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Sample records for mutant b-cell lines

  1. Expression of HLA-DR antigen in human class II mutant B-cell lines by double infection with retrovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Korman, A.J.; Cooper, J.; Pious, D.; Accolla, R.S.; Mulligan, R.C.; Strominger, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    A new retrovirus vector containing the gene for hygromycin B resistance (hyg) as a selectable marker under the control of an internal simian virus 40 promoter was constructed. It was used, together with an analogous previously described vector, DO1, which contains the gene for G418 resistance, to introduce and express the genes for the two chains of a human class II major histocompatibility complex antigen in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, these vectors were used to express DR antigens in two human mutant B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, one of which was deleted for both alleles of the DR..cap alpha.. gene and the other of which expressed no class II antigens because of a genetic defect in a putative trans-acting regulatory factor.

  2. Comparative In Vitro Immune Stimulation Analysis of Primary Human B Cells and B Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Van Belle, Kristien; Herman, Jean; Boon, Louis; Waer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    B cell specific immunomodulatory drugs still remain an unmet medical need. Utilisation of validated simplified in vitro models would allow readily obtaining new insights in the complexity of B cell regulation. For this purpose we investigated which human B lymphocyte stimulation assays may be ideally suited to investigate new B lymphocyte immunosuppressants. Primary polyclonal human B cells underwent in vitro stimulation and their proliferation, production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and of cytokines, and expression of cell surface molecules were analysed using various stimuli. ODN2006, a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, was the most potent general B cell stimulus. Subsequently, we investigated on which human B cell lines ODN2006 evoked the broadest immunostimulatory effects. The Namalwa cell line proved to be the most responsive upon TLR9 stimulation and hence may serve as a relevant, homogeneous, and stable B cell model in an in vitro phenotypic assay for the discovery of new targets and inhibitors of the B cell activation processes. As for the read-out for such screening assay, it is proposed that the expression of activation and costimulatory surface markers reliably reflects B lymphocyte activation. PMID:28116319

  3. Biotechnology and the chicken B cell line DT40.

    PubMed

    Bachl, J; Caldwell, R B; Buerstedde, J-M

    2007-01-01

    Protein optimization is a major focus of the biotech and pharmaceutical industry. Various in vitro technologies have been developed to accelerate protein evolution and to achieve protein optimization of functional characteristics such as substrate specificity, enzymatic activity and thermostability. The chicken B cell line DT40 diversifies its immunoglobulin (Ig) gene by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. This machinery can be directed to almost any gene inserted into the Ig locus. Enormously diverse protein libraries of any gene of interest can be quickly generated in DT40 by utilizing random shuffling of complex genetic domains (gene conversion) and by the introduction of novel non-templated genetic information (random mutagenesis). The unique characteristics of the chicken cell line DT40 make it a powerful in-cell diversification system to improve proteins of interest within living cells. One essential advantage of the DT40 protein optimization approach is the fact that variants are generated within an in-cell system thus allowing the direct screening for desired features in the context of intracellular networks. Utilizing specially designed selection strategies, such as the powerful fluorescent protein technology, enables the reliable identification of protein variants exhibiting the most desirable traits. Thus, DT40 is well positioned as a biotechnological tool to generate optimized proteins by applying a powerful combination of gene specific hypermutation, gene conversion and mutant selection. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Mechanism for pre-B cell loss in VH-mutant rabbits.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Gregory R; Knight, Katherine L

    2011-11-01

    Pre-BCR signaling is a critical checkpoint in B cell development in which B-lineage cells expressing functional IgH μ-chain are selectively expanded. B cell development is delayed in mutant ali/ali rabbits because the a-allotype encoding V(H)1 gene, which is normally used in VDJ gene rearrangements in wt rabbits, is deleted, and instead, most B-lineage cells use the a-allotype encoding V(H)4 gene [V(H)4(a)], which results in a severe developmental block at the pre-B cell stage. We found that V(H)4(a)-utilizing pre-B cells exhibit reduced pre-BCR signaling and do not undergo normal expansion in vitro. Transduction of murine 38B9 pre-B cells with chimeric rabbit-VDJ mouse-Cμ encoding retroviruses showed V(H)4(a)-encoded μ-chains do not readily form signal-competent pre-BCR, thereby explaining the reduction in pre-BCR signaling and pre-B cell expansion. Development of V(H)4(a)-utilizing B cells can be rescued in vivo by the expression of an Igκ transgene, indicating that V(H)4(a)-μ chains are not defective for conventional BCR formation and signaling. The ali/ali rabbit model system is unique because V(H)4(a)-μ chains have the capacity to pair with a variety of conventional IgL chains and yet lack the capacity to form a signal-competent pre-BCR. This system could allow for identification of critical structural parameters that govern pre-BCR formation/signaling.

  5. Combinatorial BTK and MALT1 inhibition augments killing of CD79 mutant diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Kutzner, Kerstin; Vincendeau, Michelle; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-12-08

    Survival of activated B cell-subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is driven by chronic B cell receptor (BCR) signaling that activates the canonical NF-κB pathway. Inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib has been shown to kill ABC DLBCL cells that carry activating mutations in the BCR adaptor CD79. However, mutations in BTK or in downstream components such as CARMA1/CARD11 can render lymphomas Ibrutinib resistant. Therefore, we assessed here the simultaneous inhibition of BTK and the protease MALT1 that acts downstream of CARMA1 and is essential for ABC DLBCL tumor growth. We show that in CD79 mutant cells BTK is a crucial upstream regulator of MALT1, but dispensable in CARMA1 mutant ABC DLBCL. Combined inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib and MALT1 by S-Mepazine additively impaired MALT1 cleavage activity and expression of NF-κB pro-survival factors. Thereby, combinatorial Ibrutinib and S-Mepazine treatment enhanced killing of CD79 mutant ABC DLBCL cells. Moreover, while expression of oncogenic CARMA1 in CD79 mutant cells conferred Ibrutinib resistance, double mutant cells were still sensitive to MALT1 inhibition by S-Mepazine. Thus, based on the genetic background combinatorial BTK and MALT1 inhibition may improve effectiveness of therapeutic treatment and reduce the chances for the development of drug resistances.

  6. JSI-124 inhibits IgE production in an IgE B cell line.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lulu; Bi, Jiacheng; Yan, Dehong; Ye, Xiufeng; Zheng, Mingxing; Yu, Guang; Wan, Xiaochun

    2017-01-29

    IgE is a key effector molecule in atopic diseases; however, the regulation mechanisms of IgE production in IgE B cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that JSI-124 (cucurbitacin I), a selective STAT3 inhibitor, selectively inhibits production of IgE by a human IgE B cell line, CRL-8033 cells, while does not affect the IgG production by IgG B cell lines. In the aspect of molecular mechanism, we found that Igλ, but not Ighe, gene expression was suppressed by JSI-124. The above effects of JSI-124 were not mediated by affecting cellular proliferation or apoptosis. Furthermore, multiple B cell differentiation-related genes expression was not significantly affected by JSI-124. Taken together, we demonstrate a potential strategy of therapeutically suppressing IgE production without affecting IgG production in atopic patients.

  7. Identification of a germ-line pro-B cell subset that distinguishes the fetal/neonatal from the adult B cell development pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Sheng; Tung, James; Baumgarth, Nicole; Herman, Ometa; Gleimer, Michael; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2002-03-05

    Studies presented here show that the expression of CD4, MHC class II (Ia,) and B220 cleanly resolves a major and a minor subset within the earliest pro-B cell population (germ-line pro-B) in adult bone marrow (BM). The major subset expresses intermediate B220 and low CD4 levels. The minor subset, which constitutes roughly 20% of the adult germ-line pro-B, expresses very low B220 levels and does not express CD4. Ia is clearly detectable at low levels on the major germ-line pro-B subset, both in wild-type adult mice and in gene-targeted mice (RAG2-/- and microMT), in which B cell development terminates before the pre-B cell stage. A small proportion of cells in the more mature pro-B cell subsets (Hardy Fractions B and C) also express Ia at this level. In contrast, Ia levels on the minor subset are barely above (or equal to) background. Surprisingly, the major germ-line pro-B cell subset found in adults is missing in fetal and neonatal animals. All of the germ-line pro-B in these immature animals express a phenotype (very low B220, no CD4, or Ia) similar to that of the minor pro-B cell subset in adult BM. Because B cell development in fetal/neonatal animals principally results in B-1 cells, these findings demonstrate that the B-1 development pathway does not include the major germ-line pro-B subset found in adult BM and hence identify a very early difference between the B-1 and -2 development pathways.

  8. Enhancement of hypermutation frequency in the chicken B cell line DT40 for efficient diversification of the antibody repertoire

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Masaki; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Todo, Kagefumi; Ikeda, Mika; Kanayama, Naoki Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2010-05-28

    Chicken B cell line DT40 continuously accumulates mutations in the immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) gene by gene conversion and point mutation, both of which are mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), thereby producing an antibody (Ab) library that is useful for screening monoclonal Abs (mAbs) in vitro. We previously generated an engineered DT40 line named DT40-SW, whose AID expression can be reversibly switched on or off, and developed an in vitro Ab generation system using DT40-SW cells. To efficiently create an Ab library with sufficient diversity, higher hypermutation frequency is advantageous. To this end, we generated a novel cell line DT40-SW{Delta}C, which conditionally expresses a C-terminus-truncated AID mutant lacking the nuclear export signal. The transcription level of the mutant AID gene in DT40-SW{Delta}C cells was similar to that of the wild-type gene in DT40-SW cells. However, the protein level of the truncated AID mutant was less than that of the wild type. The mutant protein was enriched in the nuclei of DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, although the protein might be highly susceptible to degradation. In DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, both gene conversion and point mutation occurred in the IgV gene with over threefold higher frequency than in DT40-SW cells, suggesting that a lower level of the mutant AID protein was sufficient to increase mutation frequency. Thus, DT40-SW{Delta}C cells may be useful for constructing Ab libraries for efficient screening of mAbs in vitro.

  9. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cell Line U-2946: Model for MCL1 Inhibitor Testing.

    PubMed

    Quentmeier, Hilmar; Drexler, Hans G; Hauer, Vivien; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Pommerenke, Claudia; Uphoff, Cord C; Zaborski, Margarete; Berglund, Mattias; Enblad, Gunilla; Amini, Rose-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide. We describe the establishment and molecular characteristics of the DLBCL cell line U-2946. This cell line was derived from a 52-year-old male with DLBCL. U-2946 cells carried the chromosomal translocation t(8;14) and strongly expressed MYC, but not the mature B-cell lymphoma associated oncogenes BCL2 and BCL6. Instead, U-2946 cells expressed the antiapoptotic BCL2 family member MCL1 which was highly amplified genomically (14n). MCL1 amplification is recurrent in DLBCL, especially in the activated B cell (ABC) variant. Results of microarray expression cluster analysis placed U-2946 together with ABC-, but apart from germinal center (GC)-type DLBCL cell lines. The 1q21.3 region including MCL1 was focally coamplified with a short region of 17p11.2 (also present at 14n). The MCL1 inhibitor A-1210477 triggered apoptosis in U-2946 (MCL1pos/BCL2neg) cells. In contrast to BCL2pos DLBCL cell lines, U-2946 did not respond to the BCL2 inhibitor ABT-263. In conclusion, the novel characteristics of cell line U-2946 renders it a unique model system to test the function of small molecule inhibitors, especially when constructing a panel of DLBCL cell lines expressing broad combinations of antiapoptotic BCL2-family members.

  10. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cell Line U-2946: Model for MCL1 Inhibitor Testing

    PubMed Central

    Quentmeier, Hilmar; Drexler, Hans G.; Hauer, Vivien; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Pommerenke, Claudia; Uphoff, Cord C.; Zaborski, Margarete; Berglund, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide. We describe the establishment and molecular characteristics of the DLBCL cell line U-2946. This cell line was derived from a 52-year-old male with DLBCL. U-2946 cells carried the chromosomal translocation t(8;14) and strongly expressed MYC, but not the mature B-cell lymphoma associated oncogenes BCL2 and BCL6. Instead, U-2946 cells expressed the antiapoptotic BCL2 family member MCL1 which was highly amplified genomically (14n). MCL1 amplification is recurrent in DLBCL, especially in the activated B cell (ABC) variant. Results of microarray expression cluster analysis placed U-2946 together with ABC-, but apart from germinal center (GC)-type DLBCL cell lines. The 1q21.3 region including MCL1 was focally coamplified with a short region of 17p11.2 (also present at 14n). The MCL1 inhibitor A-1210477 triggered apoptosis in U-2946 (MCL1pos/BCL2neg) cells. In contrast to BCL2pos DLBCL cell lines, U-2946 did not respond to the BCL2 inhibitor ABT-263. In conclusion, the novel characteristics of cell line U-2946 renders it a unique model system to test the function of small molecule inhibitors, especially when constructing a panel of DLBCL cell lines expressing broad combinations of antiapoptotic BCL2-family members. PMID:27907212

  11. Anti-HIV B Cell Lines As Candidate Vaccine Biosensors1

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B.; Huber, Michael; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katherine J.; Hangartner, Lars; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph; Lifson, Jeffrey; Wu, Xueling; Mascola, John R.; Poignard, Pascal; Binley, James M.; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Schief, William R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Burton, Dennis R.; Nemazee, David

    2012-01-01

    Challenge studies following passive immunization with neutralizing antibodies suggest that an HIV vaccine could be efficacious were it able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs4). To better understand the requirements for activation of B cells producing bNAbs, we generated cell lines expressing bNAbs or their germline-reverted versions (gl-bNAbs) as BCRs. We then tested the abilities of the bNAb-expressing cells to recognize HIV pseudovirions and vaccine candidate proteins by binding and activation assays. The results suggest that HIV Env antigen-expressing, infection-competent virions are poorly recognized by high affinity bNAb-expressing cells, as measured by the inability of antigens to induce rapid increases in intracellular calcium levels. Other antigen forms appear to be highly stimulatory: in particular, soluble gp140 trimers and a multimerized, scaffolded epitope protein. Virions failed to efficiently activate bNAb-expressing B cells owing to delayed or inefficient BCR recognition, most likely caused by the low density of Env spikes. Importantly, B cells carrying gl-bNAb BCRs were not stimulated by any of the tested vaccine candidates. These data provide insight into why many HIV immunogens, and natural HIV infections, fail to rapidly stimulate bNAb responses and suggest that bNAb-expressing cell lines might be useful tools in evaluation of vaccine antigens for infectious diseases. As soluble Env trimers or multimerized scaffolded epitopes are best at activating B cell expressing bNAbs, these antigenic forms should be considered as preferred vaccine components, though they should be modified to better target naïve gl-bNAb B cells. PMID:23066156

  12. Lymphotoxin is an autocrine growth factor for Epstein-Barr virus- infected B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Because human lymphotoxin (LT) was originally isolated from a lymphoblastoid cell line, we investigated the role of this molecule in three newly established Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human B cell lines. These lines were derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Z- 6), myelodysplastic syndrome (Z-43), and acute myelogenous leukemia (Z- 55) patients who had a prior EBV infection. Each lymphoblastoid cell line had a karyotype that was different from that of the original parent leukemic cells, and all expressed B cell, but not T cell or myeloid surface markers. In all three lines, rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain joining region (JH) bands were found, and the presence of EBV DNA was confirmed by Southern blotting. Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55 cell lines constitutively produced 192, 48, and 78 U/ml LT, respectively, as assessed by a cytotoxicity assay and antibody neutralization. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were undetectable. Scatchard analysis revealed that all the cell lines expressed high-affinity TNF/LT receptors with receptor densities of 4197, 1258, and 1209 sites/cell on Z-6, Z-43, and Z-55, respectively. Furthermore, labeled TNF binding could be reversed by both unlabeled TNF, as well as by LT. Studies with p60 and p80 receptor-specific antibodies revealed that the three lines expressed primarily the p80 form of the TNF receptor. When studied in a clonogenic assay, exogenous LT stimulated proliferation of all three cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations ranging from 25 to 500 U/ml. Similar results were obtained with [3H]TdR incorporation. Monoclonal anti-LT neutralizing antibodies at concentrations of 25-500 U/ml inhibited cellular multiplication in a dose-dependent manner. It is interesting that in spite of a common receptor, TNF (1,000 U/ml) had no direct effect on Z-55 cell growth, whereas it partially reversed the stimulatory effect of exogenous LT. In addition, TNF inhibited Z-6 and Z-43 cell proliferation, and its

  13. Properties of an EBV-B cell line derived interleukin 1 (IL 1) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, K.; Akahoshi, T.; Yamada, M.; Furutani, Y.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    The properties of an human IL 1 receptor on a human EBV-B line were studied. Purified human IL 1-..beta.. produced by a myelomonocytic cell line (THP-1) was labeled with /sup 125/I by the Bolton-Hunter method without loss of biological activity. Among four EBV-B cell lines tested, a pre-B cell type (VDS-O) specifically bound the most /sup 125/I IL-..beta... Maximal binding was reached within 20 min at 4/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta.. to VDS-O cells yielded a Kd of 2.4-5.9 x 10/sup -00/ M with 110 to 220 binding (receptor) sites/cell. The binding of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta.. to VDS-O cells was inhibited by anti-human IL 1 antibody, natural and recombinant human IL 1-..cap alpha.. as well as IL 1-..beta.., but not by IFN-..cap alpha.., TNF, or LT, suggesting that IL 1-..cap alpha.. and IL 1-..beta.. specifically bind to the same receptor. The mw of the IL 1 receptor on human EBV-B cells was estimated to be 60 Kd both by a chemical crosslinking method and by HPLC gel filtration analysis of solubilized receptor extracted from membranes by a nonionic detergent (CHAPS). The pI of solubilized human IL 1 receptor was 7.3 by HPLC chromatofocusing. Data showing that VDS-O cells proliferate in response to exogenously added IL 1, express IL 1 receptors and also produce IL 1 all support the hypothesis that IL 1 may function as an autocrine signal for B lymphocytes.

  14. Establishment of a novel feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-negative B-cell cell line from a cat with B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Ide, Tetsuya; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Watanabe, Shinya; Sato, Hirofumi; Sato, Masahiko; Kotera, Yukiko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2011-04-15

    We established a novel feline B-cell line, MS4, from the neoplastic pleural effusion of a cat with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Immunophenotype staining of the MS4 cells was positive for CD20, CD79α, and IgA and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8α, CD18, CD21, CD22, IgM, IgG, Ig light chain, and MHC class II. PCR analysis for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements revealed a monoclonal rearrangement, whereas no clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor γ gene was detected. Southern blotting with an exogenous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) U3 probe revealed no integration of exogenous FeLV provirus. The MS4 cell line is the first FeLV-negative feline B-cell lymphoma cell line, and may be used to investigate the pathogenesis of spontaneously occurring feline lymphoma and the development of new therapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The chicken B-cell line DT40 proteome, beadome and interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    In developing a new quantitative AP-MS method for exploring interactomes in the chicken B-cell line DT40, we also surveyed the most abundant proteins in this organism and explored the likely contaminants that bind to a variety of affinity resins that would later be confirmed quantitatively [1]. We present the ‘Top 150 abundant DT40 proteins list’, the DT40 beadomes as well as protein interaction lists for the Phosphatidyl inositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase 2β and Fanconi anaemia protein complexes. PMID:26217713

  16. Memory B cells, but not long-lived plasma cells, possess antigen specificities for viral escape mutants

    PubMed Central

    Purtha, Whitney E.; Tedder, Thomas F.; Johnson, Syd

    2011-01-01

    Memory B cells (MBCs) and long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) persist after clearance of infection, yet the specific and nonredundant role MBCs play in subsequent protection is unclear. After resolution of West Nile virus infection in mice, we demonstrate that LLPCs were specific for a single dominant neutralizing epitope, such that immune serum poorly inhibited a variant virus that encoded a mutation at this critical epitope. In contrast, a large fraction of MBC produced antibody that recognized both wild-type (WT) and mutant viral epitopes. Accordingly, antibody produced by the polyclonal pool of MBC neutralized WT and variant viruses equivalently. Remarkably, we also identified MBC clones that recognized the mutant epitope better than the WT protein, despite never having been exposed to the variant virus. The ability of MBCs to respond to variant viruses in vivo was confirmed by experiments in which MBCs were adoptively transferred or depleted before secondary challenge. Our data demonstrate that class-switched MBC can respond to variants of the original pathogen that escape neutralization of antibody produced by LLPC without a requirement for accumulating additional somatic mutations. PMID:22162833

  17. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  18. Human B cell activating factor (BCAF): production by a human T cell tumor line.

    PubMed

    Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Mollier, P; Abadie, A; Olive, D; Mawas, C; Theze, J

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that supernatants from human T cell clones stimulated by a pair of anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies cause resting human B cells to become activated and to proliferate in the absence of any other signals. The activity responsible for these effects was shown to be different from already characterized lymphokines and in particular from IL-2 and IL-4, and was named B Cell Activating Factor or BCAF. In this paper, we describe the production of BCAF by a human T cell tumor line T687 after phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation; this production can be potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We further show that the stimulatory phase can be separated from the secretory phase thereby avoiding contamination of BCAF-containing supernatant by PMA and PHA. Supernatants produced under these conditions do not contain either IL-4 or IFN but contain traces of lymphotoxin and 2 to 10 ng/ml of IL-2. The T687 cell line will allow us to obtain a large volume of supernatant for biochemical study and purification of the molecule(s) responsible for BCAF activity.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of drug sodium iron chlorophyllin addition to Hep 3B cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Fengying; Zhou, Xinwen; Jin, Hong; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2012-09-21

    The human hepatoma 3B cell line was chosen as an experimental model for in vitro test of drug screening. The drugs included chlorophyllin and its derivatives such as fluo-chlorophyllin, sodium copper chlorophyllin, and sodium iron chlorophyllin. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method was used in this study to obtain the primary screening results. The results showed that sodium iron chlorophyllin had the best LC(50) value. Proteomic analysis was then performed for further investigation of the effect of sodium iron chlorophyllin addition to the Hep 3B cell line. The proteins identified from a total protein extract of Hep 3B before and after the drug addition were compared by two-dimensional-gel-electrophoresis. Then 32 three-fold differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. There are 29 unique proteins among those identified proteins. These proteins include proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), T-complex protein, heterogeneous nuclear protein, nucleophosmin, heat shock protein A5 (HspA5) and peroxiredoxin. HspA5 is one of the proteins which are involved in protecting cancer cells against stress-induced apoptosis in cultured cells, protecting them against apoptosis through various mechanisms. Peroxiredoxin has anti-oxidant function and is related to cell proliferation, and signal transduction. It can protect the oxidation of other proteins. Peroxiredoxin has a close relationship with cancer and can eventually become a disease biomarker. This might help to develop a novel treatment method for carcinoma cancer.

  20. Synergistic activity of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Taishi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; it derives from germinal center B cells. Although DLBCL harbors many genetic alterations, synergistic roles between such alterations in the development of lymphoma are largely undefined. We previously established a mouse model of lymphoma by transplanting gene-transduced germinal center B cells into mice. Here, we chose one of the frequently mutated genes in DLBCL, Card11 mutant, to explore its possible synergy with other genes, using our lymphoma model. Given that BCL6 and BCL2 expression and/or function are often deregulated in human lymphoma, we examined the possible synergy between Card11, Bcl6, and Bcl2. Germinal center B cells were induced in vitro, transduced with Card11 mutant, Bcl6, and Bcl2, and transplanted. Mice rapidly developed lymphomas, with exogenously transduced Bcl2 being dispensable. Although some mice developed lymphoma in the absence of transduced Bcl6, the absence was compensated by elevated expression of endogenous Bcl6. Additionally, the synergy between Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of lymphoma was confirmed by the fact that the combination of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 caused lymphoma or death significantly earlier and with higher penetrance than Card11 mutant or Bcl6 alone. Lymphoma cells expressed interferon regulatory factor 4 and PR domain 1, indicating their differentiation toward plasmablasts, which characterize activated B cell-like DLBCL that represents a clinically aggressive subtype in humans. Thus, our mouse model provides a versatile tool for studying the synergistic roles of altered genes underlying lymphoma development.

  1. Surface IgM mediated regulation of RAG gene expression in E mu-N-myc B cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, A; Fisher, P; Dildrop, R; Oltz, E; Rathbun, G; Achacoso, P; Stall, A; Alt, F W

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying either the c-myc or N-myc oncogene deregulated by the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer element (E mu) develop both pre-B and B cell lymphomas (E mu-c-myc and E mu-N-myc lymphomas). We report here that B cell lines derived from these tumors, as well as a line derived from v-myc retroviral transformation, simultaneously express surface immunoglobulin (a hallmark of mature B cells) as well as a common subset of genes normally restricted to the pre-B stage of development-including the recombinase activating genes RAG-1 and RAG-2. Continued RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression in these lines is associated with VDJ recombinase activity detected with a VDJ recombination substrate. Cross-linking of the surface immunoglobulin on these lines with an anti-mu antibody leads to rapid, specific and reversible down-regulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 gene expression. We also find that a small but significant percentage of normal surface immunoglobulin bearing bone marrow B cells express the RAG-1 gene. These findings are discussed in the context of their possible implications for the control of specific gene expression during the pre-B to B cell transition. Images PMID:1628630

  2. Methylseleninic acid inhibits HDAC activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Shireen; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Maharaj, Lenushka; Hiley, Crispin T; Juliger, Simone; Joel, Simon P

    2011-09-01

    Selenium is a trace element that is fundamental to human health. Research has mainly focussed on its role in cancer prevention, but recent evidence supports its role in established cancer, with high concentrations inducing tumour cell death and non-toxic concentrations sensitising cells to chemotherapy. However, the precise mechanism of selenium action is not clear. The effect of methylseleninic acid (MSA), an organic selenium compound, on histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines is reported here. Lymphoma cell lines were exposed to MSA under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Protein expression was determined by western blotting, HDAC activity and VEGF concentration by fluorimetric and electrochemiluminescence assays, respectively, and intracellular selenium metabolites quantified by mass spectrometry. MSA inhibited HDAC activity, which resulted in the acetylation of histone H3 and α-tubulin. However, cellular metabolism of MSA to methylselenol was required for this effect. Dimethylselenide, the methylation product of methylselenol, was found to be the major intracellular metabolite. MSA also inhibited HIF-1α expression and VEGF secretion, a possible consequence of HDAC inhibition. The ability of methylselenol to inhibit HDAC activity has not been previously reported, thus providing a novel mechanism of selenium action.

  3. Genomic Landscape of Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Geffers, Robert; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corrina; Faehnrich, Silke; Chen, Suning; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B-Cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a recently defined entity comprising ~2–10% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Unlike most NHL subtypes, PMBL lacks recurrent gene rearrangements to serve as biomarkers or betray target genes. While druggable, late chemotherapeutic complications warrant the search for new targets and models. Well characterized tumor cell lines provide unlimited material to serve as preclinical resources for verifiable analyses directed at the discovery of new biomarkers and pathological targets using high throughput microarray technologies. The same cells may then be used to seek intelligent therapies directed at clinically validated targets. Four cell lines have emerged as potential PMBL models: FARAGE, KARPAS-1106P, MEDB-1 and U-2940. Transcriptionally, PMBL cell lines cluster near c(lassical)-HL and B-NHL examples showing they are related but separate entities. Here we document genomic alterations therein, by cytogenetics and high density oligonucleotide/SNP microarrays and parse their impact by integrated global expression profiling. PMBL cell lines were distinguished by moderate chromosome rearrangement levels undercutting cHL, while lacking oncogene translocations seen in B-NHL. In total 61 deletions were shared by two or more cell lines, together with 12 amplifications (≥4x) and 72 homozygous regions. Integrated genomic and transcriptional profiling showed deletions to be the most important class of chromosome rearrangement. Lesions were mapped to several loci associated with PMBL, e.g. 2p15 (REL/COMMD1), 9p24 (JAK2, CD274), 16p13 (SOCS1, LITAF, CIITA); plus new or tenuously associated loci: 2p16 (MSH6), 6q23 (TNFAIP3), 9p22 (CDKN2A/B), 20p12 (PTPN1). Discrete homozygous regions sometimes substituted focal deletions accompanied by gene silencing implying a role for epigenetic or mutational inactivation. Genomic amplifications increasing gene expression or gene-activating rearrangements were respectively rare or absent. Our findings

  4. T cell binding to B lymphoid cell lines in humans: a marker for T-B cell interaction?

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-04-15

    Binding of human circulating T cells to established normal and malignant B cell lines results in rosette formation. The percentage of B cells, circulating T cells, and thymocytes able to bind to the B-LCL Raji were 0%, 59 +/- 4% and 61 +/- 6%, respectively. The percentage of rosettes formed between Raji cells and circulating mononuclear cells from 92 normal individuals was 27.8 +/- 5.3%, and remained stable over several months. This phenomenon seems to involve relatively mature B cells, and a T cell marker which appears early in T cell ontogeny. In the peripheral blood, most of the B-LCL binding T cells exhibit a 'helper-inducer' phenotype, as determined with the monoclonal antibodies Leu 3a and OKT4. However, a significant percentage of T cells with so-called 'cytotoxic-suppressor' markers (Leu 2a and OKT8) also bind to B-LCL. The T cells involved in this morphological interactive reaction with B cells might conceivably be specifically involved in regulating B cell functions. Enumeration of this particular subset may be useful in conditions where abnormal T-B cell interactions are suspected.

  5. Allelic inclusion in a pre-B-cell line that generates immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, G; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1987-01-01

    In a pre-B-cell line that rearranges its heavy chain gene segments in vitro, we found that the rate of productive rearrangement on one allele was not influenced by the presence of heavy chain protein encoded by the other allele. This shows that allelic exclusion of heavy chain genes is not regulated at the genetic level. Images PMID:3103122

  6. Effect of cell-derived growth factors and cytokines on the clonal outgrowth of EBV-infected B cells and established lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ifversen, P; Zhang, X M; Ohlin, M; Zeuthen, J; Borrebaeck, C A

    1993-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a potent inducer of polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and is widely used as a tool for the establishment of B cell lines producing human monoclonal antibodies. However, because of low transformability, low clonability, and the inherent instability of EBV-infected B cells, valuable antibody-producing B cells are often lost during this procedure. We have here examined various cell-derived cytokines for their ability to enhance both the cellular outgrowth of newly infected B cells and the clonability of infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Our results show that the murine thymoma cell line EL-4 is superior to peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both cellular outgrowth and cloning experiments, whereas monocyte-derived factors and monocyte cell lines were less capable than peripheral blood mononuclear cells in enhancing cellular outgrowth and cloning. Furthermore, the human T cell hybridoma cell line MP6 that secretes a B cell growth and differentiation factor, recently identified as an isoform of thioredoxin, is also capable of stimulating EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Co-cultivation of EBV-infected B cells with MP6 cells significantly enhanced the cloning efficiency at the 1 cell/well level. The present results also suggest that one potential role of the MP6-derived thioredoxin could be the up regulation of IL-6 receptor expression in EBV-infected B cells.

  7. B cell signatures of BCWD-resistant and susceptible lines of rainbow trout: a shift towards more EBF-expressing progenitors and fewer mature B cells in resistant animals.

    PubMed

    Zwollo, Patty; Ray, Jocelyn C; Sestito, Michael; Kiernan, Elizabeth; Wiens, Gregory D; Kaattari, Steve; StJacques, Brittany; Epp, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a chronic disease of rainbow trout, and is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum (Fp), a common aquaculture pathogen. The National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture has bred two genetic lines of rainbow trout: a line of Fp-resistant trout (ARS-Fp-R or R-line trout) and a line of susceptible trout (ARS-Fp-S, or S-line). Little is known about how phenotypic selection alters immune response parameters or how such changes relate to genetic disease resistance. Herein, we quantify interindividual variation in the distribution and abundance of B cell populations (B cell signatures) and examine differences between genetic lines of naive animals. There are limited trout-specific cell surface markers currently available to resolve B cell subpopulations and thus we developed an alternative approach based on detection of differentially expressed transcription factors and intracellular cytokines. B cell signatures were compared between R-line and S-line trout by flow cytometry using antibodies against transcription factors early B cell factor-1 (EBF1) and paired domain box protein Pax5, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, and the immunoglobulin heavy chain mu. R-line trout had higher percentages of EBF(+) B myeloid/ progenitor and pre-B cells in PBL, anterior and posterior kidney tissues compared to S-line trout. The opposite pattern was detected in more mature B cell populations: R-line trout had lower percentages of both IgM(+) mature B cells and IgM-secreting cells in anterior kidney and PBL compared to S-line trout. In vitro LPS-activation studies of PBL and spleen cell cultures revealed no significant induction differences between R-line and S-line trout. Together, our findings suggest that selective resistance to BCWD may be associated with shifts in naive animal developmental lineage commitment that result in decreased B lymphopoiesis and increased myelopoiesis in BCWD resistant trout relative

  8. Reconstitution of B cell antigen receptor-induced signaling events in a nonlymphoid cell line by expressing the Syk protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Richards, J D; Gold, M R; Hourihane, S L; DeFranco, A L; Matsuuchi, L

    1996-03-15

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) cross-linking activates both Src family and Syk tyrosine kinases, resulting in increased cellular protein-tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of several downstream signaling enzymes. To define the role of Syk in these events, we expressed the BCR in the AtT20 mouse pituitary cell line. These nonlymphoid cells endogenously expressed the Src family kinase Fyn but not Syk. Anti-IgM stimulation of these cells failed to induce most of the signaling events that occur in B cells. BCR-expressing AtT20 transfectants were generated that also expressed Syk. Syk expression reconstituted several signaling events upon anti-IgM stimulation, including Syk phosphorylation and association with the BCR, tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins including Shc, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. In contrast, Syk expression did not reconstitute anti-IgM-induced inositol phosphate production. A catalytically inactive Syk mutant could associate with the BCR and become tyrosine phosphorylated but could not reconstitute downstream signaling events. Expression of the Src family kinase Lck instead of Syk also did not reconstitute signaling. Thus, wild type Syk was required to reconstitute several BCR-induced signaling events but was not sufficient to couple the BCR to the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

  9. Proteoglycan expression correlates with the phenotype of malignant and non-malignant EBV-positive B-cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsidulko, Alexandra Y.; Matskova, Liudmila; Astakhova, Lidiia A.; Ernberg, Ingemar; Grigorieva, Elvira V.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of proteoglycans (PGs) in EBV-host interactions and lymphomagenesis remains poorly investigated. In this study, expression of major proteoglycans (syndecan-1, glypican-1, perlecan, versican, brevican, aggrecan, NG2, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, lumican, CD44), heparan sulphate (HS) metabolic system (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, HS2ST1, HS3ST1/2, HS6ST1/2, SULF1/2, HPSE) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen 1A1, fibronectin, elastin) in primary B cells and EBV carrying cell lines with different phenotypes, patterns of EBV-host cell interaction and viral latency stages (type I-III) was investigated. Primary B cells expressed a wide repertoire of PGs (dominated by serglycin and CD44) and ECM components. Lymphoblastoid EBV+ B cell lines (LCLs) showed specific PG expression with down-regulation of CD44 and ECM components and up-regulation of serglycin and perlecan/HSPG2. For Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL), serglycin was down-regulated in BL type III cells and perlecan in type I BL cells. The biosynthetic machinery for HS was active in all cell lines, with some tendency to be down-regulated in BL cells. 5′-aza-dC and/or Trichostatin A resulted in transcriptional upregulation of the genes, suggesting that low expression of ECM components, proteoglycan core proteins and HS biosynthetic system is due to epigenetic suppression in type I cells. Taken together, our data show that proteoglycans are expressed in primary B lymphocytes whereas they are not or only partly expressed in EBV-carrying cell lines, depending on their latency type program. PMID:26527314

  10. Fusion Toxin BLyS-Gelonin Inhibits Growth of Malignant Human B Cell Lines In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luster, Troy A.; Mukherjee, Ipsita; Carrell, Jeffrey A.; Cho, Yun Hee; Gill, Jeffrey; Kelly, Lizbeth; Garcia, Andy; Ward, Christopher; Oh, Luke; Ullrich, Stephen J.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Humphreys, Robin

    2012-01-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a member of the TNF superfamily of cytokines. The biological activity of BLyS is mediated by three cell surface receptors: BR3/BAFF-R, TACI and BCMA. The expression of these receptors is highly restricted to B cells, both normal and malignant. A BLyS-gelonin fusion toxin (BLyS-gel) was generated consisting of the recombinant plant-derived toxin gelonin fused to the N-terminus of BLyS and tested against a large and diverse panel of B-NHL cell lines. Interestingly, B-NHL subtypes mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and B cell precursor-acute lymphocytic leukemia (BCP-ALL) were preferentially sensitive to BLyS-gel mediated cytotoxicity, with low picomolar EC50 values. BLyS receptor expression did not guarantee sensitivity to BLyS-gel, even though the construct was internalized by both sensitive and resistant cells. Resistance to BLyS-gel could be overcome by treatment with the endosomotropic drug chloroquine, suggesting BLyS-gel may become trapped within endosomal/lysosomal compartments in resistant cells. BLyS-gel induced cell death was caspase-independent and shown to be at least partially mediated by the “ribotoxic stress response.” This response involves activation of p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK, and BLyS-gel mediated cytotoxicity was inhibited by the p38/JNK inhibitor SB203580. Finally, BLyS-gel treatment was shown to localize to sites of disease, rapidly reduce tumor burden, and significantly prolong survival in xenograft mouse models of disseminated BCP-ALL, DLBCL, and MCL. Together, these findings suggest BLyS has significant potential as a targeting ligand for the delivery of cytotoxic “payloads” to malignant B cells. PMID:23056634

  11. Antibody-induced antigenic modulation is antigen dependent: characterization of 22 proteins on a malignant human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pesando, J.M.; Hoffman, P.; Abed, M.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of several of the surface antigens on normal and malignant hematopoietic cells is reduced or is modulated by incubation with specific antibodies. Although antigenic modulation provides a means by which cells can escape antibody-mediated immune destruction, the physiologic significance and frequency of this phenomenon are both poorly understood. To begin to address these issues, the authors identified and characterized surface antigens on the malignant B cell line Laz 221 established from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with the use of 26 hematopoietic cell populations and immune precipitation studies with the use of iodinated ALL cells indicate the 163 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) identify 22 different proteins on this cell line, including at least six previously described surface molecules. Seven of these antigens are expressed by all nucleated cells examined, whereas only the ..mu.. chain of immunoglobulin is B cell specific. Studies that made use of multiple MoAb specific for the same antigen suggest that the capacity for antigenic modulation is an intrinsic property of individual antigens. These studies also suggest that the murine immune response to shared human antigens varies from one immunizing cell population to another. Immunogenicity of individual human antigens in the mouse may be a function of their cell surface environment.

  12. Assessment of carbonic anhydrase IX expression and extracellular pH in B-cell lymphoma cell line models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Howison, Christine M.; Spier, Catherine; Stopeck, Alison T.; Malm, Scott W.; Pagel, Mark D.; Baker, Amanda F.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA IX) and it’s relation to acidosis in lymphomas has not been widely studied. We investigated the protein expression of CA IX in a human B-cell lymphoma tissue microarray, and in Raji, Ramos, and Granta 519 lymphoma cell lines and tumor models, while also investigating the relation with hypoxia. An imaging method, acidoCEST MRI, was used to estimate lymphoma xenograft extracellular pH (pHe). Our results showed that clinical lymphoma tissues and cell line models in vitro and in vivo had moderate CA IX expression. Although in vitro studies showed that CA IX expression was induced by hypoxia, in vivo studies did not show this correlation. Untreated lymphoma xenograft tumor pHe had acidic fractions, and an Acidity Score was qualitatively correlated with CA IX expression. Therefore, CA IX is expressed in B-cell lymphomas and is qualitatively correlated with extracellular acidosis in xenograft tumor models. PMID:25130478

  13. Molecular cloning of a novel human hsp70 from a B cell line and its assignment to chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fathallah, D.M.; Arnaout, M.A. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA ); Cherif, D.; Dellagi, K. )

    1993-07-15

    A 2391-bp cDNA encoding a novel human hsp70, named hsp70 RY, is described. It was cloned from a cDNA library constructed using mRNA derived from an established EBV-transformed B cell line from a patient with leukocyte adhesion molecule deficiency. hsp70 RY is 701 amino acids long, has the characteristic N-terminal ATP-binding domain and the C-terminal peptide binding domain, and contains four potential N-glycosylation sites. Northern blotting revealed a single mRNA species of 3.0 kb in total RNA prepared from the patient's EBV cell line. In situ hybridization localized the single copy hsp70 RY gene to the long arm of chromosome 5 at 5q31.1-5q31.2. 30 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seong-Su; Han, Sangwoo; Kamberos, Natalie L.

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  15. Cloning and Expression of CD19, a Human B-Cell Marker in NIH-3T3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Background CD19 is a pan B cell marker that is recognized as an attractive target for antibody-based therapy of B-cell disorders including autoimmune disease and hematological malignancies. The object of this study was to stably express the human CD19 antigen in the murine NIH-3T3 cell line aimed to be used as an immunogen in our future study. Methods Total RNA was extracted from Raji cells in which high expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Synthesized cDNA was used for CD19 gene amplification by conventional PCR method using Pfu DNA polymerase. PCR product was ligated to pGEM-T Easy vector and ligation mixture was transformed to DH5α competent bacteria. After blue/white selection, one positive white colony was subjected to plasmid extraction and direct sequencing. Then, CD19 cDNA was sub-cloned into pCMV6-Neo expression vector by double digestion using KpnI and HindIII enzymes. NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line was subsequently transfected by the construct using Jet-PEI transfection reagent. After 48 hours, surface expression of CD19 was confirmed by flow cytometry and stably transfected cells were selected by G418 antibiotic. Results Amplification of CD19 cDNA gave rise to 1701 bp amplicon confirmed by alignment to reference sequence in NCBI database. Flow cytometric analysis showed successful transient and stable expression of CD19 on NIH-3T3 cells (29 and 93%, respectively). Conclusion Stable cell surface expression of human CD19 antigen in a murine NIH-3T3 cell line may develop a proper immunogene which raises specific anti-CD19 antibody production in the mice immunized sera. PMID:25926951

  16. A Diverse Repertoire of Human Immunoglobulin Variable Genes in a Chicken B Cell Line is Generated by Both Gene Conversion and Somatic Hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Philip A.; Schusser, Benjamin; Yi, Henry; Glanville, Jacob; Harriman, William

    2015-01-01

    Chicken immune responses to human proteins are often more robust than rodent responses because of the phylogenetic relationship between the different species. For discovery of a diverse panel of unique therapeutic antibody candidates, chickens therefore represent an attractive host for human-derived targets. Recent advances in monoclonal antibody technology, specifically new methods for the molecular cloning of antibody genes directly from primary B cells, has ushered in a new era of generating monoclonal antibodies from non-traditional host animals that were previously inaccessible through hybridoma technology. However, such monoclonals still require post-discovery humanization in order to be developed as therapeutics. To obviate the need for humanization, a modified strain of chickens could be engineered to express a human-sequence immunoglobulin variable region repertoire. Here, human variable genes introduced into the chicken immunoglobulin loci through gene targeting were evaluated for their ability to be recognized and diversified by the native chicken recombination machinery that is present in the B-lineage cell line DT40. After expansion in culture the DT40 population accumulated genetic mutants that were detected via deep sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the human targeted constructs are performing as expected in the cell culture system, and provide a measure of confidence that they will be functional in transgenic animals. PMID:25852694

  17. Transcriptional activation of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in the pre-B cell line Ea3.123.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, F; Deavall, D G; Macro, J A; Kiernan, R; Dimaline, R

    1999-01-01

    Uptake and storage of monoamines in secretory granules is accomplished by vesicular monoamine transporters, and it is likely that vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is important for histamine transport in vivo. In the present study we have used the pre-B-cell line Ea3.123 to investigate the mechanisms involved in the transcriptional activation of the VMAT2 gene. In Ea3.123 cells, VMAT2 mRNA abundance was increased following mobilization of intracellular calcium, and this increased mRNA expression was paralleled by changes in l-histidine decarboxylase mRNA, suggesting that VMAT2 may be responsible for sequestration of histamine into secretory vesicles in this cell line. We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the VMAT2 gene and determined its transcriptional start site by primer extension of rat VMAT2 mRNA. There was no TATA or TATA-like sequence upstream of this region; instead there were GC-rich elements, Ca2+/cAMP-response-element- and SP1-binding motifs. Approx. 900 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site was a purine-pyrimidine repeat sequence that may form a Z-DNA structure. A series of 5'-deletional VMAT2-promoter segments cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter were capable of driving transcription and indicated the presence of multiple regulatory elements, while stimulation with ionomycin or PMA resulted in an increased level of the transcriptional activity of the 5'-promoter segments studied. PMID:9882615

  18. Oryza Tag Line, a phenotypic mutant database for the Génoplante rice insertion line library

    PubMed Central

    Larmande, Pierre; Gay, Céline; Lorieux, Mathias; Périn, Christophe; Bouniol, Matthieu; Droc, Gaëtan; Sallaud, Christophe; Perez, Pascual; Barnola, Isabelle; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Martin, Jérôme; Morel, Jean Benoît; Johnson, Alexander A. T.; Bourgis, Fabienne; Ghesquière, Alain; Ruiz, Manuel; Courtois, Brigitte; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    To organize data resulting from the phenotypic characterization of a library of 30 000 T-DNA enhancer trap (ET) insertion lines of rice (Oryza sativa L cv. Nipponbare), we developed the Oryza Tag Line (OTL) database (http://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/OryzaTagLine/). OTL structure facilitates forward genetic search for specific phenotypes, putatively resulting from gene disruption, and/or for GUSA or GFP reporter gene expression patterns, reflecting ET-mediated endogenous gene detection. In the latest version, OTL gathers the detailed morpho-physiological alterations observed during field evaluation and specific screens in a first set of 13 928 lines. Detection of GUS or GFP activity in specific organ/tissues in a subset of the library is also provided. Search in OTL can be achieved through trait ontology category, organ and/or developmental stage, keywords, expression of reporter gene in specific organ/tissue as well as line identification number. OTL now contains the description of 9721 mutant phenotypic traits observed in 2636 lines and 1234 GUS or GFP expression patterns. Each insertion line is documented through a generic passport data including production records, seed stocks and FST information. 8004 and 6101 of the 13 928 lines are characterized by at least one T-DNA and one Tos17 FST, respectively that OTL links to the rice genome browser OryGenesDB. PMID:17947330

  19. Toxic effects of various pollutants in 11B7501 lymphoma B cell line from harbour seal (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Frouin, Héloïse; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel

    2010-04-11

    Although, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been reported at high levels in marine mammals, little is known about the toxic effects of some of these contaminants. In this study, we assessed the immunotoxic and genotoxic effects of seven heavy metals (arsenic, vanadium, selenium, iron, zinc, silver and chromium) and one PAH (benzo[a]pyrene or B[a]P) on a lymphoma B cell line from harbour seal (Phoca vitulina). A significant reduction in lymphocyte proliferation was registered following an exposure to 0.05 microM of B[a]P, 5 microM of arsenic or selenium, 50 microM of vanadium, 100 microM of silver and 200 microM of iron. On the contrary, zinc increased the lymphoproliferative response at 200 microM. Decreased phagocytosis was observed at 20 microM of arsenic, 50 microM of B[a]P or selenium, 200 microM of zinc and 500 microM of vanadium. Micronuclei induction occurred with 0.2 microM of B[a]P, 100 microM of vanadium and with 200muM of arsenic or selenium. Exposure to 50muM of arsenic decreased G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. Chromium did not induce any effects at the concentrations tested. Concentrations of heavy metals (except silver and vanadium) and B[a]P inducing an toxic effect are within the environmental ranges reported in the blood tissue of pinnipeds. The reduction of some functional activities of the harbour seal immune system may cause a significant weakness capable of altering host resistance to disease in free-ranging pinnipeds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of a soluble suppressor of human B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis produced by a continuous human suppressor T cell line

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A human suppressor T cell maintained in long-term culture with conditioned medium containing interleukin 2 elaborates a suppressor factor(s) that specifically inhibits human polyclonal B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis. This soluble immune suppressor supernate of immunoglobulin production (CTC-SISS-B) shares a number of features with the previously described suppressive mediator elaborated by concanavalin A-activated human peripheral T cells (SISS-B) including: (a) the inhibition by a noncytotoxic mechanism, (b) the suppression of immunoglobulin biosynthesis either through direct action on the B cell or indirect action via the monocyte, (c) the loss of inhibition in the presence of the monosaccharide L-rhamnose, (d) the elaboration by cells irradiated with 500 ro 2,000 rad, and (e) molecular weights of 60,000-- 90,000. Furthermore, the suppression by this mediator appears to be specific for B cell immunoglobulin production in that CTC-SISS B has no effect on T cell proliferation to mitogens, antigens, an allogeneic cells or on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicate that one possible mechanism of suppressor T cell inhibition of human immunoglobulin production is via the generation of a lectinlike suppressor lymphokine that interacts with defined saccharide determinants on the cell surface of either the B cell or monocyte. PMID:6454754

  1. Synthesis of germ-line gamma 1 immunoglobulin heavy-chain transcripts in resting B cells: induction by interleukin 4 and inhibition by interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Berton, M T; Uhr, J W; Vitetta, E S

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) induces the expression of IgG1 and IgE in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B cells. Previous studies have suggested that heavy-chain class switching may be regulated by increasing the accessibility of specific switch regions to switch recombinases. In this study, we have used an RNase protection assay to demonstrate that IL-4 induces expression of germ-line gamma 1 transcripts in B cells within 4 hr of culture; induction is dose-dependent and is inhibited by interferon gamma. IL-4 alone is capable of inducing the expression of germ-line gamma 1 transcripts in small, resting B cells, but lipopolysaccharide enhances expression. The germ-line transcripts are the same size (1.8 and 3.4 kilobases) as the secreted and membrane forms of the functional gamma 1 mRNAs and presumably result from the splicing of an upstream switch-region exon(s) to the gamma 1 constant-region exon(s). These data strongly support the "accessibility" model for the regulation of isotype switching and suggest that lymphokines such as IL-4 may direct specific switch events by transcriptional activation of the corresponding switch regions. Images PMID:2495537

  2. Generation of high-titre virus stocks using BrK.219, a B-cell line infected stably with recombinant Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Kati, Semra; Hage, Elias; Mynarek, Martin; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Indenbirken, Daniela; Grundhoff, Adam; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gamma-2-lymphotropic human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV establishes latency soon after infection in vivo and in vitro. Consequently, it is technically difficult to generate high-titre virus stocks required for infection experiments in tissue culture. Currently used methods of KSHV stock production involve induction of the lytic/productive cycle in PEL cell lines or in adherent cell lines harbouring recombinant KSHV genomes. In this study, the BJAB-derived B-cell line BrK.219, which is infected latently with a recombinant KSHV (rKSHV.219), is used to produce high-titre virus stocks. BrK.219 cells enter the lytic KSHV replication cycle upon cross-linking of B-cell receptors (BCRs) with anti-IgM antibodies without the need for additional, potentially toxic chemical inducers. High cell concentrations can be cultured and induced easily in spinner flasks, saving time and resources. The established protocol allows the generation of KSHV virus stocks with titres of up to 10(6) IU/ml in unconcentrated culture supernatants, representing a 10(3)-10(4)-fold improvement compared to conventional methods.

  3. Formation of coding joints in V(D)J recombination-inducible severe combined immune deficient pre-B cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yung; Brown, Matthew L.

    1999-01-01

    Characterization of the severe combined immune deficient (scid) defect in the recombination process has provided many insights into the underlying mechanisms of variable (diversity) joining recombination. By using recombination-inducible scid pre-B cell lines transformed with the temperature-sensitive Abelson-murine leukemia virus, we show that large quantities of recombination intermediates can be generated, and their resolution can be followed during further cell culture. In this study, we demonstrate that the ability of these scid pre-B cell lines to resolve coding ends depends on the cell culture temperature. At the nonpermissive temperature of 39°C, scid pre-B cell lines fail to form coding joints and contain mostly unresolved hairpin-coding ends. Once the cell culture is returned to the permissive temperature of 33°C, these same cells make a significant amount of coding joints concomitant with the disappearance of hairpin-coding ends. Thus, the scid cells are capable of resolving coding ends under certain culture conditions. However, the majority of the recovered coding joints contains extensive deletions, indicating that the temperature-dependent resolution of coding ends is still scid-like. Our results suggest that the inability of scid cells to promptly nick hairpin-coding ends may lead to aberrant joining in these cells. PMID:9874794

  4. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eμ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Mike I.; Eve, Paul D.; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T.; Valenti, Melanie R.; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K.; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J.; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P.; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E.; Perkins, Neil D.; Aherne, G. Wynne; Reader, John C.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition. PMID:26295308

  5. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eµ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Walton, Mike I; Eve, Paul D; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E; Perkins, Neil D; Aherne, G Wynne; Reader, John C; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D

    2016-01-19

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4 nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220 nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition.

  6. Genetic characterization of glossy-leafed mutant broccoli lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glossy mutants of Brassica oleracea L. have reduced or altered epicuticular wax on the surface of their leaves as compared to wild-type plants, conveying a shiny green appearance. Mutations conferring glossiness are common and have been found in most B. oleracea crop varieties, including cauliflower...

  7. Real-time analysis of the detailed sequence of cellular events in mAb-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity of B-cell lines and of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lindorfer, Margaret A; Cook, Erika M; Tupitza, Jillian C; Zent, Clive S; Burack, Richard; de Jong, Rob N; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Taylor, Ronald P

    2016-02-01

    Complement-dependent cytotoxicity is an important mechanism of action of certain mAbs used in cancer immunotherapy, including ofatumumab and rituximab. However, the detailed sequence of cellular changes that occur in nucleated cells attacked by mAb and complement has not been delineated. Recently developed CD20 mAbs, engineered to form hexamers on binding to cells, react with B-cells in serum, chelate C1q, and then activate complement and promote cell killing considerably more effectively than their wild-type precursors. We used these engineered mAbs as a model to investigate the sequence of events that occur when mAbs bind to B-cell lines and to primary cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and then activate complement. Based on four-color confocal microscopy real-time movies and high resolution digital imaging, we find that after CD20 mAb binding and C1q uptake, C3b deposits on cells, followed by Ca(2+) influx, revealed by bright green signals generated on cells labeled with FLUO-4, a Ca(2+) indicator. The bright FLUO-4/Ca(2+) signal fades, replaced by punctate green signals in mitochondria, indicating Ca(2+) localization. This step leads to mitochondrial poisoning followed by cell death. The entire sequence is completed in <2 min for hexamerization-enhanced CD20 mAb-mediated killing. To our knowledge this is the first time the entire process has been characterized in detail in real time. By identifying multiple discrete steps in the cytotoxic pathway for nucleated cells our findings may inform future development and more effective application of complement-fixing mAbs to cancer treatment.

  8. A CD4+ T cell line-secreted factor, growth promoting for normal and leukemic B cells, identified as thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Rosen, A; Lundman, P; Carlsson, M; Bhavani, K; Srinivasa, B R; Kjellström, G; Nilsson, K; Holmgren, A

    1995-04-01

    In this study, a B cell growth stimulatory factor, constitutively secreted by a human CD4+ T cell hybridoma clone, MP6, has been purified and characterized. Serum-free 24 h culture media from MP6 cells were collected, concentrated by ultrafiltration and separated by gel chromatography. Fractions were analyzed for stimulatory activity using [3H]thymidine incorporation in normal and leukemic (B-CLL) B cells as target cells. Activity was present in a 12 kDa protein peak. Upon storage this lost activity indicating that the factor was sensitive to air oxidation, a well-known property of mammalian thioredoxins (Trxs). Treatment of the inactive fraction with dithiothreitol restored full activity. When culture medium was analyzed with a radioimmunoassay for human placenta Trx, the MP6 clone was shown to release 30-50 ng/ml per million cells during 24 h. The B cell stimulatory activity of the MP6 medium was removed by Sepharose-bound anti-human placenta Trx IgG and activity was recovered by elution from the antibodies. Furthermore, MP6 medium showed Trx activity with NADPH and Trx reductase using an insulin disulfide reduction assay. Starting from 5 l of serum-free MP6 conditioned medium, the Trx was purified approximately 100,000-fold. After gel electrophoresis banding, the material was analyzed by peptide sequencing and a full length sequence of an 104 amino acid long protein was obtained. This Trx sequence was identical to the previously published sequence of human Trx from HTLV-1 transformed T cells, adult T cell leukemia-derived factor/Trx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Chemo-sensitivity in a panel of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines, YCUB series, derived from children.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hiroaki; Naruto, Takuya; Tanoshima, Reo; Kato, Hiromi; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Fujii, Hisaki; Yokota, Shumpei; Komine, Hiromi

    2009-10-01

    Sensitivity to 10 anticancer drugs was evaluated in 6 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cell lines. Authenticity of newly established cell lines was confirmed by genomic fingerprinting. The line YCUB-5R established at relapse was more resistant to 4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, L-asparaginase, topotecan, fludarabine, and etoposide than YCUB-5 from the same patient at diagnosis. Of the drugs tested, etoposide and SN-38 (irinotecan) showed highest efficacy in the panel, with 50% growth inhibition at 0.22-1.8 microg/ml and 0.57-3.6 ng/ml, respectively. This cell line panel offers an in vitro model for the development of new therapies for childhood BCP-ALL.

  10. Isolation and characterization of mutant CHO cell lines with compartment-specific resistance to brefeldin A

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    22 CHOBFY (BFY) cell lines were isolated at a frequency 2-30 x 10(-7) from mutagenized populations on the basis of their ability to grow in the presence of 1 microgram/ml brefeldin A (BFA). Four of the five mutant lines tested are genetically stable and none of the mutant lines characterized degrade this drug. Immunofluorescence studies reveal that whereas early endosomes and the Golgi complex have nearly identical BFA sensitivities in the parent CHO line, the relative sensitivities of these two organelles were dramatically altered in all six mutant lines tested. Four cell lines maintain normal Golgi appearance at a BFA concentration as high as 10 micrograms/ml. Mutant lines show wide variation in the level of resistance to growth inhibition by BFA, but none of the mutant lines characterized grow above 2 micrograms/ml BFA. This specific growth inhibition is observed under conditions where Golgi morphology and function remain unaffected, suggesting that some factor(s) unrelated to Golgi function remains sensitive to BFA in BFY mutant lines. These observations provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple, organelle-specific targets for BFA. Cell-free measurements with membrane extracts establish that resistance to BFA in BFY-1 cells involves a membrane-associated factor distinct from ARFs and coatomers. This collection of mutant lines may prove valuable for the identification of intracellular target(s) for BFA and/or of effectors that interact upstream or downstream with these targets, thereby uncovering the cascade which regulates assembly of organelle- specific coats. PMID:8027187

  11. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders H; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype-envirotype interactions for other diseases.

  12. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  13. Field evaluation of mint mutant and hybrid lines for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Severity of Verticillium wilt varied significantly among mint lines and cultivars in the inoculated and non-inoculated sub-plots in two field trials. Verticillium wilt was significantly less severe for mutant lines 87M0109-1, 84M0107-7, and M90-11 than for Black Mitcham in 2002 and 2003. Verticilli...

  14. Identification of Mutant K-Ras-dependent Phenotypes Using a Panel of Isogenic Cell Lines*

    PubMed Central

    Vartanian, Steffan; Bentley, Carolyn; Brauer, Matthew J.; Li, Li; Shirasawa, Senji; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kim, Jung-Sik; Haverty, Pete; Stawiski, Eric; Modrusan, Zora; Waldman, Todd; Stokoe, David

    2013-01-01

    To assess the consequences of endogenous mutant K-Ras, we analyzed the signaling and biological properties of a small panel of isogenic cell lines. These include the cancer cell lines DLD1, HCT116, and Hec1A, in which either the WT or mutant K-ras allele has been disrupted, and SW48 colorectal cancer cells and human mammary epithelial cells in which a single copy of mutant K-ras was introduced at its endogenous genomic locus. We find that single copy mutant K-Ras causes surprisingly modest activation of downstream signaling to ERK and Akt. In contrast, a negative feedback signaling loop to EGFR and N-Ras occurs in some, but not all, of these cell lines. Mutant K-Ras also had relatively minor effects on cell proliferation and cell migration but more dramatic effects on cell transformation as assessed by growth in soft agar. Surprisingly, knock-out of the wild type K-ras allele consistently increased growth in soft agar, suggesting tumor-suppressive properties of this gene under these conditions. Finally, we examined the effects of single copy mutant K-Ras on global gene expression. Although transcriptional programs triggered by mutant K-Ras were generally quite distinct in the different cell lines, there was a small number of genes that were consistently overexpressed, and these could be used to monitor K-Ras inhibition in a panel of human tumor cell lines. We conclude that there are conserved components of mutant K-Ras signaling and phenotypes but that many depend on cell context and environmental cues. PMID:23188824

  15. Exogenous PML/RARα Fusion Gene Responds to All-trans Retinoic Acid Results in Differentiation of the Human B Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Sumimoto, Y; Maeda, Y; Naiki, Y; Sono, H; Miyatake, J; Sakaguchi, M; Matsuda, M; Kanamaru, A

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an exogenous PML/RARα fusion gene, associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia, with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was examined in B-lymphoid cell lines. RPMI8866 cells were transfected with PML/RARα cDNA in the expression vector pGD and two stable transformants (RPMI8866Y-4 and RPMI8866Y-17) were established by selection with G418. ATRA inhibited the growth of those stable transformants, as assessed by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, but had no effect on the growth of control cells stably transformed with neomycin resistant gene alone. ATRA also increased expression of CD38 and immunoglobulin production in RPMI8866Y-4 cells but not in control cells. When these results are taken together, it can be observed that the exogenous PML/RARα fusion gene responds to ATRA, which results in cell differentiation of the human B cell line.

  16. Integration of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data Sets for the Analysis of a Lymphoma B-Cell Line in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Droste, Conrad; Dégano, Rosa M; González-Muñoz, María; Ibarrola, Nieves; Pérez-Andrés, Martín; Garin-Muga, Alba; Segura, Víctor; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; LaBaer, Joshua; Orfao, Alberto; Corrales, Fernando J; De Las Rivas, Javier; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-09-04

    A comprehensive study of the molecular active landscape of human cells can be undertaken to integrate two different but complementary perspectives: transcriptomics, and proteomics. After the genome era, proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool to simultaneously identify and characterize the compendium of thousands of different proteins active in a cell. Thus, the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is promoting a full characterization of the human proteome combining high-throughput proteomics with the data derived from genome-wide expression profiling of protein-coding genes. Here we present a full proteomic profiling of a human lymphoma B-cell line (Ramos) performed using a nanoUPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap Velos proteomic platform, combined to an in-depth transcriptomic profiling of the same cell type. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001933. Integration of the proteomic and transcriptomic data sets revealed a 94% overlap in the proteins identified by both -omics approaches. Moreover, functional enrichment analysis of the proteomic profiles showed an enrichment of several functions directly related to the biological and morphological characteristics of B-cells. In turn, about 30% of all protein-coding genes present in the whole human genome were identified as being expressed by the Ramos cells (stable average of 30% genes along all the chromosomes), revealing the size of the protein expression-set present in one specific human cell type. Additionally, the identification of missing proteins in our data sets has been reported, highlighting the power of the approach. Also, a comparison between neXtProt and UniProt database searches has been performed. In summary, our transcriptomic and proteomic experimental profiling provided a high coverage report of the expressed proteome from a human lymphoma B-cell type with a clear insight into the biological processes that characterized these cells. In this way, we demonstrated the usefulness of

  17. Endogenous Neurotrophins and Trk Signaling in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines Are Involved in Sensitivity to Rituximab-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bellanger, Cynthia; Dubanet, Lydie; Lise, Marie-Claude; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Bordessoule, Dominique; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Troutaud, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Background Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common and often fatal malignancy. Immunochemotherapy, a combination of rituximab to standard chemotherapy, has resulted in improved survival. However a substantial proportion of patients still fail to reach sustained remission. We have previously demonstrated that autocrine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production plays a function in human B cell survival, at least partly via sortilin expression. As neurotrophin receptor (Trks) signaling involved activation of survival pathways that are inhibited by rituximab, we speculated that neurotrophins may provide additional support for tumour cell survival and therapeutic resistance in DLBCL. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we used two DLBCL cell lines, SUDHL4 and SUDHL6, known to be respectively less and more sensitive to rituximab. We found by RT-PCR, western blotting, cytometry and confocal microscopy that both cell lines expressed, in normal culture conditions, BDNF and to a lesser extent NGF, as well as truncated TrkB and p75NTR/sortilin death neurotrophin receptors. Furthermore, BDNF secretion was detected in cell supernatants. NGF and BDNF production and Trk receptor expression, including TrkA, are regulated by apoptotic conditions (serum deprivation or rituximab exposure). Indeed, we show for the first time that rituximab exposure of DLBCL cell lines induces NGF secretion and that differences in rituximab sensitivity are associated with differential expression patterns of neurotrophins and their receptors (TrkA). Finally, these cells are sensitive to the Trk-inhibitor, K252a, as shown by the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, K252a exhibits additive cytotoxic effects with rituximab. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these data strongly suggest that a neurotrophin axis, such NGF/TrkA pathway, may contribute to malignant cell survival and rituximab resistance in DLBCL. PMID:22076137

  18. Antibodies binding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor produced by cord blood-derived B cell lines immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R P; Laricchia Robbio, L; Liberati, A M; Reato, G; Foa, R; Funaro, A; Vinante, F; Pizzolo, G

    2000-09-15

    We detected natural antibodies (auto-Abs) binding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in umbilical cord blood (CB) (23 of 94 samples screened) and peripheral blood of women at the end of pregnancy (6 of 42 samples tested). To demonstrate that Abs detected in CB were produced by the fetus, CB mononuclear cells were infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. Ten cell lines producing constitutively anti-recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) Abs were isolated and characterized. These cells displayed a male karyotype, an early activated B cell phenotype, coexpressed surface IgM and IgD, and secreted only IgM with prevailing lambda clonal restriction. Specific cell surface binding of biotinylated rhGM-CSF and high-level anti-rhGM-CSF IgM Ab production were typical features of early cell cultures. In late cell passages the frequency of more undifferentiated B cells increased. Serum Abs of either maternal or fetal origin or Abs produced in culture did not affect the granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating activity of rhGM-CSF from bone marrow progenitors in soft agar, suggesting that the Abs produced were nonneutralizing.

  19. EBV Zta protein induces the expression of interleukin-13, promoting the proliferation of EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Chun; Lin, Sue-Jane; Chen, Po-Wen; Luo, Wen-Yi; Yeh, Te-Huei; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Chen, Chi-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can modify the cytokine expression profiles of host cells and determine the fate of those cells. Of note, expression of interleukin-13 (IL-13) may be detected in EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and the natural killer (NK) cells of chronic active EBV-infected patients, but its biologic role and regulatory mechanisms are not understood. Using cytokine antibody arrays, we found that IL-13 production is induced in B cells early during EBV infection. Furthermore, the EBV lytic protein, Zta (also known as the BZLF-1 product), which is a transcriptional activator, was found to induce IL-13 expression following transfection. Mechanistically, induction of IL-13 expression by Zta is mediated directly through its binding to the IL-13 promoter, via a consensus AP-1 binding site. Blockade of IL-13 by antibody neutralization showed that IL-13 is required at an early stage of EBV-induced proliferation and for long-term maintenance of the growth of EBV immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Thus, Zta-induced IL-13 production facilitates B-cell proliferation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, such as posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:19417211

  20. Establishment of hybridomas producing cancer specific human antibodies from B cell line derived from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, T; Ichikawa, A; Katakura, Y; Teruya, K; Yoshida, T; Kikuchi, M; Kamei, M; Hashizume, S; Shirahata, S

    2001-07-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant disease characterized by tumorous proliferation of CD4(+) T cells infected with retrovirus human T cell leukemia virus Type-I (HTLV-I) and concurs with an autoimmune disease and cancer due to attenuated immune response. In this study, we established ATL patient derived B-cell line TM-1 producing cancer-specific IgM antibodies, and further characterized its antigen specificity by establishing hybridomas fused with human-mouse origin hetero-myeloma cell line RF-S1. We established three hybridoma cell lines termed 2E12, 3E9, and 3E10, which continuously secreted human IgM antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed tissue section using antibodies secreted from these hybridomas showed that these antibodies specifically recognized tumor sites of human colon adenocarcinomas. Antibody produced from hybridoma 3E9 bound to some of leukemic cell lines, but not to normal human PBL, which was evidenced by the flow cytometric analysis, indicating that antibody produced from 3E9 recognizes cell surface antigen specifically expressed in the leukemic cells.

  1. Second-line therapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): treatment patterns and outcomes in older patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Danese, Mark D; Griffiths, Robert I; Gleeson, Michelle L; Dalvi, Tapashi; Li, Jingyi; Mikhael, Joseph R; Deeter, Robert; Dreyling, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Using SEER-Medicare linked data we identified elderly patients diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) between January 2000 and December 2007 who received second-line outpatient chemotherapy for relapsed or refractory disease. Second-line regimens were classified into three mutually exclusive groups: aggressive, conventional, and palliative. Of the 632 (426 relapsed, 206 refractory) patients in the cohort, 27.8% received aggressive second-line therapy, 39.1% received conventional therapy, and 33.1% received palliative therapy. There were no differences in survival by type of therapy received, either for relapsed or refractory patients, although the patient risk profile differed significantly. However, duration of remission, male gender, and anemia at diagnosis were important predictors in relapsed patients, and male gender, B-symptoms, comorbidity burden, and poverty status were important predictors in refractory patients. Survival in elderly patients receiving second-line therapy remains poor, and the 24-month cost of all care exceeds $97,000. Patients would benefit from improved treatment options.

  2. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib acts independently of p53 and induces cell death via apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in B-cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Sandra J; Higginbottom, Karen; Jüliger, Simone; Maharaj, Lenushka; Allen, Paul; Schenkein, David; Lister, T Andrew; Joel, Simon P

    2007-03-15

    Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor with proven efficacy in multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This study reports the effects of bortezomib in B-cell lymphoma cell lines with differing sensitivity to bortezomib to investigate factors that influence sensitivity. Bortezomib induced a time- and concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability in five lymphoma cell lines, with EC(50) values ranging from 6 nmol/L (DHL-7 cells) to 25 nmol/L (DHL-4 cells) after 72 h. Bortezomib cytotoxicity was independent of p53 function, as all cell lines exhibited mutations by sequence analysis. The difference in sensitivity was not explained by proteasome or nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibition as these were similar in the most and least sensitive cells. NF-kappaB inhibition was less marked than that of a specific NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082. Cell cycle analysis showed a marked G(2)-arrested population in the least sensitive DHL-4 line only, an effect that was not present with Bay 11-7082 treatment. Conversely, in DHL-7 cells, bortezomib treatment resulted in cells moving into an aberrant mitosis, indicative of mitotic catastrophe that may contribute to increased sensitivity to bortezomib. These studies show that although bortezomib treatment had similar effects on apoptotic and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in these cell lines, different cell cycle effects were observed and induction of a further mechanism of cell death, mitotic catastrophe, was observed in the more sensitive cell line, which may provide some pointers to the difference in sensitivity between cell lines. An improved understanding of how DHL-7 cells abrogate the G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint may help identify targets to increase the efficacy of bortezomib.

  3. Specificity and isotype of Rh specific antibodies produced by human B-cell lines established from alloimmunized Rh negative women.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Roya Payam Khaja; Bahrami, Zahra Samadi; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Ramzi, Fereshteh; Razavi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Fazel

    2005-10-01

    Despite the successful outcome of anti-D prophylaxis program, alloimmunization still occurs. The aim of this study was to examine the specificity and isotype of anti-Rh antibodies in plasma samples of Rh negative alloimmunized individuals and to study the same parameters in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from the same donors. Specificity of anti-Rh antibodies was determined in plasma of nine alloimmunized subjects by direct hemagglutination using a panel of known RBC genotypes and isotype of specific antibodies were identified by an antigen specific ELISA. Similar methods were employed to determine specificity and isotype of antibodies produced by Rh specific LCLs established from four donors. LCLs were generated by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from each donor followed by their culture over a feeder of human fetal fibroblasts. Upon emergence of lymphoblastoid cells, culture supernatants were assayed for presence of Rh specific antibody by hemagglutination assay. Anti-D was the predominant antibody in both plasma samples and among the 128 established LCLs; however, antibodies to other Rh specificities namely C and E were also produced. The isotype of anti-Rh antibody in all plasma samples was found to be IgG, predominantly IgG1, combined in 7 samples with IgM. Similarly 76%, 9.2% and 14.8% of LCLs were determined to produce antibody of IgG, IgM and of both isotypes, respectively. The data supported that the D antigen is the immunodominant component of the Rh system as indicated by the in vitro and in vivo profiles of Rh specificities in our alloimmunized subjects.

  4. Xenobiotic metabolism induction and bulky DNA adducts generated by particulate matter pollution in BEAS-2B cell line: geographical and seasonal influence.

    PubMed

    Lepers, Capucine; André, Véronique; Dergham, Mona; Billet, Sylvain; Verdin, Anthony; Garçon, Guillaume; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Sichel, François; Shirali, Pirouz

    2014-06-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) toxicity is of growing interest as diesel exhaust particles have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. However, PM is a mixture of chemicals, and respective contribution of organic and inorganic fractions to PM toxicity remains unclear. Thus, we analysed the link between chemical composition of PM samples and bulky DNA adduct formation supported by CYP1A1 and 1B1 genes induction and catalytic activities. We used six native PM samples, collected in industrial, rural or urban areas, either during the summer or winter, and carried out our experiments on the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Cell exposure to PM resulted in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes induction. This was followed by an increase in EROD activity, leading to bulky DNA adduct formation in exposed cells. Bulky DNA adduct intensity was associated to global EROD activity, but this activity was poorly correlated with CYPs mRNA levels. However, EROD activity was correlated with both metal and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. Finally, principal components analysis revealed three clusters for PM chemicals, and suggested synergistic effects of metals and PAHs on bulky DNA adduct levels. This study showed the ability of PM samples from various origins to generate bulky DNA adducts in BEAS-2B cells. This formation was promoted by increased expression and activity of CYPs involved in PAHs activation into reactive metabolites. However, our data highlight that bulky DNA adduct formation is only partly explained by PM content in PAHs, and suggest that inorganic compounds, such as iron, may promote bulky DNA adduct formation by supporting CYP activity.

  5. Evaluation of the miRNA profiling and effectiveness of the propolis on B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ugur Cem; Bagca, Bakiye Goker; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Asude; Durmaz, Burak; Aykut, Ayca; Kayalar, Husniye; Avci, Cigir Biray; Susluer, Sunde Yilmaz; Gunduz, Cumhur; Cogulu, Ozgur

    2016-12-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most frequent causes of death from cancer. Since the discovery of chemotherapeutic agents, ALL has become a model for improvement of survival. In parallel to this, serious side effects were observed and new natural therapeutic options has been discussed. One of these substances is called propolis which is a resinous substance gathered by honeybees. In the molecular era, miRNAs have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of many clinical conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Aydın propolis on 81 human miRNA activity in CCRF-SB leukemia cell line. Apoptotic effects of propolis on cell lines were also evaluated and apoptosis were found to be induced 1.5 fold in B-cell leukemia cells. The expression of 63 miRNAs (46 miRNAs were downregulated, 19 miRNAs were upregulated) in propolis treated leukemia cells have changed significantly (p<0.05). In conclusion propolis has changed expression of miRNAs which have epigenetic effects on leukemic cells. It is thought that it can be a promising agent for ALL treatment for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  7. Maintenance of growth transformation with Epstein-Barr virus is mediated by secretion of autocrine growth factors in two serum-free B-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J E; Baglia, L A; Leung, K

    1988-09-01

    The characteristics of two tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) B-cell lines (sfBIT and sfBT) growth-transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that proliferate continuously in serum-free medium are described. sfBIT was established by selecting cells for growth in RPMI 1640 supplemented with insulin, transferrin, and selenium (J. E. Shaw, R. G. Petit, and K. Leung, J. Virol. 61:4033-4037, 1987). sfBT, a subline of sfBIT cells reported here for the first time, required transferrin as the only protein supplement for continuous growth in RPMI 1640. Growth of sfBT cells was linear with human transferrin at 10(-2) to 10 micrograms/ml. Transferrin at 5 micrograms/ml yielded a culture density of 5 X 10(5) to 1 X 10(6) cells per ml, a cell doubling time of 2 to 3 days, and a culture viability greater than 95%. sfBIT and sfBT cells released transforming virus during continuous growth in serum-free culture medium without EBV-inducing agents. The spent medium of both serum-free lines supported cell growth at low culture density (1 x 10(4) to 5 X 10(4) cells per ml), but growth was arrested at low culture density with fresh serum-free medium. A procedure to measure growth-promoting activity (GPA) was established, and it revealed that the GPA of spent medium was greater than that of fresh medium for both serum-free cell lines. When fresh and spent media were dialyzed (molecular weight cutoff, 3,500) and subsequently concentrated by lyophilization, only the GPA of spent medium increased. We conclude that maintenance of growth transformation of tamarin cells latently infected with EBV is mediated by growth factors that are entirely autocrine in origin.

  8. Long-term outcomes of first-line treatment with doxycycline in patients with previously untreated ocular adnexal marginal zone B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Joon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Mee Kum; Khwarg, Sang In; Kim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Il Han; Heo, Dae Seog

    2015-04-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) has been associated with Chlamydophila psittaci infection, for which doxycycline has been suggested as a treatment option. We conducted this study to evaluate the long-term results of first-line doxycycline treatment in patients with OAL. Ninety patients with histologically confirmed OAL with marginal zone B cell lymphoma were enrolled. Each patient received one or two cycles of doxycycline (100 mg bid) for 3 weeks. After a median follow-up period of 40.5 months (8-85), the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 60.9 %. All patients were alive at the last follow-up date. Thirty-one patients (34 %) showed local treatment failure without systemic spread. However, PFS rate in these patients was 100 % after salvage chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. PFS was independently predicted in multivariate analysis by the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging (hazard ratio [HR], 4.35; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 2.03-9.32; P < 0.001) and number of cycles of doxycycline (HR, 0.31; 95 % CI, 0.14-0.69; P = 0.004). No serious adverse event was reported during doxycycline therapy. In conclusion, first-line doxycycline therapy was effective and safe. Patients who failed to respond to doxycycline therapy were successfully salvaged with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy without compromising long-term outcomes. Patients with T1N0M0 disease could be considered good candidates for first-line doxycycline.

  9. Copper phytoextraction in tandem with oilseed production using commercial cultivars and mutant lines of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Kolbas, A; Mench, M; Herzig, R; Nehnevajova, E; Bes, C M

    2011-01-01

    Use of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) for Cu phytoextraction and oilseed production on Cu-contaminated topsoils was investigated in afield trial at a former wood preservation site. Six commercial cultivars and two mutant lines were cultivated in plots with and without the addition of compost (5% w/w) and dolomitic limestone (0.2% w/w). Total soil Cu ranged from 163 to 1170 mg kg(-1). In soil solutions, Cu concentration varied between 0.16-0.93 mg L(-1). The amendment increased soil pH, reduced Cu exposure and promoted sunflower growth. Stem length, shoot and capitulum biomasses, seed yield, and shoot and leaf Cu concentrations were measured. At low total soil Cu, shoot Cu mineralomass was higher in commercial cultivars, Le., Salut, Energic, and Countri, whereas competition and shading affected morphological traits of mutants. Based on shoot yield (7 Mg DW ha(-1)) and Cu concentration, the highest removal was 59 g Cu ha(-1). At high total soil Cu, shoot Cu mineralomass peaked for mutants (e.g., 52 g Cu ha(-1) for Mutant 1 line) and cultivars Energic and Countri. Energic seed yield (3.9 Mg air-DW ha(-1)) would be sufficient to produce oil Phenotype traits and shoot Cu removal depended on sunflower types and Cu exposure.

  10. Establishment and characterization of a novel MYC/BCL2 "double-hit" diffuse large B cell lymphoma cell line, RC.

    PubMed

    Pham, Lan V; Lu, Gary; Tamayo, Archito T; Chen, Juan; Challagundla, Pramoda; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Ford, Richard J

    2015-10-29

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoid malignancy worldwide. Approximately 5 % of cases of DLBCL are so-called double-hit lymphomas (DHL), defined by a chromosomal translocation or rearrangement involving MYC/8q24.2 in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, usually BCL2/18q21.3. Patients with MYC/BCL2 DHL are resistant to standard front-line therapy, and currently, there is no consensus for a therapeutic strategy to treat these patients. Lack of clinically relevant or validated human experimental DHL models of any type that would improve our understanding of the biologic basis of MYC/BCL2 DHL pathophysiology continues to hamper identification of valid therapeutic targets. We describe a unique MYC/BCL2 DHL cell line with morphologic features of DLBCL that we have established, designated as RC. We used tissue culture techniques to establish the RC cell line from primary DLBCL cells. We also utilized molecular and cellular biological techniques including flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA fingerprinting, reverse-phase protein array, conventional cytogenetics, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to characterize the RC cell line. NSG-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were utilized as a model for xeno-transplantation of RC cells. RC cells had the following immunophenotype: positive for CD10, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD38, CD43, CD44, and CD79b and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD11c, CD14, CD30, CD56, and CD200, which was identical to the primary tumor cells. Conventional cytogenetic analysis showed a t(2;8)(p12;q24.2) and t(14;18)(q32;q21.3), corresponding to MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements, respectively. DNA fingerprinting authenticated the RC cell line to be of the same clone as the primary tumor cells. In addition, RC cells were established in SCID mice as an in vivo model for translational therapeutics studies. Proteomic analysis showed activation of the mTOR signaling pathway

  11. Translation and assembly of HLA-DR antigens in Xenopus oocytes injected with mRNA from a human B-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Long, E O; Gross, N; Wake, C T; Mach, J P; Carrel, S; Accolla, R; Mach, B

    1982-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens are polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins, expressed primarily in B lymphocytes and macrophages, which are thought to play an important role in the immune response. Two polypeptide chains, alpha and beta, are associated at the cell surface, and a third chain associates with alpha and beta intracellularly. RNA isolated from the human B-cell line Raji was injected in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Immunoprecipitates of translation products with several monoclonal antibodies revealed the presence of HLA-DR antigens similar to those synthesized in Raji cells. One monoclonal antibody was able to bind the beta chain after dissociation of the three polypeptide chains with detergent. The presence of all three chains was confirmed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The glycosylation pattern of the three chains was identical to that observed in vivo, as evidenced in studies using tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. The presence of alpha chains assembled with beta chains in equimolar ratio was further demonstrated by amino-terminal sequencing. An RNA fraction enriched for the three mRNAs, encoding alpha, beta, and intracellular chains, was isolated. This translation-assembly system and the availability of monoclonal antibodies make it possible to assay for mRNA encoding specific molecules among the multiple human Ia-like antigens. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6821356

  12. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  13. High temperature specifically affects the photoprotective responses of chlorophyll b-deficient wheat mutant lines.

    PubMed

    Brestic, Marian; Zivcak, Marek; Kunderlikova, Kristyna; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2016-12-01

    The effects of high temperature on CO2 assimilation rate, processes associated with photosynthetic electron and proton transport, as well as photoprotective responses, were studied in chlorophyll b-deficient mutant lines (ANK-32A and ANK-32B) and wild type (WT) of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Despite the low chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a-to-b ratio, the non-stressed mutant plants had the similar level of CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic responses as WT. However, in ANK mutant plants exposed to prolonged high temperature episode (42 °C for ~10 h), we observed lower CO2 assimilation compared to WT, especially when a high CO2 supply was provided. In all heat-exposed plants, we found approximately the same level of PSII photoinhibition, but the decrease in content of photooxidizable PSI was higher in ANK mutant plants compared to WT. The PSI damage can be well explained by the level of overreduction of PSI acceptor side observed in plants exposed to high temperature, which was, in turn, the result of the insufficient transthylakoid proton gradient associated with low non-photochemical quenching and lack of ability to downregulate the linear electron transport to keep the reduction state of PSI acceptor side low enough. Compared to WT, the ANK mutant lines had lower capacity to drive the cyclic electron transport around PSI in moderate and high light; it confirms the protective role of cyclic electron transport for the protection of PSI against photoinhibition. Our results, however, also suggest that the inactivation of PSI in heat stress conditions can be the protective mechanism against photooxidative damage of chloroplast and cell structures.

  14. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer is required to maintain transfected gamma 2A gene expression in a pre-B-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Porton, B; Zaller, D M; Lieberson, R; Eckhardt, L A

    1990-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) enhancer serves to activate efficient and accurate transcription of cloned IgH genes when introduced into B lymphomas or myelomas. The role of this enhancer after gene activation, however, is unclear. The endogenous IgH genes in several cell lines, for example, have lost the IgH enhancer by deletion and yet continue to be expressed. This might be explained if the role of the enhancer were to establish high-level gene transcription but not to maintain it. Alternatively, other enhancers might lie adjacent to endogenous IgH genes, substituting their activity for that of the lost IgH enhancer. To address both of these alternatives, we searched for enhancer activity within the flanking regions of one of these IgH enhancer-independent genes and designed an experiment that allowed us to consider separately the establishment and maintenance of expression of a transfected gene. For the latter experiment we generated numerous pre-B cell lines stably transformed with a gamma 2a gene. In this gene, the IgH enhancer lay at a site outside the heavy-chain transcription unit, between DH and JH gene segments. After expression of the transfected gene was established, selective conditions were chosen for the outgrowth of subclones that had undergone D-J joining and thus IgH enhancer deletion. Measurements of gamma 2a expression before and after enhancer deletion revealed that the enhancer was required for maintenance of expression of the transfected gene. The implication of this finding for models of enhancer function in endogenous genes is discussed. Images PMID:2106067

  15. Selection and molecular characterization of a high tocopherol accumulation rice mutant line induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Eun; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Kwon, Soon-Jae; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kang, Si-Yong; Kim, Dong Sub

    2014-11-01

    Tocopherols are micronutrients with antioxidant properties. They are synthesized by photosynthetic bacteria and plants, and play important roles in animal and human nutrition. In this study, we isolated a new rice mutant line with elevated tocopherol content (MRXII) from an in vitro mutagenized population induced by gamma irradiation. The mutant exhibited greater seed longevity than the control, indicating a crucial role for tocopherols in maintaining viability during quiescence, and displayed faster seedling growth during the early growth stage. To study the molecular mechanism underlying vitamin E biosynthesis, we examined the expression patterns of seven rice genes encoding vitamin E biosynthetic enzymes. Accumulation levels of the OsVTE2 transcript and OsVTE2 protein in the MRXII mutant were significantly higher than in the control. Sequence analysis revealed that the MRXII mutant harbored a point mutation in the OsVTE2 promoter region, which resulted in the generation of MYB transcription factor-binding cis-element. These results help identify the promoter regions that regulate OsVTE2 transcription, and offer insights into the regulation of tocopherol content.

  16. Assessment of a systematic expression profiling approach in ENU-induced mouse mutant lines.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Matthias; Horsch, Marion; Drobyshev, Alexei; Chen, Yali; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Beckers, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genomewide expression profiling is a powerful tool in the effort to annotate the mouse genome with biological function. The systematic analysis of RNA expression data of mouse lines from the Munich ENU mutagenesis screen might support the understanding of the molecular biology of such mutants and provide new insights into mammalian gene function. In a direct comparison of DNA microarray experiments of individual versus pooled RNA samples of organs from ENU-induced mouse mutants, we provide evidence that individual RNA samples may outperform pools in some aspects. Genes with high biological variability in their expression levels (noisy genes) are identified as false positives in pooled samples. Evidence suggests that highly stringent housing conditions and standardized procedures for the isolation of organs significantly reduce biological variability in gene expression profiling experiments. Data on wild-type individuals demonstrate the positive effect of controlling variables such as social status, food intake before organ sampling, and stress with regard to reproducibility of gene expression patterns. Analyses of several organs from various ENU-induced mutant lines in general show low numbers of differentially expressed genes. We demonstrate the feasibility to detect transcriptionally affected organs employing RNA expression profiling as a tool for molecular phenotyping.

  17. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Horsch, Marion; Garrett, Lillian; Östereicher, Manuela A; Hans, Wolfgang; Abe, Koichiro; Sagawa, Nobuho; Rozman, Jan; Vargas-Panesso, Ingrid L; Sandholzer, Michael; Lisse, Thomas S; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Ehrhard, Nicole; Elvert, Ralf; Gau, Christine; Hölter, Sabine M; Micklich, Katja; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Racz, Ildiko; Stoeger, Claudia; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Michel, Dian; Diener, Susanne; Wieland, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Favor, John; Graw, Jochen; Klingenspor, Martin; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Strom, Tim M; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2016-12-07

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1-3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3(N294K/N294K)), which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). Scube3(N294K/N294K) mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB), associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3 In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3(N294K/N294K) mice. The Scube3(N294K/N294K) mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function. Copyright © 2016 Fuchs et al.

  18. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Horsch, Marion; Garrett, Lillian; Östereicher, Manuela A.; Hans, Wolfgang; Abe, Koichiro; Sagawa, Nobuho; Rozman, Jan; Vargas-Panesso, Ingrid L.; Sandholzer, Michael; Lisse, Thomas S.; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Ehrhard, Nicole; Elvert, Ralf; Gau, Christine; Hölter, Sabine M.; Micklich, Katja; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Racz, Ildiko; Stoeger, Claudia; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Michel, Dian; Diener, Susanne; Wieland, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Favor, John; Graw, Jochen; Klingenspor, Martin; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Strom, Tim M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1–3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3N294K/N294K), which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). Scube3N294K/N294K mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB), associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3. In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3N294K/N294K mice. The Scube3N294K/N294K mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function. PMID:27815347

  19. Physiological Basis and Transcriptional Profiling of Three Salt-Tolerant Mutant Lines of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Concha; Lalanne, Eric; Catalá, María M.; Pla, Eva; Reig-Valiente, Juan L.; Talón, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a complex trait that affects growth and productivity in many crops, including rice. Mutation induction, a useful tool to generate salt tolerant plants, enables the analysis of plants with similar genetic background, facilitating the understanding of the salt tolerance mechanisms. In this work, we generated three salt tolerant mutant lines by irradiation of a salt-sensitive cultivar plants and screened M2 plants at seedling stage in the presence of high salinity. These three lines, SaT20, SaS62, and SaT58, showed different responses to salinity, but exhibited similar phenotype to wild type plants, except SaT20 that displayed shorter height when grown in the absence of salt. Under salt conditions, all three mutants and the parental line showed similar reduction in yield, although relevant differences in other physiological parameters, such as Na+ accumulation in healthy leaves of SaT20, were registered. Microarray analyses of gene expression profiles in roots revealed the occurrence of common and specific responses in the mutants. The three mutants showed up-regulation of responsive genes, the activation of oxido-reduction process and the inhibition of ion transport. The participation of jasmonate in the plant response to salt was evident by down-regulation of a gene coding for a jasmonate O-methyltransferase. Genes dealing with lipid transport and metabolism were, in general, up-regulated except in SaS62, that also exhibited down-regulation of genes involved in ion transport and Ca2+ signal transduction. The two most tolerant varieties, SaS62 and SaT20, displayed lower levels of transcripts involved in K+ uptake. The physiological study and the description of the expression analysis evidenced that the three lines showed different responses to salt: SaT20 showed a high Na+ content in leaves, SaS62 presented an inhibition of lipid metabolism and ion transport and SaT58 differs in both features in the response to salinity. The analysis of these salt

  20. MicroRNA-26a/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 axis controls proliferation, apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Floriana Maria; Inguscio, Alessandra; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Cortesi, Alice; Elia, Leonardo; Quintavalle, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite a favorable therapeutic response to first-line chemo-immunotherapy, still 30–40% of patients is refractory, or relapse after this treatment. Thus, alternative strategies must be sought. Previous studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is involved in tumor development and progression, and it may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, its role in modulating DLBCL growth and progression remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that CDK5 and its activator, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5R1 or p35), are overexpressed in DLBCL cell lines and that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and activity is dependent on CDK5 expression in DLBCL. Using public data sets, we also demonstrate that patients with DLBCL show a higher expression of CDK5 compared with healthy individuals. By using loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that CDK5’s activity regulates proliferation and survival of DLBCL cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulating gene expression and are involved in cancer initiation and progression. We identify miR-26a as direct regulator of p35 expression and CDK5 activity. We show that miR-26a expression is lower in DLBCL cell lines compared to B lymphocytes and that its ectopic expression leads to a drastic reduction of DLBCL tumor growth in vivo and decreased proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and survival in vitro. Remarkably, concomitant overexpression of a 3′-UTR-truncated form of p35 promoted tumor growth in vivo and cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell survival in vitro. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for miR-26a and CDK5 together in the survival and growth of DLBCL cells, suggesting the existence of potential novel therapeutic targets for the

  1. Fermented wheat germ extract induces apoptosis and downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in tumor T and B cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Hidvégi, Maté; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Ion, Gabriela; Demydenko, Dmytro; Tömösközi-Farkas, Rita; Vizler, Csaba; Telekes, András; Resetar, Akos; Monostori, Eva

    2002-03-01

    The fermented wheat germ extract (code name: MSC, trade name: Avemar), with standardized benzoquinone content has been shown to inhibit tumor propagation and metastases formation in vivo. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the anti-tumor effect of MSC. Therefore, we have designed in vitro model experiments using T and B tumor lymphocytic cell lines. Tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins and elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration were examined using immunoblotting with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody and cytofluorimetry by means of Ca2+ sensitive fluorescence dyes, Fluo-3AM and FuraRed-AM, respectively. Apoptosis was measured with cytofluorimetry by staining the DNA with propidium iodide and detecting the cell population. The level of the cell surface MHC class I molecules was analysed with indirect immunofluorescence on cytofluorimeter using a monoclonal antibody to the non-polymorphic region of the human MHC class I. MSC stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins and the influx of extracellular Ca2+ resulted in elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Prominent apoptosis of 20-40% was detected upon 24 h of MSC treatment of the cell lines. As a result of the MSC treatment, the amount of the cell surface MHC class I proteins was downregulated by 70-85% compared to the non-stimulated control. MSC did not induce a similar degree of apoptosis in healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Inhibition of the cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity or Ca2+ influx resulted in the opposite effect increasing or diminishing the Avemar induced apoptosis as well as the MHC class I downregulation, respectively. A benzoquinone component (2,6-dimethoxi-p-benzoquinone) in MSC induced similar apoptosis and downregulation of the MHC class I molecules in the tumor T and B cell lines to that of MSC. These results suggest that MSC acts on lymphoid tumor cells by reducing MHC class I expression

  2. B cell signatures of BCWD-resistant and susceptible lines of rainbow trout: a shift towards more EBF-expressing progenitors and fewer mature B cells in resistant animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial Cold Water Disease (BCWD) is a chronic disease of rainbow trout, and is caused by the gram-negative bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum (Fp), a common aquaculture pathogen. The National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture has bred two genetic lines of rainbow trout: a line of Fp...

  3. Apoptotic induction by pinobanksin and some of its ester derivatives from Sonoran propolis in a B-cell lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Alday, Efrain; Valencia, Dora; Carreño, Ana Laura; Picerno, Patrizia; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Rastrelli, Luca; Robles-Zepeda, Ramon; Hernandez, Javier; Velazquez, Carlos

    2015-12-05

    Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera) from the selective collection of exudates and bud secretions from several plants. In previous works, we reported the antiproliferative activity of Sonoran propolis (SP) on cancer cells; in addition we suggested the induction of apoptosis after treatment with SP due to the presence of morphological changes and a characteristic DNA fragmentation pattern. Herein, in this study we demonstrated that the antiproliferative effect of SP is induced through apoptosis in a B-cell lymphoma cancer cell line, M12.C3.F6, by an annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide double labeling. This apoptotic effect of SP resulted to be mediated by modulations in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and through activation of caspases signaling pathway (3, 8 and 9). Afterward, in order to characterize the chemical constituents of SP that induce apoptosis in cancer cells, an HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS method followed by a preparative isolation procedure and NMR spectroscopy analysis have been used. Eighteen flavonoids, commonly described in propolis from temperate regions, were characterized. Chrysin, pinocembrin, pinobanksin and its ester derivatives are the main constituents of SP and some of them have never been reported in SP. In addition, two esters of pinobanksin (8 and 13) are described by first time in propolis samples in general. The antiproliferative activity on M12.C3.F6 cells through apoptosis induction was exhibited by pinobanksin (4), pinobanksin-3-O-propanoate (14), pinobanksin-3-O-butyrate (16), pinobanksin-3-O-pentanoate (17), and the already reported galangin (11), chrysin (9) and CAPE. To our knowledge this is the first report of bioactivity of pinobanksin and some of its ester derivatives as apoptosis inducers. Further studies are needed to advance in the understanding of the molecular basis of apoptosis induction by SP and its constituents, as well as the structure-activity relationship of them

  4. Antigen-processing organelles from DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1104 B cell lines display a differential degradation activity.

    PubMed

    Barbey, C; Watts, C; Corradin, G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro assay for tetanus toxin (tt) C fragment (C-fr) degradation. Purified endosomes (abbreviated endosomes 1101 or 1104) and lysosomes (abbreviated lysosomes 1101 or 1104) from the DRB1*1101 (Gly 86) and DRB1*1104 (Val 86) B cell lines were used to degrade 125I-labeled C-fr in vitro. Using three distinct methods of analysis, we show that the capacity of endosomes and lysosomes to degrade the tt C-fr or tt synthetic Y-P30 peptide differed. Using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 125I-labeled C-fr degradation patterns observed either with endosomes 1101/1104 or lysosomes 1101/1104 are distinct both in terms of the number of fragments and the kinetics of generation of the fragments. These results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, where we observed that the elution profiles of the 125I-labeled Y-P30 peptide digested by endosomes 1101/1104 were different compared to those obtained with lysosomes 1101/1104. Furthermore, the kinetics of degradation of 125I-labeled Y-P30 were faster with lysosomes 1104 than with lysosomes 1101. This difference in activity of the 1101 and 1104 organelles was also found in a functional assay where we showed that the activation capacity of the P30 peptide was diminished when digested by lysosome 1104, regardless of the antigen-presenting cell (APC) used, whereas endosomes 1101 or lysosomes 1101 modified P30 peptide in a form that discriminated between presentation by 1101 or 1104 APC. Taken together, these results suggest that the differential processing and presentation displayed by the DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1104 APC is due partly to a different enzymatic content and partly to the dimorphism at position DR beta 86.

  5. Identification of genes modulated in rheumatoid arthritis using complementary DNA microarray analysis of lymphoblastoid B cell lines from disease-discordant monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christian S; Creighton, Chad J; Pi, Xiujun; Maine, Ira; Koch, Alisa E; Haines, G Kenneth; Ling, Song; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Holoshitz, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    To identify disease-specific gene expression profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray analyses on lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs) derived from RA-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins. The cDNA was prepared from LCLs derived from the peripheral blood of 11 pairs of RA-discordant MZ twins. The RA twin cDNA was labeled with cy5 fluorescent dye, and the cDNA of the healthy co-twin was labeled with cy3. To determine relative expression profiles, cDNA from each twin pair was combined and hybridized on 20,000-element microarray chips. Immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the expression of selected gene products in synovial tissue from patients with RA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and normal healthy controls. In RA twin LCLs compared with healthy co-twin LCLs, 1,163 transcripts were significantly differentially expressed. Of these, 747 were overexpressed and 416 were underexpressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed many genes known to play a role in apoptosis, angiogenesis, proteolysis, and signaling. The 3 most significantly overexpressed genes were laeverin (a novel enzyme with sequence homology to CD13), 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (a steroid pathway enzyme), and cysteine-rich, angiogenic inducer 61 (a known angiogenic factor). The products of these genes, heretofore uncharacterized in RA, were all abundantly expressed in RA synovial tissues. Microarray cDNA analysis of peripheral blood-derived LCLs from well-controlled patient populations is a useful tool to detect RA-relevant genes and could help in identifying novel therapeutic targets.

  6. B cell helper assays.

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  7. TK{sup {minus}} mutants attributable to localized gene conversion in a human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Giver, C.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    1995-11-01

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 is heterozygous at the tk gene, carrying an inactivating frameshift near the end of the coding sequence, within exon 7 of the functional allele. Here, we describe our use of sequence analyses at these polymorphic sites to identify 8 x-ray induced mutations, out of 184 examined, which exhibit partial conversion of the tk functional allele to the non-functional sequence. These mutants are characterized by loss of heterozygosity at the exon 4 frameshift polymorphism, and remain heterozgousity at exon 7. No restriction fragment length alterations were observed by Southern blotting, and sequencing of the tk cDNA in these mutants revealed the presence of two full length tk transcripts, both having the sequence of the non-functional allele in exon 4, but representing the two different sequences in exon 7. Therefore, the results cannot be explained by a partial deletion of the functional tk allele. Polymorphic microsatellite markers located both proximally and distally to tk on the q arm of chromosome 17 were found to remain heterozygous, ruling out the possibility of a single homologous exchange event. These mutants may be explained by single strand invasion coupled with mismatch repair of the resultant heteroduplex, or by recombinationally mediated repair of a double strand break or gap. We also present microsatellite mapping data which localizes the human tk gene to a 1cM region between markers D17S802 and D17S937.

  8. HDAC1,2 inhibition impairs EZH2- and BBAP- mediated DNA repair to overcome chemoresistance in EZH2 gain-of-function mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tharkar, Shweta; Quayle, Steven N.; Shearstone, Jeffrey R.; Jones, Simon; McDowell, Maria E.; Wellman, Hannah; Tyler, Jessica K.; Cairns, Bradley R.; Chandrasekharan, Mahesh B.; Bhaskara, Srividya

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the catalytic site of EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2), is observed in about 22% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. Here we show that selective inhibition of histone deacetylase 1,2 (HDAC1,2) activity using a small molecule inhibitor causes cytotoxic or cytostatic effects in EZH2 gain-of-function mutant (EZH2GOF) DLBCL cells. Our results show that blocking the activity of HDAC1,2 increases global H3K27ac without causing a concomitant global decrease in H3K27me3 levels. Our data shows that inhibition of HDAC1,2 is sufficient to decrease H3K27me3 present at DSBs, decrease DSB repair and activate the DNA damage response in these cells. In addition to increased H3K27me3, we found that the EZH2GOF DLBCL cells overexpress another chemotherapy resistance factor − B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein (BBAP). BBAP monoubiquitinates histone H4K91, a residue that is also subjected to acetylation. Our results show that selective inhibition of HDAC1,2 increases H4K91ac, decreases BBAP-mediated H4K91 monoubiquitination, impairs BBAP-dependent DSB repair and sensitizes the refractory EZH2GOF DLBCL cells to treatment with doxorubicin, a chemotherapy agent. Hence, selective HDAC1,2 inhibition provides a novel DNA repair mechanism-based therapeutic approach as it can overcome both EZH2- and BBAP-mediated DSB repair in the EZH2GOF DLBCL cells. PMID:25605023

  9. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  10. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-04

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate.

  11. RAPD and SSR Polymorphisms in Mutant Lines of Transgenic Wheat Mediated by Low Energy Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiegu; Huang, Qunce; Feng, Weisen

    2007-10-01

    Two types of markers-random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat DNA (SSR)-have been used to characterize the genetic diversity among nine mutant lines of transgenic wheat intermediated by low energy ion beam and their four receptor cultivars. The objectives of this study were to analyze RAPD-based and SSR-based genetic variance among transgenic wheat lines and with their receptors, and to find specific genetic markers of special traits of transgenic wheat lines. 170 RAPD primers were amplified to 733 fragments in all the experimental materials. There were 121 polymorphic fragments out of the 733 fragments with a ratio of polymorphic fragments of 16.5%. 29 SSR primer pairs were amplified to 83 fragments in all the experiment materials. There were 57 polymorphic fragments out of the 83 fragments with a ratio of polymorphic fragments of 68.7%. The dendrograms were prepared based on a genetic distance matrix using the UPGMA (Unweighted Pair-group Method with Arithmetic averaging) algorithm, which corresponded well to the results of the wheat pedigree analysis and separated the 13 genotypes into four groups. Association analysis between RAPD and SSR markers with the special traits of transgenic wheat mutant lines discovered that three RAPD markers, s1, opt-16, and f14, were significantly associated with the muticate trait, while three SSR markers, Rht8 (Xgwm261), Rht-B1b, and Rht-D1b, highly associated with the dwarf trait. These markers will be useful for marker-assistant breeding and can be used as candidate markers for further gene mapping and cloning.

  12. Efficient production of a gene mutant cell line through integrating TALENs and high-throughput cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changhong; Fan, Yu; Li, Juan; Wang, Gancheng; Zhang, Hanshuo; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2015-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are becoming powerful DNA-targeting tools in a variety of mammalian cells and model organisms. However, generating a stable cell line with specific gene mutations in a simple and rapid manner remains a challenging task. Here, we report a new method to efficiently produce monoclonal cells using integrated TALE nuclease technology and a series of high-throughput cell cloning approaches. Following this method, we obtained three mTOR mutant 293T cell lines within 2 months, which included one homozygous mutant line.

  13. B cells flying solo.

    PubMed

    Groom, Joanna; Mackay, Fabienne

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmunity such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with the loss of B-cell tolerance, B-cell dysregulation and autoantibody production. While some autoantibodies may contribute to the pathology seen with SLE, numerous studies have shown that dysregulation of T-cell function is another critical aspect driving disease. The positive results obtained in clinical trials using T-cell- or B-cell-specific treatments have suggested that cooperation between T and B cells probably underlies disease progression in many patients. A similar cooperative mechanism seemed to explain SLE developing in mice overexpressing the B-cell-activating factor from the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF). However, surprisingly, T-cell-deficient BAFF transgenic (Tg) mice develop SLE similar to T-cell-sufficient BAFF Tg mice, and the disease was linked to innate activation of B cells and production of proinflammatory autoantibody isotypes. In conclusion, dysregulated innate activation of B cells alone can drive disease independently of T cells, and as such this aspect represents a new pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity.

  14. The A Allele of the Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism rs630923 Creates a Binding Site for MEF2C Resulting in Reduced CXCR5 Promoter Activity in B-Cell Lymphoblastic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mitkin, Nikita A.; Muratova, Alisa M.; Schwartz, Anton M.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR5 is highly expressed in B-cells and under normal conditions is involved in their migration to specific areas of secondary lymphoid organs. B-cells are known to play an important role in various autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) where areas of demyelinating lesions attract B-cells by overexpressing CXCL13, the CXCR5 ligand. In this study, we aimed to determine the functional significance of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs630923 (A/C), which is located in cxcr5 gene promoter, and its common allele is associated with increased risk of MS. Using bioinformatics and pull-down assay in B-lymphoblastic cell lines, we showed that protective minor rs630923 “A” allele created functional binding site for MEF2C transcription factor. Elevated MEF2C expression in B-cells correlated with reduced activity of cxcr5 promoter containing rs630923 “A” allele. This effect that was fully neutralized by MEF2C-directed siRNA may mechanistically explain the protective role of the rs630923 minor allele in MS. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the cxcr5 gene promoter, we were unable to find any experimental evidence for the previously proposed role of NFκB transcription factors in rs630923-mediated CXCR5 promoter regulation. Thus, our results identify MEF2C as a possible mediator of protective function of the rs630923 “A” allele in MS. PMID:27909439

  15. The A Allele of the Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism rs630923 Creates a Binding Site for MEF2C Resulting in Reduced CXCR5 Promoter Activity in B-Cell Lymphoblastic Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Mitkin, Nikita A; Muratova, Alisa M; Schwartz, Anton M; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR5 is highly expressed in B-cells and under normal conditions is involved in their migration to specific areas of secondary lymphoid organs. B-cells are known to play an important role in various autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) where areas of demyelinating lesions attract B-cells by overexpressing CXCL13, the CXCR5 ligand. In this study, we aimed to determine the functional significance of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs630923 (A/C), which is located in cxcr5 gene promoter, and its common allele is associated with increased risk of MS. Using bioinformatics and pull-down assay in B-lymphoblastic cell lines, we showed that protective minor rs630923 "A" allele created functional binding site for MEF2C transcription factor. Elevated MEF2C expression in B-cells correlated with reduced activity of cxcr5 promoter containing rs630923 "A" allele. This effect that was fully neutralized by MEF2C-directed siRNA may mechanistically explain the protective role of the rs630923 minor allele in MS. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the cxcr5 gene promoter, we were unable to find any experimental evidence for the previously proposed role of NFκB transcription factors in rs630923-mediated CXCR5 promoter regulation. Thus, our results identify MEF2C as a possible mediator of protective function of the rs630923 "A" allele in MS.

  16. Ribozyme-mediated inactivation of mutant K-ras oncogene in a colon cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, T; Tsuchida, T; Kijima, H; Okamoto, K; Oshika, Y; Sawa, N; Ohnishi, Y; Yamazaki, H; Miura, S; Ueyama, Y; Nakamura, M

    2000-01-01

    Mutation of c-K-ras oncogene is an important step in progression of colon cancer. We used a hammerhead ribozyme (KrasRz) against mutated K-ras gene transcripts (codon 12, GTT) to inactivate mutant K-ras function in the colon cancer cell line SW480, harbouring a mutant K-ras gene. The β-actin promoter-driven KrasRz sequence (pHβ/KrasRz) was introduced into these cells (SW480/KrasRz), and we evaluated its effects on growth of the colon cancer. The gene expression of angiogenesis-related molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor and thrombospondin) was also estimated in SW480/KrasRz. KrasRz specifically and efficiently cleaved the mutant K-ras mRNA but not wild-type mRNA in vitro. SW480/KrasRz showed decreased growth rate under tissue culture conditions (P< 0.01, Dunnett’s test). The xenotransplantability of SW480/KrasRz (XeSW480/KrasRz) was significantly decreased in nude mice (P< 0.05, Fisher’s exact test). Tumour volume of the xenografts XeSW480/KrasRz was significantly smaller than that of XeSW480/DisKrasRz (P< 0.01, Dunnett’s test). Gene expression of VEGF was suppressed in SW480/KrasRz, while TSP1 gene expression was enhanced. The SW480/KrasRz cells showed apoptosis-related features including nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. These results suggested that the hammerhead ribozyme-mediated inactivation of the mutated K-ras mRNA induced growth suppression, apoptosis and alteration of angiogenic factor expression. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952790

  17. Isolation and characterization of a new mutant human cell line unresponsive to alpha and beta interferons.

    PubMed

    John, J; McKendry, R; Pellegrini, S; Flavell, D; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1991-08-01

    Previously we described human cell line 2fTGH, in which expression of guanine phosphoribosyltransferase is tightly controlled by the upstream region of interferon (IFN)-stimulated human gene 6-16. After mutagenesis of 2fTGH and selection with 6-thioguanine and IFN-alpha, we isolated 11.1, a recessive mutant that does not respond to IFN-alpha. We now describe U2, a second recessive mutant, selected similarly, that complements 11.1. U2 had no response to IFN-alpha or IFN-beta, and its response to IFN-gamma was partially defective. Although many genes did respond to IFN-gamma in U2, the 9-27 gene did not and the antiviral response of U2 cells to IFN-gamma was greatly reduced. Band shift assays showed that none of the transcription factors normally induced in 2fTGH cells by IFN-alpha (E and M) or IFN-gamma (G) were induced in U2. However, extracts of untreated U2 cells gave rise to a novel band that was increased by treatment with IFN-gamma but not IFN-alpha. Band shift complementation assays revealed that untreated and IFN-gamma-treated U2 cells lack the functional E gamma subunit of transcription factor E and that IFN-alpha-treated U2 cells do contain the functional E alpha subunit.

  18. Prevention of Lysosomal Storage Diseases and Derivation of Mutant Stem Cell Lines by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J.; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  19. Accumulation of p53 in a mutant cell line defective in the ubiquitin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, D R; Dermody, J J; Jha, K K; Ozer, H L

    1994-01-01

    The wild-type p53 gene product plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Altered function is frequently associated with changes in p53 stability. We have studied the role of the ubiquitination pathway in the degradation of p53, utilizing a temperature-sensitive mutant, ts20, derived from the mouse cell line BALB/c 3T3. We found that wild-type p53 accumulates markedly because of decreased breakdown when cells are shifted to the restrictive temperature. Introduction of sequences encoding the human ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 corrects the temperature sensitivity defect in ts20 and prevents accumulation of p53. The data therefore strongly indicate that wild-type p53 is degraded intracellularly by the ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:8114731

  20. CD40 Ligand and Appropriate Cytokines Induce Switching to IgG, IgA, and IgE and Coordinated Germinal Center and Plasmacytoid Phenotypic Differentiation in a Human Monoclonal IgM+IgD+ B Cell Line1

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Zan, Hong; Schaffer, Andras; Bergsagel, Leif; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Max, Edward E.; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocytes are induced to undergo Ig class switching and a complex phenotypic differentiation by the milieu of the germinal center. Partly as a result of the lack of a suitable in vitro B cell model, the relationship between these processes in the humans has never been formally established in vitro. We have identified a human monoclonal B cell line, CL-01, that expresses surface IgM and IgD and, upon induction with CD40 ligand, IL-4, and IL-10, switches to all seven downstream isotypes, showing typical DNA switch recombination preceded by germline transcription of targeted CH regions. In CL-01 cells, switch-inducing stimuli trigger concomitant changes in expression of surface IgD, CD23, CD38, and CD77 that parallel those reported in ex vivo isolated tonsillar centroblasts, centrocytes, and memory B cells. Eventually, in the presence of IL-6, CL-01 cells express CD56 and accumulate cytoplasmic IgG and IgA, both traits of plasmacytoid differentiation. Analysis of transcription and recombination of the Ig H locus in sorted CL-01 cells suggest that Ig class switching begins in centroblasts, it extends to all isotypes in centrocytes, and it is extinct in memory B cells. Thus, we have induced coordinated Ig class switching, progression through germinal center phenotypic stages, and differentiation to memory B cells and plasma cells at the level of a single B clonotype. Our data suggest that these processes are likely regulated by a common maturation program, the activation of which may require CD40 ligand, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-6 only. PMID:9498752

  1. Differential expression of migration inhibitory and migration stimulatory factors in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. 1. Migration stimulatory factor(s) from T and B cells of immune spleen.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; el-Gharbi, N; Siddiqui, M U; Couderc, J; Decreusefond, C; Stiffel, C

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the lymphokine migration inhibition factor in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) response of their lymph node cells to phytohemagglutinin was found to be modulated by concomitant expression of migration stimulation factor(s) [MStF(s)]. The expression of both lymphokines was dependent on genetic character and the immunizing dose of antigen. In mice immunized 5 days earlier with 50 micrograms ovalbumin in Freund's complete adjuvant (Ova in FCA immune), migration inhibition factor, assessed with a sensitive photoelectric method, was well expressed by male spleen or lymph node 24-hour culture supernatants of Lo/PHA but Hi/PHA, especially female, expressed marked MStF(s) instead. Immunization with 500 micrograms Ova in FCA markedly enhanced expression of MStF(s) in Lo/PHA but inhibited it in Hi/PHA. MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens of the two lines were found to derive from both T and B cells, B cell activity being greater. Lo/PHA were by far better expressors of both T- and B-cell-derived MStF(s) as compared to Hi/PHA (p less than 0.01). Spleen cells of mice immunized with FCA alone also expressed MStF(s) but to lesser extent than Ova in FCA immune spleens, expression by Lo/PHA B cells being significantly higher than in Hi/PHA (p less than 0.05). The MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens was found to be non-immunoglobulin in nature.

  2. Generation of a Collection of Mutant Tomato Lines Using Pooled CRISPR Libraries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Thomas B; Zhang, Ning; Patel, Dhruv; Martin, Gregory B

    2017-08-01

    The high efficiency of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated mutagenesis in plants enables the development of high-throughput mutagenesis strategies. By transforming pooled CRISPR libraries into tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), collections of mutant lines were generated with minimal transformation attempts and in a relatively short period of time. Identification of the targeted gene(s) was easily determined by sequencing the incorporated guide RNA(s) in the primary transgenic events. From a single transformation with a CRISPR library targeting the immunity-associated leucine-rich repeat subfamily XII genes, heritable mutations were recovered in 15 of the 54 genes targeted. To increase throughput, a second CRISPR library was made containing three guide RNAs per construct to target 18 putative transporter genes. This resulted in stable mutations in 15 of the 18 targeted genes, with some primary transgenic plants having as many as five mutated genes. Furthermore, the redundancy in this collection of plants allowed for the association of aberrant T0 phenotypes with the underlying targeted genes. Plants with mutations in a homolog of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) boron efflux transporter displayed boron deficiency phenotypes. The strategy described here provides a technically simple yet high-throughput approach for generating a collection of lines with targeted mutations and should be applicable to any plant transformation system. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Expression of an anthranilate synthase from maize mutant bf-1 in maize line HiII

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize mutant bf-1 was one of a series of maize mutants generated by radiation from the Bikini Atoll atomic bomb test in 1946. It is characterized by blue fluorescence in seedlings and anthers under ultraviolet illumination and by mutant plants giving off a characteristic grape-like odor due to the ...

  4. Lenalidomide Maintenance Compared With Placebo in Responding Elderly Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With First-Line Rituximab Plus Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisone.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Gomes da Silva, Maria; Casasnovas, Rene-Olivier; Fruchart, Christophe; Morschhauser, Franck; Haioun, Corinne; Lazarovici, Julien; Grosicka, Anida; Perrot, Aurore; Trotman, Judith; Sebban, Catherine; Caballero, Dolores; Greil, Richard; van Eygen, Koen; Cohen, Amos M; Gonzalez, Hugo; Bouabdallah, Reda; Oberic, Lucie; Corront, Bernadette; Choufi, Bachra; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Catalano, John; Van Hoof, Achiel; Briere, Josette; Cabeçadas, Jose; Salles, Gilles; Gaulard, Philippe; Bosly, Andre; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2017-08-01

    Purpose The standard treatment of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent, has shown activity in DLBCL. This randomized phase III trial compared lenalidomide as maintenance therapy with placebo in elderly patients with DLBCL who achieved a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to R-CHOP induction. Methods Patients with previously untreated DLBCL or other aggressive B-cell lymphoma were 60 to 80 years old, had CR or PR after six or eight cycles of R-CHOP, and were randomly assigned to lenalidomide maintenance 25 mg/d or placebo for 21 days of every 28-day cycle for 24 months. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results A total of 650 patients were randomly assigned. At the time of the primary analysis (December 2015), with a median follow-up of 39 months from random assignment, median PFS was not reached for lenalidomide maintenance versus 58.9 months for placebo (hazard ratio, 0.708; 95% CI, 0.537 to 0.933; P = .01). The result was consistent among analyzed subgroups (eg, male v female, age-adjusted International Prognostic Index 0 or 1 v 2 or 3, age younger than 70 v ≥ 70 years), response (PR v CR) after R-CHOP, and positron emission tomography status at assignment (negative v positive). With longer median follow-up of 52 months (October 2016), overall survival was similar between arms (hazard ratio, 1.218; 95% CI, 0.861 to 1.721; P = .26). Most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events associated with lenalidomide versus placebo maintenance were neutropenia (56% v 22%) and cutaneous reactions (5% v 1%), respectively. Conclusion Lenalidomide maintenance for 24 months after obtaining a CR or PR to R-CHOP significantly prolonged PFS in elderly patients with DLBCL.

  5. Nonsense Mediated Decay Resistant Mutations Are a Source of Expressed Mutant Proteins in Colon Cancer Cell Lines with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David S.; Bird, Matthew J.; Jorissen, Robert N.; Yu, Yen Lin; Walker, Franscesa; Zhang, Hui Hua; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High) colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. Methods Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS) by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. Results Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK), but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3). Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12) were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45%) of the MSI-High cell lines tested. Conclusion NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific immunological

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the Chinese bread wheat cultivar Yunong 201 and its ethyl methanesulfonate mutant line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Shasha; Zhang, Xiangfen; Dong, Zhongdong; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dangqun

    2016-01-10

    Roche 454 next-generation sequencing was applied to obtain extensive information about the transcriptomes of the bread wheat cultivar Yunong 201 and its EMS mutant line Yunong 3114. Totals of 1.43 million and 1.44 million raw reads were generated, 14,432, 17,845 and 27,867 isotigs were constructed using the reads in Yunong 201, Yunong 3114 and their combination, respectively. Moreover, 29,042, 34,722, and 48,486 unigenes were generated in Yunong 201, Yunong 3114, and combined cultivars, respectively. A total of 50,382 and 59,891 unigenes from the Yunong 201 and Yunong 3114 were mapped on different chromosomes. Of all unigenes, 1363 DEGs were identified in Yunong 201 and Yunong 3114. qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression profiles of 40 candidate unigenes possibly related to abiotic stresses. The expression patterns of four annotated DEGs were also verified in the two wheat cultivars under abiotic stresses. This study provided useful information for further analysis of wheat functional genomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transitional B cells are the target of negative selection in the B cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    B lymphocytes recognize antigen through membrane-bound antigen- receptors, membrane IgM and IgD (mIgM and mIgD). Binding to foreign antigens initiates a cascade of biochemical events that lead to activation and differentiation. In contrast, binding to self-antigens leads to death or to inactivation. It is commonly believed that the B cells acquire the ability to discriminate between self and nonself in the early phases of development. We report here that immature B cells, which have just emerged from the mIgMneg, B220pos pool, are not deleted upon binding of self-antigen. In vivo, developing B cells become sensitive to tolerance induction in a relatively late window of differentiation, when they are in transition from the immature (HSAbright, B220dull) to the mature (HSAdull, B220bright) stage. In the transitional B cells, early markers of differentiation such as Pgp1 (CD44) and ThB reach the highest level of expression, while the expression of CD23 and mIgD, late markers of differentiation, and expression of class II MHC, progressively increases. Most of the transitional B cells, but only few of the mature and of the immature B cells, express the fas antigen, while mature B cells, but not immature and transitional B cells, express bcl-2 protein. mIgM is present in low amounts in immature B cells, reaches the highest level of expression in transitional B cells and is down-regulated in mature resting B cells, where it is coexpressed with mIgD. The high expression of mIgM, the presence of the fas antigen and the absence of bcl-2 protein is compatible with the high sensitivity of transitional B cells to negative selection. In vitro, immature B cells die rapidly by apoptosis after cross-linking of mIgM. This result, combined with the resistance of immature B cells to elimination in vivo, suggests that early in development the stroma cell microenvironment modulates signals transduced through mIgM. The functional and phenotypic division of IgMpos bone marrow B cells in

  8. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yuan; Chen, Yuling; Geng, Chuanying; Liu, Nian; Yang, Guangzhong; Liu, Jinwei; Li, Xin; Deng, Haiteng; Chen, Wenming

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells.

  9. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    JIAN, YUAN; CHEN, YULING; GENG, CHUANYING; LIU, NIAN; YANG, GUANGZHONG; LIU, JINWEI; LI, XIN; DENG, HAITENG; CHEN, WENMING

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells. PMID:27284413

  10. Identification of Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins as novel regulators of pathogenic B cell receptor signaling and tumor growth in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Bodo, Juraj; Danda, Avinash; Yan, Di; Phillips, James G.; Lindner, Daniel; Hill, Brian T.; Smith, Mitchell R.; Hsi, Eric D.; Gupta, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a hematological cancer associated with an aggressive clinical course. The predominant subtypes of DLBCL display features of chronic or tonic B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. However, it is not known if the spatial organization of the BCR contributes to regulation of pro-survival signaling pathways and cell growth. Here, we show that primary DLBCL tumors and patient-derived DLBCL cell lines contain high levels of phosphorylated Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins. The surface BCRs in both activated B cell and germinal B cell subtype DLBCL cells co-segregate with phosphoERM suggesting that the cytoskeletal network may support localized BCR signaling and contribute to pathogenesis. Indeed, ablation of membrane-cytoskeletal linkages by dominant negative mutants, pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of ERM proteins disrupted cell surface BCR organization, inhibited proximal and distal BCR signaling, and reduced the growth of DLBCL cell lines. In vivo administration of the ezrin inhibitor retarded the growth of DLBCL tumor xenografts, concomitant with reduction in intratumor phosphoERM levels, dampened pro-survival signaling and induction of apoptosis. Our results reveal a novel ERM-based spatial mechanism that is coopted by DLBCL cells to sustain tumor cell growth and survival. PMID:25801911

  11. ABT-737 resistance in B-cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and leukemia cell lines is overcome by the pleiotropic kinase inhibitor quercetin through Mcl-1 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Volpe, Silvestro; Tedesco, Idolo; Bilotto, Stefania; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2013-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most frequent form of leukemia in adult population and despite numerous studies, it is considered an incurable disease. Since CLL is characterized by overexpression of pro-survival Bcl-2 family members, treatments with their antagonists, such as ABT-737, represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. ABT-737 is a BH3 mimetic agent which binds Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bcl-w with high affinity, while weakly interacts with Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Previous studies demonstrated that quercetin, a flavonoid naturally present in food and beverages, was able to sensitize B-cells isolated from CLL patients to apoptosis when associated with death ligands or fludarabine, through a mechanism involving Mcl-1 down-regulation. Here, we report that the association between ABT-737 and quercetin synergistically induces apoptosis in B-cells and in five leukemic cell lines (Combination Index <1). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell from healthy donors were not affected by quercetin treatment. The molecular pathways triggered by quercetin have been investigated in HPB-ALL cells, characterized by the highest resistance to both ABT-737 and quercetin when applied as single molecules, but highly sensitivity to the co-treatment. In this cell line, quercetin down-regulated Mcl-1 through the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, leading to Mcl-1 instability. The same mechanism was confirmed in B-cells. These results may open new clinical perspectives based on a translational approach in CLL therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of mutant IDH1 decreases D-2-HG levels without affecting tumorigenic properties of chondrosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Suijker, Johnny; Oosting, Jan; Koornneef, Annemarie; Struys, Eduard A.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Schaap, Frank G.; Waaijer, Cathelijn J.F.; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M.; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H.; Haazen, Lizette; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Danen, Erik; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found in a subset of benign and malignant cartilage tumors, gliomas and leukaemias. The mutant enzyme causes the production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), affecting CpG island and histone methylation. While mutations in IDH1/2 are early events in benign cartilage tumors, we evaluated whether these mutations play a role in malignant chondrosarcomas. Compared to IDH1/2 wildtype cell lines, chondrosarcoma cell lines harboring an endogenous IDH1 (n=3) or IDH2 mutation (n=2) showed up to a 100-fold increase in intracellular and extracellular D-2-HG levels. Specific inhibition of mutant IDH1 using AGI-5198 decreased levels of D-2-HG in a dose dependent manner. After 72 hours of treatment one out of three mutant IDH1 cell lines showed a moderate decrease in viability, while D-2-HG levels decreased >90%. Likewise, prolonged treatment (up to 20 passages) did not affect proliferation and migration. Furthermore, global gene expression, CpG island methylation as well as histone H3K4, -9, and -27 trimethylation levels remained unchanged. Thus, while IDH1/2 mutations cause enchondroma, malignant progression towards central chondrosarcoma renders chondrosarcoma growth independent of these mutations. Thus, monotherapy based on inhibition of mutant IDH1 appears insufficient for treatment of inoperable or metastasized chondrosarcoma patients. PMID:25895133

  13. Memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kometani, Kohei; Ise, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    The immune system can remember a previously experienced pathogen and can evoke an enhanced response to reinfection that depends on memory lymphocyte populations. Recent advances in tracking antigen-experienced memory B cells have revealed the existence of distinct classes of cells that have considerable functional differences. Some of these differences seem to be determined by the stimulation history during memory cell formation. To induce rapid recall antibody responses, the contributions of other types of cells, such as memory T follicular helper cells, have also now begun to be appreciated. In this Review, we discuss these and other recent advances in our understanding of memory B cells, focusing on the underlying mechanisms that are required for rapid and effective recall antibody responses.

  14. Analysis of mutational signatures in exomes from B-cell lymphoma cell lines suggest APOBEC3 family members to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma

    DOE PAGES

    Wagener, R.; Alexandrov, L. B.; Montesinos-Rongen, M.; ...

    2015-02-04

    Here, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large B-cell neoplasm particularly affecting immunodeficient hosts with an increased incidence in young or middle-aged males infected with the HIV.1 The clinical outcome of patients with PEL is unfavorable with a median survival of <6 months.1 PEL has been closely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8, previously called Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus) infection.1 In some cases a coinfection of HHV8 with the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) has been described.1 HHV8 encodes various genes homologous to cellular genes that have proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions.2 Although HHV8 is supposed to be a major driver ofmore » PEL, it alone is not sufficient for a full-blown lymphomagenesis.2 PEL usually shows complex karyotypes with many chromosomal aberrations.3 This chromosomal complexity might be driven by the viral infection and lead to genetic alterations cooperating with HHV8 in PEL lymphomagenesis.4« less

  15. Analysis of mutational signatures in exomes from B-cell lymphoma cell lines suggest APOBEC3 family members to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wagener, R.; Alexandrov, L. B.; Montesinos-Rongen, M.; Schlesner, M.; Haake, A.; Drexler, H. G.; Richter, J.; Bignell, G. R.; McDermott, U.; Siebert, R.

    2015-02-04

    Here, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large B-cell neoplasm particularly affecting immunodeficient hosts with an increased incidence in young or middle-aged males infected with the HIV.1 The clinical outcome of patients with PEL is unfavorable with a median survival of <6 months.1 PEL has been closely associated with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8, previously called Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus) infection.1 In some cases a coinfection of HHV8 with the Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) has been described.1 HHV8 encodes various genes homologous to cellular genes that have proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions.2 Although HHV8 is supposed to be a major driver of PEL, it alone is not sufficient for a full-blown lymphomagenesis.2 PEL usually shows complex karyotypes with many chromosomal aberrations.3 This chromosomal complexity might be driven by the viral infection and lead to genetic alterations cooperating with HHV8 in PEL lymphomagenesis.4

  16. Alloantigen presentation by B cells: analysis of the requirement for B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J L; Cunningham, A C; Kirby, J A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model for investigation of the functional implications of B-cell activation for antigen presentation. Mixed lymphocyte cultures were used to assess the ability of freshly isolated B cells, mitogen-activated B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell lines to stimulate the activation and proliferation of allogeneic T cells under a variety of experimental conditions. It was found that resting B cells presented antigen poorly, while activated cells were highly immunogenic. Paraformaldehyde fixation completely eliminated antigen presentation by resting B cells, despite constitutive expression of class II MHC antigens. However, fixation had little effect on antigen presentation by activated B cells that expressed B7-1 and B7-2 in addition to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Arrest of B-cell activation by serial fixation after treatment with F(ab')2 fragments of goat anti-human IgM produced cells with variable antigen-presenting capacity. Optimal antigen presentation was observed for cells fixed 72 hr after the initiation of B-cell activation. Although both B7-1 and B7-2 antigen expression increased after B-cell activation, it was found that the rate of T-cell proliferation correlated most closely with B7-2 expression. Stimulation of T cells by fixed activated B lymphocytes could be blocked by antibodies directed at class II MHC molecules, indicating involvement of the T-cell antigen receptor. In addition, T-cell proliferation was inhibited by antibodies specific for B7-1 and B7-2 and by the fusion protein CTLA4-Ig, demonstrating a requirement for CD28 signal transduction. The sole requirement of B7 family expression for antigen presentation by B lymphocytes was shown by demonstration of T-cell stimulation by fixed resting B cells in the presence of CD28 antibody as a source of artificial costimulation. PMID:8550066

  17. B Cell Repopulation After Alemtuzumab Induction—Transient Increase in Transitional B Cells and Long-Term Dominance of Naïve B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, S; Hester, J; Shankar, S; Friend, P J; Wood, K J

    2012-01-01

    In organ transplantation, the composition of the B-cell compartment is increasingly identified as an important determinant for graft outcome. Whereas naïve and transitional B cells have been associated with long-term allograft survival and operational tolerance, memory B cells have been linked to decreased allograft survival. Alemtuzumab induction therapy effectively depletes B cells, but is followed by rapid repopulation up to levels exceeding base line. The characteristics of the repopulating B cells are currently unknown. We studied the phenotypic and functional characteristics of B cells longitudinally in 19 kidney transplant recipients, before and at 6, 9 and 12 months after alemtuzumab induction therapy. A transient increase in transitional B cells and cells with phenotypic characteristics of regulatory B cells, as well as a long-term dominance in naïve B cells was found in alemtuzumab-treated kidney transplant recipients, which was not influenced by conversion from tacrolimus to sirolimus. At all time-points after treatment, B cells showed unaltered proliferative and IgM-producing capacity as compared to pretransplant samples, whereas the ability to produce IgG was inhibited long-term. In conclusion, induction therapy with alemtuzumab results in a long-term shift toward naïve B cells with altered phenotypic and functional characteristics. PMID:22420490

  18. Development of low-linolenic acid Brassica oleracea lines through seed mutagenesis and molecular characterization of mutants.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Habibur; Singer, Stacy D; Weselake, Randall J

    2013-06-01

    Designing the fatty acid composition of Brassica napus L. seed oil for specific applications would extend the value of this crop. A mutation in Fatty Acid Desaturase 3 (FAD3), which encodes the desaturase responsible for catalyzing the formation of α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3 (cisΔ9,12,15)), in a diploid Brassica species would potentially result in useful germplasm for creating an amphidiploid displaying low ALA content in the seed oil. For this, seeds of B. oleracea (CC), one of the progenitor species of B. napus, were treated with ethyl-methane-sulfonate to induce mutations in genes encoding enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Seeds from 1,430 M2 plants were analyzed, from which M3 seed families with 5.7-6.9 % ALA were obtained. Progeny testing and selection for low ALA content were carried out in M3-M7 generations, from which mutant lines with <2.0 % ALA were obtained. Molecular analysis revealed that the mutation was due to a single nucleotide substitution from G to A in exon 3 of FAD3, which corresponds to an amino acid residue substitution from glutamic acid to lysine. No obvious differences in the expression of the FAD3 gene were detected between wild type and mutant lines; however, evaluation of the performance of recombinant Δ-15 desaturase from mutant lines in yeast indicated reduced production of ALA. The novelty of this mutation can be inferred from the position of the point mutation in the C-genome FAD3 gene when compared to the position of mutations reported previously by other researchers. This B. oleracea mutant line has the potential to be used for the development of low-ALA B. napus and B. carinata oilseed crops.

  19. A Gammaherpesvirus Bcl-2 Ortholog Blocks B Cell Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis and Promotes the Survival of Developing B Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Carrie B.; McGraw, Jennifer E.; Feldman, Emily R.; Roth, Alexa N.; Keyes, Lisa R.; Grau, Katrina R.; Cochran, Stephanie L.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Liang, Chengyu; Forrest, J. Craig; Tibbetts, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV-8) establish lifelong latency in their hosts and are associated with the development of several types of malignancies, including a subset of B cell lymphomas. These viruses are thought to co-opt the process of B cell differentiation to latently infect a fraction of circulating memory B cells, resulting in the establishment of a stable latency setpoint. However, little is known about how this infected memory B cell compartment is maintained throughout the life of the host. We have previously demonstrated that immature and transitional B cells are long-term latency reservoirs for murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68), suggesting that infection of developing B cells contributes to the maintenance of lifelong latency. During hematopoiesis, immature and transitional B cells are subject to B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated negative selection, which results in the clonal deletion of autoreactive B cells. Interestingly, numerous gammaherpesviruses encode homologs of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, suggesting that virus inhibition of apoptosis could subvert clonal deletion. To test this, we quantified latency establishment in mice inoculated with MHV68 vBcl-2 mutants. vBcl-2 mutant viruses displayed a marked decrease in the frequency of immature and transitional B cells harboring viral genome, but this attenuation could be rescued by increased host Bcl-2 expression. Conversely, vBcl-2 mutant virus latency in early B cells and mature B cells, which are not targets of negative selection, was remarkably similar to wild-type virus. Finally, in vivo depletion of developing B cells during chronic infection resulted in decreased mature B cell latency, demonstrating a key role for developing B cells in the maintenance of lifelong latency. Collectively, these findings support a model in which gammaherpesvirus latency in circulating mature B cells is sustained in part through the

  20. A Comparison of the Anti-Tumor Effects of a Chimeric versus Murine Anti-CD19 Immunotoxins on Human B Cell Lymphoma and Pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Lydia K.; Pop, Laurentiu M.; Liu, Xiaoyun; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) affects five to six thousand adults and almost three thousand children every year. Approximately 25% of the children and 60% of the adults die from their disease, highlighting the need for new therapies that complement rather than overlap chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Immunotherapy is a class of therapies where toxicities and mechanisms of action do not overlap with those of chemotherapy. Because CD19 is a B cell- restricted membrane antigen that is expressed on the majority of pre-B tumor cells, a CD19-based immunotherapy is being developed for ALL. In this study, the anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins (ITs) constructed by conjugating a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), HD37, or its chimeric (c) construct to recombinant ricin toxin A chain (rRTA) were compared both in vitro using human pre-B ALL and Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines and in vivo using a disseminated human pre-B ALL tumor cell xenograft model. The murine and chimeric HD37 IT constructs were equally cytotoxic to pre-B ALL and Burkitt’s lymphoma cells in vitro and their use in vivo resulted in equivalent increases in survival of SCID mice with human pre-B ALL tumors when compared with control mice. PMID:22069716

  1. Study of radiosensitive Drosophila lines. XI. Induction of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have studied the frequency of occurrence of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) after treatment of the females with ..gamma..-rays as a function of the dose (from 5 to 20 Gy) and oogenesis stage. They have shown that within the dose range used the oocytes of the 14th and 7th development stage are more sensitive in females of the mutant line than in those of the control. They detected significant differences in the frequency of occurrence of RSLLM between the 14th and 7th stages of development of oocytes for both Drosophila lines investigated.

  2. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell mediated. This new understanding of the role of B cells opened up novel therapeutic options for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This paper includes an overview of the different functions of B cells in autoimmunity; the involvement of B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes; and current B-cell-based therapeutic treatments. We conclude with a discussion of novel therapies aimed at the selective targeting of pathogenic B cells. PMID:23807906

  3. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  4. Analysis of the activation state of alpha4beta1 integrin in human B cell lines derived from myeloma, leukemia or lymphoma.

    PubMed

    García-Gila, M; Cabañas, C; García-Pardo, A

    1997-12-01

    Myeloma cells specifically localize in the bone marrow and rarely circulate in blood. To study whether this immobilization could be partially explained by the presence of constitutively activated integrins, particularly alpha4beta1, we used the activation reporter HUTS-21 anti-beta1 mAb. These analyses showed that beta1 integrins on myeloma cells were moderately active and could be upregulated similarly to integrins on lymphoma or leukemia cells. Myeloma cells were also tested for their ability to attach to RGD-containing fibronectin fragments, a property of activated (but not resting) alpha4beta1. Two cell lines adhered to these fragments and this was inhibited by anti-alpha5 but not by anti-alpha4 mAbs. These results show that myeloma cells bear low/moderately active alpha4beta1 and support the notion that multiple interactions contribute to their localization in the bone marrow.

  5. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Freedman, Brett; Porter, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Otto, Michael; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe’s success as a human pathogen. PMID:27711145

  6. Analysis of spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in neuroblasts of genetically unstable mutant lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Derzhavets, E.M.; Kim, A.I.; Aslanyan, M.M.

    1988-11-01

    The spectrum and frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the somatic cells of III instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster mutator line were studied using three of its derivatives (sbt, if, and w/sup a/) and line w as control. It has been demonstrated that the frequency of anaphases with bridges and acentric fragments increases in the neuroblast of flies of the mutator line as well as in the neuroblasts of the larvae of the lines sbt, if, and w/sup a/. The metaphase analysis revealed that the mutator line and its derivatives are characterized by higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations as compared to the control. Chromatid breaks are predominant type of rearrangements. These results, suggest probably presence of the specific mutator factor or factors in the line studied, affecting chromosomal structure and, possibly, activating migration of the mobile genetic elements in the mutator line.

  7. Pore mutants of HERG and KvLQT1 downregulate the reciprocal currents in stable cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiao-Qin; Liu, Gong Xin; Organ-Darling, Louise E.; Zheng, Renjian; Roder, Karim; Jindal, Hitesh K.; Centracchio, Jason; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported a transgenic rabbit model of long QT syndrome based on overexpression of pore mutants of repolarizing K+ channels KvLQT1 (LQT1) and HERG (LQT2).The transgenes in these rabbits eliminated the slow and fast components of the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs and IKr, respectively), as expected. Interestingly, the expressed pore mutants of HERG and KvLQT1 downregulated the remaining reciprocal repolarizing currents, IKs and IKr, without affecting the steady-state levels of the native polypeptides. Here, we sought to further explore the functional interactions between HERG and KvLQT1 in heterologous expression systems. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing KvLQT1-minK or HERG were transiently transfected with expression vectors coding for mutant or wild-type HERG or KvLQT1. Transiently expressed pore mutant or wild-type KvLQT1 downregulated IKr in HERG stable CHO cell lines by 70% and 44%, respectively. Immunostaining revealed a severalfold lower surface expression of HERG, which could account for the reduction in IKr upon KvLQT1 expression. Deletion of the KvLQT1 NH2-terminus did not abolish the downregulation, suggesting that the interactions between the two channels are mediated through their COOH-termini. Similarly, transiently expressed HERG reduced IKs in KvLQT1-minK stable cells. Coimmunoprecipitations indicated a direct interaction between HERG and KvLQT1, and surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a specific, physical association between the COOH-termini of KvLQT1 and HERG. Here, we present an in vitro model system consistent with the in vivo reciprocal downregulation of repolarizing currents seen in transgenic rabbit models, illustrating the importance of the transfection method when studying heterologous ion channel expression and trafficking. Moreover, our data suggest that interactions between KvLQT1 and HERG are mediated through COOH-termini. PMID:20833965

  8. Characterization of cis-regulatory elements of the c-myc promoter responding to human GM-CSF or mouse interleukin 3 in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing the human GM-CSF receptor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Ishida, S; Koike, K; Arai, K

    1995-06-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3) or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activates c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc genes and proliferation in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Using a series of deletion mutants of the beta subunit of human GM-CSF receptor (hGMR) and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, two distinct signaling pathways, one for activation of c-fos and c-jun genes, and the other for cell proliferation and activation of c-myc gene have been elucidated. In contrast to wealth of information on the pathway leading to activation of c-fos/c-jun genes, knowledge of the latter is scanty. To clarify the mechanisms of activation of c-myc gene by cytokines, we established a transient transfection assay in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing hGMR. Analyses of hGMR beta subunit mutants revealed two cytoplasmic regions involved in activation of the c-myc promoter, one is essential and the other is dispensable but enhances the activity. These regions are located at the membrane proximal and the distal regions covering amino acid positions 455-544 and 544-589, respectively. Characterization of cis-acting regulatory elements of the c-myc gene showed that the region containing the P2 promoter initiation site is sufficient to mediate the response to mIL-3 or hGM-CSF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using an oligonucleotide corresponding to the distal putative E2F binding site revealed that p107/E2F complex, the negative regulator of E2F, decreased, and free E2F increased after mIL-3 stimulation. These results support the thesis that mIL-3 or hGM-CSF regulates the c-myc promoter by altering composition of the E2F complexes at E2F binding site.

  9. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM), wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers. In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling.

  10. Provision of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines in a routine tissue typing laboratory: practicalities and applications.

    PubMed

    Bass, H; Walters, R; Darke, C

    2004-04-01

    A bank of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (BCLs) has been established in this laboratory over the last 7 years. Novel, rare and unusual HLA phenotypes were highlighted during routine clinical testing and during typing of volunteer haematopoietic stem cell donors for the Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry. The BCLs are routinely used as laboratory reagents, as a source of DNA for reference purposes and for research work. Consenting donors are tested for hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) before their B-lymphocytes are transformed. Strict bio-identity checks are performed before and after transformation and after each BCL expansion. Each BCL is tested regularly for mycoplasma contamination. A total of 230 blood samples were transformed. One hundred and fifty-nine sterile samples produced 157 BCLs (98.7% success), while 71 non-sterile samples produced 50 BCLs (70.4% success), giving an overall success rate of 90.0%. Fifteen of the transformation failures have since been repeated successfully. Factors contributing to the high success rate and reasons for the 23 failed transformations are discussed. The successful development and use of pools of BCLs for HLA antibody screening by flow cytometry are described. Whilst certain training and health and safety issues require close attention, it is clear that EBV transformation of B lymphocytes and/or the use of BCLs is feasible in a routine tissue typing laboratory and that BCLs are a valuable resource. Careful adherence to the methods and procedures detailed here should virtually guarantee successful transformation (98.7%) from good quality, sterile whole blood samples.

  11. Chimeric, divalent and tetravalent anti-CD19 monoclonal antibodies with potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against human B-cell lymphoma and pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Pop, Laurentiu M; Tsai, Lydia; Pop, Iliodora V; Vitetta, Ellen S

    2011-07-15

    CD19 is an attractive therapeutic target for treating human B-cell tumors. In our study, chimeric (c) divalent (cHD37) and tetravalent (cHD37-DcVV) anti-CD19 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were constructed, expressed and evaluated for their binding to human 19-positive (CD19(+)) tumor cell lines. They were also tested for proapoptotic activity and the ability to mediate effector functions. The antitumor activity of these MAbs was further tested in mice xenografted with the CD19(+) Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Daudi or the pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line, NALM-6. The cHD37 and cHD37-DcVV MAbs exhibited specific binding and comparable proapoptotic activity on CD19(+) tumor cell lines in vitro. In addition, the cHD37 and cHD37-DcVV MAbs were similar in their ability to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP). However, the tetravalent cHD37-DcVV MAb bound more avidly, had a slower dissociation rate, and did not internalize as well. It also had enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with human but not murine effector cells. The cHD37 and cHD37-DcVV MAbs exhibited comparable affinity for the human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and similar pharmacokinetics (PKs) in mice. Moreover, all the HD37 constructs were similar in extending the survival of mice xenografted with Daudi or NALM-6 tumor cells. Therefore, the cHD37 and cHD37-DcVV MAbs have potent antitumor activity and should be further developed for use in humans. Although not evident in mice, due to its increased ability to mediate ADCC with human but not mouse effector cells, the cHD37-DcVV MAb should have superior therapeutic efficacy in humans.

  12. Cytotoxic, apoptotic, and sensitization properties of ent-kaurane-type diterpenoids from Croton tonkinensis Gagnep on human liver cancer HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh Quan; Iscache, Anne Laure; Pham, Quoc Long; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2016-04-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. A very poor prognosis and a lack of effective treatments make liver cancer a major public health problem, notably in less developed regions, particularly in eastern Asia. This fully justifies the search of new molecules and therapeutic strategies against HCC. Ent-kaurane diterpenoids are natural compounds displaying a broad spectrum of potential therapeutic effects including anticancer activity. In this study, we analyzed the pharmacological properties of a family of ent-kaurane diterpenoids from Croton tonkinensis Gagnep in human HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines, used as cellular reference models for in vitro evaluation of new molecules active on HCC. A structure-related cytotoxicity was observed against both HCC cell lines, enlighting the role of the 16-en-15-one skeleton of ent-kaurane diterpenoids. Cytotoxicity was closely correlated to apoptosis, evidenced by concentration-dependent subG1 cell accumulation, and increased annexin V expression. In addition, subtoxic concentration of ent-kaurane diterpenoid dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to doxorubicin. All together, our data bring strong support to the potential interest of ent-kaurane diterpenoids, alone or in combination with a cytotoxic agent, in cancer and more precisely against HCC.

  13. Auto-reactive B cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    In order to understand how the natural occurrence of autoreactive B cells is controlled in normal individuals, and how self reactive B cells can escape this control during diverse clinical situations, many different transgenic mice have been generated expressing self reactive antibodies. In this review, we focus our attention on disease-associated self reactive transgenic models which show the variety of the tolerization mechanisms. The same transgenic lines are also used to analyse the effects of the autoimmune genetic background on the self reactive B cell fate, as well as to study the influence of infectious agents on the behaviour of the auto-reactive transgenic B cells.

  14. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line–encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC. PMID:27588903

  15. Interaction of glucosinolate content of Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines and feeding and oviposition by generalist and specialist lepidopterans.

    PubMed

    Badenes-Perez, Francisco R; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G

    2013-02-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is an insect specialized on glucosinolate-containing Brassicaceae that uses glucosinolates in host-plant recognition. We used wild-type and mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Brassicaceae) to investigate the interaction between plant glucosinolate and myrosinase content and herbivory by larvae of the generalist Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and the specialist P. xylostella. We also measured glucosinolate changes as a result of herbivory by these larvae to investigate whether herbivory and glucosinolate induction had an effect on oviposition preference by P. xylostella. Feeding by H. armigera and P. xylostella larvae was 2.1 and 2.5 times less, respectively, on apk1 apk2 plants (with almost no aliphatic glucosinolates) than on wild-type plants. However, there were no differences in feeding by H. armigera and P. xylostella larvae on wild-type, gsm1 (different concentrations of aliphatic glucosinolates compared to wild-type plants), and tgg1 tgg2 plants (lacking major myrosinases). Glucosinolate induction (up to twofold) as a result of herbivory occurred in some cases, depending on both the plant line and the herbivore. For H. armigera, induction, when observed, was noted mostly for indolic glucosinolates, while for P. xylostella, induction was observed in both aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates, but not in all plant lines. For H. armigera, glucosinolate induction, when observed, resulted in an increase of glucosinolate content, while for P. xylostella, induction resulted in both a decrease and an increase in glucosinolate content. Two-choice tests with wild-type and mutant plants were conducted with larvae and ovipositing moths. There were no significant differences in preference of larvae and ovipositing moths between wild-type and gsm1 mutants and between wild-type and tgg1 tgg2 mutants. However, both larvae and ovipositing moths preferred wild-type over apk

  16. Bryostatin-1, Fenretinide and 1α,25 (OH)2D3 Induce Growth Inhibition, Apoptosis and Differentiation in T and B Cell-Derived Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Lines (CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6)

    PubMed Central

    Ardekani, Ali M.; Fard, Shahrzad Soleymani; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Ghahremanzade, Ramin

    2011-01-01

    In many acute leukemias, normal differentiation does not occur. However, in many cell lines derived from hematologic malignancies, differentiation or apoptosis can be induced by variety of agents. Despite advances in the treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), in most patients long-term survival rates remain unsatisfactory, especially in T-cell derived ALL. Thus we studied the anti-cancer effects of fenretinide, 1α,25(OH)2D3, and bryostatin-1 in CCRF-CEM (T-cell derived) and Nalm-6 (B-cell derived) ALL cell lines. Using MTT assays, both cell lines were shown to exhibit increased inhibition of proliferation at micro (fenretinide) and nanomolar (1α,25(OH)2D3, bryostatin-1) concentrations. These anti-cancer agents were shown to induce apoptosis and activate caspase-3 pathway in both ALL cell lines. Furthermore, for the first time we are reporting consistent anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of Bryostatin-1 in ALL T-cell derived cell line with the lowest ED50 (ranging 4.6-7.4 nM). To evaluate the differentiation induction by fenretinide, 1α,25(OH)2D3, and bryostatin-1 in ALL cell lines, we assayed for the expressions of CD19, CD38 markers on Nalm-6 and CD7 marker on CCRF-CEM cell line. The flow cytometric analysis showed a significant increase in expression of CD markers in response to anti-cancer drug treatments. To assay the effects of anti-cancer drugs on cell cycle distribution, cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry was employed. These anti-cancer drugs appear to affect the CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6 cell cycles differently (G0/G1 and G2/M arrest, respectively). Overall results demonstrate that the anti-cancer agents used in this study are strong inhibitors of ALL cell proliferation and inducers of apoptosis and differentiation in vitro. These findings may be quite helpful if these drugs are to be used for differentiation therapy of ALL patients in clinics in the future. Further studies are warranted to establish the in vivo effect of these drugs

  17. Bryostatin-1, Fenretinide and 1α,25 (OH)(2)D(3) Induce Growth Inhibition, Apoptosis and Differentiation in T and B Cell-Derived Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Lines (CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6).

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Ali M; Fard, Shahrzad Soleymani; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Ghahremanzade, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    In many acute leukemias, normal differentiation does not occur. However, in many cell lines derived from hematologic malignancies, differentiation or apoptosis can be induced by variety of agents. Despite advances in the treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), in most patients long-term survival rates remain unsatisfactory, especially in T-cell derived ALL. Thus we studied the anti-cancer effects of fenretinide, 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3), and bryostatin-1 in CCRF-CEM (T-cell derived) and Nalm-6 (B-cell derived) ALL cell lines. Using MTT assays, both cell lines were shown to exhibit increased inhibition of proliferation at micro (fenretinide) and nanomolar (1α,25(OH)(2)D(3), bryostatin-1) concentrations. These anti-cancer agents were shown to induce apoptosis and activate caspase-3 pathway in both ALL cell lines. Furthermore, for the first time we are reporting consistent anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of Bryostatin-1 in ALL T-cell derived cell line with the lowest ED(50) (ranging 4.6-7.4 nM). To evaluate the differentiation induction by fenretinide, 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3), and bryostatin-1 in ALL cell lines, we assayed for the expressions of CD19, CD38 markers on Nalm-6 and CD7 marker on CCRF-CEM cell line. The flow cytometric analysis showed a significant increase in expression of CD markers in response to anti-cancer drug treatments. To assay the effects of anti-cancer drugs on cell cycle distribution, cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry was employed. These anti-cancer drugs appear to affect the CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6 cell cycles differently (G0/G1 and G2/M arrest, respectively). Overall results demonstrate that the anti-cancer agents used in this study are strong inhibitors of ALL cell proliferation and inducers of apoptosis and differentiation in vitro. These findings may be quite helpful if these drugs are to be used for differentiation therapy of ALL patients in clinics in the future. Further studies are warranted to establish the in vivo effect of

  18. The Kasumi-1 cell line: a t(8;21)-kit mutant model for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Larizza, Lidia; Magnani, Ivana; Beghini, Alessandro

    2005-02-01

    The Kasumi-1 cell line is an intensively investigated model system of Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(8;21) translocation, that represents 1 of the 2 main subtypes of Core Binding Factor Leukemia (CBFL). Since establishment in 1991 the Kasumi-1 cell line has provided the tool to study the peculiar molecular, morphologic, immunophenotypic findings of AML with t(8;21) and the functional consequences of the AML1-ETO fusion oncogene on myeloid differentiation. Leukemogenesis involves multiple genetic changes and, as suggested by murine experiments and other findings in humans, AML1-ETO expression may not be sufficient for full blown leukemia. In agreement with the "two hits" model of leukemogenesis, based on the cooperation between 1 class of mutations that impair hematopoietic differentiation and a second class of mutations that confer a proliferative and/or survival advantage to hematopoietic progenitors an activating mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the c-kit gene was identified in the AML1/ETO expressing Kasumi-1 cell line. The dosage of the Asn822Lys mutated allele was shown to be about 5-fold compared to the normal allele and c-kit amplification was found to map to minute 4cen-q11 marker chromosomes, likely derived from the extra chromosome 4 recorded in the newly established cell line. The combination of t(8;21) and trisomy 4 leading to enhanced dosage of a mutated kit allele is a feature of a few CBFL patients reproduced by the Kasumi-1 cell model. The Kasumi-1 cell line, paralleling the commitment stage of CBF leukemia also provides a valuable resource to investigate the effect of tyrosine kinase kit mutant on the main KIT-regulated signal transduction pathways, i.e. MAPK, PI3K/AKT and STAT3 and the diverse inhibitory effect exerted by STI 571 on these KIT mutant activated pathways. PI3K-dependent activation of AKT and STAT activation was observed in Kasumi-1 cells. Contrary to the expectations for an amplified tyrosine kinase kit mutant, we found that

  19. Rituximab with dose-adjusted EPOCH as first-line treatment in patients with highly aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and autologous stem cell transplantation in selected patients

    PubMed Central

    Pejša, Vlatko; Prka, Željko; Lucijanić, Marko; Mitrović, Zdravko; Piršić, Mario; Jakšić, Ozren; Ajduković, Radmila; Kušec, Rajko

    2017-01-01

    Aim To assess the benefit of rituximab with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (R-DA-EPOCH) regimen as a first-line treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) presenting with unfavorable or aggressive features, and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as a part of the first-line treatment for selected DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 75 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients with Ki-67+≥80% or International Prognostic Index ≥2 who were treated with R-DA-EPOCH between 2005 and 2015. Of 24 DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features (Ki-67+≥90% or age-adjusted IPI≥2) who were planned to receive consolidation with ASCT, 17 patients underwent the procedure. We determined the overall response rate (ORR), complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), 5-year overall survival (OS), and progression free survival (PFS) in all DLBCL patients and specifically those planned to receive ASCT. Results All 75 patients included in the analysis started one or more cycles of therapy. The ORR, CR, and PR rates were 80%, 55%, and 25%, respectively. The response was non-evaluable in 10 of 75 patients due to treatment discontinuation. The OS and PFS rates for all 75 patients were 70% and 61%, respectively, and 80% and 79%, respectively, for 24 planned-to-receive-ASCT patients. Age (≤65 vs >65 years) had no prognostic impact on OS and PFS (P = 0.994 and P = 0.827, respectively). Conclusion Our retrospective analysis of one of the largest DLBCL patient cohorts outside the US National Cancer Institute showed that R-DA-EPOCH is a very effective therapeutic option as a first-line treatment of DLBCL patients with unfavorable prognostic features irrespective of their age. ASCT provided additional benefit for DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. PMID:28252874

  20. Characterization of the endosperm starch and the pleiotropic effects of biosynthetic enzymes on their properties in novel mutant rice lines with high resistant starch and amylose content.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuuki; Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Misato; Hosaka, Yuko; Fujita, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is beneficial to human health. In order to reduce the current prevalence of diabetes and obesity, several transgenic and mutant crops containing high RS content are being developed. RS content of steamed rice with starch-branching enzyme (BE)IIb-deficient mutant endosperms is considerably high. To understand the mechanisms of RS synthesis and to increase RS content, we developed novel mutant rice lines by introducing the gene encoding starch synthase (SS)IIa and/or granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS)I from an indica rice cultivar into a japonica rice-based BEIIb-deficient mutant line, be2b. Introduction of SSIIa from an indica rice cultivar produced higher levels of amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 11-18 than those in be2b; the extent of the change was slight due to the shortage of donor chains for SSIIa (DP 6-12) owing to BEIIb deficiency. The introduction of GBSSI from an indica rice cultivar significantly increased amylose content (by approximately 10%) in the endosperm starch. RS content of the new mutant lines was the same as or slightly higher than that of the be2b parent line. The relationship linking starch structure, RS content, and starch biosynthetic enzymes in the new mutant lines has also been discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Memory B cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Anita S.; Sciammas, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on the humoral response to allografts has focused on circulating serum antibodies and the long-lived plasma cells that produce these antibodies. In contrast, the interrogation of the quiescent memory B cell compartment is technically more challenging and thus has not been incorporated into the clinical diagnostic or prognostic toolkit. In this review, we discuss new technologies that have allowed this heretofore enigmatic subset of B cells to be identified at quiescence and during a recall response. These technologies in experimental models are providing new insights into memory B cell heterogeneity with respect to their phenotype, cellular function and the antibodies they produce. Similar technologies are also allowing for the identification of comparable memory alloreactive B cells in transplant recipients. While much of the focus in transplant immunology has been on controlling the alloreactive B cell population, long-term transplant patient survival is critically dependent on protection by pathogen-specific memory B cells. Techniques are also available that allow the interrogation of memory B cell response to pathogen re-encounter. Thus we are poised in our ability toinvestigate how immunosuppression affects allo- as well as pathogen-specific memory B cells, and reason that these investigation can yield new insights that will be beneficial for graft as well as patient survival. PMID:25525921

  2. Dysfunctional p53 deletion mutants in cell lines derived from Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Feuerborn, Alexander; Möritz, Constanze; Von Bonin, Frederike; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Trümper, Lorenz; Stürzenhofecker, Benjamin; Kube, Dieter

    2006-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a distinct malignancy of the immune system. Despite the progress made in the understanding of the pathology of cHL, the transforming events remain to be elucidated. It has been proposed that mutations in the TP53 gene in biopsy material as well as cell lines derived from cHL are rare and therefore not notably involved in the pathogenesis of the malignant H&RS cells. Re-evaluating the expression in cHL-derived cell lines, we found that in 3/6 of these cell lines, TP53 transcripts are characterized by deletions within exon 4 (L428 cells) and nearly a complete loss of exons 10 - 11 (L1236) or exons 8 - 11 (HDLM-2), respectively. These changes were found in otherwise rarely mutated regions of TP53. Cell lines L1236 and HDLM-2 harbour fusions with alu-repeats in their TP53 mRNA 3'-ends, resulting in the carboxyterminal truncation and loss of the transcriptional activity of p53. Transcriptional inactivity was also found for p53 in L428 cells. This study characterizes mutations in TP53 transcripts within cHL cell lines with associated functional defects in the resulting p53 proteins and therefore reintroduces the concept that mutations of TP53 might be involved in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  3. Testing the role of the FcγRIIB immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in regulation of the B cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) of the inhibitory Fc receptor FcγRIIB is critical for mediating attenuation of signaling via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) containing receptors, such as the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), when FcγRIIB is co-cross-linked to these activation receptors. To test the role of the FcγRIIB ITIM motif in regulation of the B cell immune response in vivo, we constructed lines of transgenic mice expressing a form of FcγRIIB with an inactivating tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) mutation in the ITIM motif. Detailed studies of one of these lines, in which the mutant FcγRIIB was expressed on B cells and other cell types that normally express this receptor, were performed. No quantitative differences in germinal center (GC) B cell responses were observed between the mutant FcγRIIB transgenic line and control mice. However, serum antibody and antibody forming cell responses were often observed to be elevated in the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB transgenic mice as compared to controls, though not to the same extent as mice deficient in expression of FcγRIIB. Moreover, primary B cells from the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB line did not display the same level of augmented BCR signaling as primary FcγRIIB deficient B cells under conditions inducing co-cross-linking of FcγRIIB and the BCR. In total, these data suggest that a functional ITIM motif is not required for all in vivo inhibitory activity of this receptor. However, we also found that the transgenic ITIM mutant FcγRIIB receptor was expressed at abnormal levels in several hematopoietic lineages. Thus, confirmation of our findings will require the generation and analysis of mice in which an ITIM mutant form of FcγRIIB is expressed in vivo as is the endogenous receptor.

  4. Drosophila lines with mutant and wild type human TDP-43 replacing the endogenous gene reveals phosphorylation and ubiquitination in mutant lines in the absence of viability or lifespan defects

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jer-Cherng

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in TDP-43 are associated with proteinaceous inclusions in neurons and are believed to be causative in neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal dementia or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here we describe a Drosophila system where we have engineered the genome to replace the endogenous TDP-43 orthologue with wild type or mutant human TDP-43(hTDP-43). In contrast to other models, these flies express both mutant and wild type hTDP-43 at similar levels to those of the endogenous gene and importantly, no age-related TDP-43 accumulation observed among all the transgenic fly lines. Immunoprecipitation of TDP-43 showed that flies with hTDP-43 mutations had increased levels of ubiquitination and phosphorylation of the hTDP-43 protein. Furthermore, histologically, flies expressing hTDP-43 M337V showed global, robust neuronal staining for phospho-TDP. All three lines: wild type hTDP-43, -G294A and -M337V were homozygous viable, with no defects in development, life span or behaviors observed. The primary behavioral defect was that flies expressing either hTDP-43 G294A or M337V showed a faster decline with age in negative geotaxis. Together, these observations implied that neurons could handle these TDP-43 mutations by phosphorylation- and ubiquitin-dependent proteasome systems, even in a background without the wild type TDP-43. Our findings suggest that these two specific TDP-43 mutations are not inherently toxic, but may require additional environmental or genetic factors to affect longevity or survival. PMID:28686708

  5. Drosophila lines with mutant and wild type human TDP-43 replacing the endogenous gene reveals phosphorylation and ubiquitination in mutant lines in the absence of viability or lifespan defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Morton, David B

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in TDP-43 are associated with proteinaceous inclusions in neurons and are believed to be causative in neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal dementia or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here we describe a Drosophila system where we have engineered the genome to replace the endogenous TDP-43 orthologue with wild type or mutant human TDP-43(hTDP-43). In contrast to other models, these flies express both mutant and wild type hTDP-43 at similar levels to those of the endogenous gene and importantly, no age-related TDP-43 accumulation observed among all the transgenic fly lines. Immunoprecipitation of TDP-43 showed that flies with hTDP-43 mutations had increased levels of ubiquitination and phosphorylation of the hTDP-43 protein. Furthermore, histologically, flies expressing hTDP-43 M337V showed global, robust neuronal staining for phospho-TDP. All three lines: wild type hTDP-43, -G294A and -M337V were homozygous viable, with no defects in development, life span or behaviors observed. The primary behavioral defect was that flies expressing either hTDP-43 G294A or M337V showed a faster decline with age in negative geotaxis. Together, these observations implied that neurons could handle these TDP-43 mutations by phosphorylation- and ubiquitin-dependent proteasome systems, even in a background without the wild type TDP-43. Our findings suggest that these two specific TDP-43 mutations are not inherently toxic, but may require additional environmental or genetic factors to affect longevity or survival.

  6. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  7. Homologous recombination can restore normal immunoglobulin production in a mutant hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Pennell, N; Bosnoyan, L; Shulman, M J

    1988-01-01

    We report here the occurrence of homologous recombination between transferred and chromosomal immunoglobulin genes. Specifically, we have corrected a chromosomal immunoglobulin gene mutation by transferring pSV2neo vectors encoding the constant region of the immunoglobulin mu heavy chain to mutant hybridoma cells that bear a 2-base-pair deletion in the third constant region exon of their chromosomal mu gene. After DNA transfer, we detected G418-resistant transformants that produce normal IgM. Analysis of the DNA structure of the mu gene in these transformants indicates that in four of five cases the mu gene has been restored as a result of the integration of a single copy of the transfer vector by a reciprocal homologous recombination event; the fifth case seems to have resulted from gene conversion or double crossover. These results suggest that this technology might be adapted for mapping immunoglobulin gene mutations by marker rescue and for more convenient engineering of specifically altered immunoglobulin. Images PMID:2842771

  8. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effect of Dendrosomal Curcumin Nanoformulation in P53 Mutant and Wide-Type Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Maryam; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Younes; Mohaghegh, Mina; Panahi, Alireza; Khodi, Samaneh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) on the expression of p53 in both p53 mutant cell lines SKBR3/SW480 and p53 wild-type MCF7/HCT116 in both RNA and protein levels. Curcumin, derived from Curcumin longa, is recently considered in cancer related researches for its cell growth inhibition properties. p53 is a common tumor-suppressor gene involved in cancers and its mutation not only inhibits tumor suppressor activity but also promotes oncogenic activity. Here, p53 mutant/Wild-type cells were employed to study the toxicity of DNC using MTT assay, Flow cytometry and Annexin-V, Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to analyze p53, BAX, Bcl-2, p21 and Noxa changes after treatment. During the time, DNC increased the SubG1 cells and decreased G1, S and G2/M cells, early apoptosis also indicated the inhibition of cell growth in early phase. Real-Time PCR assay showed an increased mRNA of BAX, Noxa and p21 during the time with decreased Bcl-2. The expression of p53 mutant decreased in SKBR3/SW480, and the expression of p53 wild-type increased in MCF7/HCT116. Consequently, p53 plays an important role in mediating the survival by DNC, which can prevent tumor cell growth by modulating the expression of genes involved in apoptosis and proliferation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Tonic B-cell receptor signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Havranek, Ondrej; Xu, Jingda; Köhrer, Stefan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Becker, Lisa; Comer, Justin M; Henderson, Jared; Ma, Wencai; Man Chun Ma, John; Westin, Jason R; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Shinners, Nicholas; Sun, Luhong; Yi, Allen F; Karri, Anusha R; Burger, Jan A; Zal, Tomasz; Davis, R Eric

    2017-08-24

    We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated genomic modification to investigate B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in cell lines of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Three manipulations that altered BCR genes without affecting surface BCR levels showed that BCR signaling differs between the germinal center B-cell (GCB) subtype, which is insensitive to Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibition by ibrutinib, and the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype. Replacing antigen-binding BCR regions had no effect on BCR signaling in GCB-DLBCL lines, reflecting this subtype's exclusive use of tonic BCR signaling. Conversely, Y188F mutation in the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of CD79A inhibited tonic BCR signaling in GCB-DLBCL lines but did not affect their calcium flux after BCR cross-linking or the proliferation of otherwise-unmodified ABC-DLBCL lines. CD79A-GFP fusion showed BCR clustering or diffuse distribution, respectively, in lines of ABC and GCB subtypes. Tonic BCR signaling acts principally to activate AKT, and forced activation of AKT rescued GCB-DLBCL lines from knockout (KO) of the BCR or 2 mediators of tonic BCR signaling, SYK and CD19. The magnitude and importance of tonic BCR signaling to proliferation and size of GCB-DLBCL lines, shown by the effect of BCR KO, was highly variable; in contrast, pan-AKT KO was uniformly toxic. This discrepancy was explained by finding that BCR KO-induced changes in AKT activity (measured by gene expression, CXCR4 level, and a fluorescent reporter) correlated with changes in proliferation and with baseline BCR surface density. PTEN protein expression and BCR surface density may influence clinical response to therapeutic inhibition of tonic BCR signaling in DLBCL. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Circulating clonotypic B cells in classic Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard J; Gocke, Christopher D; Kasamon, Yvette L; Miller, Carole B; Perkins, Brandy; Barber, James P; Vala, Milada S; Gerber, Jonathan M; Gellert, Lan L; Siedner, Mark; Lemas, M Victor; Brennan, Sarah; Ambinder, Richard F; Matsui, William

    2009-06-04

    Although Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells are B lymphoid cells, they are unlike any normal cells of that lineage. Moreover, the limited proliferative potential of HRS cells belies the clinical aggressiveness of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). More than 20 years ago, the L428 HL cell line was reported to contain a small population of phenotypic B cells that appeared responsible for the continued generation of HRS cells. This observation, however, has never been corroborated, and such clonotypic B cells have never been documented in HL patients. We found that both the L428 and KM-H2 HL cell lines contained rare B-cell subpopulations responsible for the generation and maintenance of the predominant HRS cell population. The B cells within the HL cell lines expressed immunoglobulin light chain, the memory B-cell antigen CD27, and the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Clonal CD27(+)ALDH(high) B cells, sharing immunoglobulin gene rearrangements with lymph node HRS cells, were also detected in the blood of most newly diagnosed HL patients regardless of stage. Although the clinical significance of circulating clonotypic B cells in HL remains unclear, these data suggest they may be the initiating cells for HL.

  11. Reduced Levels of Hspa9 Attenuates Stat5 Activation in Mouse B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Kilannin; Tibbitts, Justin F.; Shao, Jin; Liu, Tuoen; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    HSPA9 is located on chromosome 5q31.2 in humans, a region that is commonly deleted in patients with myeloid malignancies [del(5q)], including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). HSPA9 expression is reduced by 50% in patients with del(5q)-associated MDS, consistent with haploinsufficient levels. Zebrafish mutants and knockdown studies in human and mouse cells have implicated a role for HSPA9 in hematopoiesis. To comprehensively evaluate the effects of Hspa9 haploinsufficiency on hematopoiesis, we generated an Hspa9 knockout mouse model. While homozygous knockout of Hspa9 is embryonic lethal, mice with heterozygous deletion of Hspa9 (Hspa9+/−) are viable and have a 50% reduction in Hspa9 expression. Hspa9+/− mice have normal basal hematopoiesis and do not develop MDS. However, Hspa9+/− mice have a cell- intrinsic reduction in bone marrow CFU-PreB colony formation without alterations in the number of B-cell progenitors in vivo, consistent with a functional defect in Hspa9+/− B-cell progenitors. We further reduced Hspa9 expression (<50%) using RNAi and observe reduced B-cell progenitors in vivo, indicating that appropriate levels (≥50%) of Hspa9 are required for normal B- lymphopoiesis in vivo. Knockdown of Hspa9 in an IL-7 dependent mouse B-cell line reduced Stat5 phosphorylation following IL-7 receptor stimulation, supporting a role for Hspa9 in Stat5 signaling in B-cells. Collectively, these data implicate a role for Hspa9 in B-lymphopoiesis and Stat5 activation downstream of IL-7 signaling. PMID:25550197

  12. A BCWD-resistant line of rainbow trout exhibits higher abundance of IgT+ B cells and heavy chain tau transcripts compared to a susceptible line following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial Cold Water Disease (BCWD) is a common, chronic disease in rainbow trout, and is caused by the gram-negative bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum (Fp). Through selective breeding, the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture has generated a genetic line that is highly resistant...

  13. Regulation of cytokine expression by an autoreactive B cell clone derived from MRL/MP-lpr/lpr mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, T; Hamano, T; Fujimoto, J; Ogata, A; Kakishita, E

    1998-01-01

    The B cell line, MRL159.5, was established by somatic hybridization between splenic MRL/MP-lpr/lpr (lpr) mice B cells and 2.52M, a hypoxanthine-aminopterine-thymidine (HAT) medium-sensitive B cell line mutant. It possessed a receptor molecule for mouse erythrocytes treated with bromelain (Br-MRBC) on its surface, likely to be an autoreactive B cell clone specific for Br-MRBC as detected by rosette-forming assay with Br-MRBC. MRL159.5 spontaneously produced IL-6 and secreted IgM, and was induced to augment IgM secretion when treated with Br-MRBC or IL-6. Triggering of CD40 led to an augmentation of IgM secretion as well as IL-6 expression. Blocking the binding of IL-6 to its cellular receptor through the use of inhibitory antibodies inhibited CD40-induced IgM secretion, suggesting a possible autocrine role of IL-6 for CD40-induced differentiation of this B cell hybridoma. Addition of IL-4 or Br-MRBC augmented IL-6 expression as well as IgM secretion by CD40-activated MRL159.5 cells. CD40 also augmented tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expression but resulted in decreased IL-10 expression. Furthermore, under conditions where IL-6 expression was augmented, IL-6Rα (gp80) expression was down-regulated, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism of an IL-6 autocrine loop in this hybridoma. These results demonstrate a role by which T cell-dependent activation through CD40 regulates an IL-6 autocrine loop, controlling differentiation of autoreactive B cells in autoimmune disease. PMID:9764595

  14. Central nervous system prophylaxis with intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in a subset of high-risk patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma receiving first line systemic therapy in a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    González-Barca, E; Canales, M; Salar, A; Ferreiro-Martínez, J J; Ferrer-Bordes, S; García-Marco, J A; Sánchez-Blanco, J J; García-Frade, J; Peñalver, J; Bello-López, J L; Sancho, J M; Caballero, D

    2016-05-01

    The dissemination in the central nervous system (CNS) is an uncommon but fatal complication occurring in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Standard prophylaxis has been demonstrated to reduce CNS relapse and improve survival rates. Intrathecal (IT) liposomal cytarabine allows maintaining elevated drug levels in the cerebrospinal fluid for an extended period of time. Data on the efficacy and safety of liposomal cytarabine as CNS prophylaxis in patients with DLBCL are still insufficient. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the prophylaxis with IT liposomal cytarabine in prevention of CNS relapse in high-risk patients with DLBCL who were included in a trial of first line systemic therapy with 6 cycles of dose-dense R-CHOP every 14 days. Twenty-four (18.6 %) out of 129 patients were identified to have risk factors for CNS involvement, defined as follows: >30 % bone marrow infiltration, testes infiltration, retroperitoneal mass ≥10 cm, Waldeyer ring, or bulky cervical nodes involvement. Liposomal cytarabine (50 mg) was administered by lumbar puncture the first day of the 1st, 2nd, and 6th cycle of R-CHOP14 scheme. Among 70 IT infusions, grade 3-4 adverse events reported were headache (one patient) and nausea/vomiting (one patient). With a median follow-up of 40.1 months, no CNS involvement by DLBCL was observed in any patient. In conclusion, IT liposomal cytarabine is safe, feasible, and effective for CNS prophylaxis, causing few associated risks and little discomfort to patients with DLBCL.

  15. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial cell lines from wild-type and mutant TgN737Rpw mice.

    PubMed

    Richards, W G; Yoder, B K; Isfort, R J; Detilleux, P G; Foster, C; Neilsen, N; Woychik, R P; Wilkinson, J E

    1997-04-01

    The Tg737 gene encodes a tetratricopeptide repeat containing protein that, when disrupted in TgN737Rpw mutant mice, results in pleiotropic phenotypes that include the proliferation of epithelial cells. In the kidney and liver, this causes a phenotype that resembles autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In the liver, the affected epithelial cells morphologically and immunologically resemble oval cells. Here we describe the isolation, culture, and characterization of epithelial cell lines derived from the livers of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous TgN737Rpw mice. Essentially homogeneous cell cultures were established and the expression of liver markers was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry. All of the cell lines reacted to the A6 antibody that was raised against mouse oval cells and expressed markers seen in oval cells. Cells transplanted into the interscapular fat pads of isogenic mice formed well defined ductular structures. Furthermore, in transfection experiments, we have demonstrated the involvement of Tg737 in cellular proliferation.

  16. Effect of trehalose on the properties of mutant {gamma}PKC, which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14, in neuronal cell lines and cultured Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takahiro; Abe-Seki, Nana; Kikawada, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2010-10-22

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is susceptible to aggregation, which induces apoptotic cell death. The disaccharide trehalose has been reported to inhibit aggregate formation and to alleviate symptoms in cellular and animal models of Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, and prion disease. Here, we show that trehalose can be incorporated into SH-SY5Y cells and reduces the aggregation of mutant γPKC-GFP, thereby inhibiting apoptotic cell death in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cultured Purkinje cells (PCs). Trehalose acts by directly stabilizing the conformation of mutant γPKC without affecting protein turnover. Trehalose was also found to alleviate the improper development of dendrites in PCs expressing mutant γPKC-GFP without aggregates but not in PCs with aggregates. In PCs without aggregates, trehalose improves the mobility and translocation of mutant γPKC-GFP, probably by inhibiting oligomerization and thereby alleviating the improper development of dendrites. These results suggest that trehalose counteracts various cellular dysfunctions that are triggered by mutant γPKC in both neuronal cell lines and primary cultured PCs by inhibiting oligomerization and aggregation of mutant γPKC.

  17. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  18. Effects of Fuzzless Cottonseed Phenotype on Cottonseed Nutrient Composition in near Isogenic Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Mutant Lines under Well-Watered and Water Stress Conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton mutant near isogenic lines (NILs) for fuzzless seed trait has been used to investigate cell biology, genetic, and molecular processes of fiber initiation, development, fiber yield and quality. However, there is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrie...

  19. Cell fusion-mediated improvement in transfection competence for repair-deficient mutant of mouse T cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, T.; Hieda-Shiomi, N.; Sato, K.; Yoshizumi, T.; Nakazawa, T.

    1988-03-01

    A multiple mutagen-sensitive mutant (XUM1) of mouse T-cell lymphoma line, L5178Y, is hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) light, and cross-linking agents (such as mitomycin C). The frequency of transfection for XUM1 cells after exposure to calcium phosphate-coprecipitated pSV2neo DNA was more than 10(4)-fold less effective than that for Ltk-aprt- (LTA) cells. Other transfection methods (DEAE-dextran and polybrene-DMSO) were not effective for L5178Y and XUM1 cells. The transfection-proficient trait of LTA cells was demonstrated to be genetically dominant by examining the the transfection frequency in hybrid clones constructed between XUM1 and LTA cells. To circumvent the problem with XUM1, the LTA genes necessary for transformation processes were introduced into XUM1 cells by constructing hybrids between XUM1 and LTA cells irradiated with X-rays which causes directional chromosome elimination for hybrid cells. Four of 194 hybrid clones tested were transfection-proficient and hypersensitive to UV (XL102, XL107, XL215, and XL216). All four clones were not hypersensitive to X-rays or mitomycin C. The frequencies of transfection for XL102 and XL216 were nearly the same level as that for LTA cells. The efficiency of transfection for XL107 and XL215 was 10 to 100-fold lower than that for LTA cells.

  20. Enduring vulnerability to reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yijin; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Niwa, Minae; Nagai, Taku; Nitta, Atsumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2007-07-01

    Genetic factors are considered to play an important role in drug dependence/addiction including the development of drug dependence and relapse. With the use of a model of drug self-administration in mutant mice, several specific genes and proteins have been identified as potentially important in the development of drug dependence. In contrast, little is known about the role of specific genes in enduring vulnerability to relapse, a clinical hallmark of drug addiction. Using a mouse model of reinstatement, which models relapse of drug-seeking behavior in addicts, we provide evidence that a partial reduction in the expression of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) potentiates methamphetamine (METH) self-administration, enhances motivation to take METH, increases vulnerability to drug-primed reinstatement, and prolongs cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished METH-seeking behavior. In contrast, there was no significant difference in novelty responses, METH-stimulated hyperlocomotion and locomotor sensitization, food-reinforced operant behavior and motivation, or reinstatement of food-seeking behavior between GDNF heterozygous knockout mice and wild-type littermates. These findings suggest that GDNF may be associated with enduring vulnerability to reinstatement of METH-seeking behavior and a potential target in the development of therapies to control relapse.

  1. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  2. Proliferative activity of a blend of Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea root extracts in human vein epithelial, HeLa, and QBC-939 cell lines, but not in Beas-2b cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Cichello, Simon Angelo; Yao, Qian; He, Xiao Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Echinacea is used for its immunostimulating properties and may have a role in modulating adverse immune effects of chemotherapy (i.e., use of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); fluorouracil and its immunosuppressive effect). Patients may seek herbal remedies such as Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea) for immune stimulation. Echinacea extracts have been prescribed to supplement cancer chemotherapy for their immune-supportive effects; however, the extracts may also influence tumourgenesis. Our study aimed to determine the proliferative effect of the ethanolic blend of E. angustifolia and E. purpurea on various cancer cervical and bile duct cell lines, including HELA and QBC-939. Various cancer cells (HeLa and QBC-939) and human vein epithelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with the Echinacea blend sample that was evaporated and reconstituted in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). As the extract concentration of Echinacea was increased from 12.5 μg/mL to 25 μg/mL, there was an increase in cell inhibition up to 100%, which then reduced to 90% over the next three concentrations, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, and 200 μg/mL, in HeLa cells; further inhibitory effects were observed in QBC-939 cells, from 9% inhibition at a concentration of 25 μg/mL up to 37.96% inhibition at 100 μg/mL concentration. Moreover, this is the first study to report the growth-promoting effects of this Echinacea blend in HUVEC, up to 800% at a dose concentration of 200 μg/mL. Previous studies have suggested that chicoric acid of Echinacea spp. is responsible for the increased cell growth. The results of this study show that the hydroethanolic extract of Echinacea herbal medicine promotes the growth of HeLa cells and QBC-939 cancer cell proliferation, and may interfere with cancer treatment (i.e., chemotherapy drugs such as 5-fluorouracil and Cisplatin (DDP)). However, the Echinacea blend shows potential in neurodegenerative diseases with growth-promoting effects in HUVEC. Further animal

  3. Proliferative activity of a blend of Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea root extracts in human vein epithelial, HeLa, and QBC-939 cell lines, but not in Beas-2b cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo; Yao, Qian; He, Xiao Qiong

    2016-04-01

    Echinacea is used for its immunostimulating properties and may have a role in modulating adverse immune effects of chemotherapy (i.e., use of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); fluorouracil and its immunosuppressive effect). Patients may seek herbal remedies such as Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea) for immune stimulation. Echinacea extracts have been prescribed to supplement cancer chemotherapy for their immune-supportive effects; however, the extracts may also influence tumourgenesis. Our study aimed to determine the proliferative effect of the ethanolic blend of E. angustifolia and E. purpurea on various cancer cervical and bile duct cell lines, including HELA and QBC-939. Various cancer cells (HeLa and QBC-939) and human vein epithelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with the Echinacea blend sample that was evaporated and reconstituted in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). As the extract concentration of Echinacea was increased from 12.5 μg/mL to 25 μg/mL, there was an increase in cell inhibition up to 100%, which then reduced to 90% over the next three concentrations, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, and 200 μg/mL, in HeLa cells; further inhibitory effects were observed in QBC-939 cells, from 9% inhibition at a concentration of 25 μg/mL up to 37.96% inhibition at 100 μg/mL concentration. Moreover, this is the first study to report the growth-promoting effects of this Echinacea blend in HUVEC, up to 800% at a dose concentration of 200 μg/mL. Previous studies have suggested that chicoric acid of Echinacea spp. is responsible for the increased cell growth. The results of this study show that the hydroethanolic extract of Echinacea herbal medicine promotes the growth of HeLa cells and QBC-939 cancer cell proliferation, and may interfere with cancer treatment (i.e., chemotherapy drugs such as 5-fluorouracil and Cisplatin (DDP)). However, the Echinacea blend shows potential in neurodegenerative diseases with growth-promoting effects in HUVEC. Further animal

  4. Chronic active B-cell-receptor signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Eric; Ngo, Vu N; Lenz, Georg; Tolar, Pavel; Young, Ryan M; Romesser, Paul B; Kohlhammer, Holger; Lamy, Laurence; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Johnson, Nathalie A; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Wilson, Wyndham H; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Pierce, Susan K; Staudt, Louis M

    2010-01-07

    A role for B-cell-receptor (BCR) signalling in lymphomagenesis has been inferred by studying immunoglobulin genes in human lymphomas and by engineering mouse models, but genetic and functional evidence for its oncogenic role in human lymphomas is needed. Here we describe a form of 'chronic active' BCR signalling that is required for cell survival in the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The signalling adaptor CARD11 is required for constitutive NF-kappaB pathway activity and survival in ABC DLBCL. Roughly 10% of ABC DLBCLs have mutant CARD11 isoforms that activate NF-kappaB, but the mechanism that engages wild-type CARD11 in other ABC DLBCLs was unknown. An RNA interference genetic screen revealed that a BCR signalling component, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, is essential for the survival of ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11. In addition, knockdown of proximal BCR subunits (IgM, Ig-kappa, CD79A and CD79B) killed ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11 but not other lymphomas. The BCRs in these ABC DLBCLs formed prominent clusters in the plasma membrane with low diffusion, similarly to BCRs in antigen-stimulated normal B cells. Somatic mutations affecting the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signalling modules of CD79B and CD79A were detected frequently in ABC DLBCL biopsy samples but rarely in other DLBCLs and never in Burkitt's lymphoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In 18% of ABC DLBCLs, one functionally critical residue of CD79B, the first ITAM tyrosine, was mutated. These mutations increased surface BCR expression and attenuated Lyn kinase, a feedback inhibitor of BCR signalling. These findings establish chronic active BCR signalling as a new pathogenetic mechanism in ABC DLBCL, suggesting several therapeutic strategies.

  5. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junxin; Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Page, Carly; Younger, Kenisha M.; Tiper, Irina V.; Frieman, Matthew; Kimball, Amy S.; Webb, Tonya J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:24955247

  6. SOX2 expression is an early event in a murine model of EGFR mutant lung cancer and promotes proliferation of a subset of EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Irem; Kawabata, Shigeru; Bergbower, Emily; Gills, Joell J.; Ekmekci, Abdullah; Wilson, Willie; Rudin, Charles M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary and acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer occurs primarily through secondary mutations in EGFR or Met amplification. Drug resistance can also be mediated by expression of pluripotency transcription factors, such as OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that decrease terminal differentiation. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of SOX2 in model systems of EGFR mutant tumors. Materials and Methods Immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry was used to assess expression of pluripotency transcription factors in lungs of transgenic mice or in human NSCLC cell lines. Expression of SOX2 was reduced by shRNA knockdown, and response to erlotinib and cellular proliferation were assessed. Results and Conclusion Induction of mutant EGFR in transgenic CCSP-rtTA/TetO-EGFRL858R/T790M mice correlated with increased OCT4 and SOX2 expression in lung tissue prior to tumor development. Established lung tumors retained SOX2 expression. To assess a role for SOX2 in tumorigenesis, a panel of NSCLC cell lines with activating EGFR mutations was assessed for SOX2 expression. Two of six cell lines with mutant EGFR showed detectable SOX2 levels, suggesting SOX2 expression did not correlate with EGFR mutation status. To assess the role of SOX2 in these cell lines, HCC827 and H1975 cells were infected with lentivirus containing SOX2 shRNA. Knockdown of SOX2 decreased proliferation in both cell lines and increased sensitivity to erlotinib in HCC827 cells. Because constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with EGFR TKI resistance, cells were treated with PI3K/AKT inhibitors and expression of SOX2 was examined. PI3K/Akt inhibitors decreased SOX2 expression in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest targeting SOX2 may provide therapeutic benefit in the subset of EGFR-mutant tumors with high constitutive levels of SOX2, and that until more direct means of inhibiting SOX2 are developed, PI3K/Akt inhibitors might be useful to inhibit SOX2

  7. Essential Role for Survivin in the Proliferative Expansion of Progenitor and Mature B Cells.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Ana V; Jellusova, Julia; Cato, Matthew H; Lee, Charlotte R; Baracho, Gisele V; Conway, Edward M; Rickert, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins and a biomarker of poor prognosis in aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In addition to its role in inhibition of apoptosis, survivin also regulates mitosis. In this article, we show that deletion of survivin during early B cell development results in a complete block at the cycling pre-B stage. In the periphery, B cell homeostasis is not affected, but survivin-deficient B cells are unable to mount humoral responses. Correspondingly, we show that survivin is required for cell division in response to mitogenic stimulation. Thus, survivin is essential for proliferation of B cell progenitors and activated mature B cells, but is dispensable for B cell survival. Moreover, a small-molecule inhibitor of survivin strongly impaired the growth of representative B lymphoma lines in vitro, supporting the validity of survivin as an attractive therapeutic target for high-grade B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  8. Inhibition of demethylase KDM6B sensitizes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohit; Sehgal, Lalit; Havranek, Ondrej; Köhrer, Stefan; Khashab, Tamer; Jain, Neeraj; Burger, Jan A.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Davis, R. Eric; Samaniego, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation and demethylation regulate B-cell development, and their deregulation correlates with tumor chemoresistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, limiting cure rates. Since histone methylation status correlates with disease aggressiveness and relapse, we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting histone 3 Lys27 demethylase KDM6B, in vitro, using the small molecule inhibitor GSK-J4. KDM6B is overexpressed in the germinal center B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and higher KDM6B levels are associated with worse survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP. GSK-J4-induced apoptosis was observed in five (SU-DHL-6, OCI-Ly1, Toledo, OCI-Ly8, SU-DHL-8) out of nine germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Treatment with GSK-J4 predominantly resulted in downregulation of B-cell receptor signaling and BCL6. Cell lines expressing high BCL6 levels or CREBBP/EP300 mutations were sensitive to GSK-J4. Our results suggest that B-cell receptor-dependent downregulation of BCL6 is responsible for GSK-J4-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GSK-J4-mediated inhibition of KDM6B sensitizes germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to chemotherapy agents that are currently utilized in treatment regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27742770

  9. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Daniel J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-05

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3 Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2-OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein-protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell-restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity.

  10. Targeting of CD22-positive B-cell lymphoma cells by synthetic divalent sialic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Astrid; Wöhner, Miriam; Prescher, Horst; Brossmer, Reinhard; Nitschke, Lars

    2012-10-01

    CD22 is an inhibitory co-receptor of the B-cell receptor (BCR) on B cells. Since CD22 is ubiquitously expressed in the B-cell lineage and CD22 endocytosis can be triggered efficiently, antibodies and antibody-based immunotoxins against CD22 are used to target B cells both in B-cell lymphomas and leukemias, as well as in autoimmune diseases. CD22 recognizes α2,6-linked sialic acids as endogenous ligands. We have developed new synthetic sialosides as ligands for human CD22. These sialosides bind CD22 on human B cells with high affinity and can efficiently enhance IgM-triggered Ca(2+) signaling. We coupled these sialosides to Pseudomonas exotoxin A to generate a novel CD22 ligand-based immunotoxin. This sialoside-exotoxin-A construct can specifically kill CD22-positive B-cell lymphoma cells. It binds specifically to CD22-positive B-cell lymphoma cells and is dominant over endogenous cis-ligands on the B-cell surface. The sialoside-exotoxin-A construct is efficiently internalized by endocytosis into B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus we show the development of a new therapeutic compound for targeting CD22 on human B cells, both for B-cell lymphoma, as well as for B-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Memory B cells: total recall.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tri Giang; Tangye, Stuart G

    2017-03-28

    Immunological memory is a cornerstone of adaptive immune responses in higher vertebrates. The remarkable ability to generate memory cells following Ag exposure, in the context of natural infection or immunization, provides long-lived protection against infectious diseases, often for the hosts' lifetime. Indeed, the generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells underpins the success of most vaccines. The concept of immunological memory is not new-it was first proposed nearly 2500 years ago. While our understanding of the complexities of humoral and cell-mediated memory continues to evolve, important aspects of this process remain unresolved. Here, we will provide an overview of recent advances in B-cell memory in mice and humans, and in health and disease.

  12. Isolation and characterization of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific B cell from immortalized human naïve B cell library.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehua; Lu, Shiqiang; Yang, Zheng; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Meiyun

    2017-01-10

    With the recent development of single B cell cloning techniques, an increasing number of HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated since 2009. However, knowledge regarding HIV-1-specific B cells in vivo is limited. In this study, an HIV-1-specific B cell line has been established using healthy PBMC donors by the highly efficient EBV transformation method to generate immortalized human naïve B cell libraries. The enrichment of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells was observed after four rounds of cell panning with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. An HIV-1 envelope-specific stable B cell line (LCL-P4) was generated. Although this cell line acquired a lymphoblastic phenotype, no expression was observed for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme responsible for initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in B cells. This study describes a method that enables fast isolation of HIV-1-specific B cells, and this approach may extend to isolating other B cell-specific antigens for further experiments.

  13. Determination of essential fatty acid composition among mutant lines of Canola (Brassica napus), through high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ghulam; Siddique, Aquil; Khan, Imtiaz Ahmad; Ashraf, Muhammed Yasin; Khatri, Abdullah

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the methyl esters of lenoleic acid (LA), gamma-lenolenic acid (LNA) and oleic acid (OL) in the oil of Brassica napus mutants. Five stable mutants (ROO-75/1, ROO-100/6, ROO-125/12, ROO-125/14, and ROO-125/17) of B. napus cv. 'Rainbow' (P) and three mutants (W97-95/16, W97-0.75/11 and W97-.075/13) of B. napus cv. 'Westar' (P) at M6 stage, exhibiting better yield and yield components, were analyzed for essential fatty acids. The highest seed yield was observed in the mutant (ROO-100/6) followed by ROO-125/14 of Rainbow, that is, 34% and 32% higher than their parent plants, respectively. Westar mutant W97-75/11 also showed 30% higher seed yield than its parent plant. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the composition of fatty acids indicated that OL was the most dominant fatty acid, ranging from 39.1 to 66.3%; LA was second (15.3-41.6%) and LNA was third (18.1-28.9%). Mutant ROO-125/14 showed higher OL contents than parent (Rainbow). These results are expected to support the approval of ROO-125/14 in the National Uniform Varietal Yield Trials (NUVYT) as a new variety based on high oil quality.

  14. B-cell tolerance and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Tsubata, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Self-reactive B cells are tolerized at various stages of B-cell development and differentiation, including the immature B-cell stage (central tolerance) and the germinal center (GC) B-cell stage, and B-cell tolerance involves various mechanisms such as deletion, anergy, and receptor editing. Self-reactive B cells generated by random immunoglobulin variable gene rearrangements are tolerized by central tolerance and anergy in the periphery, and these processes involve apoptosis regulated by Bim, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, and regulation of B-cell signaling by various phosphatases, including SHIP-1 and SHP-1. Self-reactive B cells generated by somatic mutations during GC reaction are also eliminated. Fas is not directly involved in this process but prevents persistence of GC reaction that allows generation of less stringently regulated B cells, including self-reactive B cells. Defects in self-tolerance preferentially cause lupus-like disease with production of anti-nuclear antibodies, probably due to the presence of a large potential B-cell repertoire reactive to nucleic acids and the presence of nucleic acid-induced activation mechanisms in various immune cells, including B cells and dendritic cells. A feed-forward loop composed of anti-nuclear antibodies produced by B cells and type 1 interferons secreted from nucleic acid-activated dendritic cells plays a crucial role in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:28408984

  15. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-05-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  16. A mutant RAS gene acts through protein kinase C to augment interleukin-3 dependent proliferation in a fastidious immortal myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Boswell, H S; Harrington, M A; Burgess, G S; Nahreini, T L; Derigs, H G; Hodges, T D; English, D; Crean, C D; Gabig, T G

    1989-09-01

    The functional role of a mutant RAS gene in immortal myeloid cell proliferation was examined in a fastidious interleukin-3 (IL-3) dependent cell line (NFS/N1.H7) formed by forced proliferation in IL-3 of marrow cells of the NFS/N mouse. The NFS/N1.H7 cell line was strictly dependent upon IL-3 for growth, and the cell line could be activated by phorbol esters (PMA) to augment IL-3 dependent proliferation, but when pKC was downregulated, diminished IL-3 proliferative response resulted. Transfection (electroporation) of the T24 RAS-containing vector pAL8 to NFS/N1.H7 led to clones (H7 NeoRas.F3, H7 NeoRas.E2) that had incorporated the entire 6.6 Kb human mutant H-RAS genome. The mutant RAS-containing clones demonstrated greater proliferation than parent cells or cells containing a control (neo-resistance) vector over a range of suboptimal IL-3 does and in optimal IL-3 concentrations had a faster doubling rate than parent cells. The clone H7 NeoRas.F3 was studied biochemically, and found to constitutively form 3-fold more 3H-diacylglycerol than the parent cell line upon exposure to 3H-glycerol. PMA could partially repair the proliferative defect of NFS/N1.H7 compared to the RAS-expressor. These studies affirm a secondary, accelerating role for a mutant RAS gene product acting through pKC to promote clonal expansion of immortal myeloid cells stimulated by IL-3.

  17. Next-Generation EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Treating EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer beyond First Line.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are now standard treatment in the clinic for patients with advanced EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First-generation EGFR TKIs, binding competitively and reversibly to the ATP-binding site of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, have resulted in a significant improvement in outcome for NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations (L858R and Del19). However, after a median duration of response of ~12 months, all patients develop tumor resistance, and in over half of these patients this is due to the emergence of the EGFR T790M resistance mutation. The second-generation EGFR/HER TKIs were developed to treat resistant disease, targeting not only T790M but EGFR-activating mutations and wild-type EGFR. Although they exhibited promising anti-T790M activity in the laboratory, their clinical activity among T790M+ NSCLC was poor mainly because of dose-limiting toxicity due to simultaneous inhibition of wild-type EGFR. The third-generation EGFR TKIs selectively and irreversibly target EGFR T790M and activating EGFR mutations, showing promising efficacy in NSCLC resistant to the first- and second-generation EGFR TKIs. They also appear to have lower incidences of toxicity due to the limited inhibitory effect on wild-type EGFR. Currently, the first-generation gefitinib and erlotinib and second-generation afatinib have been approved for first-line treatment of metastatic NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations. Among the third-generation EGFR TKIs, osimertinib is today the only drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency to treat metastatic EGFR T790M NSCLC patients who have progressed on or after EGFR TKI therapy. In this review, we summarize the available post-progression therapies including third-generation EGFR inhibitors and combination treatment strategies for treating patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and address the

  18. Next-Generation EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Treating EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer beyond First Line

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are now standard treatment in the clinic for patients with advanced EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First-generation EGFR TKIs, binding competitively and reversibly to the ATP-binding site of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, have resulted in a significant improvement in outcome for NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations (L858R and Del19). However, after a median duration of response of ~12 months, all patients develop tumor resistance, and in over half of these patients this is due to the emergence of the EGFR T790M resistance mutation. The second-generation EGFR/HER TKIs were developed to treat resistant disease, targeting not only T790M but EGFR-activating mutations and wild-type EGFR. Although they exhibited promising anti-T790M activity in the laboratory, their clinical activity among T790M+ NSCLC was poor mainly because of dose-limiting toxicity due to simultaneous inhibition of wild-type EGFR. The third-generation EGFR TKIs selectively and irreversibly target EGFR T790M and activating EGFR mutations, showing promising efficacy in NSCLC resistant to the first- and second-generation EGFR TKIs. They also appear to have lower incidences of toxicity due to the limited inhibitory effect on wild-type EGFR. Currently, the first-generation gefitinib and erlotinib and second-generation afatinib have been approved for first-line treatment of metastatic NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations. Among the third-generation EGFR TKIs, osimertinib is today the only drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency to treat metastatic EGFR T790M NSCLC patients who have progressed on or after EGFR TKI therapy. In this review, we summarize the available post-progression therapies including third-generation EGFR inhibitors and combination treatment strategies for treating patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and address the

  19. Isolation of coordinately regulated genes that are expressed in discrete stages of B-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Yancopoulos, G D; Oltz, E M; Rathbun, G; Berman, J E; Smith, R K; Lansford, R D; Rothman, P; Okada, A; Lee, G; Morrow, M

    1990-01-01

    We have utilized subtractive hybridization to isolate 16 distinct cDNA sequences representing genes expressed in pre-B-cell lines but not myeloma cell or fibroblast lines. These sequences represent RNA transcripts that vary in abundance in pre-B-cell lines from 0.001% to 0.05%. Five of these sequences were not related to any known genes. One was related to but distinct from known myosin regulatory light chain genes and another encoded a protein with lectin domains. Three represented previously identified genes encoding carbonic anhydrase type II, thymosin, and CD2; these genes were not previously known to be specifically expressed in early stages of B-cell development. Other isolated genes corresponded to pre-B-cell-specific or pre-B-cell/B cell-specific genes recently described by others. The isolated cDNA sequences may be divided into two general categories--those representing genes expressed only in the pre-B-cell stage of B-cell development and those expressed in both the pre-B-cell and B-cell stages. The in vivo expression patterns of the identified genes suggest that some function specifically in lymphocytes while others may have roles in additional lineages. Images PMID:1696011

  20. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cutting edge: regulation of TLR4-driven B cell proliferation by RP105 is not B cell autonomous.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jessica L; Flick, Leah M; Divanovic, Senad; Jackson, Shaun W; Bram, Richard; Rawlings, David J; Finkelman, Fred D; Karp, Christopher L

    2012-03-01

    Mechanistic understanding of RP105 has been confounded by the fact that this TLR homolog has appeared to have opposing, cell type-specific effects on TLR4 signaling. Although RP105 inhibits TLR4-driven signaling in cell lines and myeloid cells, impaired LPS-driven proliferation by B cells from RP105(-/-) mice has suggested that RP105 facilitates TLR4 signaling in B cells. In this article, we show that modulation of B cell proliferation by RP105 is not a function of B cell-intrinsic expression of RP105, and identify a mechanistic role for dysregulated BAFF expression in the proliferative abnormalities of B cells from RP105(-/-) mice: serum BAFF levels are elevated in RP105(-/-) mice, and partial BAFF neutralization rescues aberrant B cell proliferative responses in such mice. These data indicate that RP105 does not have dichotomous effects on TLR4 signaling and emphasize the need for caution in interpreting the results of global genetic deletion.

  2. Cutting Edge: Regulation of TLR4-driven B cell proliferation by RP105 is not B cell-autonomous

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Flick, Leah M.; Divanovic, Senad; Jackson, Shaun W.; Bram, Richard; Rawlings, David J.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of RP105 has been confounded by the fact that this TLR homolog has appeared to have opposing, cell type-specific effects on TLR4 signaling. While RP105 inhibits TLR4-driven signaling in cell lines and myeloid cells, impaired LPS-driven proliferation by B cells from RP105−/− mice has suggested that RP105 facilitates TLR4 signaling in B cells. We show here that modulation of B cell proliferation by RP105 is not a function of B cell-intrinsic expression of RP105, and identify a mechanistic role for dysregulated BAFF expression in the proliferative abnormalities of B cells from RP105−/− mice: serum BAFF levels are elevated in RP105−/− mice, and partial BAFF neutralization rescues aberrant B cell proliferative responses in such mice. These data indicate that RP105 does not have dichotomous effects on TLR4 signaling, and emphasize the need for caution in interpreting the results of global genetic deletion. PMID:22291190

  3. Kidins220/ARMS binds to the B cell antigen receptor and regulates B cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Gina J.; Janowska, Iga; Prutek, Fabiola; Hobeika, Elias; Satapathy, Annyesha; Sprenger, Adrian; Plum, Thomas; Seidl, Maximilian; Dengjel, Jörn; Reth, Michael; Cesca, Fabrizia; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is critical for B cell development and activation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a protein kinase D–interacting substrate of 220 kD (Kidins220)/ankyrin repeat–rich membrane-spanning protein (ARMS) as a novel interaction partner of resting and stimulated BCR. Upon BCR stimulation, the interaction increases in a Src kinase–independent manner. By knocking down Kidins220 in a B cell line and generating a conditional B cell–specific Kidins220 knockout (B-KO) mouse strain, we show that Kidins220 couples the BCR to PLCγ2, Ca2+, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling. Consequently, BCR-mediated B cell activation was reduced in vitro and in vivo upon Kidins220 deletion. Furthermore, B cell development was impaired at stages where pre-BCR or BCR signaling is required. Most strikingly, λ light chain–positive B cells were reduced sixfold in the B-KO mice, genetically placing Kidins220 in the PLCγ2 pathway. Thus, our data indicate that Kidins220 positively regulates pre-BCR and BCR functioning. PMID:26324445

  4. B cell development in mice that lack one or both immunoglobulin kappa light chain genes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Trounstine, M; Kurahara, C; Young, F; Kuo, C C; Xu, Y; Loring, J F; Alt, F W; Huszar, D

    1993-01-01

    We have generated mice that lack the ability to produce immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa light chains by targeted deletion of J kappa and C kappa gene segments and the intervening sequences in mouse embryonic stem cells. In wild type mice, approximately 95% of B cells express kappa light chains and only approximately 5% express lambda light chains. Mice heterozygous for the J kappa C kappa deletion have approximately 2-fold more lambda+ B cells than wild-type littermates. Compared with normal mice, homozygous mutants for the J kappa C kappa deletion have about half the number of B cells in both the newly generated and the peripheral B cell compartments, and all of these B cells express lambda light chains in their Ig. Therefore, homozygous mutant mice appear to produce lambda-expressing cells at nearly 10 times the rate observed in normal mice. These findings demonstrate that kappa gene assembly and/or expression is not a prerequisite for lambda gene assembly and expression. Furthermore, there is no detectable rearrangement of 3' kappa RS sequences in lambda+ B cells of the homozygous mutant mice, thus rearrangements of these sequences, per se, is not required for lambda light chain gene assembly. We discuss these findings in the context of their implications for the control of Ig light chain gene rearrangement and potential applications of the mutant animals. Images PMID:8458340

  5. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Daniel J.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W.; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D.; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E.; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3. Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2–OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein–protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell–restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity. PMID:26993806

  6. Construction of a lipopolysaccharide reporter cell line and its use in identifying mutants defective in endotoxin, but not TNF-alpha, signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Delude, R L; Yoshimura, A; Ingalls, R R; Golenbock, D T

    1998-09-15

    Gram-negative bacterial LPS is a potent activator of inflammatory responses. The binding of LPS to CD14 initiates signal transduction; however, the molecular processes immediately following this event remain unclear. We engineered an LPS-inducible fibroblast reporter cell line to facilitate the use of molecular genetic techniques to study the LPS signaling pathway. A plasmid containing the human Tac Ag cDNA under transcriptional control of the human E selectin promoter was cotransfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells together with a CD14 expression plasmid. A cell line was obtained, 3E10, which upregulated expression of Tac following stimulation with LPS. Pools of mutagenized cells were exposed to LPS and then labeled with anti-Tac mAb. Cells that failed to up-regulate Tac expression were enriched by flow cytometry. Thirty clonal mutant cell lines were identified that continued to express CD14 and bind LPS, but failed to express Tac or translocate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) following LPS exposure. TNF-alpha-treated mutant cells continued to express Tac and translocate NF-kappaB. An analysis of LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity in heterokaryons derived from polyethylene glycol-fused cell lines indicated that recessive mutations in genes encoding components of the LPS signaling pathway accounted for the signaling defects. To date, two complementation groups have been identified from 11 cell lines analyzed. These data demonstrate that the TNF-alpha signaling pathway diverges from the LPS pathway early in the signal-transduction cascade despite similarities in LPS- and TNF-alpha-induced responses. Identification of the genes affected in these mutant reporter cells should identify heretofore-elusive components of the LPS signaling cascade.

  7. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruikang

    2016-01-01

    the dsRNA produced in excess in cells infected with a vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzyme mutant and by wild-type virus colocalized with the viral E3 protein in cytoplasmic viral factories. Novel human cell lines defective in either or both protein kinase R and RNase L dsRNA effector pathways and/or the cellular 5′ exonuclease Xrn1 were prepared by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing. Inactivation of both pathways was necessary and sufficient to allow full replication of the E3 mutant and reverse the defect cause by inactivation of Xrn1, whereas the decapping enzyme mutant still exhibited defects in gene expression. The study provided new insights into functions of the VACV proteins, and the well-characterized panel of CRISPR-Cas9-modified human cell lines should have broad applicability for studying innate dsRNA pathways. PMID:27334583

  8. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruikang; Moss, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    excess in cells infected with a vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzyme mutant and by wild-type virus colocalized with the viral E3 protein in cytoplasmic viral factories. Novel human cell lines defective in either or both protein kinase R and RNase L dsRNA effector pathways and/or the cellular 5' exonuclease Xrn1 were prepared by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing. Inactivation of both pathways was necessary and sufficient to allow full replication of the E3 mutant and reverse the defect cause by inactivation of Xrn1, whereas the decapping enzyme mutant still exhibited defects in gene expression. The study provided new insights into functions of the VACV proteins, and the well-characterized panel of CRISPR-Cas9-modified human cell lines should have broad applicability for studying innate dsRNA pathways. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  10. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  11. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiko; Kusunoki, Hideki; Mochida, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Mizuochi, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:21789042

  12. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  13. Efficacy and safety of subcutaneous and intravenous rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone in first-line diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: the randomized MabEase study.

    PubMed

    Lugtenburg, Pieternella; Avivi, Irit; Berenschot, Henriette; Ilhan, Osman; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Nagler, Arnon; Rueda, Antonio; Tani, Monica; Turgut, Mehmet; Osborne, Stuart; Smith, Rodney; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2017-09-21

    Intravenous rituximab plus chemotherapy is standard treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A subcutaneous formulation of rituximab is expected to simplify and shorten drug preparation and administration, and to reduce treatment burden. MabEase (NCT01649856) examined efficacy, safety and patient satisfaction with subcutaneous rituximab plus chemotherapy in treatment-naïve patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to subcutaneous rituximab (intravenous 375 mg/m(2) cycle 1; subcutaneous 1,400 mg cycles 2-8) or intravenous rituximab (375 mg/m(2) cycles 1-8) plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone every 14 or 21 days. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed complete response/unconfirmed complete response. Secondary endpoints included safety, treatment satisfaction (Cancer Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire and Rituximab Administration Satisfaction Questionnaire), time savings, and survival. Of 576 randomized patients, 572 (378 subcutaneous; 194 intravenous) received treatment. End-of-induction complete response/unconfirmed complete response rates were 50.6% (subcutaneous) and 42.4% (intravenous). After a median 35 months, median overall, event-free and progression-free survivals were not reached. Grade ≥3 adverse events (subcutaneous 58.3%; intravenous 54.3%) and administration-related adverse events (both groups 21%) were similar between arms. Injection-site reactions were more common with subcutaneous (5.7% versus 0%). Rituximab Administration Satisfaction Questionnaire scores for 'impact on activities of daily living, convenience, and satisfaction were improved with subcutaneous versus intravenous; Cancer Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores were similar between arms. Median administration time (6 minutes vs 2.6-3.0 hours), chair/bed and overall hospital times were shorter with subcutaneous versus intravenous rituximab. Overall, subcutaneous and intravenous rituximab had similar efficacy

  14. Growth sensitivity of a recombinant simian virus 5 P/V mutant to type I interferon differs between tumor cell lines and normal primary cells.

    PubMed

    Wansley, Elizabeth K; Dillon, Patrick J; Gainey, Maria D; Tam, James; Cramer, Scott D; Parks, Griffith D

    2005-04-25

    A paramyxovirus SV5 mutant (rSV5-P/V-CPI-) that encodes 6 naturally-occurring P/V gene substitutions is a potent inducer of type I interferon (IFN) and is restricted for low moi growth, two phenotypes not seen with WT SV5. In this study, we have compared the IFN sensitivity of WT SV5 and the rSV5-P/V-CPI- mutant in tumor cell lines and in cultures of normal primary cells. We have tested the hypothesis that differences in IFN induction elicited by WT rSV5 and rSV5-P/V-CPI- are responsible for differences in low moi growth and spread. In contrast to WT SV5, low moi infection of A549 lung carcinoma cells with rSV5-P/V-CPI- resulted in a plateau of virus production by 24-48 h pi when secreted IFN levels were between approximately 100 and 1000 U/ml. Gene microarray and RT-PCR analyses identified IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes whose expression were increased by infection of A549 cells with WT and P/V mutant viruses. Restricted low moi growth and spread of rSV5-P/V-CPI- in A549 cells was relieved in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFN-beta but not TNF-alpha. When A549 or MDA-MB-435 breast tumor cells were pretreated with IFN, both WT and P/V mutant viruses showed delayed spread and approximately 10-fold reduction in virus yield, but infections were not eliminated. Using normal primary human epithelial cells that have undergone limited passage in culture, WT rSV5 and rSV5-P/V-CPI- displayed high moi growth properties that were similar to that seen in A549 cells. However, IFN pretreatment of these primary cells as well as normal human lung cells eliminated low moi spread of both mutant and WT rSV5 infections. Together, these data demonstrate that SV5 growth in normal primary human cells is highly sensitive to IFN compared to growth in some tumor cell lines, regardless of whether the P/V gene is WT or mutant. These results suggest a model in which spread of WT SV5 in normal human cells is dependent on the ability of the virus to prevent IFN synthesis. The

  15. Production of monoclonal antibody recognizing a subpopulation of human B lymphocytes producing B cell growth factor (BCGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Witzel, N.; Ambrus, J.L. Jr.; Jurgensen, C.H.; Mostowski, H.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    Several laboratories have recently reported production of B cell growth factors (BCGF) by a variety of human B cell lines. The authors have described production of BCGF by clones of B cell lymphoma lines and by normal Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I-activated B cells. To further evaluate whether BCGF production was the function of particular subpopulations of B cells, they immunized mice with the BCGF producing line Namalva and then developed a panel of hybridomas. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for binding to Namalva and the absence of binding to a non-BCGF producing B cell line. One monoclonal antibody, NN4, which met these criteria was also noted by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to stain clones from a B cell lymphoma line producing BCGF but not clones from the same line which do not produce BCGF. The monoclonal antibody did not stain T cells or monocytes but stained 1-5% of normal human B lymphocytes from peripheral blood or tonsils. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled NN4 to NN4/sup +/ B cells was not affected by the presence of BCGF. Therefore, NN4 recognizes a unique antigen present on B cell lines which produces BCGF; studies are in progress to determine the significance of this antigen on normal B cells.

  16. Role of MYC in B Cell Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Korać, Petra; Dotlić, Snježana; Matulić, Maja; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Dominis, Mara

    2017-04-04

    B cell lymphomas mainly arise from different developmental stages of B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissue. There are a number of signaling pathways that affect the initiation and development of B cell lymphomagenesis. The functions of several key proteins that represent branching points of signaling networks are changed because of their aberrant expression, degradation, and/or accumulation, and those events determine the fate of the affected B cells. One of the most influential transcription factors, commonly associated with unfavorable prognosis for patients with B cell lymphoma, is nuclear phosphoprotein MYC. During B cell lymphomagenesis, oncogenic MYC variant is deregulated through various mechanisms, such as gene translocation, gene amplification, and epigenetic deregulation of its expression. Owing to alterations of downstream signaling cascades, MYC-overexpressing neoplastic B cells proliferate rapidly, avoid apoptosis, and become unresponsive to most conventional treatments. This review will summarize the roles of MYC in B cell development and oncogenesis, as well as its significance for current B cell lymphoma classification. We compared communication networks within transformed B cells in different lymphomas affected by overexpressed MYC and conducted a meta-analysis concerning the association of MYC with tumor prognosis in different patient populations.

  17. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The selective radiosensitivity of sIgM >> sIgD marginal zone B cells is associated with the selective loss of B cell function. The simultaneous restoration of impaired function and recovery of these cells with time supports this premise. B cell recovery, delayed one week after irradiation, is in progress at two weeks, and virtually complete by three weeks. XID mice reveal similar recovery kinetics although there are fewer recovering cells and these bear reduced levels of Ia. This observation represents additional evidence that xid B cells are distinct from those of normal mice. The simultaneous loss, and concurrent recovery, of sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness in irradiated mice suggests the existence of a unique B cell subpopulation possessing both phenotypes. Additional support for this hypothesis is provided by demonstrating that splenocytes, depleted of IgD{sup +} cells adoptively reconstitute this response in XID mice. The peritoneal B cell pool, which, compared to the spleen, consist of increased numbers of sIgM >> sIgD B cells, is shown to be a source of radiosensitive B cells that are TI-2 responsive. These observations represent additional evidence for an association between sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness.

  18. Increased B cell proliferation and reduced Ig production in DREAM transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Savignac, Magali; Mellström, Britt; Bébin, Anne-Gaëlle; Oliveros, Juan C; Delpy, Laurent; Pinaud, Eric; Naranjo, Jose R

    2010-12-15

    DREAM/KChIP-3 is a calcium-dependent transcriptional repressor highly expressed in immune cells. Transgenic mice expressing a dominant active DREAM mutant show reduced serum Ig levels. In vitro assays show that reduced Ig secretion is an intrinsic defect of transgenic B cells that occurs without impairment in plasma cell differentiation, class switch recombination, or Ig transcription. Surprisingly, transgenic B cells show an accelerated entry in cell division. Transcriptomic analysis of transgenic B cells revealed that hyperproliferative B cell response could be correlated with a reduced expression of Klf9, a cell-cycle regulator. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the defect in Ig production is associated with reduced translation rather than with increased protein degradation. Importantly, transgenic B cells showed reduced expression of the Eif4g3 gene, which encodes a protein related to protein translation. Our results disclose, to our knowledge, a novel function of DREAM in proliferation and Ig synthesis in B lymphocytes.

  19. Partial restoration of mutant enzyme homeostasis in three distinct lysosomal storage disease cell lines by altering calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ting-Wei; Fowler, Douglas M; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2008-02-01

    A lysosomal storage disease (LSD) results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil-both US Food and Drug Administration-approved hypertension drugs-partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient-derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely alpha-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety.

  20. Quorum Sensing Contributes to Activated IgM-Secreting B Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Montaudouin, Caroline; Anson, Marie; Hao, Yi; Duncker, Susanne V.; Fernandez, Tahia; Gaudin, Emmanuelle; Ehrenstein, Michael; Kerr, William G.; Colle, Jean-Hervé; Bruhns, Pierre; Daëron, Marc; Freitas, António A.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of plasma IgM levels is critical for immune system function and homeostasis in humans and mice. However, the mechanisms that control homeostasis of the activated IgM-secreting B cells are unknown. After adoptive transfer into immune-deficient hosts, B lymphocytes expand poorly, but fully reconstitute the pool of natural IgM-secreting cells and circulating IgM levels. By using sequential cell transfers and B cell populations from several mutant mice, we were able to identify novel mechanisms regulating the size of the IgM-secreting B cell pool. Contrary to previous mechanisms described regulating homeostasis, which involve competition for the same niche by cells having overlapping survival requirements, homeostasis of the innate IgM-secreting B cell pool is also achieved when B cell populations are able to monitor the number of activated B cells by detecting their secreted products. Notably, B cell populations are able to assess the density of activated B cells by sensing their secreted IgG. This process involves the FcγRIIB, a low-affinity IgG receptor that is expressed on B cells and acts as a negative regulator of B cell activation, and its intracellular effector the inositol phosphatase SHIP. As a result of the engagement of this inhibitory pathway, the number of activated IgM-secreting B cells is kept under control. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled B cell activation and autoimmunity. PMID:23209322

  1. Salicylic acid deficiency in NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants increases seed yield in the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria Elizabeth; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid-deficient NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants were used to evaluate the role of this compound in the development of the short-lived, annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with a particular focus on the interplay between salicylic acid and other phytohormones. Low salicylic acid levels led to increased growth, as well as to smaller abscisic acid levels and reduced damage to PSII (as indicated by F(v)/F(m) ratios) during the reproductive stages in rosette leaves of NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants, compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, salicylic acid deficiency highly influenced seed yield and composition. Seed production increased by 4.4-fold and 3.5-fold in NahG transgenic lines and sid2 mutants, respectively, compared to the wild type. Salicylic acid deficiency also improved seed composition in terms of antioxidant vitamin concentrations, seeds of salicylic acid-deficient plants showing higher levels of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol (vitamin E) and beta-carotene (pro-vitamin A) than seeds of wild-type plants. Seeds of salicylic acid-deficient plants also showed higher nitrogen concentrations than seeds of wild-type plants. It is concluded that (i) the sid2 gene, which encodes for isochorismate synthase, plays a central role in salicylic acid biosynthesis during plant development in A. thaliana, (ii) salicylic acid plays a role in the regulation of growth, senescence, and seed production, (iii) there is a cross-talk between salicylic acid and other phytohormones during plant development, and (iv) the concentrations of antioxidant vitamins in seeds may be influenced by the endogenous levels of salicylic acid in plants.

  2. A Salmonella typhi OmpC fusion protein expressing the CD154 Trp140–Ser149 amino acid strand binds CD40 and activates a lymphoma B-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Mario I; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Luría-Perez, Rosendo; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Isibasi, Armado; González-Bonilla, Cesar R

    2003-01-01

    CD154 is a type II glycoprotein member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, which is expressed mainly on the surface of activated T lymphocytes. The interaction with its receptor CD40, plays a central role in the control of several functions of the immune system. Structural models based on the homology of CD154 with TNF and lymphotoxin indicate that binding to CD40 involves three regions surrounding amino acids K143, R203 and Q220, and that strands W140–S149 and S198–A210 are critical for such interactions. Also, it has been reported that two recombinant CD154 fragments, including amino acid residues Y45–L261 or E108–L261 are biologically active, whereas other polypeptides, including S149–L261, are not. Therefore, we decided to construct a fusion protein inserting the W140-S149 amino acid strand (WAEKGYYTMS) in an external loop of the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and assess its ability to bind CD40 and activate B cells. The sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the chimeric OmpC–gp39 protein conserved its ability to form trimers. Binding to CD40 was established by three variants of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a direct binding assay by coating plates with a recombinant CD40–Fc protein and through two competition assays between OmpC–gp39 and recombinant CD154 or soluble CD40–Fc. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that OmpC–gp39 increased the expression levels of major histocompatibility complex II, CD23, and CD80, in Raji human B-cell lymphoma similarly to an antibody against CD40. These results further support that the CD154/CD40 interaction is similar to the TNF/TNF receptor. This is the first report of a bacterial fusion protein containing a small amino acid strand form a ligand that is able to activate its cognate receptor. PMID:14511234

  3. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  4. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  5. Selection of natural autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies produced by CD5+ B1 B cells include anti-thymocyte autoantibody (ATA). Transgenic mice bearing the Ig-μ heavy chain of a prototypic ATA, V(H)3609Vκ21c, demonstrated a critical requirement for self-antigen in the accumulation of ATA B cells and production of high levels of serum ATA. Further work with ATA-μκ transgenic mice revealed that, while development of most B cells were blocked at an immature stage in spleen, some mature ATA B cells were present. ATA-μκ transgenic mice with varying levels of Thy-1 autoantigen showed a clear relationship between BCR crosslinking and B cell fate, with low levels generating marginal zone ATA B cells and complete antigen absence allowing maturation to follicular ATA B cells. Finally, different fates of developing ATA B cells encountering high levels self-antigen may be accounted for by variations in the response of newly formed B cells arising from foetal and adult development.

  6. The B-Cell Specific Transcription Factor, Oct-2, Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Latency by Inhibiting the Viral Immediate-Early Protein, BZLF1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Amanda R.; Kwek, Swee Sen; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-lytic switch is mediated by the BZLF1 immediate-early protein. EBV is normally latent in memory B cells, but cellular factors which promote viral latency specifically in B cells have not been identified. In this report, we demonstrate that the B-cell specific transcription factor, Oct-2, inhibits the function of the viral immediate-early protein, BZLF1, and prevents lytic viral reactivation. Co-transfected Oct-2 reduces the ability of BZLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in two different latently infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, Oct-2 inhibits BZLF1 activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays, and attenuates BZLF1 binding to lytic viral promoters in vivo. Oct-2 interacts directly with BZLF1, and this interaction requires the DNA-binding/dimerization domain of BZLF1 and the POU domain of Oct-2. An Oct-2 mutant (Δ262–302) deficient for interaction with BZLF1 is unable to inhibit BZLF1-mediated lytic reactivation. However, an Oct-2 mutant defective for DNA-binding (Q221A) retains the ability to inhibit BZLF1 transcriptional effects and DNA-binding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Oct-2 expression in several EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines increases the level of lytic EBV gene expression, while decreasing EBNA1 expression. Moreover, treatments which induce EBV lytic reactivation, such as anti-IgG cross-linking and chemical inducers, also decrease the level of Oct-2 protein expression at the transcriptional level. We conclude that Oct-2 potentiates establishment of EBV latency in B cells. PMID:22346751

  7. [B-cell targeted therapy for children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Morbach, H; Girschick, H J

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cytokine-targeted therapies has significantly improved the treatment options of rheumatic diseases; however, some patients are also refractory to these treatment measures. The B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases and B-cell targeted therapies are a promising option as second-line medication for treating patients with a refractory disease course. Randomized controlled trials analyzing the efficacy of B-cell directed therapies for childhood rheumatic diseases have not yet been performed. The use of the B-cell depleting antibody rituximab showed positive results in non-controlled case series of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Patients with a refractory disease course of oligoarticular or polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis might also benefit from B-cell depletion using rituximab. The B cell-targeting therapies for the treatment of childhood rheumatic diseases should be initiated and closely supervised by a pediatric rheumatologist.

  8. CD22 Regulates Adaptive and Innate Immune Responses of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Rademacher, Christoph; Paulson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    B cells sense microenvironments through the B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). While signals from BCR and TLRs synergize to distinguish self from nonself, inappropriate regulation can result in development of autoimmune disease. Here we show that CD22, an inhibitory co-receptor of BCR, also negatively regulates TLR signaling in B cells. CD22-deficient (Cd22–/–) B cells exhibit hyperactivation in response to ligands of TLRs 3, 4 and 9. Evidence suggests that this results from impaired induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3, well-known suppressors of TLR signaling. Antibody-mediated sequestration of CD22 on wild-type (WT) B cells augments proliferation by TLR ligands. Conversely, expression of CD22 in a Cd22–/– B cell line blunts responses to TLR ligands. We also show that lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription by nuclear factor-κB is inhibited by ectopic expression of CD22 in a TLR4 reporter cell line. Taken together, these results suggest that negative regulation of TLR signaling is an intrinsic property of CD22. Since TLRs and BCR activate B cells through different signaling pathways, and are differentially localized in B cells, CD22 exhibits a broader regulation of receptors that mediate adaptive and innate immune responses of B cells than previously recognized. PMID:21178327

  9. Transposable element rbg induces the differential expression of opaque-2 mutant gene in two maize o2 NILs derived from the same inbred line.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Gang; Li, Xinhai; Song, Liya; Yan, Na; Weng, Jianfeng; Hao, Zhuanfang; Zhang, Degui; Li, Mingshun; Zhang, Shihuang

    2014-01-01

    The recessive opaque-2 mutant gene (o2) reduces α-zeins accumulation in maize endosperm, changes the amino acid composition of maize kernels, induces an opaque endosperm, and increases the lysine content of kernels. The quality protein maize (QPM) inbred line CA339 (o2o2) and an elite normal inbred line liao2345 (O2O2) were used to construct o2 near-isogenic lines (NILs) by marker-assisted selection (MAS) using the co-dominant SSR marker phi057. Two specific o2 NILs were constructed, named liao2345/o2-1 and liao2345/o2-2. However, the kernel phenotypes of the two o2 NILs were different from each other. liao2345/o2-1 had the wild-type vitreous endosperm, which is similar to its recurrent parent liao2345, while the endosperm of liao2345/o2-2 was opaque, identical to typical o2 mutant individuals. In comparison to their recurrent parent liao2345, the lysine concentration of liao2345/o2-1 was similar and the lysine concentration in liao2345/o2-2 was doubled. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that liao2345/o2-1 had the same zeins ratio as liao2345, whereas the zeins concentration of liao2345/o2-2 was markedly lower. Sequence and transcript abundance analyses indicated that the CDS of two o2 NILs are derived from CA339, but they have different promoters. The O2 transcript of liao2345/o2-2 is largely inhibited because of an rbg transposable element inserted between the TATA box and initiator codon of liao2345/o2-2. We concluded that different crossing-over patterns during the process of o2 NIL construction resulted in the different kernel phenotypes of the two o2 NILs. We surmise that the reversion of liao2345/o2-1 to wild type was due to the recombination with the wild type liao2345 promoter during introgression and backcrossing. The o2 mutant gene of donor (CA339) is a null mutant because of low O2 expression. However, its CDS probably encodes a protein with normal function which can maintain the normal accumulation of zeins in maize endosperm.

  10. Transposable Element rbg Induces the Differential Expression of opaque-2 Mutant Gene in Two Maize o2 NILs Derived from the Same Inbred Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Li, Xinhai; Song, Liya; Yan, Na; Weng, Jianfeng; Hao, Zhuanfang; Zhang, Degui; Li, Mingshun; Zhang, Shihuang

    2014-01-01

    The recessive opaque-2 mutant gene (o2) reduces α-zeins accumulation in maize endosperm, changes the amino acid composition of maize kernels, induces an opaque endosperm, and increases the lysine content of kernels. The quality protein maize (QPM) inbred line CA339 (o2o2) and an elite normal inbred line liao2345 (O2O2) were used to construct o2 near-isogenic lines (NILs) by marker-assisted selection (MAS) using the co-dominant SSR marker phi057. Two specific o2 NILs were constructed, named liao2345/o2-1 and liao2345/o2-2. However, the kernel phenotypes of the two o2 NILs were different from each other. liao2345/o2-1 had the wild-type vitreous endosperm, which is similar to its recurrent parent liao2345, while the endosperm of liao2345/o2-2 was opaque, identical to typical o2 mutant individuals. In comparison to their recurrent parent liao2345, the lysine concentration of liao2345/o2-1 was similar and the lysine concentration in liao2345/o2-2 was doubled. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that liao2345/o2-1 had the same zeins ratio as liao2345, whereas the zeins concentration of liao2345/o2-2 was markedly lower. Sequence and transcript abundance analyses indicated that the CDS of two o2 NILs are derived from CA339, but they have different promoters. The O2 transcript of liao2345/o2-2 is largely inhibited because of an rbg transposable element inserted between the TATA box and initiator codon of liao2345/o2-2. We concluded that different crossing-over patterns during the process of o2 NIL construction resulted in the different kernel phenotypes of the two o2 NILs. We surmise that the reversion of liao2345/o2-1 to wild type was due to the recombination with the wild type liao2345 promoter during introgression and backcrossing. The o2 mutant gene of donor (CA339) is a null mutant because of low O2 expression. However, its CDS probably encodes a protein with normal function which can maintain the normal accumulation of zeins in maize endosperm. PMID:24416355

  11. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  12. The human Ig-[beta] cDNA sequence, a homologue of murine B29, is identical in B cell and plasma cell lines producing all the human Ig isotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shiori; Gregersen, P.K.; Chiorazzi, N. Cornell Univ., New York, NY )

    1993-01-15

    The B cell Ag receptor complex consists of at least two disulfide-linked, heterodimeric structures: the clonally restricted membrane Ig (mIg) molecule and the nonpolymorphic Ig-[alpha]:Ig-[beta] protein dimer. The latter molecule is encoded by two separate genes, mb-1 and B29. The DNA sequences of murine and human mb-1 and murine B29 have been determined previously. This study describes the sequence of the full-length human cDNA homologue of the murine Ig-[beta]/B29 message. The human sequence codes for a protein that displays the typical subunit features of a transmembrane member of the Ig superfamily. The transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains exhibit striking nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity between the two species. These regions show almost complete conservation of areas presumed to be involved in noncovalent interactions with other members of the receptor complex and with intracellular kinases and cytoskeletal components. The only sequence dissimilarity seen in these presumed critical areas involves the Y-E-G-L-N motif, a potential target for tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast, the extracellular portion is much more divergent. Inasmuch as similar patterns of species diversity have been reported for Ig-[alpha], the Ig-[alpha] and Ig-[beta] molecules may have coevolved to maintain species-specific extracellular interactions between one another and with mIg. Similar to the Ig-[alpha] molecule, the Ig-[beta] sequence is identical in B lineage cells expressing all five Ig isotypes. However, in contrast to the Ig-[alpha] molecule, the Ig-[beta] sequence is expressed at apparently similar levels in terminally differentiated, mIg[sup [minus

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Phase II Trial of Six Cycles of Dose-Dense R-CHOP-14 for First-Line Treatment of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in Young and Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    González-Barca, Eva; Canales, Miguel A; Salar, Antonio; Ferrer, Secundino; Domingo-Domenech, Eva; Vidal, María-Jesús; Grande, Carlos; Bargay, Joan; Gardella, Santiago; Oriol, Albert; Briones, Javier; García-Frade, Javier; Bello, Jose L; Sánchez-Blanco, Jose J; Peñalver, Francisco Javier; Tomás, Jose Francisco; Asensio, Antonio; López, Andrés; Caballero, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab-cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) every 14 days seems to achieve better outcomes than R-CHOP every 21 days in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Currently, the standard regimen is R-CHOP every 21 days. This is a phase II clinical trial of treatment with 6 cycles of R-CHOP-14 with pegfilgrastim support in 2 populations of previously untreated DLBCL patients aged ≥65 years (n = 73) or <65 years (n = 51) with low-risk International Prognostic Index scores (0-2). With a median follow-up of 63.7 months, the 5-year event-free survival rate was 53.8% in patients aged ≥65 years and 71.0% in patients aged <65 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.4 and 89.8%, respectively. The complete remission rate was 69.9% for older and 80.4% for younger patients. The median relative dose intensity of cytotoxic drugs was 143.2% in the elderly and 149.1% in the young patients. Febrile neutropenia was the most common grade 3-4 adverse event, being higher in elderly patients (21.3 vs. 9.3%). Eight deaths (7 in elderly patients) were considered treatment related. In conclusion, the R-CHOP-14 regimen is feasible and very active, though it is more toxic in elderly patients mainly due to an increased incidence of infections. New strategies, such as new monoclonal antibodies or new targeted therapies, are needed to improve the outcomes of DLBCL patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Oncogenic CARMA1 couples NF-κB and β-catenin signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bognar, M K; Vincendeau, M; Erdmann, T; Seeholzer, T; Grau, M; Linnemann, J R; Ruland, J; Scheel, C H; Lenz, P; Ott, G; Lenz, G; Hauck, S M; Krappmann, D

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the antiapoptotic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a hallmark of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Recurrent oncogenic mutations are found in the scaffold protein CARMA1 (CARD11) that connects B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling to the canonical NF-κB pathway. We asked how far additional downstream processes are activated and contribute to the oncogenic potential of DLBCL-derived CARMA1 mutants. To this end, we expressed oncogenic CARMA1 in the NF-κB negative DLBCL lymphoma cell line BJAB. By a proteomic approach we identified recruitment of β-catenin and its destruction complex consisting of APC, AXIN1, CK1α and GSK3β to oncogenic CARMA1. Recruitment of the β-catenin destruction complex was independent of CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 complex formation or constitutive NF-κB activation and promoted the stabilization of β-catenin. The β-catenin destruction complex was also recruited to CARMA1 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which coincided with elevated β-catenin expression. In line, β-catenin was frequently detected in non-GCB DLBCL biopsies that rely on chronic BCR signaling. Increased β-catenin amounts alone were not sufficient to induce classical WNT target gene signatures, but could augment TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activation in response to WNT signaling. In conjunction with NF-κB, β-catenin enhanced expression of immunosuppressive interleukin-10 and suppressed antitumoral CCL3, indicating that β-catenin can induce a favorable tumor microenvironment. Thus, parallel activation of NF-κB and β-catenin signaling by gain-of-function mutations in CARMA1 augments WNT stimulation and is required for regulating the expression of distinct NF-κB target genes to trigger cell-intrinsic and extrinsic processes that promote DLBCL lymphomagenesis. PMID:26776161

  15. Auxin Transport and Ribosome Biogenesis Mutant/Reporter Lines to Study Plant Cell Growth and Proliferation under Altered Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, Miguel A.; Manzano, Ana I.; van Loon, Jack JWA.; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Carnero-Diaz, Eugenie; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. J.

    2013-02-01

    We tested different Arabidopsis thaliana strains to check their availability for space use in the International Space Station (ISS). We used mutants and reporter gene strains affecting factors of cell proliferation and cell growth, to check variations induced by an altered gravity vector. Seedlings were grown either in a Random Positioning Machine (RPM), under simulated microgravity (μg), or in a Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC), under hypergravity (2g). A combination of the two devices (μgRPM+LDC) was also used. Under all gravity alterations, seedling roots were longer than in control 1g conditions, while the levels of the nucleolar protein nucleolin were depleted. Alterations in the pattern of expression of PIN2, an auxin transporter, and of cyclin B1, a cell cycle regulator, were shown. All these alterations are compatible with previous space data, so the use of these strains will be useful in the next experiments in ISS, under real microgravity.

  16. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Rui, Ke; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    B cells are generally considered to be positive regulators of the immune response because of their capability to produce antibodies, including autoantibodies. The production of antibodies facilitates optimal CD4+ T-cell activation because B cells serve as antigen-presenting cells and exert other modulatory functions in immune responses. However, certain B cells can also negatively regulate the immune response by producing regulatory cytokines and directly interacting with pathogenic T cells via cell-to-cell contact. These types of B cells are defined as regulatory B (Breg) cells. The regulatory function of Breg cells has been demonstrated in mouse models of inflammation, cancer, transplantation, and particularly in autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the recent advances that lead to the understanding of the development and function of Breg cells and the implications of B cells in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23292280

  17. Altered B cell signalling in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, David J.; Metzler, Genita; Wray-Dutra, Michelle; Jackson, Shaun W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has provided new insights into how altered B cell-intrinsic signals — through the B cell receptor (BCR) and key co-receptors — function together to promote the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. These combined signals affect B cells at two distinct stages: first, in the selection of the naive repertoire; and second, during extrafollicular or germinal centre activation responses. Thus, dysregulated signalling can lead to both an altered naive BCR repertoire and the generation of autoantibody-producing B cells. Strikingly, high-affinity autoantibodies predate and predict disease in several autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. This Review summarizes how, rather than being a downstream consequence of autoreactive T cell activation, dysregulated B cell signalling can function as a primary driver of many human autoimmune diseases. PMID:28393923

  18. Characterization of an adenosine deaminase-deficient human histiocytic lymphoma cell line (DHL-9) and selection of mutants deficient in adenosir kinase and deoxycytidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kubota, M; Kamatani, N; Daddona, P E; Carson, D A

    1983-06-01

    The association of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency with immunodeficiency disease has emphasized the importance of this purine metabolic enzyme for human lymphocyte growth and function. This report describes the natural occurrence of ADA deficiency in a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, DHL-9. The minimal ADA activity in DHL-9 extracts, 0.028 nmol/min/mg protein, was less than 50% of the activity in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from ADA-deficient patients and was resistant to the potent ADA inhibitor deoxycoformycin. A sensitive radioimmunoassay failed to detect immunoreactive ADA in DHL-9 cells. Moreover, in DHL-9 cells, deoxycoformycin did not augment either the growth-inhibitory effects of adenosine and deoxyadenosine or the accumulation of deoxyadenosine triphosphate from deoxyadenosine. When compared to six other human hematopoietic cell lines, DHL-9 had 5.6-fold-higher levels of adenosylhomocysteinase. Chromosome 20, which bears the structural gene for ADA and adenosylhomocysteinase, was diploid and had a normal Giemsa banding pattern. The parental DHL-9 cell line was used for the selection and cloning of secondary mutants deficient in deoxycytidine kinase and adenosine kinase.

  19. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders.

  20. Silencing the wild-type and mutant K-ras increases the resistance to 5-flurouracil in HCT-116 as a colorectal cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Hashemi, Saba; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Eghbalpour, Farnaz; Safavifar, Farnaz; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2015-02-01

    Colon cancer is the second to third common cancer worldwide. Several efforts have been made to reveal the pathways responsible for drug resistance in this type of cancer. We aimed to investigate the effect of silencing both mutant and wild-type Kristen Rous sarcoma (k-ras) on the response of human colorectal tumor 116 (HCT-116) as a colon cancer cell line to the cytotoxic effect of 5-flurouracil (5-FU). One oligonucelotide against mutant k-ras (12th codon, namely 207) and two against wild-type k-ras (namely 535 and 689) were cloned into pSilencer neo2.1. The linearized vectors besides the negative control plasmid were stably transfected into HCT-116. The proliferation rates of these cells in different concentrations of 5-FU and the apoptosis rates of the cells after treatment with lethal doses of 5-FU were studied. Moreover, the cell cycle in these cells was also analyzed by staining the cells with propidium iodide. Stably transfected cells were named HCT207ks, HCT535ks, HCT689ks, and HCT-Sc (transfected with the negative control plasmid). Decreased expression of k-ras in HCT207ks, HCT535ks, and to a lesser extent in HCT689ks was proved by quantitative real-time PCR. Although in HCT207ks the cells were mostly in G0/G1 and G2/M phases, in HCT535ks and HCT689ks, the cells in the S phase were higher in comparison with nontransfected HCT-116. Lethal doses of 5-FU in HCT-116 and HCT-Sc were 2.5-3 and 3-3.5 µmol/l, whereas in HCT207ks, HCT535ks, and HCT689ks, they were 35-40, 37.5-40, and 22.5-25 µmol/l. In conclusion, silencing mutant and wild-type k-ras would increase the resistance of HCT-116 cell line as a model of colorectal cancer to 5-FU. The degree of resistance was related directly to the k-ras mRNA level. Therefore, both mutant and wild-type k-ras may play a role in sensitizing colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU as a common chemotherapeutic drug.

  1. Mice Lacking Ras-GRF1 Show Contextual Fear Conditioning but not Spatial Memory Impairments: Convergent Evidence from Two Independently Generated Mouse Mutant Lines

    PubMed Central

    d’Isa, Raffaele; Clapcote, Steven J.; Voikar, Vootele; Wolfer, David P.; Giese, Karl Peter; Brambilla, Riccardo; Fasano, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53) in which a non-sense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdala functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to contextual learning. PMID

  2. B cell delivered gene therapy for tolerance induction: role of autoantigen-specific B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Hong; Li, Xin; Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Su, Yan; Skupsky, Jonathan; Thomas, James W.; Scott, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-specific tolerance induction using autologous B-cell gene therapy is a potential treatment to eliminate undesirable immune responses. For example, we have shown that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and type 1 diabetes in NOD mice can be ameliorated using antigen-Ig fusion protein transduced B cells. However, it is well established that autoreactive antigen-specific B cells are activated in many autoimmune diseases and can contribute to pathogenesis. While syngeneic B cells from immunized or autoimmune mice can serve as tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APC), this observation begs the question of whether the antigen-specific B cells per se can be transduced as tolerogenic APC. To test this, we employed two model systems employing B cell receptor (BCR) transgenic or wild type (wt) mice as B cell donors. While adoptively transferred MOG-Ig transduced wt C57Bl/6 B cells were highly tolerogenic and ameliorated EAE, MOG-Ig transduced anti-MOG B cells from BCR transgenic mice were not. This phenomenon was reproduced in the NOD diabetes model in which pro-insulin-Ig transduced polyclonal wt NOD B cells were protective, whereas similarly transduced anti-insulin BCR B cells were not. Since the frequency of antigen-specific B cells in an immunized animal is quite low, we wished to determine the threshold numbers of BCR transgenic B cells that could be present in an effective transduced population. Therefore, we “spiked” polyclonal wt C57Bl/6 B cells with different numbers of anti-MOG BCR transgenic B cells. In the EAE model, we found protection when BCR B cells were present at 1%, but they prevented tolerance induction at 10%. Antigen-specific B cells expressed normal levels of co-stimulatory molecules and were tolerogenic when transduced with an irrelevant antigen (OVA). Thus, the presence of a BCR specific for the target autoantigen may interfere with the tolerogenic process to that antigen, but BCR-specific B cells are not intrinsically

  3. LMP1 and LMP2A collaborate to promote Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced B cell lymphomas in a cord blood-humanized mouse model but are not essential.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Han; Romero-Masters, James C; Ranheim, Erik A; Huebner, Shane M; Bristol, Jillian; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-01-11

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with B cell lymphomas in humans. The ability of EBV to convert human B cells into long-lived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) in vitro requires the collaborative effects of EBNA2 (which hijacks notch signaling), LMP1 (which mimics CD40 signaling), and EBNA 3A/3C (which inhibit oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis). However, we recently showed that an LMP1-deleted EBV mutant induces B cell lymphomas in a newly developed cord blood-humanized mouse model that allows EBV-infected B cells to interact with CD4 T cells (the major source of CD40 ligand). Here we examined whether the EBV LMP2A protein, which mimics constitutively active B cell receptor signaling, is required for EBV-induced lymphomas in this model. We find that deletion of LMP2A delays the onset of EBV-induced lymphomas, but does not affect the tumor phenotype or the number of tumors. Simultaneous deletion of both LMP1 and LMP2A results in fewer tumors, and a further delay in tumor onset. Nevertheless, the double LMP1/LMP2A mutant induces lymphomas in approximately half of the infected animals. These results indicate that neither LMP1 nor LMP2A is absolutely essential for the ability of EBV to induce B cell lymphomas in the cord blood-humanized mouse model, although simultaneous loss of both LMP1/LMP2A decreases the proportion of animals developing tumors and increases the time to tumor onset. Thus, either LMP1 or LMP2A expression may be sufficient to promote early-onset EBV-induced tumors in this model.

  4. Gene targeting in the Ig kappa locus: efficient generation of lambda chain-expressing B cells, independent of gene rearrangements in Ig kappa.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Y R; Takeda, S; Rajewsky, K

    1993-01-01

    The production of lambda chain-expressing B cells was studied in mice in which either the gene encoding the constant region of the kappa chain (C kappa) or the intron enhancer in the Ig kappa locus was inactivated by insertion of a neomycin resistance gene. The two mutants have similar phenotypes: in heterozygous mutant mice the fraction of lambda chain-bearing B cells is twice that in the wildtype. Homozygous mutants produce approximately 7 times more lambda-expressing B cells (and about 2.3 times fewer total B cells) in the bone marrow than their normal counterparts, suggesting that B cell progenitors can differentiate into either kappa- or lambda-producing cells and do the latter in the mutants. Whereas gene rearrangements in the Ig kappa locus are blocked in the case of enhancer inactivation, they still occur in that of the C kappa mutant, although in this mutant RS rearrangement is lower than in the wildtype. This indicates that gene rearrangements in the Ig lambda locus can occur in the absence of a putative positive signal resulting from gene rearrangements in Ig kappa, including RS recombination. Complementing these results, we also present data indicating that in normal B cell development kappa chain rearrangement can be preceded by lambda chain rearrangement and that the frequency of kappa/lambda double producers is small and insufficient to explain the massive production of lambda chain-expressing B cells in the mutants. Images PMID:8458339

  5. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  6. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.; Lussier, A.M.; Lee, S.K.; Appel, M.C.; Woodland, R.T.

    1988-09-15

    We have previously shown that low doses of ionizing radiation selectively impair a functionally defined B cell subpopulation. Normal mice, after exposure to 200 rad of ionizing radiation, have normal or near normal splenic plaque-forming cell responses to thymus-independent type 1 Ag, but reduced responses to thymus-independent type 2 Ag. Here, we confirm and extend the original findings by using hapten-specific serum RIA to demonstrate this differential radiosensitivity is systemic. We also examined splenocytes stained with a panel of lymphocyte surface Ag by FACS analysis to determine if these functional changes are accompanied by a physical alteration of the B cell pool of irradiated mice. Single-parameter FACS analyses demonstrate a diminution in both B cell number and the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression within the surviving B cell pool after irradiation. In contrast, T cells are relatively radioresistant as the relative percentage of T cells in the irradiated splenocyte pool increases, whereas the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression remains constant. Multiparameter FACS analyses indicate that B cells with the sIgM much greater than sIgD phenotype are more radiosensitive than B cells of the sIgM much less than sIgD phenotype. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of splenic sections stained with anti-IgM or anti-IgD reveal the enhanced radiosensitivity of marginal zone B cells.

  7. Gene therapy for B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Fielding, A K; Russell, S J

    1997-01-01

    The use of genes or genetically modified cells for therapeutic benefit is likely to have a significant therapeutic role for patients with B cell lymphomas in the future. To date, most gene therapy strategies applicable to the therapy of these diseases have not reached the point of clinical study. Adoptive immunotherapy using donor leucocyte infusion to treat aggressive B cell neoplasms in immunosuppressed patients has, however, shown great promise clinically, and studies of idiotypic vaccination in patients with low grade B cell neoplasms are also under way. Results from in vitro and animal studies continue to suggest that it may become possible to use the immune system for therapeutic benefit, and many current basic research strategies in the gene therapy of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are based on immune modulation of T cells or tumour cells themselves. Other major approaches to gene therapy for B cell malignancies include the introduction of directly toxic or "suicide genes" into B cells or the chemoprotection of haemopoietic stem cells by the introduction of drug resistance genes. All of these approaches require efficient and accurate gene transfer as well as correct expression of the gene product within the target cell. Although some way from therapeutic use, specific targeting of gene delivery is an area of active investigation and will be of value in many of the gene therapy strategies applicable to B cell lymphomas.

  8. Enhanced sodium-dependent extrusion of magnesium in mutant cells established from a mouse renal tubular cell line.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaru; Konishi, Masato; Ohkido, Ichiro; Matsufuji, Senya

    2005-10-01

    To study the regulatory mechanisms of intracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)](i)) in renal tubular cells as well as in other cell types, we established a mutant strain of mouse renal cortical tubular cells that can grow in culture media with very high extracellular Mg(2+) concentrations ([Mg(2+)](o) > 100 mM: 101Mg-tolerant cells). [Mg(2+)](i) was measured with a fluorescent indicator furaptra (mag-fura 2) in wild-type and 101Mg-tolerant cells. The average level of [Mg(2+)](i) in the 101Mg-tolerant cells was kept lower than that in the wild-type cells either at 51 mM or 1 mM [Mg(2+)](o). When [Mg(2+)](o) was lowered from 51 to 1 mM, the decrease in [Mg(2+)](i) was significantly faster in the 101Mg-tolerant cells than in the wild-type cells. These differences between the 101Mg-tolerant cells and the wild-type cells were abolished in the absence of extracellular Na(+) or in the presence of imipramine, a known inhibitor of Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchange. We conclude that Na(+)-dependent Mg(2+) transport activity is enhanced in the 101Mg-tolerant cells. The enhanced Mg(2+) extrusion may prevent [Mg(2+)](i) increase to higher levels and may be responsible for the Mg(2+) tolerance.

  9. Functional characterization of a new p53 mutant generated by homozygous deletion in a neuroblastoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yohko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Ohira, Miki; Kamijo, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Akira . E-mail: akiranak@chiba-cc.jp

    2007-03-23

    p53 is a key modulator of a variety of cellular stresses. In human neuroblastomas, p53 is rarely mutated and aberrantly expressed in cytoplasm. In this study, we have identified a novel p53 mutant lacking its COOH-terminal region in neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells. p53 accumulated in response to cisplatin (CDDP) and thereby promoting apoptosis in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells bearing wild-type p53, whereas SK-N-AS cells did not undergo apoptosis. We found another p53 (p53{delta}C) lacking a part of oligomerization domain and nuclear localization signals in SK-N-AS cells. p53{delta}C was expressed largely in cytoplasm and lost the transactivation function. Furthermore, a 3'-part of the p53 locus was homozygously deleted in SK-N-AS cells. Thus, our present findings suggest that p53 plays an important role in the DNA-damage response in certain neuroblastoma cells and it seems to be important to search for p53 mutations outside DNA-binding domain.

  10. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1+ B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain −3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  11. N-glycomic profiling of a glucosidase II mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum by ''off-line'' liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hykollari, Alba; Dragosits, Martin; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have performed the first mass spectrometric analysis of N-glycans of the M31 mutant strain of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, previously shown to have a defect in glucosidase II. Together with glucosidase I, this enzyme mediates part of the initial processing of N-glycans; defects in either glucosidase are associated with human diseases and result in an accumulation of incorrectly processed oligosaccharides which are not, or only poor, substrates for a range of downstream enzymes. To examine the effect of the glucosidase II mutation in Dictyostelium, we employed off-line LC-MALDI-TOF MS in combination with chemical and enzymatic treatments and MS/MS to analyze the neutral and anionic N-glycans of the mutant as compared to the wild type. The major neutral species were, as expected, of the composition Hex10-11 HexNAc2-3 with one or two terminal glucose residues. Consistent with the block in processing of neutral N-glycans caused by the absence of glucosidase II, fucose was apparently absent from the N-glycans and bisecting N-acetylglucosamine was rare. The major anionic oligosaccharides were sulfated and/or methylphosphorylated forms of Hex8-11 HexNAc2-3 , many of which surprisingly lacked glucose residues entirely. As anionic N-glycans are considered to be mostly associated with lysosomal enzymes in Dictyostelium, we hypothesise that glycosidases present in the acidic compartments may act on the oligosaccharides attached to such slime mould proteins. Furthermore, our chosen analytical approach enabled us, via observation of diagnostic negative-mode MS/MS fragments, to determine the fine structure of the methylphosphorylated and sulfated N-glycans of the M31 glucosidase mutant in their native state.

  12. Activity of panitumumab alone or with chemotherapy in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines expressing mutant epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel J; Bush, Tammy; Ogbagabriel, Selam; Belmontes, Brian; Juan, Todd; Plewa, Cherylene; Van, Gwyneth; Johnson, Carol; Radinsky, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain mutations cause hyperresponsiveness to ligand and hypersensitivity to small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, little is known about how these mutations respond to antibodies against EGFR. We investigated the activity of panitumumab, a fully human anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, in vitro in mutant EGFR-expressing non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells and in vivo with chemotherapy in xenograft models. Mutant EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells (NCI-H1975 [L858R+T790M] and NCI-H1650 [Delta746-750]) and CHO cells were treated with panitumumab before EGF stimulation to assess the inhibition of EGFR autophosphorylation. Established tumors were treated with panitumumab (25, 100, or 500 mug/mouse twice a week) alone or with docetaxel (10 or 20 mg/kg once a week) or cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg once a week). Antitumor activity and levels of proliferation markers were analyzed. Treatment of mutant EGFR-expressing CHO and NSCLC cells with panitumumab inhibited ligand-dependent autophosphorylation. In NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1650 xenografts, treatment with panitumumab alone or with cisplatin inhibited tumor growth compared with control (P < 0.0003). With panitumumab plus docetaxel, enhanced antitumor activity was seen in both xenografts versus panitumumab alone. Panitumumab treatment alone decreased Ki-67 and phospho- mitogen-activated protein kinase (pMAPK) staining in both xenografts compared with control. Docetaxel enhanced panitumumab activity in NCI-H1650 xenografts (decreased Ki-67 and pMAPK staining by >60%) when compared with either agent alone. Panitumumab inhibits ligand-induced EGFR phosphorylation, tumor growth, and markers of proliferation alone or with docetaxel in NSCLC cell lines that express clinically observed EGFR kinase domain mutations, including the small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant T790M mutation.

  13. Regulation of Cell Surface CB2 Receptor during Human B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Roth, Michael D

    2017-09-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is the primary receptor pathway mediating the immunologic consequences of cannabinoids. We recently reported that human peripheral blood B cells express CB2 on both the extracellular membrane and at intracellular sites, where-as monocytes and T cells only express intracellular CB2. To better understand the pattern of CB2 expression by human B cells, we examined CD20(+) B cells from three tissue sources. Both surface and intracellular expression were present and uniform in cord blood B cells, where all cells exhibited a naïve mature phenotype (IgD(+)/CD38(Dim)). While naïve mature and quiescent memory B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(-)) from tonsils and peripheral blood exhibited a similar pattern, tonsillar activated B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(+)) expressed little to no surface CB2. We hypothesized that regulation of the surface CB2 receptor may occur during B cell activation. Consistent with this, a B cell lymphoma cell line known to exhibit an activated phenotype (SUDHL-4) was found to lack cell surface CB2 but express intracellular CB2. Furthermore, in vitro activation of human cord blood resulted in a down-regulation of surface CB2 on those B cells acquiring the activated phenotype but not on those retaining IgD expression. Using a CB2 expressing cell line (293 T/CB2-GFP), confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of both cell surface expression and multifocal intracellular expression, the latter of which co-localized with endoplasmic reticulum but not with mitochondria, lysosomes, or nucleus. Our findings suggest a dynamic multi-compartment expression pattern for CB2 in B cells that is specifically modulated during the course of B cell activation.

  14. Disodium cromoglycate enhances ongoing immunoglobulin production in vitro in human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, H; Yoshida, A; Ishioka, C; Mikawa, H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) upon human immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and IgG subclasses production by purified B cells was studied. DSCG enhanced IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgA production in a dose-dependent fashion, while DSCG failed to induce IgE production at any concentrations tested by purified B cells. When B cells were separated into small resting and large activated B cells, DSCG failed to induce Ig production from small resting B cells in the presence or absence of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I (SAC). In contrast, in large activated B cells DSCG significantly enhanced all types of Ig production (two-to threefold), especially IgG4 production (seven-to 11-fold), except IgE, which large B cells did not produce. The enhancement of IgG subclass production was not subclass switching, since DSCG failed to enhance IgG1 production in B cells depleted of surface IgG1+ cells (sIgG1+ cells). Similarly, DSCG did not enhance IgG2, IgG3 or IgG4 production from sIgG2-, sIgG3- or sIgG4- B cells, respectively, Interleukin-4 (IL-4) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) also enhanced Ig production except IgG4 from large activated B cells. The enhancing effect of DSCG was not mediated by IL-4 or IL-6 since anti-IL-4 or anti-IL-6 antibody failed to block the DSCG-induced enhancement. DSCG also enhanced IgG2 and IgM production from human B-cell lines GM-1500 and CBL, respectively. These results suggest that DSCG directly and preferentially stimulates activated B cells which are producing Ig and, in addition, enhances their Ig production. PMID:1904400

  15. Changes in tonsil B cell phenotypes and EBV receptor expression in children under 5 years old.

    PubMed

    Wohlford, Eric M; Baresel, Paul C; Wilmore, Joel R; Mortelliti, Anthony J; Coleman, Carrie B; Rochford, Rosemary

    2017-09-08

    Palatine tonsils are principally B cell organs that are the initial line of defense against many oral pathogens, as well as the site of infection for others. While the size of palatine tonsils changes greatly in the first five years of life, the cellular changes during this period are not well studied. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a common orally transmitted virus that infects tonsillar B cells. Naïve B cells are thought to be the target of primary infection with EBV in vivo, suggesting that they are targeted by the virus. EBV enters B cells through CD21, but studies of older children and adults have not shown differences in surface CD21 between naïve B cells and other tonsil B cell populations. In this study we used an 11-color flow cytometry panel to detail the changes in B cell subpopulations in human tonsils over the first five years of life from 33 healthy US children. We provide reference ranges for tonsil B cell subpopulations over this age range. We show that the frequency of naïve tonsil B cells decreases over the early years of life, and that naïve B cells expressed higher surface levels of CD21 relative to other tonsil B cell populations. We show that young children have a higher frequency of naïve tonsil B cells, and importantly that these cells express increased surface EBV receptor, suggesting that young children have a larger pool of cells that can be infected by the virus. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Probing pyruvate metabolism in normal and mutant fibroblast cell lines using 13C-labeled mass isotopomer analysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Roya; Khairallah, Maya; Cameron, Jessie M; Pencharz, Paul B; Des Rosiers, Christine; Robinson, Brian H

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast cell lines are frequently used to diagnose genetic mitochondrial defects in children. The effect of enzyme deficiency on overall flux rate through metabolic pathways is, however, not generally considered. We have transposed an experimental paradigm that was developed for isolated perfused organs using (13)C-labeled substrates and (13)C-isotopomer analysis to probe pyruvate mitochondrial metabolism in cultured human fibroblast cell lines with normal or genetically mutant pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) or carboxylation (PC) activity. Cells were incubated with 1mM [U-(13)C]pyruvate, and the (13)C-molar percent enrichment (MPE) of intracellular pyruvate, citrate, malate (as a surrogate of oxaloacetate) and aspartate was assessed by mass spectrometry. We estimated various flux ratios relevant to metabolic pathways involved in energy production, namely pyruvate formation, PDC, PC, and citrate recycling in the citric acid cycle (CAC). In all cell lines, exogenous pyruvate was predominately decarboxylated (PC/PDC ratios 0.01-0.3). PC-deficient cell lines displayed an expected negligible contribution of PC flux to oxaloacetate formation for citrate synthesis (PC/CS), which was associated with a greater contribution of PDC to acetyl-CoA formation (PDC/CS), and greater recycling of (13)C-labeled citrate into the CAC. In PDH-deficient cell lines, metabolic flux alterations were most apparent in cells with more than 50% reduction in enzyme activity. This led to an unexpected lower PC/CS flux ratio, while the PDC/CS flux ratio was unchanged. These data illustrate the usefulness of this approach in identifying unexpected metabolic consequences of genetic defects related to pyruvate metabolism.

  17. Structure and function in rhodopsin: high level expression of a synthetic bovine opsin gene and its mutants in stable mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reeves, P J; Thurmond, R L; Khorana, H G

    1996-10-15

    Stable mammalian cell lines harboring a synthetic bovine opsin gene have been derived from the suspension-adapted HEK293 cell line. The opsin gene is under the control of the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer in an expression vector that also contains a selectable marker (Neo) governed by a relatively weak promoter. The cell lines expressing the opsin gene at high levels are selected by growth in the presence of high concentrations of the antibiotic geneticin. Under the conditions used for cell growth in suspension, opsin is produced at saturated culture levels of more than 2 mg/liter. After reconstitution with 11-cis-retinal, rhodopsin is purified to homogeneity in a single step by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Rhodopsin thus prepared (> 90% recovery at concentrations of up to 15 microM) is indistinguishable from rhodopsin purified from bovine rod outer segments by the following criteria: (i) UV/Vis absorption spectra in the dark and after photobleaching and the rate of metarhodopsin II decay, (ii) initial rates of transducin activation, and (iii) the rate of phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Although mammalian cell opsin migrates slower than rod outer segment opsin on SDS/polyacrylamide gels, presumably due to a different N-glycosylation pattern, their mobilities after deglycosylation are identical. This method has enabled the preparation of several site-specific mutants of bovine opsin in comparable amounts.

  18. HER2 overexpression reverses the relative resistance of EGFR-mutant H1975 cell line to gefitinib.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Xu, Wen-Hong; Ruan, Shu-Qin; Pan, Chi; Wei, Qi-Chun

    2016-12-01

    Gefitinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR TKI) that has been demonstrated to be clinically useful for the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, ~50% of patients do not respond to EGFR TKI treatment through the emergence of mutations, such as T790M. Therefore, it is important to determine which patients are eligible for treatment with gefitinib. As a preferred dimerization partner for EGFR, the role of EGFR 2 (HER2) in mediating sensitivity to gefitinib is poorly understood. In the present study, full-length human HER2 cDNA was introduced to the NSCLC cell lines H1975 and H1299, which have a low endogenous expression level of HER2. In addition, it was observed in the present study that the H1975 cell line harbored the L858R and T790M mutations in the EGFR kinase domain. Western blot analysis and MTT assay were used to evaluate the TKI sensitivity of HER2 expression status, and the activation of HER3 and HER2 downstream effectors. The results indicated that the sensitivity of H1975 cells to gefitinib was restored by the overexpression of HER2, which stimulated HER2-driven signaling cascades accompanied by the activation of protein kinase B. By contrast, ectopic HER2 overexpression in H1299 cells did not significantly alter the sensitivity to gefitinib treatment. In conclusion, the current study results suggested that the relatively resistance of the H1975 cell line to gefitinib could be reversed by the overexpression of HER2. Therefore, the expression of HER2 could also be considered when evaluate the patients' potential response to gefitinib, particularly in the subgroup of lung cancer patients who harbor an EGFR mutation.

  19. Novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as dual Src-Abl inhibitors active against mutant form of Abl and the leukemia K-562 cell line.

    PubMed

    El-Moghazy, Samir M; George, Riham F; Osman, Essam Eldin A; Elbatrawy, Ahmed A; Kissova, Miroslava; Colombo, Ambra; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni

    2016-11-10

    Some novel 6-substituted pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines 4, 5, 6a-d, 7a-c, 8 and pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidines 9a-c, 10a-c, 11, 12a,b, 13a-c and 14 were synthesized and characterized by spectral and elemental analyses. They were screened for their biological activity in vitro against Abl and Src kinases. Compounds 7a and 7b revealed the highest activity against both wild and mutant Abl kinases as well as the Src kinase and the leukemia K-562 cell line. They can be considered as new hits for further structural optimization to obtain better activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined ALK and MDM2 inhibition increases antitumor activity and overcomes resistance in human ALK mutant neuroblastoma cell lines and xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui Qin; Halilovic, Ensar; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Jinsheng; Cao, Yichen; Rakiec, Daniel P; Ruddy, David A; Jeay, Sebastien; Wuerthner, Jens U; Timple, Noelito; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Li, Nanxin; Williams, Juliet A; Sellers, William R; Huang, Alan; Li, Fang

    2017-04-20

    The efficacy of ALK inhibitors in patients with ALK-mutant neuroblastoma is limited, highlighting the need to improve their effectiveness in these patients. To this end, we sought to develop a combination strategy to enhance the antitumor activity of ALK inhibitor monotherapy in human neuroblastoma cell lines and xenograft models expressing activated ALK. Herein, we report that combined inhibition of ALK and MDM2 induced a complementary set of anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic proteins. Consequently, this combination treatment synergistically inhibited proliferation of TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma cells harboring ALK amplification or mutations in vitro, and resulted in complete and durable responses in neuroblastoma xenografts derived from these cells. We further demonstrate that concurrent inhibition of MDM2 and ALK was able to overcome ceritinib resistance conferred by MYCN upregulation in vitro and in vivo. Together, combined inhibition of ALK and MDM2 may provide an effective treatment for TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma with ALK aberrations.

  1. Canonical NF-κB signaling is uniquely required for the long-term persistence of functional mature B cells

    PubMed Central

    Derudder, Emmanuel; Herzog, Sebastian; Labi, Verena; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Köchert, Karl; Janz, Martin; Villunger, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Although canonical NF-κB signaling is crucial to generate a normal mature B-cell compartment, its role in the persistence of resting mature B cells is controversial. To resolve this conflict, we ablated NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), two essential mediators of the canonical pathway, either early on in B-cell development or specifically in mature B cells. Early ablation severely inhibited the generation of all mature B-cell subsets, but follicular B-cell numbers could be largely rescued by ectopic expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), despite a persisting block at the transitional stage. Marginal zone (MZ) B and B1 cells were not rescued, indicating a possible role of canonical NF-κB signals beyond the control of cell survival in these subsets. When canonical NF-κB signaling was ablated specifically in mature B cells, the differentiation and/or persistence of MZ B cells was still abrogated, but follicular B-cell numbers were only mildly affected. However, the mutant cells exhibited increased turnover as well as functional deficiencies upon activation, suggesting that canonical NF-κB signals contribute to their long-term persistence and functional fitness. PMID:27099294

  2. Isolation and characterization of dexamethasone-resistant mutants from human lymphoid cell line CEM-C7

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.M.; Thompson, E.B.

    1981-06-01

    Fifty-four independent dexamethasone-resistant clones were isolated from the clonal, glucocorticoid-sensitive human leukemic T-cell line CEM-C7. Resistance to 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone was acquired spontaneously at a rate of 2.6 x 10/sup -5/ per cell per generation as determined by fluctuation analysis. After mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), the phenotypic expression time for dexamethasone resistance was determined to be 3 days. The mutagens ICR 191 and MNNG were effective in increasing the dexamethasone-resistant fraction of cells in mutagenized cultures; ICR 191 produced a 35.6-fold increase, and MNNG produced an 8.5-fold increase. All the spontaneous dexamethasone-resistant clones contained glucocorticoid receptors, usually less than half of the amount found in the parental clone. They are therefore strikingly different from dexamethasone-resistant clones derived from the mouse cell lines S49 and W7. Dexamethasone-resistant clones isolated after mutagenesis of CEM-C7 contained, on the average, lower concentrations of receptor than did those isolated spontaneously, and one clone contained no detectable receptor. These results are consistent with a mutational origin for dexamethasone resistance in these human cells at a haploid or functionally hemizygous locus. They also suggest that this is a useful system for mutation assay.

  3. The early history of B cells.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Max D

    2015-03-01

    The separate development of functionally intertwined lineages of lymphocytes known as B cells and T cells is now recognized as a fundamental organizing principle of the adaptive immune system in all vertebrates. Immunologists strive to define the different sublineages of the clonally diverse B cells and T cells, how they interact with each other and how they interact with innate lymphoid cells and other elements of the innate immune system to counter infections, cancer and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. On the 50th anniversary of the recognition of B cells as a discrete cell lineage, this Timeline article recounts some of the milestones marking the development of the concept that B cells are a functionally and developmentally distinct arm of the adaptive immune system.

  4. Capabilities of HPLC with APEX-Q nebulisation ICP-MS and ESI MS/MS to compare selenium uptake and speciation of non-malignant with different B cell lymphoma lines.

    PubMed

    Goenaga-Infante, Heidi; Kassam, Shireen; Stokes, Emma; Hopley, Christopher; Joel, Simon P

    2011-02-01

    The formation of intracellular dimethylselenide (DMSe) as a product of exposure of non-malignant (PBMCs) and lymphoma (RL and DHL-4) cell lines to methylseleninic acid (MSA) at clinical levels is suggested here for the first time. This was achieved by analysis of cell lysates by HPLC coupled to ICP-MS via APEX-Q nebulisation, enabling limits of detection for target methyl-Se species which are up to 12-fold lower than those obtained with conventional nebulisation. Methyl-Se-glutathione (CH₃Se-SG), although detected in lysates of cells exposed to MSA, was found to be a reaction product of MSA with glutathione. This was confirmed by HPLC-ESI MS (MS) analysis of lysates of control cells (unexposed to Se) spiked with MSA. The MS/MS data obtained by collision-induced dissociation fragmentation of the ion m/z 402 (for [M+H](+) ⁸⁰Se) were consistent with the presence of CH₃Se-SG. Formation of DMSe was not detected by HPLC-ICP-MS in these spiked lysates, and it was found to require live cells in cell media containing MSA. Interestingly, the ratio of DMSe to CH₃Se-SG was significantly higher in lymphoma cells exposed to MSA in comparison to non-malignant cells. Moreover, maximum Se uptake levels in lymphoma cell lines seemed to be reached much earlier (after 10 min of MSA exposure) than in non-malignant cells. Finally, the GC-TOF-MS speciation data obtained for cell headspace suggested that the major Se species (dimethyldiselenide) appeared to be present in lymphoma cell headspace at significantly higher concentrations than in non-malignant cell headspace after only 10 min of exposure to MSA. Evidence for the presence of dimethylselenidesulfide in lymphoma cell headspace is also provided for the first time.

  5. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  6. Subepithelial B cells in the human palatine tonsil. I. Morphologic, cytochemical and phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Dono, M; Burgio, V L; Tacchetti, C; Favre, A; Augliera, A; Zupo, S; Taborelli, G; Chiorazzi, N; Grossi, C E; Ferrarini, M

    1996-09-01

    This study describes the purification of a subset of tonsillar B cells which share phenotypic, morphologic and cytochemical features with subepithelial (SE) B cells. These cells, which represented the 5-10% of the total tonsillar B cells, were found in the Percoll gradient fraction of highest density, together with resting follicular mantle (FM) B cells. The latter B cells, however, expressed surface CD5 and could be removed by an immune rosetting procedure. The remaining small CD5- B cells had a surface phenotype (IgM+, IgD+, CD23-, CD38+/-, CD10-, CD44+) that was different from that of FM (IgM+, IgD+, CD23+, CD39+, CD38-, CD10-, CD44+2) and of germinal center (GC) (CD23-, CD39-, CD38+, CD10+, CD44+/-, IgG+) B cells isolated from the same cell suspensions. Furthermore, the absence of surface activation markers (CD71 and CD69) and of surface IgG allowed us to distinguish small CD5- B cells from activated and memory cells migrating within Percoll fractions of lower density. In situ immunohistochemical studies revealed that B cells with an identical phenotype as that of small CD5- B cells could be detected predominantly in the SE region (lamina propria) of the tonsil, and also within the epithelium lining the cryptae. This area was also comprised of a relatively minor proportion of activated B cells, not found in the small CD5- B cell fraction owing to the separation procedure used. Consistent with the notion that the SE area could be a site of B cell activation was also the presence of activated macrophages and of plasma cells. Thirty to forty percent of small CD5- B cells isolated in suspension were positive for the endogeneous alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In contrast, only a few FM B cells were ALP+, while GC cells were consistently ALP-. In situ studies also demonstrated a prevalent expression of ALP activity by the B cells in the SE area. At the ultrastructural level, small CD5- B cells were clearly different from both FM and GC B cells. They displayed a

  7. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  8. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  9. Ligand Stimulation of ErbB4 and A Constitutively-Active ErbB4 Mutant Result in Different Biological Responses In Human Pancreatic Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:21110957

  10. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma classification system that associates normal B-cell subset phenotypes with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie S; Kjeldsen, Malene K; Schmitz, Alexander; Bilgrau, Anders E; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Li, Ling; Bergkvist, Kim S; Laursen, Maria B; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Marques, Sara C; Rasmussen, Sophie B; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Møller, Michael B; Samworth, Richard J; Shah, Rajen D; Johansen, Preben; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Young, Ken H; Johnsen, Hans E

    2015-04-20

    Current diagnostic tests for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma use the updated WHO criteria based on biologic, morphologic, and clinical heterogeneity. We propose a refined classification system based on subset-specific B-cell-associated gene signatures (BAGS) in the normal B-cell hierarchy, hypothesizing that it can provide new biologic insight and diagnostic and prognostic value. We combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression profiling, and statistical modeling to generate BAGS for naive, centrocyte, centroblast, memory, and plasmablast B cells from normal human tonsils. The impact of BAGS-assigned subtyping was analyzed using five clinical cohorts (treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP], n = 270; treated with rituximab plus CHOP [R-CHOP], n = 869) gathered across geographic regions, time eras, and sampling methods. The analysis estimated subtype frequencies and drug-specific resistance and included a prognostic meta-analysis of patients treated with first-line R-CHOP therapy. Similar BAGS subtype frequencies were assigned across 1,139 samples from five different cohorts. Among R-CHOP-treated patients, BAGS assignment was significantly associated with overall survival and progression-free survival within the germinal center B-cell-like subclass; the centrocyte subtype had a superior prognosis compared with the centroblast subtype. In agreement with the observed therapeutic outcome, centrocyte subtypes were estimated as being less resistant than the centroblast subtype to doxorubicin and vincristine. The centroblast subtype had a complex genotype, whereas the centrocyte subtype had high TP53 mutation and insertion/deletion frequencies and expressed LMO2, CD58, and stromal-1-signature and major histocompatibility complex class II-signature genes, which are known to have a positive impact on prognosis. Further development of a diagnostic platform using BAGS-assigned subtypes may allow pathogenetic studies to

  11. B cell receptor revision diminishes the autoreactive B cell response after antigen activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Diamond, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Autoreactive B cells are regulated in the BM during development through mechanisms, including editing of the B cell receptor (BCR), clonal deletion, and anergy. Peripheral B cell tolerance is also important for protection from autoimmune damage, although the mechanisms are less well defined. Here we demonstrated, using a mouse model of SLE-like serology, that during an autoimmune response, RAG was reinduced in antigen-activated early memory or preplasma B cells. Expression of RAG was specific to antigen-reactive B cells, required the function of the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R), and contributed to maintenance of humoral tolerance. We also showed that soluble antigen could diminish a non-autoreactive antibody response through induction of BCR revision. These data suggest that tolerance induction operates in B cells at a postactivation checkpoint and that BCR revision helps regulate autoreactivity generated during an ongoing immune response. PMID:18636122

  12. Identification and linkage analysis of a new rice bacterial blight resistance gene from XM14, a mutant line from IR24

    PubMed Central

    Busungu, Constantine; Taura, Satoru; Sakagami, Jun-Ichi; Ichitani, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is a chief factor limiting rice productivity worldwide. XM14, a rice mutant line resistant to Xoo, has been obtained by treating IR24, which is susceptible to six Philippine Xoo races and six Japanese Xoo races, with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. XM14 showed resistance to six Japanese Xoo races. The F2 population from XM14 × IR24 clearly showed 1 resistant : 3 susceptible segregation, suggesting control of resistance by a recessive gene. The approximate chromosomal location of the resistance gene was determined using 10 plants with shortest lesion length in the F2 population from XM14 × Koshihikari, which is susceptible to Japanese Xoo races. DNA marker-assisted analysis revealed that the gene was located on chromosome 3. IAS16 line carries IR24 genetic background with a Japonica cultivar Asominori segment of chromosome 3, on which the resistance gene locus was thought to be located. The F2 population from IAS16 × XM14 showed a discrete distribution. Linkage analysis indicated that the gene is located around the centromeric region. The resistance gene in XM14 was a new gene, named XA42. This gene is expected to be useful for resistance breeding programs and for genetic analysis of Xoo resistance. PMID:27795689

  13. Identification and linkage analysis of a new rice bacterial blight resistance gene from XM14, a mutant line from IR24.

    PubMed

    Busungu, Constantine; Taura, Satoru; Sakagami, Jun-Ichi; Ichitani, Katsuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is a chief factor limiting rice productivity worldwide. XM14, a rice mutant line resistant to Xoo, has been obtained by treating IR24, which is susceptible to six Philippine Xoo races and six Japanese Xoo races, with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. XM14 showed resistance to six Japanese Xoo races. The F2 population from XM14 × IR24 clearly showed 1 resistant : 3 susceptible segregation, suggesting control of resistance by a recessive gene. The approximate chromosomal location of the resistance gene was determined using 10 plants with shortest lesion length in the F2 population from XM14 × Koshihikari, which is susceptible to Japanese Xoo races. DNA marker-assisted analysis revealed that the gene was located on chromosome 3. IAS16 line carries IR24 genetic background with a Japonica cultivar Asominori segment of chromosome 3, on which the resistance gene locus was thought to be located. The F2 population from IAS16 × XM14 showed a discrete distribution. Linkage analysis indicated that the gene is located around the centromeric region. The resistance gene in XM14 was a new gene, named XA42. This gene is expected to be useful for resistance breeding programs and for genetic analysis of Xoo resistance.

  14. A mutant cell line resistant to Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH): its potential in identification of putative receptor for TDH.

    PubMed

    Tang, G; Iida, T; Inoue, H; Yutsudo, M; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1997-05-24

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), a pore-forming toxin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, is cytotoxic to Rat-1, a fibroblast cell line derived from rat embryo. Through mutagenesis of Rat-1 with nitrosoguanidine, we established a mutant cell line, MR-T1. MR-T1 was over 200 times more resistant to the cytotoxic activity of TDH than Rat-1. TDH increased membrane permeability of Rat-1 but not of MR-T1. Binding analysis showed that, while being able to bind to Rat-1. TDH failed to bind to MR-T1, indicating that MR-T1 is deficient in the putative receptor for TDH. Somatic hybrid cells between Rat-1 and MR-T1 were similarly sensitive to TDH as Rat-1. Moreover, TDH could bind to the hybrid cells as well as to Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that MR-T1 is promising for complementation cloning of a gene related to the putative receptor for TDH.

  15. Distinct Transcriptomic Features are Associated with Transitional and Mature B-Cell Populations in the Mouse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Eden; Salyakina, Daria; De Heusch, Magali; Hoek, Kristen L.; Llanes, Joan M.; Castro, Iris; Wright, Jacqueline A.; Clark, Emily S.; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Capobianco, Enrico; Takeda, Akiko; McCormack, Ryan M.; Podack, Eckhard R.; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Khan, Wasif N.

    2015-01-01

    Splenic transitional B-cells (T1 and T2) are selected to avoid self-reactivity and to safeguard against autoimmunity, then differentiate into mature follicular (FO-I and FO-II) and marginal zone (MZ) subsets. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq of the five B-cell subsets revealed T1 cell signature genes included RAG suggesting a potential for receptor revision. T1 to T2 B-cell differentiation was marked by a switch from Myb to Myc, increased expression of the PI3K adapter DAP10 and MHC class II. FO-II may be an intermediate in FO-I differentiation and may also become MZ B-cells as suggested by principle component analysis. MZ B-cells possessed the most distinct transcriptome including down-regulation of CD45 phosphatase-associated protein (CD45-AP/PTPRC-AP), as well as upregulation of IL-9R and innate molecules TLR3, TLR7, and bactericidal Perforin-2 (MPEG1). Among the endosomal TLRs, stimulation via TLR3 further enhanced Perforin-2 expression exclusively in MZ B-cells. Using gene-deleted and overexpressing transgenic mice we show that IL-9/IL-9R interaction resulted in rapid activation of STAT1, 3, and 5, primarily in MZ B-cells. Importantly, CD45-AP mutant mice had reduced transitional and increased mature MZ and FO B-cells, suggesting that it prevents premature entry of transitional B-cells to the mature B-cell pool or their survival and proliferation. Together, these findings suggest, developmental plasticity among splenic B-cell subsets, potential for receptor revision in peripheral tolerance whereas enhanced metabolism coincides with T2 to mature B-cell differentiation. Further, unique core transcriptional signatures in MZ B-cells may control their innate features. PMID:25717326

  16. Nonrandon X chromosome inactivation in B cells from carriers of X chromosome-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E.; Lavoie, A.; Briggs, C.; Brown, P.; Guerra, C.; Puck, J.M.

    1988-05-01

    X chromosome-linked sever combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by markedly reduced numbers of T cells, the absence of proliferative responses to mitogens, and hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells. To determine if the failure of the B cells to produce immunoglobulin might be due to expression of the XSCID gene defect in B-lineage cells as well as T cells, the authors analyzed patterns of X chromosome inactivation in B cells from nine obligate carriers of this disorder. A series of somatic cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X chromosome was produced from Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated B cells from each woman. To distinguish between the two X chromosome, the hybrids from each woman were analyzed using an X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism for which the woman in question was heterozygous. In all obligate carriers of XSCID, the B-cell hybrids demonstrated preferential use of a single X chromosome, the nonmutant X, as the active X. To determine if the small number of B-cell hybrids that contained the mutant X were derived from an immature subset of B cells, lymphocytes from three carriers were separated into surface IgM positive and surface IgM negative B cells prior to exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and production of B-cell hybrids. The results demonstrated normal random X chromosome inactivation in B-cell hybrids derived from the less mature surface IgM positive B cells. These results suggest that the XSCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as T cells and is required during B-cell maturation.

  17. Genetic complexity of regulatory mutants defective for HLA class II gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, C.; Saraiya, C.; Osterweil, Z.; Fu, Y. Ping; Lee, J.S. )

    1992-03-01

    MHC (called HLA in man) class II genes play an essential role in cell-mediated immunity. Absence of HLA class II Ag on B lymphocytes is the basis of some congenital immunodeficiencies (CID). The authors have studied CID by generating transient heterokaryons from cell lines of such patients, and report that the mutations fall into four complementation groups. In addition, fusions with the HLA class II deletion mutant 721.180 indicate that the genetic defects for each group in HLA class II expression map outside the HLA class II region. A small HLA-DRA promoter fragment is sufficient to drive expression of a reporter gene in normal B cell lines, but expression from the same construct is clearly reduced in mutant cell lines representative of all four complementation groups. This confirms earlier results that indicate defective transcription of HLA class II genes in the class II[sup [minus

  18. TNFRSF13B hemizygosity reveals TACI haploinsufficiency at later stages of B-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Romberg, Neil; Virdee, Manmeet; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Oe, Tyler; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Perkins, Tiffany; Cantaert, Tineke; Rachid, Rima; Rosengren, Sally; Palazzo, Regina; Geha, Raif; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterozygous C104R or A181E TNFRSF13B mutations impair the removal of autoreactive B cells, weaken B-cell activation and convey to common variable immune deficiency (CVID) patients an increased risk for autoimmunity. How mutant TACI influences wildtype TACI function is unclear; different models suggest either a dominant-negative effect or haploinsufficiency. Objective We investigated potential TACI haploinsufficiency by analyzing antibody-deficient Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) patients, who possess only one TNFRSF13B allele and antibody-deficient patients carrying one c.204insA TNFRSF13B null mutation. Methods We tested the reactivity of antibodies isolated from single B cells from SMS patients and patients with a c.204insA TNFRSF13B mutation and compared them with counterparts from CVID patients with heterozygous C104R or A181E TNFRSF13B missense mutations. We also assessed if loss of a TNFRSF13B allele induced haploinsufficiency in naïve and memory B cells recapitulate abnormal immunological features typical of CVID patients with heterozygous TNFRSF13B missense mutations. Results We found loss of a TNFRSF13B allele does not impact TACI expression, activation responses, or establishment of central B-cell tolerance in naïve B cells. Additionally, SMS patients and patients with a c.204insA TNFRSF13B mutation display normal Treg function and peripheral B-cell tolerance. The lack of a TNFRSF13B allele did result in decreased TACI expression on memory B cells, resulting in impaired activation and antibody secretion. Conclusion TNFRSF13B hemizygosity does not recapitulate autoimmune features of CVID-associated C104R and A181E TNFRSF13B mutations, which likely encode dominant-negative products, but instead reveals selective TACI haploinsufficiency at later stages of B-cell development. PMID:26100089

  19. Obesity induces pro-inflammatory B cells and impairs B cell function in old mice.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Vazquez, Thomas; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed B cells infiltrating the Visceral Adipose Tissue (VAT) of young and old mice to identify contributors to the phenotypic and functional changes observed in aged B cells. We found higher percentages of pro-inflammatory (age-associated B cells, ABC) and less Follicular (FO) B cells in VAT as compared to spleen. VAT B cells express higher pro-adipogenic and inflammatory markers, including NF-kB, as compared to splenic B cells, and also secrete IgG2c antibodies, some of which have been shown to be autoimmune in other studies. Moreover, we found that in the presence of an adipocyte-conditioned medium FO B cells differentiated into ABC. Additional results showed production of pro-inflammatory chemokines by the adipocytes, suggesting a mechanism for B cell attraction by the VAT. These results are the first to show a direct effect of adipocytes on the generation of pro-inflammatory B cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glycosphingolipid storage leads to the enhanced degradation of the B cell receptor in Sandhoff disease mice

    PubMed Central

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Jeans, Aruna; Platt, Frances M.; Sillence, Daniel John

    2013-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid storage diseases are a group of inherited metabolic diseases in which glycosphingolipids accumulate due to their impaired lysosomal breakdown. Splenic B cells isolated from NPC1, Sandhoff, GM1-gangliosidosis and Fabry disease mouse models showed large (20- to 30-fold) increases in disease specific glycosphingoli-pids and up to a 4-fold increase in cholesterol. The magnitude of glycosphingolipid storage was in the order NPC1 > Sandhoff, ~ GM1 gangliosidosis > Fabry. Except for Fabry disease, glycosphingolipid storage led to an increase in the lysosomal compartment and altered glycosphingolipid trafficking. In order to investigate the consequences of storage on B cell function, the levels of surface expression of B cell IgM receptor and its associated components were quantitated in Sandhoff B cells, since they are all raft-associated on activation. Both the B cell receptor, CD21 and CD19 had decreased cell surface expression. In contrast, CD40 and MHC II, surface receptors that do not associate with lipid rafts, were unchanged. Using a pulse chase biotinylation procedure, surface B cell receptors on a Sandhoff lymphoblast cell line were found to have a significantly decreased half-life. Increased co-localization of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin and lysosomes was also observed in Sandhoff B cells. Glycosphingolipid storage leads to the enhanced formation of lysosomal lipid rafts, altered endocytic trafficking and increased degradation of the B cell receptor. PMID:20458542

  1. Glycosphingolipid storage leads to the enhanced degradation of the B cell receptor in Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Jeans, Aruna; Platt, Frances M; Sillence, Daniel John

    2010-06-01

    Glycosphingolipid storage diseases are a group of inherited metabolic diseases in which glycosphingolipids accumulate due to their impaired lysosomal breakdown. Splenic B cells isolated from NPC1, Sandhoff, GM1-gangliosidosis and Fabry disease mouse models showed large (20- to 30-fold) increases in disease specific glycosphingolipids and up to a 4-fold increase in cholesterol. The magnitude of glycosphingolipid storage was in the order NPC1 > Sandhoff approximately GM1 gangliosidosis > Fabry. Except for Fabry disease, glycosphingolipid storage led to an increase in the lysosomal compartment and altered glycosphingolipid trafficking. In order to investigate the consequences of storage on B cell function, the levels of surface expression of B cell IgM receptor and its associated components were quantitated in Sandhoff B cells, since they are all raft-associated on activation. Both the B cell receptor, CD21 and CD19 had decreased cell surface expression. In contrast, CD40 and MHC II, surface receptors that do not associate with lipid rafts, were unchanged. Using a pulse chase biotinylation procedure, surface B cell receptors on a Sandhoff lymphoblast cell line were found to have a significantly decreased half-life. Increased co-localization of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin and lysosomes was also observed in Sandhoff B cells. Glycosphingolipid storage leads to the enhanced formation of lysosomal lipid rafts, altered endocytic trafficking and increased degradation of the B cell receptor.

  2. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  3. SIGLEC-G deficiency increases susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Giorgia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Rodriguez, Tania Veliz; Apollonio, Benedetta; Dagklis, Antonis; Rocchi, Martina; Innocenzi, Anna; Casola, Stefano; Winkler, Thomas H.; Nitschke, Lars; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ghia, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin SIGLEC-G is a negative regulator of B-cell receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Its deficiency leads to reduced turnover and increased proliferation and survival of murine B-1a cells. Siglecg−/− mice show a premature expansion of polyclonal CD5+ B cells in the spleen and the peritoneal cavity. Here we studied the fate of B lymphocytes in Siglecg−/− mice over time. We demonstrate that in aging animals SIGLEC-G deficiency promotes progressive accumulation of monoclonal B lymphocytes and increases the susceptibility to develop B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Lymphoid tumors arising in aged Siglecg−/− mice are monoclonal and histologically heterogeneous as they include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and medium-to-large B-cell monomorphic lymphoma but surprisingly not chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The tumors express high levels of BCL-2 and are transplantable. In keeping with these findings we have also observed a remarkable down-regulation of the human ortholog SIGLEC10 in human B-cell lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Taken together, these observations indicate that the down-regulation of negative B-cell receptor regulators such as SIGLEC-G/SIGLEC10 may represent another mechanism relevant to the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24859880

  4. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19+CD20+GM-CSF+ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19+CD20+GM-CSF- B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM+IgD+, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils. PMID:26066485

  5. Cooperation of B cell lineages in induction of HIV-1-broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Bonsignori, Mattia; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Cai, Fangping; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Song, Hongshuo; Zhou, Tongqing; Lynch, Rebecca M; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Ferrari, Guido; Berrong, Mark; Kelsoe, Garnett; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Montefiori, David C; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Hraber, Peter; Kwong, Peter D; Korber, Bette T; Mascola, John R; Kepler, Thomas B; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-07-31

    Development of strategies for induction of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) by vaccines is a priority. Determining the steps of bnAb induction in HIV-1-infected individuals who make bnAbs is a key strategy for immunogen design. Here, we study the B cell response in a bnAb-producing individual and report cooperation between two B cell lineages to drive bnAb development. We isolated a virus-neutralizing antibody lineage that targeted an envelope region (loop D) and selected virus escape mutants that resulted in both enhanced bnAb lineage envelope binding and escape mutant neutralization-traits associated with increased B cell antigen drive. Thus, in this individual, two B cell lineages cooperated to induce the development of bnAbs. Design of vaccine immunogens that simultaneously drive both helper and broadly neutralizing B cell lineages may be important for vaccine-induced recapitulation of events that transpire during the maturation of neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  6. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  7. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  8. Pro-B-cell-specific transcription and proapoptotic function of protein kinase Ceta.

    PubMed

    Morrow, T A; Muljo, S A; Zhang, J; Hardwick, J M; Schlissel, M S

    1999-08-01

    Using a subtractive cloning scheme on cDNA prepared from primary pro-B and pre-B cells, we identified several genes whose products regulate apoptosis. We further characterized one of these genes, encoding protein kinase Ceta (PKCeta). PKCeta transcripts were readily detected in pro-B cells but were absent in pre-B cells. Although both a full-length and a truncated form of PKCeta were detectable in bone marrow pro-B cells, transition to the pre-B-cell stage was associated with increased relative levels of truncated PKCeta. We found that PKCeta is proteolyzed in apoptotic lymphocytes, generating a kinase-active fragment identical to the truncated form which is capable of inducing apoptosis when expressed in a pro-B cell line. Caspase-3 can generate an identical PKCeta cleavage product in vitro, and caspase inhibitors prevent the generation of this product during apoptosis in transfected cell lines. Inducible overexpression of either the full-length or truncated form of PKCeta results in cell cycle arrest at the G(1)/S transition. These results suggest that the expression and proteolytic activation of PKCeta play an important role in the regulation of cell division and cell death during early B-cell development.

  9. Electron microscope detection of an endogenous infection of retrovirus-like particles in L20B cells.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Thorley, Bruce R; Bruggink, Leesa D; Marshall, John A

    2013-08-01

    L20B cells are a cell line commonly used for the isolation of poliovirus. The current study indicates that L20B cells are chronically infected with a retrovirus-like particle that replicates in the cytoplasm and buds through the plasma membrane. The findings indicate that care is needed in the use of L20B cells for certain virus isolation studies and emphasize the importance of electron microscope studies as an adjunct to the development of diagnostic virology protocols.

  10. The IL-15-based ALT-803 complex enhances FcγRIIIa-triggered NK cell responses and in vivo clearance of B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Maximillian; Bai, Liu; Kong, Lin; Collins, Lynne I.; Schneider, Stephanie E.; Chen, Xiaoyue; Han, Kaiping; Jeng, Emily K.; Rhode, Peter R.; Leong, Jeffrey W.; Schappe, Timothy; Jewell, Brea A.; Keppel, Catherine R.; Shah, Keval; Hess, Brian; Romee, Rizwan; Piwnica-Worms, David R.; Cashen, Amanda F.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Wong, Hing C.; Fehniger, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important immunotherapy for B cell lymphoma, and provide evidence that the immune system may be harnessed as an effective lymphoma treatment approach. ALT-803 is a super-agonist IL-15 mutant and IL-15Rα–Fc fusion complex that activates the IL-15 receptor constitutively expressed on NK cells. We hypothesized that ALT-803 would enhance anti-CD20 mAb-directed NK cell responses and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We tested this hypothesis by adding ALT-803 immunostimulation to anti-CD20 mAb triggering of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Cell lines and primary human lymphoma cells were utilized as targets for primary human NK cells. Two complementary in vivo mouse models were used, which included human NK cell xenografts in NOD-SCID-γc−/− mice. REULTS We demonstrate that short-term ALT-803 stimulation significantly increased degranulation, IFN-γ production, and ADCC by human NK cells against B-cell lymphoma cell lines or primary follicular lymphoma cells. ALT-803 augmented cytotoxicity and the expression of granzyme B and perforin, providing one potential mechanism for this enhanced functionality. Moreover, in two distinct in vivo B cell lymphoma models, the addition of ALT-803 to anti-CD20 mAb therapy resulted in significantly reduced tumor cell burden and increased survival. Long-term ALT-803 stimulation of human NK cells induced proliferation and NK cell subset changes with preserved ADCC. CONCLUSIONS ALT-803 represents a novel immunostimulatory drug that enhances NK cell anti-lymphoma responses in vitro and in vivo, thereby supporting the clinical investigation of ALT-803 plus anti-CD20 mAbs in patients with indolent B cell lymphoma. PMID:26423796

  11. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  12. Mls presentation by peritoneal cavity B cells.

    PubMed

    Riggs, James E; Howell, Koko F; Taylor, Justin; Mahjied, Tazee; Prokopenko, Nataliya; Alvarez, John; Coleman, Clenton

    2004-01-01

    DBA/2J spleen and peritoneal cells were compared for their ability to present the minor lymphocyte stimulatory superantigen Mls-1a. Although capable of Mls presentation in vivo, peritoneal cells were less effective than spleen cells in vitro. This difference was not due to cell concentration or culture duration. Flow cytometric comparison of spleen and peritoneal B cells revealed no significant differences in cell surface markers needed for cognate interaction with T cells. Resolution of peritoneal B cell subsets by cell sorting revealed that even though B-1 cells were capable of Mls presentation, they were less effective than B-2 cells. Mixing experiments showed that B-1 cells did not inhibit B-2 cell presentation of Mls. In contrast, total peritoneal cells inhibited T cell responses to Mls presented by spleen cells. The peritoneal cavity harbors B cells that can present Mls as well as other cells that can suppress this response.

  13. B-cells and mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Mascia, Maria Teresa; Sebastiani, Marco; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Daniela; Giunti, Marco; Pileri, Stefano A; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2007-12-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis; B-cell expansion is the biological substrate of the disease. It can be regarded as benign lymphoproliferative condition that may evolve to frank lymphoma. HCV infection is the main causative factor of MC, as well as of other overlapping disorders, through multifactorial and multistep pathogenetic process. HCV-related B-cell proliferation represents an important model of virus-driven autoimmune/neoplastic disorder. The term HCV syndrome is referred to a wide spectrum of both hepatic and extrahepatic disorders. The present review analyzes the complex virological, clinico-pathological, and therapeutic implications of B-cell proliferation, with or without HCV infection, in MC patients.

  14. Effects of aging on B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Ability to make an optimal immune response to vaccines and infectious agents declines with age in humans and animal models. Recent advances have shown intrinsic B cell defects in aged mice and humans, including decreases in Ig class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and E47 transcription factor. Effects on somatic hypermutation (SHM) have been varied depending on the system studied. Increase of AID in mice has shown improved CSR but not SHM. The reported microarray analysis of human B cell subsets may now be used to delineate B cell defects with aging and all the advances presented should lead to selecting agents for improved immune response in the elderly. PMID:19608393

  15. B cell suppression in primary glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Hofstra, Julia M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-03-01

    Membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and minimal change disease (MCD) are the most common causes of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. For many years prednisone, alkylating agents, and calcineurin inhibitors have been the standard of therapy for these patients. More effective or better tolerated treatment modalities are needed. B cell targeted therapy was recently introduced in clinical practice. In this review, we briefly summarize the current standard therapy and discuss the efficacy of B cell targeted therapy in primary glomerular diseases. Observational, short-term studies suggest that rituximab is effective and comparable to standard therapy in maintaining remissions in patients with frequently relapsing or steroid-dependent MCD or FSGS. In contrast, response is limited in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Rituximab also induces remissions in patients with membranous nephropathy. Controlled clinical trials on kidney endpoints are urgently needed to position B cell targeted therapy in clinical practice.

  16. Innate control of B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Mature B cells generate protective immunity by undergoing immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching and somatic hypermutation, two Ig gene-diversifying processes that usually require cognate interactions with T cells that express CD40 ligand. This T cell-dependent pathway provides immunological memory but is relatively slow to occur. Thus it must be integrated with a faster, T cell-independent pathway for B cell activation through CD40 ligand-like molecules that are released by innate immune cells in response to microbial products. Here we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between the innate immune system and B cells, particularly at the mucosal interface. We also review the role of innate signals in the regulation of Ig diversification and production PMID:21419699

  17. B cell phenotypes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis relapsing after Rituximab: Expression of B cell activating factor-binding receptors on B cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Elena; De La Torre, Inmaculada; Leandro, Maria J; Cambridge, Geraldine

    2017-08-11

    Serum levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) rise following Rituximab (RTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Initiation of naïve B cell return to the periphery and autoreactive B cell expansion leading to relapse after RTX may therefore be linked to interactions between BAFF and BAFF-binding receptors (BBR). Relationships between serum BAFF and BBR expression (BAFFR, TACI and BCMA) were determined on B cell subsets, defined using IgD/CD38. 20 pre-RTX and 18 RA patients relapsing after B cell depletion were included. Results were analysed with respect to timing of relapse up to 7 months after peripheral B cell return (≥5 B cells/μL) and to serum BAFF levels. After B cell return, B cell populations from relapsing patients had significantly lower BAFFR+ expression compared to HC and pre-RTX patients. %BAFFR+ B cells increased with time after B cell return and was inversely correlated with serum BAFF levels. BAFFR expression remained reduced. %TACI+ memory B cells were lower in RA patients after RTX compared with HC. BCMA expression (% and expression) did not differ between patients and HC. Relapse following B cell return appeared largely independent of the %BAFFR or %BCMA positive B cells or serum BAFF levels. The lower %TACI+ memory B cells may reduce inhibitory signaling for B cell differentiation. In patients relapsing at longer periods after B cell return, recovery of the B cell pool was more complete, suggesting that selection or expansion of autoreactive B cells may be needed to precipitate relapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Cellular metabolic responses of PET radiotracers to (188)Re radiation in an MCF7 cell line containing dominant-negative mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Choi, Jung-A; Lee, Su-Jae; Ahn, Soon-Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Sup; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the relations between the cell uptakes of metabolic radiotracers and beta-radiation pretreatment using a dominant mutant p53 (p53mt) cell line to evaluate the effects of p53 genes on (18)F labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer uptakes. pCMV-Neo-Bam (control), which contains a neo-resistance marker, and p53 dominant-negative mutant expression constructs were stably transfected into MCF7 cell line. Cells were plated in 24-well plates at 1.0x10(5) cells for 18 h. Rhenium-188 ((188)Re) (a beta emitter) was added to the medium (3.7, 18.5, 37 MBq) and incubated for 24 h. We performed gamma-counting to determine the cellular uptakes of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), o-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 2'-[(18)F]fluoro-2'-deoxythymidine (FLT) (370 kBq, 60 min). Cell viabilities were determined by trypan blue staining and flow cytometry. p53mt cells showed 1.5-2-fold higher FDG uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FDG uptake was greater after (188)Re treatment (P<.01). FET uptake increased with (188)Re dose without a significant difference between p53 statuses. p53mt cells showed lower FLT uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FLT uptake was greater after (188)Re treatment. By cell viability testing and FACS analysis, p53mt cells showed lower viability and a larger apoptotic fraction (sub-G1) than wild-type p53 cells after (188)Re treatment. We speculate that p53 dysfunction increases glucose and decreases thymidine metabolism in cancer cells and that this may be exaggerated by (188)Re beta-radiation. Our findings suggest that FDG could reflect tumor viability and malignant potential after (188)Re beta-radiation treatment, whereas FLT could be a more useful PET radiotracer for assessing therapeutic response to beta-radiation, especially in cancer cells with an altered function of p53.

  19. JAM-A is both essential and inhibitory to development of hepatic polarity in WIF-B cells.

    PubMed

    Braiterman, Lelita T; Heffernan, Sean; Nyasae, Lydia; Johns, David; See, Alfred P; Yutzy, Rebeca; McNickle, Allison; Herman, Mira; Sharma, Arun; Naik, Ulhas P; Hubbard, Ann L

    2008-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) is involved in tight junction (TJ) formation in epithelial cells. Three JAMs (A, B, and C) are expressed in rat hepatocytes, but only rat JAM-A is present in polarized WIF-B cells, a rat-human hepatic line. We used knockdown (KD) and overexpression in WIF-B cells to determine the role of JAM-A in the development of hepatic polarity. Expression of rat JAM-A short hairpin RNA resulted in approximately 50% KD of JAM-A and substantial loss of hepatic polarity, as measured by the absence of apical cysts formed by adjacent cells and sealed by TJ belts. When inhibitory RNA-resistant human JAM-A (huWT) was expressed in KD cells, hepatic polarity was restored. In contrast, expression of JAM-A that either lacked its PDZ-binding motif (huDeltaC-term) or harbored a point mutation (T273A) did not complement, indicating that multiple sites within JAM-A's cytoplasmic tail are required for the development of hepatic polarity. Overexpression of huWT in normal WIF-B cells unexpectedly blocked WIF-B maturation to the hepatic phenotype, as did expression of three huJAM-A constructs with single point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites. In contrast, huDeltaC-term was without effect, and the T273A mutant only partially blocked maturation. Our results show that JAM-A is essential for the development of polarity in cultured hepatic cells via its possible phosphorylation and recruitment of relevant PDZ proteins and that hepatic polarity is achieved within a narrow range of JAM-A expression levels. Importantly, formation/maintenance of TJs and the apical domain in hepatic cells are linked, unlike simple epithelia.

  20. Amplification of IL-21 signalling pathway through Bruton's tyrosine kinase in human B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheau-Pey; Iwata, Shigeru; Nakayamada, Shingo; Niiro, Hiroaki; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Kondo, Masahiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Maiko; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-08-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) in cytokine-induced human B cell differentiation and class-switch recombination remains incompletely defined. This study analysed the effect of Btk on human activated B cells. Purified B cells from healthy subjects were stimulated with B cell receptor (BCR) and other stimuli with or without a Btk inhibitor and gene expression was measured. The B cell line BJAB was used to assess Btk-associated signalling cascades. Phosphorylated Btk (p-Btk) in peripheral blood B cells obtained from 10 healthy subjects and 41 patients with RA was measured by flow cytometry and compared with patient backgrounds. IL-21 signalling, in concert with BCR, CD40 and BAFF signals, led to robust expression of differentiation- and class-switch DNA recombination-related genes and IgG production in human B cells, all of which were significantly suppressed by the Btk inhibitor. Although phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was induced by co-stimulation with IL-21, BCR and CD40, STAT1 phosphorylation in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, was exclusively impaired by Btk blockade. High levels of p-Btk were noted in B cells of RA patients compared with controls and they correlated significantly with titres of RF among RF-positive patients. The findings elucidate a model in which Btk not only plays a fundamental role in the regulation of BCR signalling, but may also mediate crosstalk with cytokine signalling pathways through regulation of IL-21-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 in the nuclei of human B cells. Btk appears to have pathological relevance in RA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Molecular characterization of the early B cell response to pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2012-12-15

    The role of B cells in host defense against fungi has been difficult to establish. We quantified and determined the molecular derivation of B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 B cell populations in C57BL/6 mice after pulmonary infection with Cryptococcus neoformans. Total B-1 and B-2 cell numbers increased in lungs and peritoneal cavity as early as day 1 postinfection, but lacked signs of clonal expansion. Labeled capsular (24067) and acapsular (Cap67) C. neoformans strains were used to identify C. neoformans-binding B cell subsets by flow cytometry. Peritoneal cavity B-1a B cells exhibited the most acapsular and capsular C. neoformans binding in C. neoformans-infected mice, and C. neoformans-selected B-1 B cells secreted laminarin- and C. neoformans-binding IgM. Single-cell PCR-based sequence analysis of B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 cell IgH V region H chain (V(H)) genes revealed increased usage of V(H)11 and V(H)12, respectively, in acapsular and capsular C. neoformans-selected B-1a cells. Germline V(H) segments were used, with capsular C. neoformans-selected cells having less junctional diversity than acapsular C. neoformans-selected cells. Further studies in B-1 B cell-depleted mice showed that these mice had higher brain and lung fungal burdens and less alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of C. neoformans than did control and B-1a B cell-reconstituted mice. Taken together, these results establish a mechanistic role for B-1 B cells in the innate B cell response to pulmonary infection with C. neoformans and reveal that IgM-producing B-1a cells, which express germline V(H) genes, bind C. neoformans and contribute to early fungal clearance. Thus, B-1a B cells provide a first line of defense during pulmonary C. neoformans infection in mice.

  2. Increased levels of (class switched) memory B cells in peripheral blood of current smokers.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Hylkema, Machteld N; Geerlings, Marie; van Geffen, Wouter H; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2009-11-12

    There is increasing evidence that a specific immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. B-cell follicles are present in lung tissue and increased anti-elastin titers have been found in plasma of COPD patients. Additionally, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been implicated in its pathogenesis as they control immunological reactions. We hypothesize that the specific immune response in COPD is smoke induced, either by a direct effect of smoking or as a result of smoke-induced lung tissue destruction (i.e. formation of neo-epitopes or auto antigens). Furthermore, we propose that Tregs are involved in the suppression of this smoke-induced specific immune response.The presence of B cells, memory B cells and Tregs was assessed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood of 20 COPD patients and 29 healthy individuals and related to their current smoking status.COPD patients had lower (memory) B-cell percentages and higher Treg percentages in peripheral blood than healthy individuals, with a significant negative correlation between these cells. Interestingly, current smokers had higher percentages of (class-switched) memory B cells than ex-smokers and never smokers, irrespective of COPD.This increase in (class-switched) memory B cells in current smokers is intriguing and suggests that smoke-induced neo-antigens may be constantly induced in the lung. The negative correlation between B cells and Tregs in blood is in line with previously published observations that Tregs can suppress B cells. Future studies focusing on the presence of these (class switched) memory B cells in the lung, their antigen specificity and their interaction with Tregs are necessary to further elucidate the specific B-cell response in COPD.

  3. Targeting B cells with biologics in SLE

    PubMed Central

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field The use of biologics as immune modulators in several autoimmune diseases has provided new tools to the physician's therapeutic armamentiarium and has led to improved patients' outcomes and quality of life. By producing autoantibodies, B cells in SLE are key players in the pathogenesis of the disease and in its clinical manifestations. Therefore, biologics that target B cells in SLE aims at reducing the activity of these cells for the induction of remissions and/or amelioration of disease activity, reduction of organ involvement, and limitation of the complications and side effects caused by immunosuppressive therapies. Areas covered in this review This review describes the past and current clinical trials with B cell-targeted biologics in SLE, to provide a historical perspective and the state-of-the-art on the topic. What the reader will gain We will review how the disappointment in the field from promising agents has been instrumental in providing valuable lessons leading to an improved design of new trials that are now giving encouraging results Take home message In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the use of B cell-based biologics in clinical trials has shown both disappointment and promise PMID:20919800

  4. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. B Cells and Humoral Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Diehl, Cody J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Insights into the important contribution of inflammation and immune functions in the development and progression of atherosclerosis have greatly improved our understanding of this disease. Although the role of T cells has been extensively studied for decades, only recently has the role of B cells gained more attention. Recent studies have identified differential effects of different B-cell subsets and helped to clarify the still poorly understood mechanisms by which these act. B1 cells have been shown to prevent lesion formation, whereas B2 cells have been suggested to promote it. Natural IgM antibodies, mainly derived from B1 cells, have been shown to mediate atheroprotective effects, but the functional role of other immunoglobulin classes, particularly IgG, still remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent insights on the role of B cells and various immunoglobulin classes and how these may mediate their effects in atherosclerotic lesion formation. Moreover, we will highlight potential therapeutic approaches focusing on B-cell depletion that could be used to translate experimental evidence to human disease. PMID:24855199

  6. Engagement of CD22 on B cells with the monoclonal antibody epratuzumab stimulates the phosphorylation of upstream inhibitory signals of the B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Lumb, Simon; Fleischer, Sarah J; Wiedemann, Annika; Daridon, Capucine; Maloney, Alison; Shock, Anthony; Dörner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The binding of antigen to the B cell receptor (BCR) results in a cascade of signalling events that ultimately drive B cell activation. Uncontrolled B cell activation is regulated by negative feedback loops that involve inhibitory co-receptors such as CD22 and CD32B that exert their functions following phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). The CD22-targeted antibody epratuzumab has previously been shown to inhibit BCR-driven signalling events, but its effects on ITIM phosphorylation of CD22 and CD32B have not been properly evaluated. The present study therefore employed both immunoprecipitation and flow cytometry approaches to elucidate the effects of epratuzumab on direct phosphorylation of key tyrosine (Tyr) residues on both these proteins, using both transformed B cell lines and primary human B cells. Epratuzumab induced the phosphorylation of Tyr(822) on CD22 and enhanced its co-localisation with SHP-1. Additionally, in spite of high basal phosphorylation of other key ITIMs on CD22, in primary human B cells epratuzumab also enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr(807), a residue involved in the recruitment of Grb2. Such initiation events could explain the effects of epratuzumab on downstream signalling in B cells. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that epratuzumab stimulated the phosphorylation of Tyr(292) on the low affinity inhibitory Fc receptor CD32B which would further attenuate BCR-induced signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that engagement of CD22 with epratuzumab leads to the direct phosphorylation of key upstream inhibitory receptors of BCR signalling and may help to explain how this antibody modulates B cell function.

  7. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  8. Memory B cell subpopulations in the aged.

    PubMed

    Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Aquino, Alessandra; Bulati, Matteo; Di Lorenzo, Gabriele; Listì, Florinda; Vitello, Salvatore; Lio, Domenico; Candore, Giuseppina; Clesi, Gioacchino; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-01-01

    The literature on immunosenescence has focused mainly on T cell impairment. With the aim of gaining insight into B cell immunosenescence, the authors investigated the serum IgD levels in 24 young and 21 old people and analyzed their relationship with the number of CD19+CD27+ memory cells. Serum IgD were quantified by the use of radial immunodiffusion and the lymphocyte population CD19+CD27+ was identified by a FACScan flow cytometer. Serum IgD levels were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) in old subjects, and the percentage of CD19+CD27+ lymphocytes were significantly increased (p = 0.01) in old subjects. Finally, a significant negative correlation was found (p = 0.01) between serum concentrations of IgD and CD19+CD27+. The present results show that the levels of IgD are negatively age-related to the amount of B memory cells. This suggests that the B repertoire available to respond to new antigenic challenges is decreased in the elderly. In fact, many memory IgD- B cells fill immunologic space, and the number of naïve IgD+ B cells is dramatically decreased. Therefore, these preliminary results suggest that a decrease of naïve IgD+CD27- B cells and a concomitant increase of memory IgD-CD27+ B cells could represent hallmarks of B immunosenescence, might provide biomarkers related to the lifespan of humans, and could be useful for the evaluation of antiaging treatments.

  9. Maturation-dependent expression of AIM2 in human B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Patzi Churqui, Marianela; Schlüter, Kerstin; Lind, Liza; Eriksson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular DNA- and RNA-sensing receptors, such as the IFN-inducible protein Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2), serve as host sensors against a wide range of infections. Immune sensing and inflammasome activation by AIM2 has been implicated in innate antiviral recognition in many experimental systems using cell-lines and animal models. However, little is known about the expression and function of AIM2 in freshly isolated human cells. In this study we investigated the expression of AIM2 in different cell types derived from human cord and adult peripheral blood, in steady state and following in vitro-activation. Adult but not cord blood B-cells expressed high levels of AIM2 mRNA at steady state. In adults, AIM2 was primarily expressed in mature memory CD27+ B-cells. Both adult and cord blood derived B-cells could induce their transcription of AIM2 mRNA in response to type II IFN but not type I IFN or the AIM2 ligand poly dA:dT. Upon B-cell receptor stimulation, B-cells from adult blood expressed reduced levels of AIM2 mRNA. In addition, we show that adult B-cells were able to release IL-1β upon stimulation with synthetic DNA. We conclude that functional AIM2 is preferentially expressed in adult human CD27+ B-cells, but is absent in cord blood mononuclear cells. PMID:28809949

  10. Evaluation of EBV transformation of human memory B-cells isolated by FACS and MACS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Younesi, Vahid; Pourlak, Tala; Afkham, Amir; Shokri, Fazel; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have been performed to develop effective neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can efficiently immortalize B-cells to establish lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and so it has been used extensively for transformation of B-cells to produce and secrete immunoglobulin. The present study addressed the effect of TLR7/8 agonist (R848), feeder cells layer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) cell separation methods on the transformation efficiency of antibody-producing memory B-cells. For these studies, the antigen used for analyses of antibody formation was the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) derived from Clostridium tetani. The results here showed that employing an HFFF.PI6 feeder cell layer, R848 agonist and FACS-mediated purification of memory B-cells led to increased transformation efficiency. Altogether, the effects of the R848 and the feeder cells provided an efficient method for EBV transformation of human B-cells. Moreover, there was an advantage in using FACS sorting of B-cells over the MACS method in the context of EBV transformation and immortalization of precursors of antigen-specific B-cells.

  11. Maturation-dependent expression of AIM2 in human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Alexandra; Patzi Churqui, Marianela; Schlüter, Kerstin; Lind, Liza; Eriksson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular DNA- and RNA-sensing receptors, such as the IFN-inducible protein Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2), serve as host sensors against a wide range of infections. Immune sensing and inflammasome activation by AIM2 has been implicated in innate antiviral recognition in many experimental systems using cell-lines and animal models. However, little is known about the expression and function of AIM2 in freshly isolated human cells. In this study we investigated the expression of AIM2 in different cell types derived from human cord and adult peripheral blood, in steady state and following in vitro-activation. Adult but not cord blood B-cells expressed high levels of AIM2 mRNA at steady state. In adults, AIM2 was primarily expressed in mature memory CD27+ B-cells. Both adult and cord blood derived B-cells could induce their transcription of AIM2 mRNA in response to type II IFN but not type I IFN or the AIM2 ligand poly dA:dT. Upon B-cell receptor stimulation, B-cells from adult blood expressed reduced levels of AIM2 mRNA. In addition, we show that adult B-cells were able to release IL-1β upon stimulation with synthetic DNA. We conclude that functional AIM2 is preferentially expressed in adult human CD27+ B-cells, but is absent in cord blood mononuclear cells.

  12. Molecular evidence of Zn chelation of the procaspase activating compound B-PAC-1 in B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aloke; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Jefferson; Patel, Viralkumar; Neelapu, Sattva S.; McMurray, John S.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of apoptosis in cancer cells is pivotal for their survival and is typically ruled by mutations or dysregulation of core apoptotic cascade. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin's B-cell malignancy expressing higher anti-apoptotic proteins providing survival advantage. B-PAC-1, a procaspase activating compound, induces apoptosis by sequestering Zn bound to procaspase-3, but the amino acids holding Zn in Caspase-3 is not known. Here we show that reintroduction of WT caspase-3 or 7 in Caspase3–7 double knock-out (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) promoted B-PAC-1 to induce apoptosis (27–43%), but not in DKO MEFs or MEFs expressing respective Casp3–7 catalytic mutants (12–13%). Using caspase-6 and -9 exosite analysis, we identified and mutated predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3 (H108A, C148S and E272A) and overexpressed into DKO MEFs. Mutants carrying E272A abrogated Zn-reversal of apoptosis induced by B-PAC-1 via higher XIAP and smac expressions but not in H108A or C148S mutants. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed stronger XIAP-caspase-3 interaction suggesting a novel mechanism of impulsive apoptosis resistance by disrupting predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3. B-PAC-1 sponsored apoptosis in MCL cell lines (30–73%) via caspase-3 and PARP cleavages accompanied by loss of Mcl-1 and IAPs including XIAP while Zn substantially abrogated B-PAC-1-driven apoptosis (18–36%). In contrary, Zn is dispensable to inhibit staurosporin, bendamustine, ABT199 or MK206-induced apoptosis. Consistent to cell lines, B-PAC-1 stimulated cell death in primary B-lymphoma cells via caspase-3 cleavage with decline in both Mcl-1 and XIAP. This study underscores the first genetic evidence that B-PAC-1 driven apoptosis is mediated via Zn chelation. PMID:26658105

  13. Molecular evidence of Zn chelation of the procaspase activating compound B-PAC-1 in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Aloke; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Jefferson; Patel, Viralkumar; Neelapu, Sattva S; McMurray, John S; Gandhi, Varsha

    2016-01-19

    The resistance of apoptosis in cancer cells is pivotal for their survival and is typically ruled by mutations or dysregulation of core apoptotic cascade. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin's B-cell malignancy expressing higher anti-apoptotic proteins providing survival advantage. B-PAC-1, a procaspase activating compound, induces apoptosis by sequestering Zn bound to procaspase-3, but the amino acids holding Zn in Caspase-3 is not known. Here we show that reintroduction of WT caspase-3 or 7 in Caspase3-7 double knock-out (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) promoted B-PAC-1 to induce apoptosis (27-43%), but not in DKO MEFs or MEFs expressing respective Casp3-7 catalytic mutants (12-13%). Using caspase-6 and -9 exosite analysis, we identified and mutated predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3 (H108A, C148S and E272A) and overexpressed into DKO MEFs. Mutants carrying E272A abrogated Zn-reversal of apoptosis induced by B-PAC-1 via higher XIAP and smac expressions but not in H108A or C148S mutants. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed stronger XIAP-caspase-3 interaction suggesting a novel mechanism of impulsive apoptosis resistance by disrupting predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3. B-PAC-1 sponsored apoptosis in MCL cell lines (30-73%) via caspase-3 and PARP cleavages accompanied by loss of Mcl-1 and IAPs including XIAP while Zn substantially abrogated B-PAC-1-driven apoptosis (18-36%). In contrary, Zn is dispensable to inhibit staurosporin, bendamustine, ABT199 or MK206-induced apoptosis. Consistent to cell lines, B-PAC-1 stimulated cell death in primary B-lymphoma cells via caspase-3 cleavage with decline in both Mcl-1 and XIAP. This study underscores the first genetic evidence that B-PAC-1 driven apoptosis is mediated via Zn chelation.

  14. B cell-intrinsic CD84 and Ly108 maintain germinal center B cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eric B.; Soni, Chetna; Chan, Alice Y.; Domeier, Phillip P.; Shwetank; Abraham, Thomas; Limaye, Nisha; Khan, Tahsin N.; Elias, Melinda J.; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Wakeland, Edward K.; Rahman, Ziaur S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling lymphocyte activation molecules (SLAMs) play an integral role in immune regulation. Polymorphisms in the SLAM family receptors are implicated in human and mouse model of lupus disease. The lupus-associated, somatically mutated and class-switched pathogenic autoantibodies are generated in spontaneously developed germinal centers (Spt-GCs) in secondary lymphoid organs. The role and mechanism of B cell-intrinsic expression of polymorphic SLAM receptors that affect B cell tolerance at the GC checkpoint is not clear. Here, we generated several bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice that overexpress B6 alleles of different SLAM family genes in autoimmune-prone B6.Sle1b mice. B6.Sle1b mice overexpressing B6-derived Ly108 and CD84 exhibit a significant reduction in the Spt-GC response and autoantibody production compared to B6.Sle1b mice. These data suggest a prominent role of Sle1b-derived Ly108 and CD84 in altering the GC checkpoint. We further confirm that expression of lupus-associated CD84 and Ly108 specifically on GC B cells in B6.Sle1b mice is sufficient to break B cell tolerance leading to an increase in autoantibody production. In addition, we observe that B6.Sle1b B cells have reduced BCR signaling, and a lower frequency of B cell-T cell conjugates, which are reversed in B6.Sle1b mice overexpressing B6 alleles of CD84 and Ly108. Finally, we find a significant decrease in apoptotic GC B cells in B6.Sle1b mice compared to B6 controls. Our study establishes the central role of GC B cell-specific CD84 and Ly108 expression in maintaining B cell tolerance in GCs and in preventing autoimmunity. PMID:25801429

  15. Subtype-specific addiction of the activated B-cell subset of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to FOXP1

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Joseph D.; Park, Daechan; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Kohlhammer, Holger; Deng, Wei; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Georgiou, George; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Staudt, Louis M.; Tucker, Haley O.

    2016-01-01

    High expression of the forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) transcription factor distinguishes the aggressive activated B cell (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) subtype from the better prognosis germinal center B-cell (GCB)-DLBCL subtype and is highly correlated with poor outcomes. A genetic or functional role for FOXP1 in lymphomagenesis, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that sustained FOXP1 expression is vital for ABC-DLBCL cell-line survival. Genome-wide analyses revealed direct and indirect FOXP1 transcriptional enforcement of ABC-DLBCL hallmarks, including the classical NF-κB and MYD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88) pathways. FOXP1 promoted gene expression underlying transition of the GCB cell to the plasmablast—the transient B-cell stage targeted in ABC-DLBCL transformation—by antagonizing pathways distinctive of GCB-DLBCL, including that of the GCB “master regulator,” BCL6 (B-cell lymphoma 6). Cell-line derived FOXP1 target genes that were highly correlated with FOXP1 expression in primary DLBCL accurately segregated the corresponding clinical subtypes of a large cohort of primary DLBCL isolates and identified conserved pathways associated with ABC-DLBCL pathology. PMID:26787899

  16. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro. PMID:6787164

  17. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  18. Progenitors for Ly-1 B cells are distinct from progenitors for other B cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Data from previous multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and sorting studies define a subset of murine B cells that expresses the Ly-1 surface determinant in conjunction with IgM, IgD, Ia, and other typical B cell markers. These Ly-1 B cells are physically and functionally distinct. They express more IgM and less IgD than most other B cells; they are not normally found in lymph node or bone marrow; they are always present at low frequencies (1-5%) in normal spleens, and, as we show here, they comprise about half of the B cells (10-20% of total cells) recovered from the peritoneal cavity in normal mice. Furthermore, most of the commonly studied IgM autoantibodies in normal and autoimmune mice are produced by these Ly-1 B cells, even though they seldom produce antibodies to exogenous antigens such as trinitrophenyl-Ficoll or trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Cell transfer studies presented here demonstrate that the progenitors of Ly-1 B cells are different from the progenitors of the predominant B cell populations in spleen and lymph node. In these studies, we used FACS analysis and functional assays to characterize donor-derived (allotype-marked) B cells present in lethally irradiated recipients 1-2 mo after transfer. Surprisingly, adult bone marrow cells typically used to reconstitute B cells in irradiated recipients selectively failed to reconstitute the Ly-1 B subset. Liver, spleen, and bone marrow cells from young mice, in contrast, reconstituted all B cells (including Ly-1 B), and peritoneal "washout" cells (PerC) from adult mice uniquely reconstituted Ly-1 B. Bone marrow did not block Ly- 1 B development, since PerC and newborn liver still gave rise to Ly-1 B when jointly transferred with marrow. These findings tentatively assign Ly-1 B to a distinct developmental lineage originating from progenitors that inhabit the same locations as other B cell progenitors in young animals, but move to unique location(s) in adults. PMID

  19. Selumetinib plus dacarbazine versus placebo plus dacarbazine as first-line treatment for BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma: a phase 2 double-blind randomised study.

    PubMed

    Robert, Caroline; Dummer, Reinhard; Gutzmer, Ralf; Lorigan, Paul; Kim, Kevin B; Nyakas, Marta; Arance, Ana; Liszkay, Gabriella; Schadendorf, Dirk; Cantarini, Mireille; Spencer, Stuart; Middleton, Mark R

    2013-07-01

    Patients with metastatic melanoma, 50% of whose tumours harbour a BRAF mutation, have a poor prognosis. Selumetinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, has shown antitumour activity in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma and in preclinical models when combined with chemotherapy. This study was designed to look for a signal of improved efficacy by comparing the combination of selumetinib and dacarbazine with dacarbazine alone. This double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 study investigated selumetinib plus dacarbazine versus placebo plus dacarbazine as first-line treatment in patients older than 18 years with histologically or cytologically confirmed advanced BRAF-mutant cutaneous or unknown primary melanoma. Patients were randomly assigned by central interactive voice response system (1:1 ratio, block size four) to take either oral selumetinib (75 mg twice daily in a 21-day cycle) or placebo; all patients received intravenous dacarbazine (1000 mg/m(2) on day 1 of a 21-day cycle). Patients, investigators, and the study team were masked to the treatment assigned. The primary endpoint was overall survival analysed by intention to treat. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00936221. Between July 20, 2009, and April 8, 2010, 91 patients were randomly assigned to receive dacarbazine in combination with selumetinib (n=45) or placebo (n=46). Overall survival did not differ significantly between groups (median 13·9 months, 80% CI 10·2-15·6, in the selumetinib plus dacarbazine group and 10·5 months, 9·6-14·7, in the placebo plus dacarbazine group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·93, 80% CI 0·67-1·28, one-sided p=0·39). However, progression-free survival was significantly improved in the selumetinib plus dacarbazine group versus the placebo plus dacarbazine group (HR 0·63, 80% CI 0·47-0·84, one-sided p=0·021), with a median of 5·6 months (80% CI 4·9-5·9) versus 3·0 months (2·8-4·6), respectively. The most frequent adverse events included nausea (28 [64

  20. Antigen-affinity controls pre-germinal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn HA; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism behind pre-GC affinity-mediated B cell selection. We applied affinity mutants of HEL antigen and found that rapidly after activation B cells become highly dependent on the cytokine BAFF. Moreover, expression of BAFF receptor CD268 is regulated in a BCR-affinity dependent fashion. High affinity responses via BAFF correlated with PI3K activation, which controlled expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1, and thereby increased survival. In the presence of excess BAFF, or in absence of the Mcl-1 antagonist Noxa, more low-affinity B cells survived the first two days after antigen encounter. This resulted in increased numbers of antigen-specific B cells of low affinity upon immunization and reduced the overall affinity of cells that contributed to the germinal center reaction. Our findings elucidate a crucial molecular pathway of B cell selection in the earliest phases of activation by identifying a novel link between BCR affinity and BAFF-R signaling towards Mcl-1. PMID:27762293

  1. Recurrent mutations of the exportin 1 gene (XPO1) and their impact on selective inhibitor of nuclear export compounds sensitivity in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Fabrice; Pujals, Anais; Pelletier, Laura; Bohers, Elodie; Camus, Vincent; Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney; Sola, Brigitte; Ochmann, Marlène; Lemonnier, François; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bertrand, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gaulard, Philippe; Damotte, Diane; Delarue, Richard; Haioun, Corinne; Argueta, Christian; Landesman, Yosef; Salles, Gilles; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Figeac, Martin; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Molina, Thierry Jo; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Cornic, Marie; Fest, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Lemasle, Emilie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Moeller, Peter; Dyer, Martin J S; Sundstrom, Christer; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Leroy, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is an entity of B-cell lymphoma distinct from the other molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We investigated the prevalence, specificity, and clinical relevance of mutations of XPO1, which encodes a member of the karyopherin-β nuclear transporters, in a large cohort of PMBL. PMBL cases defined histologically or by gene expression profiling (GEP) were sequenced and the XPO1 mutational status was correlated to genetic and clinical characteristics. The XPO1 mutational status was also assessed in DLBCL, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and mediastinal gray-zone lymphoma (MGZL).The biological impact of the mutation on Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds (KPT-185/330) sensitivity was investigated in vitro. XPO1 mutations were present in 28/117 (24%) PMBL cases and in 5/19 (26%) HL cases but absent/rare in MGZL (0/20) or DLBCL (3/197). A higher prevalence (50%) of the recurrent codon 571 variant (p.E571K) was observed in GEP-defined PMBL and was associated with shorter PFS. Age, International Prognostic Index and bulky mass were similar in XPO1 mutant and wild-type cases. KPT-185 induced a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and increased cell-death in PMBL cell lines harboring wild type or XPO1 E571K mutant alleles. Experiments in transfected U2OS cells further confirmed that the XPO1 E571K mutation does not have a drastic impact on KPT-330 binding. To conclude the XPO1 E571K mutation represents a genetic hallmark of the PMBL subtype and serves as a new relevant PMBL biomarker. SINE compounds appear active for both mutated and wild-type protein. Am. J. Hematol. 91:923-930, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reduction of polyhedrin mRNA and protein expression levels in Sf9 and Hi5 cell lines, but not in Sf21 cells, infected with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus fp25k mutants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin-Hua; Hillman, Christopher C; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2013-01-01

    During cell infection, the fp25k gene of baculoviruses frequently mutates, producing the few polyhedra (FP) per cell phenotype with reduced polyhedrin (polh) expression levels compared with wild-type baculoviruses. Here we report that the fp25k gene of the model baculovirus, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), contains two hypermutable seven-adenine (A7) mononucleotide repeats (MNRs) that were mutated to A8 MNRs and a TTAA site that had host DNA insertions, producing fp25k mutants during Sf21 cell infection. The FP phenotype in Sf9 and Hi5 cells was more pronounced than in Sf21 cells. AcMNPV fp25k mutants produced similar levels of polyhedra or enhanced GFP, which were both under the control of the AcMNPV polh promoter for expression, in Sf21 cells but lower levels in Sf9 and Hi5 cells compared with AcMNPV with an intact fp25k gene. This correlated with the polh mRNA levels detected in each cell line. The majority of Sf21 cells infected with fp25 mutants showed high polh promoter-mediated GFP expression levels. Two cell lines subcloned from Sf21 cells that were infected with fp25k mutants showed different GFP expression levels. Furthermore, a small proportion of Hi5 cells infected with fp25k mutants showed higher production of polyhedra and GFP expression than the rest, and the latter was not correlated with increased m.o.i. Therefore, these data suggest that AcMNPV polh promoter-mediated gene expression activities differ in the three cell lines and are influenced by different cells within the cell line.

  3. Aberrant B cell selection and activation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kil, Laurens P; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2013-08-01

    The detrimental role of B lymphocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is evident from the high levels of pathogenic antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) found in SLE patients. Affirming this causative role, additional antibody-independent roles of B cells in SLE were appreciated. In recent years, many defects in B cell selection and activation have been identified in murine lupus models and SLE patients that explain the increased emergence and persistence of autoreactive B cells and their lowered activation threshold. Therefore, clinical trials with B cell depletion regimens in SLE patients were initiated but disappointingly the efficacy of B cell depleting agents proved to be limited. Remarkably however, a major breakthrough in SLE therapy was accomplished by blocking B cell survival factors rather then eliminating B cells. This surprising finding indicates that although SLE is a B cell-driven disease, the amplifying crosstalk between B cells and other cells of the immune system likely evokes the observed tolerance breakdown in B cells. Moreover, this implies that intelligent interception of pro-inflammatory loops rather then selectively silencing B cells will be key to the development of new SLE therapies. In this review, we will not only highlight the intrinsic B cell defects that facilitate the persistence of autoreactive B cells and their activation, but in addition we will focus on B cell extrinsic signals derived from T cells and innate immune cells that lower the activation threshold for B cells.

  4. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  5. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish.

    PubMed

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  7. A critical role for the protein kinase PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells and the development of B1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Pulvino, Mary; Sanz, Ignacio; Ryan, Daniel; Ryan, Charlotte; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Poligone, Brian; Pentland, Alice P; Ritchlin, Christopher; Zhao, Jiyong

    2016-04-01

    Protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) regulates NF-κB activation and is required for the survival of certain lymphoma cells. Mice lacking PKK die soon after birth, and previous studies suggest that the role of PKK in B cell development might be context dependent. We have generated a mouse strain harboring conditional null alleles for PKK and a Cre-recombinase transgene under the control of the endogenous CD19 promoter. In the present study, we show that knockout of PKK in B cells results in the reduction of long-lived recirculating mature B cell population in lymph nodes and bone marrow as well as a decrease in peritoneal B1 cells, while PKK deficiency has no apparent effect on early B cell development in bone marrow or the development of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. In addition, we demonstrate that PKK-deficient B cells display defective proliferation and survival responses to stimulation of B cell receptor (BCR), which may underlie the reduction of recirculating mature B cells in PKK mutant mice. Consistently, BCR-mediated NF-κB activation, known to be required for the survival of activated but not resting B cells, is attenuated in PKK-deficient B cells. Thus, our results reveal a critical role of PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells as well as the development of B1 cells in mice.

  8. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    PubMed

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies.

  9. Serum B-cell maturation antigen: a novel biomarker to predict outcomes for multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Ghermezi, Michael; Li, Mingjie; Vardanyan, Suzie; Harutyunyan, Nika Manik; Gottlieb, Jillian; Berenson, Ariana; Spektor, Tanya M; Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Petraki, Sophia; Sanchez, Eric; Udd, Kyle; Wang, Cathy S; Swift, Regina A; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James R

    2017-04-01

    B-cell maturation antigen is expressed on plasma cells. In this study, we have identified serum B-cell maturation antigen as a novel biomarker that can monitor and predict outcomes for multiple myeloma patients. Compared to healthy donors, patients with multiple myeloma showed elevated serum B-cell maturation antigen levels (P<0.0001). Serum B-cell maturation antigen levels correlated with the proportion of plasma cells in bone marrow biopsies (Spearman's rho = 0.710; P<0.001), clinical status (complete response vs partial response, P=0.0374; complete response vs progressive disease, P<0.0001), and tracked with changes in M-protein levels. Among patients with non-secretory disease, serum B-cell maturation antigen levels correlated with bone marrow plasma cell levels and findings from positron emission tomography scans. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that serum B-cell maturation antigen levels above the median levels were predictive of a shorter progression-free survival (P=0.0006) and overall survival (P=0.0108) among multiple myeloma patients (n=243). Specifically, patients with serum B-cell maturation antigen levels above the median level at the time of starting front-line (P=0.0043) or a new salvage therapy (P=0.0044) were found to have shorter progression-free survival. Importantly, serum B-cell maturation antigen levels did not show any dependence on renal function and maintained independent significance when tested against other known prognostic markers for multiple myeloma such as age, serum β2 microglobulin, hemoglobin, and bone disease. These data identify serum B-cell maturation antigen as a new biomarker to manage multiple myeloma patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Heterogeneity of CD44 expression among human B-cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Kremmidiotis, G; Ridings, J; Hicks, M; Beckman, I G; Bryson, G; Collins, R; Zola, H

    1998-03-01

    CD44 is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that participates in a number of cellular adhesion and signal transduction processes. Germinal center B cells express very low levels of CD44, whereas their precursors and differentiation products express much higher levels. In immunofluorescence studies comparing 20 antibodies classified as being against the hematopoietic isoform of CD44, one antibody, A1G3, was unreactive with germinal center B cells, whereas the other antibodies showed low intensity but definite reactivity. Western blotting and sequential immunoprecipitation studies of lysates from density-separated lymphocyte fractions showed two bands that were differentially expressed and reacted differently with A1G3 compared with the other CD44 antibodies. These results suggest that germinal center B cells and non-germinal center B cells express different forms of CD44. Of 21 malignant B-cell populations examined, 5 showed reactivity with a "standard" CD44 reagent and significantly reduced reactivity with A1G3, while one sample showed the opposite pattern and the remainder were positive for both reagents. Of 10 cell lines studied, 5 were differentially stained by A1G3 and a standard CD44 antibody. PCR amplification of reverse transcribed mRNA from sorted human tonsil B-cell subpopulations and Southern blotting showed that B cells express a number of splice isoforms of CD44. These results demonstrate that B cells express multiple forms of CD44; both splice insert isoforms and variants distinguished by A1G3; the form of CD44 expressed depends on B-cell differentiation state.

  11. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  12. B cell differentiation factor-induced B cell maturation: regulation via reduction in cAMP.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Cioffi, J; Berg, K; London, R; Cidon, M; Maayani, S; Mayer, L

    1995-04-15

    We have previously described a novel human B cell differentiation factor (BCDF), 446-BCDF, that is distinct biochemically and functionally from other cytokines. Since signal transduction pathways involved in human B cell differentiation have been incompletely studied and are poorly understood, we assessed the effects of 446-BCDF on various intracellular second messenger systems. After exposure of B cells to 446-BCDF, intracellular cAMP concentration started to decrease at 5 min and was significantly lower at 30 min and reached the lowest level at 4 hr. In most cases, cAMP concentrations returned toward baseline by 24 hr. A cAMP analog (dibutyryl cAMP), a stimulator of adenyl cyclase (forskolin), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (aminophylline and IBMX) which inhibited the 446-BCDF-induced decrease in intracellular cAMP, inhibited 446-BCDF-induced B cell differentiation, suggesting that the fall in intracellular cAMP was a critical event in this process. To understand the mechanism involved in the reduction of cAMP, B cells were treated with pertussis toxin (PTX), a Gi protein inhibitor. Pertussis toxin blocked 446-BCDF-induced B cell differentiation as well, suggesting that 446-BCDF may function by stimulation of a Gi-linked receptor resulting in the inhibition of adenylate cyclase with a consequent reduction in cAMP. Other cytokines known to promote Ig secretion (IL2 and IL6) also caused a reduction in cAMP, suggesting that this pathway may be generally important in B cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest that at least one pathway of terminal maturation in B cells may involve the reduction of intracellular cAMP.

  13. Ibrutinib inhibition of Bruton protein-tyrosine kinase (BTK) in the treatment of B cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The Bruton non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase (BTK), a deficiency of which leads to X-linked agammaglobulinemia, plays a central role in B cell antigen receptor signaling. Owing to the exclusivity of this enzyme in B cells, the acronym could represent B cell tyrosine kinase. BTK is activated by the Lyn and SYK protein kinases following activation of the B cell receptor. BTK in turn catalyzes the phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cγ2 leading to the downstream activation of the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway and the NF-κB pathways. Both pathways participate in the maturation of antibody-producing B cells. The BTK domains include a PH (pleckstrin homology) domain that interacts with membrane-associated phosphatidyl inositol trisphosphate, a TH (TEC homology) domain, which is followed by an SH3, SH2, and finally a protein kinase domain. Dysregulation of B cell receptor signaling occurs in several B cell neoplasms including mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Ibrutinib is FDA-approved as first-line or second line treatment for these diseases. The drug binds tightly in the ATP-binding pocket of BTK making salt bridges with residues within the hinge that connects the two lobes of the enzyme; then its unsaturated acrylamide group forms a covalent bond with BTK cysteine 481 to form an inactive adduct. In addition to the treatment of various B cell lymphomas, ibrutinib is under clinical trials for the treatment of numerous solid tumors owing to the role of tumor-promoting inflammation in the pathogenesis of neoplastic diseases.

  14. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sabyasachi; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C; Kumar, Pankaj; Yi, Fuming; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-09-28

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology) was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  15. Memory B Cells of Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Florian; Shlomchik, Mark

    2017-01-30

    Wecomprehensively review memory B cells (MBCs), covering the definition of MBC and their identities and subsets, how MBCs are generated, where they are localized, how they are maintained, and how they are reactivated. Whereas naive B cells adopt multiple fates upon stimulation, MBCs are more restricted in their responses. Evolving work reveals that the MBC compartment in mice and humans consists of distinct subpopulations with differing effector functions. We discuss the various approaches to define subsets and subset-specific roles. A major theme is the need to both deliver faster effector function upon reexposure and readapt to antigenically variant pathogens while avoiding burnout, which would be the result if all MBCs generated only terminal effector function. We discuss cell-intrinsic differences in gene expression and signaling that underlie differences in function between MBCs and naive B cells and among MBC subsets and how this leads to memory responses. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  16. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M; Thome, Margot

    2009-11-24

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity is relevant for tumor growth. Here we report that MALT1 is constitutively active in DLBCL lines of the ABC but not the GCB subtype. Inhibition of the MALT1 proteolytic activity led to reduced expression of growth factors and apoptosis inhibitors, and specifically affected the growth and survival of ABC DLBCL lines. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in DLBCL of the ABC subtype, and provide a rationale for the development of pharmacological inhibitors of MALT1 in DLBCL therapy.

  17. In Senescence, Age-associated B Cells (ABC) Secrete TNFα and Inhibit Survival of B Cell Precursors1

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Michelle; Alter, Sarah; Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Riley, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Aged mice exhibit ~ 5-10 fold increases in an ordinarily minor CD21/35− CD23− mature B cell subset termed age-associated B cells (ABC). ABC from old, but not young, mice induce apoptosis in pro-B cells directly through secretion of TNFα. In addition, aged ABC, via TNFα, stimulate bone marrow cells to suppress pro-B cell growth. ABC effects can be prevented by the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Notably, CD21/35+ CD23+ follicular (FO) splenic and FO-like recirculating bone marrow B cells in both young and aged mice contain a subpopulation which produces IL-10. Unlike young adult FO B cells, old FO B cells also produce TNFα; however, secretion of IL-10 within this B cell population ameliorates the TNFα-mediated effects on B cell precursors. Loss of B cell precursors in the bone marrow of old mice in vivo was significantly associated with increased ABC relative to recirculating FO-like B cells. Adoptive transfer of aged ABC into RAG-2 KO recipients resulted in significant losses of pro-B cells within the bone marrow. These results suggest that alterations in B cell composition during old age, in particular the increase in ABC within the B cell compartments contribute to a pro-inflammatory environment within the bone marrow. This provides a mechanism of inappropriate B cell “feedback” which promotes down-regulation of B lymphopoiesis in old age. PMID:23410004

  18. Distinct germinal center selection at local sites shapes memory B cell response to viral escape

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yu; Onodera, Taishi; Yamada, Yuki; Daio, Rina; Tsuiji, Makoto; Inoue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Ato, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory influenza virus infection induces cross-reactive memory B cells targeting invariant regions of viral escape mutants. However, cellular events dictating the cross-reactive memory B cell responses remain to be fully defined. Here, we demonstrated that lung-resident memory compartments at the site of infection, rather than those in secondary lymphoid organs, harbor elevated frequencies of cross-reactive B cells that mediate neutralizing antibody responses to viral escape. The elevated cross-reactivity in the lung memory compartments was correlated with high numbers of VH mutations and was dependent on a developmental pathway involving persistent germinal center (GC) responses. The persistent GC responses were focused in the infected lungs in association with prolonged persistence of the viral antigens. Moreover, the persistent lung GCs supported the exaggerated B cell proliferation and clonal selection for cross-reactive repertoires, which served as the predominant sites for the generation of cross-reactive memory progenitors. Thus, we identified the distinct GC selection at local sites as a key cellular event for cross-reactive memory B cell response to viral escape, a finding with important implications for developing broadly protective influenza vaccines. PMID:26324444

  19. Abnormal B-cell function in HTLV-I-tax transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Peebles, R S; Maliszewski, C R; Sato, T A; Hanley-Hyde, J; Maroulakou, I G; Hunziker, R; Schneck, J P; Green, J E

    1995-03-16

    Transgenic mice that carry the HTLV-I Tax gene develop an exocrinopathy with some similarities to Sjoegren's syndrome. Our experiments reveal that these mice have lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly composed primarily of B lymphocytes, as well as abnormal levels of secreted immunoglobulins. To gain insight into whether the lymphadenopathy manifested by these transgenic mice was the result of induction of cytokines by Tax, we utilized cell lines from these mice to study in vitro B-cell responses. Conditioned media (CM) derived from the cell lines caused B-cells to proliferate when a second signal, surface Ig cross-linking, was provided. The CM also caused a marked enhancement of IgM secretion by spleen cells or by purified B-cells treated with supplemental cytokines. The B-cell proliferative response and enhanced IgM secretion have not been attributed to a known cytokine. These results suggest that the CM from the cell lines contain a factor(s) involved in novel pathways of B-cell growth and differentiation that may participate in the pathologic development of autoimmune disease.

  20. Human B cells fail to secrete type I interferons upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure.

    PubMed

    Gram, Anna M; Sun, Chenglong; Landman, Sanne L; Oosenbrug, Timo; Koppejan, Hester J; Kwakkenbos, Mark J; Hoeben, Rob C; Paludan, Søren R; Ressing, Maaike E

    2017-09-29

    Most cells are believed to be capable of producing type I interferons (IFN I) as part of an innate immune response against, for instance, viral infections. In macrophages, IFN I is potently induced upon cytoplasmic exposure to foreign nucleic acids. Infection of these cells with herpesviruses leads to triggering of the DNA sensors interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS). Thereby, the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and the downstream molecules TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) are sequentially activated culminating in IFN I secretion. Human gamma-herpesviruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), exploit B cells as a reservoir for persistent infection. In this study, we investigated whether human B cells, similar to macrophages, engage the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway to induce an innate immune response. We found that the B cells fail to secrete IFN I upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure, although they express the DNA sensors cGAS and IFI16 and the signaling components TBK1 and IRF3. In primary human B lymphocytes and EBV-negative B cell lines, this deficiency is explained by a lack of detectable levels of the central adaptor protein STING. In contrast, EBV-transformed B cell lines did express STING, yet both these lines as well as STING-reconstituted EBV-negative B cells did not produce IFN I upon dsDNA or cGAMP stimulation. Our combined data show that the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway is dysfunctional in human B cells. This exemplifies that certain cell types cannot induce IFN I in response to cytoplasmic DNA exposure providing a potential niche for viral persistence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Jagan R; Schmitz, Roland; Green, Jesse A; Xiao, Wenming; Larsen, Adrien B; Braun, Sterling E; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Staudt, Louis M; Cyster, Jason G

    2014-12-11

    Germinal centre B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL) is a common malignancy, yet the signalling pathways that are deregulated and the factors leading to its systemic dissemination are poorly defined. Work in mice showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (S1PR2), a Gα12 and Gα13 coupled receptor, promotes growth regulation and local confinement of germinal centre B cells. Recent deep sequencing studies of GCB-DLBCL have revealed mutations in many genes in this cancer, including in GNA13 (encoding Gα13) and S1PR2 (refs 5,6, 7). Here we show, using in vitro and in vivo assays, that GCB-DLBCL-associated mutations occurring in S1PR2 frequently disrupt the receptor's Akt and migration inhibitory functions. Gα13-deficient mouse germinal centre B cells and human GCB-DLBCL cells were unable to suppress pAkt and migration in response to S1P, and Gα13-deficient mice developed germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Germinal centre B cells, unlike most lymphocytes, are tightly confined in lymphoid organs and do not recirculate. Remarkably, deficiency in Gα13, but not S1PR2, led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination into lymph and blood. GCB-DLBCL cell lines frequently carried mutations in the Gα13 effector ARHGEF1, and Arhgef1 deficiency also led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination. The incomplete phenocopy of Gα13- and S1PR2 deficiency led us to discover that P2RY8, an orphan receptor that is mutated in GCB-DLBCL and another germinal centre B-cell-derived malignancy, Burkitt's lymphoma, also represses germinal centre B-cell growth and promotes confinement via Gα13. These findings identify a Gα13-dependent pathway that exerts dual actions in suppressing growth and blocking dissemination of germinal centre B cells that is frequently disrupted in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

  2. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  3. Establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole via lentivirus-mediated transduction of mutant cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masafumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Horie, Kengo; Hirayama, Takashi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Kuroda, Kengo; Donai, Kenichiro; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) shows social behaviors such as monogamy and parenting of infants with pair bonding. These social behaviors are specific to the prairie vole and have not been observed in other types of voles, such as mountain voles. Although the prairie vole has several unique characteristics, an in vitro cell culture system has not been established for this species. Furthermore, establishment of cultured cells derived from the prairie vole may be beneficial based on the three Rs (i.e., Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement) concept. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to establish an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole. Our previous research has shown that transduction with mutant forms of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) could efficiently immortalize cells from multiple species, including humans, cattle, pigs, and monkeys. Here, we introduced these three genes into prairie vole-derived muscle fibroblasts. The expression of mutant CDK4 and cyclin D proteins was confirmed by western blotting, and telomerase activity was detected in immortalized vole muscle-derived fibroblasts (VMF-K4DT cells or VMFs) by stretch PCR. Population doubling analysis showed that the introduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and TERT extended the lifespan of VMFs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the establishment of an immortalized cell line derived from the prairie vole through the expression of mutant CDK4, cyclin D, and human TERT. PMID:26496927

  4. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  5. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis leads to the restoration of B-cell lymphopoiesis and splenic B-cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Cnops, J; Bockstal, V; De Trez, C; Miquel, M C; Radwanska, M; Magez, S

    2015-09-01

    African trypanosomosis is a parasitic disease affecting both humans (sleeping sickness) and animals (nagana). In murine trypanosomosis, the B-cell compartment is rapidly destroyed after infection. In addition, B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow is abrogated, B-cell subsets in the spleen are irreversibly depleted, and B-cell memory is destroyed. Here, we investigated the effect of cure of infection on the B-cell compartment. Suramin and diminazene aceturate were used in this study as these drugs exhibit different modes of uptake and different mechanisms of trypanocidal action. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis infection led to the re-initiation of B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow, and to the repopulation of splenic B-cell subsets, independent of the drug used. Neither of these drugs by itself induced measurable effects on B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow or B-cell homoeostasis in the spleen in healthy, naïve animals.

  6. Early B Cell Progenitors Deficient for GON4L Fail To Differentiate Due to a Block in Mitotic Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jennifer Y; Goodfellow, Renee X; Colgan, Diana F; Colgan, John D

    2017-04-05

    B cell development in Justy mutant mice is blocked due to a precursor mRNA splicing defect that depletes the protein GON4-like (GON4L) in B cell progenitors. Genetic and biochemical studies have suggested that GON4L is a transcriptional regulator that coordinates cell division with differentiation, but its role in B cell development is unknown. To understand the function of GON4L, we characterized B cell differentiation, cell cycle control, and mitotic gene expression in GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors from Justy mice. We found that these cells established key aspects of the transcription factor network that guides B cell development and proliferation and rearranged the IgH gene locus. However, despite intact IL-7 signaling, GON4L-deficient pro-B cell stage precursors failed to undergo a characteristic IL-7-dependent proliferative burst. These cells also failed to upregulate genes required for mitotic division, including those encoding the G1/S cyclin D3 and E2F transcription factors and their targets. Additionally, GON4L-deficient B cell progenitors displayed defects in DNA synthesis and passage through the G1/S transition, contained fragmented DNA, and underwent apoptosis. These phenotypes were not suppressed by transgenic expression of prosurvival factors. However, transgenic expression of cyclin D3 or other regulators of the G1/S transition restored pro-B cell development from Justy progenitor cells, suggesting that GON4L acts at the beginning of the cell cycle. Together, our findings indicate that GON4L is essential for cell cycle progression and division during the early stages of B cell development.

  7. Rearrangement of mouse immunoglobulin kappa deleting element recombining sequence promotes immune tolerance and lambda B cell production.

    PubMed

    Vela, José Luis; Aït-Azzouzene, Djemel; Duong, Bao Hoa; Ota, Takayuki; Nemazee, David

    2008-02-01

    The recombining sequence (RS) of mouse and its human equivalent, the immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa deleting element (IGKDE), are sequences found at the 3' end of the Ig kappa locus (Igk) that rearrange to inactivate Igk in developing B cells. RS recombination correlates with Ig lambda (Iglambda) light (L) chain expression and likely plays a role in receptor editing by eliminating Igk genes encoding autoantibodies. A mouse strain was generated in which the recombination signal of RS was removed, blocking RS-mediated Igk inactivation. In RS mutant mice, receptor editing and self-tolerance were impaired, in some cases leading to autoantibody formation. Surprisingly, mutant mice also made fewer B cells expressing lambda chain, whereas lambda versus kappa isotype exclusion was only modestly affected. These results provide insight into the mechanism of L chain isotype exclusion and indicate that RS has a physiological role in promoting the formation of lambda L chain-expressing B cells.

  8. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  9. Selective inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 blocks initiation and maintenance of B-cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Mahasenan, Kiran V.; Yan, Fengting; Karkhanis, Vrajesh; Chung, Ji-Hyun; Smith, Emily M.; Quinion, Carl; Smith, Porsha L.; Kim, Lisa; Patton, John T.; Lapalombella, Rosa; Yu, Bo; Wu, Yun; Roy, Satavisha; De Leo, Alessandra; Pileri, Stefano; Agostinelli, Claudio; Ayers, Leona; Bradner, James E.; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Elemento, Olivier; Motiwala, Tasneem; Majumder, Sarmila; Byrd, John C.; Jacob, Samson; Sif, Said; Li, Chenglong

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic events that are essential drivers of lymphocyte transformation remain incompletely characterized. We used models of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–induced B-cell transformation to document the relevance of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) to regulation of epigenetic-repressive marks during lymphomagenesis. EBV+ lymphomas and transformed cell lines exhibited abundant expression of PRMT5, a type II PRMT enzyme that promotes transcriptional silencing of target genes by methylating arginine residues on histone tails. PRMT5 expression was limited to EBV-transformed cells, not resting or activated B lymphocytes, validating it as an ideal therapeutic target. We developed a first-in-class, small-molecule PRMT5 inhibitor that blocked EBV-driven B-lymphocyte transformation and survival while leaving normal B cells unaffected. Inhibition of PRMT5 led to lost recruitment of a PRMT5/p65/HDAC3-repressive complex on the miR96 promoter, restored miR96 expression, and PRMT5 downregulation. RNA-sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments identified several tumor suppressor genes, including the protein tyrosine phosphatase gene PTPROt, which became silenced during EBV-driven B-cell transformation. Enhanced PTPROt expression following PRMT5 inhibition led to dephosphorylation of kinases that regulate B-cell receptor signaling. We conclude that PRMT5 is critical to EBV-driven B-cell transformation and maintenance of the malignant phenotype, and that PRMT5 inhibition shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for B-cell lymphomas. PMID:25742700

  10. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  11. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-12-09

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE(+) B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE(+) germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE(+) GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses.

  12. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-01-01

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE+ B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE+ germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE+ GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21238.001 PMID:27935477

  13. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Classification System That Associates Normal B-Cell Subset Phenotypes With Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie S.; Kjeldsen, Malene K.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bilgrau, Anders E.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Li, Ling; Bergkvist, Kim S.; Laursen, Maria B.; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Marques, Sara C.; Rasmussen, Sophie B.; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Møller, Michael B.; Samworth, Richard J.; Shah, Rajen D.; Johansen, Preben; El-Galaly, Tarec C.; Young, Ken H.; Johnsen, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Current diagnostic tests for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma use the updated WHO criteria based on biologic, morphologic, and clinical heterogeneity. We propose a refined classification system based on subset-specific B-cell–associated gene signatures (BAGS) in the normal B-cell hierarchy, hypothesizing that it can provide new biologic insight and diagnostic and prognostic value. Patients and Methods We combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression profiling, and statistical modeling to generate BAGS for naive, centrocyte, centroblast, memory, and plasmablast B cells from normal human tonsils. The impact of BAGS-assigned subtyping was analyzed using five clinical cohorts (treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP], n = 270; treated with rituximab plus CHOP [R-CHOP], n = 869) gathered across geographic regions, time eras, and sampling methods. The analysis estimated subtype frequencies and drug-specific resistance and included a prognostic meta-analysis of patients treated with first-line R-CHOP therapy. Results Similar BAGS subtype frequencies were assigned across 1,139 samples from five different cohorts. Among R-CHOP–treated patients, BAGS assignment was significantly associated with overall survival and progression-free survival within the germinal center B-cell–like subclass; the centrocyte subtype had a superior prognosis compared with the centroblast subtype. In agreement with the observed therapeutic outcome, centrocyte subtypes were estimated as being less resistant than the centroblast subtype to doxorubicin and vincristine. The centroblast subtype had a complex genotype, whereas the centrocyte subtype had high TP53 mutation and insertion/deletion frequencies and expressed LMO2, CD58, and stromal-1–signature and major histocompatibility complex class II–signature genes, which are known to have a positive impact on prognosis. Conclusion Further development of a diagnostic platform using

  14. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 μM HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  15. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  16. Near infrared photoimmunotherapy of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-11-01

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new, highly-selective cancer theranostics that employs an antibody-photo absorber conjugate (APC). NIR-PIT has successfully treated preclinical tumor models with APCs and is now in the first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial for head and neck cancer patients against EGFR. CD20 is highly expressed in many B-cell lymphomas and is emerging as a molecular target for this disease. Here, we describe the use of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), rituximab-IR700 APC for NIR-PIT of B-cell lymphoma in two CD20-expressing lymphoma mouse models. CD20 expressing B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Daudi and Ramos) were used in this study. Rituximab-IR700, rituximab conjugated with IRDye700DX, showed specific binding, and cell-specific killing only after exposure of NIR light to both cells in vitro. To evaluate effects of NIR-PIT in vivo, tumor-bearing mice were separated into 4 groups: (1) control; (2) APC i.v. only; (3) NIR light exposure only; (4) APC and NIR light (NIR-PIT). These were performed every week for up to 3 weeks. Rituximab-IR700 showed high tumor accumulation and high target-to-background ratio in vivo. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by NIR-PIT in comparison with the other groups (p < 0.001 for both tumors), and survival was significantly prolonged in both tumors (p < 0.001 for Daudi tumors and p < 0.0001 for Ramos tumors vs other groups). More than half of tumors were cured with this single regimen of NIR-PIT. In conclusion, anti-CD20 rituximab-IR700 works as a highly effective APC for NIR-PIT against B-cell lymphoma. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) remains a curable lymphoma, with improved outcome due in large part to incorporation of rituximab in standard regimens. The disease is heterogeneous clinically, morphologically, and molecularly. Recent insights into the molecular heterogeneity of DLBCL are beginning to yield novel therapeutics with significant promise for key subsets of patients. Although CHOP chemotherapy with rituximab remains a standard therapeutic approach for most patients with DLBCL, we anticipate that novel agents will be included in treatment regimens for many patients in the near future. PMID:18954744

  18. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who develop chronic B- ... care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ...

  19. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... t k e P Types of Cancer Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  20. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who develop chronic B- ... care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ...

  1. A brief history of T cell help to B cells

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Shane

    2015-01-01

    In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cells, I take a look back at the history of T cell help to B cells, which was discovered 47 years ago. In addition, I summarize and categorize the distinct molecules that are expressed by CD4+ T cells that constitute ‘help’ to B cells, and particularly the molecules expressed by T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which are the specialized providers of help to B cells. PMID:25677493

  2. A brief history of T cell help to B cells.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Shane

    2015-03-01

    In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cells, I take a look back at the history of T cell help to B cells, which was discovered 47 years ago. In addition, I summarize and categorize the distinct molecules that are expressed by CD4(+) T cells that constitute 'help' to B cells, and particularly the molecules expressed by T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which are the specialized providers of help to B cells.

  3. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Deborah; Guirnalda, Patrick; Haynes, Carole; Bockstal, Viki; Magez, Stefan; Black, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1 -/-) retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i) B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR -/-) and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/-) C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii) administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136) but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144) prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii) splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv) purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v) adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi) degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei infected

  4. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Deborah; Zhang, Fengqiu; Guirnalda, Patrick; Haynes, Carole; Bockstal, Viki; Radwanska, Magdalena; Magez, Stefan; Black, Samuel J

    2016-07-01

    After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/-) retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i) B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/-) and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/-) C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii) administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136) but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144) prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii) splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv) purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v) adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi) degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei infected mice

  5. Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pileri, Stefano A.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Pieri, Federica; Berra, Eva; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Piccioli, Milena; Johnson, Peter W. M.; Giardini, Roberto; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Novero, Domenico; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Marafioti, Teresa; Alonso, Miguel A.; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Although primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma has been primarily studied, its precise phenotype, molecular characteristics, and histogenesis are still a matter of debate. The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group collected 137 such cases for extensive pathological review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with fibrosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm. On immunohistochemistry, the following phenotype was observed: CD45+, CD20+, CD79a+, PAX5/BSAP+, BOB.1+, Oct-2+, PU.1+, Bcl-2+, CD30+, HLA-DR+, MAL protein+/−, Bcl-6+/−, MUM1/IRF4+/−, CD10−/+, CD21−, CD15−, CD138−, CD68−, and CD3−. Immunoglobulins were negative both at immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis, performed in 45 cases, showed novel findings. More than half of the cases displayed BCL-6 gene mutations, which usually occurred along with functioning somatic IgVH gene mutations and Bcl-6 and/or MUM1/IRF4 expression. The present study supports the concept that a sizable fraction of cases of this lymphoma are from activated germinal center or postgerminal center cells. However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective immunoglobulin production despite the expression of OCT-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors and the lack of IgVH gene crippling mutations. PMID:12507907

  6. Pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing John C

    2010-09-01

    Substantial additional insight has been obtained in the past decade regarding the pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Distinct subtypes of DLBCL have been defined by gene expression profiling (GEP) and they differ not only in GE profiles but also in the pattern of genetic abnormalities. The ability to correlate corresponding genetic and GEP data markedly facilitates the identification of target genes in regions with copy number abnormalities. Oncogenic pathways are often differentially activated in these different subtypes of DLBCL, suggesting that therapy should be targeted according to these differences. The tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in determining outcome and may be a novel target for therapy. The role of microRNA in lymphomagenesis is increasingly being recognized and mutation of key genes has been demonstrated to drive the activation of the NF-kappaB pathway and B cell receptor signaling. The pace of discovery will be even more rapid in the near future with the convergence of data from multiple complementary genome-wide studies and technological innovations including the rapid advance in the technology of high-throughput sequencing.

  7. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  8. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  9. The IgD-binding domain of the Moraxella IgD-binding protein MID (MID962-1200) activates human B cells in the presence of T cell cytokines.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Therése; Jendholm, Johan; Samuelsson, Martin; Forsgren, Arne; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2006-02-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis immunoglobulin D (IgD)-binding protein (MID) is an outer membrane protein with specific affinity for soluble and cell-bound human IgD. Here, we demonstrate that mutated M. catarrhalis strains devoid of MID show a 75% decreased activation of human B cells as compared with wild-type bacteria. In contrast to MID-expressing Moraxella, the MID-deficient Moraxella mutants did not bind to human CD19+ IgD+ B cells. The smallest MID fragment with preserved IgD-binding capacity comprises 238 amino acids (MID(962-1200)). To prove the specificity of MID(962-1200) for IgD, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line expressing membrane-anchored human IgD was manufactured. MID(962-1200) bound strongly to the recombinant IgD on CHO cells. Moreover, MID(962-1200) stimulated peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation 5- and 15-fold at 0.1 and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively. This activation could be blocked completely by antibodies directed against the CD40 ligand (CD154). MID(962-1200) also activated purified B cells in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 or IL-4. An increased IL-6 production was seen after stimulation with MID(962-1200), as revealed by a human cytokine protein array. MID(962-1200) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound to human B cells and activated PBL to the same degree as MID(962-1200). Taken together, MID is the only IgD-binding protein in Moraxella. Furthermore, the novel T cell-independent antigen MID(962-1200) may, together with MID(962-1200)-GFP, be considered as promising reagents in the study of IgD-dependent B cell activation.

  10. The skin, a novel niche for recirculating B cells1

    PubMed Central

    Geherin, Skye A.; Fintushel, Sarah R.; Lee, Michael H.; Wilson, R. Paul; Patel, Reema T.; Alt, Carsten; Young, Alan J.; Hay, John B.; Debes, Gudrun F.

    2012-01-01

    B cells infiltrate the skin in many chronic inflammatory diseases caused by autoimmunity or infection. Despite potential contribution to disease, skin-associated B cells remain poorly characterized. Using an ovine model of granulomatous skin inflammation, we demonstrate that B cells increase in the skin and skin-draining afferent lymph during inflammation. Surprisingly, skin B cells are a heterogeneous population that is distinct from lymph node B cells, with more large lymphocytes as well as B-1-like B cells that co-express high levels IgM and CD11b. Skin B cells have increased MHCII, CD1, and CD80/86 expression compared with lymph node B cells, suggesting that they are well-suited for T cell activation at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, we show that skin accumulation of B cells and antibody-secreting cells during inflammation increases local antibody titers, which could augment host defense and autoimmunity. While skin B cells express typical skin homing receptors such as E-selectin ligand and alpha-4 and beta-1 integrins, they are unresponsive to ligands for chemokine receptors associated with T cell homing into skin. Instead, skin B cells migrate toward the cutaneously expressed CCR6 ligand CCL20. Our data support a model in which B cells use CCR6-CCL20 to recirculate through the skin, fulfilling a novel role in skin immunity and inflammation. PMID:22561151

  11. Analysis of FOXO1 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) accounts for 30% to 40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas and has an overall cure rate of approximately 60%. Previously, we observed FOXO1 mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patient samples. To explore the effects of FOXO1 mutations, we assessed FOXO1 status in 279 DLBCL patient samples and 22 DLBCL-derived cell lines.

  12. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81.

  13. Expression of val-12 mutant ras p21 in an IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell line is associated with loss of serum-dependence and increases in membrane PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M T; Boswell, H S; English, D; Gabig, T G

    1991-01-01

    We previously showed that the proliferative response of a serum- and interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine myeloid cell line, NFS/N1-H7, was partially inhibited by pertussis toxin as a result of toxin-induced increased adenylate cyclase activity. In the present studies, we examined the role of the phosphoinositide cycle in the proliferative response of these cells and demonstrated that there was no change in PIP (phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate)-specific phospholipase C activity in response to IL-3 alone. However, serum caused a pertussis toxin-insensitive increase in PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity as reflected by decreased cellular levels of 32P-labelled PIP2. Proliferation of a subline selected from val-12-mutant H-ras-transfected NFS-H7 cells, clone E5, was insensitive to pertussis toxin, occurred in the absence of serum but remained serum-stimulatable and absolutely dependent on IL-3. This val-12 mutant ras-expressing cell line showed an increase in 32P-labelled PIP (phosphatidylinositol phosphate) in response to serum whereas the parent cell line did not. Membrane fractions from 32P-labelled ras-transfected cells displayed higher GTP gamma S-, GTP-, or F(-)-stimulated PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity compared to membranes from the parent cell line. Thus serum-dependence and adenylate cyclase-mediated pertussis toxin-sensitivity of the parent cell line was bypassed by val-12 mutant ras p21, possibly as a result of increased PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

  14. Lenalidomide in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Catherine; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults. Even if the natural history of DLBCL has been improved with the advent of immunochemotherapy, the survival results obtained with current treatment options clearly indicate that new agents or novel approaches are needed. Lenalidomide (Revlimid, Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, USA), an analogue of thalidomide, is an immunomodulatory drug with pleiotropic mechanisms of action potentially adding to immunochemotherapy. We present here the biological rational for the use of lenalidomide in DLBCL in light of recent advances in the pathophysiology of the disease and the therapeutic results of the most recent trials published in literature or reported in meetings in relapsed/refractory situations as well as in first-line treatment.

  15. B-cell receptor pathway modulators in NHL

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kristie A.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent success of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, idelalisib, in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a number of new agents targeting the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway are in clinical development. In addition, multiple trials combining these agents with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory agents, monoclonal antibodies, or other kinase inhibitors are underway. This review will summarize the current data with the use of single agent and combination therapy with BCR inhibitors in NHL. In addition, commonly encountered as well as serious toxicities and hypothesized resistance mechanisms will be discussed. Lastly, this review will examine the future of these agents and opportunities to maneuver them into the front-line setting in selected NHL subtypes. PMID:26637705

  16. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  17. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  18. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  19. B cell receptor-mediated calcium signaling is impaired in B lymphocytes of type Ia patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Christian; Voelxen, Nadine; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Baerbel; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Goldacker, Sigune; Thiel, Jens; Feske, Stefan; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Warnatz, Klaus

    2010-06-15

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated B cell intrinsic activation defects in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The rapid increase of intracellular free calcium concentrations after engagement of the BCR represents one crucial element in this activation process. The analysis of 53 patients with CVID for BCR-induced calcium flux identified a subgroup of patients with significantly reduced Ca2+ signals in primary B cells. This subgroup strongly corresponded to the class Ia of the Freiburg classification. Comparison at the level of defined B cell subpopulations revealed reduced Ca2+ signals in all mature B cell populations of patients with CVID class Ia when compared with healthy individuals and other groups of patients with CVID but not in circulating transitional B cells. BCR-induced Ca2+ responses were the lowest in CD21low B cells in patients as well as healthy donors, indicating an additional cell-specific mechanism inhibiting the Ca2+ flux. Although proximal BCR signaling events are unperturbed in patients' B cells, including normal phospholipase Cgamma2 phosphorylation and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space is significantly impaired. CD22, a negative regulator of calcium signals in B cells, is highly expressed on CD21low B cells from patients with CVID Ia and might be involved in the attenuated Ca2+ response of this B cell subpopulation. These data from patients with CVID suggest that a defect leading to impaired BCR-induced calcium signaling is associated with the expansion of CD21low B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, autoimmune dysregulation, and lymphadenopathy.

  20. Active Akt and Functional p53 Modulate Apoptosis in Abelson Virus-Transformed Pre-B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Unnikrishnan, Indira; Raghavan, Anuradha; Parmar, Kalindi; Rosenberg, Naomi

    2004-01-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is an important feature of the Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV) transformation process. During multistep transformation, Ab-MLV-infected pre-B cells undergo p53-dependent apoptosis during the crisis phase of transformation. Even once cells are fully transformed, an active v-Abl protein tyrosine kinase is required to suppress apoptosis because cells transformed by temperature-sensitive (ts) kinase mutants undergo rapid apoptosis after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, inactivation of the v-Abl protein by a temperature shift interrupts signals transmitted via multiple pathways, making it difficult to identify those that are critically important for the suppression of apoptosis. To begin to dissect these pathways, we tested the ability of an SH2 domain Ab-MLV mutant, P120/R273K, to rescue aspects of the ts phenotype of pre-B cells transformed by the conditional kinase domain mutant. The P120/R273K mutant suppressed apoptosis at the nonpermissive temperature, a phenotype correlated with its ability to activate Akt. Apoptosis also was suppressed at the nonpermissive temperature by constitutively active Akt and in p53-null pre-B cells transformed with the ts kinase domain mutant. These data indicate that an intact Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is not critical for apoptosis suppression and suggest that signals transmitted through Akt and p53 play an important role in the response. PMID:14747529

  1. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  2. Circulating CD21low B cells in common variable immunodeficiency resemble tissue homing, innate-like B cells.

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Baerbel; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Foerster, Christian; Hoenig, Manfred; Driessen, Gertjan; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J; Wiech, Elisabeth; Visentini, Marcella; Quinti, Isabella; Prasse, Antje; Voelxen, Nadine; Salzer, Ulrich; Goldacker, Sigune; Fisch, Paul; Eibel, Hermann; Schwarz, Klaus; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Warnatz, Klaus

    2009-08-11

    The homeostasis of circulating B cell subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy adults is well regulated, but in disease it can be severely disturbed. Thus, a subgroup of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) presents with an extraordinary expansion of an unusual B cell population characterized by the low expression of CD21. CD21(low) B cells are polyclonal, unmutated IgM(+)IgD(+) B cells but carry a highly distinct gene expression profile which differs from conventional naïve B cells. Interestingly, while clearly not representing a memory population, they do share several features with the recently defined memory-like tissue, Fc receptor-like 4 positive B cell population in the tonsils of healthy donors. CD21(low) B cells show signs of previous activation and proliferation in vivo, while exhibiting defective calcium signaling and poor proliferation in response to B cell receptor stimulation. CD21(low) B cells express decreased amounts of homeostatic but increased levels of inflammatory chemokine receptors. This might explain their preferential homing to peripheral tissues like the bronchoalveolar space of CVID or the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, as a result of the close resemblance to the gene expression profile, phenotype, function and preferential tissue homing of murine B1 B cells, we suggest that CD21(low) B cells represent a human innate-like B cell population.

  3. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  4. FcgammaRIIB is differentially expressed during B cell maturation and in B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Camilleri-Broët, Sophie; Cassard, Lydie; Broët, Philippe; Delmer, Alain; Le Touneau, Agnès; Diebold, Jacques; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Molina, Thierry Jo; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    FcgammaRIIB, a low affinity receptor for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG), is thought to drive negative selection of B cells in germinal centers (GC) by inducing apoptosis upon interaction with immune complexes. Its expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 22 reactive lymphoid tissues and 112 B-cell lymphomas. Pre-GC mantle cells, marginal zone cells and their neoplastic counterparts expressed FcgammaRIIB. The B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphomas were also positive. Not detected in GC, FcgammaRIIB was expressed in 52% of follicular lymphomas and in 20% of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL). In DLBCL, FcgammaRIIB expression was linked to transformation (P < 0.001). Re-analysis of a gene profile data set from the Lymphochip microarrays showed that FcgammaRIIB expression in the activated B-like DLBCL subgroup was higher than in the GC-like one (P < 0.04), and was associated with an adverse prognostic both in univariate (P < 0.003) and in multivariate analysis including the International Prognostic Indicator (IPI) (P < 0.01). Thus these results challenge the potential role of FcgammaRIIB during B-cell selection in GC, and suggest a prognostic value of FcgammaRIIB expression in DLBCL.

  5. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Mariano G.; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R.; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P.; Elemento, Olivier; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Melnick, Ari M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands. PMID:27482887

  6. Screening of abscisic acid insensative (ABI) and low phosphorous efficiency (LPE) mutants from some sequenced lines in the sorghum TILLING population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sorghum population for Targeting Induced Local Lesion IN Genome (TILLING) was generated from BTx623 in 2005 and publicly available in 2009. After releasing to the public, this population was intensively screened by morphological observation in the field and a number of mutants with useful traits wer...

  7. Expression of the human B-cell surface protein CD20: alteration by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, M.A.; Cotner, T.; Gaur, L.; Torres, R.; Clark, E.A.

    1987-11-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes human B-cell surface protein CD20 and can activate resting B cells; with this antibody the authors found CD20 to be a 35/37-kDa non-disulfide-linked protein. The protein has a pI of 7.5-8.0 and is phosphorylated in B-cell lines, tonsillar B cells, and peripheral blood B cells. Both CD20 surface expression and phosphorylation are increased on buoyant tonsillar B cells activated in vivo. Because phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) supports the activation signal initiated by monoclonal antibody 1F5, they studied the effect of PMA on CD20 expression. After brief incubation with mitogenic levels of PMA, the number of dense tonsillar B cells positive for CD20 protein transiently decreased. Paradoxically, the cells remaining positive had more surface CD20 than did control cells, and these remaining surface CD20 molecules were hyperphosphorylated. Furthermore, PMA not only induced phosphorylation of CD20 protein on Raji cells but also increased the internalization of CD20 molecules; both phosphorylation and internalization of CD20 molecules were decreased with the protein kinase C inhibitor palmitoyl carnitine. Conditions that increase CD20 phosphorylation are shown also to increase surface mobility of the molecule, suggesting that CD20 protein internalization may be a critical early event for B-cell entry into the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle.

  8. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  9. Central B-Cell Tolerance: Where Selection Begins

    PubMed Central

    Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an adaptive immune system based on the random generation of antigen receptors requires a stringent selection process that sifts through receptor specificities to remove those reacting with self-antigens. In the B-cell lineage, this selection process is first applied to IgM+ immature B cells. By using increasingly sophisticated mouse models, investigators have identified the central tolerance mechanisms that negatively select autoreactive immature B cells and prevent inclusion of their antigen receptors into the peripheral B-cell pool. Additional studies have uncovered mechanisms that promote the differentiation of nonautoreactive immature B cells and their positive selection into the peripheral B-cell population. These mechanisms of central selection are fundamental to the generation of a naïve B-cell repertoire that is largely devoid of self-reactivity while capable of reacting with any foreign insult. PMID:22378602

  10. Novel B-cell maturation factor from spontaneously autoimmune viable motheaten mice.

    PubMed

    Sidman, C L; Marshall, J D; Masiello, N C; Roths, J B; Shultz, L D

    1984-11-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro, mice homozygous for the viable motheaten mutation show severe immunodeficiency, polyclonal B-cell activation and Ig secretion, and spontaneous production of a lymphokine [B-cell maturation factor (BMF)] that directly drives the maturation of normal or tumor B cells to the state of active Ig secretion. BMF from motheaten mice is distinct from previously identified forms in its cells of origin (B cells) and biochemical characteristics (apparent Mr 15,000 by gel filtration and NaDodSO4/PAGE; pI 4.3 by chromatofocusing). Among the known murine single-gene models of autoimmunity, only motheaten mice show high levels of spontaneous BMF production, which therefore may be an important component in the development of this form of autoimmunity/immunodeficiency disease. The coincidence of spontaneous BMF production and uncontrolled Ig secretion within the same mutant mouse constitutes the strongest evidence to date for a significant physiological (in vivo) role for BMFs.

  11. Novel B-cell maturation factor from spontaneously autoimmune viable motheaten mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, C L; Marshall, J D; Masiello, N C; Roths, J B; Shultz, L D

    1984-01-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro, mice homozygous for the viable motheaten mutation show severe immunodeficiency, polyclonal B-cell activation and Ig secretion, and spontaneous production of a lymphokine [B-cell maturation factor (BMF)] that directly drives the maturation of normal or tumor B cells to the state of active Ig secretion. BMF from motheaten mice is distinct from previously identified forms in its cells of origin (B cells) and biochemical characteristics (apparent Mr 15,000 by gel filtration and NaDodSO4/PAGE; pI 4.3 by chromatofocusing). Among the known murine single-gene models of autoimmunity, only motheaten mice show high levels of spontaneous BMF production, which therefore may be an important component in the development of this form of autoimmunity/immunodeficiency disease. The coincidence of spontaneous BMF production and uncontrolled Ig secretion within the same mutant mouse constitutes the strongest evidence to date for a significant physiological (in vivo) role for BMFs. Images PMID:6334306

  12. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  13. TIM-1 signaling is required for maintenance and induction of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M Y; Ding, Q; Brooks, C R; Xiao, S; Workman, C J; Vignali, D A A; Ueno, T; Padera, R F; Kuchroo, V K; Najafian, N; Rothstein, D M

    2015-04-01

    Apart from their role in humoral immunity, B cells can exhibit IL-10-dependent regulatory activity (Bregs). These regulatory subpopulations have been shown to inhibit inflammation and allograft rejection. However, our understanding of Bregs has been hampered by their rarity, lack of a specific marker, and poor insight into their induction and maintenance. We previously demonstrated that T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-1 (TIM-1) identifies over 70% of IL-10-producing B cells, irrespective of other markers. We now show that TIM-1 is the primary receptor responsible for Breg induction by apoptotic cells (ACs). However, B cells that express a mutant form of TIM-1 lacking the mucin domain (TIM-1(Δmucin) ) exhibit decreased phosphatidylserine binding and are unable to produce IL-10 in response to ACs or by specific ligation with anti-TIM-1. TIM-1(Δmucin) mice also exhibit accelerated allograft rejection, which appears to be due in part to their defect in both baseline and induced IL-10(+) Bregs, since a single transfer of WT TIM-1(+) B cells can restore long-term graft survival. These data suggest that TIM-1 signaling plays a direct role in Breg maintenance and induction both under physiological conditions (in response to ACs) and in response to therapy through TIM-1 ligation. Moreover, they directly demonstrate that the mucin domain regulates TIM-1 signaling.

  14. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  15. Elevated expression of pleiotrophin in lymphocytic leukemia CD19+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Chun-Xian; Wang, Lan; Li, Yan; Xiao, Wei; Guo, Qin-Lian; Chen, Fei; Tan, Xin-Ti

    2014-10-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) has been demonstrated to be strongly expressed in many fetal tissues, but seldom in healthy adult tissues. While PTN has been reported to be expressed in many types of tumors as well as at high serum concentrations in patients with many types of cancer, to date, there has been no report that PTN is expressed in leukemia, especially in lymphocytic leukemia. We isolated the CD19(+) subset of B cells from peripheral blood from healthy adults, B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL) patients, and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients and examined these cells for PTN mRNA and protein expression. We used immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to show that PTN protein is highly expressed in CD19(+) B cells from B-ALL and B-CLL patients, but barely expressed in B cells from healthy adults. We also examined PTN expression at the nucleic acid level using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and northern blotting and detected a high levels of PTN transcripts in the CD19(+) B cells from both groups of leukemia patients, but very few in the CD19(+) B cells from the healthy controls. Interestingly, the quantity of the PTN transcripts correlated with the severity of disease. Moreover, suppression of PTN activity with an anti-PTN antibody promoted apoptosis of cells from leukemia patients and cell lines SMS-SB and JVM-2. This effect of the anti-PTN antibody suggests that PTN may be a new target for the treatment of lymphocytic leukemia. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Immature surface Ig+ B cells can continue to rearrange kappa and lambda L chain gene loci

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pro and pre B cells possess the long-term capacity to proliferate in vitro on stromal cells and interleukin 7 (IL-7) and can differentiate to surface immunoglobulin (sIg+) cells upon removal of IL-7 from the cultures. A key event in this differentiation is the extensive cell loss due to apoptosis. Because the proto-oncogene bcl-2 can promote cell survival, we established pre-B cell lines from E mu-bcl-2 transgenic mice. These pre-B cells have the same properties as those derived from non-bcl-2 transgenic mice except that they do not die by apoptosis. This allowed us to study the fate of newly formed B cells in vitro for a longer period of time. Here we show that early during the differentiation of pre-B cells, upregulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression go hand in hand with rearrangements of the Ig gene loci. Moreover, the newly formed sIg+ B cells continue to express RAG-1 and RAG-2 and continue to rearrange L chain gene loci, even in the absence of proliferation, in an orderly fashion, so that kappa L+ sIg+ cells can become lambda L+ sIg+ or sIg- cells, whereas lambda L+ sIg+ cells can become sIg-, but not kappa L+ sIg+ cells. Thus, deposition of a complete Ig molecule on the surface of a B cell does not automatically stop the Ig-rearrangement machinery. PMID:8376934

  17. Targeting Non-proteolytic Protein Ubiquitination for the Treatment of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yibin; Kelly, Priscilla; Shaffer, Arthur L; Schmitz, Roland; Yoo, Hee Min; Liu, Xinyue; Huang, Da Wei; Webster, Daniel; Young, Ryan M; Nakagawa, Masao; Ceribelli, Michele; Wright, George W; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Yu, Xin; Xu, Weihong; Chan, Wing C; Jaffe, Elaine S; Gascoyne, Randy D; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Rimsza, Lisa; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-11

    Chronic active B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a hallmark of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), engages the CARD11-MALT1-BCL10 (CBM) adapter complex to activate IκB kinase (IKK) and the classical NF-κB pathway. Here we show that the CBM complex includes the E3 ubiquitin ligases cIAP1 and cIAP2, which are essential mediators of BCR-dependent NF-κB activity in ABC DLBCL. cIAP1/2 attach K63-linked polyubiquitin chains on themselves and on BCL10, resulting in the recruitment of IKK and the linear ubiquitin chain ligase LUBAC, which is essential for IKK activation. SMAC mimetics target cIAP1/2 for destruction, and consequently suppress NF-κB and selectively kill BCR-dependent ABC DLBCL lines, supporting their clinical evaluation in patients with ABC DLBCL.

  18. Yin Yang 1 overexpression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with B-cell transformation and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Giancarlo; Torrisi, Elena; Ligresti, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Malaponte, Grazia; Traval, Salvatore; McCubrey, James A; Canevari, Silvana; Libra, Massimo

    2010-02-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1), a multifunctional transcription factor, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of several cancer types. However, its role in hematological malignancies has not yet been fully investigated. In the present study, using computational methods, we showed that YY1 transcript levels were significantly increased in the high-grade lymphomas, including Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), compared with those of both low-grade lymphomas and normal B-cells. The significant increase in gene expression resulted in a significant increase also at protein level in three NHL cell lines. The association of YY1 expression with some clinical-pathological features in DLBCL showed a positive correlation between a high level of YY1 mRNA and high levels of BCL-6 protein. Moreover, by analyzing the large series of DLBCL in the Hummel dataset, we identified the transcription factor PAX-5 among the top 50 genes positively correlated with YY1. These findings are also supported by the biological network analysis in which the top network, with the highest score, associated with YY1 expression levels in DLBCL is cellular movement, hematological system development and function, and immune response. overall these data suggest that YY1 is involved in B cells transformation which gives rise to high-grade lymphomas through a dysregulation in the normal development of B cells affecting cell cycle and cellular motility.

  19. Effects of fuzzless cottonseed phenotype on cottonseed nutrient composition in near isogenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant lines under well-watered and water stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Turley, Rickie B

    2013-01-01

    There is no information available on the effect of fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrient composition (minerals, N, S, protein, and oil) under drought stress. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the fuzzless seed trait on cottonseed nutrients using five sets of near-isogenic lines (NILs). Each set consists of two lines that share the same genetic background, but differ in seed fuzziness (fuzzy, F; fuzzless, N). The near isogenic lines will enable us to compare the effect of the trait without confounding the genotypic background effects. We hypothesized that since the fuzzless trait involved in fiber initiation development, and was reported to be involved in biochemical, molecular, and genetic processes, this trait may also alter cottonseed nutrient composition. Results showed that NIL sets accumulated different levels of minerals in seeds and leaves, and the fuzzless trait (N) in most of the lines altered seed and leaf mineral accumulations when compared with fuzzy lines (F) or the control line. For example, K, P, Mg, Cu, and Na concentrations in seeds were higher in MD N and STV N than in their equivalent MD F and STV F lines. Leaf concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, S, B, Cu, and Fe in MD N lines were higher than MD F line. Lower levels of nutrients in seeds and leaves were observed under water stress conditions, especially Ca, Mg, N, and B in seeds.Generally and with few exceptions, seed protein was higher in fuzzy lines than in fuzzless lines; however, seed oil was higher in fuzzless lines than in fuzzy lines. Our research demonstrated that fuzzless trait altered the composition and level of nutrients in seed and leaves in well watered and water stressed plants. Differences in protein and oil between fuzzy and fuzzless seeds may indicate alteration in nitrogen and carbon fixation and metabolism. The differential accumulation of seed nutrients in this germplasm could be used by cotton breeders to select for higher cottonseed quality.

  20. Aberrantly Expressed OTX Homeobox Genes Deregulate B-Cell Differentiation in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently reported that deregulated homeobox gene MSX1 mediates repression of the B-cell specific transcription factor ZHX2. In this study we investigated regulation of MSX1 in this B-cell malignancy. Accordingly, we analyzed expression and function of OTX homeobox genes which activate MSX1 transcription during embryonal development in the neural plate border region. Our data demonstrate that OTX1 and OTX2 are aberrantly expressed in both HL patients and cell lines. Moreover, both OTX loci are targeted by genomic gains in overexpressing cell lines. Comparative expression profiling and subsequent pathway modulations in HL cell lines indicated that aberrantly enhanced FGF2-signalling activates the expression of OTX2. Downstream analyses of OTX2 demonstrated transcriptional activation of genes encoding transcription factors MSX1, FOXC1 and ZHX1. Interestingly, examination of the physiological expression profile of ZHX1 in normal hematopoietic cells revealed elevated levels in T-cells and reduced expression in B-cells, indicating a discriminatory role in lymphopoiesis. Furthermore, two OTX-negative HL cell lines overexpressed ZHX1 in correlation with genomic amplification of its locus at chromosomal band 8q24, supporting the oncogenic potential of this gene in HL. Taken together, our data demonstrate that deregulated homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 respectively impact transcriptional inhibition of (B-cell specific) ZHX2 and activation of (T-cell specific) ZHX1. Thus, we show how reactivation of a specific embryonal gene regulatory network promotes disturbed B-cell differentiation in HL. PMID:26406991

  1. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  2. The role of lactic acid in autocrine B-cell growth stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, S E; Markey, S P; Ijames, C; Jones, K D; Tosato, G

    1991-01-01

    Growth and survival of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized B lymphocytes cultured at low cell densities require autocrine soluble factors. In this study, we have purified a low molecular weight autocrine soluble factor that promotes growth of EBV-immortalized B cells in serum-free conditions and identified it as lactic acid (LA). Synthetic LA stimulated growth in EBV-immortalized B cells at 1-10 mM, a concentration of LA measured in the culture supernatant of EBV-immortalized cell lines. LA alone was found to account for greater than 70% of the autocrine growth factor activity in serum-free supernatants of EBV-immortalized B cells. Aminooxyacetate, a glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase inhibitor, specifically inhibited B-cell growth induced by LA, suggesting that this process requires mitochondrial-cytosol transfers. Thus, LA is an autocrine stimulatory molecule that in serum-free conditions is essential for the continuous proliferation of EBV-immortalized B cells. This represents an unexpected function for LA. PMID:1662382

  3. Arginine methylation regulates antibody responses through modulating cell division and isotype switching in B cells.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kikumi; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, cell proliferation and/or differentiation. B cells undergo clonal division, isotype switching and differentiate into antibody forming cells following stimulation with Toll-like receptor-ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and T cell-derived signals, including CD40-ligand (CD40-L) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Whether protein arginine methylation affects B cell division and/or isotype switching to IgG1 in response to LPS, IL-4, and CD40-L was examined using the arginine methyl transferase inhibitor adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (AdOx). Addition of AdOx substantially reduced the number of division cycles of stimulated B cells, whereas cell viability remained intact. Upon stimulation with LPS/IL-4/CD40-L, the proportion of surface IgG1 positive cells in each division cycle was slightly diminished by AdOx. However, the degree of expression of γ1 germ line transcript and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L were unaffected by addition of AdOx, suggesting that AdOx influences class switch recombination independent of AID expression through transcriptional control. Taken together, arginine methylation appears to be involved in B cell isotype switching, as well as in clonal expansion of B cells in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L.

  4. A novel mutant 10Ala/Arg together with mutant 144Ser/Arg of hepatitis B virus X protein involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis in HepG2 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Junwei; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Anna; Guo, Hongliang; Wei, Feili; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Espitia, Stephen; Smith, Davey M.; Liu, Longgen; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a major health problem worldwide. HBV X (HBx) protein is the most common open reading frame that may undergo mutations, resulting in the development of HCC. This study aimed to determine specific HBx mutations that differentiate the central- and para-tumor tissues, and identify their association with HCC development. HBx gene from HCC tumor and para-tumor tissues of 47 HCC patients was amplified, sequenced and statistically analyzed. A novel combination of 2 mutations at residues 10 and 144 was identified which might play a significant role in HCC development. Expression vectors carrying HBx with the specific mutations were constructed and transfected into HepG2 and p53-null HepG2 cells. Compared to wild type (WT) and single mutation of HBx at residue 10 or 144, the 10/144 double mutations strongly up-regulated p21 expression and prolonged G1/S transition in WT- and p53-null HepG2 cells. Apoptosis was also inhibited by HBx harboring 10/44 double-mutation. Binding of 10/144 double-mutant HBx to p53 was lower than WT HBx. Conclusively, the 10/144 double mutation of HBx might play a crucial role in HCC formation. PMID:26706415

  5. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  6. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Blimp-1{delta}exon7: A naturally occurring Blimp-1 deletion mutant with auto-regulatory potential

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Doris; Nayak, Arnab; Schumann, Julia E.; Schimpl, Anneliese; Berberich, Ingolf Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2008-12-10

    Blimp-1 is a master regulator of terminal B cell differentiation and plays a pivotal role in various developmental processes. In addition to full length Blimp-1, a Blimp-1 mRNA lacking exon 7 (Blimp-1{delta}7) has been described to occur in murine B cells. The activity and function of the mutant mRNA-encoded protein (Blimp-1{delta}7), lacking three crucial zinc fingers necessary for DNA interaction, is completely unknown. Since isoforms of other prdm family proteins affect each other's functions, we wondered whether Blimp-1{delta}7 still plays a role in B cells, independent of direct DNA binding. In this study, we found that Blimp-1{delta}7 is preferentially expressed in naive CD19{sup +} B cells. A fraction of Blimp-1{delta}7 migrates to the nucleus, colocalizes with HDAC2 and is found at sites of repressed chromatin, although it does not bind to the Blimp-1 DNA consensus site. Unexpectedly, Blimp-1 and Blimp-1{delta}7 homodimerize as well as heterodimerize with each other. Ectopic expression of Blimp-1{delta}7 in WEHI 231 cells, a Blimp-1-negative murine lymphoma line, leads to cessation of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. Importantly, LPS-induced differentiation is suppressed in the presence of Blimp-1{delta}7. This is in agreement with our finding that Blimp-1{delta}7 interferes with endogenous Blimp-1 expression. Thus, our data suggest an auto-regulatory mechanism of Blimp-1 activation.

  8. Defective B-cell memory in patients with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Ruud H J; Driessen, Gertjan J; Bartol, Sophinus J W; van Noesel, Carel J M; Boon, Louis; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J M; de Vries, Esther; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    Patients with Down syndrome carry immunologic defects, as evidenced by the increased risks for autoimmune diseases, hematologic malignancies, and respiratory tract infections. Moreover, the low numbers of circulating B cells suggest impaired humoral immunity. We sought to study how immunodeficiency in patients with Down syndrome results from immunologic defects in the B-cell compartment. We studied blood B-cell subset composition, replication history, somatic hypermutation status, and class-switch recombination in 17 children with Down syndrome. Germinal centers and plasma cells were studied in tonsils from 4 additional children with Down syndrome. Blood transitional B-cell numbers were normal, but naive mature and memory B-cell numbers were reduced despite slightly increased serum B cell-activating factor levels. Germinal centers and plasma cells in tonsils appeared normal, as were serum immunoglobulin levels. CD27(+)IgD(+)IgM(+) "natural effector" B cells showed reduced proliferation and somatic hypermutation levels, whereas these were normal in CD27(+)IgD(-) memory B cells. Furthermore, IgM(+) and IgA(+), but not IgG(+), memory B cells showed impaired molecular signs for antigen selection. The B-cell pattern was highly similar to that of patients with common variable immunodeficiency and a defect in B-cell activation and proliferation. Children with Down syndrome seem capable of normal germinal center and plasma cell formation. Still, blood memory B-cell numbers were reduced and showed impaired molecular maturation of IgA and IgM, which are important for mucosal immunity. The observed molecular defects in circulating IgA and IgM B-cell memory could reflect impaired local responses, which underlie the increased susceptibility to respiratory tract infections of patients with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. FcR-Like 2 Inhibition of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tanisha A.; Haga, Christopher L.; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Davis, Randall S.; Cooper, Max D.

    2017-01-01

    FcR-like (FCRL) 2 is a transmembrane protein with immunomodulatory potential that is preferentially expressed by memory B cells in humans. It has two consensus ITIMs in addition to a putative ITAM sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. We have confirmed the cellular distribution of FCRL2 and analyzed its functional potential to show that coligation with the BCR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its ITIM motifs and subsequent Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 recruitment to facilitate inhibition of BCR signaling. Mutational analysis indicates that the tyrosine residues in both inhibitory motifs of FCRL2 are required for complete inhibition of BCR signaling, whereas tyrosines in the putative activation motif are dispensable for signal modulation. These findings suggest a negative immunomodulatory function for FCRL2 in the regulation of memory B cells. PMID:21068405

  10. Inhibition of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway blocks a subset of B cell responses to antigen.

    PubMed

    Richards, J D; Davé, S H; Chou, C H; Mamchak, A A; DeFranco, A L

    2001-03-15

    Signal transduction initiated by B cell Ag receptor (BCR) cross-linking plays an important role in the development and activation of B cells. Therefore, considerable effort has gone into determining the biochemical signaling events initiated by the BCR and delineating which events participate in specific biological responses to Ag. We used two inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) 1 and MEK2, PD98059, and U0126, to assess the role the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway plays in several BCR-induced responses. PD98059 or U0126 treatment substantially inhibited the BCR-induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) forms of mitogen-activated protein kinase in the immature B cell line WEHI-231, in immature splenic B cells, and in mature splenic B cells. However, MEK-ERK inhibition did not block BCR-induced growth arrest or apoptosis of WEHI-231 cells or apoptosis of immature splenic B cells, indicating that the MEK-ERK pathway is not required for these events. In contrast, PD98059 and U0126 treatment did inhibit the up-regulation of specific BCR-induced proteins, including the transcription factor Egr-1 in WEHI-231 and mature splenic B cells, and the CD44 adhesion molecule and CD69 activation marker in mature splenic B cells. Moreover, both inhibitors suppressed BCR-induced proliferation of mature splenic B cells, in the absence and in the presence of IL-4. Therefore, activation of the MEK-ERK pathway is necessary for a subset of B cell responses to Ag.

  11. Expression of SHP-1 phosphatase indicates post-germinal center cell derivation of B-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Paessler, Michele; Kossev, Plamen; Tsai, Donald; Raghunath, Puthiaveetil; Majewski, Miroslaw; Zhang, Qian; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schuster, Stephen; Tomaszewski, John; Arber, Daniel A; Hsi, Eric; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2002-11-01

    SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase acts as a negative regulator of signaling by receptors for growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines and by receptors involved in immune response. Our recent study showed that SHP-1 is tightly regulated at various stages of B-cell differentiation and is expressed in the mantle and marginal zones, interfollicular B cells, and plasma cells, whereas it is nondetectable in germinal center cells. In this study we evaluated expression of SHP-1 in vitro and in vivo in nine cell lines representing three different types of EBV+ B-cell populations closely resembling or derived from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). Furthermore, we examined tissue samples from 58 patients with B-cell PTLDs, both EBV+ (85% of the cases analyzed) and EBV- (15%). SHP-1 protein was strongly expressed in all cell lines and PTLD cases. In addition, the PTLD cases were essentially negative for germinal center B-cell markers: none expressed CD10 and only one expressed BCL-6. More than 40% expressed a late post-germinal B-cell marker, CD138. The universal expression of SHP-1, lack of expression of CD10 and BCL-6, and frequent expression of CD138 suggest that PTLDs are derived from post-germinal center B cells regardless of the EBV cell infection status. Based on the immunophenotype, B-cell PTLDs could be divided into two broad categories corresponding to the early (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138-) and late (CD10-/BCL-6-/SHP-1+/CD138+) post-germinal center cells. By being expressed earlier, SHP-1 is a more sensitive marker of post-germinal center B cells than CD138, which is seen on the terminally differentiated immunoblasts and plasma cells.

  12. Distinct processing of the pre-B cell receptor and the B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sharon; Haimovich, Joseph; Hollander, Nurit

    2013-06-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that while oligosaccharide moieties of μ heavy chains in the B-cell receptor (BCR) are of the complex type as expected, those of the pre-BCR on the surface of pre-B cells contain oligosaccharide moieties of the high-mannose type only. This is unique, because high-mannose glycans are generally restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum and not presented on the surface of mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the processing of the unusually glycosylated μ heavy chains in pre-B cells. We demonstrate that the pre-BCR reaches the cell surface by a non-conventional brefeldin A-sensitive monensin-insensitive transport pathway. Although pre-BCR complexes consist of μ heavy chains with high-mannose oligosaccharide moieties, they are stably expressed in the plasma membrane and demonstrate turnover rates similar to those of the BCR. Thus, rapid internalization cannot account for their low surface expression, as previously postulated. Rather, we demonstrate that the low pre-BCR abundance in the plasma membrane results, at least in part, from insufficient production of surrogate light chains, which appears to be a limiting factor in pre-BCR expression.

  13. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  14. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-01-01

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  15. Differential Programming of B Cells in AID Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; Velds, Arno; van den Berk, Paul CM.; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; van Steensel, Bas; Jacobs, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The Aicda locus encodes the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and is highly expressed in germinal center (GC) B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Besides these Ig specific activities in B cells, AID has been implicated in active DNA demethylation in non-B cell systems. We here determined a potential role of AID as an epigenetic eraser and transcriptional regulator in B cells. RNA-Seq on different B cell subsets revealed that Aicda−/− B cells are developmentally affected. However as shown by RNA-Seq, MethylCap-Seq, and SNP analysis these transcriptome alterations may not relate to AID, but alternatively to a CBA mouse strain derived region around the targeted Aicda locus. These unexpected confounding parameters provide alternative, AID-independent interpretations on genotype-phenotype correlations previously reported in numerous studies on AID using the Aicda−/− mouse strain. PMID:23922811

  16. The PI3K pathway in B cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jellusova, Julia; Rickert, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    B cell growth and proliferation is tightly regulated by signaling through the B cell receptor and by other membrane bound receptors responding to different cytokines. The PI3K signaling pathway has been shown to play a crucial role in B cell activation, differentiation and survival. Activated B cells undergo metabolic reprograming in response to changing energetic and biosynthetic demands. B cells also need to be able to coordinate metabolic activity and proliferation with nutrient availability. The PI3K signaling network has been implicated in regulating nutrient acquisition, utilization and biosynthesis, thus integrating receptor-mediated signaling with cell metabolism. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about metabolic changes induced in activated B cells, strategies to adapt to metabolic stress and the role of PI3K signaling in these processes.

  17. RP105-Negative B Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koarada, Syuichi; Tada, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease characterized by B cells producing autoantibodies against nuclear proteins and DNA, especially anti-double-strand DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. RP105 (CD180), the toll-like receptor- (TLR-) associated molecule, is expressed on normal B cells. However, RP105-negative B cells increase in peripheral blood from patients with active SLE. RP105 may regulate B-cell activation, and RP105-negative B cells produce autoantibodies and take part in pathophysiology of SLE. It is possible that targeting RP105-negative B cells is one of the treatments of SLE. In this paper, we discuss the RP105 biology and clinical significance in SLE. PMID:21941580

  18. Transitional B cells: step by step towards immune competence.

    PubMed

    Chung, James B; Silverman, Michael; Monroe, John G

    2003-06-01

    Transitional B cells mark the crucial link between bone-marrow (BM) immature and peripheral mature B cells. Examination reveals unexpected heterogeneity, consisting of contiguous subsets with phenotypic and functional differences. Data point to the late transitional B-cell stage as a crucial juncture at which developing B cells gain access to splenic follicles, become responsive to T-cell help and lose sensitivity to negative selection, characterizing the immature B-cell response to B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling in vitro and in vivo. The biological and molecular processes directing maturation through this stage are becoming clearer through biochemical studies and murine models deficient in various components of the BCR signaling pathway.

  19. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  20. Innate response activator B cells: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells are a subset of B-1a derived B cells that produce the growth factors granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and IL-3. In mouse models of sepsis and pneumonia, B-1a B cells residing in serosal sites recognize bacteria, migrate to the spleen or lung, and differentiate to IRA B cells that then contribute to the host response by amplifying inflammation and producing polyreactive IgM. In atherosclerosis, IRA B cells accumulate in the spleen, where they promote extramedullary hematopoiesis and activate classical dendritic cells. In this review, we focus on the ontogeny and function of IRA B cells in acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25957266

  1. Double-Hit Large B Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Khelfa, Yousef; Lebowicz, Yehuda; Jamil, Muhammad Omer

    2017-09-26

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), accounting for approximately 25% of NHL cases. It is a heterogeneous group of diseases. BCL2, BCL6, and MYC are the most frequent mutated genes in DLBCL. Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) is an aggressive form of DLBCL with an unmet treatment need, in which MYC rearrangement is present with either BCL2 or BCL6 rearrangement. Patients typically present with a rapidly growing mass with B symptoms. DHL has been linked to very poor outcomes when treated with RCHOP chemotherapy. Dual-expressor lymphoma is a form of DLBCL with overexpression of MYC and BCL2/BCL6. There is a paucity of prospective trials evaluating the treatment of DHL. Retrospective series suggest that more aggressive treatment regimens such as DA-EPOCH and hyper CVAD may be more efficacious. However, there remains a lack of consensus regarding optimal treatment for DHL. Further clinical trials, including novel agents, are needed for improvement in outcomes.

  2. Relevant B Cell Epitopes in Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The 3-dimensional structure of an allergen defines the accessible parts on the surface of the molecule or epitopes that interact with antibodies. Mapping the antigenic determinants for IgE antibody binding has been pursued through strategies based on the use of overlapping synthetic peptides, recombinant allergenic fragments or unfolded allergens. These approaches led to the identification of mostly linear epitopes and are useful for food allergens that undergo digestion or food processing. For inhaled allergens, conformational epitopes appear to be the primary targets of IgE responses. Knowledge of the molecular structure of allergens alone and in complex with antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding is important to understand the immune recognition of B cell-antigenic determinants on allergens and the design of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy. Starting with the molecular cloning and expression of allergens, and with the advent of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we have been able to visualize conformational epitopes on allergens. PMID:19940500

  3. Comparative analyses of B cell populations in trout kidney and mouse bone marrow; establishing “B cell signatures”

    PubMed Central

    Zwollo, Patty; Mott, Katrina; Barr, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the frequency and distribution of developing B cell populations in the kidney of the rainbow trout, using four molecular B cell markers that are highly conserved between species, including two transcription factors, Pax5 and EBF1, recombination activating gene RAG1, and the immunoglobulin heavy chain mu. Three distinct B cell stages were defined: early developing B cells (CLP, pro-B, and early pre-B cells), late developing B cell (late pre-B, immature B, and mature B cells), and IgM-secreting cells. Developmental stage-specific, combinatorial expression of Pax5, EBF1, RAG1 and immunoglobulin mu was determined in trout anterior kidney cells by flow cytometry. Trout staining patterns were compared to a well-defined primary immune tissue, mouse bone marrow, and using mouse surface markers B220 and CD43. A remarkable level of similarity was uncovered between the primary immune tissues of both species. Subsequent analysis of the entire trout kidney, divided into five contiguous segments K1-K5, revealed a complex pattern of early developing, late developing, and IgM-secreting B cells. Patterns in anterior kidney segment K1 were most similar to those of mouse bone marrow, while the most posterior part of the kidney, K5, had many IgM-secreting cells, but lacked early developing B cells. A potential second B lymphopoiesis site was uncovered in segment K4 of the kidney. The B cell patterns, or “B cell signatures” described here provide information on the relative abundance of distinct developing B cell populations in the trout kidney, and can be used in future studies on B cell development in other vertebrate species. PMID:20705088

  4. B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas with Plasmacytic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Charles M; Smith, Lauren B

    2016-03-01

    B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation are a diverse group of entities with extremely variable morphologic features. Diagnostic challenges can arise in differentiating lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma from marginal zone lymphoma and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. In addition, plasmablastic lymphomas can be difficult to distinguish from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or other high-grade lymphomas. Judicious use of immunohistochemical studies and molecular testing can assist in appropriate classification.

  5. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  6. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-02-02

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens.

  7. Loss of B Cells in Patients with Heterozygous Mutations in IKAROS.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, H S; Boisson, B; Cunningham-Rundles, C; Reichenbach, J; Stray-Pedersen, A; Gelfand, E W; Maffucci, P; Pierce, K R; Abbott, J K; Voelkerding, K V; South, S T; Augustine, N H; Bush, J S; Dolen, W K; Wray, B B; Itan, Y; Cobat, A; Sorte, H S; Ganesan, S; Prader, S; Martins, T B; Lawrence, M G; Orange, J S; Calvo, K R; Niemela, J E; Casanova, J-L; Fleisher, T A; Hill, H R; Kumánovics, A; Conley, M E; Rosenzweig, S D

    2016-03-17

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by late-onset hypogammaglobulinemia in the absence of predisposing factors. The genetic cause is unknown in the majority of cases, and less than 10% of patients have a family history of the disease. Most patients have normal numbers of B cells but lack plasma cells. We used whole-exome sequencing and array-based comparative genomic hybridization to evaluate a subset of patients with CVID and low B-cell numbers. Mutant proteins were analyzed for DNA binding with the use of an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze peripheral-blood lymphocytes and bone marrow aspirates. Six different heterozygous mutations in IKZF1, the gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS, were identified in 29 persons from six families. In two families, the mutation was a de novo event in the proband. All the mutations, four amino acid substitutions, an intragenic deletion, and a 4.7-Mb multigene deletion involved the DNA-binding domain of IKAROS. The proteins bearing missense mutations failed to bind target DNA sequences on EMSA and confocal microscopy; however, they did not inhibit the binding of wild-type IKAROS. Studies in family members showed progressive loss of B cells and serum immunoglobulins. Bone marrow aspirates in two patients had markedly decreased early B-cell precursors, but plasma cells were present. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed in 2 of the 29 patients. Heterozygous mutations in the transcription factor IKAROS caused an autosomal dominant form of CVID that is associated with a striking decrease in B-cell numbers. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  8. Loss of function mutations in PTPN6 promote STAT3 deregulation via JAK3 kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Demosthenous, Christos; Han, Jing Jing; Hu, Guangzhen; Stenson, Mary; Gupta, Mamta

    2015-12-29

    PTPN6 (SHP1) is a tyrosine phosphatase that negatively controls the activity of multiple signaling pathways including STAT signaling, however role of mutated PTPN6 is not much known. Here we investigated whether PTPN6 might also be a potential target for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and performed Sanger sequencing of the PTPN6 gene. We have identified missense mutations within PTPN6 (N225K and A550V) in 5% (2/38) of DLBCL tumors. Site directed mutagenesis was performed to mutate wild type (WT) PTPN6 and stable cell lines were generated by lentiviral transduction of PTPN6(WT), PTPN6(N225K) and PTPN6(A550V) constructs, and effects of WT or mutated PTPN6 on STAT3 signaling were analyzed. WT PTPN6 dephosphorylated STAT3, but had no effect on STAT1, STAT5 or STAT6 phosphorylation. Both PTPN6 mutants were unable to inhibit constitutive, as well as cytokines induced STAT3 activation. Both PTPN6 mutants also demonstrated reduced tyrosine phosphatase activity and exhibited enhanced STAT3 transactivation activity. Intriguingly, a lack of direct binding between STAT3 and WT or mutated PTPN6 was observed. However, compared to WT PTPN6, cells expressing PTPN6 mutants exhibited increased binding between JAK3 and PTPN6 suggesting a more dynamic interaction of PTPN6 with upstream regulators of STAT3. Consistent with this notion, both the mutants demonstrated increased resistance to JAK3 inhibitor, WHIP-154 relative to WT PTPN6. Overall, this is the first study, which demonstrates that N225K and A550V PTPN6 mutations cause loss-of-function leading to JAK3 mediated deregulation of STAT3 pathway and uncovers a mechanism that tumor cells can use to control PTPN6 substrate specificity.

  9. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in healthy blood donors: an unexpectedly common finding

    PubMed Central

    Rachel, Jane M.; Ghia, Paolo; Boren, Jeff; Abbasi, Fatima; Dagklis, Antonis; Venable, Geri; Kang, Jiyeon; Degheidy, Heba; Plapp, Fred V.; Vogt, Robert F.; Menitove, Jay E.; Marti, Gerald E.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating monoclonal B cells may be detected in healthy adults, a condition called monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). MBL has also been identified in donated blood, but no systematic study of blood donors has been reported. Using sensitive and specific laboratory methods, we detected MBL in 149 (7.1%; 95% confidence interval, 6.0% to 8.3%) of 2098 unique donors ages 45 years or older in a Midwestern US regional blood center between 2010 and 2011. Most of the 149 donors had low-count MBL, including 99 chronic lymphocytic leukemia–like (66.4%), 22 atypical (14.8%), and 19 CD5– (12.8%) immunophenotypes. However, 5 donors (3.4%) had B-cell clonal counts above 500 cells per µL, including 3 with 1693 to 2887 cells per µL; the clone accounted for nearly all their circulating B cells. Four donors (2.7%) had 2 distinct MBL clones. Of 51 MBL samples in which immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH)V-D-J genotypes could be determined, 71% and 29% used IGHV3- and IGHV4-family genes, respectively. Sequencing revealed 82% with somatic hypermutation, whereas 18% had >98% germ-line identity, including 5 with entirely germ-line sequences. In conclusion, MBL prevalence is much higher in blood donors than previously reported, and although uncommon, the presence of high-count MBL warrants further investigations to define the biological fate of the transfused cells in recipients. PMID:24345750

  10. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in healthy blood donors: an unexpectedly common finding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Youn K; Rachel, Jane M; Ghia, Paolo; Boren, Jeff; Abbasi, Fatima; Dagklis, Antonis; Venable, Geri; Kang, Jiyeon; Degheidy, Heba; Plapp, Fred V; Vogt, Robert F; Menitove, Jay E; Marti, Gerald E

    2014-02-27

    Circulating monoclonal B cells may be detected in healthy adults, a condition called monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). MBL has also been identified in donated blood, but no systematic study of blood donors has been reported. Using sensitive and specific laboratory methods, we detected MBL in 149 (7.1%; 95% confidence interval, 6.0% to 8.3%) of 2098 unique donors ages 45 years or older in a Midwestern US regional blood center between 2010 and 2011. Most of the 149 donors had low-count MBL, including 99 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (66.4%), 22 atypical (14.8%), and 19 CD5(-) (12.8%) immunophenotypes. However, 5 donors (3.4%) had B-cell clonal counts above 500 cells per µL, including 3 with 1693 to 2887 cells per µL; the clone accounted for nearly all their circulating B cells. Four donors (2.7%) had 2 distinct MBL clones. Of 51 MBL samples in which immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH)V-D-J genotypes could be determined, 71% and 29% used IGHV3- and IGHV4-family genes, respectively. Sequencing revealed 82% with somatic hypermutation, whereas 18% had >98% germ-line identity, including 5 with entirely germ-line sequences. In conclusion, MBL prevalence is much higher in blood donors than previously reported, and although uncommon, the presence of high-count MBL warrants further investigations to define the biological fate of the transfused cells in recipients.

  11. EZH2 inhibition re-sensitizes multidrug resistant B-cell lymphomas to etoposide mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smonskey, Matthew; Lasorsa, Elena; Rosario, Spencer; Kirk, Jason S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Ellis, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of apoptotic pathways is an attractive strategy for patients with treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. The tumor suppressor, p53 is central for apoptotic response to multiple DNA damaging agents used to treat aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including etoposide. It has been demonstrated that etoposide induced DNA damage and therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combination with inhibitors of the histone methyltransferase, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). Further, EZH2 was identified to regulate cell fate decisions in response to DNA damage. Using B-cell lymphoma cell lines resistant to etoposide induced cell death; we show that p53 is dramatically down regulated and MDMX, a negative regulator of p53, is significantly up regulated. However, these cell lines remain responsive to etoposide mediated DNA damage and exhibit cell cycle inhibition and induction of senescence. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of EZH2 directs DNA damage to a predominant p53 dependent apoptotic response associated with loss of MDMX and BCL-XL. These data provide confirmation of EZH2 in determining cell fate following DNA damage and propose a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with aggressive treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26973857

  12. Small Molecule Growth Inhibitors of Human Oncogenic Gammaherpesvirus Infected B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dzeng, Richard K.; Jha, Hem Chandra; Lu, Jie; Saha, Abhik; Banerjee, Sagarika; Robertson, Erle S.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two human gammaherpesviruses associated with a broad spectrum of B-cell lymphomas, most acutely in immuno-compromised populations. However, there are no drugs which specifically target KSHV or EBV-associated lymphomas. To identify small molecules which selectively inhibit the growth of EBV or KSHV-associated B-cell lines, we performed a fluorescence based high-throughput screen on multiple stable GFP expressing virus-infected or uninfected B-cell lines. We identified 40 initial compounds with selective growth inhibition and subsequently determined the 50% growth inhibitory concentrations (GI50) for each drug. We further examined compounds with higher specificity to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms using transcription factor analysis, as well as a sh-RNA based knockdown strategy. Our data identified ten compounds with relatively high efficacy for growth inhibition. Two novel small molecules, NSC#10010 and NSC#65381 were potent growth inhibitors for gammaherpesvirus-associated B-lymphomas through activation of both the NF-κB and c-Myc- mediated signaling pathways. These drugs can serve as potential lead compounds to expand the current therapeutic window against EBV or KSHV associated human B-cell malignancies. PMID:25306391

  13. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  14. B-cell subpopulations in children: National reference values

    PubMed Central

    Duchamp, Marie; Sterlin, Delphine; Diabate, Aminata; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Monnier, Delphine; Malcus, Christophe; Labalette, Myriam; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral B-lymphocytes undergo a series of changes during the first few years of life. Encounters with foreign antigens lead to maturation and differentiation. Several primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) affecting B-cell development are associated with abnormalities in the composition and/or differentiation of B-cell compartments. The most recent international classifications of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) and common variable immunodeficiencies (CVID) have highlighted the importance of B-cell immunophenotyping and age-specific reference intervals for diagnostic purposes. We established national reference values for memory B-cell subpopulations, on the basis of CD27 and surface IgD expression in the peripheral blood of 242 healthy children. We report here the absolute counts and percentages of naive, switched and non-switched memory B-cells for seven age groups, from neonates to adults. We found that the naive B-cells percentage declined between the ages of 6 months and 8 years, after which it remained stable at about 70–80%. Memory B-cells are already present at birth and their numbers increase throughout childhood, stabilizing between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The definition of reference intervals for pediatric B-cell levels should facilitate the screening and diagnosis of various B-cell immunodeficiencies. This multicenter study, providing national reference values, should thus facilitate immunological diagnosis in children. PMID:25505547

  15. B-cell subpopulations in children: National reference values.

    PubMed

    Duchamp, Marie; Sterlin, Delphine; Diabate, Aminata; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Monnier, Delphine; Malcus, Christophe; Labalette, Myriam; Picard, Capucine

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral B-lymphocytes undergo a series of changes during the first few years of life. Encounters with foreign antigens lead to maturation and differentiation. Several primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) affecting B-cell development are associated with abnormalities in the composition and/or differentiation of B-cell compartments. The most recent international classifications of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) and common variable immunodeficiencies (CVID) have highlighted the importance of B-cell immunophenotyping and age-specific reference intervals for diagnostic purposes. We established national reference values for memory B-cell subpopulations, on the basis of CD27 and surface IgD expression in the peripheral blood of 242 healthy children. We report here the absolute counts and percentages of naive, switched and non-switched memory B-cells for seven age groups, from neonates to adults. We found that the naive B-cells percentage declined between the ages of 6 months and 8 years, after which it remained stable at about 70-80%. Memory B-cells are already present at birth and their numbers increase throughout childhood, stabilizing between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The definition of reference intervals for pediatric B-cell levels should facilitate the screening and diagnosis of various B-cell immunodeficiencies. This multicenter study, providing national reference values, should thus facilitate immunological diagnosis in children.

  16. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  17. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  18. Transcriptional networks in developing and mature B cells.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Patrick; Rolink, Antonius G

    2005-06-01

    The development of B cells from haematopoietic stem cells proceeds along a highly ordered, yet flexible, pathway. At multiple steps along this pathway, cells are instructed by transcription factors on how to further differentiate, and several check-points have been identified. These check-points are initial commitment to lymphocytic progenitors, specification of pre-B cells, entry to the peripheral B-cell pool, maturation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells. At each of these regulatory nodes, there are transcriptional networks that control the outcome, and much progress has recently been made in dissecting these networks. This article reviews our current understanding of this exciting field.

  19. Obesity decreases B cell responses in young and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Daniela; Ferracci, Franco; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Lechner, Suzanne; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of obesity-associated inflammation on influenza vaccine responses. In young and elderly individuals, both lean and with obesity, antibody responses to influenza vaccination were measured. A decrease in in vivo vaccine responses, circulating switched memory, and transitional B cells and an increase in pro-inflammatory late/exhausted memory B cells were found. In vitro B cell function was measured by activation-induced cytidine deaminase and E47, markers of optimal antibody responses. Moreover, IL-6 production was increased, whereas IL-10 production was decreased in cultures of B cells from individuals with obesity. Markers of immune activation (TNF-α, TLR4, micro-RNAs) in unstimulated B cells were also found increased and were negatively correlated with B cell function. In order to reveal potential mechanisms, we stimulated B cells from lean individuals in vitro with leptin, the adipokine increased in obesity. Leptin increased phospho-STAT3, crucial for TNF-α production, and decreased phospho-AMPK, the energy sensing enzyme upstream of phospho-p38 MAPK and E47. Leptin-induced phospho-STAT3 and phospho-AMPK levels were similar to those in B cells from individuals with obesity. These results demonstrate that leptin can be responsible for decreased B cell function in obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  20. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  1. B cell receptor-mediated internalization of salmonella: a novel pathway for autonomous B cell activation and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S Marieke

    2009-06-15

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and secretion of anti-Salmonella Ab by the Salmonella-specific B cells. In addition, BCR-mediated internalization leads to efficient Ag delivery to the MHC class II Ag-loading compartments, even though Salmonella remains vital intracellularly in primary B cells. Consequently, BCR-mediated bacterial uptake induces efficient CD4(+) T cell help, which boosts Salmonella-specific Ab production. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella by B cells is superior over extracellular Ag extraction to induce rapid and specific humoral immune responses and efficiently combat infection.

  2. A Phase II, Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Study of Simtuzumab in Combination with FOLFIRI for the Second‐Line Treatment of Metastatic KRAS Mutant Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Al B.; Vyushkov, Dmitry; Yang, Yingsi; Bendell, Johanna; Verma, Udit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. The safety profile in the patient groups who received FOLFIRI and simtuzumab did not differ from that in the FOLFIRI and placebo group.The addition of simtuzumab to chemotherapy with FOLFIRI does not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant colorectal carcinoma. Background. Simtuzumab, a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody to lysyl oxidase‐like 2 (LOXL2), blocks desmoplastic reaction in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells in vitro. Methods. Patients with metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutant CRC were randomized to receive second‐line 5‐fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) with either 200 or 700 mg simtuzumab or placebo every 2 weeks in cycles of 28 days. Progression‐free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety were assessed. Results. In total, 249 patients were randomized and treated with FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 700 mg (n = 84), FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 200 mg (n = 85), and FOLFIRI/placebo (n = 80). After a median follow‐up of 5.1, 3.8, and 5.5 months, respectively, median PFS for each of the respective treatment groups was 5.5 months (adjusted HR [95% CI], p value versus placebo; 1.32 [0.92, 1.89]; p = .10), 5.4 months (1.45 [1.01, 2.06]; p = .04), and 5.8 months. Median OS was 11.4 months (1.23 [0.80, 1.91]; p = .25), 10.5 months (1.50 [0.98, 2.30]; p = .06), and 16.3 months, respectively. ORR was 11.9%, 5.9%, and 10%, respectively. Simtuzumab was tolerable in metastatic KRAS mutant CRC patients. Conclusion. The addition of simtuzumab to FOLFIRI did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant CRC. PMID:28246207

  3. Reduced non-switched memory <