein supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) to receive one of the following diets for 4 weeks: control diet (C), whey protein-composed diet (WP), and whey protein-supplemented diet (WPS). The C and WP diets consisted of AIN-93 with 20% casein and 20% whey protein as protein source, respectively. WPS was AIN-93 (20% casein) supplemented by the addition of 20% (w/w) whey protein. Four weeks of ingesting a WPS diet resulted in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total protein and methionine intakes. Although a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels occurred in WPS group compared with C and WP, no significant change was observed in plasma Hcy concentration between groups. Furthermore, the levels of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced oxidation protein products, known liver oxidative stress markers, were increased in the WPS group compared with the C group. In addition, no change in glutathione liver concentration was observed in any of the groups studied. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake substantially; however, it does not change plasma Hcy concentrations. On the other hand, increased hepatic oxidative stress markers were observed in whey protein supplemented rats were probably due to high protein intake.

  16. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces endothelial dysfunctions in rats.

    PubMed

    de Belchior, Aucelia C S; Angeli, Jhuli K; Faria, Thaís de O; Siman, Fabiana D M; Silveira, Edna A; Meira, Eduardo F; da Costa, Carlos P; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10(-10)-3.10(-4) M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10(-4) M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001-300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10(-10)-10(-3) M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model.

  17. Post-Weaning Protein Malnutrition Increases Blood Pressure and Induces Endothelial Dysfunctions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Fabiana D. M.; Silveira, Edna A.; Meira, Eduardo F.; da Costa, Carlos P.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Padilha, Alessandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10−10–3.10−4 M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10−4 M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001–300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10−10–10−3 M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model. PMID:22529948

  18. Mitochondrial stress causes increased succination of proteins in adipocytes in response to glucotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Thomas, Sonia A; Carson, James A; Baynes, John W

    2012-07-15

    2SC [S-(2-succino)-cysteine] is a chemical modification formed by a Michael addition reaction of fumarate with cysteine residues in proteins. Formation of 2SC, termed 'succination' of proteins, increases in adipocytes grown in high-glucose medium and in adipose tissues of Type 2 diabetic mice. However, the metabolic mechanisms leading to increased fumarate and succination of protein in the adipocyte are unknown. Treatment of 3T3 cells with high glucose (30 mM compared with 5 mM) caused a significant increase in cellular ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and Δψm (mitochondrial membrane potential). There was also a significant increase in the cellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins, which may be attributed to the increase in NADH/NAD+ and subsequent inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases. Chemical uncouplers, which dissipated Δψm and reduced the NADH/NAD+ ratio, also decreased the fumarate concentration and protein succination. High glucose plus metformin, an inhibitor of complex I in the electron transport chain, caused an increase in fumarate and succination of protein. Thus excess fuel supply (glucotoxicity) appears to create a pseudohypoxic environment (high NADH/NAD+ without hypoxia), which drives the increase in succination of protein. We propose that increased succination of proteins is an early marker of glucotoxicity and mitochondrial stress in adipose tissue in diabetes.

  19. Increased in vitro phosphorylation of rat liver nucleolar proteins following triiodothyronine administration.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, E; Gallo, G; Pertica, M

    1976-11-15

    It has been shown that triiodothyronine (Ta) administration to thyroidectomized rats induces an increase in the in vitro net 32P uptake into liver nucleolar proteins. Such an increase depends on a stimulation of the nucleolus-associated protein kinase activity and not on a lower dephosphorylation rate.

  20. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  1. The rate of synthesis and decomposition of tissue proteins in hypokinesia and increased muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, I. V.; Chernyy, A. V.; Fedorov, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    During hypokinesia and physical loading (swimming) of rats, the radioactivity of skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, and blood proteins was determined after administration of radioactive amino acids. Tissue protein synthesis decreased during hypokinesia, and decomposition increased. Both synthesis and decomposition increased during physical loading, but anabolic processes predominated in the total tissue balance. The weights of the animals decreased in hypokinesia and increased during increased muscle activity.

  2. Increased Nitration and Carbonylation of Proteins in MRL +/+ Mice Exposed to Trichloroethene: Potential Role of Protein Oxidation in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Firoze Khan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases (~3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-γ) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs. PMID:19332086

  3. Increased nitration and carbonylation of proteins in MRL +/+ mice exposed to trichloroethene: Potential role of protein oxidation in autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gangduo; Wang Jianling; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2009-06-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4{sup th} day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases ({approx}3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-{gamma}) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs.

  4. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of rice and tobacco genomes using Cpf1 from Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Akira; Masafumi, Mikami; Kaya, Hidetaka; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems are nowadays applied extensively to effect genome editing in various organisms including plants. CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is a newly characterized RNA-guided endonuclease that has two distinct features as compared to Cas9. First, Cpf1 utilizes a thymidine-rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) while Cas9 prefers a guanidine-rich PAM. Cpf1 could be used as a sequence-specific nuclease to target AT-rich regions of a genome that Cas9 had difficulty accessing. Second, Cpf1 generates DNA ends with a 5′ overhang, whereas Cas9 creates blunt DNA ends after cleavage. “Sticky” DNA ends should increase the efficiency of insertion of a desired DNA fragment into the Cpf1-cleaved site using complementary DNA ends. Therefore, Cpf1 could be a potent tool for precise genome engineering. To evaluate whether Cpf1 can be applied to plant genome editing, we selected Cpf1 from Francisella novicida (FnCpf1), which recognizes a shorter PAM (TTN) within known Cpf1 proteins, and applied it to targeted mutagenesis in tobacco and rice. Our results show that targeted mutagenesis had occurred in transgenic plants expressing FnCpf1 with crRNA. Deletions of the targeted region were the most frequently observed mutations. Our results demonstrate that FnCpf1 can be applied successfully to genome engineering in plants. PMID:27905529

  5. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  6. Simple and efficient oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis using one primer and circular plasmid DNA template.

    PubMed

    Marotti, K R; Tomich, C S

    1989-01-01

    A rapid and simple procedure for site-directed mutagenesis is described. This method uses only a single oligonucleotide primer with the double-stranded circular plasmid DNA as the template for mutagenesis. The phage T4 gene 32 product is included during primer extension in vitro to increase efficiency. Single and multiple changes as well as deletions have been obtained at an efficiency of 1-2%.

  7. Threonine utilization for synthesis of acute phase proteins, intestinal proteins, and mucins is increased during sepsis in rats.

    PubMed

    Faure, Magali; Choné, Frédérique; Mettraux, Christine; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Béchereau, Fabienne; Vuichoud, Jacques; Papet, Isabelle; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane

    2007-07-01

    We hypothesized that the dietary threonine demand for the anabolic response may be increased more than that of other essential amino acids during sepsis. Using a flooding dose of either L-[1 -13C]valine or L-[U -13C]threonine, we measured valine and threonine utilization for syntheses of plasma proteins (minus albumin), and wall, mucosal, and mucin proteins of the small intestine in infected (INF; d 2 and d 6 of postinfection) and control pair-fed (PF) rats. At d 2, the protein absolute synthesis rate (ASR) of INF rats was 21% (mucins) to 41% (intestinal wall) greater than that of PF when measured using valine as tracer, and 45% (mucosa) to 113% (mucins) greater than that of PF when measured with threonine as tracer. Plasma protein ASR was higher in INF than in PF rats, reaching 5- to 6-fold the value of PF. The utilization of both amino acid tracers for the protein synthesis was significantly increased by the infection in all compartments studied. The daily increased absolute threonine utilization for protein synthesis in gut wall plus plasma proteins was 446 micromol/d compared with 365 micromol/d for valine, and it represented 2.6 times the dietary threonine intake of rats at d 2. Most changes in protein ASR and threonine utilization observed at d 6 of postinfection were limited. In conclusion, sepsis increased the utilization of threonine for the anabolic splanchnic response. Because this threonine requirement is likely covered by muscle protein mobilization, increasing the threonine dietary supply would be an effective early nutritional management for patients with sepsis.

  8. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein.

  9. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  10. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  11. Ribozyme Mediated gRNA Generation for In Vitro and In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ashley Shu Mei; Ingham, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is now regularly used for targeted mutagenesis in a wide variety of systems. Here we report the use of ribozymes for the generation of gRNAs both in vitro and in zebrafish embryos. We show that incorporation of ribozymes increases the types of promoters and number of target sites available for mutagenesis without compromising mutagenesis efficiency. We have tested this by comparing the efficiency of mutagenesis of gRNA constructs with and without ribozymes and also generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing gRNA using a heat shock promoter (RNA polymerase II-dependent promoter) that was able to induce mutagenesis of its target. Our method provides a streamlined approach to test gRNA efficiency as well as increasing the versatility of conditional gene knock out in zebrafish. PMID:27832146

  12. Acute supplementation of amino acids increases net protein accretion in IUGR fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura D; Rozance, Paul J; Thorn, Stephanie R; Friedman, Jacob E; Hay, William W

    2012-08-01

    Placental insufficiency decreases fetal amino acid uptake from the placenta, plasma insulin concentrations, and protein accretion, thus compromising normal fetal growth trajectory. We tested whether acute supplementation of amino acids or insulin into the fetus with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) would increase net fetal protein accretion rates. Late-gestation IUGR and control (CON) fetal sheep received acute, 3-h infusions of amino acids (with euinsulinemia), insulin (with euglycemia and euaminoacidemia), or saline. Fetal leucine metabolism was measured under steady-state conditions followed by a fetal muscle biopsy to quantify insulin signaling. In CON, increasing amino acid delivery rates to the fetus by 100% increased leucine oxidation rates by 100%. In IUGR, amino acid infusion completely suppressed fetal protein breakdown rates but increased leucine oxidation rate by only 25%, resulting in increased protein accretion rates by 150%. Acute insulin infusion, however, had very little effect on amino acid delivery rates, fetal leucine disposal rates, or fetal protein accretion rates in CON or IUGR fetuses despite robust signaling of the fetal skeletal muscle insulin-signaling cascade. These results indicate that, when amino acids are given directly into the fetal circulation independently of changes in insulin concentrations, IUGR fetal sheep have suppressed protein breakdown rates, thus increasing net fetal protein accretion.

  13. Dexamethasone increases aquaporin-2 protein expression in ex vivo inner medullary collecting duct suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minguang; Cai, Hui; Klein, Janet D.; Laur, Oskar; Chen, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is the vasopressin-regulated water channel that controls renal water reabsorption and plays an important role in the maintenance of body water homeostasis. Excessive glucocorticoid as often seen in Cushing's syndrome causes water retention. However, whether and how glucocorticoid regulates AQP2 remains unclear. In this study, we examined the direct effect of dexamethasone on AQP2 protein expression and activity. Dexamethasone increased AQP2 protein abundance in rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) suspensions. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells transfected with AQP2 cDNA. Cell surface protein biotinylation showed an increase of dexamethasone-induced cell membrane AQP2 expression and this effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Functionally, dexamethasone treatment of oocytes injected with an AQP2 cRNA increased water transport activity as judged by cell rupture time in a hypo-osmotic solution (66 ± 13 s in dexamethasone vs. 101 ± 11 s in control, n = 15). We further found that dexamethasone treatment reduced AQP2 protein degradation, which could result in an increase of AQP2 protein. Interestingly, dexamethasone promoted cell membrane AQP2 moving to less buoyant lipid raft submicrodomains. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dexamethasone promotes AQP2 protein expression and increases water permeability mainly via inhibition of AQP2 protein degradation. The increase in AQP2 activity promotes water reabsorption, which may contribute to glucocorticoid-induced water retention and hypertension. PMID:26578982

  14. Extinction of Hepatitis C Virus by Ribavirin in Hepatoma Cells Involves Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Prieto, Ana M.; Sheldon, Julie; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Tejero, Héctor; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan I.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction produced by enhanced mutation rates, is under investigation as an antiviral strategy that aims at counteracting the adaptive capacity of viral quasispecies, and avoiding selection of antiviral-escape mutants. To explore lethal mutagenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV), it is important to establish whether ribavirin, the purine nucleoside analogue used in anti-HCV therapy, acts as a mutagenic agent during virus replication in cell culture. Here we report the effect of ribavirin during serial passages of HCV in human hepatoma Huh-7.5 cells, regarding viral progeny production and complexity of mutant spectra. Ribavirin produced an increase of mutant spectrum complexity and of the transition types associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, resulting in HCV extinction. Ribavirin-mediated depletion of intracellular GTP was not the major contributory factor to mutagenesis since mycophenolic acid evoked a similar decrease in GTP without an increase in mutant spectrum complexity. The intracellular concentration of the other nucleoside-triphosphates was elevated as a result of ribavirin treatment. Mycophenolic acid extinguished HCV without an intervening mutagenic activity. Ribavirin-mediated, but not mycophenolic acid-mediated, extinction of HCV occurred via a decrease of specific infectivity, a feature typical of lethal mutagenesis. We discuss some possibilities to explain disparate results on ribavirin mutagenesis of HCV. PMID:23976977

  15. Lethal Mutagenesis Failure May Augment Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Matthew L.; Stolte, Steven P.; Bull, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the attempt to extinguish a population by elevating its mutation rate, has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach for treating viral infections. In support of the concept, in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. However, the one known mutagenic drug used on patients commonly fails to cure infections, and in vitro studies typically find a wide range of mutagenic conditions permissive for viral growth. A key question becomes how subsequent evolution is affected if the viral population is mutated but avoids extinction—Is viral adaptation augmented rather than suppressed? Here we consider the evolution of highly mutated populations surviving mutagenesis, using the DNA phage T7. In assays using inhibitory hosts, whenever resistance mutants were observed, the mutagenized populations exhibited higher frequencies, but some inhibitors blocked plaque formation by even the mutagenized stock. Second, outgrowth of previously mutagenized populations led to rapid and potentially complete fitness recovery but polymorphism was slow to decay, and mutations exhibited inconsistent patterns of change. Third, the combination of population bottlenecks with mutagenesis did cause fitness declines, revealing a vulnerability that was not apparent from mutagenesis of large populations. The results show that a population surviving high mutagenesis may exhibit enhanced adaptation in some environments and experience little negative fitness consequences in many others. PMID:24092771

  16. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: This study examined how a sudden increase in exercise energy expenditure affected whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in people of differing aerobic fitness. We hypothesized that whole-body protein turnover would be attenuated, and nitrogen balance would be preserved, in aerobi...

  17. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-03

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  18. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling.

  19. Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice Using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs), such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system, are powerful tools for understanding gene function and for developing novel traits in plants. In plant species for which transformation and regeneration systems using protoplasts are not yet established, direct delivery to nuclei of SSNs either in the form of RNA or protein is difficult. Thus, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of SSN expression constructs in cultured cells is a practical means of delivering targeted mutagenesis in some plant species including rice. Because targeted mutagenesis occurs stochastically in transgenic cells and SSN-mediated targeted mutagenesis often leads to no selectable phenotype, identification of highly mutated cell lines is a critical step in obtaining regenerated plants with desired mutations.

  20. Protein interaction evolution from promiscuity to specificity with reduced flexibility in an increasingly complex network

    PubMed Central

    Alhindi, T.; Zhang, Z.; Ruelens, P.; Coenen, H.; Degroote, H.; Iraci, N.; Geuten, K.

    2017-01-01

    A key question regarding protein evolution is how proteins adapt to the dynamic environment in which they function and how in turn their evolution shapes the protein interaction network. We used extant and resurrected ancestral plant MADS-domain transcription factors to understand how SEPALLATA3, a protein with hub and glue properties, evolved and takes part in network organization. Although the density of dimeric interactions was saturated in the network, many new interactions became mediated by SEPALLATA3 after a whole genome triplication event. By swapping SEPALLATA3 and its ancestors between dimeric networks of different ages, we found that the protein lost the capacity of promiscuous interaction and acquired specificity in evolution. This was accompanied with constraints on conformations through proline residue accumulation, which made the protein less flexible. SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE on the other hand (non-hub) was able to gain protein-protein interactions due to a C-terminal domain insertion, allowing for a larger interaction interface. These findings illustrate that protein interaction evolution occurs at the level of conformational dynamics, when the binding mechanism concerns an induced fit or conformational selection. Proteins can evolve towards increased specificity with reduced flexibility when the complexity of the protein interaction network requires specificity. PMID:28337996

  1. Corticosteroids increase protein breakdown and loss in newly diagnosed pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Steven J; Noe, Joshua D; Denne, Scott C

    2011-11-01

    Children with Crohn disease have altered growth and body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated decreased protein breakdown after either corticosteroid or anti-TNF-α therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whole body protein metabolism during corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease. Children with suspected Crohn disease and children with abdominal symptoms not consistent with Crohn disease underwent outpatient metabolic assessment. Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease and prescribed corticosteroid therapy returned in 2 wk for repeat metabolic assessment. Using the stable isotopes [d5] phenylalanine, [1-(13)C] leucine, and [(15)N(2)] urea, protein kinetics were determined in the fasting state. Thirty-one children (18 controls and 13 newly diagnosed with Crohn disease) completed the study. There were no significant differences in protein breakdown or loss between patients with Crohn disease at diagnosis and controls. After corticosteroid therapy in patients with Crohn disease, the rates of appearance of phenylalanine (32%) and leucine (26%) increased significantly, reflecting increased protein breakdown, and the rate of appearance of urea also increased significantly (273%), reflecting increased protein loss. Whole body protein breakdown and loss increased significantly after 2 wk of corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease, which may have profound effects on body composition.

  2. Single-strand DNA-mediated targeted mutagenesis of genomic DNA in early mouse embryos is stimulated by Rad51/54 and by Ku70/86 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Morozov, V; Wawrousek, E F

    2008-03-01

    Low and variable efficiency is a major problem in targeted gene alteration, which is used as a primary tool in gene therapy and animal model studies. We tested several types of constructs alone, or in combination with other factors, to introduce a point mutation into the alphaB-crystallin gene in one-celled mouse embryos. We found that co-injection of ssDNA along with antibodies against Ku70/86, or supplementing the system with hRad51/hRad54, increases efficiency of targeted mutagenesis. These findings suggest that proteins in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway contribute, and that proteins involved in the alternative nonhomologous end-joining pathway inhibit, ssDNA-mediated targeted mutagenesis. This is the first successful demonstration of targeted mutation in early mouse embryos. This novel methodology of supplying protein factors to stimulate gene modification in the nucleus has not been previously reported.

  3. Increase in local protein concentration by field-inversion gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Henghang; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that migrate through cross-linked polyacrylamide gels (PAGs) under the influence of a constant electric field experience negative factors, such as diffusion and nonspecific trapping in the gel matrix. These negative factors reduce protein concentrations within a defined gel volume with increasing migration distance and, therefore, decrease protein recovery efficiency. Here, we describe the enhancement of protein separation efficiency up to twofold in conventional one-dimensional PAG electrophoresis (1D PAGE), two-dimensional (2D) PAGE, and native PAGE by implementing pulses of inverted electric field during gel electrophoresis.

  4. Protein Targeting and Transport as a Necessary Consequence of Increased Cellular Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    With increasing intracellular complexity, a new cell-biological problem that is the allocation of cytoplasmically synthesized proteins to their final destinations within the cell emerged. A special challenge is thereby the translocation of proteins into or across cellular membranes. The underlying mechanisms are only in parts well understood, but it can be assumed that the course of cellular evolution had a deep impact on the design of the required molecular machines. In this article, we aim to summarize the current knowledge and concepts of the evolutionary development of protein trafficking as a necessary premise and consequence of increased cellular complexity. PMID:25085907

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis for the functional study of transcription factors involved in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Kong, Que; Yuan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is largely coordinated by a complex network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs), co-factors, and their cognate cis-regulatory elements in the genome. TFs are multidomain proteins that arise evolutionarily through protein domain shuffling. The modular nature of TFs has led to the idea that specific modules of TFs can be re-designed to regulate desired gene(s) through protein engineering. Utilization of designer TFs for the control of metabolic pathways has emerged as an effective approach for metabolic engineering. We are interested in engineering the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, Myc-type) transcription factors. Using site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, in combination with efficient and high-throughput screening systems, we have identified and characterized several amino acid residues critical for higher transactivation activity of a Myc-like bHLH transcription factor involved in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Site-directed and saturation mutagenesis should be generally applicable to engineering of all TFs.

  6. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  7. Disruption of Macrodomain Protein SCO6735 Increases Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor*

    PubMed Central

    Lalić, Jasna; Posavec Marjanović, Melanija; Palazzo, Luca; Perina, Dragutin; Sabljić, Igor; Žaja, Roko; Colby, Thomas; Pleše, Bruna; Halasz, Mirna; Jankevicius, Gytis; Bucca, Giselda; Ahel, Marijan; Matić, Ivan; Ćetković, Helena; Luić, Marija; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that can alter the physical and chemical properties of target proteins and that controls many important cellular processes. Macrodomains are evolutionarily conserved structural domains that bind ADP-ribose derivatives and are found in proteins with diverse cellular functions. Some proteins from the macrodomain family can hydrolyze ADP-ribosylated substrates and therefore reverse this post-translational modification. Bacteria and Streptomyces, in particular, are known to utilize protein ADP-ribosylation, yet very little is known about their enzymes that synthesize and remove this modification. We have determined the crystal structure and characterized, both biochemically and functionally, the macrodomain protein SCO6735 from Streptomyces coelicolor. This protein is a member of an uncharacterized subfamily of macrodomain proteins. Its crystal structure revealed a highly conserved macrodomain fold. We showed that SCO6735 possesses the ability to hydrolyze PARP-dependent protein ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, we showed that expression of this protein is induced upon DNA damage and that deletion of this protein in S. coelicolor increases antibiotic production. Our results provide the first insights into the molecular basis of its action and impact on Streptomyces metabolism. PMID:27634042

  8. Posttranslational arginylation enzyme Ate1 affects DNA mutagenesis by regulating stress response

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Birnbaum, Michael D; Patel, Devang M; Morgan, William M; Singh, Jayanti; Barrientos, Antoni; Zhang, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Arginyltransferase 1 (Ate1) mediates protein arginylation, a poorly understood protein posttranslational modification (PTM) in eukaryotic cells. Previous evidence suggest a potential involvement of arginylation in stress response and this PTM was traditionally considered anti-apoptotic based on the studies of individual substrates. However, here we found that arginylation promotes cell death and/or growth arrest, depending on the nature and intensity of the stressing factor. Specifically, in yeast, mouse and human cells, deletion or downregulation of the ATE1 gene disrupts typical stress responses by bypassing growth arrest and suppressing cell death events in the presence of disease-related stressing factors, including oxidative, heat, and osmotic stresses, as well as the exposure to heavy metals or radiation. Conversely, in wild-type cells responding to stress, there is an increase of cellular Ate1 protein level and arginylation activity. Furthermore, the increase of Ate1 protein directly promotes cell death in a manner dependent on its arginylation activity. Finally, we found Ate1 to be required to suppress mutation frequency in yeast and mammalian cells during DNA-damaging conditions such as ultraviolet irradiation. Our study clarifies the role of Ate1/arginylation in stress response and provides a new mechanism to explain the link between Ate1 and a variety of diseases including cancer. This is also the first example that the modulation of the global level of a PTM is capable of affecting DNA mutagenesis. PMID:27685622

  9. Bactericidal Permeability Increasing Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T.; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods: The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Results: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease. PMID:26228368

  10. Optogenetic Stimulation Increases Level of Antiapoptotic Protein Bcl-xL in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lanshakov, D A; Drozd, U S; Dygalo, N N

    2017-03-01

    The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL is associated with several neuroplastic processes such as formation of synapses, regulation of spontaneous and evoked synaptic responses, and release of neurotransmitters. Dependence of expression on activity of neurons is characteristic for many proteins participating in regulation of neuroplasticity. Whether such property is exhibited by the Bcl-xL protein was analyzed using in vivo optogenetic stimulation of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons expressing channelrhodopsin ChR2H134 under CAMKIIa promoter in the adeno-associated viral vector, followed by immunohistochemical determination of the level of Bcl-xL protein in these neurons and surrounding cells. Increase in the level of early response c-Fos protein following illumination with blue light was indicative of activation of these hippocampal neurons. The optogenetic activation of hippocampus resulted in a significant increase in the level of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the photosensitive neurons as well as in the surrounding cells. The dependence of the level of expression of Bcl-xL protein on the activity of neurons indicates that this protein possesses one more important property that is essential for participation in neuroplastic processes in the brain.

  11. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  12. Heat-shock protein ClpL/HSP100 increases penicillin tolerance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Penicillin resistance and tolerance has been an increasing threat to the treatment of pneumococcal pneumoniae. However, no penicillin tolerance-related genes have been claimed. Here we show that a major heat shock protein ClpL/HSP100 could modulate the expression of a cell wall synthesis enzyme PBP2x, and subsequently increase cell wall thickness and penicillin tolerance in Streptococus pneumoniae.

  13. Increased temporal cortex ER stress proteins in depressed subjects who died by suicide.

    PubMed

    Bown, C; Wang, J F; MacQueen, G; Young, L T

    2000-03-01

    Regulation of ER stress proteins, such as the 78-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (GRP78) by chronic treatment with mood stabilizing drugs suggests that this family of proteins may be involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Indeed, increased levels of GRP78, GRP94, and calreticulin, a third member of the ER stress protein family, were found in temporal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder who died by suicide compared with controls and subjects who died by other means. No such differences were found in subjects with other psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. These data suggest a potential role for ER stress proteins in severe depression that merits further study.

  14. Deletion mutagenesis identifies a haploinsufficient role for gamma-zein in opaque-2 endosperm modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard kernel variant of the high-lysine mutant, opaque-2. Using gamma irradiation, we created opaque QPM variants to identify opaque-2 modifier genes and to investigate deletion mutagenesis combined with Illumina sequencing as a maize functional genomics tool. A K0326...

  15. Pokeweed antiviral protein increases HIV-1 particle infectivity by activating the cellular mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Kutky, Meherzad; Hudak, Katalin A

    2012-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a plant-derived N-glycosidase that exhibits antiviral activity against several viruses. The enzyme removes purine bases from the messenger RNAs of the retroviruses Human immunodeficiency virus-1 and Human T-cell leukemia virus-1. This depurination reduces viral protein synthesis by stalling elongating ribosomes at nucleotides with a missing base. Here, we transiently expressed PAP in cells with a proviral clone of HIV-1 to examine the effect of the protein on virus production and quality. PAP reduced virus production by approximately 450-fold, as measured by p24 ELISA of media containing virions, which correlated with a substantial decline in virus protein synthesis in cells. However, particles released from PAP-expressing cells were approximately 7-fold more infectious, as determined by single-cycle infection of 1G5 cells and productive infection of MT2 cells. This increase in infectivity was not likely due to changes in the processing of HIV-1 polyproteins, RNA packaging efficiency or maturation of virus. Rather, expression of PAP activated the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway to a limited extent, resulting in increased phosphorylation of viral p17 matrix protein. The increase in infectivity of HIV-1 particles produced from PAP-expressing cells was compensated by the reduction in virus number; that is, virus production decreased upon de novo infection of cells over time. However, our findings emphasize the importance of investigating the influence of heterologous protein expression upon host cells when assessing their potential for antiviral applications.

  16. Faux Mutagenesis: Teaching Troubleshooting through Controlled Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartberg, Yasha

    2006-01-01

    By shifting pedagogical goals from obtaining successful mutations to teaching students critical troubleshooting skills, it has been possible to introduce site-directed mutagenesis into an undergraduate teaching laboratory. Described in this study is an inexpensive laboratory exercise in which students follow a slightly modified version of…

  17. CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MUTAGENESIS
    Michael D. Waters
    US Environmental Protection Agency, MD-51A, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 USA

    Our rapidly growing understanding of the structure of the human genome is forming the basis for numerous new...

  18. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  19. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G.; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P.; Oakeley, Edward J.; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  20. Integrated Management Strategies Increase Cottonseed, Oil and Protein Production: The Key Role of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xinyue; Chen, Binglin; Meng, Yali; Wang, Youhua; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed, oil, and protein, as the by-products of cotton production, have the potential to provide commodities to meet the increasing demand of renewable bio-fuels and ruminant feed. An increase in crop yield per unit area requires high-yielding cultivar management with an economic nitrogen (N) rate, an optimal N application schedule, high-yielding plant populations and strong seedlings. Whether the integration of these agronomic practices into a coherent management system can increase the productivity of cotton fiber, embryo oil and protein requires experimental elucidation. In this 2-year study, conventional management practices (CM) were used as a control, and two integrated management strategies (IMS1 and IMS2) were considered at two soil fertility levels (high soil fertility and low soil fertility) to analyze the metabolic and biochemical traits of cotton embryos. The results illustrate that the cottonseed, oil, and protein yields for IMS1 and IMS2 were significantly higher than those under CM at both soil fertility levels and the fiber yield increased as well. The IMS regulated the maternal photo thermal environment by delaying the flowering date, resulting in increases in the seed weight. In developing cotton embryos, the IMS increased the embryo weight accumulation rate and biomass partitioning into oil and protein, which were associated with high activities of H+-ATPase, H+-PPase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and cell wall invertase (C-INV) and low activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and vacuole invertase (V-INV). Increased hexoses (D-fructose, D-glucose) content contributed to the oil and protein contents. These results suggest that increased sucrose/H+ symport, sucrose hydrolysis, hexoses synthesis, and cumulative photo-thermal product (PTP), especially in the early stage of embryo growth, play a dominant role in the high productivity of cotton oil and protein. PMID:28194156

  1. Enzymatic Pre-Treatment Increases the Protein Bioaccessibility and Extractability in Dulse (Palmaria palmata)

    PubMed Central

    Mæhre, Hanne K.; Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Several common protein extraction protocols have been applied on seaweeds, but extraction yields have been limited. The aims of this study were to further develop and optimize existing extraction protocols and to examine the effect of enzymatic pre-treatment on bioaccessibility and extractability of seaweed proteins. Enzymatic pre-treatment of seaweed samples resulted in a three-fold increase in amino acids available for extraction. Combining enzymatic pre-treatment with alkaline extraction resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in the protein extraction yield compared to a standard alkaline extraction protocol. A simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model showed that enzymatic pre-treatment of seaweed increased the amount of amino acids available for intestinal absorption 3.2-fold. In conclusion, enzymatic pre-treatment of seaweeds is effective for increasing the amount of amino acids available for utilization and may thus be an effective means for increasing the utilization potential of seaweed proteins. However, both the enzymatic pre-treatment protocol and the protein extraction protocol need further optimization in order to obtain optimal cost-benefit and results from the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model need to be confirmed in clinical models. PMID:27792166

  2. Increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Thomas, G; Maller, J L

    1982-01-01

    A single ribosomal protein (Mr, 32,000) becomes phosphorylated during progesterone-induced in vitro maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The protein is identified as 40S ribosomal protein S6. Phosphorylation of S6 is monitored by incorporation of 32Pi and by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. S6 is minimally phosphorylated in unstimulated oocytes. After progesterone treatment, phosphorylation of S6 precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and is maximal at the time when 50% of the oocytes have undergone GVBD. S6, when maximally phosphorylated, exists in derivatives that correspond to the most highly phosphorylated forms observed in other systems, and the increase in S6 phosphorylation occurs at approximately the same time as the increase in the overall protein synthesis rate reported to occur during oocyte maturation. S6 is also maximally phosphorylated in unfertilized eggs following maturation in vivo. Injection of a partially purified preparation of maturation-promoting factor into immature oocytes induces immediate phosphorylation of S6 and rapidly increases the rate of protein synthesis. Moreover, incubation of ribosomes with this factor and radiolabeled ATP results in labeling of S6. These findings suggest that S6 phosphorylation may be important in the control of protein synthesis during maturation and may also play a role in the mechanism of action of maturation-promoting factor. Images PMID:7045876

  3. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  4. Substitution of aspartic acid with glutamic acid increases the unfolding transition temperature of a protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Yeon; Kim, Kyeong-Ae; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Key-Sun

    2004-07-30

    Proteins from thermophiles are more stable than those from mesophiles. Several factors have been suggested as causes for this greater stability, but no general rule has been found. The amino acid composition of thermophile proteins indicates that the content of polar amino acids such as Asn, Gln, Ser, and Thr is lower, and that of charged amino acids such as Arg, Glu, and Lys is higher than in mesophile proteins. Among charged amino acids, however, the content of Asp is even lower in thermophile proteins than in mesophile proteins. To investigate the reasons for the lower occurrence of Asp compared to Glu in thermophile proteins, Glu was substituted with Asp in a hyperthermophile protein, MjTRX, and Asp was substituted with Glu in a mesophile protein, ETRX. Each substitution of Glu with Asp decreased the Tm of MjTRX by about 2 degrees C, while each substitution of Asp with Glu increased the Tm of ETRX by about 1.5 degrees C. The change of Tm destabilizes the MjTRX by 0.55 kcal/mol and stabilizes the ETRX by 0.45 kcal/mol in free energy.

  5. Exploring the potential of megaprimer PCR in conjunction with orthogonal array design for mutagenesis library construction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lixia; Zheng, Kai; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Huayu; Wang, Hu; Song, Chunlei; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Although megaprimer PCR mutagenesis has been used routinely in protein directed evolution, users sometimes encounter technical hurdles, particularly inefficiency during amplification when large fragments are used or the template is difficult to be amplified. Instead of methodology development, here we simply overcome the limitation by optimizing megaprimer PCR conditions via orthogonal array design of the four PCR components in three levels of each: template, primer, Mg(2+) , and dNTPs. For this, only nine PCRs need to be performed. The strategy (termed as OptiMega) was not only successfully applied for the construction of one multiple-site saturation mutagenesis library of halohydrin dehalogenase HheC, which failed to be constructed previously using the standard QuikChange™ protocol, but also expanded the construction of two high-quality random mutagenesis libraries of HheA and HheC. Most importantly, OptiMega offers a quick and simple way of constructing random mutagenesis libraries by eliminating the ligation step. Our results demonstrated that the OptiMega strategy could greatly strengthen the potential of megaprimer PCR mutagenesis for library construction.

  6. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  7. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Barenholz, Uri; Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms.

  8. A yeast-based genetic screening to identify human proteins that increase homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Galli, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    To identify new human proteins implicated in homologous recombination (HR), we set up 'a papillae assay' to screen a human cDNA library using the RS112 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing an intrachromosomal recombination substrate. We isolated 23 cDNAs, 11 coding for complete proteins and 12 for partially deleted proteins that increased HR when overexpressed in yeast. We characterized the effect induced by the overexpression of the complete human proteasome subunit beta 2, the partially deleted proteasome subunits alpha 3 and beta 8, the ribosomal protein L12, the brain abundant membrane signal protein (BASP1) and the human homologue to v-Ha-RAS (HRAS), which elevated HR by 2-6.5-fold over the control. We found that deletion of the RAD52 gene, which has a key role in most HR events, abolished the increase of HR induced by the proteasome subunits and HRAS; by contrast, the RAD52 deletion did not affect the high level of HR due to BASP1 and RPL12. This suggests that the proteins stimulated yeast HR via different mechanisms. Overexpression of the complete beta 2 human proteasome subunit or the partially deleted alpha 3 and beta 8 subunits increased methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) resistance much more in the rad52 Delta mutant than in the wild-type. Overexpression of RPL12 and BASP1 did not affect MMS resistance in both the wild-type and the rad52 Delta mutant, whereas HRAS decreased MMS resistance in the rad52 Delta mutant. The results indicate that these proteins may interfere with the pathway(s) involved in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage. Finally, we provide further evidence that yeast is a helpful tool to identify human proteins that may have a regulatory role in HR.

  9. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  10. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  11. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  12. Possible role for increased C4b-binding-protein level in acquired protein S deficiency in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Lefebvre, P

    1990-04-01

    In this study, total protein S (PS) immunological levels, free-PS and C4b-binding-protein (C4bBP) concentrations, and PS functional activity were investigated in insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic patients and compared with nondiabetic subjects. Mean total PS antigen concentration was not different between diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects, whereas free-PS levels and PS functional activity were significantly reduced in diabetic patients. C4bBP was increased in diabetic patients and correlated with HbA1 levels. This study shows that type I diabetic patients have depressed free PS and PS activity despite the presence of normal total PS concentration and suggests that this phenomenon is probably linked to the increase of circulating C4bBP.

  13. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W; Amin, Hesham M; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Rosen, Steven T; Pham, Lan V; Ngo, Vu N

    2016-11-08

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5-10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL.

  14. Removal of wheat-germ agglutinin increases protein synthesis in wheat-germ extracts.

    PubMed

    Abraham, A K; Kolseth, S; Pihl, A

    1982-05-17

    Affinity chromatography of wheat germ extracts on a chitin column increased the rate and extent of protein synthesis, programmed by rabbit globin mRNA. Addition of purified wheat germ agglutinin to the chitin-treated extract reduced the rate of protein synthesis to about the levels seen in the untreated extracts. Experiments where the ratio of messenger to extract and the ratio of supernatant to ribosomes were varied, indicated that addition of wheat germ agglutinin reduced the amount of available ribosomes. Reduced and carboxymethylated wheat germ agglutinin failed to inhibit protein synthesis and was unable to bind to the ribosomes. However, labelled intact agglutinin was found to be bound to ribosomes. The bound agglutinin was not released by acid treatment. The inhibiting effect of wheat germ, agglutinin on protein synthesis could not be counteracted by addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or sialic acid, whereas thiols partially diminished the inhibition. The data indicate that wheat germ agglutinin binds reversibly to ribosomes, probably through mixed disulfide formation, and that chitin treatment increases the ability of wheat germ extracts to support protein synthesis, at least in part, by removing the wheat germ agglutinin. The possibility that chitin treatment also removed other inhibitors of protein synthesis cannot be excluded.

  15. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected.

  16. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W.; Amin, Hesham M.; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Rosen, Steven T.; Pham, Lan V.; Ngo, Vu N.

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5–10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL. PMID:27713153

  17. Nutrient signaling in protein homeostasis: an increase in quantity at the expense of quality.

    PubMed

    Conn, Crystal S; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2013-04-16

    The discovery that rapamycin extends the life span of diverse organisms has triggered many studies aimed at identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates cell growth and may regulate organismal aging by controlling mRNA translation. However, how inhibiting mTORC1 and decreasing protein synthesis can extend life span remains an unresolved issue. We showed that constitutively active mTORC1 signaling increased general protein synthesis but unexpectedly reduced the quality of newly synthesized polypeptides. We demonstrated that constitutively active mTORC1 decreased translation fidelity by increasing the speed of ribosomal elongation. Conversely, rapamycin treatment restored the quality of newly synthesized polypeptides mainly by slowing the rate of ribosomal elongation. We also found distinct roles for mTORC1 downstream targets in maintaining protein homeostasis. Loss of S6 kinases, but not 4E-BP family proteins, which are both involved in regulation of translation, attenuated the effects of rapamycin on the quality of newly translated proteins. Our results reveal a mechanistic connection between mTORC1 and protein quality, highlighting the central role of nutrient signaling in growth and aging.

  18. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  19. Identification of Ubiquilin, a Novel Presenilin Interactor That Increases Presenilin Protein Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Alex L.; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Monteiro, Mervyn J.

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the highly homologous presenilin genes encoding presenilin-1 and presenilin-2 (PS1 and PS2) are linked to early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, apart from a role in early development, neither the normal function of the presenilins nor the mechanisms by which mutant proteins cause AD are well understood. We describe here the properties of a novel human interactor of the presenilins named ubiquilin. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction, glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, and colocalization of the proteins expressed in vivo, together with coimmunoprecipitation and cell fractionation studies, provide compelling evidence that ubiquilin interacts with both PS1 and PS2. Ubiquilin is noteworthy since it contains multiple ubiquitin-related domains typically thought to be involved in targeting proteins for degradation. However, we show that ubiquilin promotes presenilin protein accumulation. Pulse-labeling experiments indicate that ubiquilin facilitates increased presenilin synthesis without substantially changing presenilin protein half-life. Immunohistochemistry of human brain tissue with ubiquilin-specific antibodies revealed prominent staining of neurons. Moreover, the anti-ubiquilin antibodies robustly stained neurofibrillary tangles and Lewy bodies in AD and Parkinson's disease affected brains, respectively. Our results indicate that ubiquilin may be an important modulator of presenilin protein accumulation and that ubiquilin protein is associated with neuropathological neurofibrillary tangles and Lewy body inclusions in diseased brain. PMID:11076969

  20. Side-stream smoking reduces intestinal inflammation and increases expression of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhao, Jun-Xing; Hu, Nan; Ren, Jun; Du, Min; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of side-stream smoking on gut microflora composition, intestinal inflammation and expression of tight junction proteins. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to side-stream cigarette smoking for one hour daily over eight weeks. Cecal contents were collected for microbial composition analysis. Large intestine was collected for immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses of the inflammatory pathway and tight junction proteins. RESULTS: Side-stream smoking induced significant changes in the gut microbiota with increased mouse intestinal bacteria, Clostridium but decreased Fermicutes (Lactoccoci and Ruminococcus), Enterobacteriaceae family and Segmented filamentous baceteria compared to the control mice. Meanwhile, side-stream smoking inhibited the nuclear factor-κB pathway with reduced phosphorylation of p65 and IκBα, accompanied with unchanged mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α or interleukin-6. The contents of tight junction proteins, claudin3 and ZO2 were up-regulated in the large intestine of mice exposed side-stream smoking. In addition, side-stream smoking increased c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK kinase signaling, while inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase in the large intestine. CONCLUSION: Side-stream smoking altered gut microflora composition and reduced the inflammatory response, which was associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:22611310

  1. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Bergeron, Sadie A; Tabor, Kathryn M; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-04-20

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3' untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models.

  2. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein’s adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the “fossils” of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment. PMID

  3. Increased glycosylation efficiency of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli by auto-induction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Yang, Chunguang; Sun, Shenxia; Han, Lichi; Ruan, Yao; Guo, Longhua; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jianing

    2017-03-25

    Escherichia coli cells have been considered as promising hosts for producing N-glycosylated proteins since the successful production of N-glycosylated protein in E. coli with the pgl (N-linked protein glycosylation) locus from Campylobacter jejuni. However, one hurdle in producing N-glycosylated proteins in large scale using E. coli is inefficient glycan glycosylation. In this study, we developed a strategy for the production of N-glycosylated proteins with high efficiency via an optimized auto-induction method. The 10th human fibronectin type III domain (FN3) was engineered with native glycosylation sequon DFNRSK and optimized DQNAT sequon in C-terminus with flexible linker as acceptor protein models. The resulting glycosylation efficiencies were confirmed by Western blots with anti-FLAG M1 antibody. Increased efficiency of glycosylation was obtained by changing the conventional IPTG induction to auto-induction method, which increased the glycosylation efficiencies from 60% and 75% up to 90% and 100% respectively. Moreover, in the condition of inserting the glycosylation sequon in the loop of FN3 (the acceptor sequon with local structural conformation), the glycosylation efficiency was increased from 35% to 80% by our optimized auto-induction procedures. To justify the potential for general application of the optimized auto-induction method, the reconstituted lsg locus from Haemophilus influenzae and PglB from C. jejuni were utilized, and this led to 100% glycosylation efficiency. Our studies provided quantitative evidence that the optimized auto-induction method will facilitate the large-scale production of pure exogenous N-glycosylation proteins in E. coli cells.

  4. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  5. Supplementation of cattle fed tropical grasses with microalgae increases microbial protein production and average daily gain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D F A; Quigley, S P; Isherwood, P; McLennan, S R; Poppi, D P

    2016-05-01

    A series of 3 experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of microalgae as supplements for ruminants consuming low-CP tropical grasses. In Exp. 1, the chemical composition and in vitro protein degradability of 9 algae species and 4 protein supplements were determined. In Exp. 2, rumen function and microbial protein (MCP) production were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with , , , or cottonseed meal (CSM). In Exp. 3, DMI and ADG were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with increasing amounts of NPN (urea combined with ammonia sulfate), CSM, or . In Exp. 1, the CP content of and (675 and 580 g/kg DM) was highest among the algae species and higher than the other protein supplements evaluated, and sp. had the highest crude lipid (CL) content (198 g/kg DM). In Exp. 2, supplementation increased speargrass hay intake, the efficiency of MCP production, the fractional outflow rate of digesta from the rumen, the concentration of NHN, and the molar proportion of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen fluid of steers above all other treatments. acceptance by steers was low and this resulted in no significant difference to unsupplemented steers for all parameters measured for this algae supplement. In Exp. 3, ADG linearly increased with increasing supplementary N intake from both and NPN, with no difference between the 2 supplements. In contrast, ADG quadratically increased with increasing supplementary N intake from CSM. It was concluded that and may potentially be used as protein sources for cattle grazing low-CP pastures.

  6. A Ketogenic Diet Increases Brown Adipose Tissue Mitochondrial Proteins and UCP1 Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Baxa, Ulrich; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding a ketogenic diet (KD) for a month on general physiology with emphasis on brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mice. KD did not reduce the caloric intake, or weight or lipid content of BAT. Relative epididymal fat pads were 40% greater in the mice fed the KD (P = 0.06) while leptin was lower (P < 0.05). Blood glucose levels were 30% lower while D-β-hydroxybutyrate levels were about 3.5-fold higher in the KD group. Plasma insulin and leptin levels in the KD group were about half of that of the mice fed NIH-31 pellets (chow group). Median mitochondrial size in the inter-scapular BAT (IBAT) of the KD group was about 60% greater, whereas the median lipid droplet size was about half of that in the chow group. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteins were increased (1.5–3-fold) and the uncoupling protein 1 levels were increased by threefold in mice fed the KD. The levels of PPARγ, PGC-1α, and Sirt1 in KD group were 1.5–3-fold while level of Sirt3 was about half of that in the chow-fed group. IBAT cyclic AMP levels were 60% higher in the KD group and cAMP response element binding protein was 2.5-fold higher, suggesting increased sympathetic system activity. These results demonstrate that a KD can also increase BAT mitochondrial size and protein levels. PMID:23233333

  7. The Transient Nature of Bunyamwera Orthobunyavirus NSs Protein Expression: Effects of Increased Stability of NSs Protein on Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    van Knippenberg, Ingeborg; Fragkoudis, Rennos; Elliott, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The NSs proteins of bunyaviruses are the viral interferon antagonists, counteracting the host's antiviral response to infection. During high-multiplicity infection of cultured mammalian cells with Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus (BUNV), NSs is rapidly degraded after reaching peak levels of expression at 12hpi. Through the use of inhibitors this was shown to be the result of proteasomal degradation. A recombinant virus (rBUN4KR), in which all four lysine residues in NSs were replaced by arginine residues, expresses an NSs protein (NSs4KR) that is resistant to degradation, confirming that degradation is lysine-dependent. However, despite repeated attempts, no direct ubiquitylation of NSs in infected cells could be demonstrated. This suggests that degradation of NSs, although lysine-dependent, may be achieved through an indirect mechanism. Infection of cultured mammalian cells or mice indicated no disadvantage for the virus in having a non-degradable NSs protein: in fact rBUN4KR had a slight growth advantage over wtBUNV in interferon-competent cells, presumably due to the increased and prolonged presence of NSs. In cultured mosquito cells there was no difference in growth between wild-type BUNV and rBUN4KR, but surprisingly NSs4KR was not stabilised compared to the wild-type NSs protein. PMID:23667701

  8. Antagonism of ultraviolet-light mutagenesis by the methyl-directed mismatch-repair system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Hewitt, S R; Hays, J B

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Escherichia coli MutHLS mismatch-repair system can process UV-irradiated DNA in vivo and that the human MSH2.MSH6 mismatch-repair protein binds more strongly in vitro to photoproduct/base mismatches than to "matched" photoproducts in DNA. We tested the hypothesis that mismatch repair directed against incorrect bases opposite photoproducts might reduce UV mutagenesis, using two alleles at E. coli lacZ codon 461, which revert, respectively, via CCC --> CTC and CTT --> CTC transitions. F' lacZ targets were mated from mut(+) donors into mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients, once cells were at substantial densities, to minimize spontaneous mutation prior to irradiation. In umu(+) mut(+) recipients, a range of UV fluences induced lac(+) revertant frequencies of 4-25 x 10(-8); these frequencies were consistently 2-fold higher in mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients. Since this effect on mutation frequency was unaltered by an Mfd(-) defect, it appears not to involve transcription-coupled excision repair. In mut(+) umuC122::Tn5 bacteria, UV mutagenesis (at 60 J/m(2)) was very low, but mutH or mutL or mutS mutations increased reversion of both lacZ alleles roughly 25-fold, to 5-10 x 10(-8). Thus, at UV doses too low to induce SOS functions, such as Umu(2)'D, most incorrect bases opposite occasional photoproducts may be removed by mismatch repair, whereas in heavily irradiated (SOS-induced) cells, mismatch repair may only correct some photoproduct/base mismatches, so UV mutagenesis remains substantial. PMID:10655206

  9. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  10. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  11. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  12. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R.; Houtz, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  13. HIF1α protein stability is increased by acetylation at lysine 709.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hao; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Changhui; David, Larry L; Beer, Tomasz M; Thomas, George V; Dai, Mu-Shui; Qian, David Z

    2012-10-12

    Lysine acetylation regulates protein stability and function. p300 is a component of the HIF-1 transcriptional complex and positively regulates the transactivation of HIF-1. Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism by which p300 facilitates HIF-1 activity. p300 increases HIF-1α (HIF1α) protein acetylation and stability. The regulation can be opposed by HDAC1, but not by HDAC3, and is abrogated by disrupting HIF1α-p300 interaction. Mechanistically, p300 specifically acetylates HIF1α at Lys-709, which increases the protein stability and decreases polyubiquitination in both normoxia and hypoxia. Compared with the wild-type protein, a HIF1α K709A mutant protein is more stable, less polyubiquitinated, and less dependent on p300. Overexpression of the HIF1α wild-type or K709A mutant in cancer cells lacking the endogenous HIF1α shows that the K709A mutant is transcriptionally more active toward the HIF-1 reporter and some endogenous target genes. Cancer cells containing the K709A mutant are less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth arrest than the cells containing the HIF1α wild-type. Taken together, these data demonstrate a novel biological consequence upon HIF1α-p300 interaction, in which HIF1α can be stabilized by p300 via Lys-709 acetylation.

  14. Highly increased detection of silver stained protein bands in polyacrylamide gels with thermo-optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Giulia; Posnicek, Thomas; Brandl, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is a well-known technique to separate proteins by their molecular weight. After electrophoresis, the gels are commonly stained for protein band analysis with silver stain; this allows the detection of protein loads to about 1 ng. To increase the detection sensitivity of the protein bands down in the subnanogram level, a sensor has been developed based on the thermal lens effect to scan and quantify protein loads which would remain undetected using the standard imaging systems. The thermal lens sensor is equipped with a 450 nm diode pump laser modulated at 1 Hz and a HeNe probe laser mounted in collinear geometry. The sensor could detect protein bands of 0.05 ng when the gel was soaked in methanol/water and 0.1 ng in water. The limit of detection ranged from 8 to 20 pg, depending on the soaking medium and the staining efficiency. Thus, the detection of silver stain by thermal lens effect results 10 to 20 times more sensitive than the standard colorimetric method.

  15. Exercise training increases protein O-GlcNAcylation in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hortemo, Kristin Halvorsen; Lunde, Per Kristian; Anonsen, Jan Haug; Kvaløy, Heidi; Munkvik, Morten; Rehn, Tommy Aune; Sjaastad, Ivar; Lunde, Ida Gjervold; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Sejersted, Ole M

    2016-09-01

    Protein O-GlcNAcylation has emerged as an important intracellular signaling system with both physiological and pathophysiological functions, but the role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in skeletal muscle remains elusive. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protein O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic signaling system in skeletal muscle in exercise and disease. Immunoblotting showed different protein O-GlcNAcylation pattern in the prototypical slow twitch soleus muscle compared to fast twitch EDL from rats, with greater O-GlcNAcylation level in soleus associated with higher expression of the modulating enzymes O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), O-GlcNAcase (OGA), and glutamine fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase isoforms 1 and 2 (GFAT1, GFAT2). Six weeks of exercise training by treadmill running, but not an acute exercise bout, increased protein O-GlcNAcylation in rat soleus and EDL There was a striking increase in O-GlcNAcylation of cytoplasmic proteins ~50 kDa in size that judged from mass spectrometry analysis could represent O-GlcNAcylation of one or more key metabolic enzymes. This suggests that cytoplasmic O-GlcNAc signaling is part of the training response. In contrast to exercise training, postinfarction heart failure (HF) in rats and humans did not affect skeletal muscle O-GlcNAcylation level, indicating that aberrant O-GlcNAcylation cannot explain the skeletal muscle dysfunction in HF Human skeletal muscle displayed extensive protein O-GlcNAcylation that by large mirrored the fiber-type-related O-GlcNAcylation pattern in rats, suggesting O-GlcNAcylation as an important signaling system also in human skeletal muscle.

  16. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  17. Heparin treatment increases thioredoxin interacting protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Aysim; Iscan, Evin; Topel, Hande; Avci, Sanem Tercan; Gumustekin, Mukaddes; Erdal, Esra; Atabey, Nese

    2015-08-01

    Heparins play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, migration and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms of heparin mediated cellular behaviors are not well defined. To determine the effect of heparin on gene expression, we performed a cDNA microarray in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and found that heparin regulates transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism. In this study, we showed a new role of heparin in the regulation of thioredoxin interacting protein, which is a major regulator of glucose metabolism, in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We determined the importance of a unique carbohydrate response element located on its promoter for the heparin-induced activation of thioredoxin-interacting protein and the modulatory role of heparin on nuclear accumulation of carbohydrate response element associated proteins. We showed the importance of heparin mediated histone modifications and down-regulation of Enhancer of zeste 2 polycomb repressive complex 2 expression for heparin mediated overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein. When we tested biological significance of these data; we observed that cells overexpressing thioredoxin-interacting protein are less adhesive and proliferative, however they have a higher migration and invasion ability. Interestingly, heparin treatment increased thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver of diabetic rats. In conclusion, our results show that heparin activates thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver and hepatocellular carcinoma cells and provide the first evidences of regulatory roles of heparin on carbohydrate response element associated factors. This study will contribute future understanding of the effect of heparin on glucose metabolism and glucose independent overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Sucrose increases calcium-dependent protein kinase and phosphatase activities in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Raíces, M; MacIntosh, G C; Ulloa, R M; Gargantini, P R; Vozza, N F; Téllez-Inón, M T

    2003-09-01

    The effect of sucrose on tuber formation, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and phosphatase activities was analysed using in vitro cultured potato plants. In short treatments, sucrose induced CDPK and phosphatase activities. In long treatments, sucrose induced tuber formation in the absence of other tuber inducing stimuli. Sorbitol caused a minor increase in CDPK activity and affected plant morphology but did not induce tuber development. The addition of the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine precluded sucrose-induced tuberization. Altogether, our results suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events are involved in sucrose-induced tuber development.

  19. Memory-enhancing corticosterone treatment increases amygdala norepinephrine and Arc protein expression in hippocampal synaptic fractions.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Jayme R; Donowho, Kyle; Abdi, Amin; McGaugh, James L; Roozendaal, Benno; McIntyre, Christa K

    2010-03-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that glucocorticoid hormones enhance the consolidation of memory for emotionally arousing events through interactions with the noradrenergic system of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). We previously reported that intra-BLA administration of a beta-adrenoceptor agonist immediately after inhibitory avoidance training enhanced memory consolidation and increased hippocampal expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). In the present experiments corticosterone (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after inhibitory avoidance training to examine effects on long-term memory, amygdala norepinephrine levels, and hippocampal Arc expression. Corticosterone increased amygdala norepinephrine levels 15 min after inhibitory avoidance training, as assessed by in vivo microdialysis, and enhanced memory tested at 48 h. Corticosterone treatment also increased expression of Arc protein in hippocampal synaptic tissue. The elevation in BLA norepinephrine appears to participate in corticosterone-influenced modulation of hippocampal Arc expression as intra-BLA blockade of beta-adrenoceptors with propranolol (0.5 microg/0.2 microL) attenuated the corticosterone-induced synaptic Arc expression in the hippocampus. These findings indicate that noradrenergic activity at BLA beta-adrenoceptors is involved in corticosterone-induced enhancement of memory consolidation and expression of the synaptic-plasticity-related protein Arc in the hippocampus.

  20. Expression of the RNA-binding protein TIAR is increased in neurons after ischemic cerebral injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, K; Li, W; Nagayama, T; He, X; Sinor, A D; Chang, J; Mao, X; Graham, S H; Simon, R P; Greenberg, D A

    2000-03-15

    T-cell restricted intracellular antigen-related protein (TIAR) is an RNA recognition motif-type RNA-binding protein that has been implicated in the apoptotic death of T-lymphocytes and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Western blots prepared with a monoclonal antibody against TIAR showed expression in normal rat hippocampus, and induction by 15 min of global cerebral ischemia. This increased expression was evident at 8 hr after ischemia and maximal at 24 hr, whereas expression at 72 hr was reduced below basal levels. Expression of TIAR protein was also increased in parietal cortex 6 and 24 hr after 90 min of focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, as well as in cultured cortical neurons and astroglia after exposure to hypoxia in vitro. Immunocytochemistry showed that increased expression of TIAR occurred mainly in the CA1 sector of hippocampus 24 hr after global ischemia, and in cortical and striatal neurons 24 hr after 20 or 90 min of focal ischemia. Double-labeling studies showed that TIAR protein expression was co-localized with DNA damage in neuronal cells. The findings suggest that TIAR may be involved in neuronal cell death after cerebral ischemic injury.

  1. Pancreatic protein hypersecretion and elevated plasma CCK: prerequisites for increased pancreatic growth?

    PubMed

    Rivard, N; Guan, D; Maouyo, D; Morisset, J

    1993-09-01

    This study was undertaken to establish if a correlation exists between chronic elevated pancreatic secretion and growth of the pancreas. Rats provided with jugular, pancreatic, biliary, duodenal, or ileal cannulas were fed throughout the experiment with a liquid diet continuously infused into the duodenum. Four days after surgery, control rats and those infused with cerulein (CE) 0.45 microgram/kg/h had their pancreatic juice returned into the duodenum. Two other groups had their pancreatic juice either totally diverted outside (DO) or returned into the ileum (DI). In all groups, bile was returned into the duodenum. Pancreatic juice was collected every 4 h for 4 days with volume and protein determined. After 4 days, rats were killed and their pancreata were evaluated for weight and contents of DNA, RNA, protein, amylase, and chymotrypsinogen. The average volumes/4 h were significantly increased by 259, 241, and 270% in DO, DI, and CE rats, respectively. Protein output remained at control levels in DO rats, whereas increases of 200 and 90% above control values were observed in DI and CE rats, respectively, during the last periods of collection. Constant drainage of pancreatic juice outside (DO) had no effect on pancreatic growth; on the contrary, its reinfusion into the ileum and constant cerulein infusion were associated with impressive growth of the pancreas, with cerulein being the most potent stimulus. In conclusion these data support the hypothesis that increased protein output is associated with pancreatic growth, a phenomenon mediated by endogenous cholecystokinin.

  2. Improving the chitinolytic activity of Bacillus pumilus SG2 by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vahed, Majid; Motalebi, Ebrahim; Rigi, Garshasb; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2013-11-28

    Bacillus pumilus SG2, a halotolerant strain, expresses two major chitinases designated ChiS and ChiL that were induced by chitin and secreted into the supernatant. The present work aimed to obtain a mutant with higher chitinolytic activity through mutagenesis of Bacillus pumilus SG2 using a combination of UV irradiation and nitrous acid treatment. Following mutagenesis and screening on chitin agar and subsequent formation of halos, the mutated strains were examined for degradation of chitin under different conditions. A mutant designated AV2-9 was selected owing to its higher chitinase activity. To search for possible mutations in the whole operon including ChiS and ChiL, the entire chitinase operon, including the intergenic region, promoter, and two areas corresponding to the ChiS and ChiL ORF, was suquenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the complete chitinase operon from the SG2 and AV2-9 strains showed the presence of a mutation in the catalytic domain (GH18) of chitinase (ChiL). The results demonstrated that a single base change had occurred in the ChiL sequence in AV2- 9. The wild-type chitinase, ChiL, and the mutant (designated ChiLm) were cloned, expressed, and purified in E. coli. Both enzymes showed similar profiles of activity at different ranges of pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature, but the mutant enzyme showed approximately 30% higher catalytic activity under all the conditions tested. The results obtained in this study showed that the thermal stability of chitinase increased in the mutant strain. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to predict changes in the stability of proteins caused by mutation.

  3. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K; Reitelseder, Søren; Drummond, Micah J; Schjerling, Peter; Scheike, Thomas; Serena, Anja; Holm, Lars

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated whether well-tolerated light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects skeletal muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and anabolic intracellular signaling as a way to counteract age-related loss of muscle mass. Untrained healthy elderly (>65-yr-old) men were subjected to 13 h of supine rest. After 2.5 h of rest, unilateral LL-RE, consisting of leg extensions (10 sets, 36 repetitions) at 16% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), was conducted. Subsequently, the subjects were randomized to oral intake of 4 g of whey protein per hour (PULSE, n = 10), 28 g of whey protein at 0 h and 12 g of whey protein at 7 h postexercise (BOLUS, n = 10), or 4 g of maltodextrin per hour (placebo, n = 10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7, and 10 h postexercise from the resting and the exercised leg of each subject. Myofibrillar FSR and activity of select targets from the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1-signaling cascade were analyzed from the biopsies. LL-RE increased myofibrillar FSR compared with the resting leg throughout the 10-h postexercise period. Phosphorylated (T308) AKT expression increased in the exercised leg immediately after exercise. This increase persisted in the placebo group only. Levels of phosphorylated (T37/46) eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 increased throughout the postexercise period in the exercised leg in the placebo and BOLUS groups and peaked at 7 h. In all three groups, phosphorylated (T56) eukaryotic elongation factor 2 decreased in response to LL-RE. We conclude that resistance exercise at only 16% of 1 RM increased myofibrillar FSR, irrespective of nutrient type and feeding pattern, which indicates an anabolic effect of LL-RE in elderly individuals. This finding was supported by increased signaling for translation initiation and translation elongation in response to LL-RE.

  4. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L.; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector–cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 × 10−5 to 1.2 × 10−4 per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells. PMID:17062627

  5. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B; Ruley, H Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector-cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 x 10(-5) to 1.2 x 10(-4) per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells.

  6. In-Frame Amber Stop Codon Replacement Mutagenesis for the Directed Evolution of Proteins Containing Non-Canonical Amino Acids: Identification of Residues Open to Bio-Orthogonal Modification

    PubMed Central

    Arpino, James A. J.; Baldwin, Amy J.; McGarrity, Adam R.; Tippmann, Eric M.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2015-01-01

    Expanded genetic code approaches are a powerful means to add new and useful chemistry to proteins at defined residues positions. One such use is the introduction of non-biological reactive chemical handles for site-specific biocompatible orthogonal conjugation of proteins. Due to our currently limited information on the impact of non-canonical amino acids (nAAs) on the protein structure-function relationship, rational protein engineering is a “hit and miss” approach to selecting suitable sites. Furthermore, dogma suggests surface exposed native residues should be the primary focus for introducing new conjugation chemistry. Here we describe a directed evolution approach to introduce and select for in-frame codon replacement to facilitate engineering proteins with nAAs. To demonstrate the approach, the commonly reprogrammed amber stop codon (TAG) was randomly introduced in-frame in two different proteins: the bionanotechnologically important cyt b562 and therapeutic protein KGF. The target protein is linked at the gene level to sfGFP via a TEV protease site. In absence of a nAA, an in-frame TAG will terminate translation resulting in a non-fluorescent cell phenotype. In the presence of a nAA, TAG will encode for nAA incorporation so instilling a green fluorescence phenotype on E. coli. The presence of endogenously expressed TEV proteases separates in vivo target protein from its fusion to sfGFP if expressed as a soluble fusion product. Using this approach, we incorporated an azide reactive handle and identified residue positions amenable to conjugation with a fluorescence dye via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). Interestingly, best positions for efficient conjugation via SPAAC were residues whose native side chain were buried through analysis of their determined 3D structures and thus may not have been chosen through rational protein engineering. Molecular modeling suggests these buried native residues could become partially exposed on

  7. Increased activity of rat liver nucleolar protein kinase following triiodothyronine administration.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, E; Gallo, G; Pertica, M; Voci, A; Orunesu, M

    1977-12-08

    Triiodothyronine (T3) administration to thyroidectomized rats induces a significant increase in the nucleolus-associated protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) activity. The general properties of the protein kinase solubilized from liver nucleoli have been investigated. Mg2+ (20 mM) is essential for the reaction and an appropriate concentration of NaCl (100 mM) is required to achieve maximal phosphorylation rates. The optimal pH for casein phosphorylation is 7.6. The kinase phosphorylates casein more efficiently than phosvitin and displays an almost undetectable activity towards histones and protamine. No significant stimulation of the kinase activity by cyclic AMP has been detected. The apparent Km values for casein and ATP are 1.5 mg/ml and 1.5-10(-5) M, respectively, and are not affected by the hormone administration.

  8. Low-dose gamma irradiation of food protein increases its allergenicity in a chronic oral challenge.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A F M; Souza, M P; Medeiros, P L; Melo, A M M A; Silva-Lucca, R A; Santana, L A; Oliva, M L V; Perez, K R; Cuccovia, I M; Correia, M T S

    2013-01-01

    Few chronic food protein models have described the relationship between allergenicity and the molecular structure of food protein after physical processing. The effect of γ-radiation on the structure of food protein was measured by fluorescence, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and then given non-irradiated and irradiated Con-A by daily gavage for 28days. The tendency to form insoluble amorphous aggregates and partially unfolded species was observed after irradiation. The administration of non-irradiated and irradiated samples at low-dose significantly increased weight loss as well as plasma levels of eotaxin in animals repeatedly exposed to Con-A. Significant lymphocytic infiltrate filling completely the stroma of microvilli and tubular glands was observed in the small intestinal of the group given Con-A irradiated at a low dose. This phenotype was not observed in animals treated with Con-A irradiated at a high dose.

  9. Smoking impairs muscle protein synthesis and increases the expression of myostatin and MAFbx in muscle.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Anne Marie Winther; Magkos, Faidon; Atherton, Philip; Selby, Anna; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2007-09-01

    Smoking causes multiple organ dysfunction. The effect of smoking on skeletal muscle protein metabolism is unknown. We hypothesized that the rate of skeletal muscle protein synthesis is depressed in smokers compared with non-smokers. We studied eight smokers (> or =20 cigarettes/day for > or =20 years) and eight non-smokers matched for sex (4 men and 4 women per group), age (65 +/- 3 and 63 +/- 3 yr, respectively; means +/- SEM) and body mass index (25.9 +/- 0.9 and 25.1 +/- 1.2 kg/m(2), respectively). Each subject underwent an intravenous infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in conjunction with blood and muscle tissue sampling to measure the mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) and whole body leucine rate of appearance (Ra) in plasma (an index of whole body proteolysis), the expression of genes involved in the regulation of muscle mass (myostatin, a muscle growth inhibitor, and MAFBx and MuRF-1, which encode E3 ubiquitin ligases in the proteasome proteolytic pathway) and that for the inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha in muscle, and the concentration of inflammatory markers in plasma (C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha, interleukin-6) which are associated with muscle wasting in other conditions. There were no differences between nonsmokers and smokers in plasma leucine concentration, leucine rate of appearance, and plasma concentrations of inflammatory markers, or TNF-alpha mRNA in muscle, but muscle protein FSR was much less (0.037 +/- 0.005 vs. 0.059 +/- 0.005%/h, respectively, P = 0.004), and myostatin and MAFBx (but not MuRF-1) expression were much greater (by approximately 33 and 45%, respectivley, P < 0.05) in the muscle of smokers than of nonsmokers. We conclude that smoking impairs the muscle protein synthesis process and increases the expression of genes associated with impaired muscle maintenance; smoking therefore likely increases the risk of sarcopenia.

  10. Increased Serine-Arginine (SR) Protein Phosphorylation Changes Pre-mRNA Splicing in Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Jakubauskiene, Egle; Vilys, Laurynas; Makino, Yuichi; Poellinger, Lorenz; Kanopka, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    The removal of introns from mRNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) is an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. The splicing machinery heavily contributes to biological complexity and especially to the ability of cells to adapt to altered cellular conditions. Inhibitory PAS domain protein (IPAS), a dominant negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression, is generated from hypoxia inducible transcription factor-3α (HIF-3α) pre-mRNA by an alternative splicing mechanism. Inactivation of the IPAS transcript in mice leads to the neo-vascularization of the cornea, suggesting that IPAS is an important regulator of anti-angiogenesis in this tissue. For the first time we demonstrate that serine-arginine (SR) proteins are involved in oxygen tension-dependent changes in pre-mRNA splicing. SR proteins isolated from hypoxic cells differentially interact with RNA (compared with proteins isolated from cells cultured under normoxic conditions). They possess the differential ability to activate hypoxia-dependent splice sites, and they are more phosphorylated than those isolated from normoxic HeLa cells. We also show that expression of SR protein kinases (CLK1, SRPK1, SRPK2) in hypoxic cells is elevated at mRNA and protein levels. Increased expression of CLK1 kinase is regulated by HIFs. Reduction of CLK1 cellular expression levels reduces hypoxia-dependent full-length carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) mRNA and CAIX protein formation and changes hypoxia-dependent cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) mRNA isoform formation profiles. PMID:26023237

  11. In vitro mutagenesis of a full-length cDNA clone of Semliki Forest virus: the small 6,000-molecular-weight membrane protein modulates virus release.

    PubMed Central

    Liljeström, P; Lusa, S; Huylebroeck, D; Garoff, H

    1991-01-01

    We report on the construction of a full-length cDNA clone of Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By placing the cDNA under the SP6 promoter, infectious RNA can be produced in vitro and used to transfect cells to initiate virus infection. To achieve efficient transfections, a new protocol for electroporation of RNA was developed. This method gave up to 500-fold improvement over the traditional DEAE-dextran transfection procedure. Since virtually 100% of the cells can be transfected by electroporation, this method is a useful tool for detailed biochemical studies of null mutations of SFV that abolish production of infections virus particles. We used the cDNA clone of SFV to study what effects a deletion of the 6,000-molecular-weight membrane protein (6K membrane protein) had on virus replication. The small 6K protein is part of the structural precursor molecule (C-p62-6K-E1) of the virus. Our results conclusively show that the 6K protein is not needed for the heterodimerization of the p62 and E1 spike membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, nor is it needed for their transport out to the cell surface. The absence of the 6K protein did, however, result in a dramatic reduction in virus release, suggesting that the protein exerts its function late in the assembly pathway, possibly during virus budding. Images PMID:2072446

  12. Preferential increase in the hippocampal synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) by pentylenetetrazole kindling.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Ishihara, Shizuka; Terada, Ryo; Kikuta, Miki; Sofue, Nobumasa; Kawai, Yoshiko; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi

    2009-12-18

    The present study evaluated the expressional levels of synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) and other secretary machinery proteins (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes, Munc18-1, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)) in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Repeated administration of sub-convulsive PTZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) progressively increased seizure susceptibility in mice and consistently induced clonic seizures in most animals tested at 15 days after the treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that, among the secretary machinery proteins examined, hippocampal SV2A was selectively elevated by PTZ kindling. PTZ kindling-induced SV2A expression appeared region-specific and the SV2A levels in the cerebral cortex or cerebellum were unaltered. In addition, SV2A expression by PTZ kindling was prominent in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus (DG) where GABAergic interneurons are located, but not in other hippocampal regions (e.g., the stratum lucidum of the CA3 and synaptic layers surrounding CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neurons). These findings suggest that PTZ kindling preferentially elevates SV2A expression in the hippocampus probably as a compensatory mechanism to activate the inhibitory neurotransmission.

  13. Folding pathways of proteins with increasing degree of sequence identities but different structure and function.

    PubMed

    Giri, Rajanish; Morrone, Angela; Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo; Jemth, Per; Brunori, Maurizio; Gianni, Stefano

    2012-10-30

    Much experimental work has been devoted in comparing the folding behavior of proteins sharing the same fold but different sequence. The recent design of proteins displaying very high sequence identities but different 3D structure allows the unique opportunity to address the protein-folding problem from a complementary perspective. Here we explored by Φ-value analysis the pathways of folding of three different heteromorphic pairs, displaying increasingly high-sequence identity (namely, 30%, 77%, and 88%), but different structures called G(A) (a 3-α helix fold) and G(B) (an α/β fold). The analysis, based on 132 site-directed mutants, is fully consistent with the idea that protein topology is committed very early along the pathway of folding. Furthermore, data reveals that when folding approaches a perfect two-state scenario, as in the case of the G(A) domains, the structural features of the transition state appear very robust to changes in sequence composition. On the other hand, when folding is more complex and multistate, as for the G(B)s, there are alternative nuclei or accessible pathways that can be alternatively stabilized by altering the primary structure. The implications of our results in the light of previous work on the folding of different members belonging to the same protein family are discussed.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation studies and in vitro site directed mutagenesis of avian beta-defensin Apl_AvBD2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Defensins comprise a group of antimicrobial peptides, widely recognized as important elements of the innate immune system in both animals and plants. Cationicity, rather than the secondary structure, is believed to be the major factor defining the antimicrobial activity of defensins. To test this hypothesis and to improve the activity of the newly identified avian β-defensin Apl_AvBD2 by enhancing the cationicity, we performed in silico site directed mutagenesis, keeping the predicted secondary structure intact. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies were done to predict the activity. Mutant proteins were made by in vitro site directed mutagenesis and recombinant protein expression, and tested for antimicrobial activity to confirm the results obtained in MD simulation analysis. Results MD simulation revealed subtle, but critical, structural variations between the wild type Apl_AvBD2 and the more cationic in silico mutants, which were not detected in the initial structural prediction by homology modelling. The C-terminal cationic 'claw' region, important in antimicrobial activity, which was intact in the wild type, showed changes in shape and orientation in all the mutant peptides. Mutant peptides also showed increased solvent accessible surface area and more number of hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules. In functional studies, the Escherichia coli expressed, purified recombinant mutant proteins showed total loss of antimicrobial activity compared to the wild type protein. Conclusion The study revealed that cationicity alone is not the determining factor in the microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides. Factors affecting the molecular dynamics such as hydrophobicity, electrostatic interactions and the potential for oligomerization may also play fundamental roles. It points to the usefulness of MD simulation studies in successful engineering of antimicrobial peptides for improved activity and other desirable functions. PMID

  15. INCREASE IN ACTIVATED PROTEIN C MEDIATES ACUTE TRAUMATIC COAGULOPATHY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chesebro, Brian B.; Rahn, Pamela; Carles, Michel; Esmon, Charles T.; Xu, Jun; Brohi, Karim; Frith, Daniel; Pittet, Jean-François; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    In severely injured and hypoperfused trauma patients, endogenous acute coagulopathy (EAC) is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Recent human data correlate this coagulopathy with activation of the protein C pathway. To examine the mechanistic role of protein C in the development of EAC, we used a mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, characterized by the combination of tissue injury and severe metabolic acidosis. Mice were subjected to one of four treatment groups: 1) C, control; 2) T, trauma (laparotomy); 3) H, hemorrhage (MAP, 35 mmHg × 60 min); 4) TH, trauma + hemorrhage. After 60 min, blood was drawn for analysis. Compared with C mice, the TH mice had a significantly elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (23.3 vs. 34.5 s) and significantly increased levels of activated protein C (aPC; 2.30 vs. 13.58 ng/mL). In contrast, T and H mice did not develop an elevated activated partial thromboplastin time or increased aPC. Selective inhibition of the anticoagulant property of aPC prevented the coagulopathy seen in response to trauma/hemorrhage (23.5 vs. 38.6 s [inhibitory vs. control monoclonal antibody]) with no impact on survival during the shock period. However, complete blockade of both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of aPC caused 100% mortality within 45 min of shock, with histopathology evidence of pulmonary thrombosis and perivascular hemorrhage. These results indicate that our unique mouse model of T/H shock mimics our previous observations in trauma patients and demonstrates that EAC is mediated by the activation of the protein C pathway. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of protein C activation seems to be necessary for survival of the initial shock injury. PMID:19333141

  16. Hypocretin-1 causes G protein activation and increases ACh release in rat pons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, René; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2003-10-01

    The effects of the arousal-promoting peptide hypocretin on brain stem G protein activation and ACh release were examined using 16 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro[35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography was used to test the hypothesis that hypocretin-1-stimulated G protein activation is concentration-dependent and blocked by the hypocretin receptor antagonist SB-334867. Activated G proteins were quantified in dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), locus coeruleus (LC) and pontine reticular nucleus oral part (PnO) and caudal part (PnC). Concentration-response data revealed a significant (P < 0.001) effect of hypocretin-1 (2-2000 nm) in all brain regions examined. Maximal increases over control levels of [35S]GTPgammaS binding were 37% (DR), 58% (LC), 52% (PnO) and 44% (PnC). SB-334867 (2 micro m) significantly (P < 0.002) blocked hypocretin-1 (200 nm)-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in all four nuclei. This is the first autoradiographic demonstration that hypocretin-1 activates G proteins in arousal-related brain stem nuclei as a result of specific receptor interactions. This finding suggests that some hypocretin receptors in brain stem couple to inhibitory G proteins. In vivo microdialysis was used to test the hypothesis that PnO administration of hypocretin-1 increases ACh release in PnO. Dialysis delivery of hypocretin-1 (100 micro m) significantly (P < 0.002) increased (87%) ACh release. This finding is consistent with the interpretation that one mechanism by which hypocretin promotes arousal is by enhancing cholinergic neurotransmission in the pontine reticular formation.

  17. Increased expression of the TIAR protein in the hippocampus of Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Oleana, V H; Salehi, A; Swaab, D F

    1998-05-11

    T-cell restricted intracellular antigen related protein (TIAR) is an RNA-binding protein that is supposed to be involved in the process of stress-induced apoptosis. TIAR triggers DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes and its expression diminishes in the cell nucleus and rises simultaneously in the cytoplasm during Fas-induced cell death. Using a monoclonal antibody against TIAR, we stained different areas of the hippocampus from seven controls and 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was a clear expression of TIAR in the hippocampus of non-demented controls. Surprisingly, a significant increase was found in the expression of TIAR in the hippocampal area in AD. The increased expression of TIAR in AD may be related to the process of neurodegeneration in the hippocampus.

  18. RNA-Seq analysis and targeted mutagenesis for improved free fatty acid production in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-energy-density biofuels are typically derived from the fatty acid pathway, thus establishing free fatty acids (FFAs) as important fuel precursors. FFA production using photosynthetic microorganisms like cyanobacteria allows for direct conversion of carbon dioxide into fuel precursors. Recent studies investigating cyanobacterial FFA production have demonstrated the potential of this process, yet FFA production was also shown to have negative physiological effects on the cyanobacterial host, ultimately limiting high yields of FFAs. Results Cyanobacterial FFA production was shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lead to increased cell membrane permeability. To identify genetic targets that may mitigate these toxic effects, RNA-seq analysis was used to investigate the host response of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Stress response, nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding genes were up-regulated during FFA production while genes involved in carbon and hydrogen metabolisms were down-regulated. Select genes were targeted for mutagenesis to confirm their role in mitigating FFA toxicity. Gene knockout of two porins and the overexpression of ROS-degrading proteins and hypothetical proteins reduced the toxic effects of FFA production, allowing for improved growth, physiology, and FFA yields. Comparative transcriptomics, analyzing gene expression changes associated with FFA production and other stress conditions, identified additional key genes involved in cyanobacterial stress response. Conclusions A total of 15 gene targets were identified to reduce the toxic effects of FFA production. While single-gene targeted mutagenesis led to minor increases in FFA production, the combination of these targeted mutations may yield additional improvement, advancing the development of high-energy-density fuels derived from cyanobacteria. PMID:23919451

  19. A case of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease showing increased dosage of the proteolipid protein gene.

    PubMed

    Harding, B; Ellis, D; Malcolm, S

    1995-04-01

    Clinical, neuropathological and molecular genetic studies in a 9 month old boy with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease are described. The principal clinical features were developmental delay, nystagmus, stridor and seizures. Both brain and spinal cord showed almost complete absence of stainable central myelin, while cranial and spinal root myelin was preserved. Probes for cDNA in the boy and his asymptomatic mother indicated an increase in the dosage of proteolipid protein gene (of at least twofold) compared with controls.

  20. Increased gene expression of Alzheimer disease beta-amyloid precursor protein in senescent cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Adler, M J; Coronel, C; Shelton, E; Seegmiller, J E; Dewji, N N

    1991-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the brains of patients. Plaque cores contain a 4- to 5-kDa amyloid beta-protein fragment which is also found in the cerebral blood vessels of affected individuals. Since amyloid deposition in the brain increases with age even in normal people, we sought to establish whether the disease state bears a direct relationship with normal aging processes. As a model for biological aging, the process of cellular senescence in vitro was used. mRNA levels of beta-amyloid precursor protein associated with Alzheimer disease were compared in human fibroblasts in culture at early passage and when the same fibroblasts were grown to senescence after more than 52 population doublings. A dramatic increase in mRNA was observed in senescent IMR-90 fibroblasts compared with early-passage cells. Hybridization of mRNA from senescent and early proliferating fibroblasts with oligonucleotide probes specific for the three alternatively spliced transcripts of the gene gave similar results, indicating an increase during senescence of all three forms. A similar, though more modest, increase in message levels was also observed in early-passage fibroblasts made quiescent by serum deprivation; with repletion of serum, however, the expression returned to previous low levels. ELISAs were performed on cell extracts from senescent, early proliferating, and quiescent fibroblasts, and quiescent fibroblasts repleted with serum for over 48 hr, using polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide of the beta-amyloid precursor. The results confirmed that the differences in mRNA expression were partially reflected at the protein level. Regulated expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein may be an important determinant of growth and metabolic responses to serum and growth factors under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  1. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  2. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells.

  3. Heat Shock Protein translocation induced by membrane fluidization increases tumor-cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Nina C; Ireland, H Elyse; Smith, Carly M; Hoyle, Christine F; Williams, John H H

    2010-10-28

    Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains a challenge due to the frequency of drug resistance amongst patients. Improving the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents while reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) within the cancer cells may facilitate in overcoming this drug resistance. We demonstrate for the first time that sub-lethal doses of chemotherapeutic agents can be combined with membrane fluidizing treatments to produce a significant increase in drug efficacy and apoptosis in vitro. We show that fluidizers result in a transient decrease in intracellular HSPs, resulting in increased tumor-cell sensitivity and a membrane-associated induction of HSP gene expression.

  4. Expression of a Truncated ATHB17 Protein in Maize Increases Ear Weight at Silking

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Griffith, Cara; Ahrens, Jeffrey E.; Taylor, J. Philip; Murphy, Lesley R.; Manjunath, Siva; Thompson, Rebecca L.; Lingard, Matthew J.; Back, Stephanie L.; Larue, Huachun; Brayton, Bonnie R.; Burek, Amanda J.; Tiwari, Shiv; Adam, Luc; Morrell, James A.; Caldo, Rico A.; Huai, Qing; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K.; Kuehn, Rosemarie; Sant, Anagha M.; Wingbermuehle, William J.; Sala, Rodrigo; Foster, Matt; Kinser, Josh D.; Mohanty, Radha; Jiang, Dongming; Ziegler, Todd E.; Huang, Mingya G.; Kuriakose, Saritha V.; Skottke, Kyle; Repetti, Peter P.; Reuber, T. Lynne; Ruff, Thomas G.; Petracek, Marie E.; Loida, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    ATHB17 (AT2G01430) is an Arabidopsis gene encoding a member of the α-subclass of the homeodomain leucine zipper class II (HD-Zip II) family of transcription factors. The ATHB17 monomer contains four domains common to all class II HD-Zip proteins: a putative repression domain adjacent to a homeodomain, leucine zipper, and carboxy terminal domain. However, it also possesses a unique N-terminus not present in other members of the family. In this study we demonstrate that the unique 73 amino acid N-terminus is involved in regulation of cellular localization of ATHB17. The ATHB17 protein is shown to function as a transcriptional repressor and an EAR-like motif is identified within the putative repression domain of ATHB17. Transformation of maize with an ATHB17 expression construct leads to the expression of ATHB17Δ113, a truncated protein lacking the first 113 amino acids which encodes a significant portion of the repression domain. Because ATHB17Δ113 lacks the repression domain, the protein cannot directly affect the transcription of its target genes. ATHB17Δ113 can homodimerize, form heterodimers with maize endogenous HD-Zip II proteins, and bind to target DNA sequences; thus, ATHB17Δ113 may interfere with HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional activity via a dominant negative mechanism. We provide evidence that maize HD-Zip II proteins function as transcriptional repressors and that ATHB17Δ113 relieves this HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional repression activity. Expression of ATHB17Δ113 in maize leads to increased ear size at silking and, therefore, may enhance sink potential. We hypothesize that this phenotype could be a result of modulation of endogenous HD-Zip II pathways in maize. PMID:24736658

  5. Expression of a truncated ATHB17 protein in maize increases ear weight at silking.

    PubMed

    Rice, Elena A; Khandelwal, Abha; Creelman, Robert A; Griffith, Cara; Ahrens, Jeffrey E; Taylor, J Philip; Murphy, Lesley R; Manjunath, Siva; Thompson, Rebecca L; Lingard, Matthew J; Back, Stephanie L; Larue, Huachun; Brayton, Bonnie R; Burek, Amanda J; Tiwari, Shiv; Adam, Luc; Morrell, James A; Caldo, Rico A; Huai, Qing; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Kuehn, Rosemarie; Sant, Anagha M; Wingbermuehle, William J; Sala, Rodrigo; Foster, Matt; Kinser, Josh D; Mohanty, Radha; Jiang, Dongming; Ziegler, Todd E; Huang, Mingya G; Kuriakose, Saritha V; Skottke, Kyle; Repetti, Peter P; Reuber, T Lynne; Ruff, Thomas G; Petracek, Marie E; Loida, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    ATHB17 (AT2G01430) is an Arabidopsis gene encoding a member of the α-subclass of the homeodomain leucine zipper class II (HD-Zip II) family of transcription factors. The ATHB17 monomer contains four domains common to all class II HD-Zip proteins: a putative repression domain adjacent to a homeodomain, leucine zipper, and carboxy terminal domain. However, it also possesses a unique N-terminus not present in other members of the family. In this study we demonstrate that the unique 73 amino acid N-terminus is involved in regulation of cellular localization of ATHB17. The ATHB17 protein is shown to function as a transcriptional repressor and an EAR-like motif is identified within the putative repression domain of ATHB17. Transformation of maize with an ATHB17 expression construct leads to the expression of ATHB17Δ113, a truncated protein lacking the first 113 amino acids which encodes a significant portion of the repression domain. Because ATHB17Δ113 lacks the repression domain, the protein cannot directly affect the transcription of its target genes. ATHB17Δ113 can homodimerize, form heterodimers with maize endogenous HD-Zip II proteins, and bind to target DNA sequences; thus, ATHB17Δ113 may interfere with HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional activity via a dominant negative mechanism. We provide evidence that maize HD-Zip II proteins function as transcriptional repressors and that ATHB17Δ113 relieves this HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional repression activity. Expression of ATHB17Δ113 in maize leads to increased ear size at silking and, therefore, may enhance sink potential. We hypothesize that this phenotype could be a result of modulation of endogenous HD-Zip II pathways in maize.

  6. Redesigning Protein Cavities as a Strategy for Increasing Affinity in Protein-Protein Interaction: Interferon-γ Receptor 1 as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Combining computational and experimental tools, we present a new strategy for designing high affinity variants of a binding protein. The affinity is increased by mutating residues not at the interface, but at positions lining internal cavities of one of the interacting molecules. Filling the cavities lowers flexibility of the binding protein, possibly reducing entropic penalty of binding. The approach was tested using the interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNγR1) complex with IFNγ as a model. Mutations were selected from 52 amino acid positions lining the IFNγR1 internal cavities by using a protocol based on FoldX prediction of free energy changes. The final four mutations filling the IFNγR1 cavities and potentially improving the affinity to IFNγ were expressed, purified, and refolded, and their affinity towards IFNγ was measured by SPR. While individual cavity mutations yielded receptor constructs exhibiting only slight increase of affinity compared to WT, combinations of these mutations with previously characterized variant N96W led to a significant sevenfold increase. The affinity increase in the high affinity receptor variant N96W+V35L is linked to the restriction of its molecular fluctuations in the unbound state. The results demonstrate that mutating cavity residues is a viable strategy for designing protein variants with increased affinity. PMID:26060819

  7. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  8. Teicoplanin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus expresses a novel membrane protein and increases expression of penicillin-binding protein 2 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Shlaes, D M; Shlaes, J H; Vincent, S; Etter, L; Fey, P D; Goering, R V

    1993-01-01

    In the recent clinical trials of teicoplanin therapy of endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, at least one instance of the emergence of teicoplanin-resistant strains during therapy has been reported (G.W. Kaatz, S. M. Seo, N. J. Dorman, and S. A. Lerner, J. Infect. Dis 162:103-108, 1990). We have confirmed, using conventional electrophoresis of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI-digested chromosomal DNA, that the resistant strain (12873) (MIC, 16 micrograms/ml) is genetically very similar to the susceptible parent (12871) (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml). Kaatz et al. were able to select spontaneous teicoplanin-resistant mutants (10(-9)), suggesting that a single gene might be involved. We have shown that the mutation is highly stable during growth in the absence of teicoplanin. Using Tn551, we have selected insertion mutants of 12873 that become teicoplanin susceptible. We have examined a number of aspects of cell wall physiology in strains 12871 and 12873 and the teicoplanin-susceptible Tn551 mutants of 12873. 12873 was more susceptible to lysostaphin lysis than 12871 and the susceptible Tn551 derivatives of 12873. Autolysis in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) and cell wall turnover rates were similar in 12871 and 12873. An analysis of membrane proteins revealed the expression of a ca. 35-kDa protein and increased expression of both polypeptides of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2 (PBP2) in 12873 relative to 12871 and the Tn551 mutants of 12873. This increased expression was not related to PBP2', since both strains were susceptible to oxacillin in 2% NaCl (MIC, < or = 0.25 microgram/ml) and cellular DNA from neither strain hybridized with a specific mec gene probe. Two independent Tn551 inserts have been mapped to a ca. 117-kb SmaI fragment of the chromosome. These data suggest the possibility that the mutation resulting in resistance to teicoplanin involves the regulation of expression of both polypeptides of PBP2 and a 35-k

  9. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  10. Extracellular Vpr protein increases cellular permissiveness to human immunodeficiency virus replication and reactivates virus from latency.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D N; Refaeli, Y; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus is a virion-associated regulatory protein that has been shown using vpr mutant viruses to increase virus replication, particularly in monocytes/macrophages. We have previously shown that vpr can directly inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell differentiation, events linked to the control of HIV replication, and also that the replication of a vpr mutant but not that of wild-type HIV type 1 (HIV-1) was compatible with cellular proliferation (D. N. Levy, L. S. Fernandes, W. V. Williams, and D. B. Weiner, Cell 72:541-550, 1993). Here we show that purified recombinant Vpr protein, in concentrations of < 100 pg/ml to 100 ng/ml, increases wild-type HIV-1 replication in newly infected transformed cell lines via a long-lasting increase in cellular permissiveness to HIV replication. The activity of extracellular Vpr protein could be completely inhibited by anti-Vpr antibodies. Extracellular Vpr also induced efficient HIV-1 replication in newly infected resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Extracellular Vpr transcomplemented a vpr mutant virus which was deficient in replication in promonocytic cells, restoring full replication competence. In addition, extracellular Vpr reactivated HIV-1 expression in five latently infected cell lines of T-cell, B-cell, and promonocytic origin which normally express very low levels of HIV RNA and protein, indicating an activation of translational or pretranslational events in the virus life cycle. Together, these results describe a novel pathway governing HIV replication and a potential target for the development of anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:7815499

  11. ALK1 heterozygosity increases extracellular matrix protein expression, proliferation and migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Eleno, Nélida; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological situation in which excessive amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) are deposited in the tissue. Myofibroblasts play a crucial role in the development and progress of fibrosis as they actively synthesize ECM components such as collagen I, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cause organ fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a major role in tissue fibrosis. Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a type I receptor of TGF-β1 with an important role in angiogenesis whose function in cellular biology and TGF-β signaling is well known in endothelial cells, but its role in fibroblast biology and its contribution to fibrosis is poorly studied. We have recently demonstrated that ALK1 regulates ECM protein expression in a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of ALK1 in several processes involved in fibrosis such as ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration in ALK1(+/+) and ALK1(+/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) after TGF-β1 stimulations and inhibitors. ALK1 heterozygous MEFs show increased expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF/CCN2), cell proliferation and migration due to an alteration of TGF-β/Smad signaling. ALK1 heterozygous disruption shows an increase of Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation that explains the increases in CTGF/CCN2, fibronectin and collagen I, proliferation and cell motility observed in these cells. Therefore, we suggest that ALK1 plays an important role in the regulation of ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration.

  12. Carnosol, a Constituent of Zyflamend, Inhibits Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Activation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 Transcription and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mohebati, Arash; Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kochhar, Amit; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, plays a significant role in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induced carcinogenesis. In the upper aerodigestive tract of humans, tobacco smoke, a source of PAHs, activates the AhR leading to increased expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which encode proteins that convert PAHs to genotoxic metabolites. Inhibitors of Hsp90 ATPase cause a rapid decrease in levels of AhR, an Hsp90 client protein, and thereby block PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. The main objective of this study was to determine whether Zyflamend, a polyherbal preparation, suppressed PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibited DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis. We also investigated whether carnosol, one of multiple phenolic antioxidants in Zyflamend, had similar inhibitory effects. Treatment of cell lines derived from oral leukoplakia (MSK-Leuk1) and skin (HaCaT) with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a prototypic PAH, induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transcription, resulting in enhanced levels of message and protein. Both Zyflamend and carnosol suppressed these effects of B[a]P. Notably, both Zyflamend and carnosol inhibited Hsp90 ATPase activity and caused a rapid reduction in AhR levels. The formation of B[a]P induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis were also inhibited by Zyflamend and carnosol. Collectively, these results show that Zyflamend and carnosol inhibit Hsp90 ATPase leading to reduced levels of AhR, suppression of B[a]P-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibition of mutagenesis. Carnosol-mediated inhibition of Hsp90 ATPase activity can help explain the chemopreventive activity of herbs such as Rosemary, which contain this phenolic antioxidant. PMID:22374940

  13. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  14. Serine-Aspartate Repeat Protein D Increases Staphylococcus aureus Virulence and Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Satoshi; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Ajayi, Clement; Sollid, Johanna U. E.; van Sorge, Nina M.; Nizet, Victor; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus expresses a panel of cell wall-anchored adhesins, including proteins belonging to the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family, exemplified by the serine-aspartate repeat protein D (SdrD), which serve key roles in colonization and infection. Deletion of sdrD from S. aureus subsp. aureus strain NCTC8325-4 attenuated bacterial survival in human whole blood ex vivo, which was associated with increased killing by human neutrophils. Remarkably, SdrD was able to inhibit innate immune-mediated bacterial killing independently of other S. aureus proteins, since addition of recombinant SdrD protein and heterologous expression of SdrD in Lactococcus lactis promoted bacterial survival in human blood. SdrD contributes to bacterial virulence in vivo, since fewer S. aureus subsp. aureus NCTC8325-4 ΔsdrD bacteria than bacteria of the parent strain were recovered from blood and several organs using a murine intravenous infection model. Collectively, our findings reveal a new property of SdrD as an important key contributor to S. aureus survival and the ability to escape the innate immune system in blood. PMID:27795358

  15. Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheatwood, Joseph L; Burnet, Derek; Butteiger, Dustie N; Banz, William J

    2011-01-20

    Stroke is a leading cause of lasting disability. Dietary strategies aimed at increasing post-stroke outcomes are lifestyle alterations which could be easily implemented by people at risk of occlusive stroke. Soy diets have been demonstrated to provide some benefits in the short term following stroke, but longer time periods have not been studied. Further, carefully defined diets containing soy protein isolates have not been investigated. In the current study, male Long Evans Hooded rats were fed semi-purified diets containing either sodium caseinate or soy protein isolate. Rats were trained to perform the skilled forelimb reaching task and subsequently underwent unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to induce a stroke lesion. After stroke, rats remained on the same diet and were tested daily for a period of 8 weeks to observe their performance on the skilled forelimb reaching task. In the first week following stroke, rats receiving the soy protein-containing diet (SP) demonstrated less severe reaching deficits than rats fed the Na caseinate-containing diet (CAS) (p<0.05). These results suggest that a soy protein-based diet provides significant protection from neurological damage following MCAO stroke in rats.

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis of IRX9, IRX9L and IRX14 proteins involved in xylan biosynthesis: glycosyltransferase activity is not required for IRX9 function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanfang; Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Lau, Jane; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2014-01-01

    Xylans constitute the main non-cellulosic polysaccharide in the secondary cell walls of plants. Several genes predicted to encode glycosyltransferases are required for the synthesis of the xylan backbone even though it is a homopolymer consisting entirely of β-1,4-linked xylose residues. The putative glycosyltransferases IRX9, IRX14, and IRX10 (or the paralogs IRX9L, IRX14L, and IRX10L) are required for xylan backbone synthesis in Arabidopsis. To investigate the function of IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14, we identified amino acid residues known to be essential for catalytic function in homologous mammalian proteins and generated modified cDNA clones encoding proteins where these residues would be mutated. The mutated gene constructs were used to transform wild-type Arabidopsis plants and the irx9 and irx14 mutants, which are deficient in xylan synthesis. The ability of the mutated proteins to complement the mutants was investigated by measuring growth, determining cell wall composition, and microscopic analysis of stem cross-sections of the transgenic plants. The six different mutated versions of IRX9 and IRX9-L were all able to complement the irx9 mutant phenotype, indicating that residues known to be essential for glycosyltransferases function in homologous proteins are not essential for the biological function of IRX9/IRX9L. Two out of three mutated IRX14 complemented the irx14 mutant, including a mutant in the predicted catalytic amino acid. A IRX14 protein mutated in the substrate-binding DxD motif did not complement the irx14 mutant. Thus, substrate binding is important for IRX14 function but catalytic activity may not be essential for the function of the protein. The data indicate that IRX9/IRX9L have an essential structural function, most likely by interacting with the IRX10/IRX10L proteins, but do not have an essential catalytic function. Most likely IRX14 also has primarily a structural role, but it cannot be excluded that the protein has an important enzymatic

  17. AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-10

    dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 50 and 100 f.J.g/rnl was used as a 3 TLS Project Nn. A0ŗ-003: AS52/GPT Mammalian Mutagenesis Assay promutagen that requires metabolic...Chemical Source Lot No. air Air Products N/A calcium chloride Sigma 84F-0723 d imeth y !sulfoxide Fisher 933274 dimethylnitrosamine Sigma 82B0365...methanesulfonate (EMS) at 150 and 300 J.i-g/ml is used as a direct-acting mutagen for the nonactivated portion, and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) at 150 and 300

  18. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  19. Fluorometric method of quantitative cell mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-12-12

    A method for assaying a cell culture for mutagenesis is described. A cell culture is stained first with a histochemical stain, and then a fluorescent stain. Normal cells in the culture are stained by both the histochemical and fluorescent stains, while abnormal cells are stained only by the fluorescent stain. The two stains are chosen so that the histochemical stain absorbs the wavelengths that the fluorescent stain emits. After the counterstained culture is subjected to exciting light, the fluorescence from the abnormal cells is detected.

  20. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  1. Amyloid-beta oligomers increase the localization of prion protein at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Beraldo, Flavio H; Hajj, Glaucia N M; Guimaraes, Andre L; Jürgensen, Sofia; Wasilewska-Sampaio, Ana Paula; Hirata, Pedro H F; Souza, Ivana; Machado, Cleiton F; Wong, Daisy Y-L; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T; Prado, Vania F; Rylett, R Jane; Martins, Vilma R; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-05-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) interacts with distinct proteins at the cell surface to interfere with synaptic communication. Recent data have implicated the prion protein (PrP(C)) as a putative receptor for Aβ. We show here that Aβ oligomers signal in cells in a PrP(C)-dependent manner, as might be expected if Aβ oligomers use PrP(C) as a receptor. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and cell surface protein biotinylation experiments indicated that treatment with Aβ oligomers, but not monomers, increased the localization of PrP(C) at the cell surface in cell lines. These results were reproduced in hippocampal neuronal cultures by labeling cell surface PrP(C). In order to understand possible mechanisms involved with this effect of Aβ oligomers, we used live cell confocal and total internal reflection microscopy in cell lines. Aβ oligomers inhibited the constitutive endocytosis of PrP(C), but we also found that after Aβ oligomer-treatment PrP(C) formed more clusters at the cell surface, suggesting the possibility of multiple effects of Aβ oligomers. Our experiments show for the first time that Aβ oligomers signal in a PrP(C)-dependent way and that they can affect PrP(C) trafficking, increasing its localization at the cell surface.

  2. Uncoupling Protein 2 Increases Susceptibility to Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Jianchun; Hu, Mingdong; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang; Xu, Jing; Lei, Chuanjiang; Jiao, Yan; Xu, JianCheng

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is upregulated in patients with systemic inflammation and infection, but its functional role is unclear. We up- or downregulated UCP2 expression using UCP2 recombinant adenovirus or the UCP2 inhibitor, genipin, in lungs of mice, and investigated the mechanisms of UCP2 in ALI. UCP2 overexpression in mouse lungs increased LPS-induced pathological changes, lung permeability, lung inflammation, and lowered survival rates. Furthermore, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were decreased, while reactive oxygen species production was increased. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activity was elevated, which increased the sensitivity to LPS-induced apoptosis and inflammation. LPS-induced apoptosis and release of inflammatory factors were alleviated by pretreatment of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 or the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059 in UCP2-overexpressing mice. On the other hand, LPS-induced alveolar epithelial cell death and inflammation were attenuated by genipin. In conclusion, UCP2 increased susceptibility to LPS-induced cell death and pulmonary inflammation, most likely via ATP depletion and activation of MAPK signaling following ALI in mice. PMID:27057102

  3. Computational evidence that fast translation speed can increase the probability of cotranslational protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ercheng; Wang, Jun; Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2015-10-21

    Translation speed can affect the cotranslational folding of nascent peptide. Experimental observations have indicated that slowing down translation rates of codons can increase the probability of protein cotranslational folding. Recently, a kinetic modeling indicates that fast translation can also increase the probability of cotranslational protein folding by avoiding misfolded intermediates. We show that the villin headpiece subdomain HP35 is an ideal model to demonstrate this phenomenon. We studied cotranslational folding of HP35 with different fast translation speeds by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and found that HP35 can fold along a well-defined pathway that passes the on-pathway intermediate but avoids the misfolded off-pathway intermediate in certain case. This greatly increases the probability of HP35 cotranslational folding and the approximate mean first passage time of folding into native state is about 1.67μs. Since we also considered the space-confined effect of the ribosomal exit tunnel on the cotranslational folding, our simulation results suggested alternative mechanism for the increasing of cotranslational folding probability by fast translation speed.

  4. Fascin, an Actin-bundling Protein, Induces Membrane Protrusions and Increases Cell Motility of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Shigeko; Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Ono, Shoichiro; Matsumura, Fumio

    1998-01-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein that is found in membrane ruffles, microspikes, and stress fibers. The expression of fascin is greatly increased in many transformed cells, as well as in specialized normal cells including neuronal cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. A morphological characteristic common to these cells expressing high levels of fascin is the development of many membrane protrusions in which fascin is predominantly present. To examine whether fascin contributes to the alterations in microfilament organization at the cell periphery, we have expressed fascin in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells to levels as high as those found in transformed cells and in specialized normal cells. Expression of fascin results in large changes in morphology, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell motility: fascin-transfected cells form an increased number of longer and thicker microvilli on apical surfaces, extend lamellipodia-like structures at basolateral surfaces, and show disorganization of cell–cell contacts. Cell migration activity is increased by 8–17 times when assayed by modified Boyden chamber. Microinjection of a fascin protein into LLC-PK1 cells causes similar morphological alterations including the induction of lamellipodia at basolateral surfaces and formation of an increased number of microvilli on apical surfaces. Furthermore, microinjection of fascin into REF-52 cells, normal fibroblasts, induces the formation of many lamellipodia at all regions of cell periphery. These results together suggest that fascin is directly responsible for membrane protrusions through reorganization of the microfilament cytoskeleton at the cell periphery. PMID:9571235

  5. KRIT1 protein depletion modifies endothelial cell behavior via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Kuebel, Julia M; Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-11-21

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1(+/-) mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1.

  6. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein (BPI) Inhibits the Infectivity of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pinkenburg, Olaf; Meyer, Torben; Bannert, Norbert; Norley, Steven; Bolte, Kathrin; Czudai-Matwich, Volker; Herold, Susanne; Gessner, André; Schnare, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their well-known antibacterial activity some antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) display also antiviral effects. A 27 aa peptide from the N-terminal part of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) previously shown to harbour antibacterial activity inhibits the infectivity of multiple Influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1) the causing agent of the Influenza pneumonia. In contrast, the homologous murine BPI-peptide did not show activity against Influenza A virus. In addition human BPI-peptide inhibits the activation of immune cells mediated by Influenza A virus. By changing the human BPI-peptide to the sequence of the mouse homologous peptide the antiviral activity was completely abolished. Furthermore, the human BPI-peptide also inhibited the pathogenicity of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but failed to interfere with HIV and measles virus. Electron microscopy indicate that the human BPI-peptide interferes with the virus envelope and at high concentrations was able to destroy the particles completely. PMID:27273104

  7. A soluble bone morphogenetic protein type IA receptor increases bone mass and bone strength.

    PubMed

    Baud'huin, Marc; Solban, Nicolas; Cornwall-Brady, Milton; Sako, Dianne; Kawamoto, Yoshimi; Liharska, Katia; Lath, Darren; Bouxsein, Mary L; Underwood, Kathryn W; Ucran, Jeffrey; Kumar, Ravindra; Pobre, Eileen; Grinberg, Asya; Seehra, Jasbir; Canalis, Ernesto; Pearsall, R Scott; Croucher, Peter I

    2012-07-24

    Diseases such as osteoporosis are associated with reduced bone mass. Therapies to prevent bone loss exist, but there are few that stimulate bone formation and restore bone mass. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ superfamily, which act as pleiotropic regulators of skeletal organogenesis and bone homeostasis. Ablation of the BMPR1A receptor in osteoblasts increases bone mass, suggesting that inhibition of BMPR1A signaling may have therapeutic benefit. The aim of this study was to determine the skeletal effects of systemic administration of a soluble BMPR1A fusion protein (mBMPR1A-mFc) in vivo. mBMPR1A-mFc was shown to bind BMP2/4 specifically and with high affinity and prevent downstream signaling. mBMPR1A-mFc treatment of immature and mature mice increased bone mineral density, cortical thickness, trabecular bone volume, thickness and number, and decreased trabecular separation. The increase in bone mass was due to an early increase in osteoblast number and bone formation rate, mediated by a suppression of Dickkopf-1 expression. This was followed by a decrease in osteoclast number and eroded surface, which was associated with a decrease in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) production, an increase in osteoprotegerin expression, and a decrease in serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5b) concentration. mBMPR1A treatment also increased bone mass and strength in mice with bone loss due to estrogen deficiency. In conclusion, mBMPR1A-mFc stimulates osteoblastic bone formation and decreases bone resorption, which leads to an increase in bone mass, and offers a promising unique alternative for the treatment of bone-related disorders.

  8. Dopamine D1 receptor-agonist interactions: A mutagenesis and homology modeling study.

    PubMed

    Mente, Scot; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Gray, David

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates intracellular signaling via agonist activation. Although the number of solved GPCR X-ray structures has been steadily increasing, still no structure of the D1 receptor exists. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of 12 orthosteric vicinity residues of possible importance to G protein-coupled activation to examine the function of prototypical orthosteric D1 agonists and partial agonists. We find that residues from four different regions of the D1 receptor make significant contributions to agonist function. All compounds studied, which are catechol-amines, are found to interact with the previously identified residues: the conserved D103(3.32), as well as the trans-membrane V serine residues. Additional key interactions are found for trans-membrane VI residues F288(6.51), F289(6.52) and N292(6.55), as well as the extra-cellular loop residue L190(ECL2). Molecular dynamics simulations of a D1 homology model have been used to help put the ligand-residue interactions into context. Finally, we considered the rescaling of fold-shift data as a method to account for the change in the size of the mutated side-chain and found that this rescaling helps to relate the calculated ligand-residue energies with observed experimental fold-shifts.

  9. Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 in preeclamptic Placenta and its relevance to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuying; Peng, Huilian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hanzhi; Dong, Minyue

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) in the placenta from women with preeclampsia and normal pregnancy, and to delineate the regulatory effects on thophoblast cell by FABP4. We determined the expression of FABP4 by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) or enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting for protein. Small interference of ribonucleic acid (siRNA) and specific FABP4 inhibitor were used to inhibit FABP4. The proliferation, migration and invasion of trophoblastic cells (Swan-71 and Jar) were evaluated with cell counting kit-8, wound-healing test and transwell analysis respectively. We found the expression of FABP4 was significantly higher in the placenta of preeclamptic women than that of women with normal pregnancy (t = 4.244, P < 0.001 for mRNA; t = 4.536, P < 0.001 for protein). FABP4 siRNA significantly reduced the proliferation of trophoblasts (P < 0.001). The specific inhibition of FABP4 inhibited the proliferation of trophoblasts in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.001) and the inhibitory effect increased as the concentration of inhibitor increased. FABP4 siRNA and specific inhibitor significantly decreased the migration (P < 0.001) and invasion (P < 0.001) of trophoblasts. We concluded the increase in placental FABP4 expression in preeclampsia may affect the function of trophoblast, and this increase may have a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  10. Ischaemic preconditioning preferentially increases protein S-nitrosylation in subsarcolemmal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junhui; Nguyen, Tiffany; Aponte, Angel M.; Menazza, Sara; Kohr, Mark J.; Roth, David M.; Patel, Hemal H.; Murphy, Elizabeth; Steenbergen, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and protein S-nitrosylation (SNO) have been shown to play important roles in ischaemic preconditioning (IPC)-induced acute cardioprotection. The majority of proteins that show increased SNO following IPC are localized to the mitochondria, and our recent studies suggest that caveolae transduce acute NO/SNO cardioprotective signalling in IPC hearts. Due to the close association between subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and the sarcolemma/caveolae, we tested the hypothesis that SSM, rather than the interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), are major targets for NO/SNO signalling derived from caveolae-associated eNOS. Following either control perfusion or IPC, SSM and IFM were isolated from Langendorff perfused mouse hearts, and SNO was analysed using a modified biotin switch method with fluorescent maleimide fluors. In perfusion control hearts, the SNO content was higher in SSM compared with IFM (1.33 ± 0.19, ratio of SNO content Perf-SSM vs. Perf-IFM), and following IPC SNO content significantly increased preferentially in SSM, but not in IFM (1.72 ± 0.17 and 1.07 ± 0.04, ratio of SNO content IPC-SSM vs. Perf-IFM, and IPC-IFM vs. Perf-IFM, respectively). Consistent with these findings, eNOS, caveolin-3, and connexin-43 were detected in SSM, but not in IFM, and IPC resulted in a further significant increase in eNOS/caveolin-3 levels in SSM. Interestingly, we did not observe an IPC-induced increase in SNO or eNOS/caveolin-3 in SSM isolated from caveolin-3−/− mouse hearts, which could not be protected with IPC. In conclusion, these results suggest that SSM may be the preferential target of sarcolemmal signalling-derived post-translational protein modification (caveolae-derived eNOS/NO/SNO), thus providing an important role in IPC-induced cardioprotection. PMID:25694588

  11. Selective Pressure to Increase Charge in Immunodominant Epitopes of the H3 Hemagglutinin Influenza Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Long, Jinxue; Sun, Haoxin; Tobin, Gregory J.; Nara, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionary speed and the consequent immune escape of H3N2 influenza A virus make it an interesting evolutionary system. Charged amino acid residues are often significant contributors to the free energy of binding for protein–protein interactions, including antibody–antigen binding and ligand–receptor binding. We used Markov chain theory and maximum likelihood estimation to model the evolution of the number of charged amino acids on the dominant epitope in the hemagglutinin protein of circulating H3N2 virus strains. The number of charged amino acids increased in the dominant epitope B of the H3N2 virus since introduction in humans in 1968. When epitope A became dominant in 1989, the number of charged amino acids increased in epitope A and decreased in epitope B. Interestingly, the number of charged residues in the dominant epitope of the dominant circulating strain is never fewer than that in the vaccine strain. We propose these results indicate selective pressure for charged amino acids that increase the affinity of the virus epitope for water and decrease the affinity for host antibodies. The standard PAM model of generic protein evolution is unable to capture these trends. The reduced alphabet Markov model (RAMM) model we introduce captures the increased selective pressure for charged amino acids in the dominant epitope of hemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza (R2 > 0.98 between 1968 and 1988). The RAMM model calibrated to historical H3N2 influenza virus evolution in humans fit well to the H3N2/Wyoming virus evolution data from Guinea pig animal model studies. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00239-010-9405-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21086120

  12. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross).

  13. T Cell Inactivation by Poxviral B22 Family Proteins Increases Viral Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A.; Edwards, David M.; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K.; Pickup, David J.; Lewinsohn, David M.; Gold, Marielle C.; Wong, Scott W.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Slifka, Mark K.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  14. Extending CATH: increasing coverage of the protein structure universe and linking structure with function.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Alison L; Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Clegg, Andrew B; Rentzsch, Robert; Furnham, Nicholas; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Jones, David; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    CATH version 3.3 (class, architecture, topology, homology) contains 128,688 domains, 2386 homologous superfamilies and 1233 fold groups, and reflects a major focus on classifying structural genomics (SG) structures and transmembrane proteins, both of which are likely to add structural novelty to the database and therefore increase the coverage of protein fold space within CATH. For CATH version 3.4 we have significantly improved the presentation of sequence information and associated functional information for CATH superfamilies. The CATH superfamily pages now reflect both the functional and structural diversity within the superfamily and include structural alignments of close and distant relatives within the superfamily, annotated with functional information and details of conserved residues. A significantly more efficient search function for CATH has been established by implementing the search server Solr (http://lucene.apache.org/solr/). The CATH v3.4 webpages have been built using the Catalyst web framework.

  15. Increased response to morphine in mice lacking protein kinase C epsilon

    PubMed Central

    Newton, P. M.; Kim, J. A.; McGeehan, A. J.; Paredes, J. P.; Chu, K.; Wallace, M. J.; Roberts, A. J.; Hodge, C. W.; Messing, R. O.

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine–threonine kinases has been implicated in behavioral responses to opiates, but little is known about the individual PKC isozymes involved. Here, we show that mice lacking PKCε have increased sensitivity to the rewarding effects of morphine, revealed as the expression of place preference and intravenous self-administration at very low doses of morphine that do not evoke place preference or self-administration in wild-type mice. The PKCε null mice also show prolonged maintenance of morphine place preference in response to repeated testing when compared with wild-type mice. The supraspinal analgesic effects of morphine are enhanced in PKCε null mice, and the development of tolerance to the spinal analgesic effects of morphine is delayed. The density of μ-opioid receptors and their coupling to G-proteins are normal. These studies identify PKCε as a key regulator of opiate sensitivity in mice. PMID:16899053

  16. Deletion of PTEN produces deficits in conditioned fear and increases fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Morrison, Jessica B; White, Jessika

    2013-11-15

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new memories. We used delayed fear conditioning and trace fear conditioning to determine learning and memory deficits in neuron subset-specific Pten (NS-Pten) conditional knockout (KO) mice. We found that NS-Pten KO mice had deficits in contextual learning and trace conditioning, but did not have deficits in the ability to learn a conditioned stimulus. Furthermore, we found increased levels in the total and phosphorylated forms of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in the hippocampus of NS-Pten KO mice.

  17. Increased expression of Dock180 protein in the noninfarcted myocardium in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Lan; Li, Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Wen-Ju; Wang, Li-Ping

    2013-03-01

    The integrin β1 subunit and its downstream molecule focal adhesion kinase have been identified as critical molecules for the inhibition of postinfarction cardiac remodeling, ischemic cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. However, as a component of the integrin pathway, it is still unclear whether Dock180 (dedicator of cytokinesis 1) protein is expressed in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones. In this study, experimental myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operation (sham) models were established in Sprague Dawley rats and the expression of Dock180 protein in the myocardium of the sham group and in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones of the MI group was detected by Western blot technique. The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium was as follows: postsham 24-hour group, 0.10 ± 0.04 (n = 8); post-MI 24-hour group, 0.13 ± 0.03 (n = 8); postsham 12-week group, 0.11 ± 0.05 (n = 8); and post-MI 12-week group 0.17 ± 0.04 (n = 8). The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium in the post-MI 12-week group was significantly higher than that in the postsham 12-week group (p = 0.019), in the postsham 24-hour group (p = 0.004), and in the post-MI 24-hour group (p = 0.040). We conclude that Dock180 protein is expressed in the myocardium in rats. Furthermore, its expression is significantly increased in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones.

  18. Rational Mutagenesis of Cyclodextrin Glucanotransferase at the Calcium Binding Regions for Enhancement of Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Poh Hong; Illias, Rosli Md.; Goh, Kian Mau

    2012-01-01

    Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as “parent CGTase” herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R) were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected. PMID:22754298

  19. Atherogenic diet increases cholesteryl ester transfer protein messenger RNA levels in rabbit liver.

    PubMed

    Quinet, E M; Agellon, L B; Kroon, P A; Marcel, Y L; Lee, Y C; Whitlock, M E; Tall, A R

    1990-02-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer activity is increased in plasma of cholesterol-fed rabbits. To investigate the mechanisms leading to changes in activity, we measured cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass by RIA and CETP mRNA abundance by Northern and slot blot analysis using a human CETP cDNA probe in control (n = 8) and cholesterol-fed rabbits (n = 10). Cholesterol feeding (chow plus 0.5% cholesterol, 10% corn oil) for 30 d increased CETP mass in plasma 3.2-fold in the cholesterol-fed rabbits (12.45 +/- 0.82 micrograms/ml) compared with controls (3.86 +/- 0.38 micrograms/ml). In the hypercholesterolemic rabbit, liver CETP mRNA levels were increased 2.8 times control mRNA levels. Actin, apo E, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, and albumin mRNA abundances were unchanged. In contrast to the widespread tissue distribution in humans, CETP mRNA was not detected in extrahepatic tissues of either control or cholesterol-fed animals. Using a sensitive RNase protection assay, the increase in liver CETP mRNA was detectable within 3 d of beginning the high cholesterol diet. Thus, in response to the atherogenic diet there is an early increase in liver CETP mRNA, probably causing increased CETP synthesis and secretion, and increased plasma CETP. The results indicate that the CETP gene may be regulated by diet-induced changes in lipid metabolism.

  20. Copper status of ewes fed increasing amounts of copper from copper sulfate or copper proteinate.

    PubMed

    Eckert, G E; Greene, L W; Carstens, G E; Ramsey, W S

    1999-01-01

    The Cu status of mature, crossbred ewes fed two sources (CuSO4 vs. Cu proteinate) and three levels (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg) of dietary Cu was determined in a 73-d feeding trial. Ewes (n = 30) were fed a basal diet containing rice meal feed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed meal, meat and bone meal, cracked corn, and vitamin-mineral supplements at 2.5% of BW to meet NRC requirements for protein, energy, macrominerals, and microminerals, excluding Cu. The basal diet contained 5 mg/kg Cu, 113 mg/kg Fe, .1 mg/kg Mo, and .17% S. Copper sulfate or Cu proteinate was added to the basal diet to supply 10, 20, or 30 mg/kg of dietary copper in a 2x3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Ewes were housed in 3.7- x 9.1-m pens in an open-sided barn. Blood samples were collected on d 28 and 73. Ewes were slaughtered on d 74, and liver and other tissues were collected to determine Cu concentrations. An interaction (P = .08) occurred between source and level for liver Cu. The interaction existed due to an increase in liver Cu concentrations when ewes were fed increasing dietary Cu from CuSO4 but not when fed Cu proteinate diets. There was no source x level interaction (P>.10) for the blood constituents measured. On d 73, plasma ceruloplasmin activity was greater (P<.05) in ewes fed Cu proteinate than in those fed CuSO4 (33.1 vs. 26.8 microM x min(-1) x L(-1)). Increasing the concentration of dietary Cu did not affect (P>.10) plasma ceruloplasmin. Packed cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count (RBC), white blood cell count, whole blood hemoglobin (wHb), plasma hemoglobin, and plasma Cu were similar between sources of Cu. Ewes fed 20 mg/kg Cu had lower (P<.05) PCV, RBC, and wHb than those fed 10 or 30 mg/kg Cu diets. Feeding up to 30 mg/kg Cu from these sources did not cause an observable Cu toxicity during the 73-d period.

  1. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  2. An efficient TALEN mutagenesis system in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunling; Shan, Qiwei; Gao, Caixia

    2014-08-15

    Targeted gene mutagenesis is a powerful tool for elucidating gene function and facilitating genetic improvement in rice. TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases), consisting of a custom TALE DNA binding domain fused to a nonspecific FokI cleavage domain, are one of the most efficient genome engineering methods developed to date. The technology of TALENs allows DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced into predetermined chromosomal loci. DSBs trigger DNA repair mechanisms and can result in loss of gene function by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), or they can be exploited to modify gene function or activity by precise homologous recombination (HR). In this paper, we describe a detailed protocol for constructing TALEN expression vectors, assessing nuclease activities in vivo using rice protoplast-based assays, generating and introducing TALEN DNAs into embryogenic calluses of rice and identifying TALEN-generated mutations at targeted genomic sites. Using these methods, T0 rice plants resulting from TALEN mutagenesis can be produced within 4-5 months.

  3. A practical teaching course in directed protein evolution using the green fluorescent protein as a model.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain reaction. Screening of bacterial colonies transformed with random mutant libraries identified GFP variants with increased fluorescence yields. Mapping the three-dimensional structure of these mutants demonstrated how alterations in structural features such as the environment around the fluorophore and properties of the protein surface can influence functional properties such as the intensity of fluorescence and protein solubility.

  4. Halobacterial nano vesicles displaying murine bactericidal permeability-increasing protein rescue mice from lethal endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; DasSarma, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Oindrilla; Kim, Jong Myoung; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) had been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and endotoxin neutralizing activity by interacting with LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The current study examines the feasibility of using murine BPI (mBPI) expressed on halophilic Archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) for the treatment of endotoxemia in high-risk patients, using a murine model of D-galactosamine-induced endotoxic shock. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1was used to express the N-terminal 199 amino acid residues of mBPI fused to the GVNP GvpC protein, and bound to the surface of the haloarchaeal GVNPs. Our results indicate that delivery of mBPIN-GVNPs increase the survival rate of mice challenged with lethal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Additionally, the mBPIN-GVNP-treated mice displayed reduced symptoms of inflammation, including inflammatory anemia, recruitment of neutrophils, liver apoptosis as well as increased pro-inflammatory serum cytokine levels. PMID:27646594

  5. Iron regulatory protein-2 knockout increases perihematomal ferritin expression and cell viability after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F

    2010-06-14

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls 3 days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at 3 days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries.

  6. Iron Regulatory Protein-2 Knockout Increases Perihematomal Ferritin Expression and Cell Viability after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O.; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls three days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at three days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries. PMID:20399759

  7. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  9. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  10. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile.

  11. NFATc1 phosphorylation by DYRK1A increases its protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Yuankai; Chen, Long; Sun, Xiulian

    2017-01-01

    NFATs are transcription factors involved in immune activation and tumor progression. Previous reports showed that DYRK1A suppressed NFATc2 transcriptional activity through phosphorylation. Nonetheless, our results showed that DYRK1A increased NFATc1/αA protein level and subsequent transcriptional activity. DYRK1A phosphorylation of NFATc1/αA at S261, S278, S403 and S409 interfered with NFATc1 ubiquitination and ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Our results imply that DYRK1A is a positive kinase in regulation of NFATc1. PMID:28235034

  12. Chronic SIV and Morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S.; Lisco, Steven J.; Buch, Shilpa J.

    2015-01-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen- morphine treatment. The up regulation of heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 in the SIV+morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/Morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction. PMID:26037114

  13. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  14. Association analysis of bovine bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein gene polymorphisms with somatic cell score in Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) protein is expressed primarily in bovine neutrophils and epithelial cells and functions as a binding protein of bacterial lipopolysaccharide produced by Gram-negative bacteria. The protein is important in host defense against bacterial infections and may pl...

  15. Single amino acid substitutions on the needle tip protein IpaD increased Shigella virulence.

    PubMed

    Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Schiavolin, Lionel; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2014-07-01

    Infection of colonic epithelial cells by Shigella is associated with the type III secretion system, which serves as a molecular syringe to inject effectors into host cells. This system includes an extracellular needle used as a conduit for secreted proteins. Two of these proteins, IpaB and IpaD, dock at the needle tip to control secretion and are also involved in the insertion of a translocation pore into host cell membrane allowing effector delivery. To better understand the function of IpaD, we substituted thirteen residues conserved among homologous proteins in other bacterial species. Generated variants were tested for their ability to surface expose IpaB and IpaD, to control secretion, to insert the translocation pore, and to invade host cells. In addition to a first group of seven ipaD variants that behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, we identified a second group with mutations V314D and I319D that deregulated secretion of all effectors, but remained fully invasive. Moreover, we identified a third group with mutations Y153A, T161D, Q165L and Y276A, that exhibited increased levels of translocators secretion, pore formation, and cell entry. Altogether, our results offer a better understanding of the role of IpaD in the control of Shigella virulence.

  16. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  17. Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Increases Protein Acetylation and Accelerates Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karamanlidis, Georgios; Lee, Chi Fung; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Suthammarak, Wichit; Gong, Guohua; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.; Wang, Wang; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including heart failure but the specific mechanisms for this link remain largely elusive. We modeled the impairment of mitochondrial respiration by inactivation of the Ndufs4 gene, a protein critical for Complex I (C-I) assembly, in the mouse heart (cKO). While C-I supported respiration decreased by >40%, the cKO mice maintained normal cardiac function in vivo and high-energy phosphate content in isolated perfused hearts. However, the cKO mice developed accelerated heart failure after pressure overload or repeated pregnancy. Decreased NAD+/NADH ratio by C-I deficiency inhibited Sirt3 activity, leading to increase in protein acetylation, and sensitization of the permeability transition in mitochondria (mPTP). NAD+ precursor supplementation to cKO mice partially normalized the NAD+/NADH ratio, protein acetylation and mPTP sensitivity. These findings describe a mechanism connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to the susceptibility to diseases and propose a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23931755

  18. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p < 0.0001). Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 1.4 mmHg and 0.8 mmHg, respectively (both p ≤ 0.038). The misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h SBP was primarily explained by an increase in SBP during the wake period (+1.7 mmHg; p = 0.017), whereas the misalignment-mediated increase in 24-h DBP was primarily explained by an increase in DBP during the sleep opportunity (+1.8 mmHg; p = 0.005). Circadian misalignment per se increases hs-CRP and blood pressure in shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation Increases ChREBP Protein Content and Transcriptional Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guinez, Céline; Filhoulaud, Gaëlle; Rayah-Benhamed, Fadila; Marmier, Solenne; Dubuquoy, Céline; Dentin, Renaud; Moldes, Marthe; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Yang, Xiaoyong; Lefebvre, Tony; Girard, Jean; Postic, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbohydrate-responsive element–binding protein (ChREBP) is a key transcription factor that mediates the effects of glucose on glycolytic and lipogenic genes in the liver. We have previously reported that liver-specific inhibition of ChREBP prevents hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice by specifically decreasing lipogenic rates in vivo. To better understand the regulation of ChREBP activity in the liver, we investigated the implication of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc or O-GlcNAcylation), an important glucose-dependent posttranslational modification playing multiple roles in transcription, protein stabilization, nuclear localization, and signal transduction. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS O-GlcNAcylation is highly dynamic through the action of two enzymes: the O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which transfers the monosaccharide to serine/threonine residues on a target protein, and the O-GlcNAcase (OGA), which hydrolyses the sugar. To modulate ChREBPOG in vitro and in vivo, the OGT and OGA enzymes were overexpressed or inhibited via adenoviral approaches in mouse hepatocytes and in the liver of C57BL/6J or obese db/db mice. RESULTS Our study shows that ChREBP interacts with OGT and is subjected to O-GlcNAcylation in liver cells. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes the ChREBP protein and increases its transcriptional activity toward its target glycolytic (L-PK) and lipogenic genes (ACC, FAS, and SCD1) when combined with an active glucose flux in vivo. Indeed, OGT overexpression significantly increased ChREBPOG in liver nuclear extracts from fed C57BL/6J mice, leading in turn to enhanced lipogenic gene expression and to excessive hepatic triglyceride deposition. In the livers of hyperglycemic obese db/db mice, ChREBPOG levels were elevated compared with controls. Interestingly, reducing ChREBPOG levels via OGA overexpression decreased lipogenic protein content (ACC, FAS), prevented hepatic steatosis, and improved the lipidic profile of OGA-treated db/db mice

  20. Microtubule-Associated Protein SBgLR Facilitates Storage Protein Deposition and Its Expression Leads to Lysine Content Increase in Transgenic Maize Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Li, Shixue; Yue, Jing; Xiao, Wenhan; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) seed is deficient in protein and lysine content. Many studies have been made to improve the nutritional quality of maize seeds. Previously, we reported the role of a natural lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR in increasing protein and lysine content. However, how the SBgLR improves lysine and protein content remains unclear. Here, the reasons and possible mechanism for SBgLR in protein and lysine improvement have been analyzed and discussed. Through seed-specific expression of SBgLR, we obtained transgenic maize with the simultaneously increased lysine and protein contents. High-protein and high-lysine characters were stably inherited across generations. The expression of SBgLR in maize kernels increased the accumulation of both zeins and non-zein proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the number of protein bodies (PBs) was increased obviously in SBgLR transgenic immature endosperms with the morphology and structure of PBs unchanged. The proteinaceous matrix was more abundant in transgenic mature endosperms under scanning electron microscopy. The stabilities of zein and lysine-rich non-zein genes were also increased in transgenic endosperms. Finally, the potential application of SBgLR in maize nutrient improvement was evaluated. This study shows that a cytoskeleton-associated protein has potential applicable value in crop nutrient improving, and provided a feasible strategy for improvement of maize grain quality. PMID:26703573

  1. Learning selectively increases protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in specific regions of the chick brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, F S; McCabe, B J; Horn, G; Routtenberg, A

    1993-01-01

    The effect of imprinting, an early form of exposure learning, on the phosphorylation state of the protein kinase C substrates myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and protein F1/43-kDa growth-associated protein (F1/GAP-43) was studied in two regions of the chick forebrain. One region, the intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV), is probably a site of long-term memory; the other, the wulst, contains somatic sensory and visual projection areas. After imprinting, a significant increase in MARCKS protein phosphorylation was observed in the left IMHV but not the right IMHV. No significant alteration in F1/GAP-43 was observed in IMHV. MARCKS was resolved into two acidic components of pI approximately 5.0 and approximately 4.0. Phosphorylation of the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS but not the pI approximately 4.0 MARCKS was significantly altered by imprinting. The partial correlation between preference score (an index of learning) and phosphorylation, holding constant the effect of approach activity during training, was significant only for the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS in the left IMHV. A significant negative partial correlation between preference score and F1/GAP-43 phosphorylation in the right wulst was observed. Because the imprinting-induced alteration in MARCKS is selective with respect to phosphoprotein moiety, hemispheric location, and brain region, we propose that these alterations may be central to the learning process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8464879

  2. Rapamycin does not prevent increases in myofibrillar or mitochondrial protein synthesis following endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Philp, Andrew; Schenk, Simon; Perez-Schindler, Joaquin; Hamilton, D Lee; Breen, Leigh; Laverone, Erin; Jeromson, Stewart; Phillips, Stuart M; Baar, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed to investigate the role of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the regulation of myofibrillar (MyoPS) and mitochondrial (MitoPS) protein synthesis following endurance exercise. Forty-two female C57BL/6 mice performed 1 h of treadmill running (18 m min−1; 5° grade), 1 h after i.p. administration of rapamycin (1.5 mg · kg−1) or vehicle. To quantify skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rates, a flooding dose (50 mg · kg−1) of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine was administered via i.p. injection. Blood and gastrocnemius muscle were collected in non-exercised control mice, as well as at 0.5, 3 and 6 h after completing exercise (n = 4 per time point). Skeletal muscle MyoPS and MitoPS were determined by measuring isotope incorporation in their respective protein pools. Activation of the mTORC1-signalling cascade was measured via direct kinase activity assay and immunoblotting, whereas genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis were measured via a quantitative RT-PCR. MyoPS increased rapidly in the vehicle group post-exercise and remained elevated for 6 h, whereas this response was transiently blunted (30 min post-exercise) by rapamycin. By contrast, MitoPS was unaffected by rapamycin, and was increased over the entire post-exercise recovery period in both groups (P < 0.05). Despite rapid increases in both MyoPS and MitoPS, mTORC1 activation was suppressed in both groups post-exercise for the entire 6 h recovery period. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and mitochondrial transcription factor A mRNA increased post-exercise (P < 0.05) and this response was augmented by rapamycin (P < 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that endurance exercise stimulates MyoPS and MitoPS in skeletal muscle independently of mTORC1 activation. Key points Previous studies have shown that endurance exercise increases myofibrillar (MyoPS) and

  3. Electric field stimulation can increase protein synthesis in articular cartilage explants.

    PubMed

    MacGinitie, L A; Gluzband, Y A; Grodzinsky, A J

    1994-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the electric fields associated with the dynamic loading of cartilage may affect its growth, remodeling, and biosynthesis. While the application of exogenous fields has been shown to modulate cartilage biosynthesis, it is not known what range of field magnitudes and frequencies can alter biosynthesis and how they relate to the magnitudes and frequencies of endogenous fields. Such information is necessary to understand and identify mechanisms by which fields may act on cartilage metabolism. In this study, incorporation of 35S-methionine was used as a marker for electric field-induced changes in chondrocyte protein synthesis in disks of cartilage from the femoropatellar groove of 1 to 2-week-old calves. The cartilage was stimulated sinusoidally at 1, 10, 100, 10(3), and 10(4) Hz with current densities of 10-30 mA/cm2. Incorporation was assessed in control disks maintained in the absence of applied current at 37, 41, and 43 degrees C. The possibility that applied currents would induce synthesis of the same stress proteins that are caused by heating or other mechanisms was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examination of gel fluorographs. Total radiolabel incorporation in cartilage that had been stimulated relative to incorporation in the controls increased with current density magnitudes greater than 10 mA/cm2. The increase was greatest at 100 Hz and 1 kHz, and it depended on the position on the joint surface from which the cartilage samples were taken. Together, these results suggest that endogenous electric fields could affect cartilage biosynthesis. Stress proteins were not induced at any current density when the electrodes were electrically connected but chemically isolated from the media by agarose bridges. Stress proteins were observed for disks incubated at temperatures greater than 39 degrees C (no field) and when the stimulating platinum electrodes were in direct contact with the media

  4. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  5. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R

    2009-09-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress and no detectable induction following light stress, consistent with its susceptibility to bleaching in native environments compared to the laminar coral. Our observations also demonstrate that increased light intensity and heat stress exhibited a greater negative impact on the photosynthetic capacity of environmentally sensitive branched coral than the more resistant laminar coral. This supports a correlation between stress induction of Hsp60 and (a) ability to counter perturbation of photosynthetic capacity by light and heat stress and (b) resistance to environmentally induced coral bleaching.

  6. Increasing the Chemical‐Shift Dispersion of Unstructured Proteins with a Covalent Lanthanide Shift Reagent

    PubMed Central

    Göbl, Christoph; Resch, Moritz; Strickland, Madeleine; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Viertler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) by NMR often suffers from highly overlapped resonances that prevent unambiguous chemical‐shift assignments, and data analysis that relies on well‐separated resonances. We present a covalent paramagnetic lanthanide‐binding tag (LBT) for increasing the chemical‐shift dispersion and facilitating the chemical‐shift assignment of challenging, repeat‐containing IDPs. Linkage of the DOTA‐based LBT to a cysteine residue induces pseudo‐contact shifts (PCS) for resonances more than 20 residues from the spin‐labeling site. This leads to increased chemical‐shift dispersion and decreased signal overlap, thereby greatly facilitating chemical‐shift assignment. This approach is applicable to IDPs of varying sizes and complexity, and is particularly helpful for repeat‐containing IDPs and low‐complexity regions. This results in improved efficiency for IDP analysis and binding studies. PMID:27763708

  7. Increased bone morphogenetic protein signaling contributes to age-related declines in neurogenesis and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Emily A.; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Bond, Allison M.; Jarrett, Jennifer C.; Peng, Chian-Yu; Kessler, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus and diminished hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) increases with age by more than 10-fold in the mouse dentate gyrus while levels of the BMP inhibitor, noggin, decrease. This results in a profound 30-fold increase in phosphorylated-SMAD1/5/8, the effector of canonical BMP signaling. Just as observed in mice, a profound increase in expression of BMP4 is observed in the dentate gyrus of humans with no known cognitive abnormalities. Inhibition of BMP signaling either by overexpression of noggin or transgenic manipulation not only increases neurogenesis in aging mice, but remarkably, is associated with a rescue of cognitive deficits to levels comparable to young mice. Additive benefits are observed when combining inhibition of BMP signaling and environmental enrichment. These findings indicate that increased BMP signaling contributes significantly to impairments in neurogenesis and to cognitive decline associated with aging, and identify this pathway as a potential druggable target for reversing age-related changes in cognition. PMID:26827654

  8. Agouti-related protein increases food hoarding more than food intake in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Day, Diane E; Bartness, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Agouti-related protein (AgRP), an endogenous melanocortin 3/4 receptor antagonist, appears to play an important role in the control of food intake and energy balance because exogenous administration in rats and overexpression in mice result in hyperphagia and body mass gain. Furthermore, arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA is increased with fasting in laboratory rats and mice and is decreased with refeeding. In Siberian hamsters, fasting also increases arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA, but these animals increase food hoarding, rather than food intake with refeeding. Therefore, we tested whether exogenous AgRP increased food hoarding in this species. Hamsters were trained in a hoarding/foraging apparatus to run a programmed number of wheel revolutions to earn food pellets. Four doses of AgRP-(83-132) or vehicle were injected into the third ventricle at the beginning of the dark phase, and food hoarding, food intake, and foraging were measured at various time points subsequently. Overall, food hoarding was stimulated as much as 10 times more than food intake, and both responses occurred as early as 1 h after injection. Food hoarding was increased the greatest at the lowest dose (0.1 nmol), whereas food intake was increased the greatest at the second lowest dose (1 nmol). Food intake and especially food hoarding were increased up to seven days after the AgRP injections. Foraging was increased at all AgRP doses except the highest dose (100 nmol). These results suggest that AgRP triggers the search for food in this species, and once they find it, hoarding predominates over eating.

  9. Nitrous oxide plus isoflurane induces apoptosis and increases β-amyloid protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yu; Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yiying; Norton, David; Tian, Ming; Li, Shuren; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Background Some anesthetics have been suggested to induce neurotoxicity including promotion of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathogenesis. Nitrous oxide and isoflurane are common anesthetics. Here, we set out to assess effects of nitrous oxide and/or isoflurane on apoptosis and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in H4 human neuroglioma cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. Methods The cells or neurons were exposed to 70% nitrous oxide and/or 1% isoflurane for six hours. The cells or neurons and conditioned media were harvested at the end of the treatment. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, processing of amyloid precursor protein, and Aβ levels were determined. Results Treatment with a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 1% isoflurane for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in H4 naïve cells and primary neurons from naïve mice. The 70% nitrous oxide plus 1% isoflurane, but neither alone, for six hours induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis, and increased levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in H4-amyloid precursor protein cells. In addition, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced Aβ generation was reduced by a broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD. Finally, the nitrous oxide plus isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458, but potentiated by exogenously added Aβ. Conclusion These results suggest that common anesthetics nitrous oxide plus isoflurane may promote neurotoxicity by inducing apoptosis and increasing Aβ levels. The generated Aβ may further potentiate apoptosis to form another round of apoptosis and Aβ generation. More studies, especially the in vivo confirmation of these in vitro findings, are needed. PMID:19741497

  10. Heating decreases epithiospecifier protein activity and increases sulforaphane formation in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Matusheski, Nathan V; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2004-05-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from broccoli, is one of the most potent food-derived anticarcinogens. This compound is not present in the intact vegetable, rather it is formed from its glucosinolate precursor, glucoraphanin, by the action of myrosinase, a thioglucosidase enzyme, when broccoli tissue is crushed or chewed. However, a number of studies have demonstrated that sulforaphane yield from glucoraphanin is low, and that a non-bioactive nitrile analog, sulforaphane nitrile, is the primary hydrolysis product when plant tissue is crushed at room temperature. Recent evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis, nitrile formation from glucosinolates is controlled by a heat-sensitive protein, epithiospecifier protein (ESP), a non-catalytic cofactor of myrosinase. Our objectives were to examine the effects of heating broccoli florets and sprouts on sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile formation, to determine if broccoli contains ESP activity, then to correlate heat-dependent changes in ESP activity, sulforaphane content and bioactivity, as measured by induction of the phase II detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) in cell culture. Heating fresh broccoli florets or broccoli sprouts to 60 degrees C prior to homogenization simultaneously increased sulforaphane formation and decreased sulforaphane nitrile formation. A significant loss of ESP activity paralleled the decrease in sulforaphane nitrile formation. Heating to 70 degrees C and above decreased the formation of both products in broccoli florets, but not in broccoli sprouts. The induction of QR in cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa lclc7 cells paralleled increases in sulforaphane formation.

  11. Protection against endotoxic shock by bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Yang, R; Marsters, S; Ashkenazi, A; Bunting, S; Marra, M N; Scott, R W; Baker, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) is a neutrophil primary granule protein that inhibits effects of LPS in vitro. The current study examined the effects of BPI on hemodynamics, mortality, and circulating endotoxin and cytokines in conscious rats with endotoxic shock. Catheters were implanted into the right femoral artery and vein. 1 d later, human recombinant BPI (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was intravenously injected immediately, 30 min, or 2 h after intravenous injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were monitored and blood was collected before and after injection. BPI given immediately or 30 min after LPS prevented the LPS-induced reduction in MAP at 4-8 h and markedly reduced mortality. BPI given 2 h after LPS injection had no protective effect. BPI treated immediately after LPS reduced the circulating levels of endotoxin and IL-6 but increased the circulating levels of TNF. We propose that BPI exerts its protective effect through a TNF-independent mechanism, by inhibiting endotoxin-stimulated production of IL-6. PMID:7706502

  12. Universal method for protein bioconjugation with nanocellulose scaffolds for increased cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Sämfors, Sanna; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is an emerging biomaterial since it is biocompatible, integrates well with host tissue and can be biosynthesized in desired architecture. However, being a hydrogel, it exhibits low affinity for cell attachment, which is crucial for the cellular fate process. To increase cell attachment, the surface of BNC scaffolds was modified with two proteins, fibronectin and collagen type I, using an effective bioconjugation method applying 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium (CDAP) tetrafluoroborate as the intermediate catalytic agent. The effect of CDAP treatment on cell adhesion to the BNC surface is shown for human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the mouse mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2. In both cases, the surface modification increased the number of cells attached to the surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells indicated more healthy and viable cells. CDAP activation of bacterial nanocellulose is shown to be a convenient method to conjugate extracellular proteins to the scaffold surfaces. CDAP treatment can be performed in a short period of time in an aqueous environment under heterogeneous and mild conditions preserving the nanofibrillar network of cellulose.

  13. Resveratrol Administration Increases Transthyretin Protein Levels, Ameliorating AD Features: The Importance of Transthyretin Tetrameric Stability

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Luís Miguel; Rodrigues, Daniela; Alemi, Mobina; Silva, Sara Costa; Ribeiro, Carlos Alexandre; Cardoso, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vivo work showed that resveratrol has beneficial effects in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, resulting in increased expression of transthyretin (TTR). TTR binds amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, avoiding its aggregation and toxicity, and is reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in AD. Further, resveratrol binds TTR, stabilizing the native TTR tetrameric structure. To further explore the mechanism of neuroprotection conferred by TTR in AD, resveratrol was administered in the diet to 5- to 8-month-old AD transgenic female mice carrying just 1 copy of the mouse TTR gene for 2 months. Effects in brain Aβ burden were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and total brain Aβ levels by ELISA, showing a striking decrease in both parameters in treated animals. In addition, total brain lipoprotein-related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) levels were increased in treated animals, although its gene expression was unaltered. To further understand the mechanism(s) underlying such improvement in AD features, we measured TTR plasma levels, showing that TTR increased in resveratrol-treated mice, whereas liver TTR gene transcription was not altered. These results strengthen the stability hypothesis, which postulates that TTR is unstable in AD, leading to accelerated clearance and lower levels. Therefore, resveratrol, which stabilizes the TTR tetramer results in TTR-normalized clearance, increases the protein plasma levels. In turn, stabilized TTR binds more strongly to Aβ peptide, avoiding its aggregation. Our results represent a step forward in the understanding of the mechanism underlying TTR protection in AD and highlight the possibility of using TTR stabilization as a therapeutic target in AD. PMID:27385446

  14. Expression of HIV gp120 protein increases sensitivity to the rewarding properties of methamphetamine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P.; Hubbard, David T.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection induce neuropathological changes in corticolimbic brain areas involved in reward and cognitive function. Little is known about the combined effects of methamphetamine and HIV infection on cognitive and reward processes. The HIV/gp120 protein induces neurodegeneration in mice, similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the effects of gp120 expression on associative learning, preference for methamphetamine and non-drug reinforcers, and sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding properties of methamphetamine in transgenic (tg) mice expressing HIV/gp120 protein (gp120-tg). gp120-tg mice learned the operant response for food at the same rate as non-tg mice. In the two-bottle choice procedure with restricted access to drugs, gp120-tg mice exhibited greater preference for methamphetamine and saccharin than non-tg mice, whereas preference for quinine was similar between genotypes. Under conditions of unrestricted access to methamphetamine, the mice exhibited a decreased preference for increasing methamphetamine concentrations. However, male gp120-tg mice showed a decreased preference for methamphetamine at lower concentrations than non-tg male mice. gp120-tg mice developed methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference at lower methamphetamine doses compared with non-tg mice. No differences in methamphetamine pharmacokinetics were found between genotypes. These results indicate that gp120-tg mice exhibit no deficits in associative learning or reward/motivational function for a natural reinforcer. Interestingly, gp120 expression resulted in increased preference for methamphetamine and a highly palatable non-drug reinforcer (saccharin) and increased sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced conditioned reward. These data suggest that HIV-positive individuals may have increased sensitivity to methamphetamine, leading to high methamphetamine abuse potential in this population. PMID

  15. Modeling the contribution of individual proteins to mixed skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates over increasing periods of label incorporation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Wolff, Christopher A; Peelor, Fredrick F; Shipman, Patrick D; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-03-15

    Advances in stable isotope approaches, primarily the use of deuterium oxide ((2)H2O), allow for long-term measurements of protein synthesis, as well as the contribution of individual proteins to tissue measured protein synthesis rates. Here, we determined the influence of individual protein synthetic rates, individual protein content, and time of isotopic labeling on the measured synthesis rate of skeletal muscle proteins. To this end, we developed a mathematical model, applied the model to an established data set collected in vivo, and, to experimentally test the impact of different isotopic labeling periods, used (2)H2O to measure protein synthesis in cultured myotubes over periods of 2, 4, and 7 days. We first demonstrated the influence of both relative protein content and individual protein synthesis rates on measured synthesis rates over time. When expanded to include 286 individual proteins, the model closely approximated protein synthetic rates measured in vivo. The model revealed a 29% difference in measured synthesis rates from the slowest period of measurement (20 min) to the longest period of measurement (6 wk). In support of these findings, culturing of C2C12 myotubes with isotopic labeling periods of 2, 4, or 7 days revealed up to a doubling of the measured synthesis rate in the shorter labeling period compared with the longer period of labeling. From our model, we conclude that a 4-wk period of labeling is ideal for considering all proteins in a mixed-tissue fraction, while minimizing the slowing effect of fully turned-over proteins. In addition, we advocate that careful consideration must be paid to the period of isotopic labeling when comparing mixed protein synthetic rates between studies.

  16. Environmental mutagenesis during the end-Permian ecological crisis.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Henk; Looy, Cindy V; Collinson, Margaret E; Brinkhuis, Henk; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H A; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Sephton, Mark A

    2004-08-31

    During the end-Permian ecological crisis, terrestrial ecosystems experienced preferential dieback of woody vegetation. Across the world, surviving herbaceous lycopsids played a pioneering role in repopulating deforested terrain. We document that the microspores of these lycopsids were regularly released in unseparated tetrads indicative of failure to complete the normal process of spore development. Although involvement of mutation has long been hinted at or proposed in theory, this finding provides concrete evidence for chronic environmental mutagenesis at the time of global ecological crisis. Prolonged exposure to enhanced UV radiation could account satisfactorily for a worldwide increase in land plant mutation. At the end of the Permian, a period of raised UV stress may have been the consequence of severe disruption of the stratospheric ozone balance by excessive emission of hydrothermal organohalogens in the vast area of Siberian Traps volcanism.

  17. New transposon delivery plasmids for insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Adam C.; Perego, Marta; Hoch, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Two new transposon delivery vector systems utilizing Mariner and mini-Tn10 transposons have been developed for in vivo insertional mutagenesis in Bacillus anthracis and other compatible Gram-positive species. The utility of both systems was directly demonstrated through the mutagenesis of a widely used B. anthracis strain. PMID:17931726

  18. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  19. Increasing protein stability by polar surface residues : domain-wide consequences of interactions within a loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Raffen, R.; Dieckman, L.; Boogaard, C.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; C. Boogaard

    2002-01-01

    We have examined the influence of surface hydrogen bonds on the stability of proteins by studying the effects of mutations of human immunoglobulin light chain variable domain (V(L)). In addition to the variants Y27dD, N28F, and T94H of protein kappa IV Len that were previously described, we characterized mutants M4L, L27cN, L27cQ, and K39T, double mutant M4L/Y27dD, and triple mutant M4L/Y27dD/T94H. The triple mutant had an enhanced thermodynamic stability of 4.2 kcal/mol. We determined the structure of the triple mutant by x-ray diffraction and correlated the changes in stability due to the mutations with changes in the three-dimensional structure. Y27dD mutant had increased stability of Len by 2.7 kcal/mol, a large value for a single mutation. Asp27d present in CDR1 formed hydrogen bonds with the side-chain and main-chain atoms within the loop. In the case of the K39T mutant, which reduces stability by 2 kcal/mol, Lys39 in addition to forming a hydrogen bond with a carbonyl oxygen of a neighboring loop may also favorably influence the surface electrostatics of the molecule. We showed that hydrogen bonds between residues in surface loops can add to the overall stability of the V(L) domains. The contribution to stability is further increased if the surface residue makes more than one hydrogen bond or if it forms a hydrogen bond between neighboring turns or loops separated from each other in the amino acid sequence. Based on our experiments we suggest that stabilization of proteins might be systematically accomplished by introducing additional hydrogen bonds on the surface. These substitutions are more straightforward to predict than core-packing interactions and can be selected to avoid affecting the protein's function.

  20. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  1. Lack of Plasma Protein Hemopexin Results in Increased Duodenal Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Veronica; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Silengo, Lorenzo; Aime, Silvio; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The body concentration of iron is regulated by a fine equilibrium between absorption and losses of iron. Iron can be absorbed from diet as inorganic iron or as heme. Hemopexin is an acute phase protein that limits iron access to microorganisms. Moreover, it is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for heme and thus it mediates heme-iron recycling. Considering its involvement in iron homeostasis, it was postulated that hemopexin may play a role in the physiological absorption of inorganic iron. Methods and Results Hemopexin-null mice showed elevated iron deposits in enterocytes, associated with higher duodenal H-Ferritin levels and a significant increase in duodenal expression and activity of heme oxygenase. The expression of heme-iron and inorganic iron transporters was normal. The rate of iron absorption was assessed by measuring the amount of 57Fe retained in tissues from hemopexin-null and wild-type animals after administration of an oral dose of 57FeSO4 or of 57Fe-labelled heme. Higher iron retention in the duodenum of hemopexin-null mice was observed as compared with normal mice. Conversely, iron transfer from enterocytes to liver and bone marrow was unaffected in hemopexin-null mice. Conclusions The increased iron level in hemopexin-null duodenum can be accounted for by an increased iron uptake by enterocytes and storage in ferritins. These data indicate that the lack of hemopexin under physiological conditions leads to an enhanced duodenal iron uptake thus providing new insights to our understanding of body iron homeostasis. PMID:23826373

  2. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  3. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell.

  4. Conditional gene-trap mutagenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Lisette A; Li, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish has become a widely used model for analysis of gene function. Several methods have been used to create mutations in this organism and thousands of mutant lines are available. However, all the conventional zebrafish mutations affect the gene in all cells at all time, making it difficult to determine tissue-specific functions. We have adopted a FlEx Trap approach to generate conditional mutations in zebrafish by gene-trap mutagenesis. Combined with appropriate Cre or Flp lines, the insertional mutants not only allow spatial- and temporal-specific gene inactivation but also permit spatial- and temporal-specific rescue of the disrupted gene. We provide experimental details on how to generate and use such mutations.

  5. Increased oxidative-modifications of cytosolic proteins in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)-exposed rat liver.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Vijay V; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Yu, Li-Rong; Lee, Insong J; Eddington, Natalie D; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) causes acute liver damage in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize oxidative modification and inactivation of cytosolic proteins in MDMA-exposed rats. Markedly increased levels of oxidized and nitrated cytosolic proteins were detected 12 h after the second administration of two consecutive MDMA doses (10 mg/kg each). Comparative 2-DE analysis showed markedly increased levels of biotin-N-methylimide-labeled oxidized cytosolic proteins in MDMA-exposed rats compared to vehicle-treated rats. Proteins in the 22 gel spots of strong intensities were identified using MS/MS. The oxidatively modified proteins identified include anti-oxidant defensive enzymes, a calcium-binding protein, and proteins involved in metabolism of lipids, nitrogen, and carbohydrates (glycolysis). Cytosolic superoxide dismutase was oxidized and its activity significantly inhibited following MDMA exposure. Consistent with the oxidative inactivation of peroxiredoxin, MDMA activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase and p38 kinase. Since these protein kinases phosphorylate anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, their activation may promote apoptosis in MDMA-exposed tissues. Our results show for the first time that MDMA induces oxidative-modification of many cytosolic proteins accompanied with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, contributing to hepatic damage.

  6. Use of Transcriptional Control to Increase Secretion of Heterologous Proteins in T3S Systems.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Kevin J; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Heterologous proteins can be produced in a bacterial host and purified from the cellular constituents. Secretion of the protein of interest to the extracellular space simplifies the purification process and is thought to alleviate toxicity problems associated with intracellular accumulation of the protein of interest. In this protocol, we describe a strategy to engineer protein secretion in a bacterial culture using transcriptional control. The transcription factor HilA is inducibly produced to control production of the secretion machine, and in turn signals the production and secretion of a protein of interest. This allows for high titer of secreted protein in optimized culturing conditions and the effect is observed with all proteins tested.

  7. Moderate excess of dietary protein increases breast meat yield of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Bartov, I; Plavnik, I

    1998-05-01

    Two factorial experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of dietary protein level, expressed as energy to protein (E:P) ratio, on yields of carcass and breast and on abdominal fat pad weight of male broiler chicks at 43 and 57 d of age. Two diets similar in their energy content and differing markedly in their protein content, in which the E:P ratios were lower and identical to the NRC (1994) recommendations, were used in Experiment 1. Four diets, the combination of two energy and two protein levels, in which the E:P ratios were lower and identical to the recommendations, were used in Experiment 2. There were no differences in feed intake or weight gain until 42 d of age between broilers fed the diets with the low and those fed the recommended E:P ratio. However, feed efficiency of the former was consistently and significantly (P < 0.05) higher. The high-energy diets did not affect feed intake but significantly improved weight gain between 7 and 28 d of age and feed efficiency until 42 d of age. In both experiments, carcass yield was not affected by dietary E:P ratio at 43 d of age; however, at 57 d of age it was increased significantly by the low E:P ratio in Experiment 1 and in birds fed the high energy diet in Experiment 2. On a factorial basis, the effect of the low E:P ratio on increasing yield was significant only in Experiment 1. The high dietary energy level increased carcass yield only at 43 d of age, but on a factorial basis its effect was significant. Carcass yield was significantly (P < 0.001) higher at 57 than at 43 d of age. In both experiments, breast meat yield was negatively correlated with dietary E:P ratio, a significant factorial effect. The difference in this variable between broilers fed the diets containing the low and the recommended E:P ratio was significant, at both ages in Experiment 1, and only at 57 d of age in Experiment 2. Breast meat yield was not affected by dietary energy level, and it was significantly (P < 0.001) higher

  8. Tanshinone I increases CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wayne Y W; Zhou, Xuelin; Or, Penelope M Y; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Yeung, John H K

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of Danshen and its active ingredients on the protein expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A2 in primary rat hepatocytes. The ethanolic extract of Danshen roots (containing mainly tanshinones) inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation (IC(50)=24.6 μg/ml) in primary rat hepatocytes while the water extract containing mainly salvianolic acid B and danshenshu had no effect. Individual tanshinones such as cryptotanshinone, dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone IIA inhibited the CYP1A2-mediated metabolism with IC(50) values at 12.9, 17.4 and 31.9 μM, respectively. After 4-day treatment of the rat hepatocytes, the ethanolic extract of Danshen and tanshinone I increased rat CYP1A2 activity by 6.8- and 5.2-fold, respectively, with a concomitant up-regulation of CYP1A2 protein level by 13.5- and 6.5-fold, respectively. CYP1A2 induction correlated with the up-regulation of mRNA level of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which suggested a positive feedback mechanism of tanshinone I-mediated CYP1A2 induction. A formulated Danshen pill (containing mainly danshensu and salvianolic acid B and the tanshinones) up-regulated CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity, but danshensu and salvianolic acid B, when used individually, did not affect CYP1A2 activity. This study was the first report on the Janus action of the tanshinones on rat CYP1A2 activity.

  9. Analysis of HIV-2 Vpx by modeling and insertional mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnke, Lisa A. . E-mail: lmahnke@im.wustl.edu; Belshan, Michael; Ratner, Lee . E-mail: lratner@im.wustl.edu

    2006-04-25

    Vpx facilitates HIV-2 nuclear localization by a poorly understood mechanism. We have compared Vpx to an NMR structure HIV-1 Vpr in a central helical domain and probed regions of Vpx by insertional mutagenesis. A predicted loop between helices two and three appears to be unique, overlapping with a known novel nuclear localization signal. Overall, Vpx was found to be surprisingly flexible, tolerating a series of large insertions. We found that insertion within the polyproline-containing C-terminus destabilizes nuclear localization, whereas mutating a second helix in the central domain disrupts viral packaging. Other insertional mutants in the predicted loop and in a linker region between the central domain and the C-terminus may be useful as sites of intramolecular tags as they could be packaged adequately and retained preintegration complex associated integration activity in a serum starvation assay. An unexpected result was found within a previously defined nuclear localization motif near aa 71. This mutant retained robust nuclear localization in a GFP fusion assay and was competent for preintegration complex associated nuclear import. In summary, we have modeled helical content in Vpx and assessed potential sites of intramolecular tags which may prove useful for protein-protein interactions studies.

  10. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  11. Increased expression of lysosome membrane protein 2 in glomeruli of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Merchant, Michael L; Wilkey, Daniel W; Zhang, Terry; Zabrouskov, Vlad; van der Vlag, Johan; Dijkman, Henry B; Willemsen, Brigith K; Wetzels, Jack F; Klein, Jon B; Deegens, Jeroen K

    2015-11-01

    Urinary microvesicles constitute a rich source of membrane-bound and intracellular proteins that may provide important clues of pathophysiological mechanisms in renal disease. In the current study, we analyzed and compared the proteome of urinary microvesicles from patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN), idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (iFSGS), and normal controls using an approach that combined both proteomics and pathology analysis. Lysosome membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2) was increased greater than twofold in urinary microvesicles obtained from patients with iMN compared to microvesicles of patients with iFSGS and normal controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of renal biopsies confirmed our proteomics findings that LIMP-2 was upregulated in glomeruli from patients with iMN but not in glomeruli of diseased patients (iFSGS, minimal change nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis) and normal controls. Confocal laser microscopy showed co-localization of LIMP-2 with IgG along the glomerular basement membrane. Serum antibodies against LIMP-2 could not be detected. In conclusion, our data show the value of urinary microvesicles in biomarker discovery and provide evidence for de novo expression of LIMP-2 in glomeruli of patients with iMN.

  12. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  13. Endothelial STAT3 Activation Increases Vascular Leakage Through Downregulating Tight Junction Proteins: Implications for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jang-Hyuk; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Bae, Jong-Sup; Lee, Eun Hui; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Seung U; Ye, Sangkyu; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Chung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    Vascular inflammation is characteristic feature of diabetic retinopathy. In diabetic retina, a variety of the pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated and involved in endothelial dysfunction. STAT3 transcription factor has been implicated in mediating cytokine signaling during vascular inflammation. However, whether and how STAT3 is involved in the direct regulation of the endothelial permeability is currently undefined. Our studies revealed that IL-6-induced STAT3 activation increases retinal endothelial permeability and vascular leakage in retinas of mice through the reduced expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. In a co-culture model with microglia and endothelial cells under a high glucose condition, the microglia-derived IL-6 induced STAT3 activation in the retinal endothelial cells, leading to increasing endothelial permeability. In addition, IL-6-induced STAT3 activation was independent of ROS generation in the retinal endothelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that STAT3 activation downregulates the ZO-1 and occludin levels and increases the endothelial permeability through the induction of VEGF production in retinal endothelial cells. These results suggest the potential importance of IL-6/STAT3 signaling in regulating endothelial permeability and provide a therapeutic target to prevent the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1123-1134, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Increased non-protein bound iron in Down syndrome: contribution to lipid peroxidation and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Manna, Caterina; Officioso, Arbace; Trojsi, Francesca; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) is the leading cause of chromosomal-related intellectual disability. At an early age, adults with DS develop with the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, associated with a chronic oxidative stress. To investigate if non-protein bound iron (NPBI) can contribute to building up a pro-oxidative microenvironment, we evaluated NPBI in both plasma and erythrocytes from DS and age-matched controls, together with in vivo markers of lipid peroxidation (F2-isoprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes) and in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in erythrocytes. The serum iron panel and uric acid were also measured. Second, we explored possible correlation between NPBI, lipid peroxidation and cognitive performance. Here, we report NPBI increase in DS, which correlates with increased serum ferritin and uric acid. High levels of lipid peroxidation markers and intraerythrocyte ROS formations were also reported. Furthermore, the scores of Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM) test, performed as a measure of current cognitive function, are inversely related to NPBI, serum uric acid, and ferritin. Likewise, ROS production, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes were also inversely related to cognitive performance, whereas serum transferrin positively correlated to RCPM scores. Our data reveal that increased availability of free redox-active iron, associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation, may be involved in neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in DS. In this respect, we propose chelation therapy as a potential preventive/therapeutic tool in DS.

  15. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-05-15

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu{sup 2+} binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu{sup 2+} reduction and {sup 64}Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu{sup 2+} reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu{sup 2+} ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu{sup 2+} reductase activity and increased {sup 64}Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu{sup 2+} reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  16. Increased expression of Zinc finger protein 267 in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd; Czech, Barbara; Valletta, Daniela; Weiss, Thomas S; Kirovski, Georgi; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular lipid accumulation is a hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately cirrhosis. Zinc finger protein 267 (ZNF267) belongs to the family of Kruppel-like transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological processes that include development, proliferation, and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that ZNF267 expression is up-regulated in liver cirrhosis and is further increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we analyzed the expression of ZNF267 in tissue specimens of NAFLD patients and found a significant up-regulation compared to normal liver tissue. Noteworthy, ZNF267 mRNA was already significantly increased in steatotic liver tissue without inflammation. In line with this, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with palmitic acid induced a dose-dependent lipid accumulation and corresponding dose-dependent ZNF267 induction in vitro. Furthermore, hepatocellular lipid accumulation induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and also chemically induced ROS formation increased ZNF267 mRNA expression. In summary with previous findings, which revealed ZNF267 as pro-fibrogenic and pro-cancerogenic factor in chronic liver disease, the present study further suggests ZNF267 as promising therapeutic target particularly for NAFLD patients. In addition, it further indicates that hepatic steatosis per se has pathophysiological relevance and should not be considered as benign. PMID:22076166

  17. Increased reliability of nuclear magnetic resonance protein structures by consensus structure bundles.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Lena; Güntert, Peter

    2015-02-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures are represented by bundles of conformers calculated from different randomized initial structures using identical experimental input data. The spread among these conformers indicates the precision of the atomic coordinates. However, there is as yet no reliable measure of structural accuracy, i.e., how close NMR conformers are to the "true" structure. Instead, the precision of structure bundles is widely (mis)interpreted as a measure of structural quality. Attempts to increase precision often overestimate accuracy by tight bundles of high precision but much lower accuracy. To overcome this problem, we introduce a protocol for NMR structure determination with the software package CYANA, which produces, like the traditional method, bundles of conformers in agreement with a common set of conformational restraints but with a realistic precision that is, throughout a variety of proteins and NMR data sets, a much better estimate of structural accuracy than the precision of conventional structure bundles.

  18. Interplays Between Covalent Modifications in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Increase Conformational Diversity in Nascent Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP), the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it undergoes numerous covalent modifications. Here we investigate the interdependence and regulation of PrP oxidative folding, N-glycosylation and GPI addition in diverse ER conditions. Our results show that formation of the single disulphide bond is a pivotal event, essential for PrP transport, and can occur post-translationally. Retarding its formation enhances N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. In contrast, lowering ER Ca2+ concentration inhibits N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. These data reveal tight interplays between the different ER covalent modifications, which collectively increase of PrP conformational diversity and may be important for its propagation. PMID:19164910

  19. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis using oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Storici, F; Lewis, L K; Resnick, M A

    2001-08-01

    Functional characterization of the genes of higher eukaryotes has been aided by their expression in model organisms and by analyzing site-specific changes in homologous genes in model systems such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modifying sequences in yeast or other organisms such that no heterologous material is retained requires in vitro mutagenesis together with subcloning. PCR-based procedures that do not involve cloning are inefficient or require multistep reactions that increase the risk of additional mutations. An alternative approach, demonstrated in yeast, relies on transformation with an oligonucleotide, but the method is restricted to the generation of mutants with a selectable phenotype. Oligonucleotides, when combined with gap repair, have also been used to modify plasmids in yeast; however, this approach is limited by restriction-site availability. We have developed a mutagenesis approach in yeast based on transformation by unpurified oligonucleotides that allows the rapid creation of site-specific DNA mutations in vivo. A two-step, cloning-free process, referred to as delitto perfetto, generates products having only the desired mutation, such as a single or multiple base change, an insertion, a small or a large deletion, or even random mutations. The system provides for multiple rounds of mutation in a window up to 200 base pairs. The process is RAD52 dependent, is not constrained by the distribution of naturally occurring restriction sites, and requires minimal DNA sequencing. Because yeast is commonly used for random and selective cloning of genomic DNA from higher eukaryotes such as yeast artificial chromosomes, the delitto perfetto strategy also provides an efficient way to create precise changes in mammalian or other DNA sequences.

  20. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels.

  1. Gamete Therapeutics: Recombinant Protein Adsorption by Sperm for Increasing Fertility via Artificial Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Gallardo, Horacio; Kjelland, Michael E.; Moreno, Juan F.; Welsh, Thomas H.; Randel, Ronald D.; Lammoglia, Miguel A.; Pérez-Martínez, Mario; Lara-Sagahón, Alma V.; Esperón-Sumano, A. Enrique; Romo, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    A decrease in fertility can have a negative economic impact, both locally and over a broader geographical scope, and this is especially the case with regard to the cattle industry. Therefore, much interest exists in evaluating proteins that might be able to increase the fertility of sperm. Heparin binding proteins (HBPs), specifically the fertility associated antigen (FAA) and the Type-2 tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2), act to favor the capacitation and acrosome reaction and perhaps even modulate the immune system’s response toward the sperm. The objective of this research was to determine the effect on fertility of adding recombinant FAA (rFAA) and recombinant TIMP-2 (rTIMP-2) to bovine semen before cryopreservation for use in an artificial insemination (AI) program in a tropical environment. For this experiment, 100 crossbred (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) heifers were selected based on their estrus cycle, body condition score (BCS), of 4 to 6 on a scale of 1 to 9, and adequate anatomical conformation evaluated by pelvic and genital (normal) measurements. Heifers were synchronized using estradiol benzoate (EB), Celosil® (PGF2α) (Shering-Plough) and a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device was inserted that contained progesterone. Inseminations were performed in two groups at random, 50 animals per group. The control group was inseminated with conventional semen. The treatment group was inseminated with semen containing rFAA (25 µg/mL) and rTIMP-2 (25 µg/mL). In the control group a 16% pregnancy rate was obtained versus a 40% pregnancy rate for the HBP treatment group, resulting in a significant difference (P = 0.0037). Given the results herein, one may conclude that the HBPs can increase fertility and could be an option for cattle in tropical conditions; however, one needs to consider the environment, nutrition, and the genetic interaction affecting the final result in whatever reproductive program that is implemented. PMID:23762288

  2. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  3. Investigation by site-directed mutagenesis of the role of cytochrome P450 2B4 non-active site residues in protein-ligand interactions based on crystal structures of the ligand-bound enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Gay, Sean C.; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Residues located outside of the active site of cytochromes P450 2B have exhibited importance in ligand binding, structural stability, and drug metabolism. However, contributions of non-active site residues to the plasticity of these enzymes are not known. Thus, a systematic investigation was undertaken of unique residue-residue interactions found in crystal structures of P450 2B4 in complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI), a closed conformation, or in complex with bifonazole, an expanded conformation. Nineteen mutants distributed over eleven sites were constructed, expressed in E. coli, and purified. Most mutants showed significantly decreased expression, especially in the case of interactions found in the 4-CPI structure. Six mutants (H172A, H172F, H172Q, L437A, E474D, and E474Q) were chosen for detailed functional analysis. Among these, the Ks of H172F for bifonazole was ~20-times higher than wild type 2B4, and the Ks of L437A for 4-CPI was ~50-times higher than wild type, leading to significantly altered inhibitor selectivity. Enzyme function was tested with the substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC), 7-methoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-MFC), and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (7-BR). H172F was inactive with all three substrates, and L437A did not turn over 7-BR. Furthermore, H172A, H172Q, E474D and E474Q showed large changes in kcat/KM for each of the three substrates, in some cases up to 50-fold. Concurrent molecular dynamics simulations yield distances between some of the residues in these putative interaction pairs that are not consistent with contact. The results indicate that small changes in the protein scaffold lead to large differences in solution behavior and enzyme function. PMID:22051155

  4. Mutagenesis of a specificity-determining residue in tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that the enzyme is a robust phenylalanine hydroxylase but a fragile tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Daubner, S Colette; Avila, Audrey; Bailey, Johnathan O; Barrera, Dimitrios; Bermudez, Jaclyn Y; Giles, David H; Khan, Crystal A; Shaheen, Noel; Thompson, Janie Womac; Vasquez, Jessica; Oxley, Susan P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-26

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrH) and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) have essentially identical active sites; however, PheH is nearly incapable of hydroxylating tyrosine, while TyrH can readily hydroxylate both tyrosine and phenylalanine. Previous studies have indicated that Asp425 of TyrH is important in determining the substrate specificity of that enzyme [Daubner, S. C., Melendez, J., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 9652-9661]. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of amino acids 423-427, a mobile loop containing Asp425, shows that only mutagenesis of Asp425 alters the activity of the enzyme significantly. Saturation mutagenesis of Asp425 results in large (up to 10(4)) decreases in the V(max) and V(max)/K(tyr) values for tyrosine hydroxylation, but only small decreases or even increases in the V(max) and V(max)/K(phe) values for phenylalanine hydroxylation. The decrease in the tyrosine hydroxylation activity of the mutant proteins is due to an uncoupling of tetrahydropterin oxidation from amino acid hydroxylation with tyrosine as the amino acid substrate. In contrast, with the exception of the D425W mutant, the extent of coupling of tetrahydropterin oxidation and amino acid hydroxylation is unaffected or increases with phenylalanine as the amino acid substrate. The decrease in the V(max) value with tyrosine as the substrate shows a negative correlation with the hydrophobicity of the amino acid residue at position 425. The results are consistent with a critical role of Asp425 being to prevent a hydrophobic interaction that results in a restricted active site in which hydroxylation of tyrosine does not occur.

  5. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  6. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  7. Identification of virulence determinants for endocarditis in Streptococcus sanguinis by signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sehmi; Senty, Lauren; Das, Sankar; Noe, Jody C; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2005-09-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe and a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. It is also one of the most common agents of infective endocarditis, a serious endovascular infection. To identify virulence factors for infective endocarditis, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to the SK36 strain of S. sanguinis, whose genome is being sequenced. STM allows the large-scale creation, in vivo screening, and recovery of a series of mutants with altered virulence. Screening of 800 mutants by STM identified 38 putative avirulent and 5 putative hypervirulent mutants. Subsequent molecular analysis of a subset of these mutants identified genes encoding undecaprenol kinase, homoserine kinase, anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase, adenylosuccinate lyase, and a hypothetical protein. Virulence reductions ranging from 2-to 150-fold were confirmed by competitive index assays. One putatively hypervirulent strain with a transposon insertion in an intergenic region was identified, though increased virulence was not confirmed in competitive index assays. All mutants grew comparably to SK36 in aerobic broth culture except for the homoserine kinase mutant. Growth of this mutant was restored by the addition of threonine to the medium. Mutants containing an insertion or in-frame deletion in the anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase gene failed to grow under strictly anaerobic conditions. The results suggest that housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions are important virulence factors in S. sanguinis endocarditis.

  8. Increased fasting plasma acylation-stimulating protein concentrations in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozata, Metin; Oktenli, Cagatay; Gulec, Mustafa; Ozgurtas, Taner; Bulucu, Fatih; Caglar, Kayser; Bingol, Necati; Vural, Abdulgaffar; Ozdemir, I Caglayan

    2002-02-01

    Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipocyte-derived protein that has recently been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride (TG) storage. ASP also appears to have a role in the regulation of energy balance. In addition to its role as a hormonal regulator of body weight and energy expenditure, leptin is now implicated as a regulatory molecule in lipid metabolism. However, little is known about the alterations in fasting plasma ASP and leptin concentrations in the nephrotic syndrome. As hyperlipidemia is one of the most striking manifestations of the nephrotic syndrome, we have investigated fasting plasma ASP and leptin levels and their relation to lipid levels in this syndrome. Twenty-five patients with untreated nephrotic syndrome and 25 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Fasting plasma lipoproteins, TG, total cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), apolipoprotein AI (apoAI), apoB, urinary protein, plasma albumin, third component of complement (C3), ASP, and leptin levels were measured in both groups. Total cholesterol, TG, low and very low density lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a), apoB, and urinary protein levels were increased in the patient group, whereas plasma albumin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apoAI levels were decreased compared with those in the control group (P < 0.001). Plasma ASP levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared with the control subjects (133.72 +/- 65.14 vs. 29.93 +/- 12.68 nmol/liter; P < 0.001), whereas leptin (2.69 +/- 2.06 vs. 3.99 +/- 2.99 ng/ml; P = 0.118) and C3 (1.01 +/- 0.25 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.23 g/liter; P = 0.662) levels were not significantly different between the two groups. Plasma leptin levels were correlated with body mass index in both nephrotic patients (r(s) = 0.86; P < 0.001) and controls (r(s) = 0.98; P < 0.001), but were not correlated with the other parameters. Fasting ASP concentrations

  9. Increased dietary protein in the second trimester of gestation increases live weight gain and carcass composition in weaner calves to 6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Pacheco, G G; Curtain, L D; Rutland, C; Knott, L; Norman, S T; Phillips, N J; Perry, V E A

    2016-11-08

    Genetically similar nulliparous Polled Hereford heifers from a closed pedigree herd were used to evaluate the effects of dietary protein during the first and second trimester of gestation upon foetal, placental and postnatal growth. Heifers were randomly allocated into two groups at 35 days after artificial insemination (35 days post conception (dpc)) to a single bull and fed high (15.7% CP) or low (5.9% CP) protein in the first trimester (T1). At 90 dpc, half of each nutritional treatment group changed to a high- or low-protein diet for the second trimester until 180 dpc (T2). High protein intake in the second trimester increased birth weight in females (P=0.05), but there was no effect of treatment upon birth weight when taken over both sexes. Biparietal diameter was significantly increased by high protein in the second trimester with the effect being greater in the female (P=0.02), but also significant overall (P=0.05). Placental weight was positively correlated with birth weight, fibroblast volume and relative blood vessel volume (P<0.05). Placental fibroblast density was increased and trophoblast volume decreased in the high-protein first trimester treatment group (P<0.05). There was a trend for placental weight to be increased by high protein in the second trimester (P=0.06). Calves from heifers fed the high-protein treatment in the second trimester weighed significantly more on all occasions preweaning (at 1 month (P=0.0004), 2 months (P=0.006), 3 months (P=0.002), 4 months (P=0.01), 5 months (P=0.03), 6 months (P=0.001)), and grew at a faster rate over the 6-month period. By 6 months of age, the calves from heifers fed high nutrition in the second trimester weighed 33 kg heavier than those fed the low diet in the second trimester. These results suggest that dietary protein in early pregnancy alters the development of the bovine placenta and calf growth to weaning.

  10. Hydrophobic Mutagenesis and Semi-rational Engineering of Arginine Deiminase for Markedly Enhanced Stability and Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Serwanja; Liu, Meng-Han; Liu, Yong-Mei; Han, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Guo-Chao; Ni, Ye

    2015-07-01

    Due to its systemic arginine degradation, arginine deiminase (ADI) has attracted attentions as an anti-tumor drug. Its low activity at physiological conditions among other limitations has necessitated its engineering for improved properties. The present study describes the hydrophobic mutagenesis and semi-rational engineering of ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida (PpADI). Using an improved ADI variant M13 (D38H/A128T/E296K/H404R/I410L) as parent, site saturation mutagenesis at position 162 resulted in an over 20 % increase in protein solubility. Compared with M13 (15.23 U/mg), mutants M13-2 (M13+S245D) and M13-5 (M13+R243L) exhibited enhanced specific activity of 21.19 and 31.20 U/mg at physiological conditions. M13-5 displayed enhanced substrate specificity with a dramatic reduction in its K m value (from 0.52 to 0.16 mM). It is speculated that the improvements in M13-5 could mainly be attributed to the enhanced structural stability due to an R243L substitution. The hydrophobic contribution of Leu 243 was supported by mutant M13-9 (M13+A276W) generated based on the hydrophobic mutagenesis concept. M13-9 showed a specific activity of 18.68 U/mg, as well as remarkable thermal and pH stability. It retained over 90 % activity over pH range from 4.5 to 8.5. At 60 °C, the half-life of M13-9 was enhanced from 4 to 17.5 min in comparison with M13, and its specific activity at 62 °C (93.0 U/mg) was approximately fivefold of that determined at 37 °C. Our results suggest that the increased hydrophobicity around the active regions of PpADI might be crucial in improving its structural stability and ultimately catalytic efficiency.

  11. Advanced glycation end products increase carbohydrate responsive element binding protein expression and promote cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbei; Wu, Lifang; Li, Yakui; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Zhu, Yemin; Li, Xiaoyong; Li, Minle; Xu, Ye; Wu, Yuchen; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic patients have increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the role of AGEs in regulating cancer cell proliferation is unclear. Here, we found that treating colorectal and liver cancer cells with AGEs promoted cell proliferation. AGEs stimulated both the expression and activation of a key transcription factor called carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) which had been shown to promote glycolytic and anabolic activity as well as proliferation of colorectal and liver cancer cells. Using siRNAs or the antagonistic antibody for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression or cell proliferation in cancer cells. Suppressing ChREBP expression severely impaired AGEs-induced cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AGEs-RAGE signaling enhances cancer cell proliferation in which AGEs-mediated ChREBP induction plays an important role. These findings may provide new explanation for increased cancer progression in diabetic patients.

  12. Concentration of prion protein from biological samples to increase the limits of detection by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Eliot; Eljuga, Lucy; Dover, Katarzyna; Tian, Jean; Grossman, Abraham

    2005-06-01

    An RNA-ligand-based adsorbent has been shown to concentrate prion protein (PrP) from solutions in a model system. The work presented here extends the utility of the RNA-based adsorbent to brain homogenates of cow, sheep, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus). Brain homogenates were diluted either in buffer, representing specimens used in post-mortem tests, or in serum, modelling specimens used in biological-fluid-based tests. The RNA adsorbent was effective in binding PrPC (cellular PrP,) and PrPres (proteinase K-resistant PrP) from the brain homogenates of all the species tested in both model systems. The three antibodies against PrP used in the experiments identified PrP in immunoblot analysis after concentrating PrP from brain homogenates with the adsorbent, indicating the general applicability of this technology for improving the detection of PrP in immunoassays. Utilization of RNA adsorbent increased the level of detection of PrPres by immunoblot over several-hundredfold. The results obtained suggest that this RNA adsorbent can be used to increase detection in current post-mortem immunoassays and for the development of a blood-based ante-mortem test.

  13. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  14. Increased liver pathology in hepatitis C virus transgenic mice expressing the hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, Victor V.; Lerat, Herve; Madden, Charles R.; Finegold, Milton J.; McGarvey, Michael J.; Mohammed, Essam M.A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Grona, Shala J.; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Slagle, Betty L. . E-mail: bslagle@bcm.edu

    2006-04-10

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was identified in 21% of HCV/ATX mice, but in none of the single transgenic animals. Analysis of 8-mo animals revealed that, relative to HCV/WT mice, HCV/ATX mice had more severe steatosis, greater liver-to-body weight ratios, and a significant increase in the percentage of hepatocytes staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, primary hepatocytes from HCV, ATX, and HCV/ATX transgenic mice were more resistant to fas-mediated apoptosis than hepatocytes from nontransgenic littermates. These results indicate that HBx expression contributes to increased liver pathogenesis in HCV transgenic mice by a mechanism that involves an imbalance in hepatocyte death and regeneration within the context of severe steatosis.

  15. Soy-dairy protein blend and whey protein ingestion after resistance exercise increases amino acid transport and transporter expression in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Reidy, P T; Walker, D K; Dickinson, J M; Gundermann, D M; Drummond, M J; Timmerman, K L; Cope, M B; Mukherjea, R; Jennings, K; Volpi, E; Rasmussen, B B

    2014-06-01

    Increasing amino acid availability (via infusion or ingestion) at rest or postexercise enhances amino acid transport into human skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether alterations in amino acid availability, from ingesting different dietary proteins, can enhance amino acid transport rates and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA expression. We hypothesized that the prolonged hyperaminoacidemia from ingesting a blend of proteins with different digestion rates postexercise would enhance amino acid transport into muscle and AAT expression compared with the ingestion of a rapidly digested protein. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we studied 16 young adults at rest and after acute resistance exercise coupled with postexercise (1 h) ingestion of either a (soy-dairy) protein blend or whey protein. Phenylalanine net balance and transport rate into skeletal muscle were measured using stable isotopic methods in combination with femoral arteriovenous blood sampling and muscle biopsies obtained at rest and 3 and 5 h postexercise. Phenylalanine transport into muscle and mRNA expression of select AATs [system L amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, system A amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1] increased to a similar extent in both groups (P < 0.05). However, the ingestion of the protein blend resulted in a prolonged and positive net phenylalanine balance during postexercise recovery compared with whey protein (P < 0.05). Postexercise myofibrillar protein synthesis increased similarly between groups. We conclude that, while both protein sources enhanced postexercise AAT expression, transport into muscle, and myofibrillar protein synthesis, postexercise ingestion of a protein blend results in a slightly prolonged net amino acid balance across the leg compared with whey protein.

  16. Interspecific rice hybrid of Oryza sativa x Oryza nivara reveals a significant increase in seed protein content.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed A; Sukumar, S; Krishnan, Hari B

    2008-01-23

    Wild species offer a potential reservoir of genetic variation for crop improvement. Besides the valuable genes for disease resistance that the wild species have provided for rice improvement, recent studies have shown that these wild species could also provide favorable alleles for the improvement of yield and yield-related traits. The present study reports yet another potential of wild relatives of rice, which involves the improvement of seed protein content. A significant increase in seed protein content was observed in an interspecific hybrid between Oryza sativa ssp. indica and the wild species Oryza nivara. The hybrid showed a protein content of 12.4%, which was 28 and 18.2% higher than those of the parents O. nivara and IR 64, respectively. The increase in protein content was dependent on the genetic background of the rice variety used in the hybridization. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of seed storage proteins demonstrated that a significant increase in prolamins and glutelins was mainly responsible for the elevated protein content of the hybrid. Amino acid analysis of seed proteins revealed that the hybrid had net gains of 19.5% in lysine and 19.4% in threonine over the O. nivara parent on a seed dry weight basis. Molecular analysis indicated that the increase in protein content of the hybrid was not a result of chromosomal rearrangements or transposable element activation, at least in the chromosomal regions containing seed storage protein genes. A preliminary genetic analysis of the F 2 segregating population showed that the inheritance of the increased protein content was polygenic in nature. The development of this interspecific hybrid offers a great potential for selecting new rice cultivars that combine the high yield and superior cooking quality of IR 64 with improved seed protein content.

  17. Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, R S; Zhao, M H; Hamilton, M I; Brownlee, A; Chapman, P; Pounder, R E; Wakefield, A J; Lockwood, C M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a constituent of primary neutrophil granules, is a potent natural antibiotic and an antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) antigen in cases of vasculitis in which the target antigen is neither myeloperoxidase (MPO) nor proteinase-3 (PR3). AIM: To investigate BPI as a possible target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: ANCAs were detected by routine immunofluorescence (IIF) and solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed for antibodies to the purified neutrophil granule proteins; MPO, PR3, cathepsin-G, lactoferrin, and BPI in serum samples from 88 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (36 with Crohn's disease, 52 with ulcerative colitis). Thirty patients with bacterial enteritis acted as controls. RESULTS: Significantly more patients with ulcerative colitis were ANCA positive by IIF (60%) than patients with Crohn's disease (28%) or infectious enteritis (23%) (p < 0.001). IgG anti-BPI antibodies were present in 29% of patients with ulcerative colitis, 14% of patients with Crohn's disease, and 23% of patients with infectious enteritis, occurring in 44% of those patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were ANCA positive by IIF. Antibodies to other ANCA antigens were rare. The presence of ANCAs was not related to either disease activity or extent; presence of anti-BPI antibodies was significantly related to both a lower serum albumin concentration (p = 0.001) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.02) in patients with ulcerative colitis, and to colonic involvement in patients with Crohn's disease (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: BPI is a significant minority target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease that seems related to colonic Crohn's disease and disease activity in ulcerative colitis. Anti-BPI antibodies occur in infectious enteritis. PMID:9155585

  18. 13C-NOESY-HSQC with Split Carbon Evolution for Increased Resolution with Uniformly Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Matthias; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst

    1998-06-01

    Two new pulse sequences are presented for the recording of 2D13C-HSQC and 3D13C-NOESY-HSQC experiments, containing two consecutive carbon evolution periods. The two periods are separated by az-filter which creates a clean CxHz-quantum state for evolution in the second period. Each period is incremented (in anon-constant-time fashion) only to the extent that the defocusing of carbon inphase magnetization throughJ-coupling with neighboring carbons remains insignificant. Therefore,13C homonuclearJ-couplings are rendered ineffective, reducing the loss of signal and peak splitting commonly associated with long13C evolution times. The two periods are incremented according to a special acquisition protocol employing a13C-13C gradient echo to yield a data set analogous to one obtained by evolution over the added duration of both periods. The spectra recorded with the new technique on uniformly13C-labeled proteins at twice the evolution time of the standard13C-HSQC experiment display a nearly twofold enhancement of resolution in the carbon domain, while maintaining a good sensitivity even in the case of large proteins. Applied to the IIAManprotein ofE. coli(31 kDa), the13C-HSQC experiment recorded with a carbon evolution time of 2 × 8 ms showed a 36% decrease in linewidths compared to the standard13C-HSQC experiment, and theS/Nratio of representative cross-peaks was reduced to 40%. This reduction reflects mostly the typical loss of intensity observed when recording with an increased resolution. The13C-NOESY-HSQC experiment derived from the13C-HSQC experiment yielded additional NOE restraints between resonances which previously had been unresolved.

  19. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  20. [Overexpression of NHE1 suppresses ABCA1 protein expression via increasing calpain activity in RAW264.7 cells].

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiangang; Wang, Lan; Guo, Jing; Hong, Wei; Long, Shiqi; Zhang, Li; Xiang, Ning; Yang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of over-expressed Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) on the protein expression of adenosine three phosphate binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in RAW264.7 cells. Methods RAW264.7 cells were infected with the adenoviral vector encoding NHE1-EGFP (AdNHE1). The infected RAW264.7 cells were subjected to Western blot analysis for NHE1-EGFP fusion protein. The subcellular localization of NHE1-EGFP fusion protein was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. NHE1 activity was measured by the method of pH recovery in response to an acute acid pulse. Furthermore, Western blotting was performed to determine ABCA1 protein levels and calpain activity in NHE1-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells. The effect of calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN) on ABCA1 protein levels in the presence of TO-901317 was examined by Western blotting. Results NHE1-EGFP fusion protein was highly expressed and localized in cytoplasm and cell membrane of RAW264.7 cells infected with AdNHE1. NHE1-EGFP fusion protein reduced ABCA1 protein expression and increased calpain activity. The calpain inhibitor ALLN blocked the decrease of ABCA1 protein expression. Conclusion Overexpressed NHE1 suppresses the expression of ABCA1 protein via increasing the calpain activity in RAW264.7 cells.

  1. Increased rewarding properties of morphine in perinatally protein-malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Valdomero, A; Velazquez, E E; de Olmos, S; de Olmos, J S; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2007-12-05

    In the current research, we assessed the influence of a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 40 days of age (D-rats) on the rewarding properties of morphine in adult rats by means of the conditioned place preference paradigm. Well-nourished animals (C-rats) administered with different doses of morphine (0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 or 24 mg/kg i.p.) exhibited a conditioning place preference with doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg, whereas in D-rats such a conditioning effect was observed with doses of 1.5 and 3 mg/kg. No adverse effects were observed in either C- or D-rats for the higher doses of morphine. In addition, when animals of both groups were pretreated twice a day for 3 days with increasing doses of morphine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg s.c.), only D-rats elicited sensitization to the conditioning effect with the lowest dose of morphine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, sensitized D-rats showed a selective and significant increase in FosB expression in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), basolateral amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, brain areas that are functionally related to the rewarding neural circuit. These results demonstrate that a deficient nutritional status during the perinatal period results in adult subjects having neural alterations, leading to an increased responsiveness to morphine and/or enhanced reinforcement effects, which correlates with an overexpression of FosB in selective brain areas related to the rewarding network.

  2. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  3. Raised FGF-21 and Triglycerides Accompany Increased Energy Intake Driven by Protein Leverage in Lean, Healthy Individuals: A Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gosby, Alison K.; Lau, Namson S.; Tam, Charmaine S.; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Caterson, Ian D.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    A dominant appetite for protein drives increased energy intake in humans when the proportion of protein in the diet is reduced down to approximately 10% of total energy. Compensatory feeding for protein is apparent over a 1–2 d period but the mechanisms driving this regulation are not fully understood. Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) has been identified as a candidate protein signal as levels increase in the circulation when dietary protein is low. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to assess whether changes in percent dietary protein over a 4 d ad libitum experimental period in lean, healthy participants influenced energy intake, metabolic health, circulating FGF-21 and appetite regulating hormones including ghrelin, glucagon like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin. Twenty-two lean, healthy participants were fed ad libitum diets containing 10, 15 and 25% protein, over three, 4 d controlled, in-house experimental periods. Reduced dietary protein intake from 25% to 10% over a period of 4 d was associated with 14% increased energy intake (p = 0.02) as previously reported, and a 6-fold increase in fasting circulating plasma FGF-21 levels (p<0.0001), a 1.5-fold increase in serum triglycerides (p<0.0001), and a 0.9-fold decrease in serum total cholesterol (p = 0.02). Serum HDL cholesterol was reduced with a reduction in dietary protein from 15% to 10% (p = 0.01) over 4 d but not from 25% to 10% (p = 0.1) and the change from baseline was not different between diets. Plasma fasting insulin levels following the 4 d study period were significantly lower following the 25% ad libitum study period compared to the 15% protein period (p = 0.014) but not the 10% protein period (p = 0.2). Variability in interstitial glucose during each study period increased with a decrease in dietary protein from 25% to 15% and 10% (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin were unchanged. Increases in energy intake, plasma FGF-21

  4. Sesamin increases heme oxygenase-1 protein in RAW 264.7 macrophages through inhibiting its ubiquitination process.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Mizuki; Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Shiratsuchi, Ayano; Kawakami, Takuya; Takahashi, Madoka; Motomura, Misato; Egusa, Kyohei; Urasaki, Tomoka; Inoue, Atsuko

    2014-10-15

    Sesamin is a major component in lignans of sesame seed oil, known to possess potent anti-oxidative capacity. In this study, the variation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, a kind of anti-oxidative enzyme, by sesamin in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10μg/ml) exposure tended to increase HO-1 protein expression. Co-treatment with 100μM sesamin for 12h up-regulated the HO-1 protein level increased by LPS; however, HO-1 mRNA was unaffected. Sesamin delayed the reversal, by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (1μM), of the LPS-induced increase of HO-1 protein level. Meanwhile, sesamin suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) protein and associated NO release. LPS-induced increase of iNOS protein expression was also reversed by cycloheximide, which was not affected by sesamin, unlike HO-1. To clarify the mechanisms that underlie the up-regulation of HO-1 protein level by sesamin, the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line transfected with Flag-tagged HO-1 was used. A proteasome inhibitor, MG-132 (10μM), stabilized HO-1 protein in HEK 293T cells. Co-treatment with sesamin decreased ubiquitinated HO-1 protein accumulation by MG-132. However, sesamin did not affect the proteasome activity. These findings suggest that sesamin disturbs the degradation of HO-1 protein through inhibiting its ubiquitination, resulting in HO-1 protein up-regulation.

  5. Exploiting the right side of the Ramachandran plot: substitution of glycines by D-alanine can significantly increase protein stability.

    PubMed

    Anil, Burcu; Song, Benben; Tang, Yuefeng; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2004-10-20

    A major goal of protein engineering is the enhancement of protein stability. Here we demonstrate a rational method for enhancing the stability of globular proteins by targeting glycine residues which adopt conformations with Phi > 0. Replacement of such a glycine by d-alanine can lead to a significant increase in stability. The approach is tested at three sites in two model proteins. NMR and CD indicated that the substitutions do not alter the structure. Replacement of glycine-24 of the N-terminal domain of L9 (NTL9) with d-Ala results in an increase in stability of 1.3 kcal mol-1, while replacement of glycine-34 of NTL9 leads to an increase of 1.9 kcal mol-1. Replacement of glycine-331 of the UBA domain with d-Ala leads to an increase in stability of 0.6 kcal mol-1.

  6. Site Saturation Mutagenesis Applications on Candida methylica Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Özgün, Gülşah P.; Ordu, Emel B.; Tütüncü, H. Esra; Yelboğa, Emrah; Sessions, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    In NADH regeneration, Candida methylica formate dehydrogenase (cmFDH) is a highly significant enzyme in pharmaceutical industry. In this work, site saturation mutagenesis (SSM) which is a combination of both rational design and directed evolution approaches is applied to alter the coenzyme specificity of NAD+-dependent cmFDH from NAD+ to NADP+ and increase its thermostability. For this aim, two separate libraries are constructed for screening a change in coenzyme specificity and an increase in thermostability. To alter the coenzyme specificity, in the coenzyme binding domain, positions at 195, 196, and 197 are subjected to two rounds of SSM and screening which enabled the identification of two double mutants D195S/Q197T and D195S/Y196L. These mutants increase the overall catalytic efficiency of NAD+ to 5.6 × 104-fold and 5 × 104-fold value, respectively. To increase the thermostability of cmFDH, the conserved residue at position 1 in the catalytic domain of cmFDH is subjected to SSM. The thermodynamic and kinetic results suggest that 8 mutations on the first residue can be tolerated. Among all mutants, M1L has the best residual activity after incubation at 60°C with 17%. These studies emphasize that SSM is an efficient method for creating “smarter libraries” for improving the properties of cmFDH. PMID:27847673

  7. Increased liver-specific proteins in circulating extracellular vesicles as potential biomarkers for drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Im, Eun-Ju; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Mezey, Esteban; Song, Byoung-Joon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury are a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation. Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a source of biomarkers because they contain unique proteins reflecting the identity and tissue-specific origin of the EV proteins. This study aimed to determine whether potentially hepatotoxic agents, such as acetaminophen (APAP) and binge alcohol, can increase the amounts of circulating EVs and evaluate liver-specific EV proteins as potential biomarkers for liver injury. The circulating EVs, isolated from plasma of APAP-exposed, ethanol-fed mice, or alcoholic hepatitis patients versus normal control counterparts, were characterized by proteomics and biochemical methods. Liver specific EV proteins were analyzed by immunoblots and ELISA. The amounts of total and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from APAP-treated mice significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis of EVs from APAP-exposed mice revealed that the amounts of liver-specific and/or hepatotoxic proteins were increased compared to those of controls. Additionally, the increased protein amounts in EVs following APAP exposure returned to basal levels when mice were treated with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Similar results of increased amounts and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs were also observed in mice exposed to hepatotoxic doses of thioacetamide or d-galactosamine but not by non-hepatotoxic penicillin or myotoxic bupivacaine. Additionally, binge ethanol exposure significantly elevated liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from mice and alcoholics with alcoholic hepatitis, compared to control counterparts. These results indicate that circulating EVs in drug- and alcohol-mediated hepatic injury contain liver-specific proteins that could serve as specific biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. PMID:28225807

  8. Establishment of Tn5096-Based Transposon Mutagenesis in Gordonia polyisoprenivorans

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Quyen; Arenskötter, Matthias; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The transposons Tn5, Tn10, Tn611, and Tn5096 were characterized regarding transposition in Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2. No insertional mutants were obtained employing Tn5 or Tn10. The thermosensitive plasmid pCG79 harboring Tn611 integrated into the chromosome of G. polyisoprenivorans; however, the insertional mutants were fairly unstable und reverted frequently to the wild-type phenotype. In contrast, various stable mutants were obtained employing Tn5096-mediated transposon mutagenesis. Auxotrophic mutants, mutants defective or deregulated in carotenoid biosynthesis, and mutants defective in utilization of rubber and/or highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons were obtained by integration of plasmid pMA5096 harboring Tn5096 as a whole into the genome. From about 25,000 isolated mutants, the insertion loci of pMA5096 were subsequently mapped in 20 independent mutants in genes which could be related to the above-mentioned metabolic pathways or to putative regulation proteins. Analyses of the genotypes of pMA5096-mediated mutants defective in biodegradation of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) did not reveal homologues to recently identified genes coding for enzymes catalyzing the initial cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene). One rubber-negative mutant was disrupted in mcr, encoding an α-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase. This mutant was defective in degradation of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and also of highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons. PMID:16151089

  9. Combinatorial mutagenesis and selection to understand and improve yeast promoters.

    PubMed

    Berg, Laila; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2013-01-01

    Microbial promoters are important targets both for understanding the global gene expression and developing genetic tools for heterologous expression of proteins and complex biosynthetic pathways. Previously, we have developed and used combinatorial mutagenesis methods to analyse and improve bacterial expression systems. Here, we present for the first time an analogous strategy for yeast. Our model promoter is the strong and inducible P AOX1 promoter in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. The Zeocin resistance gene was applied as a valuable reporter for mutant P AOX1 promoter activity, and we used an episomal plasmid vector to ensure a constant reporter gene dosage in the yeast host cells. This novel design enabled direct selection for colonies of recombinant cells with altered Zeocin tolerance levels originating solely from randomly introduced point mutations in the P AOX1 promoter DNA sequence. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to select for P AOX1 promoter variants with abolished glucose repression in large mutant libraries. We also selected P AOX1 promoter variants with elevated expression level under induced conditions. The properties of the selected P AOX1 promoter variants were confirmed by expressing luciferase as an alternative reporter gene. The tools developed here should be useful for effective screening, characterization, and improvement of any yeast promoters.

  10. A Synthetic Approach to Stop-Codon Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lihua; Lavinder, Jason J.; Sarkar, Mohosin; Stephany, Kimberly; Magliery, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A general combinatorial mutagenesis strategy using common DMT-protected mononucleotide phosphoramidites and a single orthogonally-protected trinucleotide phosphoramidite (Fmoc-TAG) was developed to scan a gene with the TAG amber stop codon with complete synthetic control. In combination with stop-codon suppressors that insert natural (e.g., alanine) or unnatural (e.g., p-benzoylphenylalanine or Bpa) amino acids, a single DNA library can be used to incorporate different amino acids for diverse purposes. Here, we scanned TAG codons through part of the gene for a model four-helix bundle protein, Rop, which regulates the copy number of ColE1 plasmids. Alanine was incorporated into Rop for mapping its binding site using an in vivo activity screen, and subtle but important differences from in vitro gel-shift studies of Rop function are evident. As a test, Bpa was incorporated using a Phe14 amber mutant isolated from the scanning library. Surprisingly, Phe14Bpa Rop is weakly active, despite the critical role of Phe14 in Rop activity. Bpa is a photoaffinity label unnatural amino acid that can form covalent bonds with adjacent molecules upon UV irradiation. Irradiation of Phe14Bpa-Rop, which is a dimer in solution like wild-type Rop, results in covalent dimers, trimers and tetramers. This suggests that Phe14Bpa Rop weakly associates as a tetramer in solution and highlights the use of Bpa crosslinking as a means of trapping weak and transient interactions. PMID:21452871

  11. Insertional mutagenesis of preneoplastic astrocytes by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T A; Pekarik, V; Grazia D'Angelo, M; Klein, M A; Voigtländer, T; Stocking, C; Aguzzi, A

    2001-04-01

    Retroviral infection can induce transcriptional activation of genes flanking the sites of proviral integration in target cells. Because integration is essentially random, this phenomenon can be exploited for random mutagenesis of the genome, and analysis of integration sites in tumors may identify potential oncogenes. Here we have investigated this strategy in the context of astrocytoma progression. Neuroectodermal explants from astrocytoma-prone GFAP-v-src transgenic mice were infected with the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis indicated that astrocytes from E12.5-13.5 embryos were highly susceptible to retroviral infection and expressed viral RNA and proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In average 80% of neuroectodermal cells were infected in vitro with 9-14 proviral integrations per cell. Virus mobility assays confirmed that Mo-MuLV remained transcriptionally active and replicating in neuroectodermal primary cultures even after 45 days of cultivation. Proviral insertion sites were investigated by inverse long-range PCR. Analysis of a limited number of provirus flanking sequences in clones originated from in vitro infected GFAP-v-src neuroectodermal cells identified loci of possible relevance to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the approach described here might be suitable for acceleration of tumorigenesis in preneoplastic astrocytes. We expect this method to be useful for identifying genes involved in astrocytoma development/progression in animal models.

  12. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER).

  13. A mutagenesis study of a catalytic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.Y.; Prudent, J.R.; Baldwin, E.P.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have generated seven site-specific mutations in the genes encoding the variable region of the heavy chain domain (V{sub H}) of the phosphocholine-binding antibody S107.S107 is a member of a family of well-characterized highly homologous antibodies that bind phosphorylcholine mono- and diesters. Two of these antibodies, MOPC-167 and T15, have previously been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl N-trimethylammonioethyl carbonate. Two conserved heavy-chain residues, Tyr-33 and Arg-52, were postulated to be involved in binding and hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylcholine carbonate esters. To more precisely define the catalytic roles of these residues, three Arg-52 mutants (R52K, R52Q, R52C) and four Tyr-33 mutants (Y33H, Y33F, Y33E, Y33D) of antibody S107 were generated. The genes encoding the V{sub H} binding domain of S107 were inserted into plasmid pUC-fl, and in vitro mutagenesis was performed. These results not only demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in catalysis by antibody S107 but also show that catalytic side chains can be introduced into antibodies to enhance their catalytic efficiency.

  14. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila.

  15. Rhbdf2 mutations increase its protein stability and drive EGFR hyperactivation through enhanced secretion of amphiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Hosur, Vishnu; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Burzenski, Lisa M.; Stearns, Timothy M.; Maser, Richard S.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The rhomboid 5 homolog 2 (Rhbdf2) gene encodes an inactive rhomboid (iRhom) protease, iRhom2, one of a family of enzymes containing a long cytosolic N terminus and a dormant peptidase domain of unknown function. iRhom2 has been implicated in epithelial regeneration and cancer growth through constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. However, little is known about the physiological substrates for iRhom2 or the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions. We show that iRhom2 is a short-lived protein whose stability can be increased by select mutations in the N-terminal domain. In turn, these stable variants function to augment the secretion of EGF family ligands, including amphiregulin, independent of metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) activity. In vivo, N-terminal iRhom2 mutations induce accelerated wound healing as well as accelerated tumorigenesis, but they do not drive spontaneous tumor development. This work underscores the physiological prominence of iRhom2 in controlling EGFR signaling events involved in wound healing and neoplastic growth, and yields insight into the function of key iRhom2 domains. PMID:24825892

  16. Heterogeneity of elderly depression: increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and Aβ protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Yuki; Baba, Hajime; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Satomura, Emi; Takebayashi, Naoko; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2013-06-03

    Epidemiological studies have proposed that depression may increase the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), even in patients with early-onset depression. Although metabolism of amyloid β protein (Aβ) in elderly depression received attention in terms of their correlation, there is a serious heterogeneity in elderly depression in terms of age at onset of depression. Moreover, it is unknown whether early-onset major depressive disorder (MDD) has a long-term effect on the involvement of Aβ metabolism and later development of AD. Thus, we evaluated serum Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels, the Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio in 89 elderly (≥60 years of age) inpatients with MDD and 81 age-matched healthy controls, and compared them among patients with early-onset (<60 years) and late-onset (≥60years) MDD and controls. The results showed that the serum Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio was significantly higher in patients with both early- and late-onset MDD than in controls (early-onset, p=0.010; late-onset, p=0.043), and it is of great interest that the serum Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio was negatively correlated with the age at MDD onset (R=-0.201, p=0.032). These results suggest that an earlier onset of MDD may have a more serious abnormality in Aβ metabolism, possibly explaining a biological mechanism underlying the link between depression and AD.

  17. In anemia of multiple myeloma, hepcidin is induced by increased bone morphogenetic protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Ken; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Roodman, G. David; Huston, Alissa; Esteve, Flavia; Freytes, Cesar; Callander, Natalie; Katodritou, Eirini; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Rivera, Seth; Vanderkerken, Karin; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and a pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contributes to MM-related anemia. Searching for hepcidin-inducing cytokines in MM, we quantified the stimulation of hepcidin promoter-luciferase activity in HuH7 cells by MM sera. MM sera activated the hepcidin promoter significantly more than did normal sera. We then examined the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), the major transcriptional regulators of hepcidin. Mutations in both BMP-responsive elements abrogated the activation dramatically, while mutations in the IL-6–responsive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-binding site (STAT3-BS) had only a minor effect. Cotreatment with anti–BMP-2/4 or noggin-Fc blocked the promoter induction with all MM sera, anti–IL-6 blocked it with a minority of sera, whereas anti–BMP-4, -6, or -9 antibodies had no effect. BMP-2–immunodepleted MM sera had decreased promoter stimulatory capacity, and BMP-2 concentrations in MM sera were significantly higher than in normal sera. Our results demonstrate that BMP-2 is a major mediator of the hepcidin stimulatory activity of MM sera. PMID:20679527

  18. Selection for a zinc-finger protein contributes to seed oil increase during soybean domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Tian; Lu, Xiang; Song, Qingxin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Tao, Jian-Jun; Bian, Xiao-Hua; Shen, Ming; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Bi, Ying-Dong; Li, Wei; Lai, Yong-Cai; Lam, Sin Man; Shui, Guanghou; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2017-02-09

    Seed oil is a momentous agronomical trait of soybean targeted by domestication in breeding. Although multiple oil-related genes have been uncovered, the knowledge of regulatory mechanism of seed oil biosynthesis is currently limited. We demonstrate that seed-preferred gene GmZF351 encoding tandem CCCH zinc finger protein is selected during domestication. Further analysis shows that GmZF351 facilitates oil accumulation by directly activating WRI1, BCCP2, KASIII, TAG1 and OLEO2 in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Overexpression of GmZF351 in transgenic soybean also activates lipid biosynthesis genes, thereby accelerating seed oil accumulation. ZF351 haplotype from Glycine max group and Glycine soja subgroup III correlates well with high gene expression level, seed oil contents and promoter activity, suggesting that selection of GmZF351 expression leads to increased seed oil content in cultivated soybean. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism for seed oil accumulation and manipulation of GmZF351 may have great potential in improvement of oil production in soybean and other related crops.

  19. Rhbdf2 mutations increase its protein stability and drive EGFR hyperactivation through enhanced secretion of amphiregulin.

    PubMed

    Hosur, Vishnu; Johnson, Kenneth R; Burzenski, Lisa M; Stearns, Timothy M; Maser, Richard S; Shultz, Leonard D

    2014-05-27

    The rhomboid 5 homolog 2 (Rhbdf2) gene encodes an inactive rhomboid (iRhom) protease, iRhom2, one of a family of enzymes containing a long cytosolic N terminus and a dormant peptidase domain of unknown function. iRhom2 has been implicated in epithelial regeneration and cancer growth through constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. However, little is known about the physiological substrates for iRhom2 or the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions. We show that iRhom2 is a short-lived protein whose stability can be increased by select mutations in the N-terminal domain. In turn, these stable variants function to augment the secretion of EGF family ligands, including amphiregulin, independent of metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) activity. In vivo, N-terminal iRhom2 mutations induce accelerated wound healing as well as accelerated tumorigenesis, but they do not drive spontaneous tumor development. This work underscores the physiological prominence of iRhom2 in controlling EGFR signaling events involved in wound healing and neoplastic growth, and yields insight into the function of key iRhom2 domains.

  20. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  1. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries.

  2. A TAT-frataxin fusion protein increases lifespan and cardiac function in a conditional Friedreich's ataxia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Piyush M; Tomamichel, Wendy J; Pride, P Melanie; Babbey, Clifford M; Wang, Qiujuan; Mercier, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth M; Payne, R Mark

    2012-03-15

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most common inherited human ataxia and results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein, frataxin (FXN), which is encoded in the nucleus. This deficiency is associated with an iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster enzyme deficit leading to progressive ataxia and a frequently fatal cardiomyopathy. There is no cure. To determine whether exogenous replacement of the missing FXN protein in mitochondria would repair the defect, we used the transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain to deliver human FXN protein to mitochondria in both cultured patient cells and a severe mouse model of FRDA. A TAT-FXN fusion protein bound iron in vitro, transduced into mitochondria of FRDA deficient fibroblasts and reduced caspase-3 activation in response to an exogenous iron-oxidant stress. Injection of TAT-FXN protein into mice with a conditional loss of FXN increased their growth velocity and mean lifespan by 53% increased their mean heart rate and cardiac output, increased activity of aconitase and reversed abnormal mitochondrial proliferation and ultrastructure in heart. These results show that a cell-penetrant peptide is capable of delivering a functional mitochondrial protein in vivo to rescue a very severe disease phenotype, and present the possibility of TAT-FXN as a protein replacement therapy.

  3. Antibiotics Increase Gut Metabolism and Antioxidant Proteins and Decrease Acute Phase Response and Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pingping; Jensen, Michael Ladegaard; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Thymann, Thomas; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan; Sit, Wai-Hung; Tipoe, George L.; Sangild, Per Torp

    2012-01-01

    Background The appropriate use of antibiotics for preterm infants, which are highly susceptible to develop necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), is not clear. While antibiotic therapy is commonly used in neonates with NEC symptoms and sepsis, it remains unknown how antibiotics may affect the intestine and NEC sensitivity. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum antibiotics, given immediately after preterm birth, would reduce NEC sensitivity and support intestinal protective mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings Preterm pigs were treated with antibiotics for 5 d (oral and systemic doses of gentamycin, ampicillin and metrodinazole; AB group) and compared with untreated pigs. Only the untreated pigs showed evidence of NEC lesions and reduced digestive function, as indicated by lowered villus height and activity of brush border enzymes. In addition, 53 intestinal and 22 plasma proteins differed in expression between AB and untreated pigs. AB treatment increased the abundance of intestinal proteins related to carbohydrate and protein metabolism, actin filaments, iron homeostasis and antioxidants. Further, heat shock proteins and the complement system were affected suggesting that all these proteins were involved in the colonization-dependent early onset of NEC. In plasma, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, complement proteins) decreased, while albumin, cleaved C3, ficolin and transferrin increased. Conclusions/Significance Depressed bacterial colonization following AB treatment increases mucosal integrity and reduces bacteria-associated inflammatory responses in preterm neonates. The plasma proteins C3, ficolin, and transferrin are potential biomarkers of the colonization-dependent NEC progression in preterm neonates. PMID:23028687

  4. Testosterone and trenbolone enanthate increase mature myostatin protein expression despite increasing skeletal muscle hypertrophy and satellite cell number in rodent muscle.

    PubMed

    Dalbo, V J; Roberts, M D; Mobley, C B; Ballmann, C; Kephart, W C; Fox, C D; Santucci, V A; Conover, C F; Beggs, L A; Balaez, A; Hoerr, F J; Yarrow, J F; Borst, S E; Beck, D T

    2017-04-01

    The androgen-induced alterations in adult rodent skeletal muscle fibre cross-sectional area (fCSA), satellite cell content and myostatin (Mstn) were examined in 10-month-old Fisher 344 rats (n = 41) assigned to Sham surgery, orchiectomy (ORX), ORX + testosterone (TEST; 7.0 mg week(-1) ) or ORX + trenbolone (TREN; 1.0 mg week(-1) ). After 29 days, animals were euthanised and the levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex was harvested for analyses. LABC muscle fCSA was 102% and 94% higher in ORX + TEST and ORX + TREN compared to ORX (p < .001). ORX + TEST and ORX + TREN increased satellite cell numbers by 181% and 178% compared to ORX, respectively (p < .01), with no differences between conditions for myonuclear number per muscle fibre (p = .948). Mstn protein was increased 159% and 169% in the ORX + TEST and ORX + TREN compared to ORX (p < .01). pan-SMAD2/3 protein was ~30-50% greater in ORX compared to SHAM (p = .006), ORX + TEST (p = .037) and ORX + TREN (p = .043), although there were no between-treatment effects regarding phosphorylated SMAD2/3. Mstn, ActrIIb and Mighty mRNAs were lower in ORX, ORX + TEST and ORX + TREN compared to SHAM (p < .05). Testosterone and trenbolone administration increased muscle fCSA and satellite cell number without increasing myonuclei number, and increased Mstn protein levels. Several genes and signalling proteins related to myostatin signalling were differentially regulated by ORX or androgen therapy.

  5. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%.

  6. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  7. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  8. Increased intramuscular fat induced by reduced dietary protein in finishing pigs: effects on the longissimus lumborum muscle proteome.

    PubMed

    Pires, V M R; Madeira, M S; Dowle, A A; Thomas, J; Almeida, A M; Prates, J A M

    2016-07-19

    Due to genetic selection towards reduced subcutaneous fat, the amount of intramuscular fat (IMF) in commercial pigs has been reduced (<2.5%), compromising pork quality. The use of reduced protein diets (RPD) is a good strategy to increase IMF in pigs. We have previously shown that increased IMF promoted by RPD is mediated by lysine restriction. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we performed a proteomics study to quantify differentially regulated proteins in the longissimus lumborum muscle of pigs (n = 4) fed a normal protein diet (NPD) (16.0% CP) or a reduced protein diet (RPD) (13.0% CP). Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and label-free methods were used. Glycolysis, Krebs cycle, mitochondrion, contractile proteins, respiratory chain, and calcium signalling were significantly enriched in muscle samples. Thirty five proteins shown to be differentially expressed and were classified using gene ontology (GO) terms and functional annotation clustering, highlighting main relevant biological networks and proteins associated with muscle physiology and meat quality. Members of GO categories "muscle contraction" and "structural constituents of cytoskeleton", were the most significantly up-regulated proteins in muscle from pigs fed RPD. Conversely, in animals fed NPD most up-regulated proteins were enzymes involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our data revealed that RPD affects the amounts of proteins related to fibre type and structure, and energy metabolism. It is suggested that the increased IMF promoted by dietary protein reduction in growing-finishing pigs is mediated by shifting the metabolic properties of fibres from glycolytic to oxidative.

  9. Engineering protein farnesyltransferase for enzymatic protein labeling applications.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Jonathan K; Khatwani, Santoshkumar L; Wollack, James W; Wang, Yen-Chih; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-07-16

    Creating covalent protein conjugates is an active area of research due to the wide range of uses for protein conjugates spanning everything from biological studies to protein therapeutics. Protein Farnesyltransferase (PFTase) has been used for the creation of site-specific protein conjugates, and a number of PFTase substrates have been developed to facilitate that work. PFTase is an effective catalyst for protein modification because it transfers Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) analogues to protein substrates on a cysteine four residues from the C-terminus. While much work has been done to synthesize various FPP analogues, there are few reports investigating how mutations in PFTase alter the kinetics with these unnatural analogues. Herein we examined how different mutations within the PFTase active site alter the kinetics of the PFTase reaction with a series of large FPP analogues. We found that mutating either a single tryptophan or tyrosine residue to alanine results in greatly improved catalytic parameters, particularly in kcat. Mutation of tryptophan 102β to alanine caused a 4-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a benzaldehyde-containing FPP analogue resulting in an overall 40-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Similarly, mutation of tyrosine 205β to alanine caused a 25-fold increase in kcat and a 10-fold decrease in KM for a coumarin-containing analogue leading to a 300-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Smaller but significant changes in catalytic parameters were also obtained for cyclo-octene- and NBD-containing FPP analogues. The latter compound was used to create a fluorescently labeled form of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), a protein of therapeutic importance. Additionally, computational modeling was performed to study how the large non-natural isoprenoid analogues can fit into the active sites enlarged via mutagenesis. Overall, these results demonstrate that PFTase can be improved via mutagenesis in ways that will be useful

  10. Increased intestinal protein synthesis during sepsis and following the administration of tumour necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    von Allmen, D; Hasselgren, P O; Higashiguchi, T; Frederick, J; Zamir, O; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    The influence of sepsis on intestinal protein synthesis was studied in rats. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP); control rats were sham-operated. Protein synthesis was measured in vivo in the jejunum and ileum following a flooding dose of [14C]leucine. At 8 h after CLP the protein synthesis rate was increased by approx. 15% in jejunal mucosa, and at 16 h after CLP, the protein synthesis rate was increased by 50-60% in the mucosa and seromuscular layer of both jejunum and ileum. In a second series of experiments, rats were treated with recombinant tumour necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) or recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) administered at a total dose of 300 micrograms/kg body weight over 16 h. Control rats received corresponding volumes of solvent. Treatment with rTNF alpha resulted in an approx. 25% increase in mucosal protein synthesis in jejunum. Following treatment with rIL-1 alpha, protein synthesis increased by 25% in jejunal mucosa and almost doubled in ileal mucosa. The results suggest that sepsis stimulates intestinal protein synthesis and that this response may, at least in part, be mediated by TNF and/or IL-1. PMID:1530589

  11. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer: A TRANSIENT-STATE KINETICS, DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS, EPR, AND NMR STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-18

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn(2+), and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-06

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato.

  13. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Eva, Megan M.; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Malo, Danielle; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses. PMID:25268389

  14. Rapid increase in fibroblast growth factor 21 in protein malnutrition and its impact on growth and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yori; Saito, Kenji; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori; Takenaka, Asako

    2015-11-14

    Protein malnutrition promotes hepatic steatosis, decreases insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production and retards growth. To identify new molecules involved in such changes, we conducted DNA microarray analysis on liver samples from rats fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet for 8 h. We identified the fibroblast growth factor 21 gene (Fgf21) as one of the most strongly up-regulated genes under conditions of acute protein malnutrition (P<0·05, false-discovery rate<0·001). In addition, amino acid deprivation increased Fgf21 mRNA levels in rat liver-derived RL-34 cells (P<0·01). These results suggested that amino acid limitation directly increases Fgf21 expression. FGF21 is a polypeptide hormone that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF21 also promotes a growth hormone-resistance state and suppresses IGF-I in transgenic mice. Therefore, to determine further whether Fgf21 up-regulation causes hepatic steatosis and growth retardation after IGF-I decrease in protein malnutrition, we fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet to Fgf21-knockout (KO) mice. Fgf21-KO did not rescue growth retardation and reduced plasma IGF-I concentration in these mice. Fgf21-KO mice showed greater epididymal white adipose tissue weight and increased hepatic TAG and cholesterol levels under protein malnutrition conditions (P<0·05). Overall, the results showed that protein deprivation directly increased Fgf21 expression. However, growth retardation and decreased IGF-I were not mediated by increased FGF21 expression in protein malnutrition. Furthermore, FGF21 up-regulation rather appears to have a protective effect against obesity and hepatic steatosis in protein-malnourished animals.

  15. Development of a Critical Value for Late-Season Nitrogen to Increase Spring Wheat Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers receiving a premium for spring wheat with a protein content greater than or equal to 14%. Obtaining that protein content can be problematic without proper nitrogen (N) fertilizer management. Sensor-based technologies have been used for predicting yield. The question is whether this technol...

  16. DECREASED PRODUCTION OF SURFACTANT PROTEINS AFTER DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE INCREASES SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFLUENZA INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), termed collectins, enhance the opsonization of foreign particles and pathogens by phagocytic cells. Inhaled pollutants such as diesel exhaust (DE) have a possible role in suppressing the production of surfactant proteins whic...

  17. Enteral B-hydroxy-B-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite B-hydr...

  18. Enhancing effect of heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines on UV or chemically induced mutagenesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Shimoi, K; Kawabata, H; Tomita, I

    1992-08-01

    Most heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines--harman, norharman, harmine, harmaline--enhanced UVC (254 nm) induced mutagenesis without microsomal activation in E. coli B/r WP2. 3-Amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) was most effective and increased UVAB (295-400 nm) induced mutations as well as UVC induced ones. Trp-P-1 enhanced the frequencies of mutations induced by not only UV but also 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) or 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (AF2), while it showed little effect on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or gamma-ray induced mutagenesis. Trp-P-1 decreased the survival of UVC irradiated cells of CM571recA. However, these effects of Trp-P-1 on UVC induced mutagenesis and lethality were not observed in WP2suvrA which is excision repair deficient. The alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis demonstrated that Trp-P-1 blocked the incision step in DNA excision repair. Further, pretreatment with Trp-P-1 before UVC irradiation showed no effect on UVC induced mutagenesis. Similar effects were also seen in the case of harman or norharman. These results suggest that heterocyclic amines and beta-carbolines inhibit DNA excision repair directly or indirectly, thus enhancing UV or chemically induced mutagenesis.

  19. Novobiocin Inhibits the Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired through DNA Damage-Induced Mutagenesis in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis M.; Pérez-Varela, María; Corral, Jordi; Arch, Marta; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a worldwide emerging nosocomial pathogen, acquires antimicrobial resistances in response to DNA-damaging agents, which increase the expression of multiple error-prone DNA polymerase components. Here we show that the aminocoumarin novobiocin, which inhibits the DNA damage response in Gram-positive bacteria, also inhibits the expression of error-prone DNA polymerases in this Gram-negative multidrug-resistant pathogen and, consequently, its potential acquisition of antimicrobial resistance through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. PMID:26503651

  20. A mechanistic analysis of the increase in the thermal stability of proteins in aqueous carboxylic acid salt solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, J. K.; Bhat, R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of proteins is known to be affected significantly in the presence of high concentration of salts and is highly pH dependent. Extensive studies have been carried out on the stability of proteins in the presence of simple electrolytes and evaluated in terms of preferential interactions and increase in the surface tension of the medium. We have carried out an in-depth study of the effects of a series of carboxylic acid salts: ethylene diamine tetra acetate, butane tetra carboxylate, propane tricarballylate, citrate, succinate, tartarate, malonate, and gluconate on the thermal stability of five different proteins that vary in their physico-chemical properties: RNase A, cytochrome c, trypsin inhibitor, myoglobin, and lysozyme. Surface tension measurements of aqueous solutions of the salts indicate an increase in the surface tension of the medium that is very strongly correlated with the increase in the thermal stability of proteins. There is also a linear correlation of the increase in thermal stability with the number of carboxylic groups in the salt. Thermal stability has been found to increase by as much as 22 C at 1 M concentration of salt. Such a high thermal stability at identical concentrations has not been reported before. The differences in the heat capacities of denaturation, deltaCp for RNase A, deduced from the transition curves obtained in the presence of varying concentrations of GdmCl and that of carboxylic acid salts as a function of pH, indicate that the nature of the solvent medium and its interactions with the two end states of the protein control the thermodynamics of protein denaturation. Among the physico-chemical properties of proteins, there seems to be an interplay of the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that lead to an overall stabilizing effect. Increase in surface free energy of the solvent medium upon addition of the carboxylic acid salts appears to be the dominant factor in governing the thermal stability of proteins