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Sample records for mutant egfrviii significantly

  1. Aptamer targeting EGFRvIII mutant hampers its constitutive autophosphorylation and affects migration, invasion and proliferation of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Colecchia, David; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Fedele, Monica; Chiariello, Mario; Cerchia, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive human brain tumor, associated with very poor survival despite surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) are hallmarks in GBM with driving roles in tumor progression. In approximately half of the tumors with amplified EGFR, the EGFRvIII truncated extracellular mutant is detected. EGFRvIII does not bind ligands, is highly oncogenic and its expression confers resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). It has been demonstrated that EGFRvIII-dependent cancers may escape targeted therapy by developing dependence on PDGFRβ signaling, thus providing a strong rationale for combination therapy aimed at blocking both EGFRvIII and PDGFRβ signaling. We have recently generated two nuclease resistant RNA aptamers, CL4 and Gint4.T, as high affinity ligands and inhibitors of the human wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt) and PDGFRβ, respectively. Herein, by different approaches, we demonstrate that CL4 aptamer binds to the EGFRvIII mutant even though it lacks most of the extracellular domain. As a consequence of binding, the aptamer inhibits EGFRvIII autophosphorylation and downstream signaling pathways, thus affecting migration, invasion and proliferation of EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cell lines. Further, we show that targeting EGFRvIII by CL4, as well as by EGFR-TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, causes upregulation of PDGFRβ. Importantly, CL4 and gefitinib cooperate with the anti-PDGFRβ Gint4.T aptamer in inhibiting cell proliferation. The proposed aptamer-based strategy could have impact on targeted molecular cancer therapies and may result in progresses against GBMs. PMID:26461476

  2. CAR-Engineered NK Cells Targeting Wild-Type EGFR and EGFRvIII Enhance Killing of Glioblastoma and Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Keung Chan, Wing; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Youwei; Cohen, Justus B; Victor, Aaron; Meisen, Walter H; Kim, Sung-hak; Grandi, Paola; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Nakano, Ichiro; Chiocca, E Antonio; Glorioso, Joseph C; Kaur, Balveen; Caligiuri, Michael A; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-07-09

    Glioblastoma (GB) remains the most aggressive primary brain malignancy. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells has emerged as a promising anti-cancer approach, yet the potential utility of CAR-engineered natural killer (NK) cells to treat GB has not been explored. Tumors from approximately 50% of GB patients express wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR) and in fewer cases express both wtEGFR and the mutant form EGFRvIII; however, previously reported CAR T cell studies only focus on targeting EGFRvIII. Here we explore whether both wtEGFR and EGFRvIII can be effectively targeted by CAR-redirected NK cells to treat GB. We transduced human NK cell lines NK-92 and NKL, and primary NK cells with a lentiviral construct harboring a second generation CAR targeting both wtEGFR and EGFRvIII and evaluated the anti-GB efficacy of EGFR-CAR-modified NK cells. EGFR-CAR-engineered NK cells displayed enhanced cytolytic capability and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with GB cells or patient-derived GB stem cells in an EGFR-dependent manner. In two orthotopic GB xenograft mouse models, intracranial administration of NK-92-EGFR-CAR cells resulted in efficient suppression of tumor growth and significantly prolonged the tumor-bearing mice survival. These findings support intracranial administration of NK-92-EGFR-CAR cells represents a promising clinical strategy to treat GB.

  3. Radiolabeled novel mAb 4G1 for immunoSPECT imaging of EGFRvIII expression in preclinical glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xujie; Dong, Chengyan; Shi, Jiyun; Ma, Teng; Jin, Zhongxia; Jia, Bing; Liu, Zhaofei; Shen, Li; Wang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor mutant III (EGFRvIII) is exclusively expressed in tumors, such as glioblastoma, breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, but never in normal organs. Increasing evidence suggests that EGFRvIII has clinical significance in glioblastoma prognosis due to its enhanced tumorigenicity and chemo/radio resistance, thus the development of an imaging approach to early detect EGFRvIII expression with high specificity is urgently needed. To illustrate this point, we developed a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody 4G1 through mouse immunization, cell fusion and hybridoma screening and then confirmed its specificity and affinity by a serial of assays. Following biodistribution and small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging of 125I-4G1 in EGFRvIII positive/negative tumor-bearing mice were performed and evaluated to verify the tumor accumulation of this radiotracer. The biodistribution indicated that 125I-4G1 showed prominent tumor accumulation at 24 h post-injection, which reached maximums of 11.20 ± 0.75% ID/g and 13.98 ± 0.57% ID/g in F98npEGFRvIII and U87vIII xenografts, respectively. In contrast, 125I-4G1 had lower tumor accumulation in F98npEGFR and U87MG xenografts. Small animal SPECT/CT imaging revealed that 125I-4G1 had a higher tumor uptake in EGFRvIII-positive tumors than that in EGFRvIII-negative tumors. This study demonstrates that radiolabeled 4G1 can serve as a valid probe for the imaging of EGFRvIII expression, and would be valuable into the clinical translation for the diagnosis, prognosis, guiding therapy, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of tumors. PMID:28031526

  4. Development of a Novel Human Single Chain Antibody Against EGFRVIII Antigen by Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Akbari, Bahman; Ahdi khosroshahi, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: EGFRvIII as the most common mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor is resulting from deletion of exons 2–7 in the coding sequence and junction of exons 1 and 8 through a novel glycine residue. EGFRvIII is highly expressed in glioblastoma, carcinoma of the breast, ovary, and lung but not in normal cells. The aim of the present study was identification of a novel single chain antibody against EGFRvIII as a promising target for cancer therapy. Methods: In this study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to EGFRvIII protein was used for screening a naive human scFv phage library. A novel five-round selection strategy was used for enrichment of rare specific clones. Results: After five rounds of screening, six positive scFv clones against EGFRvIII were selected using monoclonal phage ELISA, among them, only three clones had expected size in PCR reaction. The specific interaction of two of the scFv clones with EGFRvIII was confirmed by indirect ELISA. One phage clone with higher affinity in scFv ELISA was purified for further analysis. The purity of the produced scFv antibody was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses. Conclusion: In the present study, a human anti- EGFRvIII scFv with high affinity was first identified from a scFv phage library. This study can be the groundwork for developing more effective diagnostic and therapeutic agents against EGFRvIII expressing cancers. PMID:28101463

  5. Genetically engineered T cells to target EGFRvIII expressing glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bullain, Szofia S.; Sahin, Ayguen; Szentirmai, Oszkar; Sanchez, Carlos; Lin, Ning; Baratta, Elizabeth; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Mulligan, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, warranting further investigation of novel therapies. We describe an immunotherapeutic strategy to treat glioblastoma based on adoptive transfer of genetically modified T-lymphocytes (T cells) redirected to kill EGFRvIII expressing gliomas. We constructed a chimeric immune receptor (CIR) specific to EGFRvIII, (MR1-ζ). After in vitro selection and expansion, MR1-ζ genetically modified primary human T-cells specifically recognized EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells as demonstrated by IFN-γ secretion and efficient tumor lysis compared to control CIRs defective in EGFRvIII binding (MRB-ζ) or signaling (MR1-delζ). MR1-ζ expressing T cells also inhibited EGFRvIII-positive tumor growth in vivo in a xenografted mouse model. Successful targeting of EGFRvIII-positive tumors via adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells may represent a new immunotherapy strategy with great potential for clinical applications. PMID:19387557

  6. A Novel Molecular Targeting of a Tumor-Specific Oncogenic Mutant Receptor in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in cells and can generate dominant negative mutant (15). Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs whose catalytic activity has been mapped to a...specific ribozyme targeted at the fusion junction of EGFRvIII. This specific EGFRvIII ribozyme is able to effectively cleave EGFRvIII mRNA under...physiological conditions in a cell-free system. While expressing this EGFRvIII- ribozyme in 32D/EGFRvIII cell, EGFRvIII- ribozyme is capable of down-regulating

  7. A bivalent recombinant immunotoxin with high potency against tumors with EGFR and EGFRvIII expression.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jie; Liu, Yuanyi; Gao, Shuying; Lin, Stephen; Gu, Xinbin; Pomper, Martin G; Wang, Paul C; Shan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    EGFR and EGFRvIII are overexpressed in various types of cancer, serving as optimal targets for cancer therapy. Capitalizing on the high specificity of humanized antibody 806 (mAb806) to the EGFR and EGFRvIII overexpressed in cancer, we designed and generated a bivalent recombinant immunotoxin (RIT, DT390-BiscFv806) by fusing the mAb806-derived bivalent single-chain variable fragment with a diphtheria toxin fragment, DT390. In vitro, DT390-BiscFv806 efficiently internalized into the cells and exhibited high cytotoxicity against the U87 glioblastoma cells and the EGFRvIII-transfected U87 (U87-EGFRvIII) cells with a half maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of 1.47 nM and 2.26 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Notably, DT390-BiscFv806 was 4 orders of magnitude more potent against the U87-EGFRvIII cells than against the parent U87 cells. The cytotoxicity against a group of 6 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were further analyzed, showing an IC50 ranging from 0.24 nM to 156 nM, depending on the expression level of EGFR/EGFRvIII. In animals, the U87-EGFRvIII tumor xenografts grew extremely faster than the parental U87, and systemic administration of DT390-BiscFv806 significantly inhibited the growth of established U87-EGFRvIII and U87 tumor xenografts, showing a growth inhibition rate of 76.3% (59.82-96.2%) and 59.4% (31.5-76.0%), respectively. In pathology, the RIT-treated tumors exhibited a low mitotic activity and a large number of degenerative tumor cells, compared with the control tumors. The results indicate that DT390-BiscFv806 is promising for treatment of various types of cancer, especially for those with high EGFR expression or with EGFR and EGFRvIII co-expression.

  8. Nimotuzumab enhances temozolomide-induced growth suppression of glioma cells expressing mutant EGFR in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yusuke; Shimizu, Saki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2016-03-01

    A mutant form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, is common in glioblastoma (GBM) and confers enhanced tumorigenic activity and drug resistance. Nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, has shown preclinical and clinical activity to GBM, but its specific activity against EGFRvIII has not been fully investigated. Human glioma U87MG or LNZ308 cells overexpressing either wild-type (wt) EGFR or EGFRvIII were treated with nimotuzumab, temozolomide, or both. Expression and phosphorylation status of molecules were determined by Western blot analysis. Methylation status of promoter region of O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was detected by methylation-specific PCR. Antitumor activity was tested using nude mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral xenografts along with analyses of EGFR phosphorylation status, proliferation, apoptosis, and vessel density. Nimotuzumab treatment resulted in reduction of EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation with a decrease in Akt phosphorylation that was greater than that of wtEGFR. Correspondingly, antitumor effects, growth suppression and survival elongation, were more significant in mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral tumor expressing EGFRvIII than in those expressing wtEGFR. These effects were markedly increased when temozolomide was combined with nimotuzumab. The post-treatment recurrent brain tumors exhibited a decrease in expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MSH6 and MLH1, but their methylated MGMT status did not changed. Nimotuzumab has in vivo antitumor activity against GBM, especially those expressing EGFRvIII, when combined with temozolomide. This could provide a basis for preselection of patients with GBM by EGFR status who might benefit from the nimotuzumab and temozolomide combination therapy.

  9. EGFRvIII antibody-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging-guided convection-enhanced delivery and targeted therapy of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Machaidze, Revaz; Kaluzova, Milota; Wang, Liya; Schuette, Albert J; Chen, Hongwei; Wu, Xinying; Mao, Hui

    2010-08-01

    The magnetic nanoparticle has emerged as a potential multifunctional clinical tool that can provide cancer cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement as well as targeted cancer cell therapy. A major barrier in the use of nanotechnology for brain tumor applications is the difficulty in delivering nanoparticles to intracranial tumors. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP; 10 nm in core size) conjugated to a purified antibody that selectively binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) deletion mutant (EGFRvIII) present on human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells were used for therapeutic targeting and MRI contrast enhancement of experimental glioblastoma, both in vitro and in vivo, after convection-enhanced delivery (CED). A significant decrease in glioblastoma cell survival was observed after nanoparticle treatment and no toxicity was observed with treatment of human astrocytes (P < 0.001). Lower EGFR phosphorylation was found in glioblastoma cells after EGFRvIIIAb-IONP treatment. Apoptosis was determined to be the mode of cell death after treatment of GBM cells and glioblastoma stem cell-containing neurospheres with EGFRvIIIAb-IONPs. MRI-guided CED of EGFRvIIIAb-IONPs allowed for the initial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles within or adjacent to intracranial human xenograft tumors and continued dispersion days later. A significant increase in animal survival was found after CED of magnetic nanoparticles (P < 0.01) in mice implanted with highly tumorigenic glioblastoma xenografts (U87DeltaEGFRvIII). IONPs conjugated to an antibody specific to the EGFRvIII deletion mutant constitutively expressed by human glioblastoma tumors can provide selective MRI contrast enhancement of tumor cells and targeted therapy of infiltrative glioblastoma cells after CED.

  10. humMR1, a highly specific humanized single chain antibody for targeting EGFRvIII.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Omidfar, Kobra; Khalili, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    Production of an efficient humanized single chain antibody is reported here to specifically target EGFRvIII, a truncated receptor expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. CDR loops of MR1, a phage display-derived murine single chain antibody developed against this mutant receptor, were grafted on human frameworks that had been selected based on similarity to MR1 in terms of two distinct parameters, variable domain protein sequence and CDR canonical structures. Moreover, two point mutations were introduced in CDR-H2 and CDR-H3 loops of the humanized antibody to destroy its cross-reactivity to wild-type EGFR. The resultant antibody, referred to as humMR1, was found by MTT assay, ELISA and western blot techniques to be highly specific for EGFRvIII. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII-specific 14-amino acid synthetic peptide and HC2 cells were measured to be 1.87 × 10(10) and 2.17 × 10(10)/M respectively. This humanized antibody leads to 78.5% inhibition in proliferation of EGFRvIII-overexpressing cells.

  11. EGFR phosphorylates tumor-derived EGFRvIII driving STAT3/5 and progression in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qi-Wen; Cheng, Christine; Gustafson, W. Clay; Charron, Elizabeth; Zipper, Petra; Wong, Robyn A.; Chen, Justin; Lau, Jasmine; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane; Weller, Michael; Jura, Natalia; Reifenberger, Guido; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, William A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY EGFRvIII, a frequently occurring mutation in primary glioblastoma, results in a protein product that cannot bind ligand, but signals constitutively. Deducing how EGFRvIII causes transformation has been difficult because of autocrine and paracrine loops triggered by EGFRvIII alone or in heterodimers with wild-type EGFR. Here, we document co-expression of EGFR and EGFRvIII in primary human glioblastoma that drives transformation and tumorigenesis in a cell-intrinsic manner. We demonstrate enhancement of downstream STAT signaling triggered by EGFR-catalyzed phosphorylation of EGFRvIII, implicating EGFRvIII as a substrate for EGFR. Subsequent phosphorylation of STAT3 requires nuclear entry of EGFRvIII and formation of an EGFRvIII-STAT3 nuclear complex. Our findings clarify specific oncogenic signaling relationships between EGFR and EGFRvIII in glioblastoma. PMID:24135280

  12. Inhibition of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and 2 (ACC2) Reduces Proliferation and De Novo Lipogenesis of EGFRvIII Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jessica E. C.; Esler, William P.; Patel, Rushi; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Vernochet, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation and migration processes are regulated by multiple metabolic pathways including glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is at the junction of lipids synthesis and oxidative metabolic pathways, we investigated whether use of a dual ACC inhibitor would provide a potential therapy against certain lipogenic cancers. The impact of dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibition was investigated using a dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibitor as well as dual siRNA knock down on the cellular viability and metabolism of two glioblastoma multiform cancer cell lines, U87 and a more aggressive form, U87 EGFRvIII. We first demonstrated that while ACCi inhibited DNL in both cell lines, ACCi preferentially blunted the U87 EGFRvIII cellular proliferation capacity. Metabolically, chronic treatment with ACCi significantly upregulated U87 EGFRvIII cellular respiration and extracellular acidification rate, a marker of glycolytic activity, but impaired mitochondrial health by reducing maximal respiration and decreasing mitochondrial ATP production efficiency. Moreover, ACCi treatment altered the cellular lipids content and increased apoptotic caspase activity in U87 EGFRvIII cells. Collectively these data indicate that ACC inhibition, by reducing DNL and increasing cellular metabolic rate, may have therapeutic utility for the suppression of lipogenic tumor growth and warrants further investigation. PMID:28081256

  13. Clinical significance of hepatitis B surface antigen mutants

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Onorato, Lorenzo; Minichini, Carmine; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Starace, Mario; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem in many countries, with nearly 300 million people worldwide carrying HBV chronic infection and over 1 million deaths per year due to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Several hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations have been described, most frequently due to a single amino acid substitution and seldom to a nucleotide deletion. The majority of mutations are located in the S region, but they have also been found in the pre-S1 and pre-S2 regions. Single amino acid substitutions in the major hydrophilic region of HBsAg, called the “a” determinant, have been associated with immune escape and the consequent failure of HBV vaccination and HBsAg detection, whereas deletions in the pre-S1 or pre-S2 regions have been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. This review article will focus on the HBsAg mutants and their biological and clinical implications. PMID:26644816

  14. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

    SciTech Connect

    Melchers, Lieuwe J.; Clausen, Martijn J.A.M.; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Schuuring, Ed

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was optimized on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using glioblastoma tissue. It was compared with EGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression using a specific reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction also optimized for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays including 531 HNSCCs of various stages with complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were tested for the presence of EGFRvIII. Results: None of the 531 cases showed EGFRvIII protein expression. Using an immunohistochemistry protocol reported by others revealed cytoplasmic staining in 8% of cases. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the EGFRvIII transcript of the 28 highest cytoplasmic staining cases, as well as 69 negative cases, did not show expression in any of the tested cases, suggesting aspecific staining by a nonoptimal protocol. Conclusions: The EGFRvIII mutation is not present in HNSCC. Therefore, EGFRvIII does not influence treatment response in HNSCC and is not a usable clinical prognostic marker.

  15. CXCR4 Suppression Attenuates EGFRvIII-Mediated Invasion and Induces p38 MAPK-Dependent Protein Trafficking and Degradation of EGFRvIII in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Massod; Tang, Careen K.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous report has shown that the constitutively activated EGFR variant, EGFRvIII, up-regulates the pro-metastatic chemokine receptor CXCR4 in breast cancer cells. Here we evaluated the biological effect and cell signaling effects of silencing CXCR4 expression in EGFRvIII-expressing breast cancer cells. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated suppression of CXCR4 expression significantly reduced the invasive potential and proliferation of EGFRvIII-expressing breast cancer cells. These cells exhibited a reduction of EGFRvIII activity and protein expression due to increased protein degradation and altered protein trafficking. In conclusion, suppression of CXCR4 inhibits EGFRvIII-mediated breast cancer cell invasion and proliferation. PMID:21454012

  16. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Wojciech J.; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII. The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach. PMID:27004406

  17. Tumor-specific Immunotherapy Targeting the EGFRvIII Mutation in Patients with Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Archer, Gary E.; Mitchell, Duane A.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant gliomas (MGs) fail to target tumor cells exclusively, such that their efficacy is ultimately limited by non-specific toxicity. Immunologic targeting of tumor-specific gene mutations, however, may allow more precise eradication of neoplastic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a consistent tumor-specific mutation that is widely expressed in MGs and other neoplasms. This mutation encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that enhances tumorgenicity and migration and confers radiation and chemotherapeutic resistance. This in-frame deletion mutation splits a codon resulting in the creation of a novel glycine at the fusion junction between normally distant parts of the molecule and producing a sequence rearrangement which creates a tumor-specific epitope for cellular or humoral immunotherapy in patients with MGs. We have previously shown that vaccination with a peptide that spans the EGFRvIII fusion junction is an efficacious immunotherapy in syngeneic murine models, but patients with MGs have a profound immunosuppression that may inhibit the ability of antigen presenting cells (APCs), even those generated ex vivo, to induce EGFRvIII-specific immune responses. In this report, we summarize our results in humans targeting this mutation in two consecutive and one multi-institutional Phase II immunotherapy trials. These trials demonstrated that vaccines targeting EGFRvIII are capable of inducing potent T- and B-cell immunity in these patients, and an unexpectedly long survival time. Most importantly, vaccines targeting EGFRvIII were universally successful at eliminating tumor cells expressing the targeted antigen without any evidence of symptomatic collateral toxicity. These studies establish the tumor-specific EGFRvIII mutation as a novel target for humoral- and cell-mediated immunotherapy in a variety of cancers. The recurrence of EGFRvIII-negative tumors in our patients, however, highlights the

  18. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes.

    PubMed

    Stec, Wojciech J; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-05-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII.The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach.

  19. [Cell-ELA-based determination of binding affinity of DNA aptamer against U87-EGFRvIII cell].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Liang, Huiyu; Wu, Xidong; Gao, Yubo; Zhang, Xingmei

    2013-05-01

    A15, a DNA aptamer with binding specificity for U87 glioma cells stably overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (U87-EGFRvIII), was generated by cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) using a random nucleotide library. Subsequently, we established a cell enzyme-linked assay (cell-ELA) to detect the affinity of A15 compared to an EGFR antibody. We used A15 as a detection probe and cultured U87-EGFRvIII cells as targets. Our data indicate that the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) for A15 were below 100 nmol/L and had similar affinity compared to an EGFR antibody for U87-EGFRvIII. We demonstrated that the cell-ELA was a useful method to determine the equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) of aptamers generated by cell-SELEX.

  20. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFRvIII in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFRvIII in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFRvIII mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFRvIII and EGFRWT mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFRvIII expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFRvIII expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFRvIII varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFRvIII mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFRvIII plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFRvIII importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene. PMID:28123609

  1. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFR(vIII) in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFR(vIII) in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFR(vIII) mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFR(vIII) and EGFR(WT) mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFR(vIII) expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFR(vIII) expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFR(vIII) varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFR(vIII) mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFR(vIII) plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFR(vIII) importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene.

  2. The evolution of the EGFRvIII (rindopepimut) immunotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme patients

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Michelle; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Hsu, Frank P K; Bota, Daniela A

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of brain tumor and it is uniformly fatal. The community standard of treatment for this disease is gross or subtotal resection of the tumor, followed by radiation and temozolomide. At recurrence bevacizumab can be added for increased progression free survival. Many challenges are encountered while trying to devise new drugs to treat GBM, such as the presence of the blood brain barrier which is impermeable to most drugs. Therefore in the past few years attention was turned to immunological means for the treatment of this devastating disease. EGFRvIII targeting has proven a good way to attack glioblastoma cells by using the immune system. Although in still in development, this approach holds the promise as a great first step toward immune-tailored drugs for the treatment of brain cancers. PMID:25625931

  3. Receptor dimerization is not a factor in the signalling activity of a transforming variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII).

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C T; Everiss, K D; Wikstrand, C J; Batra, S K; Kung, H J; Bigner, D D

    1997-01-01

    The type-III deletion variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is frequently found in glioblastomas and other malignant human tumours. Although EGFRvIII confers ligand-independent oncogenic transformation of cell lines, the mechanism by which it promotes aberrant cellular proliferation is unknown. Using cell lines expressing comparable numbers of either wild-type receptor (EGFRwt) or EGFRvIII, we compared several parameters of receptor activation: dimerization, tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of intracellular signalling proteins. Like activated EGFRwt, EGFRvIII was phosphorylated and bound constitutively to the Shc adapter protein. Indeed, EGFRvIII-associated Shc had a higher phosphotyrosine content than Shc associated with stimulated EGFRwt. EGFRwt dimerized in response to either EGF or transforming growth factor alpha. Higher cross-linker concentrations and incubation at higher temperatures (37 degrees C) allowed detection of EGFRwt dimers even in the absence of exogenous ligand. In contrast, EGFRvIII failed to dimerize under any conditions studied. Moreover, neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor phospholipase Cgamma were phosphorylated in EGFRvIII-expressing cells. We conclude that the deletion of 267 amino acids from the 621-amino-acid N-terminal domain of EGFR does not result simply in a constitutively activated receptor, but alters the spectrum of signalling cascades utilized. Furthermore the ligand-independent transforming activity of EGFRvIII is independent of receptor dimerization. PMID:9210410

  4. Substantially elevating the levels of αB-crystallin in spinal motor neurons of mutant SOD1 mice does not significantly delay paralysis or attenuate mutant protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guilian; Fromholt, Susan; Ayers, Jacob I; Brown, Hilda; Siemienski, Zoe; Crosby, Keith W; Mayer, Christopher A; Janus, Christopher; Borchelt, David R

    2015-05-01

    There has been great interest in enhancing endogenous protein maintenance pathways such as the heat-shock chaperone response, as it is postulated that enhancing clearance of misfolded proteins could have beneficial disease modifying effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative disorders. In cultured cell models of mutant SOD1 aggregation, co-expression of αB-crystallin (αB-crys) has been shown to inhibit the formation of detergent-insoluble forms of mutant protein. Here, we describe the generation of a new line of transgenic mice that express αB-crys at > 6-fold the normal level in spinal cord, with robust increases in immunoreactivity throughout the spinal cord grey matter and, specifically, in spinal motor neurons. Surprisingly, spinal cords of mice expressing αB-crys alone contained 20% more motor neurons per section than littermate controls. Raising αB-crys by these levels in mice transgenic for either G93A or L126Z mutant SOD1 had no effect on the age at which paralysis developed. In the G93A mice, which showed the most robust degree of motor neuron loss, the number of these cells declined by the same proportion as in mice expressing the mutant SOD1 alone. In paralyzed bigenic mice, the levels of detergent-insoluble, misfolded, mutant SOD1 were similar to those of mice expressing mutant SOD1 alone. These findings indicate that raising the levels of αB-crys in spinal motor neurons by 6-fold does not produce the therapeutic effects predicted by cell culture models of mutant SOD1 aggregation. Enhancing the protein chaperone function may present a therapeutic approach to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutations in SOD1, and other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cytosolic protein aggregation. Previous studies in cell models suggested that the chaperone known as αB-crystallin (αB-crys) can prevent mutant SOD1 aggregation. We report that transgenic expression of αB-crys at > 6-fold the normal level in spinal

  5. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Park, Gunwoo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications.

  6. Four novel FBN1 mutations: Significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, H.C.; McIntosh, I.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Francomano, C.A. ); Sakai, L.Y.; Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Defects of fibrillin (FBN1), a glycoprotein component of the extracellular microfibril, cause Marfan syndrome. This disorder is characterized by marked inter- and intrafamilial variation in phenotypic severity. To understand the molecular basis for this clinical observation, the authors have screened the fibrillin gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15, including the newly cloned 5[prime] coding sequence, for disease-producing alterations in a panel of patients with a wide range of manifestations and clinical severity. All the missense mutations identified to date, including two novel mutations discussed here, are associated with classic and moderate to severe disease and occur at residues with putative significance for calcium binding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. In contrast, two new mutations that create premature signals for termination of translation of mRNA and are associated with reduction in the amount of mutant allele transcript produce a range of phenotypic severity. The patient with the lowest amount of mutant transcript has the mildest disease. These data support a role for altered calcium binding to EGF-like domains in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and suggest a dominant negative mechanism for the pathogenesis of this disorder. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Small Molecule Inhibitor G6 Significantly Reduces Bone Marrow Fibrosis and the Mutant Burden in a Mouse Model of Jak2-Mediated Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kirabo, Annet; Park, Sung O.; Wamsley, Heather L.; Gali, Meghanath; Baskin, Rebekah; Reinhard, Mary K.; Zhao, Zhizhuang J.; Bisht, Kirpal S.; Keserű, György M.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2013-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome–negative myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, and myelofibrosis, are disorders characterized by abnormal hematopoiesis. Among these myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelofibrosis has the most unfavorable prognosis. Furthermore, currently available therapies for myelofibrosis have little to no efficacy in the bone marrow and hence, are palliative. We recently developed a Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) small molecule inhibitor called G6 and found that it exhibits marked efficacy in a xenograft model of Jak2-V617F–mediated hyperplasia and a transgenic mouse model of Jak2-V617F–mediated polycythemia vera/essential thrombocytosis. However, its efficacy in Jak2-mediated myelofibrosis has not previously been examined. Here, we hypothesized that G6 would be efficacious in Jak2-V617F–mediated myelofibrosis. To test this, mice expressing the human Jak2-V617F cDNA under the control of the vav promoter were administered G6 or vehicle control solution, and efficacy was determined by measuring parameters within the peripheral blood, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. We found that G6 significantly reduced extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver and splenomegaly. In the bone marrow, G6 significantly reduced pathogenic Jak/STAT signaling by 53%, megakaryocytic hyperplasia by 70%, and the Jak2 mutant burden by 68%. Furthermore, G6 significantly improved the myeloid to erythroid ratio and significantly reversed the myelofibrosis. Collectively, these results indicate that G6 is efficacious in Jak2-V617F–mediated myelofibrosis, and given its bone marrow efficacy, it may alter the natural history of this disease. PMID:22796437

  8. Insights into significance of combined inhibition of MEK and m-TOR signalling output in KRAS mutant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Broutin, Sophie; Stewart, Adam; Thavasu, Parames; Paci, Angelo; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to understand the dependence of MEK and m-TOR inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cell lines. Methods: In a panel of KRASM and KRASWT NSCLC cell lines, we determined growth inhibition (GI) following maximal reduction in p-ERK and p-S6RP caused by trametinib (MEK inhibitor) and AZD2014 (m-TOR inhibitor), respectively. Results: GI caused by maximal m-TOR inhibition was significantly greater than GI caused by maximal MEK inhibition in the cell line panel (52% vs 18%, P<10−4). There was no significant difference in GI caused by maximal m-TOR compared with maximal m-TOR+MEK inhibition. However, GI caused by the combination was significantly greater in the KRASM cell lines (79% vs 61%, P=0.017). Conclusions: m-TOR inhibition was more critical to GI than MEK inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cells. The combination of MEK and m-TOR inhibition was most effective in KRASM cells. PMID:27441499

  9. LY3009120, a panRAF inhibitor, has significant anti-tumor activity in BRAF and KRAS mutant preclinical models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakana, Eliza; Pratt, Susan; Blosser, Wayne; Dowless, Michele; Simpson, Nicholas; Yuan, Xiu-Juan; Jaken, Susan; Manro, Jason; Stephens, Jennifer; Zhang, Youyan; Huber, Lysiane; Peng, Sheng-Bin; Stancato, Louis F

    2017-02-07

    Activating mutations in the KRAS and BRAF genes, leading to hyperactivation of the RAS/RAF/MAPK oncogenic signaling cascade, are common in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). While selective BRAF inhibitors are efficacious in BRAFmut melanoma, they have limited efficacy in BRAFmut CRC patients. In a RASmut background, selective BRAF inhibitors are contraindicated due to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway through potentiation of CRAF kinase activity. A way to overcome such paradoxical activation is through concurrent inhibition of the kinase activity of both RAF isoforms. Here, we further examined the effects of LY3009120, a panRAF and RAF dimer inhibitor, in human models of CRC with various mutational backgrounds. We demonstrate that LY3009120 induced anti-proliferative effects in BRAFmut and KRASmut CRC cell lines through G1-cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effects of LY3009120 in KRASmut CRC cell lines phenocopied molecular inhibition of RAF isoforms by simultaneous siRNA-mediated knockdown of ARAF, BRAF and CRAF. Additionally, LY3009120 displayed significant activity in in vivo BRAFmut and KRASmut CRC xenograft models. Examination of potential resistance to LY3009120 demonstrated RAF-independent ERK and AKT activation in the KRASmut CRC cell line HCT 116. These findings describe the preclinical activity of a panRAF inhibitor in a BRAFmut and KRASmut CRC setting.

  10. Inhibition of auxin transport and auxin signaling and treatment with far red light induces root coiling in the phospholipase-A mutant ppla-I-1. Significance for surface penetration?

    PubMed

    Perrineau, F; Wimalasekera, R; Effendi, Y; Scherer, G F E

    2016-06-01

    When grown on a non-penetretable at a surface angle of 45°, Arabidopsis roots form wave-like structures and, in wild type rarely, but in certain mutants the tip root even may form circles. These circles are called coils. The formation of coils depends on the complex interaction of circumnutation, gravitropism and negative thigmotropism where - at least - gravitropism is intimately linked to auxin transport and signaling. The knockout mutant of patatin-related phospholipase-AI-1 (pplaI-1) is an auxin-signaling mutant which forms moderately increased numbers of coils on tilted agar plates. We tested the effects of the auxin efflux transport inhibitor NPA (1-naphthylphtalamic acid) and of the influx transport inhibitor 1-NOA (1-naphthoxyacetic acid) which both further increased root coil formation. The pPLAI-1 inhibitors HELSS (haloenol lactone suicide substrate=E-6-(bromomethylene)tetrahydro-3-(1-naphthalenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one) and ETYA (eicosatetraynoic acid) which are auxin signaling inhibitors also increased coil formation. In addition, far red light treatment increased coil formation. The results point out that a disturbance of auxin transport and signaling is one potential cause for root coils. As we show that the mutant pplaI-1 penetrates horizontal agar plates better than wild type plants root movements may help penetrating the soil.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  12. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  13. ENIGMA--evidence-based network for the interpretation of germline mutant alleles: an international initiative to evaluate risk and clinical significance associated with sequence variation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Healey, Sue; Devereau, Andrew; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Radice, Paolo; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Tavtigian, Sean; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E

    2012-01-01

    As genetic testing for predisposition to human diseases has become an increasingly common practice in medicine, the need for clear interpretation of the test results is apparent. However, for many disease genes, including the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, a significant fraction of tests results in the detection of a genetic variant for which disease association is not known. The finding of an "unclassified" variant (UV)/variant of uncertain significance (VUS) complicates genetic test reporting and counseling. As these variants are individually rare, a large collaboration of researchers and clinicians will facilitate studies to assess their association with cancer predisposition. It was with this in mind that the ENIGMA consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) was initiated in 2009. The membership is both international and interdisciplinary, and currently includes more than 100 research scientists and clinicians from 19 countries. Within ENIGMA, there are presently six working groups focused on the following topics: analysis, clinical, database, functional, tumor histopathology, and mRNA splicing. ENIGMA provides a mechanism to pool resources, exchange methods and data, and coordinately develop and apply algorithms for classification of variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2. It is envisaged that the research and clinical application of models developed by ENIGMA will be relevant to the interpretation of sequence variants in other disease genes.

  14. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  15. Characterization of rag1 mutant zebrafish leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Hohn, Claudia; Hanson, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Zebrafish may prove to be one of the best vertebrate models for innate immunology. These fish have sophisticated immune components, yet rely heavily on innate immune mechanisms. Thus, the development and characterization of mutant and/or knock out zebrafish are critical to help define immune cell and immune gene functions in the zebrafish model. The use of Severe Combined Immunodeficient (SCID) and recombination activation gene 1 and 2 mutant mice has allowed the investigation of the specific contribution of innate defenses in many infectious diseases. Similar zebrafish mutants are now being used in biomedical and fish immunology related research. This report describes the leukocyte populations in a unique model, recombination activation gene 1-/- mutant zebrafish (rag1 mutants). Results Differential counts of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) showed that rag1 mutants had significantly decreased lymphocyte-like cell populations (34.7%) compared to wild-types (70.5%), and significantly increased granulocyte populations (52.7%) compared to wild-types (17.6%). Monocyte/macrophage populations were similar between mutants and wild-types, 12.6% and 11.3%, respectively. Differential leukocyte counts of rag1 mutant kidney hematopoietic tissue showed a significantly reduced lymphocyte-like cell population (8%), a significantly increased myelomonocyte population (57%), 34.8% precursor cells, and 0.2% thrombocytes, while wild-type hematopoietic kidney tissue showed 29.4% lymphocytes/lymphocyte-like cells, 36.4% myelomonocytes, 33.8% precursors and 0.5% thrombocytes. Flow cytometric analyses of kidney hematopoietic tissue revealed three leukocyte populations. Population A was monocytes and granulocytes and comprised 34.7% of the gated cells in rag1 mutants and 17.6% in wild-types. Population B consisted of hematopoietic precursors, and comprised 50% of the gated cells for rag1 mutants and 53% for wild-types. Population C consisted of lymphocytes and lymphocyte

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  17. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  18. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes.

  19. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  20. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  1. Analysis of Sporulation Mutants II. Mutants Blocked in the Citric Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fortnagel, Peter; Freese, Ernst

    1968-01-01

    Sporulation mutants that were unable to incorporate uracil during the developmental period recovered this capacity with the addition of ribose and in most cases with the addition of glutamate. Of the mutants that responded to both ribose and glumate, all but three also responded to citrate, and all but five responded to acetate. One of the exceptional strains was deficient in aconitase and another one in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase; both required glutamate for growth. For the mutants which did not respond to glutamate, the products made from 14C-glutamate were determined by thin-layer chromatography. Significant differences were found which enabled the identification of mutant blocks. The deficiency of the corresponding enzyme activity was verified. Several mutants were deficient in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and one lacked succinic dehydrogenase. These mutants could still grow on glucose as sole carbon source, but not on glutamate. The intact Krebs cycle is therefore not required for vegetative growth of aerobic Bacillis subtilis, but it is indispensable for sporulation. Images PMID:4967197

  2. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  3. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  4. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Long; Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape.

  5. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    PubMed

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  6. Aminoglycoside-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in cytochrome d, nitrite reductase, and aerobic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L E; Kwan, S

    1981-01-01

    Two gentamicin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO 503 were selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. Mutant PAO 2403 had significantly increased resistance to aminoglycoside but not to other antibiotics. Mutant PAO 2402 showed a similar spectrum of resistance but of lower magnitude. Both mutants showed no detectable cytochrome d and had a high frequency of reversion to a fully wild-type phenotype. PAO 2403 had a marked decrease and PAO 2402 had a moderate decrease in nitrite reductase activity. Both mutants had reduced uptake of gentamicin and dihydrostreptomycin. Mutant PAO 2403 showed a general decrease in transport rate of cationic compounds, whereas mutant PAO 2402 had only deficient glucose transport. Both mutants showed enhanced rates of glutamine transport and no change in glutamic acid transport. Other components of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were normal. These mutants involve ferrocytochrome C551 oxidoreductase formed only on anaerobic growth but illustrate transport defects in aerobically grown cells. PMID:6791588

  7. Temperature-sensitive rubisco mutant of Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Spreitzer, R.J.; Chastain, C.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant 68-4PP is a temperature-sensitive mutant that lacks photosynthetic ability at 35/sup 0/C, but is able to grow photosynthetically at 25/sup 0/C. Genetic analysis indicated that 68-4PP is a chloroplast mutant that is allelic with known Rubisco large-subunit structural-gene mutants, implying that 68-4PP also resulted from a mutation in the large-subunit gene. The 68-4PP mutant has about 35% of the wild-type level of Rubisco holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 25/sup 0/C, but it has less than 10% of normal holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 35/sup 0/C. However, (/sup 35/S)-sulfate pulse labeling showed that Rubisco subunits were synthesized at normal rates at both temperatures. More significantly, the ratio of carboxylase activity in the absence and presence of oxygen at a limiting CO/sub 2/ concentration (6.6 ..mu..M) was about 2.2 for the mutant enzyme, as compared to about 3.0 for the wild-type enzyme. The decreased ratio of the mutant enzyme is maternally inherited, indicating that this reduced oxygen sensitivity results from a mutation in chloroplast DNA. The authors have recently cloned the 68-4PP Rubisco large-subunit gene, and DNA sequencing is in progress.

  8. A novel mutant mouse, joggle, with inherited ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyan; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2006-07-01

    While establishing a new mouse strain, we discovered a novel mutant mouse that exhibited ataxia. Mating experiments showed that the mutant phenotype was due to a single autosomal recessive gene, which we have termed joggle (gene symbol: jog). The ataxia becomes apparent around postnatal day 12, when the mice first attempt to walk, and worsens thereafter. The life span of the mutant mouse is comparable to that of the wild-type mouse. After 21 days of age, the cerebellum weights of the jog/jog mice are significantly lower than those of the wild-type mice. These observations indicate that jog/jog mutant mice could be useful models for biomedical research.

  9. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology.

  10. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major ‘green revolution’ traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  11. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  12. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  13. Genome-Wide Screen for Oxalate-Sensitive Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Stotz, H. U.; Hippchen, K.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor produced by phytopathogenic filamentous fungi. In order to discover yeast genes whose orthologs in the pathogen may confer self-tolerance and whose plant orthologs may protect the host, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library consisting of 4,827 haploid mutants harboring deletions in nonessential genes was screened for growth inhibition and survival in a rich medium containing 30 mM oxalic acid at pH 3. A total of 31 mutants were identified that had significantly lower cell yields in oxalate medium than in an oxalate-free medium. About 35% of these mutants had not previously been detected in published screens for sensitivity to sorbic or citric acid. Mutants impaired in endosomal transport, the rgp1Δ, ric1Δ, snf7Δ, vps16Δ, vps20Δ, and vps51Δ mutants, were significantly overrepresented relative to their frequency among all verified yeast open reading frames. Oxalate exposure to a subset of five mutants, the drs2Δ, vps16Δ, vps51Δ, ric1Δ, and rib4Δ mutants, was lethal. With the exception of the rib4Δ mutant, all of these mutants are impaired in vesicle-mediated transport. Indirect evidence is provided suggesting that the sensitivity of the rib4Δ mutant, a riboflavin auxotroph, is due to oxalate-mediated interference with riboflavin uptake by the putative monocarboxylate transporter Mch5. PMID:17644632

  14. Spontaneous chlorophyll mutants of Pennisetum americanum: Genetics and chlorophyll quantities.

    PubMed

    Koduru, P R; Rao, M K

    1980-05-01

    Thirteen spontaneously occurring chlorophyll deficient phenotypes have been described and their genetic basis was established. Ten of these - 'white', 'white tipped green', 'patchy white', 'white virescent', 'white striping 1', 'white striping 2', 'white striping 4', 'fine striping', 'chlorina' and 'yellow virescent' showed monogenic recessive inheritance and the remaining three - 'yellow striping', 'yellow green' and 'light green' seedling phenotypes showed digenic recessive inheritance. The genes for (i) 'white tipped green' (wr) and 'yellow virescent' (yv) and (ii) 'patchy white' (pw) and 'white striping 1' (wst 1) showed independent assortment. Further, the genes for 'white' (w), 'white tipped green' (wr) and 'yellow virescent' (yv) were inherited independently of the gene for hairy leaf margin (Hm).In the mutants - 'white tipped green', 'patchy white', 'white striping 1', 'white striping 2', 'fine striping', 'chlorina', 'yellow virescent', 'yellow striping', 'yellow green' and 'light green' phenotypes total quantity of chlorophyll was significantly less than that in the corresponding controls, while in 'white virescent' there was no reduction in the mature stage. For nine of the mutants the quantity of chlorophyll was also estimated in F1's (mutant x control green). In F1's of six of the mutants - 'white tip', 'patchy white', 'chlorina', 'yellow virescent', 'fine striping' and 'yellow striping' the quantity of chlorophyll was almost equal to the wild type. In the F1's of three of the mutants - 'white striping 1', 'white striping 2' and 'light green' an intermediate value between the mutant and wild types was observed. In 'yellow virescent' retarded synthesis of chlorophyll, particularly chlorophyll a was observed in the juvenile stage. Reduced quantity of chlorophyll was associated with defective chloroplasts. In the mutants - 'white tipped green, 'white virescent', 'fine striping', 'chlorina', 'yellow striping', 'yellow green' and 'light green' defective

  15. Selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for the efficient selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants defective in the chemotactic response to folate could be enriched up to 30-fold in one round of selection using a chamber in which a compartment that contained the chemoattractant was separated by a sandwich of four nitrocellulose filters from a compartment that contained buffer. Mutagenized cells were placed in the center of the filter layer and exposed to the attractant gradient built up between the compartments for a period of 3-4 h. While wild-type cells moved through the filters in a wave towards the compartment that contained attractant, mutant cells remained in the filter to which they were applied. After several repetitions of the selection procedure, mutants defective in chemotaxis made up 10% of the total cell population retained in that filter. Mutants exhibiting three types of alterations were collected: motility mutants with either reduced speed of movement, or altered rates of turning; a single mutant defective in production of the attractant- degrading enzyme, folate deaminase; and mutants with normal motility but reduced chemotactic responsiveness. One mutant showed drastically reduced sensitivity in folate-induced cGMP production. Morphogenetic alterations of mutants defective in folate chemotaxis are described. PMID:3793759

  16. Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in pigmentation: annotated tables.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Tobin, Desmond J; Richards-Smith, Beverly; Sundberg, John P; Paus, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian pigment cell research has recently entered a phase of significantly increased activity due largely to the exploitation of the many mutant mouse stocks that are coming on stream. Numerous transgenic, targeted mutagenesis (so-called 'knockouts'), conditional (so-called 'gene switch') and spontaneous mutant mice develop abnormal coat color phenotypes. The number of mice that exhibit such abnormalities is increasing exponentially as genetic engineering methods become routine. Since defined abnormalities in such mutant mice provide important clues to the as yet often poorly understood functional roles of many gene products, this overview includes a corresponding, annotated table of mutant mice with pigmentation alterations. These range from early developmental defects via a large array of coat color abnormalities to a melanoma metastasis model. This overview should provide helpful pointers to investigators who are looking for mouse models to explore or to compare functional activities of genes of interest and for comparing coat color phenotypes of spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse mutants with novel ones. Secondly, this review includes a table of mouse models of specific human diseases with genetically defined pigmentation abnormalities. In summary, this annotated table should serve as a useful reference for anyone interested in the molecular controls of pigmentation.

  17. Nanoformulated cell-penetrating survivin mutant and its dual actions

    PubMed Central

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the differential actions of a dominant-negative survivin mutant (SurR9-C84A) against cancerous SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell lines and differentiated SK-N-SH neurons. In both the cases, the mutant protein displayed dual actions, where its effects were cytotoxic toward cancerous cells and proliferative toward the differentiated neurons. This can be explained by the fact that tumorous (undifferentiated SK-N-SH) cells have a high endogenous survivin pool and upon treatment with mutant SuR9-C84A causes forceful survivin expression. These events significantly lowered the microtubule dynamics and stability, eventually leading to apoptosis. In the case of differentiated SK-N-SH neurons that express negligible levels of wild-type survivin, the mutant indistinguishably behaved in a wild-type fashion. It also favored cell-cycle progression, forming the chromosome-passenger complex, and stabilized the microtubule-organizing center. Therefore, mutant SurR9-C84A represents a novel therapeutic with its dual actions (cytotoxic toward tumor cells and protective and proliferative toward neuronal cells), and hence finds potential applications against a variety of neurological disorders. In this study, we also developed a novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticulate formulation to surmount the hurdles associated with the delivery of SurR9-C84A, thus enhancing its effective therapeutic outcome. PMID:25045261

  18. 6-Aminonicotinamide-resistant mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, K T; Cookson, B T; Ladika, D; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1983-01-01

    Resistance to the nicotinamide analog 6-aminonicotinamide has been used to identify the following three new classes of mutants in pyridine nucleotide metabolism. (i) pncX mutants have Tn10 insertion mutations near the pncA locus which reduce but do not eliminate the pncA product, nicotinamide deamidase. (ii) nadB (6-aminonicotinamide-resistant) mutants have dominant alleles of the nadB gene, which we propose are altered in feedback inhibition of the nadB enzyme, L-aspartate oxidase. Many of these mutants also exhibit a temperature-sensitive nicotinamide requirement phenotype. (iii) nadD mutants have mutations that affect a new gene involved in pyridine nucleotide metabolism. Since a high proportion of nadD mutations are temperature-sensitive lethal mutations, this appears to be an essential gene for NAD and NADP biosynthesis. In vivo labeling experiments indicate that in all the above cases, resistance is gained by increasing the ratio of NAD to 6-aminonicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. 6-Aminonicotinamide adenine dinucleotide turns over significantly more slowly in vivo than does normal NAD. PMID:6222034

  19. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  20. Clostridium acetobutylicum Mutants That Produce Butyraldehyde and Altered Quantities of Solvents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P; Palosaari, N

    1987-12-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B643 that were resistant to allyl alcohol (AA) were selected and characterized. These mutants contained 10- to 100-fold reduced activities of butanol and ethanol alcohol dehydrogenase. The AA mutants formed two groups and produced no ethanol. Type 1 AA mutants produced significant amounts of a new solvent, butyraldehyde, and contained normal levels of the coenzyme A-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (BAD). Type 2 AA mutants produced no significant butyraldehyde and lower levels of all solvents, and they contained 45- to 100-fold lower activity levels of BAD. Following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis, low-acid-producing (Acid) mutants were selected and characterized as superinduced solvent producers, yielding more than 99% of theoretical glucose carbon as solvents and only small amounts of acetate and butyrate. Following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis, 13 sporulation-negative (Spo) mutants were characterized; and 3 were found to produce only butyrate and acetate, a minor amount of acetone, and no alcohols. These Spo mutants contained reduced butanol dehydrogenase activity and no BAD enzyme activity. The data support the view that the type 2 AA, the Acid, and the Spo mutants somehow alter normal regulated expression of the solvent pathway in C. acetobutylicum.

  1. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0360 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey L. Greene, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE September 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant ...approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant ER signaling and

  2. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...current FDA approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant

  3. Electrophysiological study of Drosophila rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations were carried out on several independently isolated mutants of the ninaE gene, which encodes opsin in R1-6 photoreceptors, and a mutant of the ninaD gene, which is probably important in the formation of the rhodopsin chromophore. In these mutants, the rhodopsin content in R1-6 photoreceptors is reduced by 10(2)-10(6)-fold. Light-induced bumps recorded from even the most severely affected mutants are physiologically normal. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis shows that photoreceptor responses of both a ninaE mutant and a ninaD mutant follow the adapting bump model. Since any extensive rhodopsin-rhodopsin interactions are not likely in these mutants, the above results suggest that such interactions are not needed for the generation and adaptation of light-induced bumps. Mutant bumps are strikingly larger in amplitude than wild-type bumps. This difference is observed both in ninaD and ninaE mutants, which suggests that it is due to severe depletion of rhodopsin content, rather than to any specific alterations in the opsin protein. Lowering or buffering the intracellular calcium concentration by EGTA injection mimics the effects of the mutations on the bump amplitude, but, unlike the mutations, it also affects the latency and kinetics of light responses. PMID:3097245

  4. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  5. Five carboxin-resistant mutants exhibited various responses to carboxin and related fungicides.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yoko; Ito, Yasuhiro; Hatabayashi, Hidemi; Koma, Akemi; Yabe, Kimiko

    2011-01-01

    Five carboxin-resistant mutants from Aspergillus oryzae were characterized by the sensitivities of their mycelial growth and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity to carboxin and three related fungicides. Despite a significant resistance to carboxin, exhibited by all the mutants, their patterns of sensitivity to the other fungicides was distinct. This provides clues to the molecular interaction between SDH and these fungicides.

  6. The phenotype alterations showed by the res tomato mutant disappear when the plants are grown under semi-arid conditions: Is the res mutant tolerant to multiple stresses?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Albaladejo, Irene; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Capel, Carmen; Capel, Juan; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael; Bolarin, Maria C

    2016-02-23

    The res (restored cell structure by salinity) mutant, recently identified as the first tomato mutant accumulating jasmonate (JA) without stress, exhibited important morphological alterations when plants were grown under control conditions but these disappeared under salt stress. Since the defense responses against stresses are activated in the res mutant as a consequence of the increased expression of genes from the JA biosynthetic and signaling pathways, the mutant may display a tolerance response not only to salt stress but also to multiple stresses. Here, we show that when res mutant plants are grown under the summer natural conditions of the Mediterranean area, with high temperatures and low relative humidity, the characteristic leaf chlorosis exhibited by the mutant disappears and leaves become dark green over time, with a similar aspect to WT leaves. Moreover, the mutant plants are able to achieve chlorophyll and fluorescence levels similar to those of WT. These results hint that research on res tomato mutant may allow very significant advances in the knowledge of defense responses activated by JA against multiple stresses.

  7. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  8. Expression of A/B zeins in single and double maize endosperm mutants.

    PubMed

    Paulis, J W; Bietz, J A; Bogyo, T P; Nelsen, T C; Darrah, L L; Zuber, M S

    1992-12-01

    Zeins, the major endosperm proteins in maize (Zea mays L.), are deficient in the essential amino acids lysine and tryptophan. Some mutant genes, like opaque-2 (o2) and floury-2 (fl2), reduce the levels of A- and B-zeins, thereby improving maize's nutritional value. Other mutants, such as amylose-extender (ae), floury-1 (fl1), soft starch (h), dull-1 (du), shrunken-1 (sh1), sugary-1 (su1), sugary-2 (su2), and waxy (wx), primarily affect starch composition, but also alter zein composition. We undertook this study to examine the effects of some of these mutant genes on A/B-zein composition and to study the interactions of these genes in double-mutant combinations. Endosperm prolamins were extracted from inbred B37, ten near-isogenic single mutants (ae, du, fl1, fl2, h, o2, sh1, su1, su2, and wx), and most double-mutant combinations. Zeins in these extracts were fractionated by reversed-phase highperformance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) into 22-24 peaks. Of the resulting 22 major peaks the areas of 16 (per milligram endosperm) were significantly affected by individual mutant genes relative to the zein composition of the normal inbred. In combination these genes exhibited significant epistatic interactions in regulating the expression of individual A/B zeins. Epistatic interactions were judged to be significant when the amount of a peak in a double mutant differed from the averages for the peak in the two respective single mutants. The o2 gene, alone and in combination with other mutant genes, significantly decreased the amounts of many individual zeins. The effect of the o2 gene was the greatest of all the genes examined. Various clustering techniques were used to see if mutant effects could be grouped; among these was principal component analysis, a multivariate statistical technique that analyzes all peak sizes simultaneously. Three-dimensional scatter graphs were constructed based on the first three principal components. For the single mutants, these showed no

  9. Genetic interactions among homologous recombination mutants in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Alberto; Andaluz, Encarnación; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Larriba, Germán

    2015-01-01

    rad52-ΔΔ and, to a lesser extent, rad51-ΔΔ deletants of Candidaalbicans displayed slow growth and aberrant filamentous morphology whereas rad59-ΔΔ mutants, both by growth rate and morphology resembled wild type. In this study, we have constructed pair-wise double deletants to analyze genetic interactions among these homologous recombination (HR) proteins that affect growth and morphology traits. When grown in liquid YPD medium, double mutant rad51-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ exhibited growth rates, cell and colony morphologies, and plating efficiencies that were not significantly different from those observed for rad51-ΔΔ. The same was true for rad52-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ compared to rad52-ΔΔ. Slow growth and decreased plating efficiency were caused, at least in part, by a decreased viability, as deduced from FUN1 staining. Flow cytometry and microscopic studies of filamentous mutant populations revealed major changes in cell ploidy, size and morphology, whereas DAPI staining identified complex nuclear rearrangements in yeast and filamentous cells. These phenotypes were not observed in the rad59-ΔΔ mutant populations. Our results show that abolishing Rad51 functions induces the appearance of a subpopulation of aberrant yeast and filamentous forms with increased cell size and ploidy. The size of this complex subpopulation was exacerbated in rad52-ΔΔ mutants. The combination of filamentous cell morphology and viability phenotypes was reflected on the colony morphology of the respective mutants. We conclude that the rad52 mutation is epistatic to rad51 for all the morphological traits analyzed. We discuss these results in the light of the several functions of these recombination genes.

  10. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  11. Multiple classes of yeast mutants are defective in vacuole partitioning yet target vacuole proteins correctly.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y X; Zhao, H; Harding, T M; Gomes de Mesquita, D S; Woldringh, C L; Klionsky, D J; Munn, A L; Weisman, L S

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the vacuoles are partitioned from mother cells to daughter cells in a cell-cycle-coordinated process. The molecular basis of this event remains obscure. To date, few yeast mutants had been identified that are defective in vacuole partitioning (vac), and most such mutants are also defective in vacuole protein sorting (vps) from the Golgi to the vacuole. Both the vps mutants and previously identified non-vps vac mutants display an altered vacuolar morphology. Here, we report a new method to monitor vacuole inheritance and the isolation of six new non-vps vac mutants. They define five complementation groups (VAC8-VAC12). Unlike mutants identified previously, three of the complementation groups exhibit normal vacuolar morphology. Zygote studies revealed that these vac mutants are also defective in intervacuole communication. Although at least four pathways of protein delivery to the vacuole are known, only the Vps pathway seems to significantly overlap with vacuole partitioning. Mutants defective in both vacuole partitioning and endocytosis or vacuole partitioning and autophagy were not observed. However, one of the new vac mutants was additionally defective in direct protein transport from the cytoplasm to the vacuole. Images PMID:8885233

  12. Abnormal Stomatal Behavior and Hormonal Imbalance in flacca, a Wilty Mutant of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Tal, M.; Imber, D.; Itai, C.

    1970-01-01

    The wilty tomato mutant, flacca, and the normal variety, Rheinlands Ruhm, were compared for kinetin-like activity in ontogeny. The mutant wilts easily because its stomata resist closure. This stomatal resistance decreases with age. The occurrence of a root factor which induces stomatal opening was inferred from grafting experiments. It was hypothesized that the excessive stomatal openings in the mutant may result from excess of kinetin-like activity in the leaf of that plant. In addition, it was suggested that the closure of stomata in the aging mutant is due to a decrease of kinetin-like activity with age. Kinetin-like activity in the leaf was determined by incorporation of labeled leucine. The concentration of cytokinins in root exudate and leaf extract was determined by the soybean callus assay. Evidence was presented of higher kinetin-like activity in the leaves of the mutant and higher cytokinin concentration in its root exudate. Cytokinin concentration in the shoot was found to be only slightly higher in the mutant than in the normal plants. Kinetin-like activity in the leaf and cytokinin concentration of root exudate decreased with age in both mutant and normal plants. Kinetin-like activity in the leaves of mutant plants, which phenocopy the normal variety as a result of continuous application of abscisic acid, was lower than in control mutant plants. The significance of these findings per se and in connection with stomatal behavior is discussed. PMID:16657469

  13. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGES

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore » Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  14. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.

  15. Enhancers of Conidiation Mutants in Aspergillus Nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Gems, D. H.; Clutterbuck, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Mutants at a number of loci, designated sthenyo, have been isolated as enhancers of the oligoconidial mutations at the medA locus. Two loci have been mapped: sthA on linkage group I, and sthB on linkage group V. Two probable alleles have been identified at each locus but two further mutants were unlinked to either sthA or sthB. Neither sthA nor sthB mutants have conspicuous effects on morphology on their own, nor could the sthA1 sthB2 double mutant be distinguished from wild type. Mutants at both loci also interact with the temperature-sensitive brlA42 mutant at the permissive temperature to give a phenotype described as ``Abacoid.'' sthA1 also induces a slight modification of the phenotype of an abaA mutant. We conclude that sthenyo genes act mainly at the phialide stage of conidiation. We also describe the isolation of new medA mutants arising spontaneously as outgrowths on brlA42 colonies. PMID:8056325

  16. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  17. A halotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaxiola, R; Corona, M; Zinker, S

    1996-01-01

    FRD, a nuclear and dominant spontaneous mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growing in up to 2 M NaCl, was isolated. Compared with parental cells, the mutant cells have a lower intracellular Na+/K+ ratio, shorter generation times in the presence of 1 M NaCl, and alterations in gene expression. PMID:8631691

  18. Active-site mutants of beta-lactamase: use of an inactive double mutant to study requirements for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dalbadie-McFarland, G; Neitzel, J J; Richards, J H

    1986-01-28

    We have studied the catalytic activity and some other properties of mutants of Escherichia coli plasmid-encoded RTEM beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) with all combinations of serine and threonine residues at the active-site positions 70 and 71. (All natural beta-lactamases have conserved serine-70 and threonine-71.) From the inactive double mutant Ser-70----Thr, Thr-71----Ser [Dalbadie-McFarland, G., Cohen, L. W., Riggs, A. D., Morin, C., Itakura, K., & Richards, J. H. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 6409-6413], an active revertant, Thr-71----Ser (i.e., residue 70 in the double mutant had changed from threonine to the serine conserved at position 70 in the wild-type enzyme), was isolated by an approach that allows identification of active revertants in the absence of a background of wild-type enzyme. This mutant (Thr-71----Ser) has about 15% of the catalytic activity of wild-type beta-lactamase. The other possible mutant involving serine and threonine residues at positions 70 and 71 (Ser-70----Thr) shows no catalytic activity. The primary nucleophiles of a serine or a cysteine residue [Sigal, I. S., Harwood, B. G., & Arentzen, R. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7157-7160] at position 70 thus seem essential for enzymatic activity. Compared to wild-type enzyme, all three mutants show significantly reduced resistance to proteolysis; for the active revertant (Thr-71----Ser), we have also observed reduced thermal stability and reduced resistance to denaturation by urea.

  19. crl mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resemble both mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis and omnipotent translational suppressor mutants.

    PubMed

    McCusker, J H; Haber, J E

    1988-06-01

    Cyocloheximide resistant lethal (crl) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining 22 unlinked complementation groups, are unable to grow at 37 degrees. They are also highly pleiotropic at their permissive temperature of 25 degrees. The mutants are all unable to arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when grown to stationary phase or when starved for a single amino acid, though they do arrest at G1 when deprived of all nitrogen. The crl mutants are also hypersensitive to various amino acid analogs and to 3-aminotriazole. These mutants also "tighten" leaky auxotrophic mutations that permit wild-type cells to grow in the absence of the appropriate amino acid. All of these phenotypes are also exhibited by gcn mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis. In addition, the crl mutants are all hypersensitive to hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that stimulates translational misreading. The crl mutations also suppress one nonsense mutation which is phenotypically suppressed by hygromycin B. Many crl mutants are also osmotically sensitive. These are phenotypes which the crl mutations have in common with previously isolated omnipotent suppressors. We suggest that the the crl mutations all affect the fidelity of protein translation.

  20. Quantitative assessment of intragenic receptor tyrosine kinase deletions in primary glioblastomas: their prevalence and molecular correlates.

    PubMed

    Kastenhuber, Edward R; Huse, Jason T; Berman, Samuel H; Pedraza, Alicia; Zhang, Jianan; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Viale, Agnes; Cavatore, Magali; Heguy, Adriana; Szerlip, Nicholas; Ladanyi, Marc; Brennan, Cameron W

    2014-05-01

    Intragenic deletion is the most common form of activating mutation among receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) in glioblastoma. However, these events are not detected by conventional DNA sequencing methods commonly utilized for tumor genotyping. To comprehensively assess the frequency, distribution, and expression levels of common RTK deletion mutants in glioblastoma, we analyzed RNA from a set of 192 glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas for the expression of EGFRvIII, EGFRvII, EGFRvV (carboxyl-terminal deletion), and PDGFRAΔ8,9. These mutations were detected in 24, 1.6, 4.7, and 1.6 % of cases, respectively. Overall, 29 % (55/189) of glioblastomas expressed at least one RTK intragenic deletion transcript in this panel. For EGFRvIII, samples were analyzed by both quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) and single mRNA molecule counting on the Nanostring nCounter platform. Nanostring proved to be highly sensitive, specific, and linear, with sensitivity comparable or exceeding that of RNA seq. We evaluated the prognostic significance and molecular correlates of RTK rearrangements. EGFRvIII was only detectable in tumors with focal amplification of the gene. Moreover, we found that EGFRvIII expression was not prognostic of poor outcome and that neither recurrent copy number alterations nor global changes in gene expression differentiate EGFRvIII-positive tumors from tumors with amplification of wild-type EGFR. The wide range of expression of mutant alleles and co-expression of multiple EGFR variants suggests that quantitative RNA-based clinical assays will be important for assessing the relative expression of intragenic deletions as therapeutic targets and/or candidate biomarkers. To this end, we demonstrate the performance of the Nanostring assay in RNA derived from routinely collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

  1. Arabidopsis Mutant bik1 Exhibits Strong Resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Bi, Kai; He, Zhangchao; Gao, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ying; Fu, Yanping; Cheng, Jiasen; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1, and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2, and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40–50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2) and npr1-1 [non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR)] mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms. PMID:27679580

  2. Abnormal grooming activity in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Strazielle, C; Lefevre, A; Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-07-15

    Dab1(scm) mutant mice, characterized by cell ectopias and degeneration in cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, were compared to non-ataxic controls for different facets of grooming caused by brief water immersions, as well as some non-grooming behaviors. Dab1(scm) mutants were strongly affected in their quantitative functional parameters, exhibiting higher starting latencies before grooming relative to non-ataxic littermates of the A/A strain, fewer grooming bouts, and grooming components of shorter duration, with an unequal regional distribution targeting almost totally the rostral part (head washing and forelimb licking) of the animal. Only bouts of a single grooming element were preserved. The cephalocaudal order of grooming elements appeared less disorganized, mutant and control mice initiating the grooming with head washing and forelimb licking prior to licking posterior parts. However, mutants differed from controls in that all their bouts were incomplete but uninterrupted, although intergroup difference for percentage of the incorrect transitions was not significant. In contrast to grooming, Dab1(scm) mice ambulated for a longer time. During walking episodes, they exhibited more body scratching than controls, possibly to compensate for the lack of licking different body parts. In conjunction with studies with other ataxic mice, these results indicate that the cerebellar cortex affects grooming activity and is consequently involved in executing various components, but not in its sequential organization, which requires other brain regions such as cerebral cortices or basal ganglia.

  3. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models.

    PubMed

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the "pool effect." After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt.

  4. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the “pool effect.” After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt PMID:25999923

  5. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  6. Reduced gravitropic sensitivity in roots of a starch-deficient mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in seedlings of Nicotiana sylvestris Speg. et Comes wild-type (WT) and mutant NS 458 which has a defective plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1.). Starch was greatly reduced in NS 458 compared to the WT, but small amounts of starch were detected in rootcap columella cells in NS 458 by light and electron microscopy. The roots of WT are more sensitive to gravity than mutant NS 458 roots since: (1) in mutant roots, curvature was reduced and delayed in the time course of curvature; (2) curvature of mutant roots was 24-56% that of WT roots over the range of induction periods tested; (3) in intermittent-stimulation experiments, curvature of mutant roots was 37% or less than that of WT roots in all treatments tested. The perception time, determined by intermittent-stimulation experiments, was < or = 5 s for WT roots and 30-60 s for mutant roots. The growth rates for WT and NS 458 roots were essentially equal. These results and our previous results with WT and starchless mutant Arabidopsis roots (Kiss et al. 1989, Planta 177, 198-206) support the conclusions that a full complement of starch is necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity and that amyloplasts function in gravity perception. Since a presumed relatively small increase in plastid buoyant mass (N. sylvestris mutant versus Arabidopsis mutant) significantly improves the orientation of the N. sylvestris mutant roots, we suggest that plastids are the likeliest candidates to be triggering gravity perception in roots of both mutants.

  7. Phosphoproteomic Analyses of NRAS(G12) and NRAS(Q61) Mutant Melanocytes Reveal Increased CK2α Kinase Levels in NRAS(Q61) Mutant Cells.

    PubMed

    Posch, Christian; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Cholewa, Brian D; Kim, Sarasa T; Ma, Jeffrey; Lai, Kevin; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Green, Gary; Chand, Shreya; Burlingame, Alma L; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-10-01

    In melanoma, mutant and thereby constantly active neuroblastoma rat sarcoma (NRAS) affects 15-20% of tumors, contributing to tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis. Recent therapeutic approaches aim to mimic RAS extinction by interfering with critical signaling pathways downstream of the mutant protein. This study investigates the phosphoproteome of primary human melanocytes bearing mutations in the two hot spots of NRAS, NRAS(G12) and NRAS(Q61). Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture followed by mass spectrometry identified 14,155 spectra of 3,371 unique phosphopeptides mapping to 1,159 proteins (false discovery rate < 2%). Data revealed pronounced PI3K/AKT signaling in NRAS(G12V) mutant cells and pronounced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in NRAS(Q61L) variants. Computer-based prediction models for kinases involved, revealed that CK2α is significantly overrepresented in primary human melanocytes bearing NRAS(Q61L) mutations. Similar differences were found in human NRAS(Q61) mutant melanoma cell lines that were also more sensitive to pharmacologic CK2α inhibition compared with NRAS(G12) mutant cells. Furthermore, CK2α levels were pronounced in patient samples of NRAS(Q61) mutant melanoma at the mRNA and protein level. The preclinical findings of this study reveal that codon 12 and 61 mutant NRAS cells have distinct signaling characteristics that could allow for the development of more effective, mutation-specific treatment modalities.

  8. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  9. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Ning; Adachi, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Takeda, Jun; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Ishihara, Akihiko; Yasuda, Koichiro; Tsuda, Kinsuke . E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  10. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, B B; Lippincott, J A

    1966-10-01

    Lippincott, Barbara B. (Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.), and James A. Lippincott. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity. J. Bacteriol. 92:937-945. 166.-Mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic for adenine, methionine, or asparagine are less infectious than the wild-type strain B6 from which they were derived and show increased infectivity on pinto bean leaves when the specific compounds required for growth of the mutants are added to the infected leaf. Reversion to a prototrophic form of nutrition is accompanied by increased infectivity. Tumors initiated by these auxotrophic mutants are shown to arise only at large wound sites where nutritional conditions may be less restricting. The data indicate that, after inoculation, the bacteria pass through a phase in which host-supplied nutrients are utilized for the production of one or more factors necessary for successful tumor initiation.

  11. Correction of hair shaft defects through allele-specific silencing of mutant Krt75

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yan-Feng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A.; Roop, Dennis R.; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele specific siRNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific shRNA persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of the mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  12. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes.

  13. Recovery of the wild type atomic flexibility in the HIV-1 protease double mutants.

    PubMed

    De Conto, Valderes; Braz, Antônio S K; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistant mutations due to the selective pressure exerted by antiretrovirals, including protease inhibitors (PIs), remains a major problem in the treatment of AIDS. During PIs therapy, the occurrence of primary mutations in the wild type HIV-1 protease reduces both the affinity for the inhibitors and the viral replicative capacity compared to the wild type (WT) protein, but additional mutations compensate for this reduced viral fitness. To investigate this phenomenon from the structural point of view, we combined Molecular Dynamics and Normal Mode Analysis to analyze and compare the variations of the flexibility of C-alpha atoms and the differences in hydrogen bond (h-bond) network between the WT and double mutants. In most cases, the flexibility profile of the double mutants was more often similar to that of the WT than to that of the related single base mutants. All single mutants showed a significant alteration in h-bond formation compared to WT. Most of the significant changes occur in the border between the flap and cantilever regions. We found that all the considered double mutants have their h-bond pattern significantly altered in comparison to the respective single base mutants affecting their flexibility profile that becomes more similar to that of WT. This WT flexibility restoration in the double mutants appears as an important factor for the HIV-1 fitness recovery observed in patients.

  14. Isolation and characterization of unusual gin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Klippel, A; Cloppenborg, K; Kahmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Site-specific inversion of the G segment in phage Mu DNA is promoted by two proteins, the DNA invertase Gin and the host factor FIS. Recombination occurs if the recombination sites (IR) are arranged as inverted repeats and a recombinational enhancer sequence is present in cis. Intermolecular reactions as well as deletions between direct repeats of the IRs rarely occur. Making use of a fis- mutant of Escherichia coli we have devised a scheme to isolate gin mutants that have a FIS independent phenotype. This mutant phenotype is caused by single amino acid changes at five different positions of gin. The mutant proteins display a whole set of new properties in vivo: they promote inversions, deletions and intermolecular recombination in an enhancer- and FIS-independent manner. The mutants differ in recombination activity. The most active mutant protein was analysed in vitro. The loss of site orientation specificity was accompanied with the ability to recombine even linear substrates. We discuss these results in connection with the role of the enhancer and FIS protein in the wild-type situation. Images PMID:2974801

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  16. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mutant Libraries Reveals Loci-dependent Transposition Biases and Strategies to Novel Mutant Discovery.

    PubMed

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Bannantine, John P; Bayles, Darrell O; Zinniel, Denise K; Stabel, Judith R; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Barletta, Raúl G

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiologic agent of Johne's disease, is one of the most important bacterial pathogens in ruminants. A thorough understanding of MAP pathogenesis is needed to develop new vaccines and diagnostic tests. The generation of comprehensive random transposon mutant libraries is a fundamental genetic technology to determine the role of genes in physiology and pathogenesis. In this study, whole MAP genome analysis compared the insertion sites for the mycobacterial transposon Tn5367 derived from the Mycobacterium smegmatis insertion sequence IS1096 and the mariner transposon MycoMarT7 carrying the Himar1 transposase. We determined that only MycoMarT7 provides a random representation of insertions in 99% of all MAP genes. Analysis of the MAP K-10 genome indicated that 710 of all open reading frames do not possess IS1096 recognition sites, while only 37 do not have the recognition site for MycoMarT7. Thus, a significant number of MAP genes remain underrepresented in insertion libraries from IS1096 derived transposons. Analysis of MycomarT7 and Tn5367 mutants showed that Tn5367 has a predilection to insert within intergenic regions, suggesting that MycoMarT7 is more adequate to generate a comprehensive library. However, we uncovered the novel finding that both transposons have loci-dependent biases with Tn5367 being the most skewed. These loci-dependent transposition biases lead to an underestimation of the number of independent mutants required to generate a comprehensive mutant library, leading to an overestimation of essential genes. Herein, we also demonstrated a useful platform for gene discovery and analysis by isolating three novel mutants for each transposon.

  17. Improved solubility of replication factor C (RFC) Walker A mutants.

    PubMed

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Bloom, Linda B

    2012-06-01

    Protein insolubility often poses a significant problem during purification protocols and in enzyme assays, especially for eukaryotic proteins expressed in a recombinant bacterial system. The limited solubility of replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been previously documented. We found that mutant forms of RFC harboring a single point mutation in the Walker A motif were even less soluble than the wild-type complex. The addition of maltose at 0.75 M to the storage and assay buffers greatly increases protein solubility and prevents the complex from falling apart. Our analysis of the clamp loading reaction is dependent on fluorescence-based assays, which are environmentally sensitive. Using wt RFC as a control, we show that the addition of maltose to the reaction buffers does not affect fluorophore responses in the assays or the enzyme activity, indicating that maltose can be used as a buffer additive for further downstream analysis of these mutants.

  18. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to Calcofluor white.

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, C; Valdivieso, M H; Ribas, J C; Durán, A

    1988-01-01

    Calcofluor is a fluorochrome that exhibits antifungal activity and a high affinity for yeast cell wall chitin. We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to Calcofluor. The resistance segregated in a Mendelian fashion and behaved as a recessive character in all the mutants analyzed. Five loci were defined by complementation analysis. The abnormally thick septa between mother and daughter cells caused by Calcofluor in wild-type cells were absent in the mutants. The Calcofluor-binding capacity, observed by fluorescence microscopy, in a S. cerevisiae wild-type cells during alpha-factor treatment was also absent in some mutants and reduced in others. Staining of cell walls with wheat germ agglutinin-fluorescein complex indicated that the chitin uniformly distributed over the whole cell wall in vegetative or in alpha-factor-treated cells was almost absent in three of the mutants and reduced in the two others. Cell wall analysis evidenced a five- to ninefold reduction in the amount of chitin in mutants compared with that in the wild-type strain. The total amounts of cell wall mannan and beta-glucan in wild-type and mutant strains were similar; however, the percentage of beta-glucan that remained insoluble after alkali extraction was considerably reduced in mutant cells. The susceptibilities of the mutants and the wild-type strains to a cell wall enzymic lytic complex were rather similar. The in vitro levels of chitin synthase 2 detected in all mutants were similar to that in the wild type. The significance of these results is discussed in connection with the mechanism of chitin synthesis and cell wall morphogenesis in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:3280554

  20. Metabolite profiling of Phycomyces blakesleeanus carotene mutants reveals global changes across intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Eugenio; Fraser, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus provides a renewable biosource of industrial high-value compounds such as carotenes, other isoprenoids (ubiquinone and sterols), organic acids and fatty acids. Several Phycomyces mutants involved in the formation of β-carotene are available. For example, the carA mutants have a leaky mutation in the phytoene synthase and produce significantly lower amounts of carotenes, while the carB and carR mutants produce phytoene and lycopene, respectively, due to a null mutation in the genes encoding the phytoene dehydrogenase and lycopene cyclase, respectively. The carS mutants are mutated in the gene encoding the oxygenase responsible for the conversion of β-carotene into apocarotenoids and, as a result, β-carotene accumulates. In order to ascertain further the biochemical changes arising in these potential industrial strains, a metabolite profiling workflow was implemented for Phycomyces. GC-MS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array platforms enabled the identification of over 100 metabolites in 11 carA, carB, carR and carS mutant strains and their wild-type comparator. All mutant strains possessed decreased TCA cycle intermediates, galactose, alanine and ribitol, while dodecanol and valine showed a general increase. As predicted, other terpenoid levels were affected in the carB, carR and carS mutants but not in the carA mutants. The global changes across intermediary metabolism of the mutants suggest that complex metabolic networks exist between intermediary and secondary metabolism or that other mutations beyond the carotene pathway may exist in these mutants. These data show the utility of the methodology in metabolically phenotyping Phycomyces strains with potential industrial exploitation.

  1. The basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons in the Y-gene recessive Bombyx mori mutants: a defect in the cellular uptake of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Kozo; Katagiri, Chihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiro; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Sato, Ryoichi; Maekawa, Hideaki; Takada, Naoko; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Wells, Michael A; Jouni, Zeina E

    2004-10-01

    Bombyx mori is an excellent model for the study of carotenoid-binding proteins (CBP). In previous papers, we identified and molecularly characterized a CBP from the Y-gene dominant mutants. In the present study, we attempted to correlate and establish lipid metabolism and distribution in these mutants. When [3H]-triolein was fed to the mutants, typical patterns of uptake of labeled fatty acids from midgut to hemolymph and subsequent delivery to fat body and silk glands were obtained in all mutants. Further analysis of lipid and carotenoid profiles revealed that the yellow coloration in the hemolymph associated with lipophorin is not attributed to a difference in lipophorin concentrations among the mutants, nor to its lipid composition, but rather to its carotenoid content. Lipophorin of the Y+I mutant exhibited the highest concentration of total carotenoids of 55.8 microg/mg lipophorin compared to 3.1 microg/mg in the +Y+I mutant, 1.2 microg/mg in the YI mutant and 0.5 microg/mg in the +YI mutant. Characteristic retention time in HPLC of the different classes of carotenoids of lipophorin identified the presence of lutein as the major chromophore (62-77%), followed by beta-carotenes (22-38%). Although lutein and beta-carotene content of mutants' lipophorin differed significantly, the ratio of lutein to beta-carotene of 3:1 was not different among mutants. Similarly, lipid compositions of mutant silk glands were not significantly different, but carotenoid contents were. The significantly high concentration of lutein in the Y+I mutant silk gland represented more than 160-fold increase compared to +Y+I mutant (p<0.001). In this report, we conclude that lipid metabolism in the mutants is not defected and that the molecular basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons is a defect in the cellular uptake of lutein associated with the Y-gene recessive mutants.

  2. Characterization of shrunken endosperm mutants in barley.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Wei, Long; Wang, Ji-Rui; Chen, Guo-Yue; Liu, Ya-Xi; Li, Wei; Wei, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chunji; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-04-10

    Despite numerous studies on shrunken endosperm mutants caused by either maternal tissues (seg) or kernel per se (sex) in barley, the molecular mechanism for all of the eight seg mutants (seg1-seg8) and some sex mutants is yet to be uncovered. In this study, we determined the amylose content, characterized granule-binding proteins, analyzed the expression of key genes involved in starch synthesis, and examined starch granule structure of both normal (Bowman and Morex) and shrunken endosperm (seg1, seg3, seg4a, seg4b, seg5, seg6, seg7, and sex1) barley accessions. Our results showed that amylose contents of shrunken endosperm mutants ranged from 8.9% (seg4a) to 25.8% (seg1). SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 87 kDa proteins corresponding to the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) and starch synthase II (SSII) were not present in seg1, seg3, seg6, and seg7 mutants. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis indicated that waxy expression levels of seg1, seg3, seg6, and seg7 mutants decreased in varying degrees to lower levels until 27 days after anthesis (DAA) after reaching the peak at 15-21 DAA, which differed from the pattern of normal barley accessions. Further characterization of waxy alleles revealed 7 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequences and 16 SNPs and 8 indels in the promoter sequences of the mutants. Results from starch granule by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that, in comparison with normal barley accessions, seg4a, seg4b, and sex1 had fewer starch granules per grain; seg3 and seg6 had less small B-type granules; some large A-type granules in seg7 had a hollow surface. These results improve our understanding about effects of seg and sex mutants on starch biosynthesis and granule structure during endosperm development and provide information for identification of key genes responsible for these shrunken endosperm mutants.

  3. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  4. Computing border bases using mutant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, E.; Abbas Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Border bases, a generalization of Gröbner bases, have actively been addressed during recent years due to their applicability to industrial problems. In cryptography and coding theory a useful application of border based is to solve zero-dimensional systems of polynomial equations over finite fields, which motivates us for developing optimizations of the algorithms that compute border bases. In 2006, Kehrein and Kreuzer formulated the Border Basis Algorithm (BBA), an algorithm which allows the computation of border bases that relate to a degree compatible term ordering. In 2007, J. Ding et al. introduced mutant strategies bases on finding special lower degree polynomials in the ideal. The mutant strategies aim to distinguish special lower degree polynomials (mutants) from the other polynomials and give them priority in the process of generating new polynomials in the ideal. In this paper we develop hybrid algorithms that use the ideas of J. Ding et al. involving the concept of mutants to optimize the Border Basis Algorithm for solving systems of polynomial equations over finite fields. In particular, we recall a version of the Border Basis Algorithm which is actually called the Improved Border Basis Algorithm and propose two hybrid algorithms, called MBBA and IMBBA. The new mutants variants provide us space efficiency as well as time efficiency. The efficiency of these newly developed hybrid algorithms is discussed using standard cryptographic examples.

  5. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  6. Working-for-Food Behaviors: A Preclinical Study in Prader-Willi Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Glenda; Maggi, Silvia; Balzani, Edoardo; Cosentini, Ilaria; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Tucci, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal feeding behavior is one of the main symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). By studying a PWS mouse mutant line, which carries a paternally inherited deletion of the small nucleolar RNA 116 (Snord116), we observed significant changes in working-for-food behavioral responses at various timescales. In particular, we report that PWS mutant mice show a significant delay compared to wild-type littermate controls in responding to both hour-scale and seconds-to-minutes-scale time intervals. This timing shift in mutant mice is associated with better performance in the working-for-food task, and results in better decision making in these mutant mice. The results of our study reveal a novel aspect of the organization of feeding behavior, and advance the understanding of the interplay between the metabolic functions and cognitive mechanisms of PWS. PMID:27672097

  7. Oxidative stress is involved in age-dependent spermatogenic damage of Immp2l mutant mice.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E; Lu, Baisong

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in spermatogenic damage, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse in which the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene is mutated. This Immp2l mutation impairs the processing of signal peptide sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome c₁ and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion, which causes age-dependent spermatogenic damage. Here we confirm age-dependent spermatogenic damage in a new cohort of mutants, which started at the age of 10.5 months. Compared with age-matched controls, protein carbonyl content was normal in testes of 2- to 5-month-old mutants, but significantly elevated in testes of 13-month-old mutants, indicating elevated oxidative stress in the testes at the time of impaired spermatogenesis. Testicular expression of superoxide dismutases was not different between control and mutant mice, whereas that of catalase was increased in young and old mutants. The expression of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase 4 (phospholipid hydroperoxidase) in testes was significantly reduced in 13-month-old mutants, concomitant with impaired spermatogenesis. Apoptosis of all testicular populations was increased in mutant mice with spermatogenic damage. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate in germ cells of mutant mice with impaired spermatogenesis was unchanged, excluding a major role of mtDNA mutation in ROS-mediated spermatogenic damage. Our data show that increased mitochondrial ROS are one of the driving forces for spermatogenic impairment.

  8. Genetic Exchange Between Mutant Strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: Analysis, Applications, and Significance for Hyperthermophiles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-20

    A prokaryotic micro-organism originally isolated from terrestrial hot springs, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius , was studied for its ability to exchange and...genetic phenomena of prokaryotes from geothermal habitats were studied for the first time using S. acidocaldarius ; these included photoreactivation, UV...induced mutagenesis, and stimulation of genetic exchange by UV.. The rate of spontaneous mutation was measured at 75 degrees C in S. acidocaldarius

  9. Isolation and characterization of transcription fidelity mutants.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey N; Jin, Ding Jun; Court, Donald L; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Accurate transcription is an essential step in maintaining genetic information. Error-prone transcription has been proposed to contribute to cancer, aging, adaptive mutagenesis, and mutagenic evolution of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The mechanisms controlling transcription fidelity and the biological consequences of transcription errors are poorly understood. Because of the transient nature of mRNAs and the lack of reliable experimental systems, the identification and characterization of defects that increase transcription errors have been particularly challenging. In this review we describe novel genetic screens for the isolation of fidelity mutants in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli RNA polymerases. We obtained and characterized two distinct classes of mutants altering NTP misincorporation and transcription slippage both in vivo and in vitro. Our study not only validates the genetic schemes for the isolation of RNA polymerase mutants that alter fidelity, but also sheds light on the mechanism of transcription accuracy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space.

  10. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants.

    PubMed

    Dissel, Stephane; Angadi, Veena; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Suzuki, Yasuko; Donlea, Jeff; Klose, Markus; Koch, Zachary; English, Denis; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; van Swinderen, Bruno; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-18

    Given the role that sleep plays in modulating plasticity, we hypothesized that increasing sleep would restore memory to canonical memory mutants without specifically rescuing the causal molecular lesion. Sleep was increased using three independent strategies: activating the dorsal fan-shaped body, increasing the expression of Fatty acid binding protein (dFabp), or by administering the GABA-A agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). Short-term memory (STM) or long-term memory (LTM) was evaluated in rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc) mutants using aversive phototaxic suppression and courtship conditioning. Each of the three independent strategies increased sleep and restored memory to rut and dnc mutants. Importantly, inducing sleep also reverses memory defects in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease. Together, these data demonstrate that sleep plays a more fundamental role in modulating behavioral plasticity than previously appreciated and suggest that increasing sleep may benefit patients with certain neurological disorders.

  11. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  12. Cystinosis (ctns) zebrafish mutant shows pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; Khalil, Ramzi; Khodaparast, Ladan; Khodaparast, Laleh; Arcolino, Fanny O.; Morgan, Joseph; Pastore, Anna; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Ny, Annelii; Lowe, Martin; de Witte, Peter A.; Baelde, Hans J.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The human ubiquitous protein cystinosin is responsible for transporting the disulphide amino acid cystine from the lysosomal compartment into the cytosol. In humans, Pathogenic mutations of CTNS lead to defective cystinosin function, intralysosomal cystine accumulation and the development of cystinosis. Kidneys are initially affected with generalized proximal tubular dysfunction (renal Fanconi syndrome), then the disease rapidly affects glomeruli and progresses towards end stage renal failure and multiple organ dysfunction. Animal models of cystinosis are limited, with only a Ctns knockout mouse reported, showing cystine accumulation and late signs of tubular dysfunction but lacking the glomerular phenotype. We established and characterized a mutant zebrafish model with a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.706 C > T; p.Q236X) in exon 8 of ctns. Cystinotic mutant larvae showed cystine accumulation, delayed development, and signs of pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction mimicking the early phenotype of human cystinotic patients. Furthermore, cystinotic larvae showed a significantly increased rate of apoptosis that could be ameliorated with cysteamine, the human cystine depleting therapy. Our data demonstrate that, ctns gene is essential for zebrafish pronephric podocyte and proximal tubular function and that the ctns-mutant can be used for studying the disease pathogenic mechanisms and for testing novel therapies for cystinosis. PMID:28198397

  13. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R.; Kindt, Lexy M.; Kangas, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation. PMID:26366681

  14. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  15. Mutation rate and novel tt mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana induced by carbon ions.

    PubMed Central

    Shikazono, Naoya; Yokota, Yukihiko; Kitamura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana by carbon ions was carried out to investigate the mutational effect of ion particles in higher plants. Frequencies of embryonic lethals and chlorophyll-deficient mutants were found to be significantly higher after carbon-ion irradiation than after electron irradiation (11-fold and 7.8-fold per unit dose, respectively). To estimate the mutation rate of carbon ions, mutants with no pigments on leaves and stems (tt) and no trichomes on leaves (gl) were isolated at the M2 generation and subjected to analysis. Averaged segregation rate of the backcrossed mutants was 0.25, which suggested that large deletions reducing the viability of the gametophytes were not transmitted, if generated, in most cases. During the isolation of mutants, two new classes of flavonoid mutants (tt18, tt19) were isolated from carbon-ion-mutagenized M2 plants. From PCR and sequence analysis, two of the three tt18 mutant alleles were found to have a small deletion within the LDOX gene and the other was revealed to contain a rearrangement. Using the segregation rates, the mutation rate of carbon ions was estimated to be 17-fold higher than that of electrons. The isolation of novel mutants and the high mutation rate suggest that ion particles can be used as a valuable mutagen for plant genetics. PMID:12702688

  16. Assembly, processing, and infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, C T; Barklis, E

    1993-07-01

    We studied the effects of gag mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly, processing, and infectivity by using a replication-defective HIV expression system. HIV mutants were screened for infectivity by transduction of a selectable marker and were examined for assembly by monitoring particle release from transfected cells. Gag protein processing and reverse transcriptase activities of mutant particles were also assayed. Surprisingly, most Gag protein mutants were assembled and processed. The two exceptions to this rule were a myristylation-minus mutant, and one gag matrix domain mutant which expressed proteins that were trapped intracellularly. Interestingly, a mutant with a 56-amino-acid deletion within the HIV gag capsid domain still could assemble and process virus particles, exhibited a wild-type retrovirus particle density, and had wild-type reverse transcriptase activity. Indeed, although most HIV-1 gag mutants were noninfectious or poorly infectious, they produced apparently normal particles which possessed significant reverse transcriptase activities. These results strongly support the notion that the HIV-1 Gag proteins are functionally involved in post-assembly, postprocessing stages of virus infectivity.

  17. Characterization and protective property of Brucella abortus cydC and looP mutants.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Kim, Suk; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Brucella abortus readily multiplies in professional or nonprofessional phagocytes in vitro and is highly virulent in mice. Isogenic mutants of B. abortus biovar 1 strain IVKB9007 lacking the ATP/GDP-binding protein motif A (P-loop) (named looP; designated here the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 mutant) and the ATP-binding/permease protein (cydC; designated here the IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutant) were identified and characterized by transposon mutagenesis using the mini-Tn5Km2 transposon. Both mutants were found to be virtually incapable of intracellular replication in both murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and the HeLa cell line, and their virulence was significantly impaired in BALB/c mice. Respective complementation of the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants restored their ability to survive in vitro and in vivo to a level comparable with that of the wild type. These findings indicate that the cydC and looP genes play important roles in the virulence of B. abortus. In addition, intraperitoneal immunization of mice with a dose of the live IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants provided a high degree of protection against challenge with pathogenic B. abortus strain 544. Both mutants should be evaluated further as a live attenuated vaccine against bovine brucellosis for their ability to stimulate a protective immune response.

  18. Mutant p53 proteins counteract autophagic mechanism sensitizing cancer cells to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Oppici, Elisa; Dando, Ilaria; Butturini, Elena; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Mariotto, Sofia; Cellini, Barbara; Blandino, Giovanni; Palmieri, Marta; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in TP53 gene play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and cancer development. Here, we report that gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins inhibit the autophagic pathway favoring antiapoptotic effects as well as proliferation of pancreas and breast cancer cells. We found that mutant p53 significantly counteracts the formation of autophagic vesicles and their fusion with lysosomes throughout the repression of some key autophagy-related proteins and enzymes as BECN1 (and P-BECN1), DRAM1, ATG12, SESN1/2 and P-AMPK with the concomitant stimulation of mTOR signaling. As a paradigm of this mechanism, we show that atg12 gene repression was mediated by the recruitment of the p50 NF-κB/mutant p53 protein complex onto the atg12 promoter. Either mutant p53 or p50 NF-κB depletion downregulates atg12 gene expression. We further correlated the low expression levels of autophagic genes (atg12, becn1, sesn1, and dram1) with a reduced relapse free survival (RFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) of breast cancer patients carrying TP53 gene mutations conferring a prognostic value to this mutant p53-and autophagy-related signature. Interestingly, the mutant p53-driven mTOR stimulation sensitized cancer cells to the treatment with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. All these results reveal a novel mechanism through which mutant p53 proteins promote cancer cell proliferation with the concomitant inhibition of autophagy.

  19. Characterization of novel nitrate reductase-deficient mutants for transgenic Dunaliella salina systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, L J; Jia, Y L; Li, S K; Qiu, L L

    2015-10-27

    The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize novel nitrate reductase (NR)-deficient mutants, which may be useful for the transgenic manipulation of Dunaliella salina. Three NR-deficient mutants of D. salina, J-1, J-2, and J-3, were successfully isolated by screening for chlorate resistance after chemical mutagenesis with ethylnitrosourea. NR activity was not detected in the mutants and the expression of NR mRNA was significantly decreased. Growth analysis of D. salina strains grown in media containing different nitrogen sources revealed that these mutants were capable of utilizing nitrite and urea, but not nitrate as a nitrogen source, indicating that these mutants are indeed NR-deficient. Mutation analysis of NR cDNA sequences revealed that there were 11 point mutations shared by the J-1, J-2, and J-3 mutants. Furthermore, the results of the functional complementation experiment showed that NR activity of transformant T-1 derived from J-1 was recovered to 48.1 % of that of the wild-type D. salina. The findings of the present study indicate that nitrate may be used as a selective agent rather than antibiotics or herbicides for the isolated NR-deficient mutants in future transgenic D. salina systems.

  20. Nonphotic phase shifting in hamster clock mutants.

    PubMed

    Mrosovsky, N; Salmon, P A; Menaker, M; Ralph, M R

    1992-01-01

    Golden hamsters with the tau mutation were kept in the dark and induced to become active through confinement to a novel running wheel for 3 hr. The response of the mutants to this nonphotic phase-shifting stimulus differed from that of wild-type hamsters. The mutants showed larger phase shifts, and their phase response curves differed in shape, with an advance portion at about circadian time 24, a phase at which wild types show delays. The results establish that the tau mutation, in addition to its already known effects, alters the response of the circadian system to nonphotic events.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Pope, C F; Gillespie, S H; Pratten, J R; McHugh, T D

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Burkholderia cepacia mutants were selected on ciprofloxacin. The rate of mutation in gyrA was estimated to be 9.6 x 10(-11) mutations per division. Mutations in gyrA conferred 12- to 64-fold increases in MIC, and an additional parC mutation conferred a large increase in MIC (>256-fold). Growth rate, biofilm formation, and survival in water and during drying were not impaired in strains containing single gyrA mutations. Double mutants were impaired only in growth rate (0.85, relative to the susceptible parent).

  2. Metabolite profiling of two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Meuleye, Bertrand Seumo; Miller, Andreas; Shu, Qing-Yao; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2007-12-26

    Two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutant lines, Os-lpa-XS110-1 and Os-lpa-XS110-2, were grown together with their parent wild-type variety Xiushui 110 in four field trials. HPLC analysis of inositol phosphates in the seeds produced demonstrated that compared to the wild-type, the reduction in phytic acid content in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (-46%) was more pronounced than that in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (-23%). Lower inositol phosphates (InsP 3, InsP 4, InsP 5) were not detected in the mutants. The lpa mutants and the wild-type rice were subjected to comparative metabolite profiling by capillary gas chromatography. On average, 34% (Os-lpa-XS110-1) and 42% (Os-lpa-XS110-2) of the detected peaks were statistically significantly different between wild-type and mutants. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed for all field trials. Identification and quantification of the consistently different metabolites revealed that contents of myo-inositol and raffinose were increased in Os-lpa-XS110-1 but decreased in Os-lpa-XS110-2 compared to the wild-type. In addition, Os-lpa-XS110-1 exhibited increased levels of galactose and galactinol. Consideration of these metabolic changes in light of the routes involved in the biosynthesis of phytic acid indicated a disturbance in the early biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (similar to the lpa-1 type mutation in maize) and a mutation event affecting phosphorylation of myo-inositol in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (similar to the lpa-3-type mutation).

  3. Construction of a large-scale Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a pathogenic member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), has emerged as a significant threat towards cystic fibrosis patients, where infection often leads to the fatal clinical manifestation known as cepacia syndrome. Many studies have investigated the pathogenicity of B. cenocepacia as well as its ability to become highly resistant towards many of the antibiotics currently in use. In addition, studies have also been undertaken to understand the pathogen's capacity to adapt and survive in a broad range of environments. Transposon based mutagenesis has been widely used in creating insertional knock-out mutants and coupled with recent advances in sequencing technology, robust tools to study gene function in a genome-wide manner have been developed based on the assembly of saturated transposon mutant libraries. In this study, we describe the construction of a large-scale library of B. cenocepacia transposon mutants. To create transposon mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315, electrocompetent bacteria were electrotransformed with the EZ-Tn5 transposome. Tetracyline resistant colonies were harvested off selective agar and pooled. Mutants were generated in multiple batches with each batch consisting of ˜20,000 to 40,000 mutants. Transposon insertion was validated by PCR amplification of the transposon region. In conclusion, a saturated B. cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library with an estimated total number of 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed. This mutant library can now be further exploited as a genetic tool to assess the function of every gene in the genome, facilitating the discovery of genes important for bacterial survival and adaptation, as well as virulence.

  4. Agravitropic mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus do not complement mutants having a reversed gravitropic response.

    PubMed

    Cove, David J; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2006-07-01

    New mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus have been isolated, which showed abnormal gravitropic responses. The apical cells of protonemal filaments of wild-type strains respond to gravity by growing upwards and are well aligned to the gravity vector. This response only occurs in darkness. Mutants show a range of phenotypes. Some are insensitive to gravity, showing symmetrical growth, while others align to the gravity vector but orient growth downwards. A further class grows in darkness as though it were in light, showing insensitivity to gravity and continued chlorophyll synthesis. Somatic hybrids between mutants and wild-type strains and between pairs of mutants have been selected using transgenic antibiotic resistance as selective markers. Hybrids between wild-type strains and all of the mutants have a wild-type phenotype, and so all mutants therefore have recessive phenotypes. Mutants comprise three complementation groups. One group has a single member, while another has three members. The third has at least 16 members and shows a complex pattern of complementation consistent with a single gene product functioning in both orientation and alignment to gravity, as well as contributing more than one subunit to the mature product.

  5. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway.

  6. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    current FDA approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant...resistance to current FDA approved ER antagonists, but that more potent and selective estrogen receptor antagonists will be sufficiently active to...Antagonist Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Selective Estrogen Receptor Degrader Tamoxifen Fulvestrant Bazedoxifene Raloxifene GDC-0810

  7. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  8. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  9. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  10. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  11. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  12. Genotyping-by-sequencing of glossy mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glossy mutants are a common occurrence in Brassica oleracea L. and they have been documented in most crop varieties of the species including cabbage, kale, broccoli, and collard. Glossy phenotypes have been of particular interest to researchers due to observations that they influence insect behavior...

  13. Phenotypic mutant library: potential for gene discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid development of high throughput and affordable Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques has renewed interest in gene discovery using forward genetics. The conventional forward genetic approach starts with isolation of mutants with a phenotype of interest, mapping the mutation within a s...

  14. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  15. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2016-04-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection.

  16. The Rec102 Mutant of Yeast Is Defective in Meiotic Recombination and Chromosome Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, J.; Engebrecht, J. A.; Roeder, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mutation at the REC102 locus was identified in a screen for yeast mutants that produce inviable spores. rec102 spore lethality is rescued by a spo13 mutation, which causes cells to bypass the meiosis I division. The rec102 mutation completely eliminates meiotically induced gene conversion and crossing over but has no effect on mitotic recombination frequencies. Cytological studies indicate that the rec102 mutant makes axial elements (precursors to the synaptonemal complex), but homologous chromosomes fail to synapse. In addition, meiotic chromosome segregation is significantly delayed in rec102 strains. Studies of double and triple mutants indicate that the REC102 protein acts before the RAD52 gene product in the meiotic recombination pathway. The REC102 gene was cloned based on complementation of the mutant defect and the gene was mapped to chromosome XII between CDC25 and STE11. PMID:1732169

  17. Stability analysis of a high fibre yield and low lignin content "thick stem" mutant in tossa jute (Corchorus olitorius L.).

    PubMed

    Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K

    2014-01-01

    A "thick stem" mutant of Corchorus olitorius L. was induced at M2 (0.50%, 4 h, EMS) and the true breeding mutant is assessed across generations (M5 to M7) considering morphometric traits as well as SEM analysis of pollen grains and raw jute fibres, stem anatomy, cytogenetical attributes, and lignin content in relation to control. Furthermore, single fibre diameter and tensile strength are also analysed. The objective is to assess the stability of mutant for its effective exploration for raising a new plant type in tossa jute for commercial exploitation and efficient breeding. The mutant trait is monogenic recessive to normal. Results indicate that "thick stem" mutant is stable across generations (2n = 14) with distinctive high seed and fibre yield and significantly low lignin content. Stem anatomy of the mutant shows significant enhancement in fibre zone, number of fibre pyramids and fibre bundles per pyramid, and diameter of fibre cell in relation to control. Moreover, tensile strength of mutant fibre is significantly higher than control fibre and the trait is inversely related to fibre diameter. However the mutant is associated with low germination frequency, poor seed viability, and high pollen sterility, which may be eliminated through mutational approach followed by rigorous selection and efficient breeding.

  18. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  19. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  20. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  1. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  2. Physiology and pathogenicity of cpdB deleted mutant of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huifang; Chen, Liping; Si, Wei; Wang, Chunlai; Zhu, Fangna; Li, Guangxing; Liu, Siguo

    2017-04-01

    Avian colibacillosis is one of the most common infectious diseases caused partially or entirely by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) in birds. In addition to spontaneous infection, APEC can also cause secondary infections that result in greater severity of illness and greater losses to the poultry industry. In order to assess the role of 2', 3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (cpdB) in APEC on disease physiology and pathogenicity, an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli-34 (APEC-34) cpdB mutant was obtained using the Red system. The cpdB mutant grew at a slower rate than the natural strain APEC-34. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the bacteria of the cpdB mutant were significantly longer than the bacteria observed in the natural strain (P<0.01), and that the width of the cpdB mutant was significantly smaller than its natural counterpart (P<0.01). In order to evaluate the role of cpdB in APEC in the colonization of internal organs (lung, liver and spleen) in poultry, seven-day-old SPF chicks were infected with 10(9)CFU/chick of the cpdB mutant or the natural strain. No colonizations of cpdB mutants were observed in the internal organs 10days following the infection, though numerous natural strains were observed at 20days following infection. Additionally, the relative expression of division protein ftsZ, outer membrane protein A ompA, ferric uptake regulator fur and tryptophanase tnaA genes in the mutant strain were all significantly lower than in the natural strain (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These results suggested that cpdB is involved in the long-term colonization of APEC in the internal organs of the test subjects. The deletion of the cpdB gene also significantly affected the APEC growth and morphology.

  3. Amuvatinib has cytotoxic effects against NRAS-mutant melanoma but not BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Inna V; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M; Gibney, Geoffrey T; Smalley, Keiran S M

    2014-10-01

    Effective targeted therapy strategies are still lacking for the 15-20% of melanoma patients whose melanomas are driven by oncogenic NRAS. Here, we report on the NRAS-specific behavior of amuvatinib, a kinase inhibitor with activity against c-KIT, Axl, PDGFRα, and Rad51. An analysis of BRAF-mutant and NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines showed the NRAS-mutant cohort to be enriched for targets of amuvatinib, including Axl, c-KIT, and the Axl ligand Gas6. Increasing concentrations of amuvatinib selectively inhibited the growth of NRAS-mutant, but not BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines, an effect associated with induction of S-phase and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Mechanistically, amuvatinib was noted to either inhibit Axl, AKT, and MAPK signaling or Axl and AKT signaling and to induce a DNA damage response. In three-dimensional cell culture experiments, amuvatinib was cytotoxic against NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines. Thus, we show for the first time that amuvatinib has proapoptotic activity against melanoma cell lines, with selectivity observed for those harboring oncogenic NRAS.

  4. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  5. Acriflavine-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus cremoris†

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Selection for resistance to acriflavine in Streptococcus cremoris resulted in cross-resistance to the drugs neomycin, streptomycin, ethidium bromide, mitomycin C, and proflavine. Furthermore, the mutants showed resistance to lytic bacteriophages to which the parental strain was sensitive, and, unlike the parent, the mutants grew well at higher temperatures (40°C). Revertants selected independently either for temperature sensitivity or for acriflavine sensitivity lost resistance to all the drugs and dyes but retained the bacteriophage resistance phenotype. The acriflavine-resistant mutation resulted in an increase in resistance by the bacterial cells to sodium dodecyl sulfate, a potent solvent of lipopolysaccharide and lipoprotein. It is suggested that the acriflavine resistance mutation determines the synthesis of a membrane substance resistant to higher temperatures. PMID:907329

  6. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  7. Field evaluation of mint mutant and hybrid lines for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severity of Verticillium wilt varied significantly among mint lines and cultivars in the inoculated and non-inoculated sub-plots in two field trials. Verticillium wilt was significantly less severe for mutant lines 87M0109-1, 84M0107-7, and M90-11 than for Black Mitcham in 2002 and 2003. Verticilli...

  8. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future. PMID:26198671

  9. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  10. Fluoride-tolerant mutants of Aspergillus niger show enhanced phosphate solubilization capacity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R M; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F-). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F-. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F-, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F-, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F- tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources.

  11. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A; Maris, John M; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies.

  12. Functional, histological and biomechanical characterization of wheat water-mutant leaves.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Agata; Rascio, Nicoletta; Rinaldi, Michele; Valentini, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    A wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum) mutant, generated with sodium azide from wild-type (WT) cv. 'Trinakria', differs in its water affinity of dry leaves, and was designated as a water-mutant. Compared with the WT, water-mutant leaves have lower rates of water uptake, while stomatal and cuticular transpiration do not differ. The nuclear magnetic resonance proton signals used for image reconstruction of leaf cross sections showed differences between these genotypes for the T1 proton spin-density and the T2 proton spin-spin relaxation time. Structural and histochemical analyses at midrib level showed that the water-mutant has thinner leaves, with more and smaller cells per unit area of mesophyll and sclerenchyma, and has altered staining patterns of lignin and pectin-like substances. Stress-strain curves to examine the rheological properties of the leaves showed a biphasic trend, which reveals that the tensile strength at break load and the elastic modulus of the second phase of the water-mutant are significantly higher than for the WT. These data support the proposal of interrelationships among local biophysical properties of the leaf, the microscopic water structure, the rheological properties and the water flux rate across the leaf. This water-mutant can be used for analysis of the genetic basis of these differences, and for identification of gene(s) that govern these traits.

  13. Morphological characterization and assessment of genetic variability, character association, and divergence in soybean mutants.

    PubMed

    Malek, M A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Shahida Sharmin Afroz, Most; Nath, Ujjal Kumar; Mondal, M Monjurul Alam

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV) for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  14. Transcriptome sequencing and metabolic pathways of astaxanthin accumulated in Haematococcus pluvialis mutant under 15% CO2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Ke; Zhu, Yanxia; Yang, Weijuan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-03-01

    Transcriptome sequencing and annotation was performed on Haematococcus pluvialis mutant red cells induced with high light under 15% CO2 to demonstrate why astaxanthin yield of the mutant was 1.7 times higher than that of a wild strain. It was found that 56% of 1947 differentially expressed genes were upregulated in mutant cells. Most significant differences were found in unigenes related to photosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis and fatty acid biosynthesis pathways. The pyruvate kinase increased by 3.5-fold in mutant cells. Thus, more pyruvate, which was beneficial to carotenoids and fatty acid biosynthesis, was generated. Phytoene synthase, zeta-carotene desaturase, lycopene beta-cyclase involved in β-carotene biosynthesis in mutant cells were upregulated by 10.4-, 4.4-, and 5.8-fold, respectively. Beta-carotene 3-hydroxylase catalyzing conversion of β-carotene into astaxanthin was upregulated by 18.4-fold. The fatty acid biosynthesis was promoted because of the upregulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, thus increasing astaxanthin esterification and accumulation in mutant cells.

  15. Improving the synthesis of phenolic polymer using Coprinus cinereus peroxidase mutant Phe230Ala.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The F230A mutant of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP), which has a high stability against radical-inactivation, was previously reported. In the present study, the radical-robust F230A mutant was applied to the oxidative polymerization of phenol. The F230A mutant exhibited better polymerization activities than the wild-type CiP in the presence of water-miscible alcohols i.e., methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol despite its lower stability against alcohols. In particular, the F230A mutant showed a higher consumption of phenol (40%) and yielded phenolic polymer of larger molecular weight (8850Da) in a 50% (v/v) isopropanol-buffer mixture compared with the wild-type CiP (2% and 1519Da, respectively). In addition, the wild-type CiP and F230A mutant had no significant differences in enzyme inactivation by physical adsorption on the polymeric products or by heat incubation, and showed comparable kinetic parameters. These results indicate that high radical stability of the F230A mutant and improved solubility of phenolic polymers in alcohol-water cosolvent systems may synergistically contribute to the production of the high molecular weight phenolic polymer.

  16. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Malek, M. A.; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Shahida Sharmin Afroz, Most.; Nath, Ujjal Kumar; Mondal, M. Monjurul Alam

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV) for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement. PMID:25197722

  17. Compromised mutant EFEMP1 secretion associated with macular dystrophy remedied by proteostasis network alteration.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Kaushal, Shalesh; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-12-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in epidermal growth factor-containing, fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) causes its inefficient secretion and the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese/Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (ML/DHRD). To understand the influence of the protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network in rescuing mutant EFEMP1 misfolding and inefficient secretion linked to ML/DHRD, we developed a convenient and sensitive cell-based luminescence assay to monitor secretion versus intracellular accumulation. Fusing EFEMP1 to Gaussia luciferase faithfully recapitulates mutant EFEMP1 secretion defects observed previously using more cumbersome methodology. To understand what governs mutant intracellular retention, we generated a series of R345 mutants. These mutants revealed that aromatic residue substitutions (i.e., Trp, Tyr, and Phe) at position 345 cause significant EFEMP1 secretion deficiencies. These secretion defects appear to be caused, in part, by reduced native disulfide bonding in domain 6 harboring the 345 position. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant EFEMP1 secretion and proper disulfide formation are enhanced by adaptation of the cellular environment by a reduced growth temperature and/or translational attenuation. This study highlights the mechanisms underlying the inefficient secretion of R345W EFEMP1 and demonstrates that alteration of the proteostasis network may provide a strategy to alleviate or delay the onset of this macular dystrophy.

  18. Compromised mutant EFEMP1 secretion associated with macular dystrophy remedied by proteostasis network alteration

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2011-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in epidermal growth factor–containing, fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) causes its inefficient secretion and the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese/Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (ML/DHRD). To understand the influence of the protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network in rescuing mutant EFEMP1 misfolding and inefficient secretion linked to ML/DHRD, we developed a convenient and sensitive cell-based luminescence assay to monitor secretion versus intracellular accumulation. Fusing EFEMP1 to Gaussia luciferase faithfully recapitulates mutant EFEMP1 secretion defects observed previously using more cumbersome methodology. To understand what governs mutant intracellular retention, we generated a series of R345 mutants. These mutants revealed that aromatic residue substitutions (i.e., Trp, Tyr, and Phe) at position 345 cause significant EFEMP1 secretion deficiencies. These secretion defects appear to be caused, in part, by reduced native disulfide bonding in domain 6 harboring the 345 position. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant EFEMP1 secretion and proper disulfide formation are enhanced by adaptation of the cellular environment by a reduced growth temperature and/or translational attenuation. This study highlights the mechanisms underlying the inefficient secretion of R345W EFEMP1 and demonstrates that alteration of the proteostasis network may provide a strategy to alleviate or delay the onset of this macular dystrophy. PMID:22031286

  19. Fluoride-Tolerant Mutants of Aspergillus niger Show Enhanced Phosphate Solubilization Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ubiana de Cássia; Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Silva, Nina Morena R. M.; Duarte, Josiane Leal; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Tótola, Marcos Rogério; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-01-01

    P-solubilizing microorganisms are a promising alternative for a sustainable use of P against a backdrop of depletion of high-grade rock phosphates (RPs). Nevertheless, toxic elements present in RPs, such as fluorine, can negatively affect microbial solubilization. Thus, this study aimed at selecting Aspergillus niger mutants efficient at P solubilization in the presence of fluoride (F−). The mutants were obtained by exposition of conidia to UV light followed by screening in a medium supplemented with Ca3(PO4)2 and F−. The mutant FS1-555 showed the highest solubilization in the presence of F−, releasing approximately 70% of the P contained in Ca3(PO4)2, a value 1.7 times higher than that obtained for the wild type (WT). The mutant FS1-331 showed improved ability of solubilizing fluorapatites, increasing the solubilization of Araxá, Catalão, and Patos RPs by 1.7, 1.6, and 2.5 times that of the WT, respectively. These mutants also grew better in the presence of F−, indicating that mutagenesis allowed the acquisition of F− tolerance. Higher production of oxalic acid by FS1-331 correlated with its improved capacity for RP solubilization. This mutant represents a significant improvement and possess a high potential for application in solubilization systems with fluoride-rich phosphate sources. PMID:25310310

  20. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  1. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  2. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  3. p53 mutation is common in microsatellite stable, BRAF mutant colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Bond, Catherine E; Umapathy, Aarti; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Greco, Sonia A; Zhen Zhao, Zhen; Mallitt, Kylie-Ann; Buttenshaw, Ron L; Montgomery, Grant W; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki L J

    2012-04-01

    The majority of "serrated pathway" colorectal cancers have mutation of the BRAF oncogene and display the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Half these cancers have microsatellite instability (MSI) and an excellent prognosis. In the absence of MSI (microsatellite stable, MSS), BRAF mutation has been associated with a particularly poor prognosis. "Traditional pathway" cancers are BRAF wild type. Mutation of p53 is common and this correlates with advanced stage. We therefore hypothesized that p53 mutation would be common in MSS/BRAF mutant colorectal cancer. One thousand and eighty-one colorectal cancers were screened for BRAF mutation to identify two BRAF mutant study groups (MSI: n = 77; MSS: n = 69) and a BRAF wild type control group (n = 101). These were screened for p53 mutation by high resolution melt analysis and classified for CIMP and MGMT methylation by quantitative methylation specific PCR. Molecular data were compared to patient age, gender, tumor location and stage. p53 was mutated significantly more frequently in MSS/BRAF mutant (28/69, 40.6%) compared to MSI/BRAF mutant cancers (13/77, 16.9%), but this mutation rate did not differ from MSS/BRAF wild type cancers (47/101, 46.5%)(p < 0.0001). CIMP was less common in MSS/BRAF mutant (26/47, 55.3%) compared to MSI/BRAF mutant cancers (41/54, 75.9%), but was more common than in MSS/BRAF wild type cancers (3/85, 3.5%) (p < 0.0001). MSS/BRAF mutant cancers were more commonly proximal (38/54, 70.3%), but were similar to MSS/BRAF wild type cancers in terms of patient age, gender distribution and stage at presentation. MSS/BRAF mutant cancers share molecular and clinical features of both the serrated and traditional pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  4. Akt mediated ROS-dependent selective targeting of mutant KRAS tumors.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to cell death. Previously, we reported the ability of a small molecule compound, C1, to induce ROS dependent autophagy associated apoptosis in human cancer cell lines and primary tumor cells (Wong C. et al. 2010). Our ongoing investigations have unraveled a hitherto undefined novel signaling network involving hyper-phosphorylation of Akt and Akt-mediated ROS production in cancer cell lines. Interestingly, drug-induced Akt activation is selectively seen in cell lines that carry mutant KRAS; HCT116 cells that carry the V13D KRAS mutation respond favorably to C1 while HT29 cells expressing wild type KRAS are relatively resistant. Of note, not only does the compound target mutant KRAS expressing cells but also induces RAS activation as evidenced by the PAK pull down assay. Corroborating this, pharmacological inhibition as well as siRNA mediated silencing of KRAS or Akt, blocked C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony forming ability in HCT116 cells. To further confirm the involvement of KRAS, we made use of mutant KRAS transformed RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. Notably, drug-induced ROS generation and death sensitivity was significantly higher in RWPE-1-KRAS cells than the RWPE-1-vector cells, thus confirming the results obtained with mutant KRAS colorectal carcinoma cell line. Lastly, we made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout cells (KO) where the mutant KRAS allele had been deleted, thus expressing a single wild-type KRAS allele. Exposure of the KO cells to C1 failed to induce Akt activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Taken together, results show the involvement of activated Akt in ROS-mediated selective targeting of mutant KRAS expressing tumors, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of chemotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting KRAS mutant cancers.

  5. The phenotype of a phospholipase C (plc-1) mutant in a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Giblon, Rachel E; Lorenti, Miranda S H

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, phospholipase C may play a role in hyphal extension at the growing tips as part of a growth-sensing mechanism that activates calcium release from internal stores to mediate continued expansion of the hyphal tip. One candidate for a tip-localized phospholipase C is PLC-1. We characterized morphology and growth characteristics of a knockout mutant (KO plc-1) and a RIP mutated strain (RIP plc-1) (missense mutations and a nonsense mutation render the gene product non-functional). Growth and hyphal cytology of wildtype and KO plc-1 were similar, but the RIP plc-1 mutant grew slower and exhibited abnormal membrane structures at the hyphal tip, imaged using the fluorescence dye FM4-64. To test for causes of the slower growth of the RIP plc-1 mutant, we examined its physiological poise compared to wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. The electrical properties of all three strains and the electrogenic contribution of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (identified by cyanide inhibition) were the same. Responses to high osmolarity were also similar. However, the RIP plc-1 mutant had a significantly lower turgor, a possible cause of its slower growth. While growth of all three strains was inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin, the RIP plc-1 mutant did not exhibit hyphal bursting after addition of the inhibitor, observed in both wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. Although the plc-1 gene is not obligatory for tip growth, the phenotype of the RIP plc-1 mutant - abnormal tip cytology, lower turgor and resistance to inhibitor-induced hyphal bursting - suggest it does play a role in tip growth. The expression of a dysfunctional plc-1 gene may cause a shift to alternative mechanism(s) of growth sensing in hyphal extension.

  6. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  7. The contribution of mutant GBA to the development of Parkinson disease in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Maor, Gali; Cabasso, Or; Krivoruk, Olga; Rodriguez, Joe; Steller, Hermann; Segal, Daniel; Horowitz, Mia

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) results from mutations in the acid β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) encoding gene, GBA, which leads to accumulation of glucosylceramides. GD patients and carriers of GD mutations have a significantly higher propensity to develop Parkinson disease (PD) in comparison to the non-GD population. In this study, we used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to show that development of PD in carriers of GD mutations results from the presence of mutant GBA alleles. Drosophila has two GBA orthologs (CG31148 and CG31414), each of which has a minos insertion, which creates C-terminal deletion in the encoded GCase. Flies double heterozygous for the endogenous mutant GBA orthologs presented Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) and developed parkinsonian signs, manifested by death of dopaminergic cells, defective locomotion and a shorter life span. We also established transgenic flies carrying the mutant human N370S, L444P and the 84GG variants. UPR activation and development of parkinsonian signs could be recapitulated in flies expressing these three mutant variants.UPR and parkinsonian signs could be partially rescued by growing the double heterozygous flies, or flies expressing the N370S or the L444P human mutant GCase variants, in the presence of the pharmacological chaperone ambroxol, which binds and removes mutant GCase from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However flies expressing the 84GG mutant, that does not express mature GCase, did not exhibit rescue by ambroxol. Our results strongly suggest that the presence of a mutant GBA allele in dopaminergic cells leads to ER stress and to their death, and contributes to development of PD.

  8. Differential interaction between iron and mutant alpha-synuclein causes distinctive Parkinsonian phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Wu, Ka-Chun; Yung, Wing-Ho; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Ke, Ya

    2016-04-01

    Alpha-synuclein aggregation is the central hallmark of both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with different PD-causing genetic defects of alpha-synuclein usually show distinctive clinical features that are atypical to sporadic PD. Iron accumulation is invariably found in PD. Recent studies showed that mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein may have differential interaction with iron and mutant alpha-synuclein toxicity could be preferentially exacerbated by iron. We hence hypothesized that iron overload could selectively influence mutant alpha-synuclein toxicity and disease phenotypes. To test the hypothesis, we investigated if Drosophila melanogaster over-expressing A53T, A30P, and wild-type (WT) alpha-synuclein have different responses to iron treatment. We showed that iron treatment induced similar reduction of survival rate in all flies but induced a more severe motor decline in A53T and A30P mutant alpha-synuclein expressing flies, suggesting interaction between mutant alpha-synuclein and iron. Although no significant difference in total head iron content was found among these flies, we demonstrated that iron treatment induced selective DA neuron loss in motor-related PPM3 cluster only in the flies that express A53T and A30P mutant alpha-synuclein. We provided the first in vivo evidence that iron overload could induce distinctive neuropathology and disease phenotypes in mutant but not WT alpha-synuclein expressing flies, providing insights to the cause of clinical features selectively exhibited by mutant alpha-synuclein carriers.

  9. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  10. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  11. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  12. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization of Developmental Mutants from Microsporum gypseum

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, T. J.; Stock, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    Developmental mutants affected in either sporulation or spore germination have been isolated from Microsporum gypseum with the aid of nitrosoguanidine or as spontaneously occurring mutants. The time course levels of several proteins temporally associated with conidial development have been assayed in the wild-type and mutant strains. The spore germination characteristics of two of the mutants are described. The relationship of alkaline protease accumulation to tyrosinase accumulation and spore germination is discussed. PMID:4992372

  13. Mutant IDH1 downregulates ATM and alters DNA repair and sensitivity to DNA damage independent of TET2

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J.; Bendall, Sean C.; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J.; Cescon, David W.; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F.; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C.; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H.; Larsen, Dana M.; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E.; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L.; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R.; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E.; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L.; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J.; Nolan, Garry P.; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  14. Proton movement and photointermediate kinetics in rhodopsin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Szundi, Istvan; Kazmi, Manija A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Kliger, David S

    2006-05-02

    The role of ionizable amino acid side chains in the bovine rhodopsin activation mechanism was studied in mutants E134Q, E134R/R135E, H211F, and E122Q. All mutants exhibited bathorhodopsin stability on the 30 ns to 1 micros time scale similar to that of the wild type. Lumirhodopsin decay was also similar to that of the wild type except for the H211F mutant where early decay (20 micros) to a second form of lumirhodopsin was seen, followed by formation of an extremely long-lived Meta I(480) product (34 ms), an intermediate which forms to a much reduced extent, if at all, in dodecyl maltoside suspensions of wild-type rhodopsin. A smaller amount of a similar long-lived Meta I(480) product was seen after photolysis of E122Q, but E134Q and E134R/R135Q displayed kinetics much more similar to those of the wild type under these conditions (i.e., no Meta I(480) product). These results support the idea that specific interaction of His211 and Glu122 plays a significant role in deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base and receptor activation. Proton uptake measurements using bromcresol purple showed that E122Q was qualitatively similar to wild-type rhodopsin, with at least one proton being released during lumirhodopsin decay per Meta I(380) intermediate formed, followed by uptake of at least two protons per rhodopsin bleached on a time scale of tens of milliseconds. Different results were obtained for H211F, E134Q, and E134R/R135E, which all released approximately two protons per rhodopsin bleached. These results show that several ionizable groups besides the Schiff base imine are affected by the structural changes involved in rhodopsin activation. At least two proton uptake groups and probably at least one proton release group in addition to the Schiff base are present in rhodopsin.

  15. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  16. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  17. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  18. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  19. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of HDAC8 Mutants Associated with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) spectrum disorders are characterized by multiple organ system congenital anomalies that result from mutations in genes encoding core cohesin proteins SMC1A, SMC3, and RAD21, or proteins that regulate cohesin function such as NIPBL and HDAC8. HDAC8 is the Zn2+-dependent SMC3 deacetylase required for cohesin recycling during the cell cycle, and 17 different HDAC8 mutants have been identified to date in children diagnosed with CdLS. As part of our continuing studies focusing on aberrant HDAC8 function in CdLS, we now report the preparation and biophysical evaluation of five human HDAC8 mutants: P91L, G117E, H180R, D233G, and G304R. Additionally, the double mutants D233G–Y306F and P91L–Y306F were prepared to enable cocrystallization of intact enzyme–substrate complexes. X-ray crystal structures of G117E, P91L–Y306F, and D233G–Y306F HDAC8 mutants reveal that each CdLS mutation causes structural changes that compromise catalysis and/or thermostability. For example, the D233G mutation disrupts the D233–K202–S276 hydrogen bond network, which stabilizes key tertiary structure interactions, thereby significantly compromising thermostability. Molecular dynamics simulations of H180R and G304R HDAC8 mutants suggest that the bulky arginine side chain of each mutant protrudes into the substrate binding site and also causes active site residue Y306 to fluctuate away from the position required for substrate activation and catalysis. Significantly, the catalytic activities of most mutants can be partially or fully rescued by the activator N-(phenylcarbamothioyl)-benzamide, suggesting that HDAC8 activators may serve as possible leads in the therapeutic management of CdLS. PMID:26463496

  20. ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib promotes degradation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most prevalent genetic events in human Her2-positive breast cancer and are associated with poor prognosis and survival. Human clinical data and our in vitro and in vivo studies strongly suggest potent oncogenic cooperation between mutant p53 and Her2 (ErbB2). Yet, the translational significance of mutant p53 in Her2 positive breast cancer, especially with respect to Her2-targeted therapies, has not been evaluated. Our previous work identified novel oncogenic activity of mutant p53 whereby mutp53 amplifies ErbB2 signaling via the mutp53-HSF1-ErbB2 feed-forward loop. Here we report that pharmacological interception of this circuit by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib downregulates mutant p53 in vitro and in vivo. We found that ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib inhibits transcription factor HSF1, and its target Hsp90, followed by mutant p53 degradation in MDM2 dependent manner. Thus, our data suggest that mutant p53 sensitizes cancer cells to lapatinib via two complementary mechanisms: mutant p53 mediated amplification of ErbB2 signaling, and simultaneous annihilation of both potent oncogenic drivers, ErbB2 and mutant p53. Hence, our study could provide valuable information for the optimization of therapeutic protocols to achieve superior clinical effects in the treatment of Her2 positive breast cancer. PMID:27791982

  1. Construction and functional analysis of Trichoderma harzianum mutants that modulate maize resistance to the pathogen Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Ma, Jia; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to generate an insertional mutant library of the mycelial fungus Trichoderma harzianum. From a total of 450 mutants, six mutants that showed significant influence on maize resistance to C. lunata were analyzed in detail. Maize coated with these mutants was more susceptible to C. lunata compared with those coated with a wild-type (WT) strain. Similar to other fungal ATMT libraries, all six mutants were single copy integrations, which occurred preferentially in noncoding regions (except two mutants) and were frequently accompanied by the loss of border sequences. Two mutants (T66 and T312) that were linked to resistance were characterized further. Maize seeds coated with T66 and T312 were more susceptible to C. lunata than those treated with WT. Moreover, the mutants affected the resistance of maize to C. lunata by enhancing jasmonate-responsive gene expression. T66 and T312 induced maize resistance to C. lunata infection through a jasmonic acid-dependent pathway.

  2. ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib promotes degradation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D

    2017-01-24

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most prevalent genetic events in human Her2-positive breast cancer and are associated with poor prognosis and survival. Human clinical data and our in vitro and in vivo studies strongly suggest potent oncogenic cooperation between mutant p53 and Her2 (ErbB2). Yet, the translational significance of mutant p53 in Her2 positive breast cancer, especially with respect to Her2-targeted therapies, has not been evaluated. Our previous work identified novel oncogenic activity of mutant p53 whereby mutp53 amplifies ErbB2 signaling via the mutp53-HSF1-ErbB2 feed-forward loop. Here we report that pharmacological interception of this circuit by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib downregulates mutant p53 in vitro and in vivo. We found that ErbB2 inhibition by lapatinib inhibits transcription factor HSF1, and its target Hsp90, followed by mutant p53 degradation in MDM2 dependent manner. Thus, our data suggest that mutant p53 sensitizes cancer cells to lapatinib via two complementary mechanisms: mutant p53 mediated amplification of ErbB2 signaling, and simultaneous annihilation of both potent oncogenic drivers, ErbB2 and mutant p53. Hence, our study could provide valuable information for the optimization of therapeutic protocols to achieve superior clinical effects in the treatment of Her2 positive breast cancer.

  3. Integrated analysis of transcriptome and metabolome of Arabidopsis albino or pale green mutants with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Satou, Masakazu; Enoki, Harumi; Oikawa, Akira; Ohta, Daisaku; Saito, Kazunori; Hachiya, Takushi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Saito, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Nagata, Noriko; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Motohashi, Reiko

    2014-07-01

    We used four mutants having albino or pale green phenotypes with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins to analyze the regulatory system of metabolites in chloroplast. We performed an integrated analyses of transcriptomes and metabolomes of the four mutants. Transcriptome analysis was carried out using the Agilent Arabidopsis 2 Oligo Microarray, and metabolome analysis with two mass spectrometers; a direct-infusion Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR/MS) and a gas chromatograph-time of flight mass spectrometer. Among approximately 200 known metabolites detected by the FT-ICR/MS, 71 metabolites showed significant changes in the mutants when compared with controls (Ds donor plants). Significant accumulation of several amino acids (glutamine, glutamate and asparagine) was observed in the albino and pale green mutants. Transcriptome analysis revealed altered expressions of genes in several metabolic pathways. For example, genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated. These results suggest that nitrogen assimilation is constitutively promoted in the albino and pale green mutants. The accumulation of ammonium ions in the albino and pale green mutants was consistently higher than in Ds donor lines. Furthermore, genes related to pyridoxin accumulation and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated, which may have occurred as a result of the accumulation of glutamine in the albino and pale green mutants. The difference in metabolic profiles seems to be correlated with the disruption of chloroplast internal membrane structures in the mutants. In albino mutants, the alteration of metabolites accumulation and genes expression is stronger than pale green mutants.

  4. Chronologic changes in serum hepatitis B virus DNA, genotypes, surface antigen mutants and reverse transcriptase mutants during 25-year nationwide immunization in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-Y; Chang, M-H; Ni, Y-H; Chiang, C-L; Wu, J-F; Chen, H-L; Chen, P-J; Chen, D-S

    2017-02-09

    We investigated breakthrough infection and hepatitis B virus (HBV) genetic changes in immunized subjects after 25 years of a universal infant immunization. Specifically, serum HBV DNA, genotypes, surface antigen mutants and nucleoside analog-resistant (NAr) mutants were assessed in 2853 subjects (<25 years old) surveyed in 2009, and these data were compared with the data from previous serosurveys. A comparison across different age-stratified groups using the 2009 data revealed a significant increase in the seropositive rate of anti-HBc (5.51% vs 12.38%, P=.001) and HBV DNA (1.13% vs 3.96%, P=.007) between those 17-22 and 23-24 years of age, possibly due to selective infant immunization in 1984-1986. Well-characterized NAr mutants, potential NAr mutants and surface "a" determinant mutants were detected in none, 15 (45.5%) and nine (27.3%) of 33 HBV DNA-positive subjects, respectively. Of 15 immunized, HBV DNA-positive young adults (18-24 years), three (20%) carried "a" determinant mutants. Amongst 1176 HBsAg-negative subjects evaluated for occult HBV infection, those seropositive for anti-HBc had a higher seropositive rate for HBV DNA (10/110, 9.1% vs 7/1066, 0.66%; P<.001) and "a" determinant mutants (4/110, 3.6% vs 0/1066; P<.001) than those seronegative for anti-HBc. Overall, the HBsAg-positive subjects in six serosurveys showed no significant increase in genotype C frequency in the comparison between the vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts (25/98, 25.5% versus 14/79, 17.7%, P=.188). Over the 25-year programme, there was no increase in the prevalence of genotype C in HBsAg carriers and no increase in breakthrough HBV infection or surface mutant prevalence beyond adolescence. Nucleic acid amplification should still be considered the primary screening method for occult hepatitis B detection in high-risk recipients.

  5. The Contrived Mutant p53 Oncogene – Beyond Loss of Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in p53 are almost synonymous with cancer – be it susceptibility to the disease or response to treatment – and therefore, are a critical determinant of overall survival. As most of these mutations occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53, many of the clinical correlations with mutant p53 have been initially relegated to the loss of its transcription-dependent activities as a tumor suppressor. However, significant efforts over the last two decades have led to the vast knowledge on the potential functions of the mutated p53 protein, which have been attributed to the physical presence of the mutant protein rather than the loss of its wild-type (WT) functions. Beyond the inhibitory effects of mutant p53 on the remaining WT protein that leads to the dominant-negative effect in the heterozygous state, mutant p53’s presence has also been significantly attributed to novel gain-of-functions that lead to addiction of cancer cells to its presence for survival, as well as for their ability to invade and metastasize, elevating it to a contrived oncogene that drives the cancer cells forward. This review will summarize the functional consequences of the presence of mutant p53 protein on cellular and organismal physiology. PMID:26697411

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced mutant frequencies increase transiently in male germ cells of older mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; McMahan, C Alex; Hildreth, Kim; Garcia, Rebecca A; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2012-05-15

    Spontaneous mutant frequency in the male germline increases with age, thereby increasing the risk of siring offspring with genetic disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of age on ionizing radiation-induced male germline mutagenesis. lacI transgenic mice were treated with ionizing radiation at 4-, 15- and 26-month-old, and mutant frequencies were determined for pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids at 15 days or 49 days after ionizing radiation treatment. Cells collected 15 days after treatment were derivatives of irradiated differentiating spermatogenic cells while cells collected 49 days later were derivatives of spermatogonial stem cells. The results showed that (1) spontaneous mutant frequency increased in spermatogenic cells recovered from nonirradiated old mice (26-months-old), particularly in the round spermatids; (2) mutant frequencies were significantly increased in round spermatids obtained from middle-aged mice (15-months-old) and old age mice (26-months-old) at 15 and 49 days after irradiation compared to the sham-treated old mice; and (3) pachytene spermatocytes obtained from 15- or 26-month-old mice displayed a significantly increased mutant frequency at 15 days post irradiation. This study indicates that age modulates the mutagenic response to ionizing radiation in the male germline.

  7. Characterization of the mutant spectra of a fish RNA virus within individual hosts during natural infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Kurath, Gael

    2003-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an RNA virus that causes significant mortalities of salmonids in the Pacific Northwest of North America. RNA virus populations typically contain genetic variants that form a heterogeneous virus pool, referred to as a quasispecies or mutant spectrum. This study characterized the mutant spectra of IHNV populations within individual fish reared in different environmental settings by RT–PCR of genomic viral RNA and determination of partial glycoprotein gene sequences of molecular clones. The diversity of the mutant spectra from ten in vivo populations was low and the average mutation frequencies of duplicate populations did not significantly exceed the background mutation level expected from the methodology. In contrast, two in vitro populations contained variants with an identical mutational hot spot. These results indicated that the mutant spectra of natural IHNV populations is very homogeneous, and does not explain the different magnitudes of genetic diversity observed between the different IHNV genogroups. Overall the mutant frequency of IHNV within its host is one of the lowest reported for RNA viruses.

  8. Histologic and Immunohistochemical Analyses of Soft Tissue Sarcomas From brca2-Mutant/ tp53-Mutant Zebrafish Are Consistent With Neural Crest (Schwann Cell) Origin.

    PubMed

    White, L A; Sexton, J M; Shive, H R

    2017-03-01

    The zebrafish ( Danio rerio) provides a powerful model for analyzing genetic contributors to cancer. Multiple zebrafish lines with cancer-associated genetic mutations develop soft tissue sarcomas that are histologically consistent with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). The goal of this study was to determine the phenotype of soft tissue sarcomas in a brca2-mutant/ tp53-mutant zebrafish line using immunohistochemical markers that are commonly expressed in mammalian MPNST. We classified 70 soft tissue sarcomas from a brca2-mutant/ tp53-mutant zebrafish cohort as MPNST, undifferentiated sarcoma, or other tumor based on histologic features. The expression of S100, CD57, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was analyzed in nonneoplastic neural tissues and tumor specimens by immunohistochemistry. Each marker was expressed in nonneoplastic neural tissues. In MPNST, S100 and CD57 were widely expressed in neoplastic cells, with greater consistency observed for CD57 expression. In undifferentiated sarcomas, results were variable and correlated to anatomic location. Coelomic undifferentiated sarcomas often exhibited widespread CD57 expression but limited S100 expression. In comparison, ocular undifferentiated sarcomas exhibited limited expression of both CD57 and S100. Overall, CD57 and S100 expression was significantly higher in MPNST than in undifferentiated sarcomas. GFAP was not expressed in any of the tumors. This study identified commercially available antibodies that are useful for analyzing S100, CD57, and GFAP expression in zebrafish. This study further shows a correlation between degree of histologic differentiation and expression of these markers in soft tissue sarcomas from brca2-mutant/ tp53-mutant zebrafish and suggests that these cancers are derived from the neural crest with differentiation toward myelinating Schwann cells.

  9. Mutant models of prolonged life span.

    PubMed

    Mahler, J F

    2001-01-01

    Aging is an important biological process that affects all creatures. For humans, age-related diseases and the question of why we age and die also have tremendous social and philosophical impact. We can therefore expect that models to study mechanisms of the aging process will always attract much interest. Until recently, the mutant model approach to study molecular mechanisms of aging has been limited to lower animals such as yeast, worms, and flies. However, given the current power of genetic technology in mammals, we can expect that phenotypes of prolonged life span will increasingly be seen in mice and subject to evaluation by pathologists. A brief review of current models is presented.

  10. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  11. Pleiotropic aspartate taxis and serine taxis mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reader, R W; Tso, W W; Springer, M S; Goy, M F; Adler, J

    1979-04-01

    Mutants that at one time were thought to be specifically defective in taxis toward aspartate and related amino acids (tar mutants) or specifically defective in taxis toward serine and related amino acids (tar mutants) are now shown to be pleiotropic in their defects. The tar mutants also lack taxis toward maltose and away from Co2+ and Ni2+. The tsr mutants are altered in their response to a variety of repellents. Double mutants (tar tsr) fail in nearly all chemotactic responses. The tar and tsr mutants provide evidence for two complementary, converging pathways of information flow: certain chemoreceptors feed information into the tar pathway and others into the tsr pathway. The tar and tsr products have been shown to be two different sets of methylated proteins.

  12. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  13. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of mutant p53 protein in small-cell lung cancer: relationship to treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gemba, K; Ueoka, H; Kiura, K; Tabata, M; Harada, M

    2000-07-01

    We investigated the expression of mutant p53 proteins in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) immunohistochemically, by identification of stabilized mutant p53 proteins with a much longer half-life than the wild-type protein. Of 103 tumor specimens obtained by transbronchial tumor biopsy for histologic diagnosis, 52 (50%) showed positive staining for p53 protein with a p53 monoclonal antibody, DO-1. Positive staining for p53 protein was not correlated with age, sex, performance status, lifetime cigarette consumption, serum concentration of neuron-specific enolase and extent of disease. Complete response rates in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly lower than those in p53-negative patients (25% versus 59%; P=0.0005, by chi-square test). Similarly, survival periods in patients with a mutant p53 protein-positive tumor were significantly shorter than those in mutant p53-protein-negative patients (10.8 months versus 20.6 months; P=0.0001, by generalized Wilcoxon test). Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards model revealed that the presence of mutant p53 protein is an independent factor associated with differences in overall survival (hazards ratio=2.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-4.34; P=0.0001). These observations suggest that the expression of mutant p53 proteins in SCLC may be an important factor predicting poor prognosis.

  15. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropical

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.G.; Rayle, D.L. ); Cleland, R.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  16. Zebrafish Genomic Instability Mutants and Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jessica L.; Rush, Lindsay M.; Breneman, Carol; Mohideen, Manzoor-Ali P. K.; Cheng, Keith C.

    2006-01-01

    Somatic loss of tumor suppressor gene function comprising the second hit of Knudson's two-hit hypothesis is important in human cancer. A genetic screen was performed in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to find mutations that cause genomic instability (gin), as scored by Streisinger's mosaic-eye assay that models this second hit. The assay, based on a visible test for loss of wild-type gene function at a single locus, golden, is representative of genomewide events. Twelve ENU-induced genomic instability (gin) mutations were isolated. Most mutations showed weak dominance in heterozygotes and all showed a stronger phenotype in homozygotes. Trans-heterozygosity for 7 of these mutations showed greatly enhanced instability. A variety of spontaneous tumors were found in heterozygous adults from all gin lines, consistent with the expectation that genomic instability (mutator) mutations can accelerate carcinogenesis. The incidence of spontaneous cancer at 30–34 months was increased 9.6-fold in heterozygotes for the mutant with the strongest phenotype, gin-10. Tumors were seen in skin, colon, kidney, liver, pancreas, ovary, testis, and neuronal tissues, with multiple tumors in some fish. The study of these mutants will add to our understanding of the mechanisms of somatic loss of gene function and how those mechanisms contribute to cancer susceptibility. PMID:16888336

  17. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  18. The LORE1 insertion mutant resource.

    PubMed

    Małolepszy, Anna; Mun, Terry; Sandal, Niels; Gupta, Vikas; Dubin, Manu; Urbański, Dorian; Shah, Niraj; Bachmann, Asger; Fukai, Eigo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Markmann, Katharina; Su, Junyi; Umehara, Yosuke; Soyano, Takashi; Miyahara, Akira; Sato, Shusei; Hayashi, Makoto; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2016-10-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are closely related to retroviruses, and their activities shape eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a complete Lotus japonicus insertion mutant collection generated by identification of 640 653 new insertion events following de novo activation of the LTR element Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) (http://lotus.au.dk). Insertion preferences are critical for effective gene targeting, and we exploit our large dataset to analyse LTR element characteristics in this context. We infer the mechanism that generates the consensus palindromes typical of retroviral and LTR retrotransposon insertion sites, identify a short relaxed insertion site motif, and demonstrate selective integration into CHG-hypomethylated genes. These characteristics result in a steep increase in deleterious mutation rate following activation, and allow LORE1 active gene targeting to approach saturation within a population of 134 682 L. japonicus lines. We suggest that saturation mutagenesis using endogenous LTR retrotransposons with germinal activity can be used as a general and cost-efficient strategy for generation of non-transgenic mutant collections for unrestricted use in plant research.

  19. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  20. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  1. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  2. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  3. Thiostrepton-resistant mutants of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Dale M.; Thompson, Jill; Gregory, Steven T.; March, Paul E.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2004-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L11 and its associated binding site on 23S rRNA together comprise one of the principle components that mediate interactions of translation factors with the ribosome. This site is also the target of the antibiotic thiostrepton, which has been proposed to act by preventing important structural transitions that occur in this region of the ribosome during protein synthesis. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of spontaneous thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus. All mutations were found at conserved positions in the flexible N-terminal domain of L11 or at conserved positions in the L11-binding site of 23S rRNA. A number of the mutant ribosomes were affected in in vitro EF-G-dependent GTP hydrolysis but all showed resistance to thiostrepton at levels ranging from high to moderate. Structure probing revealed that some of the mutations in L11 result in enhanced reactivity of adjacent rRNA bases to chemical probes, suggesting a more open conformation of this region. These data suggest that increased flexibility of the factor binding site results in resistance to thiostrepton by counteracting the conformation-stabilizing effect of the antibiotic. PMID:15199170

  4. Effects of mutant rat dynamin on endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Dynamin is a 100-kD microtubule-activated GTPase. Recent evidence has revealed a high degree of sequence homology with the product of the Drosophila gene shibire, mutations in which block the recycling of synaptic vesicles and, more generally, the formation of coated and non- coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. We have now transfected cultured mammalian COS-7 cells with both wild-type and mutant dynamin cDNAs. Point mutations in the GTP-binding consensus sequence elements of dynamin equivalent to dominant negative mutations in ras, and an NH2- terminal deletion of the entire GTP-binding domain of dynamin, block transferrin uptake and alter the distribution of clathrin heavy chain and alpha-, but not gamma-, adaptin. COOH-terminal deletions reverse these effects, identifying this portion of dynamin as a site of interaction with other components of the endocytic pathway. Over- expression of neither wild-type nor mutant forms of dynamin affected the distribution of microtubules. These results demonstrate a specific role for dynamin and for GTP in the initial stages of receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:8335685

  5. Too many mutants with multiple mutations.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These "multiples" appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts.

  6. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  7. Cercosporin-deficient mutants by plasmid tagging in the asexual fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-R; Ehrenshaft, M; Wetzel, D K; Daub, M E

    2003-11-01

    We have successfully adapted plasmid insertion and restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) to produce cercosporin toxin-deficient mutants in the asexual phytopathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae. The use of pre-linearized plasmid or restriction enzymes in the transformation procedure significantly decreased the transformation frequency, but promoted a complicated and undefined mode of plasmid integration that leads to mutations in the C. nicotianae genome. Vector DNA generally integrated in multiple copies, and no increase in single-copy insertion was observed when enzymes were added to the transformation mixture. Out of 1873 transformants tested, 39 putative cercosporin toxin biosynthesis ( ctb) mutants were recovered that showed altered levels of cercosporin production. Seven ctb mutants were recovered using pre-linearized plasmids without the addition of enzymes, and these were considered to be non-REMI mutants. The correlation between a specific insertion and a mutant phenotype was confirmed using rescued plasmids as gene disruption vectors in the wild-type strain. Six out of fifteen rescued plasmids tested yielded cercosporin-deficient transformants when re-introduced into the wild-type strain, suggesting a link between the insertion site and the cercosporin-deficient phenotype. Sequence analysis of a fragment flanking the insert site recovered from one insertion mutant showed it to be disrupted in sequences with high homology to the acyl transferase domain of polyketide synthases from other fungi. Disruption of this polyketide synthase gene ( CTB1) using a rescued plasmid resulted in mutants that were defective in cercosporin production. Thus, we provide the first molecular evidence that cercosporin is synthesized via a polyketide pathway as previously hypothesized.

  8. Expression of alcohol-soluble endosperm proteins in maize single and double mutants.

    PubMed

    Paulis, J W; Bietz, J A; Bogyo, T P; Darrah, L L; Zuber, M S

    1990-05-01

    Many maize (Zea mays L.) mutant genes exist. Some affect protein content or composition, while others modify carbohydrates or kernel phenotype. In doublemutant lines, two mutant genes are present. We know little about interactions of such genes, however. We therefore examined a normal maize inbred, B37, 10 near-isogenic single mutants and 46 double mutants to analyze quantitative effects on alcohol-soluble endosperm proteins. Proteins were extracted with 70% ethanol0.5% sodium acetate-5% mercaptoethanol, and fractionated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Early peaks were alcohol-soluble glutelin (ASG) subunits, while late peaks contained zein. Results were quantified and statistically analyzed. In many double mutants, protein compositions differed significantly from averages of compositions of corresponding single mutants. For example, a high-methionine, water-insoluble ASG is absent when the opaque-2 (o2) gene combines with shrunken-1 (sh1) or surgary-1 (su1). Another water-insoluble ASG nearly doubled when floury-2 (fl2) andsu1 combined. A high-proline, high-histidine, water-soluble ASG nearly doubled in combinations offl2 witho2,su1 and sugary-2 (su2). Zein was about half its expected value wheno2 combined with amylose-extender (ae), floury-1 (fl1), soft-starch (h),sh1 andsu1. Thus, rapid protein extraction and quantitative RP-HPLC showed major new epistatic and synergistic effects of several mutant genes on protein composition. Unexpectedly, these effects often involve genes that primarily affect starch composition or kernel phenotype. Alcohol-soluble proteins often vary in amount, as ino2 lines. They also differ in nutritional value. Thus, RP-HPLC analysis of these proteins can identify nutritionally superior genotypes, and may help explain the basis of such quality.

  9. Molecular defect of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in the skunk mutant of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Urano, Kei; Daimon, Takaaki; Banno, Yutaka; Mita, Kazuei; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2010-11-01

    The isovaleric acid-emanating silkworm mutant skunk (sku) was first studied over 30 years ago because of its unusual odour and prepupal lethality. Here, we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the sku mutant. Because of its specific features and symptoms similar to human isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD) deficiency, also known as isovaleric acidaemia, IVD dysfunction in silkworms was predicted to be responsible for the phenotype of the sku mutant. Linkage analysis revealed that the silkworm IVD gene (BmIVD) was closely linked to the odorous phenotype as expected, and a single amino acid substitution (G376V) was found in BmIVD of the sku mutant. To investigate the effect of the G376V substitution on BmIVD function, wild-type and sku-type recombinants were constructed with a baculovirus expression system and the subsequent enzyme activity of sku-type BmIVD was shown to be significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type BmIVD. Molecular modelling suggested that this reduction in the enzyme activity may be due to negative effects of G376V mutation on FAD-binding or on monomer-monomer interactions. These observations strongly suggest that BmIVD is responsible for the sku locus and that the molecular defect in BmIVD causes the characteristic smell and prepupal lethality of the sku mutant. To our knowledge, this is, aside from humans, the first characterization of IVD deficiency in metazoa. Considering that IVD acts in the third step of leucine degradation and the sku mutant accumulates branched-chain amino acids in haemolymph, this mutant may be useful in the investigation of unique branched-chain amino acid catabolism in insects.

  10. Structure of a mutant form of proliferating cell nuclear antigen that blocks translesion DNA synthesis †

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Ramaswamy, S.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a homotrimeric protein that functions as a sliding clamp during DNA replication. Several mutant forms of PCNA that block translesion DNA synthesis have been identified in genetic studies in yeast. One such mutant protein (encoded by the rev6-1 allele) is a glycine to serine substitution at residue 178, located at the subunit interface of PCNA. To better understand how this substitution interferes with translesion synthesis, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the G178S PCNA mutant protein. This substitution has little effect on the structure of the domain in which the substitution occurs. Instead, significant, local structural changes are observed in the adjacent subunit. The most notable difference between mutant and wild-type structures is in a single, extended loop (comprising amino acid residues 105-110), which we call loop J. In the mutant protein structure, loop J adopts a very different conformation in which the atoms of the protein backbone have moved by as much as 6.5 Å from their positions in the wild-type structure. To better understand the functional consequences of this structural change, we have examined the ability of this mutant protein to stimulate nucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerase eta (pol η). Steady state kinetic studies show that while wild-type PCNA stimulates incorporation by pol η opposite an abasic site, the mutant PCNA protein actually inhibits incorporation opposite this DNA lesion. These results show that the position of loop J in PCNA plays an essential role in facilitating translesion synthesis. PMID:19053247

  11. Olesoxime suppresses calpain activation and mutant huntingtin fragmentation in the BACHD rat.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Laura E; Weber, Jonasz J; Wlodkowski, Tanja T; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Michaud, Magali; Calaminus, Carsten; Eckert, Schamim H; Gaca, Janett; Weiss, Andreas; Magg, Janine C D; Jansson, Erik K H; Eckert, Gunter P; Pichler, Bernd J; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu P

    2015-12-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal human neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which translates into a mutant huntingtin protein. A key event in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease is the proteolytic cleavage of mutant huntingtin, leading to the accumulation of toxic protein fragments. Mutant huntingtin cleavage has been linked to the overactivation of proteases due to mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium derangements. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of olesoxime, a mitochondria-targeting, neuroprotective compound, in the BACHD rat model of Huntington's disease. BACHD rats were treated with olesoxime via the food for 12 months. In vivo analysis covered motor impairments, cognitive deficits, mood disturbances and brain atrophy. Ex vivo analyses addressed olesoxime's effect on mutant huntingtin aggregation and cleavage, as well as brain mitochondria function. Olesoxime improved cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, and ameliorated cortical thinning in the BACHD rat. The treatment reduced cerebral mutant huntingtin aggregates and nuclear accumulation. Further analysis revealed a cortex-specific overactivation of calpain in untreated BACHD rats. Treated BACHD rats instead showed significantly reduced levels of mutant huntingtin fragments due to the suppression of calpain-mediated cleavage. In addition, olesoxime reduced the amount of mutant huntingtin fragments associated with mitochondria, restored a respiration deficit, and enhanced the expression of fusion and outer-membrane transport proteins. In conclusion, we discovered the calpain proteolytic system, a key player in Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, as a target of olesoxime. Our findings suggest that olesoxime exerts its beneficial effects by improving mitochondrial function, which results in reduced calpain activation. The observed alleviation of behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes encourages further

  12. The Yeast Complex I Equivalent NADH Dehydrogenase Rescues pink1 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vilain, Sven; Esposito, Giovanni; Haddad, Dominik; Schaap, Onno; Dobreva, Mariya P.; Vos, Melissa; Van Meensel, Stefanie; Morais, Vanessa A.; De Strooper, Bart; Verstreken, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Pink1 is a mitochondrial kinase involved in Parkinson's disease, and loss of Pink1 function affects mitochondrial morphology via a pathway involving Parkin and components of the mitochondrial remodeling machinery. Pink1 loss also affects the enzymatic activity of isolated Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC); however, the primary defect in pink1 mutants is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ETC deficiency is upstream of other pink1-associated phenotypes. We expressed Saccaromyces cerevisiae Ndi1p, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex I, or sea squirt Ciona intestinalis AOX, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex III and IV, in pink1 mutant Drosophila and find that expression of Ndi1p, but not of AOX, rescues pink1-associated defects. Likewise, loss of function of subunits that encode for Complex I–associated proteins displays many of the pink1-associated phenotypes, and these defects are rescued by Ndi1p expression. Conversely, expression of Ndi1p fails to rescue any of the parkin mutant phenotypes. Additionally, unlike pink1 mutants, fly parkin mutants do not show reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that Ndi1p acts downstream or parallel to Pink1, but upstream or independent of Parkin. Furthermore, while increasing mitochondrial fission or decreasing mitochondrial fusion rescues mitochondrial morphological defects in pink1 mutants, these manipulations fail to significantly rescue the reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that functional defects observed at the level of Complex I enzymatic activity in pink1 mutant mitochondria do not arise from morphological defects. Our data indicate a central role for Complex I dysfunction in pink1-associated defects, and our genetic analyses with heterologous ETC enzymes suggest that Ndi1p-dependent NADH dehydrogenase activity largely acts downstream of, or in parallel to, Pink1 but upstream of Parkin and mitochondrial remodeling. PMID:22242018

  13. Bacteriochlorophyll homolog compositions in the bchU mutants of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    Chlorosomes of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum contain a large number of self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) e molecules. The ΔbchU mutant of this organism lacks BchU, a C20-methyltransferase, and therefore produces BChl f, which is the C20-unsubstituted form of BChl e. The BChl e homolog compositions, in terms of degrees of C8(2)-methylation, were not changed in the wild type during growth, while the BChl f homolog patterns in the mutant were significantly altered at various time periods of growth. BChl f with an isobutyl group at the C8 position was dominant at the early stage of growth, whereas the proportion of BChl f with the C8-ethyl group increased in the late exponential phase. We also constructed the ΔbchU mutant of C. tepidum which originally produces BChl c: the mutant therefore produces BChl d. BChl d homologs highly methylated at the C8(2) position also increased in the ΔbchU mutant of C. tedium compared to those in the wild type. These phenomena suggest that BchU interferes with the methylation ability of BchQ, a C8(2)-methyltransferase, and that the enzymes might compete in terms of obtaining S-adenosyl-methionine, the source of a methyl group. As a result, when grown to the late log phase, the ΔbchU mutant of C. limnaeum had similar heterogeneities of pigment homolog compositions compared to those in the wild type. Chlorosomes with a high proportion of C8-ethylated BChl homologs might be important for fine-tuning the light-harvesting or energy-transfer efficiency. Chlorosomes of the ΔbchU mutants at the various growth stages will be good materials for investigating effects of C8(2)-methylations on supramolecular structures of self-aggregated pigments.

  14. TnphoA Salmonella abortusovis mutants unable to adhere to epithelial cells and with reduced virulence in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, S; Leori, G; Rizzu, P; Erre, G; Colombo, M M; Uzzau, S; Masala, G; Cappuccinelli, P

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella abortusovis is a pathogenic bacterium highly specific to sheep, causing spontaneous abortion. In order to understand the role of genes involved in pathogenicity, we investigated S. abortusovis with the random mutagenic TnphoA transposon. A total of 95 S. abortusovis TnphoA mutants yielding alkaline phosphatase active fusion protein were obtained. In this way we created a bank of strains in order to identify any phenotypic modification which could affect the periplasmic and/or exported proteins involved in virulence. The TnphoA mutants were screened for the ability to adhere to epithelial cells: a total of 23 mutant strains lost this phenotypic feature. To detect the chromosomal TnphoA insertions, DNA was restricted by the enzyme EcoRV, which does not cleave the TnphoA sequence. Southern blotting analysis revealed the existence of four classes of integration. Colonies of adhesiveless mutants appear to be as smooth as the S. abortusovis wild type, and electrophoretic analysis indicates a normal lipopolysaccharide profile. To identify mutations affecting genes encoding for outer membrane proteins (OMPs), the alkaline phosphatase portion of the fusion proteins was revealed in TnphoA mutants by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. A mutation in OMPs was detected in seven mutants. Restriction analysis identified in four mutants a common region of 2 kb where alterations in genes coding for OMPs occur. We suggested that this region is involved in pathogenicity in mice, since a group of mutant strains has shown reduced virulence in mice and one mutant is completely avirulent. Furthermore, after mice were exposed orally to these mutants, significant protection against oral challenge with the parental virulent strain resulted. Images PMID:8386703

  15. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  16. Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 protects against mutant huntingtin-induced abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and neuronal damage in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2015-12-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the protective effects of the mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi1) in striatal neurons that stably express mutant Htt (STHDhQ111/Q111) and wild-type (WT) Htt (STHDhQ7/Q7). Using gene expression analysis, biochemical methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal microscopy methods, we studied (i) mitochondrial and synaptic activities by measuring mRNA and the protein levels of mitochondrial and synaptic genes, (ii) mitochondrial function and (iii) ultra-structural changes in mutant Htt neurons relative to WT Htt neurons. We also studied these parameters in Mdivil-treated and untreated WT and mutant Htt neurons. Increased expressions of mitochondrial fission genes, decreased expression of fusion genes and synaptic genes were found in the mutant Htt neurons relative to the WT Htt neurons. Electron microscopy of the mutant Htt neurons revealed a significantly increased number of mitochondria, indicating that mutant Htt fragments mitochondria. Biochemical analysis revealed defective mitochondrial functioning. In the Mdivil-treated mutant Htt neurons, fission genes were down-regulated, and fusion genes were up-regulated, suggesting that Mdivil decreases fission activity. Synaptic genes were up-regulated, and mitochondrial function was normal in the Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Immunoblotting findings of mitochondrial and synaptic proteins agreed with mRNA findings. The TEM studies revealed that increased numbers of structurally intact mitochondria were present in Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Increased synaptic and mitochondrial fusion genes and decreased fission genes were found in the Mdivi1-treated WT Htt neurons, indicating that Mdivi1 beneficially affects healthy neurons. Taken together, these findings suggest that Mdivi1 is protective against mutant Htt-induced mitochondrial and synaptic damage in HD neurons and that Mdivi1 may be a promising molecule for the treatment of HD patients.

  17. Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A

    2017-03-07

    Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1(R132H) mutation destabilizes an IDH1 "regulatory segment," which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  18. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in acetate metabolism: isolation and characterization of Acn- mutants.

    PubMed

    McCammon, M T

    1996-09-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn- ("ACetate Nonutilizing") mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism.

  19. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  20. Isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutants that show enhanced trafficking across polarized T84 epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hopper, S; Wilbur, J S; Vasquez, B L; Larson, J; Clary, S; Mehr, I J; Seifert, H S; So, M

    2000-02-01

    Initiation of a gonococcal infection involves attachment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the plasma membrane of an epithelial cell in the mucosal epithelium and its internalization, transepithelial trafficking, and exocytosis from the basal membrane. Piliation and expression of certain Opa proteins and the immunoglobulin A1 protease influence the transcytosis process. We are interested in identifying other genetic determinants of N. gonorrhoeae that play a role in transcellular trafficking. Using polarized T84 monolayers as a model epithelial barrier, we have assayed an N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 minitransposon (mTn) mutant bank for isolates that traverse the monolayer more quickly than the isogenic wild-type (WT) strain. From an initial screen, we isolated four mutants, defining three genetic loci, that traverse monolayers significantly more quickly than their WT parent strain. These mutants adhere to and invade cells normally and do not affect the integrity of the monolayer barrier. Backcrosses of the mutations into the WT FA1090 strain yielded mutants with a similar fast-trafficking phenotype. In two mutants, the mTns had inserted 370 bp apart into the same locus, which we have named fit, for fast intracellular trafficker. Backcrosses of one of these mutants into the MS11A genetic background also yielded a fast-trafficking mutant. The fit locus contains two overlapping open reading frames, fitA and fitB, whose deduced amino acid sequences have predicted molecular weights of 8.6 and 15.3, respectively. Neither protein contains a signal sequence. FitA has a potential helix-turn-helix motif, while the deduced sequence of FitB offers no clues to its function. fitA or fitB homologues are present in the genomes of Pseudomonas syringae and Rhizobium meliloti, but not Neisseria meningitidis. Replication of the MS11A fitA mutant in A431 and T84 cells is significantly accelerated compared to that of the isogenic WT strain. In contrast, growth of this mutant in liquid media is

  1. Analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter chroococcum derepressed for nitrogenase activity and early ammonia excretion having potential as inoculants for cereal crops.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayana, K; Shukla, B; Sindhu, S S; Kumari, P; Narula, N; Sheoran, R K

    2000-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants resistant to methionine sulfoximine (Msx), methyl alanine (Mal) and methyl ammonium chloride (Mac) were derived from A. chroococcum strain A103. Msx and Mal-resistant mutants expressed 1.73 to 10.98% of the fully derepressed nitrogenase activity when grown in Burk's medium containing ammonium acetate. Mac-resistant mutants did not express nitrogenase activity in ammonium acetate supplemented medium. The mutants excreted ammonia even after 2 days of growth and some mutants excreted more ammonia as compared to the parent. Selected mutants were inoculated on wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) under field conditions. Majority of the derepressed mutants increased grain yield of wheat and barley varying from 1.2 to 33.3%. However, host-dependent effects on grain yield were observed with different mutants. Two mutants, Mal 27 and Mac 19 showed significant increase in grain yields of both the crops. The results suggest that metabolic analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter have potential for use as a biofertilizer for cereal crops.

  2. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  3. In vivo selection of a target/efflux double mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ciprofloxacin therapy.

    PubMed

    Le Thomas, I; Couetdic, G; Clermont, O; Brahimi, N; Plésiat, P; Bingen, E

    2001-10-01

    We report the emergence after 4 days of ciprofloxacin monotherapy of a double mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa overexpressing the multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and harbouring a mutation in the gyrB gene. Compared with its initial susceptible counterpart, this mutant exhibited a significant increase in resistance to most of the beta-lactam antibiotics tested (16 x MIC of ticarcillin) and to ciprofloxacin (128 x MIC). Combined ceftazidime and amikacin therapy finally eradicated the resistant isolate and cured the patient of his infection. This case illustrates how strains of P. aeruginosa may develop high levels of fluoroquinolone resistance by combining efflux mechanisms and target alterations.

  4. Purkinje cell loss and the noradrenergic system in the cerebellum of pcd mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, B; Fuller, R W; Sawyer, B D; Hemrick-Luecke, S K; Schmidt, M J

    1981-12-01

    Purkinje cells in the cerebellum receive inhibitory noradrenergic input from the locus coeruleus. In pcd mutant mice all Purkinje cells degenerate by 45 days of age. The purpose of the present studies was to determine if the loss of these cerebellar neurons affects the amounts of norepinephrine in the cerebellum of mice 25-280 days of age. No significant changes in norepinephrine content were detected during or after Purkinje cell degeneration. However, since degeneration led to a reduction in cerebellar weight, the norepinephrine concentration was increased in pcd mutants. These results indicate that despite the loss of a major postsynaptic target (Purkinje cells), the cerebellar noradrenergic input remains stable.

  5. Significance of periodogram peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süveges, Maria; Guy, Leanne; Zucker, Shay

    2016-10-01

    Three versions of significance measures or False Alarm Probabilities (FAPs) for periodogram peaks are presented and compared for sinusoidal and box-like signals, with specific application on large-scale surveys in mind.

  6. Effects of gibberellins on seed germination of phytochrome-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Y; Nagatani, A; Zhao, Y J; Kang, B J; Kendrick, R E; Kamiya, Y

    1995-10-01

    Experiments were carried out to explore the involvement of gibberellins (GAs) in the light-induced germination of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, using wild type (WT) and phytochrome-deficient mutants (phyA, phyB and phyAphyB deficient in phytochrome A, B and A plus B, respectively). Seed germination of WT and phytochrome-deficient mutants was inhibited by uniconazole (an inhibitor of an early step in biosynthesis of GA, the oxidation of ent-kaurene) and prohexadione (an inhibitor of late steps, namely, 2 beta- and 3 beta-hydroxylation). This inhibition was overcome by simultaneous application of 10(-5) M GA4. The relative activity of GAs for promoting germination of uniconazole-treated seeds was GA4 > GA1 = GA9 > GA20. The wild type and the phyA and phyB mutants had an increased response to a red light pulse in the presence of GA1, GA4, GA9, GA20 and GA24 but there were no significant differences in activity of each GA between the mutants. Therefore, neither phytochrome A nor hytochrome B appears to regulate GA biosynthesis from GA12 to GA4 during seed germination, since the conversion of GA12 to GA9 is regulated by one enzyme (GA 20-oxidase). However, GA responsiveness appears to be regulated by phytochromes other than phytochromes A and B, since the phyAphyB double mutant retains the photoreversible increased response to GAs after a red light pulse.

  7. Characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking a cytosolic non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2006-08-01

    Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde- 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NP-GAPDH) is a conserved cytosolic protein found in higher plants. In photosynthetic cells, the enzyme is involved in a shuttle transfer mechanism to export NADPH from the chloroplast to the cytosol. To investigate the role of this enzyme in plant tissues, we characterized a mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana having an insertion at the NP-GAPDH gene locus. The homozygous mutant was determined to be null respect to NP-GAPDH, as it exhibited undetectable levels of both transcription of NP-GAPDH mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the insertion mutant plant shows altered expression of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Significantly, cytosolic phosphorylating (NAD-dependent) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are induced in the mutant, which correlates with an increase in enzyme activity. mRNA levels and enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were also elevated, correlating with an increase in NADPH concentration. Moreover, increased ROS levels were measured in the mutant plants. Down-regulation of several glycolytic and photosynthetic genes suggests that NP-GAPDH is important for the efficiency of both metabolic processes. The results presented demonstrate that NP-GAPDH has a relevant role in plant growth and development.

  8. Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii high-CO sub 2 -requiring mutants to limiting CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of four high-CO{sub 2}-requiring mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were compared to those of wild type before and after a 24-hour exposure to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The four mutants represent two loci involved in the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system of this unicellular alga. All mutants had a lower photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon than did the wild type when grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating that the genetic lesion in each is expressed even at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Wild type and all four mutants exhibited adaptive responses to limiting CO{sub 2} characteristic of the induction of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system, resulting in an increased affinity for inorganic carbon only in wild type. Although other components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system were induced in these mutants, the defective component in each was sufficient to prevent any increase in the affinity for inorganic carbon. It was concluded that the genes corresponding to the ca-1 and pmp-1 loci exhibit at least partially constitutive expression and that all components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system may be required to significantly affect the photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon.

  9. Design and discovery of new combinations of mutant DNA polymerases and modified DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Sydney L; Weiden, Aurora G; Lewis, Eliza L; Ogonowsky, Alexie L; Chia, Hannah E; Barrett, Susanna E; Liu, Mira D; Leconte, Aaron Morgan

    2017-02-03

    Chemical modifications can enhance the properties of DNA by imparting nuclease resistance or generating more diverse physical structures. However, native DNA polymerases genearlly cannot synthesize any length of DNA with modified nucleotide triphosphates. Previous efforts have identified a mutant of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus DNA (SFM19) as capable of synthesizing a range of short, 2' modified DNAs; however, it is limited by the length of the products that it can synthesize. Here, we have rationally designed and characterized ten mutants of SFM19. From this library of ten mutant polymerases, we identifed enzymes with substantially improved activity relative to SFM19 for synthesis of 2'F, 2'OH, 2'OMe, and 3'OMe modified DNA as well as for reverse transcription of 2'OMe DNA. We also evaluated mutant DNA polymerases previously only tested for synthesis for 2'OMe DNA and show that they are also capable of an expanded array of modified DNA synthesis. Collectively, this work significantly expands the known combinations of modified DNA and Taq DNA polymerase mutants.

  10. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  11. Identification of Mutant Genes and Introgressed Tiger Salamander DNA in the Laboratory Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, M Ryan; Vaughn-Wolfe, Jennifer; Elias, Alexandra; Kump, D Kevin; Kendall, Katharina Denise; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir; Perry, Dustin W; Smith, Jeramiah J; Spiewak, Jessica E; Parichy, David M; Voss, S Randal

    2017-12-01

    The molecular genetic toolkit of the Mexican axolotl, a classic model organism, has matured to the point where it is now possible to identify genes for mutant phenotypes. We used a positional cloning-candidate gene approach to identify molecular bases for two historic axolotl pigment phenotypes: white and albino. White (d/d) mutants have defects in pigment cell morphogenesis and differentiation, whereas albino (a/a) mutants lack melanin. We identified in white mutants a transcriptional defect in endothelin 3 (edn3), encoding a peptide factor that promotes pigment cell migration and differentiation in other vertebrates. Transgenic restoration of Edn3 expression rescued the homozygous white mutant phenotype. We mapped the albino locus to tyrosinase (tyr) and identified polymorphisms shared between the albino allele (tyr (a) ) and tyr alleles in a Minnesota population of tiger salamanders from which the albino trait was introgressed. tyr (a) has a 142 bp deletion and similar engineered alleles recapitulated the albino phenotype. Finally, we show that historical introgression of tyr (a) significantly altered genomic composition of the laboratory axolotl, yielding a distinct, hybrid strain of ambystomatid salamander. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying genes for traits in the laboratory Mexican axolotl.

  12. Developmental Defects in Mutants of the PsbP Domain Protein 5 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Roose, Johnna L.; Frankel, Laurie K.; Bricker, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    Plants contain an extensive family of PsbP-related proteins termed PsbP-like (PPL) and PsbP domain (PPD) proteins, which are localized to the thylakoid lumen. The founding member of this family, PsbP, is an established component of the Photosystem II (PS II) enzyme, and the PPL proteins have also been functionally linked to other photosynthetic processes. However, the functions of the remaining seven PPD proteins are unknown. To elucidate the function of the PPD5 protein (At5g11450) in Arabidopsis, we have characterized a mutant T-DNA insertion line (SALK_061118) as well as several RNAi lines designed to suppress the expression of this gene. The functions of the photosynthetic electron transfer reactions are largely unaltered in the ppd5 mutants, except for a modest though significant decrease in NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH) activity. Interestingly, these mutants show striking plant developmental and morphological defects. Relative to the wild-type Col-0 plants, the ppd5 mutants exhibit both increased lateral root branching and defects associated with axillary bud formation. These defects include the formation of additional rosettes originating from axils at the base of the plant as well as aerial rosettes formed at the axils of the first few nodes of the shoot. The root-branching phenotype is chemically complemented by treatment with the synthetic strigolactone, GR24. We propose that the developmental defects observed in the ppd5 mutants are related to a deficiency in strigolactone biosynthesis. PMID:22174848

  13. High-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting for lipid hyperaccumulating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Stessman, Dan; Hart, Jason H; Dong, Haili; Wang, Yingjun; Wright, David A; Nikolau, Basil J; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    The genetically tractable microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model for renewable bioproducts and/or biofuels production. However, one limitation of C. reinhardtii is its relatively low-lipid content compared with some other algal species. To overcome this limitation, we combined ethane methyl sulfonate mutagenesis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of cells stained with the lipophilic stain Nile Red to isolate lipid hyperaccumulating mutants of C. reinhardtii. By manipulating the FACS gates, we sorted mutagenized cells with extremely high Nile Red fluorescence signals that were rarely detected in nonmutagenized populations. This strategy successfully isolated several putative lipid hyperaccumulating mutants exhibiting 23% to 58% (dry weight basis) higher fatty acid contents than their progenitor strains. Significantly, for most mutants, nitrogen starvation was not required to attain high-lipid content nor was there a requirement for a deficiency in starch accumulation. Microscopy of Nile Red stained cells revealed that some mutants exhibit an increase in the number of lipid bodies, which correlated with TLC analysis of triacyglycerol content. Increased lipid content could also arise through increased biomass production. Collectively, our findings highlight the ability to enhance intracellular lipid accumulation in algae using random mutagenesis in conjunction with a robust FACS and lipid yield verification regime. Our lipid hyperaccumulating mutants could serve as a genetic resource for stacking additional desirable traits to further increase lipid production and for identifying genes contributing to lipid hyperaccumulation, without lengthy lipid-induction periods.

  14. Overexpression of a glucokinase point mutant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lu, G; Teng, X; Zheng, Z; Zhang, R; Peng, L; Zheng, F; Liu, J; Huang, H; Xiong, H

    2016-04-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) is an important enzyme critical for glucose metabolism, and has been targeted as such in the pursuit of a cure for diabetes mellitus. We show that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic murine model exhibits low GCK expression with high blood glucose levels; moreover, aggravated glomerulonephritis is observed in the model when there is IL10 deficiency. Although T cells infiltrate into the liver and pancreas in STZ-induced diabetes mice, T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells decrease significantly with STZ addition in in vitro polarization. Using a mutant GCK gene (GCK 262) with a knocked out cytosine at position 2643 results in lower protein expression and more ubiquitination-led protein degradation compared with wild-type GCK (GCK 261). We further observed that hsa-mir-1302 can bind to 3'-untranslated region of mutant GCK, which can decrease GCK mRNA translation. Finally, delivery of mutant GCK by subcutaneous injection is more effective at decreasing blood glucose in the STZ-treated (STZ) murine diabetes model than insulin treatment alone. Similarly, mutant GCK consistently and moderately decreases blood glucose levels in GK rats over a period of 12 and 70 days without inducing hypoglycemia, whereas insulin is only effective over 12 h. These results suggest that mutant GCK may be a future cure for diabetes.

  15. Generation of an isogenic collection of yeast actin mutants and identification of three interrelated phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Whitacre, J; Davis, D; Toenjes, K; Brower, S; Adams, A

    2001-01-01

    A large collection of yeast actin mutations has been previously isolated and used in numerous studies of actin cytoskeletal function. However, the various mutations have been in congenic, rather than isogenic, backgrounds, making it difficult to compare the subtle phenotypes that are characteristic of these mutants. We have therefore placed 27 mutations in an isogenic background. We used a subset of these mutants to compare the degree to which different actin alleles are defective in sporulation, endocytosis, and growth on NaCl-containing media. We found that the three phenotypes are highly correlated. The correlations are specific and not merely a reflection of general growth defects, because the phenotypes are not correlated with growth rates under normal conditions. Significantly, those actin mutants exhibiting the most severe phenotypes in all three processes have altered residues that cluster to a small region of the actin crystal structure previously defined as the fimbrin (Sac6p)-binding site. We examined the relationship between endocytosis and growth on salt and found that shifting wild-type or actin mutant cells to high salt reduces the rate of alpha-factor internalization. These results suggest that actin mutants may be unable to grow on salt because of additive endocytic defects (due to mutation and salt). PMID:11156976

  16. Structural variability of E. coli thioredoxin captured in the crystal structures of single-point mutants

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, Martín E.; Vazquez, Diego S.; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Agudelo, William A.; Howard, Eduardo; Rasia, Rodolfo M.; Manta, Bruno; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin is a ubiquitous small protein that catalyzes redox reactions of protein thiols. Additionally, thioredoxin from E. coli (EcTRX) is a widely-used model for structure-function studies. In a previous paper, we characterized several single-point mutants of the C-terminal helix (CTH) that alter global stability of EcTRX. However, spectroscopic signatures and enzymatic activity for some of these mutants were found essentially unaffected. A comprehensive structural characterization at the atomic level of these near-invariant mutants can provide detailed information about structural variability of EcTRX. We address this point through the determination of the crystal structures of four point-mutants, whose mutations occurs within or near the CTH, namely L94A, E101G, N106A and L107A. These structures are mostly unaffected compared with the wild-type variant. Notably, the E101G mutant presents a large region with two alternative traces for the backbone of the same chain. It represents a significant shift in backbone positions. Enzymatic activity measurements and conformational dynamics studies monitored by NMR and molecular dynamic simulations show that E101G mutation results in a small effect in the structural features of the protein. We hypothesize that these alternative conformations represent samples of the native-state ensemble of EcTRX, specifically the magnitude and location of conformational heterogeneity. PMID:28181556

  17. Structural variability of E. coli thioredoxin captured in the crystal structures of single-point mutants.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Martín E; Vazquez, Diego S; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Agudelo, William A; Howard, Eduardo; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Manta, Bruno; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2017-02-09

    Thioredoxin is a ubiquitous small protein that catalyzes redox reactions of protein thiols. Additionally, thioredoxin from E. coli (EcTRX) is a widely-used model for structure-function studies. In a previous paper, we characterized several single-point mutants of the C-terminal helix (CTH) that alter global stability of EcTRX. However, spectroscopic signatures and enzymatic activity for some of these mutants were found essentially unaffected. A comprehensive structural characterization at the atomic level of these near-invariant mutants can provide detailed information about structural variability of EcTRX. We address this point through the determination of the crystal structures of four point-mutants, whose mutations occurs within or near the CTH, namely L94A, E101G, N106A and L107A. These structures are mostly unaffected compared with the wild-type variant. Notably, the E101G mutant presents a large region with two alternative traces for the backbone of the same chain. It represents a significant shift in backbone positions. Enzymatic activity measurements and conformational dynamics studies monitored by NMR and molecular dynamic simulations show that E101G mutation results in a small effect in the structural features of the protein. We hypothesize that these alternative conformations represent samples of the native-state ensemble of EcTRX, specifically the magnitude and location of conformational heterogeneity.

  18. Ret rescues mitochondrial morphology and muscle degeneration of Drosophila Pink1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Pontus; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Motori, Elisa; Schönbauer, Cornelia; Schnorrer, Frank; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated Pink1 and Parkin proteins are believed to function in a common pathway controlling mitochondrial clearance and trafficking. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its signaling receptor Ret are neuroprotective in toxin-based animal models of PD. However, the mechanism by which GDNF/Ret protects cells from degenerating remains unclear. We investigated whether the Drosophila homolog of Ret can rescue Pink1 and park mutant phenotypes. We report that a signaling active version of Ret (RetMEN2B) rescues muscle degeneration, disintegration of mitochondria and ATP content of Pink1 mutants. Interestingly, corresponding phenotypes of park mutants were not rescued, suggesting that the phenotypes of Pink1 and park mutants have partially different origins. In human neuroblastoma cells, GDNF treatment rescues morphological defects of PINK1 knockdown, without inducing mitophagy or Parkin recruitment. GDNF also rescues bioenergetic deficits of PINK knockdown cells. Furthermore, overexpression of RetMEN2B significantly improves electron transport chain complex I function in Pink1 mutant Drosophila. These results provide a novel mechanism underlying Ret-mediated cell protection in a situation relevant for human PD. PMID:24473149

  19. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank.

    PubMed

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Lamont, Elise A; Harris, N Beth; Fenton, Robert J; Zinniel, Denise K; Liu, Xiaofei; Sotos, Josh; Feng, Zhengyu; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Shpigel, Nahum Y; Czuprynski, Charles J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Barletta, Raúl G

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95%) was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  20. Mutant p53 disrupts mammary tissue architecture via the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Freed-Pastor, William A; Mizuno, Hideaki; Zhao, Xi; Langerød, Anita; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Barsotti, Anthony; Chicas, Agustin; Li, Wencheng; Polotskaia, Alla; Bissell, Mina J; Osborne, Timothy F; Tian, Bin; Lowe, Scott W; Silva, Jose M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Levine, Arnold J; Bargonetti, Jill; Prives, Carol

    2012-01-20

    p53 is a frequent target for mutation in human tumors, and mutant p53 proteins can actively contribute to tumorigenesis. We employed a three-dimensional culture model in which nonmalignant breast epithelial cells form spheroids reminiscent of acinar structures found in vivo, whereas breast cancer cells display highly disorganized morphology. We found that mutant p53 depletion is sufficient to phenotypically revert breast cancer cells to a more acinar-like morphology. Genome-wide expression analysis identified the mevalonate pathway as significantly upregulated by mutant p53. Statins and sterol biosynthesis intermediates reveal that this pathway is both necessary and sufficient for the phenotypic effects of mutant p53 on breast tissue architecture. Mutant p53 associates with sterol gene promoters at least partly via SREBP transcription factors. Finally, p53 mutation correlates with highly expressed sterol biosynthesis genes in human breast tumors. These findings implicate the mevalonate pathway as a therapeutic target for tumors bearing mutations in p53.

  1. An Arabidopsis mutant hypersensitive to red and far-red light signals.

    PubMed Central

    Genoud, T; Millar, A J; Nishizawa, N; Kay, S A; Schäfer, E; Nagatani, A; Chua, N H

    1998-01-01

    A new mutant called psi2 (for phytochrome signaling) was isolated by screening for elevated activity of a chlorophyll a/b binding protein-luciferase (CAB2-LUC) transgene in Arabidopsis. This mutant exhibited hypersensitive induction of CAB1, CAB2, and the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RBCS) promoters in the very low fluence range of red light and a hypersensitive response in hypocotyl growth in continuous red light of higher fluences. In addition, at high- but not low-light fluence rates, the mutant showed light-dependent superinduction of the pathogen-related protein gene PR-1a and developed spontaneous necrotic lesions in the absence of any pathogen. Expression of genes responding to various hormone and environmental stress pathways in the mutant was not significantly different from that of the wild type. Analysis of double mutants demonstrated that the effects of the psi2 mutation are dependent on both phytochromes phyA and phyB. The mutation is recessive and maps to the bottom of chromosome 5. Together, our results suggest that PSI2 specifically and negatively regulates both phyA and phyB phototransduction pathways. The induction of cell death by deregulated signaling pathways observed in psi2 is reminiscent of retinal degenerative diseases in animals and humans. PMID:9634578

  2. Modeling the competition between antenna size mutant and wild type microalgae in outdoor mass culture.

    PubMed

    de Mooij, Tim; Schediwy, Kira; Wijffels, René H; Janssen, Marcel

    2016-12-20

    Under high light conditions, microalgae are oversaturated with light which significantly reduces the light use efficiency. Microalgae with a reduced pigment content, antenna size mutants, have been proposed as a potential solution to increase the light use efficiency. The goal of this study was to investigate the competition between antenna size mutants and wild type microalgae in mass cultures. Using a kinetic model and literature-derived experimental data from wild type Chlorella sorokiniana, the productivity and competition of wild type cells and antenna size mutants were simulated. Cultivation was simulated in an outdoor microalgal raceway pond production system which was assumed to be limited by light only. Light conditions were based on a Mediterranean location (Tunisia) and a more temperate location (the Netherlands). Several wild type contamination levels were simulated in each mutant culture separately to predict the effect on the productivity over the cultivation time of a hypothetical summer season of 100days. The simulations demonstrate a good potential of antenna size reduction to increase the biomass productivity of microalgal cultures. However, it was also found that after a contamination with wild type cells the mutant cultures will be rapidly overgrown resulting in productivity loss.

  3. Overexpression of a glucokinase point mutant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, G; Teng, X; Zheng, Z; Zhang, R; Peng, L; Zheng, F; Liu, J; Huang, H; Xiong, H

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) is an important enzyme critical for glucose metabolism, and has been targeted as such in the pursuit of a cure for diabetes mellitus. We show that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic murine model exhibits low GCK expression with high blood glucose levels; moreover, aggravated glomerulonephritis is observed in the model when there is IL10 deficiency. Although T cells infiltrate into the liver and pancreas in STZ-induced diabetes mice, T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells decrease significantly with STZ addition in in vitro polarization. Using a mutant GCK gene (GCK 262) with a knocked out cytosine at position 2643 results in lower protein expression and more ubiquitination-led protein degradation compared with wild-type GCK (GCK 261). We further observed that hsa-mir-1302 can bind to 3′-untranslated region of mutant GCK, which can decrease GCK mRNA translation. Finally, delivery of mutant GCK by subcutaneous injection is more effective at decreasing blood glucose in the STZ-treated (STZ) murine diabetes model than insulin treatment alone. Similarly, mutant GCK consistently and moderately decreases blood glucose levels in GK rats over a period of 12 and 70 days without inducing hypoglycemia, whereas insulin is only effective over 12 h. These results suggest that mutant GCK may be a future cure for diabetes. PMID:26752353

  4. Increasing the Triacylglycerol Content in Dunaliella tertiolecta through Isolation of Starch-Deficient Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Vuttipongchaikij, Supachai; Suttangkakul, Anongpat; Yokthongwattana, Kittisak; Juntawong, Piyada; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Meetam, Metha

    2016-05-28

    The production cost of biodiesel from microalgae is still not competitive, compared with that of petroleum fuels. The genetic improvement of microalgal strains to increase triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation is one way to reduce production costs. One of the most promising approaches is the isolation of starch-deficient mutants, which have been reported to successfully increase TAG yields. To date, such a stable mutant is not available in an oleaginous marine microalga, despite several advantages of using marine species for biodiesel production. Algae in the genus Dunaliella are known to tolerate high salt concentration and other environmental stresses. In addition, the cultivation processes for large-scale outdoor commercialization have been well established for this genus. In this study, Dunaliella tertiolecta was used to screen for starch-deficient mutants, using an iodine vapor-staining method. Four out of 20,016 UV-mutagenized strains showed a substantial reduction of starch content. A significantly higher TAG content, up to 3-fold of the wild-type level, was observed in three of the mutants upon induction by nitrogen depletion. The carotenoid production and growth characteristics of these mutants, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, were not compromised, suggesting that these processes are not necessarily affected by starch deficiency. The results from this work open up new possibilities for exploring Dunaliella for biodiesel production.

  5. Structural variability of E. coli thioredoxin captured in the crystal structures of single-point mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, Martín E.; Vazquez, Diego S.; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Agudelo, William A.; Howard, Eduardo; Rasia, Rodolfo M.; Manta, Bruno; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2017-02-01

    Thioredoxin is a ubiquitous small protein that catalyzes redox reactions of protein thiols. Additionally, thioredoxin from E. coli (EcTRX) is a widely-used model for structure-function studies. In a previous paper, we characterized several single-point mutants of the C-terminal helix (CTH) that alter global stability of EcTRX. However, spectroscopic signatures and enzymatic activity for some of these mutants were found essentially unaffected. A comprehensive structural characterization at the atomic level of these near-invariant mutants can provide detailed information about structural variability of EcTRX. We address this point through the determination of the crystal structures of four point-mutants, whose mutations occurs within or near the CTH, namely L94A, E101G, N106A and L107A. These structures are mostly unaffected compared with the wild-type variant. Notably, the E101G mutant presents a large region with two alternative traces for the backbone of the same chain. It represents a significant shift in backbone positions. Enzymatic activity measurements and conformational dynamics studies monitored by NMR and molecular dynamic simulations show that E101G mutation results in a small effect in the structural features of the protein. We hypothesize that these alternative conformations represent samples of the native-state ensemble of EcTRX, specifically the magnitude and location of conformational heterogeneity.

  6. Metabolic phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with altered trehalose 6-phosphate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walther, Thomas; Mtimet, Narjes; Alkim, Ceren; Vax, Amélie; Loret, Marie-Odile; Ullah, Azmat; Gancedo, Carlos; Smits, Gertien J; François, Jean Marie

    2013-09-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, synthesis of T6P (trehalose 6-phosphate) is essential for growth on most fermentable carbon sources. In the present study, the metabolic response to glucose was analysed in mutants with different capacities to accumulate T6P. A mutant carrying a deletion in the T6P synthase encoding gene, TPS1, which had no measurable T6P, exhibited impaired ethanol production, showed diminished plasma membrane H⁺-ATPase activation, and became rapidly depleted of nearly all adenine nucleotides which were irreversibly converted into inosine. Deletion of the AMP deaminase encoding gene, AMD1, in the tps1 strain prevented inosine formation, but did not rescue energy balance or growth on glucose. Neither the 90%-reduced T6P content observed in a tps1 mutant expressing the Tps1 protein from Yarrowia lipolytica, nor the hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant had significant effects on fermentation rates, growth on fermentable carbon sources or plasma membrane H⁺-ATPase activation. However, intracellular metabolite dynamics and pH homoeostasis were strongly affected by changes in T6P concentrations. Hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant caused an increase in cytosolic pH and strongly reduced growth rates on non-fermentable carbon sources, emphasizing the crucial role of the trehalose pathway in the regulation of respiratory and fermentative metabolism.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of human wild-type and mutant p53 proteins expressed in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ponchel, F.; Milner, J.

    1998-01-01

    p53 is activated in response to DNA damage and functions in the maintenance of genetic integrity. Loss of p53 function because of mutation of the p53 gene is associated with over half all human cancers. Certain human p53 mutants are conformationally flexible in vitro and are temperature sensitive, with partial or complete recovery of wild-type (wt) properties at 32 degrees C. We have now tested the functional capacities of selected p53 mutants in vivo, by transfection into established human cell lines. Unexpectedly, we found that wt p53 can be temperature sensitive for transactivation of a co-transfected target gene in vivo. Flexible mutants retained varying degrees of functional capacity in transfected cells, and the recipient cell line appeared to be a significant determinant of both wt and mutant p53 function; importantly, two p53 null cell lines commonly used to study p53 function (Saos-2 and Hep3B) differed markedly in this latter respect. We also show that the p53 mutant V272M, which exhibits sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro, is nonetheless defective for transactivation and is unable to induce apoptosis in vivo. The valine 272 residue may thus be crucial for properties (other than sequence-specific DNA binding) that are important for p53 function(s) in vivo. Images Figure 4 PMID:9635828

  8. Isolation and characterization of OmpC porin mutants with altered pore properties

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, R.; Benson, S.A.

    1988-02-01

    The LamB protien is normally required for the uptake of maltodextrins. Starting with a LamB/sup -/ OmpF/sup -/ strain, we have isolated mutants that will grow on maltodextrins. The mutation conferring the Dex/sup +/ phenotype in the majority of these mutants has been mapped to the ompC locus. These mutants, unlike LamB/sup -/ OmpF/sup -/ strains, grew on maltotriose and maltotetraose, but not on maltopentaose, and showed a significantly higher rate of (/sup 14/C) maltose uptake than the parent strain did. In addition, these mutants showed increased sensitivity to certain ..beta..-lactam antibiotics and sodium dodecyl sulfate, but did not exhibit an increase in sensitivity to other antibiotics and detergents. The nucleotide sequence of these mutants has been determined. In all cases, residue 74 (arginine) of the mature OmpC protein was affected. The results suggest that this region of the OmpC protein is involved in the pore domain and that the alterations lead to an increased pore size.

  9. Recovery of a Low Mutant Frequency after Ionizing Radiation-Induced Mutagenesis during Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guogang; Intano, Gabriel W.; McCarrey, John R.; Walter, Ronald B.; McMahan, Alex C.; Walter, Christi A.

    2008-01-01

    Humans are exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) under various circumstances, e.g. cosmic radiation, diagnostic X-rays and radiotherapy for cancer. It has been shown that IR can impair spermatogenesis and can cause mutations in germ cells. However, the mutagenic responses of germ cells exposed to IR at different stages of testicular maturation have not been examined by directly assessing the mutant frequency in defined spermatogenic cell types. This study was performed to address whether preadult exposure to IR can increase mutations in adult germ cells that could in turn have a major impact on adult reproductive function and the health of ensuing offspring. Male Lac I transgenic mice were irradiated with a single dose of 2.5 Gy of γ-ray at different ages before adulthood, reflecting different stages of testicular maturation, and then mutant frequency (MF) was determined directly in spermatogenic cell types emanating from the irradiated precursor cells. The results showed that (1) preadult exposure to IR did not significantly increase MF in adult epididymal spermatozoa; (2) spermatogenic stages immediately following the irradiated stage(s) displayed an elevated mutant frequency, but (3) the mutant frequency was restored to unirradiated levels in later stages of spermatogenesis. These findings provide evidence that there is a mechanism(s) to prevent spermatogenic cells with elevated mutant frequencies from progressing through spermatogenesis. PMID:18582597

  10. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  11. Live four-dimensional optical coherence tomography reveals embryonic cardiac phenotype in mouse mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L., III; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-09-01

    Efficient phenotyping of developmental defects in model organisms is critical for understanding the genetic specification of normal development and congenital abnormalities in humans. We previously reported that optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with live embryo culture is a valuable tool for mouse embryo imaging and four-dimensional (4-D) cardiodynamic analysis; however, its capability for analysis of mouse mutants with cardiac phenotypes has not been previously explored. Here, we report 4-D (three-dimensional+time) OCT imaging and analysis of the embryonic heart in a Wdr19 mouse mutant, revealing a heart looping defect. Quantitative analysis of cardiac looping revealed a statistically significant difference between mutant and control embryos. Our results indicate that live 4-D OCT imaging provides a powerful phenotyping approach to characterize embryonic cardiac function in mouse models.

  12. Antiphase synchronization in a flagellar-dominance mutant of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Leptos, Kyriacos C; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-10-11

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  13. Nodulation gene mutants of Mesorhizobium loti R7A-nodZ and nolL mutants have host-specific phenotypes on Lotus spp.

    PubMed

    Rodpothong, Patsarin; Sullivan, John T; Songsrirote, Kriangsak; Sumpton, David; Cheung, Kenneth W J-T; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens; Ronson, Clive W

    2009-12-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors induce plant responses and facilitate bacterial infection, leading to the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules on host legumes. Nodule initiation is highly dependent on Nod-factor structure and, hence, on at least some of the nodulation genes that encode Nod-factor production. Here, we report the effects of mutations in Mesorhizobium loti R7A nodulation genes on nodulation of four Lotus spp. and on Nod-factor structure. Most mutants, including a DeltanodSDeltanolO double mutant that produced Nod factors lacking the carbamoyl and possibly N-methyl groups on the nonreducing terminal residue, were unaffected for nodulation. R7ADeltanodZ and R7ADeltanolL mutants that produced Nod factors without the (acetyl)fucose on the reducing terminal residue had a host-specific phenotype, forming mainly uninfected nodule primordia on Lotus filicaulis and L. corniculatus and effective nodules with a delay on L. japonicus. The mutants also showed significantly reduced infection thread formation and Nin gene induction. In planta complementation experiments further suggested that the acetylfucose was important for balanced signaling in response to Nod factor by the L. japonicus NFR1/NFR5 receptors. Overall the results reveal differences in the sensitivity of plant perception with respect to signaling leading to root hair deformation and nodule primordium development versus infection thread formation and rhizobial entry.

  14. Hoxc13 mutant mice lack external hair.

    PubMed

    Godwin, A R; Capecchi, M R

    1998-01-01

    Hox genes are usually expressed temporally and spatially in a colinear manner with respect to their positions in the Hox complex. Consistent with the expected pattern for a paralogous group 13 member, early embryonic Hoxc13 expression is found in the nails and tail. Hoxc13 is also expressed in vibrissae, in the filiform papillae of the tongue, and in hair follicles throughout the body; a pattern that apparently violates spatial colinearity. Mice carrying mutant alleles of Hoxc13 have been generated by gene targeting. Homozygotes have defects in every region in which gene expression is seen. The most striking defect is brittle hair resulting in alopecia (hairless mice). One explanation for this novel role is that Hoxc13 has been recruited for a function common to hair, nail, and filiform papilla development.

  15. Characterization of zebrafish mutants with defects in bone calcification during development.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yang; Chen, Dongyan; Sun, Lei; Li, Yuhao; Li, Lei

    2013-10-11

    Using the fluorescent dyes calcein and alcian blue, we stained the F3 generation of chemically (ENU) mutagenized zebrafish embryos and larvae, and screened for mutants with defects in bone development. We identified a mutant line, bone calcification slow (bcs), which showed delayed axial vertebra calcification during development. Before 4-5 days post-fertilization (dpf), the bcs embryos did not display obvious abnormalities in bone development (i.e., normal number, size and shape of cartilage and vertebrae). At 5-6 dpf, when vertebrae calcification starts, bcs embryos began to show defects. At 7 dpf, for example, in most of the bcs embryos examined, calcein staining revealed no signals of vertebrae mineralization, whereas during the same developmental stages, 2-14 mineralized vertebrae were observed in wild-type animals. Decreases in the number of calcified vertebrae were also observed in bcs mutants when examined at 9 and 11 dpf, respectively. Interestingly, by 13 dpf the defects in bcs mutants were no longer evident. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified vertebrae between wild-type and mutant animals. We examined the expression of bone development marker genes (e.g., Sox9b, Bmp2b, and Cyp26b1, which play important roles in bone formation and calcification). In mutant fish, we observed slight increases in Sox9b expression, no alterations in Bmp2b expression, but significant increases in Cyp26b1 expression. Together, the data suggest that bcs delays axial skeletal calcification, but does not affect bone formation and maturation.

  16. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  17. Characterization of Halobacterium halobium mutants defective in taxis.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, S A; Alam, M; Lebert, M; Spudich, J L; Oesterhelt, D; Hazelbauer, G L

    1990-05-01

    Mutant derivatives of Halobacterium halobium previously isolated by using a procedure that selected for defective phototactic response to white light were examined for an array of phenotypic characteristics related to phototaxis and chemotaxis. The properties tested were unstimulated swimming behavior, behaviorial responses to temporal gradients of light and spatial gradients of chemoattractants, content of photoreceptor pigments, methylation of methyl-accepting taxis proteins, and transient increases in rate of release of volatile methyl groups induced by tactic stimulation. Several distinct phenotypes were identified, corresponding to a mutant missing photoreceptors, a mutant defective in the methyltransferase, a mutant altered in control of the methylesterase, and mutants apparently defective in intracellular signaling. All except the photoreceptor mutant were defective in both chemotaxis and phototaxis.

  18. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii altered in cercosporin synthesis and pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, R.G.; Walker, D.C.; Rollins, J.A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M.E. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  19. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  20. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  1. Photosynthetic properties of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant possessing a defective PsbS gene.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R B; Havir, E A

    2001-11-01

    We describe the properties of npq4-9, a new mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with reduced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) capacity that possesses a single amino acid substitution in the PsbS gene encoding PSII-S, a ubiquitous pigment-binding protein associated with photosystem II (PSII) of higher plants. Growth, photosynthetic pigment contents, and levels of the major PSII antenna proteins were not affected by npq4-9. Although the extent of de-epoxidatin of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin plus zeaxanthin for leaves displaying the mutant phenotype equaled or exceeded that observed for the wild type, the relative effectiveness of de-epoxidized xanthophylls in promoting NPQ was consistently lower for the mutant. Energy partitioning in PSII was analyzed in terms of the competition for singlet chlorophyll a among the processes of fluorescence, thermal dissipation, and photochemistry. The key processes of NPQ and photochemistry in open PSII centers are represented by the relative in vivo rate constants kN and kP0, respectively. The magnitude of kP0 in normal leaves declined only slightly with increasing kN, consistent with localization of NPQ primarily in the antenna complex. Conversely, a highly significant linear decline in kP0 with increasing kN was observed for the mutant, consistent with a role for the PSII reaction center in the NPQ mechanism. Although the PSII absorption cross-section for white light was not significantly different relative to that of the wild type, PSII quantum yield was significantly lower in the mutant. The resulting lower capacity for linear electron transport in the mutant primarily affected reduction of terminal acceptors other than CO2. Parallel measurements of fluorescence and in vivo absorbance at 820 nm indicated a consistently higher steady-state level of reduction of PSII acceptors and accumulation of P700+ for the mutant. This suggests that inter-photosystem electron transport in the mutant is restricted either by a higher

  2. A genomics-based screen for yeast mutants with an altered recombination/end-joining repair ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    We recently described a yeast assay suitable for genetic screening in which simple religation nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA) compete for repair of an I-SceI-created double-strand break. Here, the required allele has been introduced into an array of 4781 MATa deletion mutants and each strain screened individually. Two mutants (rad52 and srs2) showed a clear increase in the NHEJ/SSA ratio due to preferential impairment of SSA, but no mutant increased the absolute frequency of NHEJ significantly above the wild-type level. Seven mutants showed a decreased NHEJ/SSA ratio due to frank loss of NHEJ, which corresponded to all known structural/catalytic NHEJ components (yku70, yku80, dnl4, lif1, rad50, mre11, and xrs2); no new mutants in this category were identified. A clearly separable and surprisingly large set of 16 other mutants showed partial defects in NHEJ. Further examination of these revealed that NEJ1 can entirely account for the mating-type regulation of NHEJ, but that this regulatory role was distinct from the postdiauxic/stationary-phase induction of NHEJ that was deficient in other mutants (especially doa1, fyv6, and mck1). These results are discussed in the context of the minimal set of required proteins and regulatory inputs for NHEJ. PMID:12399380

  3. Hypersensitivity to mutation and sister-chromatid-exchange induction in CHO cell mutants defective in incising DNA containing UV lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Dillehay, L.E.; Mooney, C.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five UV-sensitive mutant strains of CHO cells representing different genetic complementation groups were analyzed for their ability to perform the incision step of nucleotide excision repair after UV exposure. The assay utilized inhibitors of DNA synthesis to accumulate the short-lived strand breaks resulting from repair incisions. After 6 J/m/sup 2/, each of the mutants showed < 10% of the incision rate of the parental AA8 cells. After 50 J/m/sup 2/, the rate in AA8 was similar to that at 6 J/m/sup 2/, but the rates in the mutants were significantly higher (approx. 20% of the rate of AA8). Thus by this incision assay the mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable. Each of the mutants were hypersensitive to mutation induction at both the hprt and aprt loci by a factor of 10, and in the one strain tested ouabain resistance was induced sevenfold more efficiently than in AA8 cells. Sister chromatid exchange was also induced with sevenfold increased efficiency in the two mutant strains examined. Thus, here CHO mutants resemble xeroderma pigmentosum cells in terms of their incision defects and their hypersensitivity to DNA damage by UV.

  4. Altered fermentative metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants lacking pyruvate formate lyase and both pyruvate formate lyase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H(2) production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H(2) production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  5. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  6. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  7. Combined inhibition of MEK and Plk1 has synergistic anti-tumor activity in NRAS mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, I; Sanlorenzo, M; Ma, J; Kim, ST; Kleffel, S; Schatton, T; Rappersberger, K; Gutteridge, R; Ahmad, N; Ortiz/Urda, S

    2015-01-01

    About one third of cancers harbor activating mutations in rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) oncogenes. In melanoma, aberrant neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) signaling fuels tumor progression in about 20% of patients. Current therapeutics for NRAS driven malignancies barely impact overall survival. To date, pathway interference downstream of mutant NRAS seems to be the most promising approach. In this study, data revealed that mutant NRAS induced Plk1 expression, and pharmacologic inhibition of Plk1 stabilized the size of NRAS mutant melanoma xenografts. The combination of MEK and Plk1 inhibitors resulted in a significant growth reduction of NRAS mutant melanoma cells in vitro, and regression of xenografted NRAS mutant melanoma in vivo. Independent cell cycle arrest and increased induction of apoptosis underlies the synergistic effect of this combination. Data further suggest that the p53 signaling pathway is of key importance to the observed therapeutic efficacy. This study provides in vitro, in vivo and first mechanistic data, that a MEK/Plk1 inhibitor combination might be a promising treatment approach for patients with NRAS driven melanoma. Since mutant NRAS signaling is similar across different malignancies, this inhibitor combination could also offer a previously unreported treatment modality for NRAS mutant tumors of other cell origins. PMID:26016894

  8. Glycosynthase Mutants of Endoglycosidase S2 Show Potent Transglycosylation Activity and Remarkably Relaxed Substrate Specificity for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiezheng; Tong, Xin; Yang, Qiang; Giddens, John P; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-08-05

    Glycosylation can exert a profound impact on the structures and biological functions of antibodies. Glycosylation remodeling using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed deglycosylation and transglycosylation approach is emerging as a promising platform to produce homogeneous glycoforms of antibodies, but the broad application of this method will require the availability of highly efficient glycosynthase mutants. We describe in this paper a systematic site-directed mutagenesis of an endoglycosidase from Streptococcus pyogenes of serotype M49 (Endo-S2) and the evaluation of the resulting mutants for their hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities. We found that mutations at the Asp-184 residue gave mutants that demonstrated significantly different properties, some possessed potent transglycosylation activity with diminished hydrolysis activity but others did not, which would be otherwise difficult to predict without the comparative study. In contrast to the previously reported Endo-S mutants that are limited to action on complex type N-glycans, the Endo-S2 glycosynthases described here, including D184M and D184Q, were found to have remarkably relaxed substrate specificity and were capable of transferring three major types (complex, high-mannose, and hybrid type) of N-glycans for antibody glycosylation remodeling. In addition, the Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants were found to be much more active in general than the Endo-S mutants for transglycosylation. The usefulness of these Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants was exemplified by an efficient glycosylation remodeling of two therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and trastuzumab (Herceptin).

  9. Listeria monocytogenes mutants with altered growth phenotypes at refrigeration temperature and high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Burall, Laurel S; Laksanalamai, Pongpan; Datta, Atin R

    2012-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow in refrigerated temperatures and high-salt environments. In an effort to better understand the associated mechanisms, a library of ∼ 5,200 transposon mutants of LS411, a food isolate from the Jalisco cheese outbreak, were screened for their ability to grow in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 5°C or in the presence of 7% NaCl and two mutants with altered growth profiles were identified. The LS522 mutant has a transposon insertion between secA2 and iap and showed a significant reduction in growth in BHI broth at 5°C and in the presence of 7% NaCl. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed a substantial reduction in the expression of iap. Additionally, a hypothetical gene (met), containing a putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase domain, downstream of iap had downregulated expression. In-frame deletion mutants of iap and met were created in LS411. The LS560 (LS411 Δiap) mutant showed reduced growth at 5°C and in the presence of 7% salt, confirming its role in cold and salt growth attenuation. Surprisingly, the LS655 (LS411 Δmet) mutant showed slightly increased growth during refrigeration, though no alteration was seen in salt growth relative to the wild-type strain. The LS527 mutant, containing an insertion 36 bp upstream of the gbu operon, showed reduced expression of the gbu transcript by RT-qPCR and also showed growth reduction at 5°C and in the presence of 7% salt. This attenuation was severely exacerbated when the mutant was grown under the combined stresses. Analysis of the gbu operon deletion mutant showed decreased growth in 7% salt and refrigeration, supporting the previously characterized role for this gene in cold and salt adaptation. These studies indicate the potential for an intricate relationship between environmental stress regulation and virulence in L. monocytogenes.

  10. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  11. Isolation and characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae unencapsulated mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Benedi, V.J.; Ciurana, B.; Tomas, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants were obtained after UV irradiation and negative selection with anticapsular serum. Unencapsulation, rather than expression of a structurally altered capsule, was found in the mutants. The mutant strains showed no alterations in their outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide, and a great similarity with the wild type in the properties tested (serum resistance, antimicrobial sensitivity, and lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage sensitivity), with the exception of a higher cell surface hydrophobicity and resistance to bacteriophage FC3-9.

  12. Mutant Proteins--Enzymes to Hydrolyze Toxic Organophosphates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-15

    strains of infectious bacteria and the serine protease’ lytic protease. We also employ novel chemical modifications of ; mutant proteins to achieve...mutant RTEM -1 8-lactamase. We have previously generated and characterized mutants of RTEM -1 .- lactamase with all possible amino acid substitutions (site...denaturation than wild-type -lactamase. Uniquely among class A B- lactamases, the RTEM -1 (and RTEM -2) enzymes contain a single disulfide bond between Cys

  13. Division pattern of a round mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S

    1997-01-01

    A round mutant of Escherichia coli, when grown in Methocel medium, forms chains of cells and does not form tetrads. This implies that successive division planes of the round mutant are parallel rather than perpendicular. These results differ from a previous proposal that division planes in this round mutant are perpendicular to the prior division plane (W. D. Donachie, S. Addinall, and K. Begg, Bioessays 17:569-576, 1995). PMID:9287016

  14. [Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, A I; Beburov, M Iu; Zhdanov, V G

    1975-01-01

    3 groups of Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 5-10(-3) M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) ahve been obtained. The mutants of the 1st group (Dap-r) are selected from the initial susceptible strain by the ability to grow in the presence of 5-10(-3) M DAP. The mutants of the 2nd group (Azg-Dap-r) are selected in the selective background of two analogues of 5-10(-3) M DAP and 10(-4) M 8-azaguanine (AG). The mutants of the 3rd group (Azg-r - DAP-r) are isolated from the mutant Azg-r 34 resistant to 10(-4) M AG. The results of studying cross-resistance of mutants to DAP, AG and 8-azaadenine (AA) show that Dap-r and Azg-Dap-r mutants in contrast to Azg-r - Dap-r, have common phenotypic properties and can grow only on the analogues of adenine. DAP, but not AA, eliminates the inhibitory effect of AG on the growth of these mutants. This effect is probably due to deaminating DAP to guanine. Mutants Azg-r - Dap-r retain the initial resistance to 10(-4) M AG, but are susceptible to higher concentrations of AG and in this case DAP does not eliminate the inhibitory effect of AG. In all mutants obtained the effectiveness of the incorporation of 14C-adenine (but not 14C-guanine) is sharply reduced, thus indicating the absence of adenosine-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase activity. The mutants do not excrete purine-like compounds into the medium. In the course of the continuous growth of mutants in the presence of DAP but not of guanine the red intracellular pigment is formed which seems to be a complex of riboflavin with DAP. A disturbance in the synthesis of adenosine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase does not influence practically the level of the synthesis of riboflavin in E. ashbyii.

  15. Fatty acid biosynthesis in novel ufa mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Goodrich-Tanrikulu, M; Stafford, A E; Lin, J T; Makapugay, M I; Fuller, G; McKeon, T A

    1994-10-01

    New mutants of Neurospora crassa having the ufa phenotype have been isolated. Two of these mutants, like previously identified ufa mutants, require an unsaturated fatty acid for growth and are almost completely blocked in the de novo synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. The new mutations map to a different chromosomal location than previously characterized ufa mutations. This implies that at least one additional genetic locus controls the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Neurospora.

  16. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  17. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina Politi...CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Phenotypic changes have been observed in EGFR mutant lung cancers that become resistant to targeted

  18. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0225 TITLE: Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric Collisson...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0225 5c...one RAS-dependent. This Aim is underway and has verified that KRAS is indeed essential in the KRAS mutant mouse cell lines. Specific Aim 2. To

  19. Statistical Significance Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E., Ed.; Kaufman, Alan S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The controversy about the use or misuse of statistical significance testing has become the major methodological issue in educational research. This special issue contains three articles that explore the controversy, three commentaries on these articles, an overall response, and three rejoinders by the first three authors. They are: (1)…

  20. Significance of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The significance of brown dwarfs for resolving some major problems in astronomy is discussed. The importance of brown dwarfs for models of star formation by fragmentation of molecular clouds and for obtaining independent measurements of the ages of stars in binary systems is addressed. The relationship of brown dwarfs to planets is considered.

  1. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Fitts, Eric C.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens. PMID:27891321

  2. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants.

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Kirtley, Michelle L; Fitts, Eric C; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Andersson, Jourdan A; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens.

  3. Mutagenesis in the lacI gene target of E. coli: improved analysis for lacI(d) and lacO mutants.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Sarah J; Schaaper, Roel M

    2014-12-01

    The lacI gene of Escherichia coli has been a highly useful target for studies of mutagenesis, particularly for analysis of the specificity (spectrum) of mutations generated under a variety of conditions and in various genetic backgrounds. The gene encodes the repressor of the lac operon, and lacI-defective mutants displaying constitutive expression of the operon are readily selected. DNA sequencing of the lacI mutants has often been confined to the N-terminal region of the protein, as it presents a conveniently short target with a high density of detectably mutable sites. Mutants in this region are easily selected due to their dominance in a genetic complementation test (lacI(d) mutants). A potential complication in these studies is that constitutive expression of lac may also arise due to mutations in the lac operator (lacO mutants). Under some conditions, for example when analyzing spontaneous mutations, lacO mutants can comprise a very high fraction of the constitutive mutants due to a strong base-substitution hotspot in the lac operator. Such mutational hot spots diminish the return of the sequencing effort and do not yield significant new information. For this reason, a procedure to eliminate the lacO mutants prior to DNA sequencing is desirable. Here, we report a simple method that allows screening out of lacO mutants. This method is based on the lack of resistance of lacO mutants to kanamycin under conditions when the kan gene is expressed from a plasmid under control of the lac promoter-operator (lacPO). We show data validating the new approach with sets of known lacI(d) and lacO mutants, and further apply it to the generation of a new collection of spontaneous mutations, where lacO mutants have historically been a significant contributor.

  4. Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Mutations in Mammalian Cells Detected by the Flow Cytometry Mutation Assay and Characterized by Mutant Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Keysar, Stephen B.; Trncic, Nadira; LaRue, Susan M.; Fox, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions, cells are more resistant to cell killing by ionizing radiation by a factor of 2.5 to 3, potentially compromising the efficacy of radiotherapy. It has been shown recently that hypoxic conditions alone are sufficient to generate mutations in vitro and in vivo, likely due to the creation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in mismatch and homologous recombination DNA repair activity. These factors are known precursors to the onset of genetic instability and poor prognosis. We have previously characterized the flow cytometry mutation assay and its sensitivity to detect significant mutant fractions induced by genotoxic agents that are not detected by other mammalian assays. Here we measure the mutant fraction induced by hypoxia. CHO AL cells cultured at <0.1% O2 for 24 h generated a significant mutant fraction of 120 × 10−5 and had growth kinetics and survival characteristics similar to those obtained with other mutagens. We investigated the role of ROS by treating cells with the radical scavenger DMSO, which significantly reduced hypoxia toxicity and mutagenesis. Single cells were sorted from the mutant population, and the resulting clonal populations were stained for five antigens encoded by genes found along chromosome 11 to generate mutant spectra. The mutations were primarily large deletions, similar to those in background mutants, but the frequency was higher. We have demonstrated that hypoxic conditions alone are sufficient to generate mutations in mammalian cells in culture and that the spectrum of mutations is similar to background mutations. PMID:20041756

  5. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  6. Identification of mutant monoclonal antibodies with increased antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R R; French, D L; Gefter, M L; Scharff, M D

    1988-04-01

    Sib selection and an ELISA have been used to isolate hybridoma subclones producing mutant antibodies that bind antigen better than the parental monoclonal antibody. Such mutants arise spontaneously in culture at frequencies of 2.5-5 X 10(-5). The sequences of the heavy and light chain variable regions of the mutant antibodies are identical to that of the parent and the Ka values of the mutants and the parent are the same. The increase in binding is associated with abnormalities of the constant region polypeptide and probably reflect changes in avidity of these antibodies.

  7. Sulphate metabolism of selenate-resistant Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants.

    PubMed

    Bánszky, Luca; Simonics, Tibor; Maráz, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants were obtained from several strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The obtained mutants all belonged to the same genetic complementation group. They were low in sulphate uptake activity and in ATP sulphurylase activity. They grew on medium containing sulphite, thiosulphate, cysteine or glutathione but not methionine as the sole source of sulphur. From these results, the mutants were concluded to carry mutations in the ATP sulphurylase gene. Inability of the mutants to utilize methionine as a sulphur source is rationalized by the absence of the reverse transsulphurylation pathway in this organism; wild type strains must utilize methionine as a sulphur source after it is degraded to give rise to sulphate.

  8. Increased volatile anesthetic requirement in short-sleeping Drosophila mutants

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Schaper, Christian; Bushey, Daniel; Rohlfs, Marko; Steinfath, Markus; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Scholz, Jens; Bein, Berthold

    2009-01-01

    Background Anesthesia and sleep share physiological and behavioral similarities. The anesthetic requirement of the recently identified Drosophila mutant minisleeper and other Drosophila mutants was investigated. Methods Sleep and wakefulness were determined by measuring activity of individual wild-type and mutant flies. Based on the response of the flies at different concentrations of the volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane, concentration-response curves were generated and EC50 values were calculated. Results The average amount of daily sleep in wild-type Drosophila (n=64) was 965 ±15 minutes and 1022 ± 29 in na[har38] p>0.05; n=32) (mean ± SEM, all p compared to wild-type and other shaker alleles). Shmns flies slept 584 ±13 minutes (n=64, p<0.01), Sh102 412 ± 22 minutes (n=32, p<0.01) and Sh120 782 ± 25 minutes (n=32, p<0.01). The EC50 values for isoflurane were 0.706 (95% confidence interval 0.649 to 0.764, n=661) and for sevoflurane 1.298 (1.180 to 1.416, n=522) in wild-type Drosophila, 1.599 (1.527 to 1.671, n=308) and 2.329 (2.177 to 2.482, n=282) in Sh102, 1.306 (1.212 to 1.400, n=393) and 2.013 (1.868 to 2.158, n=550) in Shmns, 0.957 (0.860 to 1.054, n=297) and 1.619 (1.508 to 1.731, n=386) in Sh120, and 0.6154 (0.581 to 0.649, n=360; p<0.05) and 0.9339 (0.823 to 1.041, n= 274) in na[har38], respectively (all p<0.01). Conclusions A single-gene mutation in Drosophila that causes an extreme reduction in daily sleep is responsible for a significant increase in the requirement of volatile anesthetics. This suggests that a single gene mutation affects both sleep behavior and anesthesia and sedation. PMID:19164958

  9. Composite Defect Significance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-13

    A12i 299 COMPOSITE DEFECT SIGNIFICANCE(U) MATERIALS SCIENCES 1/1 \\ CORP SPRING HOUSE PA S N CHATTERJEE ET AL. 13 JUL 82 MSC/TFR/1288/il87 NADC-80848...Directorate 30 Sensors & Avionics Technology Directorate 40 Communication & Navigation Technology Directorate 50 Software Computer Directorate 60 Aircraft ...instructions concerning commercial products herein do not constitute an endorsement by the Government nor do they convey or imply the license or right to use

  10. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  11. Molecular-clinical correlations in a family with variable tissue mitochondrial DNA T8993G mutant load.

    PubMed

    Enns, Gregory M; Bai, Ren-Kui; Beck, Anita E; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2006-08-01

    Unlike many pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, the T8993G mutation associated with Leigh syndrome (LS) and neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) typically shows little variation in mutant load between different tissue types. We describe the molecular and clinical findings in a family with variable disease severity and tissue T8993G mutant loads. Real-time ARMS qPCR testing showed that two brothers with features of NARP and LS had high mutant loads (>90%) in all tissues tested, similar to previously reported cases. Their sister, who has mild speech delay but attends normal school, was found to have a relatively high mutant load (mean 93%) in tissues derived from endoderm (buccal mucosa) and mesoderm (blood and skin fibroblasts). However, in tissue derived from ectoderm (hair bulbs), she carried a considerably lower proportion of mutant mtDNA. Because both surface ectoderm, which gives rise to outer epithelia and hair, and neuroectoderm, which gives rise to the central nervous system, are derived from ectoderm, it is tempting to speculate that the mutant load detected in the oligosymptomatic sister's hair bulbs is a reflection of the brain mutant load. We conclude that significant variation in tissue mutant load may occur in at least some individuals that harbor the T8993G mutation. This adds additional complexity to genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in such instances. Given the shared embryonic origin of hair bulbs and brain, we recommend performing hair bulb mtDNA analysis in asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic individuals that have high blood mutant loads in order to understand better the genotype-phenotype correlations related to the T8993G mutation.

  12. Differentially expressed genes in the ovary of the sixth day of pupal "Ming" lethal egg mutant of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Chen, An-Li; Zhao, Qiao-Ling; Shen, Xing-Jia; Qiu, Zhi-Yong; Xia, Ding-Guo; Tang, Shun-Ming; Zhang, Guo-Zheng

    2013-09-15

    The "Ming" lethal egg mutant (l-em) is a vitelline membrane mutant in silkworm, Bombyx mori. The eggs laid by the l-em mutant lose water, ultimately causing death within an hour. Previous studies have shown that the deletion of BmEP80 is responsible for the l-em mutation in silkworm, B. mori. In the current study, digital gene expression (DGE) was performed to investigate the difference of gene expression in ovaries between wild type and l-em mutant on the sixth day of the pupal stage to obtain a global view of gene expression profiles using the ovaries of three l-em mutants and three wild types. The results showed a total of 3,463,495 and 3,607,936 clean tags in the wild type and the l-em mutant libraries, respectively. Compared with those of wild type, 239 differentially expressed genes were detected in the l-em mutant, wherein 181 genes are up-regulated and 58 genes are down-regulated in the mutant strain. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis results showed that no pathway was significantly enriched and three pathways are tightly related to protein synthesis among the five leading pathways. Moreover, the expression profiles of eight important differentially expressed genes related to oogenesis changed. These results provide a comprehensive gene expression analysis of oogenesis and vitellogenesis in B. mori which facilitates understanding of both the specific molecular mechanism of the 1-em mutant and Lepidopteran oogenesis in general.

  13. Modulation of cellular and viral promoters by mutant human p53 proteins found in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Jackson, C T; Subler, M A; Martin, D W

    1992-01-01

    Wild-type p53 has recently been shown to repress transcription from several cellular and viral promoters. Since p53 mutations are the most frequently reported genetic defects in human cancers, it becomes important to study the effects of mutations of p53 on promoter functions. We, therefore, have studied the effects of wild-type and mutant human p53 on the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter and on several viral promoters, including the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL9 promoter, the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter-enhancer, and the long terminal repeat promoters of Rous sarcoma virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. HeLa cells were cotransfected with a wild-type or mutant p53 expression vector and a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under viral (or cellular) promoter control. As expected, expression of the wild-type p53 inhibited promoter function. Expression of a p53 with a mutation at any one of the four amino acid positions 175, 248, 273, or 281, however, correlated with a significant increase of the PCNA promoter activity (2- to 11-fold). The viral promoters were also activated, although to a somewhat lesser extent. We also showed that activation by a mutant p53 requires a minimal promoter containing a lone TATA box. A more significant increase (25-fold) in activation occurs when the promoter contains a binding site for the activating transcription factor or cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Using Saos-2 cells that do not express p53, we showed that activation by a mutant p53 was a direct enhancement. The mutant forms of p53 used in this study are found in various cancer cells. The activation of PCNA by mutant p53s may indicate a way to increase cell proliferation by the mutant p53s. Thus, our data indicate a possible functional role for the mutants of p53 found in cancer cells in activating several important loci, including PCNA. Images PMID:1356162

  14. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  15. PHB biosynthesis in catabolite repression mutant of Burkholderia sacchari.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gosset, Guillermo; Rocha, Rafael Costa Santos; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Ferreira da Silva, Luiziana

    2011-10-01

    Due to the effect of catabolite repression, sugar mixtures cannot be metabolized in a rapid and efficient way implicating in lower productivity in bioprocesses using lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In gram-negative bacteria, this mechanism is mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS), which concomitantly internalizes and phosphorylates sugars. In this study, we isolated a UV mutant of Burkholderia sacchari, called LFM828, which transports hexoses and pentoses by a non-PTS uptake system. This mutant presented released glucose catabolite repression over the pentoses. In mixtures of glucose, xylose, and arabinose, specific growth rates and the specific sugar consumption rates were, respectively, 10 and 23% higher in LFM828, resulting in a reduced time to exhaust all sugars in the medium. However, in polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis experiments it was necessary the supplementation of yeast extract to maintain higher values of growth rate and sugar consumption rate. The deficient growth in mineral medium was partially recovered by replacing the ammonium nitrogen source by glutamate. It was demonstrated that the ammonium metabolism is not defective in LFM828, differently from ammonium, glutamate can also be used as carbon and energy allowing an improvement on the carbohydrates utilization for PHB production in LFM828. In contrast, higher rates of ammonia consumption and CO(2) production in LFM828 indicate altered fluxes through the central metabolism in LFM828 and the parental. In conclusion, PTS plays an important role in cell physiology and the elimination of its components has a significant impact on catabolite repression, carbon flux distribution, and PHB biosynthesis in B. sacchari.

  16. A Rice Mutant Defective in Si Uptake1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian Feng; Tamai, Kazunori; Ichii, Masahiko; Wu, Guo Feng

    2002-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) accumulates silicon (Si) in the tops to levels up to 10.0% of shoot dry weight, but the mechanism responsible for high Si uptake by rice roots is not understood. We isolated a rice mutant (GR1) that is defective in active Si uptake by screening M2 seeds (64,000) of rice cv Oochikara that were treated with 10−3 m sodium azide for 6 h at 25oC. There were no phenotypic differences between wild type (WT) and GR1 except that the leaf blade of GR1 remained droopy when Si was supplied. Uptake experiments showed that Si uptake by GR1 was significantly lower than that by WT at both low and high Si concentrations. However, there was no difference in the uptake of other nutrients such as phosphorus and potassium. Si concentration in the xylem sap of WT was 33-fold that of the external solution, but that of GR1 was 3-fold higher than the external solution at 0.15 mm Si. Si uptake by WT was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors including NaCN and 2,4-dinitrophenol and by low temperature, whereas Si uptake by GR1 was not inhibited by these agents. These results suggest that an active transport system for Si uptake is disrupted in GR1. Analysis of F2 populations between GR1 and WT showed that roots with high Si uptake and roots with low Si uptake segregated at a 3:1 ratio, suggesting that GR1 is a recessive mutant of Si uptake. PMID:12481095

  17. Photoperiod Affects the Phenotype of Mitochondrial Complex I Mutants.

    PubMed

    Pétriacq, Pierre; de Bont, Linda; Genestout, Lucie; Hao, Jingfang; Laureau, Constance; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Rzigui, Touhami; Queval, Guillaume; Gilard, Françoise; Mauve, Caroline; Guérard, Florence; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Marion, Jessica; Fresneau, Chantal; Brown, Spencer; Danon, Antoine; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Berthomé, Richard; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Cornic, Gabriel; Pineau, Bernard; Gakière, Bertrand; De Paepe, Rosine

    2017-01-01

    Plant mutants for genes encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), the first enzyme of the respiratory chain, display various phenotypes depending on growth conditions. Here, we examined the impact of photoperiod, a major environmental factor controlling plant development, on two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CI mutants: a new insertion mutant interrupted in both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 genes encoding the NDUFS8 subunit and the previously characterized ndufs4 CI mutant. In the long day (LD) condition, both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 single mutants were indistinguishable from Columbia-0 at phenotypic and biochemical levels, whereas the ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 double mutant was devoid of detectable holo-CI assembly/activity, showed higher alternative oxidase content/activity, and displayed a growth retardation phenotype similar to that of the ndufs4 mutant. Although growth was more affected in ndufs4 than in ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 under the short day (SD) condition, both mutants displayed a similar impairment of growth acceleration after transfer to LD compared with the wild type. Untargeted and targeted metabolomics showed that overall metabolism was less responsive to the SD-to-LD transition in mutants than in the wild type. The typical LD acclimation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation as well as redox-related parameters was not observed in ndufs8.1 ndufs8 Similarly, NAD(H) content, which was higher in the SD condition in both mutants than in Columbia-0, did not adjust under LD We propose that altered redox homeostasis and NAD(H) content/redox state control the phenotype of CI mutants and photoperiod acclimation in Arabidopsis.

  18. Mutant IDH1-driven cellular transformation increases RAD51-mediated homologous recombination and temozolomide resistance.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; See, Wendy L; Pieper, Russell O

    2014-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations occur in most lower grade glioma and not only drive gliomagenesis but are also associated with longer patient survival and improved response to temozolomide. To investigate the possible causative relationship between these events, we introduced wild-type (WT) or mutant IDH1 into immortalized, untransformed human astrocytes, then monitored transformation status and temozolomide response. Temozolomide-sensitive parental cells exhibited DNA damage (γ-H2AX foci) and a prolonged G2 cell-cycle arrest beginning three days after temozolomide (100 μmol/L, 3 hours) exposure and persisting for more than four days. The same cells transformed by expression of mutant IDH1 exhibited a comparable degree of DNA damage and cell-cycle arrest, but both events resolved significantly faster in association with increased, rather than decreased, clonogenic survival. The increases in DNA damage processing, cell-cycle progression, and clonogenicity were unique to cells transformed by mutant IDH1, and were not noted in cells transformed by WT IDH1 or an oncogenic form (V12H) of Ras. Similarly, these effects were not noted following introduction of mutant IDH1 into Ras-transformed cells or established glioma cells. They were, however, associated with increased homologous recombination (HR) and could be reversed by the genetic or pharmacologic suppression of the HR DNA repair protein RAD51. These results show that mutant IDH1 drives a unique set of transformative events that indirectly enhance HR and facilitate repair of temozolomide-induced DNA damage and temozolomide resistance. The results also suggest that inhibitors of HR may be a viable means to enhance temozolomide response in IDH1-mutant glioma.

  19. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example.

  20. Differential Dynamics of CALR Mutant Allele Burden in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms during Interferon Alfa Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Morten O.; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Pallisgaard, Niels; Larsen, Thomas S.; de Stricker, Karin; Skov, Vibe; Hasselbalch, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of somatic mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) has identified a subgroup of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with separate haematological characteristics and prognosis. CALR mutations serve as novel markers both of diagnostic value and as targets for monitoring molecular responses during therapy. Interferon-α (IFN) selectively targets the malignant clone in a subset of MPN patients and can induce both haematological and molecular remissions in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the response to IFN in a cohort of 21 CALR mutated MPN patients including ET, prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (pre-PMF), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) with a median follow-up of 31 months. For evaluation of a molecular response, we developed highly sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for monitoring the mutant allele burden of the two most prevalent CALR mutations (type 1 and type 2). Thirteen patients (62%) experienced a decrease in the mutant allele burden with a median decline of 29% from baseline. However, only four patients, including patients with ET, pre-PMF, and PMF diagnosis, achieved molecular responder (MR) status with >50% reduction in mutant allele burden according to European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines. MR patients displayed significant differences in the dynamics of the CALR mutant load with regard to time to response and dynamics in mutant allele burden after discontinuation of IFN treatment. Furthermore, we highlight the prognostic value of the CALR mutant allele burden by showing a close association with leucocyte- and platelet counts, hemoglobin concentration, in addition to plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) irrespective of molecular response and treatment status. PMID:27764253

  1. Structural features and activity of Brazzein and its mutants upon substitution of a surfaced exposed alanine.

    PubMed

    Ghanavatian, Parisa; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jafarian, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a member of sweet-tasting protein containing four disulfide bonds. It was reported as a compact and heat-resistant protein. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and replaced a surface-exposed alanine with aspartic acid (A19D mutant), lysine (A19K mutant) and glycine (A19G mutant). Activity comparisons of wild-type (WT) and mutants using taste panel test procedure showed that A19G variant has the same activity as WT protein. However, introduction of a positive charge in A19K mutant led to significant increase in Brz's sweetness, while A19D has reduced sweetness compared to WT protein. Docking studies showed that mutation at position 19 results in slight chain mobility of protein at the binding surface and changing the patterns of interactions toward more effective binding of E9K variant in the concave surface of sweet taste receptor. Far-UV CD data spectra have a characteristic shape of beta structure for all variants, however different magnitudes of spectra suggest that beta-sheet structure in WT and A19G is more stable than that of A19D and A19K. Equilibrium unfolding studies with fluorescence spectroscopy and using urea and dithiothritol (DTT) as chemical denaturants indicates that A19G mutant gains more stability against urea denaturation; while conformational stability of A19D and A19K decreases when compared with WT and A19G variants. We concluded that the positive charge at the surface of protein is important factor responsible for the interaction of protein with the human sweet receptor and Ala(19) can be considered as a key region for investigating the mechanism of the interaction of Brz with corresponding receptor.

  2. myosin 7aa−/− mutant zebrafish show mild photoreceptor degeneration and reduced electroretinographic responses

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Matsui, Jonathan I.; Miller, Jessica; Dowling, John E.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in myosin VIIa (MYO7A) cause Usher syndrome 1B (USH1B), a disease characterized by the combination of sensorineural hearing loss and visual impairment termed retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Although the shaker-1 mouse model of USH1B exists, only minor defects in the retina have been observed during its lifespan. Previous studies of the zebrafish mariner mutant, which also carries a mutation in myo7aa, revealed balance and hearing defects in the mutants but the retinal phenotype has not been described. We found elevated cell death in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of myo7aa−/− mutants. While myo7aa−/− mutants retained visual behaviors in the optokinetic reflex (OKR) assay, electroretinogram (ERG) recordings revealed a significant decrease in both a- and b-wave amplitudes in mutant animals, but not a change in ERG threshold sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry showed mislocalization of rod and blue cone opsins and reduced expression of rod-specific markers in the myo7aa−/− ONL, providing further evidence that the photoreceptor degeneration observed represents the initial stages of the RP. Further, constant light exposure resulted in widespread photoreceptor degeneration and the appearance of large holes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). No differences were observed in the retinomotor movements of the photoreceptors or in melanosome migration within the RPE, suggesting that myo7aa−/− does not function in these processes in teleosts. These results indicate that the zebrafish myo7aa−/− mutant is a useful animal model for the RP seen in humans with USH1B. PMID:24698764

  3. Enhanced Priming of Adaptive Immunity by Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants with High-Level Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie; Bahunde, Faith; Thompson, Afton; Yu, Jae-Sung; Jacobs, William R.; Letvin, Norm L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteria have features that make them attractive as potential vaccine vectors. The nonpathogenic and rapidly growing Mycobacterium smegmatis can express both Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and heterologous antigens from other pathogens, and it has been used as a viable vector for the development of live vaccines. In order to further improve antigen-specific immunogenicity of M. smegmatis, we screened a random transposon mutant library for mutants displaying enhanced efficiency of protein secretion (“high secretors”) and isolated 61 mutants showing enhanced endogenic and transgenic protein secretion. Sequence analysis identified a total of 54 genes involved in optimal secretion of insert proteins, as well as multiple independent transposon insertions localized within the same genomic loci and operons. The majority of transposon insertions occurred in genes that have no known protein secretion function. These transposon mutants were shown to prime antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses better than the parental strain. Specifically, upon introducing the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag gene into these transposon mutant strains, we observed that they primed SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses significantly better than the control prime immunization in a heterologous prime/boost regimen. Our results reveal a dependence on bacterial secretion of mycobacterial and foreign antigens for the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in vivo. The data also suggest that these M. smegmatis transposon mutants could be used as novel live attenuated vaccine strains to express foreign antigens, such as those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and induce strong antigen-specific T cell responses. PMID:22787192

  4. A plate method for rapid screening of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare mutants for enhanced 2-keto-l-gulonic acid production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weichao; Han, Litao; Mandlaa, Mandlaa; Zhang, Haihong; Zhang, Zhongze; Xu, Hui

    2017-02-21

    A new plate method was developed for rapid screening of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare mutants overproducing 2-keto-l-gulonic acid (2-KLG). The screening methodology took the advantage of the acidity caused by 2-KLG, which changes the color of bromothymol blue (pH indicator) from blue to yellow. Using the proposed method, a mutant, K. vulgare 65, was selected from 20,000 colonies produced by a strain subjected to spaceflight mutagenesis. When co-cultured with Bacillus megaterium 2980 in 20-L fermenters, K. vulgare 65 showed a high conversion rate (94.45%) of l-sorbose to 2-KLG. In contrast to the traditional screening method, this one significantly improved the frequency of obtaining positive mutants. The proposed plate screening method is cost-effective and easy to run and is thus useful for the isolation and screening of K. vulgare mutants overproducing 2-KLG.

  5. Defects in the ratio of the dynein isoform, DHC11 in the long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Marilyn P; Sinha, Sapna; Motiwalla, Mustafa J; Rao, Venkatramanan G; D'Souza, Jacinta S

    2017-01-22

    The long-flagella mutants (lf1, lf2, lf3 and lf4) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are defective in proteins that are required for the assembly of normal flagella, their phenotype being long flagella. In a previous study, we biophysically characterized these mutants for their waveform patterns, swimming speeds, beat frequencies and correlated these parameters with their flagellar lengths. We found an anomaly in this correlation and set out to explore the underlying molecular significance, if any. The diverse inner dynein isoforms are the flagellar motors that convert the chemical energy of ATP into the mechanical energy of motility; we probed the presence of one of these isoforms (DHC11, which might help in bend initiation) in the lf mutants and compared it with the wild-type. Our studies show that the ratio of DHC11 is defective in the long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  6. Onset coding is degraded in auditory nerve fibers from mutant mice lacking synaptic ribbons.

    PubMed

    Buran, Bradley N; Strenzke, Nicola; Neef, Andreas; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Moser, Tobias; Liberman, M Charles

    2010-06-02

    Synaptic ribbons, found at the presynaptic membrane of sensory cells in both ear and eye, have been implicated in the vesicle-pool dynamics of synaptic transmission. To elucidate ribbon function, we characterized the response properties of single auditory nerve fibers in mice lacking Bassoon, a scaffolding protein involved in anchoring ribbons to the membrane. In bassoon mutants, immunohistochemistry showed that fewer than 3% of the hair cells' afferent synapses retained anchored ribbons. Auditory nerve fibers from mutants had normal threshold, dynamic range, and postonset adaptation in response to tone bursts, and they were able to phase lock with normal precision to amplitude-modulated tones. However, spontaneous and sound-evoked discharge rates were reduced, and the reliability of spikes, particularly at stimulus onset, was significantly degraded as shown by an increased variance of first-spike latencies. Modeling based on in vitro studies of normal and mutant hair cells links these findings to reduced release rates at the synapse. The degradation of response reliability in these mutants suggests that the ribbon and/or Bassoon normally facilitate high rates of exocytosis and that its absence significantly compromises the temporal resolving power of the auditory system.

  7. Differential clinical effects of different mutation subtypes in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, D; Rumi, E; Ferretti, V V; Buduo, C A Di; Milanesi, C; Cavalloni, C; Sant'Antonio, E; Abbonante, V; Moccia, F; Casetti, I C; Bellini, M; Renna, M C; Roncoroni, E; Fugazza, E; Astori, C; Boveri, E; Rosti, V; Barosi, G; Balduini, A; Cazzola, M

    2016-01-01

    A quarter of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a driver mutation of CALR, the calreticulin gene. A 52-bp deletion (type 1) and a 5-bp insertion (type 2 mutation) are the most frequent variants. These indels might differentially impair the calcium binding activity of mutant calreticulin. We studied the relationship between mutation subtype and biological/clinical features of the disease. Thirty-two different types of CALR variants were identified in 311 patients. Based on their predicted effect on calreticulin C-terminal, mutations were classified as: (i) type 1-like (65%); (ii) type 2-like (32%); and (iii) other types (3%). Corresponding CALR mutants had significantly different estimated isoelectric points. Patients with type 1 mutation, but not those with type 2, showed abnormal cytosolic calcium signals in cultured megakaryocytes. Type 1-like mutations were mainly associated with a myelofibrosis phenotype and a significantly higher risk of myelofibrotic transformation in essential thrombocythemia. Type 2-like CALR mutations were preferentially associated with an essential thrombocythemia phenotype, low risk of thrombosis despite very-high platelet counts and indolent clinical course. Thus, mutation subtype contributes to determining clinical phenotype and outcomes in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms. CALR variants that markedly impair the calcium binding activity of mutant calreticulin are mainly associated with a myelofibrosis phenotype. PMID:26449662

  8. Excretion of ammonium by a nifL mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii fixing nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bali, A; Blanco, G; Hill, S; Kennedy, C

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene upstream of nifA in Azotobacter vinelandii was introduced into the chromosome to replace the corresponding wild-type region. The resulting mutant, MV376, produced nitrogenase constitutively in the presence of 15 mM ammonium. When introduced into a nifH-lacZ fusion strain, the mutation permitted beta-galactosidase production in the presence of ammonium. The gene upstream of nifA is therefore designated nifL because of its similarity to the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL gene in proximity to nifA, in mutant phenotype, and in amino acid sequence of the gene product. The A. vinelandii nifL mutant MV376 excreted significant quantities of ammonium (approximately 10 mM) during diazotrophic growth. In contrast, ammonium excretion during diazotrophy was much lower in a K. pneumoniae nifL deletion mutant (maximum, 0.15 mM) but significantly higher than in NifL+ K. pneumoniae. The expression of the A. vinelandii nifA gene, unlike that of K. pneumoniae, was not repressed by ammonium. PMID:1622243

  9. Residual virulence and immunogenicity of CGV26 and CGV2631 B. melitensis Rev. 1 deletion mutant strains in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Laurence A; Laroucau, Karine; Olivier, Michel; Grillo, Maria Jesus; Marin, Clara M; Verger, Jean-Michel; Blasco, Jose-Maria

    2006-04-24

    The CGV26 and CGV2631 strains are novel engineered Brucella melitensis Rev.1 mutant strains deleted for the bp26 gene or for both bp26 and omp31 genes, respectively, coding for proteins of diagnostic significance. The residual virulence and immunogenicity of both mutants were compared to the parental Rev.1 strain in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination. The deletion of the bp26 gene or both bp26 and omp31 genes had no significant effect on the intracellular survival of the Rev.1 strain in ovine macrophage cultures. The kinetics of infection induced by both mutants in sheep was similar to the Rev.1 strain, and inoculation by the subcutaneous route produced wider and more generalized infections than the conjunctival route. All strains were cleared from lymph nodes and organs within 3 months after inoculation. The CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants induced both specific systemic antibody response and lymphoproliferation in sheep. The kinetics of the responses induced by the mutants was quite similar to that of the parental Rev.1 strain, except for the intensity of the lymphoproliferative response, which was attenuated for the CGV2631 mutant. In conclusion, the residual virulence of both CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants in sheep was similar to that of the parental Rev.1 vaccine strain. These mutants induced also significant specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity in sheep and are suitable to be evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections in sheep.

  10. Suppression of KRas-mutant cancer through the combined inhibition of KRAS with PLK1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Kewen; Guo, Jiawei; Cheng, Feixiong; Lv, Jing; Jiang, Wenhao; Lu, Weiqiang; Liu, Jinsong; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    No effective targeted therapies exist for cancers with somatic KRAS mutations. Here we develop a synthetic lethal chemical screen in isogenic KRAS-mutant and wild-type cells to identify clinical drug pairs. Our results show that dual inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) leads to the synergistic effects in KRAS-mutant cancers. Microarray analysis reveals that this combinatory inhibition significantly increases transcription and activity of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1, leading to specific G2/M phase blockade in KRAS-mutant cells. Overexpression of p21WAF1/CIP1, either by cDNA transfection or clinical drugs, preferentially impairs the growth of KRAS-mutant cells, suggesting a druggable synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and p21WAF1/CIP1. Co-administration of BI-2536 and fasudil either in the LSL-KRASG12D mouse model or in a patient tumour explant mouse model of KRAS-mutant lung cancer suppresses tumour growth and significantly prolongs mouse survival, suggesting a strong synergy in vivo and a potential avenue for therapeutic treatment of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:27193833

  11. Immunogenic Response of Brucella canis virB10 and virB11 Mutants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Palomares-Resendiz, E.; Arellano-Reynoso, B.; Hernández-Castro, R.; Tenorio-Gutiérrez, V.; Salas-Téllez, E.; Suárez-Güemes, F.; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén

    2012-01-01

    The virB locus, which encodes the type IV secretion system, is a major component of virulence in Brucella. A non-polar virB10 mutant and a virB11 deletion mutant were constructed in Brucella canis. In the mouse model, both mutants were cleared at day 21 post-infection, indicating reduced virulence in mice. After challenging with wild-type B. canis, the amounts of CFU recovered at day 15 were significantly lower in the group previously vaccinated with the virB10 mutant. Levels of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgM, the induction of the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and the production of IFN-γ were measured in lymphocyte cultures. All strains elicited similar levels of different antibody isotype profiles, and no significant differences were detected (P < 0.05). The wild-type strain induced a rapid and strong INF-γ response at 24 h, while both mutants induced mild INF-γ responses at 24 h, which remained constant over the course of sampling. Our results suggest that the virB mutants elicit a protective immunity and may be considered as candidates for studies to be conducted in dogs against canine brucellosis. PMID:22919627

  12. Immunogenic response of Brucella canis virB10 and virB11 mutants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Palomares-Resendiz, E; Arellano-Reynoso, B; Hernández-Castro, R; Tenorio-Gutiérrez, V; Salas-Téllez, E; Suárez-Güemes, F; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén

    2012-01-01

    The virB locus, which encodes the type IV secretion system, is a major component of virulence in Brucella. A non-polar virB10 mutant and a virB11 deletion mutant were constructed in Brucella canis. In the mouse model, both mutants were cleared at day 21 post-infection, indicating reduced virulence in mice. After challenging with wild-type B. canis, the amounts of CFU recovered at day 15 were significantly lower in the group previously vaccinated with the virB10 mutant. Levels of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgM, the induction of the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and the production of IFN-γ were measured in lymphocyte cultures. All strains elicited similar levels of different antibody isotype profiles, and no significant differences were detected (P < 0.05). The wild-type strain induced a rapid and strong INF-γ response at 24 h, while both mutants induced mild INF-γ responses at 24 h, which remained constant over the course of sampling. Our results suggest that the virB mutants elicit a protective immunity and may be considered as candidates for studies to be conducted in dogs against canine brucellosis.

  13. Selection and evaluation of the immunogenicity of protective antigen mutants as anthrax vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Roehrl, Michael H; Basar, Emre; Wang, Julia Y

    2008-02-13

    Protective antigen (PA) is a central component of anthrax toxin and a major antigen in anthrax vaccines. However, the use of native PA as a vaccine is not optimal. If administered to people who have been freshly exposed to anthrax, PA may actually aid in anthrax toxin formation and thus may pose a serious safety concern for postexposure vaccination applications. A non-functional PA mutant may be a much safer alternative. To identify an improved anthrax vaccine antigen, we examined four non-functional mutants of PA, each being impaired in a critical step of the cellular intoxication pathway of PA. These mutants were Rec(-) (unable to bind PA-receptors), SSSR (resistant to activation by furin), Oligo(-) (unable to form oligomers), and DNI (Dominant Negative Inhibitory, unable to form endosomal transmembrane pores). When tested in mice and after three doses of immunization, all four mutants were highly potent in eliciting PA-specific, toxin-neutralizing antibodies, with immunogenicity increasing in the order of PAsignificant, DNI and Oligo(-) were significantly more immunogenic than wild-type PA. One year after immunization and compared with PA-immunized mice, DNI-immunized mice maintained significantly higher levels of anti-PA IgG with correspondingly higher titers of toxin-neutralizing activity. In contrast, Oligo(-)-immunized mice had high levels of anti-PA IgG but lower titers of toxin-neutralizing activity, suggesting that Oligo(-) mutation sites may overlap with critical protective epitopes of PA. Our study demonstrates that PA-based vaccines could be improved both in terms of safety and efficacy by strategic mutations that not only render PA non-functional but also simultaneously enhance its immunogenic potency. Recombinant PA mutants, particularly DNI, hold great promise as better and safer antigens than wild-type PA for use in postexposure

  14. Plasmidless, photosynthetically incompetent mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S A; Wimer, L T; Yoch, D C

    1984-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate rendered a high percentage of Rhodospirillum rubrum cells plasmidless and photosynthetically incompetent (Kuhl et al., J. Bacteriol. 156:737-742, 1983). By probing restriction endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these plasmidless strains with 32P-labeled R. rubrum plasmid DNA, we showed that no homology exists between the plasmid and the chromosomal DNA of the mutant. Loss of the plasmid in all the nonphotosynthetic isolates was accompanied by the synthesis of spirilloxanthin under aerobic growth conditions, resistance to cycloserine and HgCl2, and loss of ability to grow fermentatively on fructose. Changes in both the protein and lipid composition of the membranes and the impaired uptake of 203HgCl2 in the plasmidless strains (compared with the wild type) suggest either that membrane modification occurs as a result of plasmid loss, accounting for several of the acquired phenotype characteristics of the cured strains, or that both membrane modification and plasmid loss are part of the same pleiotropic mutation. Images PMID:6434514

  15. Mutant Huntingtin Disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Grima, Jonathan C; Daigle, J Gavin; Arbez, Nicolas; Cunningham, Kathleen C; Zhang, Ke; Ochaba, Joseph; Geater, Charlene; Morozko, Eva; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Glatzer, Jenna C; Pham, Jacqueline T; Ahmed, Ishrat; Peng, Qi; Wadhwa, Harsh; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Duan, Wenzhen; Snyder, Solomon H; Ranum, Laura P W; Thompson, Leslie M; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ross, Christopher A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mechanism(s) by which mutant HTT (mHTT) causes disease is unclear. Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the trafficking of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, is tightly regulated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) made up of nucleoporins (NUPs). Previous studies offered clues that mHTT may disrupt nucleocytoplasmic transport and a mutation of an NUP can cause HD-like pathology. Therefore, we evaluated the NPC and nucleocytoplasmic transport in multiple models of HD, including mouse and fly models, neurons transfected with mHTT, HD iPSC-derived neurons, and human HD brain regions. These studies revealed severe mislocalization and aggregation of NUPs and defective nucleocytoplasmic transport. HD repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins also disrupted nucleocytoplasmic transport. Additionally, overexpression of NUPs and treatment with drugs that prevent aberrant NUP biology also mitigated this transport defect and neurotoxicity, providing future novel therapy targets.

  16. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  17. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, D

    1976-01-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency. PMID:789362

  18. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  19. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  20. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  1. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  2. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  3. A Mutant Hunt Using the C-Fern (Ceratopteris Richardii)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calie, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    A modification of the popular C-Fern system, the tropical fern Ceratopteris richardii is developed in which students plate out a genetically mixed set of fern spores and then select for specific mutants. This exercise can provide students with an experience in plant mutant selection and can be used as a platform to expose students to a diverse…

  4. Mutant DD genotype of NFKB1 gene is associated with the susceptibility and severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun-Yi; Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, Yun; Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Bang-Dang; Liu, Fen; Chen, Xiao-Cui; Zheng, Hong; Ma, Yi-Tong; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear factor κappa B (NF-κB) is an important transcription factor in the development and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD). Recent evidence suggests that -94 ATTG ins/del mutant in the promoter of NFKB1 gene is an essential functional mutant. The present study demonstrated the frequencies of the del/del (DD) genotype and del (D) allele were significantly higher in CAD patients than in controls. CAD patients carrying mutant DD genotype had worse stenosis of diseased coronary arteries compared to those carrying ins/ins (II) or ins/del (ID) genotype. Plasma levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were lower, while inflammatory cytokine incnterlukin-6 (IL-6) was higher in CAD patients with DD genotype than those with II or ID genotype (both P<0.05). In vitro study showed that mutant human umbilical vein endothelial cells (DD genotype HUVECs) were more susceptible to H2O2-induced apoptosis, which was accompanied with a decreased Bcl-2 expression. Further, mutant HUVECs had lower eNOS but higher IL-6 mRNA levels and decreased phosphorylation of eNOS under H2O2-stimulation (both P<0.05). Compared to wild type cells (II genotype), significantly downregulated protein expression of total NF-κB p50 subunit were observed in mutant HUVECs with or without oxidative stress, and a lower expression of unclear p50 was associated with a decreased p50 nuclear translocation in mutant HUVECs versus wild type cells under H2O2-stimulation (both P<0.05). In conclusion, mutant DD genotype of NFKB1 gene is associated with the risk and severity of CAD. Dwonregulation of NF-κB p50 subunit leads to exacerbated endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis and enhanced inflammatory response that is the potential underlying mechanism.

  5. Elucidation of the Photorhabdus temperata Genome and Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library To Identify Motility Mutants Altered in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Sheldon; Rowedder, Holli; Michaels, Brandye; Bullock, Hannah; Jackobeck, Ryan; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Durakovic, Umjia; Gately, Jon; Janicki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora forms a specific mutualistic association with its bacterial partner Photorhabdus temperata. The microbial symbiont is required for nematode growth and development, and symbiont recognition is strain specific. The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of P. temperata and identify genes that plays a role in the pathogenesis of the Photorhabdus-Heterorhabditis symbiosis. A draft genome sequence of P. temperata strain NC19 was generated. The 5.2-Mb genome was organized into 17 scaffolds and contained 4,808 coding sequences (CDS). A genetic approach was also pursued to identify mutants with altered motility. A bank of 10,000 P. temperata transposon mutants was generated and screened for altered motility patterns. Five classes of motility mutants were identified: (i) nonmotile mutants, (ii) mutants with defective or aberrant swimming motility, (iii) mutant swimmers that do not require NaCl or KCl, (iv) hyperswimmer mutants that swim at an accelerated rate, and (v) hyperswarmer mutants that are able to swarm on the surface of 1.25% agar. The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis. The motility-defective mutant P13-7 had an insertion in the RNase II gene and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. Genetic complementation of this mutant restored wild-type activity. These results demonstrate a role for RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions. IMPORTANCE The relationship between Photorhabdus and entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis represents a well-known mutualistic system that has potential as a biological control agent. The elucidation of the genome of the bacterial partner and role that RNase II plays in its life cycle has provided a greater understanding of Photorhabdus as both an insect pathogen and a nematode symbiont. PMID

  6. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  7. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β-sheet structure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa M; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-10-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate the aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. The effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.

  8. A short flagella mutant of Dunaliella sallina (Chlorophyta, Cholorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Vismara, Rosa; Verni, Franco; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Dunaliella salina (Chlorophyta, Chlorophyceae) is a unicellular wall-less biflagellate alga. In this paper we describe a spontaneous mutant of D. salina, isolated from wild type cultures, which is characterized by very short flagella. The ultrastructure showed the basic 9 + 2 organization of wild-type flagella. Immunofluorescence localization of tubulin in this mutant confirmed the normal construction of the axoneme. Although, the mutant does not swim, still it is able to move and perform photobehavior. As shown by track reconstruction, and rotation movements, observed by means of reflection microscopy, this mutant can move, probably gliding by means of its stumpy flagella. A possible model to explain the mutant motion pattern is discussed.

  9. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  10. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; ...

    2015-09-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  11. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  12. Extreme Vulnerability of IDH1 Mutant Cancers to NAD+ Depletion.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Iafrate, A John; Tanaka, Shota; Loebel, Franziska; Lelic, Nina; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Bedel, Olivier; Deng, Gejing; Zhang, Bailin; He, Timothy; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhang, Yiyun; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J; Curry, William T; Zhao, Dan; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Nigim, Fares; Koerner, Mara V A; Ho, Quan; Fisher, David E; Roider, Elisabeth M; Kemeny, Lajos V; Samuels, Yardena; Flaherty, Keith T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Chi, Andrew S; Cahill, Daniel P

    2015-12-14

    Heterozygous mutation of IDH1 in cancers modifies IDH1 enzymatic activity, reprogramming metabolite flux and markedly elevating 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we found that 2-HG depletion did not inhibit growth of several IDH1 mutant solid cancer types. To identify other metabolic therapeutic targets, we systematically profiled metabolites in endogenous IDH1 mutant cancer cells after mutant IDH1 inhibition and discovered a profound vulnerability to depletion of the coenzyme NAD+. Mutant IDH1 lowered NAD+ levels by downregulating the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (Naprt1), sensitizing to NAD+ depletion via concomitant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition. NAD+ depletion activated the intracellular energy sensor AMPK, triggered autophagy, and resulted in cytotoxicity. Thus, we identify NAD+ depletion as a metabolic susceptibility of IDH1 mutant cancers.

  13. Quorum-Sensing-Negative (lasR) Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Avoid Cell Lysis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haenni, Marisa; Guy, Lionel; Krishnapillai, Viji; Haas, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acylhomoserine lactone signals regulate the expression of several hundreds of genes, via the transcriptional regulator LasR and, in part, also via the subordinate regulator RhlR. This regulatory network termed quorum sensing contributes to the virulence of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. The fact that two supposed PAO1 wild-type strains from strain collections were found to be defective for LasR function because of independent point mutations in the lasR gene led to the hypothesis that loss of quorum sensing might confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa under certain environmental conditions. A convenient plate assay for LasR function was devised, based on the observation that lasR mutants did not grow on adenosine as the sole carbon source because a key degradative enzyme, nucleoside hydrolase (Nuh), is positively controlled by LasR. The wild-type PAO1 and lasR mutants showed similar growth rates when incubated in nutrient yeast broth at pH 6.8 and 37°C with good aeration. However, after termination of growth during 30 to 54 h of incubation, when the pH rose to ≥ 9, the lasR mutants were significantly more resistant to cell lysis and death than was the wild type. As a consequence, the lasR mutant-to-wild-type ratio increased about 10-fold in mixed cultures incubated for 54 h. In a PAO1 culture, five consecutive cycles of 48 h of incubation sufficed to enrich for about 10% of spontaneous mutants with a Nuh− phenotype, and five of these mutants, which were functionally complemented by lasR+, had mutations in lasR. The observation that, in buffered nutrient yeast broth, the wild type and lasR mutants exhibited similar low tendencies to undergo cell lysis and death suggests that alkaline stress may be a critical factor providing a selective survival advantage to lasR mutants. PMID:15995202

  14. Human Liver Cell Trafficking Mutants: Characterization and Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L.; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Suadicani, Sylvia O.; Spray, David C.; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W.; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α’’. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype. PMID:24466322

  15. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  16. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  17. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  18. Comparable clinical outcomes in patients with HER2-mutant and EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Chang, Hou-Tai; Lim, Chor-Kuan; Liu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jin-Shing; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    HER2 is a major proliferative driver in lung cancer. HER2 gene aberrations impact the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). A one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed using RNA samples from 888 Asian lung cancer patients to detect HER2, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ROS1 mutations. The demographic data and treatment outcomes of HER2 mutation-positive lung ADC patients were analyzed and compared to those with HER2 mutation-negative tumors. HER2 mutation was identified in 40 (4.5%) lung ADC patients. HER2 mutations tended to occur in male patients with advanced-stage disease and never-smokers. A775_G776insYVMA (n = 22, 55%) was the most prevalent HER2 mutation, followed by P780_Y781insGSP (n = 4, 10%). For patients diagnosed with stage-IIIB/IV disease, HER2-mutant patients showed clinical outcomes comparable to EGFR-mutant patients (P = 0.721, log-rank test) and a better overall survival (OS) compared to patients lacking driver mutations in the investigated genes (P = 0.033, Breslow test). Specifically, lung ADC patients with stage-IV HER2-mutant tumors treated with chemotherapy or targeted agents, even without afatinib or anti-HER2 targeted therapy, showed similar clinical outcomes to lung ADC patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion or L858R mutations (P = 0.870). In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that HER2 mutation status was not a major risk factor for diminished OS in stage-IV lung cancer. In conclusion, lung ADC harboring HER2 mutations showed distinct characteristics from other driver mutations, including increased chemosensitivity with in advanced stage disease.

  19. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  20. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  1. Biomass Productivities in Wild Type and Pigment Mutant of Cyclotella sp. (Diatom)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Bartha, Richard; Aksoy, M.; Weissman, Joseph C.; Benemann, John

    2008-07-03

    Microalgae are expected to play a significant role in greenhouse gas mitigation because they can utilize CO2 from powerplant flue gases directly while producing a variety of renewable carbon-neutral biofuels. In order for such a microalgal climate change mitigation strategy to become economically feasible, it will be necessary to significantly improve biomass productivities. One approach to achieve this objective is to reduce, via mutagenesis, the number of light harvesting pigments, which, according to theory, should significantly improve the light utilization efficiency, primarily by increasing the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is). Employing chemical (ethylmethylsulfonate, EMS) and UV mutagenesis of a wild type strain of the diatom Cyclotella, approximately 10,000 pigment mutants were generated, and two of the most promising ones (CM1 and CM1-1) were subjected to further testing in both laboratory cultures and outdoor ponds. Measurements of photosynthetic oxygen production rates as a function of light intensity (i.e., P-I curves) of samples taken from laboratory batch cultures during the exponential and linear growth phase indicated that the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is) was two to three times greater in the pigment mutant CM1-1 than in the wild type, i.e., 355-443 versus 116-169 μmole/m2∙sec, respectively. While theory, i.e., the Bush equation, predicts that such a significant gain in Is should increase light utilization efficiencies and thus biomass productivities, particularly at high light intensities, no improvements in biomass productivities were observed in either semi-continuous laboratory cultures or outdoor ponds. In fact, the maximum biomass productivity in semi-continuous laboratory culture was always greater in the wild type than in the mutant, namely 883 versus 725 mg/L∙d, respectively at low light intensity (200 μmole/m2∙sec) and 1229 versus 1043 mg/L∙d, respectively at high light intensity

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lpsi reveals impairment in the root responses to local phosphate availability.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S; Jain, Ajay; Nagarajan, Vinay K; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Sahi, Shivendra V; Raghothama, Kashchandra G

    2014-04-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency triggers local Pi sensing-mediated inhibition of primary root growth and development of root hairs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Generation of activation-tagged T-DNA insertion pools of Arabidopsis expressing the luciferase gene (LUC) under high-affinity Pi transporter (Pht1;4) promoter, is an efficient approach for inducing genetic variations that are amenable for visual screening of aberrations in Pi deficiency responses. Putative mutants showing altered LUC expression during Pi deficiency were identified and screened for impairment in local Pi deficiency-mediated inhibition of primary root growth. An isolated mutant was analyzed for growth response, effects of Pi deprivation on Pi content, primary root growth, root hair development, and relative expression levels of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes, and those implicated in starch metabolism and Fe and Zn homeostasis. Pi deprived local phosphate sensing impaired (lpsi) mutant showed impaired primary root growth and attenuated root hair development. Although relative expression levels of PSR genes were comparable, there were significant increases in relative expression levels of IRT1, BAM3 and BAM5 in Pi deprived roots of lpsi compared to those of the wild-type. Better understanding of molecular responses of plants to Pi deficiency or excess will help to develop suitable remediation strategies for soils with excess Pi, which has become an environmental concern. Hence, lpsi mutant will serve as a valuable tool in identifying molecular mechanisms governing adaptation of plants to Pi deficiency.

  3. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection.

  4. Altered Sporulation and Respiratory Patterns in Mutants of Bacillus subtilis Induced by Acridine Orange

    PubMed Central

    Bott, K. F.; Davidoff-Abelson, R.

    1966-01-01

    Bott, K. F. (The University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.), and R. Davidoff-Abelson. Altered sporulation and respiratory patterns in mutants of Bacillus subtilis induced by acridine orange. J. Bacteriol. 92:229–240. 1966.—The addition of acridine orange to vegetative cultures of Bacillus subtilis induces the formation of sporulation mutants at a frequency of 20% or greater. These mutants are grouped into seven categories which reflect their different morphological properties. They are altered in their vegetative metabolism, as indicated by abnormal growth on synthetic media. Sporulation of these mutants is impaired at several levels, all of which are stable upon repeated subculturing. The initial stages of sporulation which require no increased metabolic activity (proteolytic enzyme activity and antibiotic production) are functional in all strains, but glucose dehydrogenase activity, an enzyme associated with early synthetic functions in spore synthesis, is significantly reduced. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase is slightly depressed. It is suggested that acridine orange interacts with a cellular constituent controlling respiration and consequently prevents an increased metabolic activity that may be associated with normal spore synthesis. Images PMID:4957434

  5. Spaceflight experiments with Arabidopsis starch-deficient mutants support a statolith-based model for graviperception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to help resolve some of the controversy associated with ground-based research that has supported the starch-statolith theory of gravity perception in plants, we performed spaceflight experiments with Arabidopsis in Biorack during the January 1997 and May 1997 missions of the Space Shuttle. Seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless mutant were grown in microgravity and then were given either a 30, 60, or 90 minute gravity stimulus on a centrifuge. By the 90 min 1-g stimulus, the WT exhibited the greatest magnitude of curvature and the starchless mutant exhibited the smallest curvature while the two reduced starch mutants had an intermediate magnitude of curvature. In addition, space-grown plants had two structural features that distinguished them from the controls: a greater number of root hairs and an anomalous hypocotyl hook structure. However, the morphological changes observed in the flight seedlings are likely to be due to the effects of ethylene present in the spacecraft. (Additional ground-based studies demonstrated that this level of ethylene did not significantly affect gravitropism nor did it affect the relative gravitropic sensitivity among the four strains.) Nevertheless, this experiment on gravitropism was performed the “right way” in that brief gravitational stimuli were provided, and the seedlings were allowed to express the response without further gravity stimuli. Our spaceflight results support previous ground-based studies of these and other mutants since increasing amounts of starch correlated positively with increasing sensitivity to gravity.

  6. Two-stage fermentation process for enhanced mannitol production using Candida magnoliae mutant R9.

    PubMed

    Savergave, Laxman S; Gadre, Ramchandra V; Vaidya, Bhalchandra K; Jogdand, Vitthal V

    2013-02-01

    Mutants of Candida magnoliae NCIM 3470 were generated by treatment of ultra-violet radiations, ethyl methyl sulphonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutants with higher reductase activity were screened by means of 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride agar plate assay. Among the screened mutants, the mutant R9 produced maximum mannitol (i.e. 46 g l(-1)) in liquid fermentation medium containing 250 g l(-1) glucose and hence was selected for further experiments. Preliminary optimization studies were carried out on shake-flask level which increased the mannitol production to 60 g l(-1) in liquid fermentation medium containing 300 g l(-1) glucose. A two-stage fermentation process comprising of growth phase and production phase was employed. During the growth phase, glucose was supplemented and aerobic conditions were maintained. Thereafter, the production phase was initiated by supplementing fructose and switching to anaerobic conditions by discontinuing aeration and decreasing the speed of agitation. The strategy of two-stage fermentation significantly enhanced the production of mannitol up to 240 g l(-1), which is the highest among all fermentative production processes and corresponds to 81 % yield and 4 g l(-1 )h(-1) productivity without formation of any by-product.

  7. Comparison of Zebrafish tmem88a mutant and morpholino knockdown phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Place, Elsie S.; Smith, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Tmem88a is a transmembrane protein that is thought to be a negative regulator of the Wnt signalling pathway. Several groups have used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides in an effort to characterise the role of tmem88a in zebrafish cardiovascular development, but they have not obtained consistent results. Here, we generate an 8 bp deletion in the coding region of the tmem88a locus using TALENs, and we have gone on to establish a viable homozygous tmem88aΔ8 mutant line. Although tmem88aΔ8 mutants have reduced expression of some key haematopoietic genes, differentiation of erythrocytes and neutrophils is unaffected, contradicting our previous study using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides. We find that expression of the tmem88a paralogue tmem88b is not significantly changed in tmem88aΔ8 mutants and injection of the tmem88a splice-blocking morpholino oligonucleotide into tmem88aΔ8 mutants recapitulates the reduction of erythrocytes observed in morphants using o-Dianisidine. This suggests that there is a partial, but inessential, requirement for tmem88a during haematopoiesis and that morpholino injection exacerbates this phenotype in tmem88a morpholino knockdown embryos. PMID:28192479

  8. An In Vivo Quantitative Comparison of Photoprotection in Arabidopsis Xanthophyll Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Maxwell A.; Dall’Osto, Luca; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of different LHCII antenna carotenoids to protective NPQ (pNPQ) were tested using a range of xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis: plants were either devoid of lutein (lut2), violaxanthin (npq2), or synthesized a single xanthophyll species, namely violaxanthin (aba4npq1lut2), zeaxanthin (npq2lut2), or lutein (chy1chy2lut5). A novel pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorescence analysis procedure, that used a gradually increasing actinic light intensity, allowed the efficiency of pNPQ to be tested using the photochemical quenching (qP) parameter measured in the dark (qPd). Furthermore, the yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) was calculated, and the light intensity which induces photoinhibition in 50% of leaves for each mutant was ascertained. Photoprotective capacities of each xanthophyll were quantified, taking into account chlorophyll a/b ratios and excitation pressure. Here, light tolerance, pNPQ capacity, and ΦPSII were highest in wild type plants. Of the carotenoid mutants, lut2 (lutein-deficient) plants had the highest light tolerance, and the joint the highest ΦPSII with violaxanthin only plants. We conclude that all studied mutants possess pNPQ and a more complete composition of xanthophylls in their natural binding sites is the most important factor governing photoprotection, rather than any one specific xanthophyll suggesting a strong structural effect of the molecules upon the LHCII antenna organization and discuss the results significance for future crop development. PMID:27446097

  9. Exoprotein Production Correlates with Morphotype Changes of Nonmotile Shewanella oneidensis Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wu, Lin; Xia, Yu; Chen, Haijiang; Luo, Qixia; Sun, Linlin

    2013-01-01

    We report a previously undescribed mechanism for the rugose morphotype in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for investigating redox transformations of environmental contaminants. Bacteria may form smooth or rugose colonies on agar plates. In general, conversion from the smooth to rugose colony morphotype is attributed to increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). In this work, we discovered that aflagellate S. oneidensis mutants grew into rugose colonies, whereas those with nonfunctional flagellar filaments remained smooth. EPS production was not altered in either case, but mutants with the rugose morphotype showed significantly reduced exoprotein secretion. The idea that exoproteins at a reduced level correlate with rugosity gained support from smooth suppressor strains of an aflagellate rugose fliD (encoding the capping protein) mutant, which restored the exoprotein level to the levels of the wild-type and mutant strains with a smooth morphotype. Further analyses revealed that SO1072 (a putative GlcNAc-binding protein) was one of the highly upregulated exoproteins in these suppressor strains. Most intriguingly, this study identified a compensatory mechanism of SO1072 to flagellins possibly mediated by bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP. PMID:23335418

  10. Engineered antibody therapies to counteract mutant huntingtin and related toxic intracellular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butler, David C.; McLear, Julie A.; Messer, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The engineered antibody approach to Huntington's disease (HD) therapeutics is based on the premise that significantly lowering the levels of the primary misfolded mutant protein will reduce abnormal protein interactions and direct toxic effects of the misfolded huntingtin (HTT). This will in turn reduce the pathologic stress on cells, and normalize intrinsic proteostasis. Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are single-chain (scFv) and single-domain (dAb; nanobody) variable fragments that can retain the affinity and specificity of full-length antibodies, but can be selected and engineered as genes. Functionally, they represent a protein-based approach to the problem of aberrant mutant protein folding, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and aggregation. Several intrabodies that bind on either side of the expanded polyglutamine tract of mutant HTT have been reported to improve the mutant phenotype in cell and organotypic cultures, fruit flies, and mice. Further refinements to the difficult challenges of intraneuronal delivery, cytoplasmic folding, and long-term efficacy are in progress. This review covers published studies and emerging approaches on the choice of targets, selection and engineering methods, gene and protein delivery options, and testing of candidates in cell and animal models. The resultant antibody fragments can be used as direct therapeutics and as target validation/drug discovery tools for HD, while the technology is also applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative and other diseases that are triggered by toxic proteins. PMID:22120646

  11. Changes of motor abilities during ontogenetic development in Lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Markvartová, V; Cendelín, J; Vozeh, F

    2010-07-14

    Lurcher mutant mice represent a natural model of olivocerebellar degeneration. This degeneration is caused by a mutation of the gene for the delta2 glutamate receptor. Lurcher mutants suffer from cerebellar ataxia and cognitive functions deficiency as a consequence of excitotoxic apoptosis of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex and a secondary decrease of granule cells and inferior olive neurons. This process finishes by the 90th day of postnatal life, but already by 14 days, the Purkinje cells are damaged and the ataxia is fully developed. Purkinje cells die by apoptosis within the first 3 weeks of life. The aim of our work was to study the development of motor functions in the course of the ontogenetic development in Lurcher mutant mice of the B6CBA strain and to compare it with wild type mice of the same strain. Mice aged 2, 3, 6, 9, and 22 weeks were used in our experiment. Motor skills were examined using four standard tests: the horizontal wire, rotating cylinder, footbridge and slanting ladder. Our findings in Lurcher mutant mice show a significant increase of motor abilities up to the sixth postnatal week and selective decrease early after this period. This improvement of motor skills is caused by the physiological development of musculature and the nervous system, probably with some contribution of plasticity of the maturing brain. The cause of the decline of these abilities immediately after the completion of the development is unknown.

  12. Comparison of Zebrafish tmem88a mutant and morpholino knockdown phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eve, Alexander M J; Place, Elsie S; Smith, James C

    2017-01-01

    Tmem88a is a transmembrane protein that is thought to be a negative regulator of the Wnt signalling pathway. Several groups have used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides in an effort to characterise the role of tmem88a in zebrafish cardiovascular development, but they have not obtained consistent results. Here, we generate an 8 bp deletion in the coding region of the tmem88a locus using TALENs, and we have gone on to establish a viable homozygous tmem88aΔ8 mutant line. Although tmem88aΔ8 mutants have reduced expression of some key haematopoietic genes, differentiation of erythrocytes and neutrophils is unaffected, contradicting our previous study using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides. We find that expression of the tmem88a paralogue tmem88b is not significantly changed in tmem88aΔ8 mutants and injection of the tmem88a splice-blocking morpholino oligonucleotide into tmem88aΔ8 mutants recapitulates the reduction of erythrocytes observed in morphants using o-Dianisidine. This suggests that there is a partial, but inessential, requirement for tmem88a during haematopoiesis and that morpholino injection exacerbates this phenotype in tmem88a morpholino knockdown embryos.

  13. Nitric Oxide Overproduction in Tomato shr Mutant Shifts Metabolic Profiles and Suppresses Fruit Growth and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Gupta, Suresh K.; Basha, Pinjari O.; Sakthivel, Kannabiran; Sadhana; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in growth and disease resistance in plants. It also acts as a secondary messenger in signaling pathways for several plant hormones. Despite its clear role in regulating plant development, its role in fruit development is not known. In an earlier study, we described a short root (shr) mutant of tomato, whose phenotype results from hyperaccumulation of NO. The molecular mapping localized shr locus in 2.5 Mb region of chromosome 9. The shr mutant showed sluggish growth, with smaller leaves, flowers and was less fertile than wild type. The shr mutant also showed reduced fruit size and slower ripening of the fruits post-mature green stage to the red ripe stage. Comparison of the metabolite profiles of shr fruits with wild-type fruits during ripening revealed a significant shift in the patterns. In shr fruits intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were differentially regulated than WT indicating NO affected the regulation of TCA cycle. The accumulation of several amino acids, particularly tyrosine, was higher, whereas most fatty acids were downregulated in shr fruits. Among the plant hormones at one or more stages of ripening, ethylene, Indole-3-acetic acid and Indole-3-butyric acid increased in shr, whereas abscisic acid declined. Our analyses indicate that the retardation of fruit growth and ripening in shr mutant likely results from the influence of NO on central carbon metabolism and endogenous phytohormones levels. PMID:27965677

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Mutant Subclones in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Comparison of Different Methodological Approaches.

    PubMed

    Preuner, Sandra; Barna, Agnes; Frommlet, Florian; Czurda, Stefan; Konstantin, Byrgazov; Alikian, Mary; Machova Polakova, Katerina; Sacha, Tomasz; Richter, Johan; Lion, Thomas; Gabriel, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Identification and quantitative monitoring of mutant BCR-ABL1 subclones displaying resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become important tasks in patients with Ph-positive leukemias. Different technologies have been established for patient screening. Various next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms facilitating sensitive detection and quantitative monitoring of mutations in the ABL1-kinase domain (KD) have been introduced recently, and are expected to become the preferred technology in the future. However, broad clinical implementation of NGS methods has been hampered by the limited accessibility at different centers and the current costs of analysis which may not be regarded as readily affordable for routine diagnostic monitoring. It is therefore of interest to determine whether NGS platforms can be adequately substituted by other methodological approaches. We have tested three different techniques including pyrosequencing, LD (ligation-dependent)-PCR and NGS in a series of peripheral blood specimens from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients carrying single or multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 KD. The proliferation kinetics of mutant subclones in serial specimens obtained during the course of TKI-treatment revealed similar profiles via all technical approaches, but individual specimens showed statistically significant differences between NGS and the other methods tested. The observations indicate that different approaches to detection and quantification of mutant subclones may be applicable for the monitoring of clonal kinetics, but careful calibration of each method is required for accurate size assessment of mutant subclones at individual time points.

  15. Superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 mutant can reduce paraquat pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiegang; Xu, Mingkai; Wang, Nana; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    A network of inflammation factors is related to pulmonary fibrosis induced by paraquat (PQ) poisoning. At high doses, the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 (SEC1) can induce immunological unresponsiveness and inhibit release of inflammation factors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was performed at the H118 and H122 amino acid residues of SEC1 to reduce SEC1 toxicity. The SEC1 mutant showed significantly decreased pyrogenic toxicity, but retained clonal anergy at high dosages in vitro. Pretreatment with the SEC1 mutant prior to PQ poisoning in mice reduced symptom duration and severity, prolonged survival time, and decreased the splenocyte response to ConA induction. The SEC1 mutant also down-regulated several important cytokines related to fibrosis in the plasma after PQ poisoning. SEC1 decreased the expression of genes related to pulmonary fibrosis, including α-SMA, COL1a1, COL3 and TGF-β1, in PQ poisoned mice. Histomorphological observation indicated alleviation of pathological changes in the lungs after SEC1 pretreatment compared to mice in the PQ group. In conclusion, the SEC1 mutant reduced pulmonary interstitial fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning.

  16. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  17. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  18. Spaceflight experiments with Arabidopsis starch-deficient mutants support a statolith-based model for graviperception.

    PubMed

    Kiss, J Z; Edelmann, R E

    1999-01-01

    In order to help resolve some of the controversy associated with ground-based research that has supported the starch-statolith theory of gravity perception in plants, we performed spaceflight experiments with Arabidopsis in Biorack during the January 1997 and May 1997 missions of the Space Shuttle. Seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless mutant were grown in microgravity and then were given either a 30, 60, or 90 minute gravity stimulus on a centrifuge. By the 90 min 1-g stimulus, the WT exhibited the greatest magnitude of curvature and the starchless mutant exhibited the smallest curvature while the two reduced starch mutants had an intermediate magnitude of curvature. In addition, space-grown plants had two structural features that distinguished them from the controls: a greater number of root hairs and an anomalous hypocotyl hook structure. However, the morphological changes observed in the flight seedlings are likely to be due to the effects of ethylene present in the spacecraft. (Additional ground-based studies demonstrated that this level of ethylene did not significantly affect gravitropism nor did it affect the relative gravitropic sensitivity among the four strains.) Nevertheless, this experiment on gravitropism was performed the "right way" in that brief gravitational stimuli were provided, and the seedlings were allowed to express the response without further gravity stimuli. Our spaceflight results support previous ground-based studies of these and other mutants since increasing amounts of starch correlated positively with increasing sensitivity to gravity.

  19. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  20. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance.

  1. Fine Mapping of a Degenerated Abdominal Legs Mutant (Edl) in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meijing; Hu, Hai; Li, Zhiquan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Dai, Fangyin; Lu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In insects, abdominal appendages, also called prolegs, vary due to adaptive evolution. Mutations on prolegs within species provide insights to better understand the mechanisms underlying appendage development and diversity. In silkworm Bombyx mori, extra-crescents and degenerated abdominal legs (Edl) mutant, belonging to the E pseudoallele group, is a spontaneous mutation that adds crescents and degenerates prolegs on the third abdominal segment (A3). This mutation may be a homeotic transformation of A3 to A2. In this study, the Edl locus was mapped within approximately a 211 Kb region that is 10 Kb upstream of Bmabdominal-A (Bmabd-A). RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and Western blot analysis of Bmabd-A expression showed a slight but significant decrease, while the expression of BmUltrabithorax (BmUbx) was up-regulated in the Edl mutant compared to wildtype (Dazao). Moreover, we also found that BmDistal-less (BmDll), which regulated the development of distal proleg structures, was missing at the tips of the A3 prolegs in the Edl mutant compared to BmDll expression in normally developed prolegs in both the wildtype and mutant. Collectively, we identified approximately a 211 Kb region in the Edl locus that regulates BmUbx and Bmabd-A expression and found that changes in BmUbx and Bmabd-A expression may lead to the loss of distal proleg structures in B. mori. PMID:28081147

  2. Altered motor activity, exploration and anxiety in heterozygous neuregulin 1 mutant mice: implications for understanding schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karl, T; Duffy, L; Scimone, A; Harvey, R P; Schofield, P R

    2007-10-01

    Human genetic studies have shown that neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Nrg1 influences various neurodevelopmental processes, which are potentially related to schizophrenia. The neurodevelopmental theory of schizophrenia suggests that interactions between genetic and environmental factors are responsible for biochemical alterations leading to schizophrenia. To investigate these interactions and to match experimental design with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we applied a comprehensive behavioural phenotyping strategy for motor activity, exploration and anxiety in a heterozygous Nrg1 transmembrane domain mutant mouse model (Nrg1 HET) using different housing conditions and age groups. We observed a locomotion- and exploration-related hyperactive phenotype in Nrg1 HETs. Increased age had a locomotion- and exploration-inhibiting effect, which was significantly attenuated in mutant mice. Environmental enrichment (EE) had a stimulating influence on locomotion and exploration. The impact of EE was more pronounced in Nrg1 hypomorphs. Our study also showed a moderate task-specific anxiolytic-like phenotype for Nrg1 HETs, which was influenced by external factors. The behavioural phenotype detected in heterozygous Nrg1 mutant mice is not specific to schizophrenia per se, but the increased sensitivity of mutant mice to exogenous factors is consistent with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the neurodevelopmental theory. Our findings reinforce the importance of carefully controlling experimental designs for external factors and of comprehensive, integrative phenotyping strategies. Thus, Nrg1 HETs may, in combination with other genetic and drug models, help to clarify pathophysiological mechanisms behind schizophrenia.

  3. Restoration of mutant bestrophin-1 expression, localisation and function in a polarised epithelial cell model

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Streit, Anne-Kathrin; Thomson, Steven; Koay, Yee Hui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB) is a retinopathy caused by mutations in the bestrophin-1 protein, which is thought to function as a Ca2+-gated Cl− channel in the basolateral surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Using a stably transfected polarised epithelial cell model, we show that four ARB mutant bestrophin-1 proteins were mislocalised and subjected to proteasomal degradation. In contrast to the wild-type bestrophin-1, each of the four mutant proteins also failed to conduct Cl− ions in transiently transfected cells as determined by whole-cell patch clamp. We demonstrate that a combination of two clinically approved drugs, bortezomib and 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA), successfully restored the expression and localisation of all four ARB mutant bestrophin-1 proteins. Importantly, the Cl− conductance function of each of the mutant bestrophin-1 proteins was fully restored to that of wild-type bestrophin-1 by treatment of cells with 4PBA alone. The functional rescue achieved with 4PBA is significant because it suggests that this drug, which is already approved for long-term use in infants and adults, might represent a promising therapy for the treatment of ARB and other bestrophinopathies resulting from missense mutations in BEST1. PMID:27519691

  4. A novel mouse Fgfr2 mutant, hobbyhorse (hob), exhibits complete XY gonadal sex reversal.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Pam; Carré, Gwenn-Aël; Bogani, Debora; Warr, Nick; Wells, Sara; Hilton, Helen; Esapa, Chris; Hajihosseini, Mohammad K; Greenfield, Andy

    2014-01-01

    The secreted molecule fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) plays a critical role in testis determination in the mouse. In embryonic gonadal somatic cells it is required for maintenance of SOX9 expression, a key determinant of Sertoli cell fate. Conditional gene targeting studies have identified FGFR2 as the main gonadal receptor for FGF9 during sex determination. However, such studies can be complicated by inefficient and variable deletion of floxed alleles, depending on the choice of Cre deleter strain. Here, we report a novel, constitutive allele of Fgfr2, hobbyhorse (hob), which was identified in an ENU-based forward genetic screen for novel testis-determining loci. Fgr2hob is caused by a C to T mutation in the invariant exon 7, resulting in a polypeptide with a mis-sense mutation at position 263 (Pro263Ser) in the third extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain of FGFR2. Mutant homozygous embryos show severe limb and lung defects and, when on the sensitised C57BL/6J (B6) genetic background, undergo complete XY gonadal sex reversal associated with failure to maintain expression of Sox9. Genetic crosses employing a null mutant of Fgfr2 suggest that Fgr2hob is a hypomorphic allele, affecting both the FGFR2b and FGFR2c splice isoforms of the receptor. We exploited the consistent phenotype of this constitutive mutant by analysing MAPK signalling at the sex-determining stage of gonad development, but no significant abnormalities in mutant embryos were detected.

  5. Methane monooxygenase component B mutants alter the kinetics of steps throughout the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallar, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-02-20

    Component interactions play important roles in the regulation of catalysis by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The binding of component B (MMOB) to the hydroxylase component (MMOH) has been shown in previous studies to cause structural changes in MMOH that result in altered thermodynamic and kinetic properties during the reduction and oxygen binding steps of the catalytic cycle. Here, specific amino acid residues of MMOB that play important roles in the interconversion of several intermediates of the MMO cycle have been identified. Both of the histidine residues in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b MMOB (H5 and H33) were chemically modified by diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC). Although the DEPC--MMOB species exhibited only minor changes relative to unmodified MMOB in steady-state MMO turnover, large decreases in the formation rate constants of the reaction cycle intermediates, compound P and compound Q, were observed. The site specific mutants H5A, H33A, and H5A/H33A were made and characterized. H5A and wild type MMOB elicited similar steady-state and transient kinetics, although the mutant caused a slightly lower rate constant for Q formation. Conversely, H33A exhibited a >50-fold decrease in the P formation rate constant, which resulted in slower formation of Q. The kinetics of the double mutant (H5A/H33A) were similar to those of H33A, suggesting that the highly conserved residue, H33, has the most significant effect on the efficient progress of the cycle. Ongoing NMR investigations of residues perturbed by formation of the MMOH-MMOB complex suggested construction of the MMOB N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A quadruple mutant. This mutant was found to elicit a nearly 2-fold increase in specific activity for steady-state MMO turnover of large substrates such as furan and nitrobenzene but caused no similar increase for the physiological substrate, methane. While the quadruple mutant did not have a significant effect on P and Q formation, it caused an almost 3-fold increase in the

  6. The kinetics of root gravitropism in PIN mutants suggest redundancy in the signal transduction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Chris

    As nonmotile organisms, plants rely on differential growth responses to maximize exposure to the resources necessary for growth and reproduction. One of the primary environmental cues causing differential growth in roots is gravity, which is thought to be sensed predominately in the root cap. This gravity perception event is thought to be transduced into information in the form of an auxin gradient across the cap and propagating basipetally toward the elongation zone. The discovery of several families of auxin efflux and influx carriers has provided significant insight into the mechanisms of directional auxin transport, and the identification of mutants in the genes encoding these carriers provides the opportunity to test the roles of these transporters in plant gravitropism. In this study, we report the results of a systematic, high-resolution study of the kinetics of root gravitropism of mutants in the PIN family of auxin efflux carriers. Based on reported expression and localization patterns, we predicted mutations in PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 to cause the greatest reduction in root gravitropism. While pin2 mutants showed severe gravitropic deficiencies in roots as reported previously, several alleles of pin3, pin4 and pin7 remained strongly gravitropic. PIN3 has been localized to the central columella cells, the purported gravisensing cells in the root, and shown to rapidly relocate to the lower flank of the columella cells upon gravistimulation, suggesting an early role in auxin gradient formation. Mutant alleles of PIN3 showed an early delay in response, with just 7 deg of curvature in the first hour compared to approximately 15 deg h-1 in wild-type, but their rate of curvature recovered to near wild-type levels over the ensuing 3 h. Pin3 mutants also showed a slower overall growth rate (124 µm h-1 ), elongating at approximately half the rate of wild-type roots (240 µm h-1 ). PIN4 has been localized to the quiescent center in the root, where it presumably

  7. Identification and characterization of an anti-oxidative stress-associated mutant of Aspergillus fumigatus transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    FAN, ZHONGQI; YU, HUIMEI; GUO, QI; HE, DAN; XUE, BAIJI; XIE, XIANGLI; YOKOYAMA, KOJI; WANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi, surviving in various environmental conditions. Maintenance of the redox homeostasis of the fungus relies upon the well-organized regulation between reactive oxygen species generated by immune cells or its own organelles, and the activated anti-oxidative stress mechanism. To investigate such a mechanism, the present study obtained a number of randomly-inserted mutants of A. fumigatus, mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In addition, a high throughput hydrogen peroxide screening system was established to examine ~1,000 mutants. A total of 100 mutants exhibited changes in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, among which a significant increase in sensitivity was observed in the AFM2658 mutant. Further investigations of the mutant were also performed, in which the sequence of this mutant was characterized using thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction. This revealed that the insertion site was located on chromosome 2 afu1_92, and the 96 bp sequence was knocked out, which partially comprised a sequence localized between the integral membrane protein coding region and the helix-loop-helix transcription factor coding region. A decrease in the levels of anti-oxidative stress-associated mRNAs were observed, and an increase in reactive oxygen species were detected using fluorescence. The results of the present study demonstrated that this sequence may have a protective role in A. fumigatus in the presence of oxidative stress. PMID:26847000

  8. Alterations in growth, photosynthesis, and respiration in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) deficient in chloroplast phosphoglucomutase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Huber, S.C.; Somerville, C.

    1985-09-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which lacks leaf starch was isolated by screening for plants which did not stain with iodine. When grown in a 12-h photoperiod, leaves of the wild-type accumulated substantial amounts of starch but lower levels of soluble sugars. Under these conditions, the mutant accumulated relatively high levels of soluble sugars. Rates of growth and net photosynthesis of the mutant and wild-type were indistinguishable when the plants were grown in constant illumination. However, in a short photoperiod, the growth of the mutant was severely impaired, the rate of photosynthesis was depressed relative to the wild-type, and the rate of dark respiration, which was high following the onset of darkness, exhibited an uncharacteristic decay throughout the dark period. The depressed photosynthetic capacity of the mutant may also reflect a metabolic adaptation to the accumulation of high levels of soluble carbohydrate which mimics the effects of alterations in source/sink ratio. The activities of sucrose phosphate synthase and acid invertase are significantly higher in the mutant than in the wild-type whereas ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity is lower. This suggests that the activities of these enzymes may be modulated in response to metabolite concentrations or flux through the pathways.

  9. On the structural affinity of macromolecules with different biological properties: Molecular dynamics simulations of a series of TEM-1 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Giampaolo, Alessia Di; Mazza, Fernando; Daidone, Isabella; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of TEM-1 mutants. •Mutations effects on the mechanical properties are considered. •Mutants do not significantly alter the average enzymes structure. •Mutants produce sharp alterations in enzyme conformational repertoire. •Mutants also produce changes in the active site volume. -- Abstract: Molecular Dynamics simulations have been carried out in order to provide a molecular rationalization of the biological and thermodynamic differences observed for a class of TEM β-lactamases. In particular we have considered the TEM-1(wt), the single point mutants TEM-40 and TEM-19 representative of IRT and ESBL classes respectively, and TEM-1 mutant M182T, TEM-32 and TEM-20 which differ from the first three for the additional of M182T mutation. Results indicate that most of the thermodynamic, and probably biological behaviour of these systems arise from subtle effects which, starting from the alterations of the local interactions, produce drastic modifications of the conformational space spanned by the enzymes. The present study suggests that systems showing essentially the same secondary and tertiary structure may differentiate their chemical–biological activity essentially (and probably exclusively) on the basis of the thermal fluctuations occurring in their physiological environment.

  10. Abnormal Mammary Adipose Tissue Environment of Brca1 Mutant Mice Show a Persistent Deposition of Highly Vascularized Multilocular Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laundette P; Buelto, Destiney; Tago, Elaine; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo E

    2011-12-08

    A major challenge to breast cancer research is the identification of alterations in the architecture and composition of the breast that are associated with breast cancer progression. The aim of the present investigation was to characterize the mammary adipose phenotype from Brca1 mutant mice in the expectation that this would shed light on the role of the mammary tissue environment in the early stages of breast tumorigenesis. We observed that histological sections of mammary tissue from adult Brca1 mutant mice abnormally display small, multilocular adipocytes that are reminiscent of brown adipose tissue (BAT) as compared to wildtype mice. Using a marker for BAT, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), we demonstrated that these multilocular adipose regions in Brca1 mutant mice stain positive for UCP1. Transcriptionally, UCP1 mRNA levels in the Brca1 mutant mice were elevated greater than 50-fold compared to age-matched mammary glands from wildtype mice. Indeed, BAT has characteristics that are favorable for tumor growth, including high vascularity. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the multilocular brown adipose phenotype in the mammary fat pad of Brca1 mutant mice displayed regions of increased vascularity as evidenced by a significant increase in the protein expression of CD31, a marker for angiogenesis. This Brca1 mutant mouse model should provide a physiologically relevant context to determine whether brown adipose tissue can play a role in breast cancer development.

  11. Isolation of Mutants of Euglena gracilis With Impaired Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Russell, George K.; Lyman, Harvard

    1968-01-01

    Four mutant strains of Euglena gracilis have been isolated after treatment of wild type cells with ultraviolet light or the chemical mutagen nitrosoguanidine. None of the mutants is capable of autotrophic growth or photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. The mutant strains contain normal amounts of the enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and are qualitatively similar to the wild type in pigment composition, but are unable to carry out the Hill reaction (light induced reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol). Isolated mutant plastids cannot photoreduce NADP with water as the electron donor but can carry out this reaction when the electron donating system is ascorbate and 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol. Whole cells of the mutants show the light induced oxidation of cytochrome f by light reaction I but are unable to bring about cytochrome f reduction by light reaction II. The mutants appear to be blocked at or near light reaction II in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The mutants may represent alterations of the chloroplast genome since the mutation isolation was carried out under conditions where chloroplast viability was severely impaired, but cell viability was unaffected. PMID:5700022

  12. Mouse infection and pathogenesis by Trypanosoma brucei motility mutants.

    PubMed

    Kisalu, Neville K; Langousis, Gerasimos; Bentolila, Laurent A; Ralston, Katherine S; Hill, Kent L

    2014-06-01

    The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei is an essential and multifunctional organelle that drives parasite motility and is receiving increased attention as a potential drug target. In the mammalian host, parasite motility is suspected to contribute to infection and disease pathogenesis. However, it has not been possible to test this hypothesis owing to lack of motility mutants that are viable in the bloodstream life cycle stage that infects the mammalian host. We recently identified a bloodstream-form motility mutant in 427-derived T. brucei in which point mutations in the LC1 dynein subunit disrupt propulsive motility but do not affect viability. These mutants have an actively beating flagellum, but cannot translocate. Here we demonstrate that the LC1 point mutant fails to show enhanced cell motility upon increasing viscosity of the surrounding medium, which is a hallmark of wild type T. brucei, thus indicating that motility of the mutant is fundamentally altered compared with wild type cells. We next used the LC1 point mutant to assess the influence of trypanosome motility on infection in mice. Wesurprisingly found that disrupting parasite motility has no discernible effect on T. brucei bloodstream infection. Infection time-course, maximum parasitaemia, number of waves of parasitaemia, clinical features and disease outcome are indistinguishable between motility mutant and control parasites. Our studies provide an important step toward understanding the contribution of parasite motility to infection and a foundation for future investigations of T. brucei interaction with the mammalian host.

  13. Rhizobium japonicum mutants defective in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Stacey, G; Tandon, S R; Silver, L E; Brill, W J

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strains 3I1b110 and 61A76 were mutagenized to obtain 25 independently derived mutants that produced soybean nodules defective in nitrogen fixation, as assayed by acetylene reduction. The proteins of both the bacterial and the plant portions of the nodules were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of the mutants had lower-than-normal levels of the nitrogenase components, and all but four contained a prominent bacteroid protein not observed in wild-type bacteroids. Experiments with bacteria grown ex planta suggested that this protein was derepressed by the absence of ammonia. Nitrogenase component II of one mutant was altered in isoelectric point. The soluble plant fraction of the nodules of seven mutants had very low levels of heme, yet the nodules of five of these seven mutants contained the polypeptide of leghemoglobin. Thus, the synthesis of the globin may not be coupled to the content of available heme in soybean nodules. The nodules of the other two of these seven mutants lacked not only leghemoglobin but most of the other normal plant and bacteroid proteins. Ultrastructural examination of nodules formed by these two mutants indicated normal ramification of infection threads but suggested a problem in subsequent survival of the bacteria and their release from the infection threads. Images PMID:6956566

  14. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  15. A computational study of λ-lac mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Maria; Aurell, Erik

    2009-12-01

    We present a comprehensive, computational study of the properties of bacteriophage λ mutants designed by Atsumi and Little (2006 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 103 4558-63). These phages underwent a genetic reconstruction where Cro was replaced by a dimeric form of the Lac repressor. To clarify the theoretical characteristics of these mutants, we built a detailed thermodynamic model. The mutants all have a different genetic wiring than the wild-type λ. One group lacks regulation of PRM by the lytic protein. These mutants only exhibit the lysogenic equilibrium, with no transiently active PR. The other group lacks the negative feedback from CI. In this group, we identify a handful of bi-stable mutants, although the majority only exhibit the lysogenic equilibrium. The experimental identification of functional phages differs from our predictions. From a theoretical perspective, there is no reason why only 4 out of 900 mutants should be functional. The differences between theory and experiment can be explained in two ways. Either, the view of the λ phage as a bi-stable system needs to be revised, or the mutants have in fact not undergone a modular replacement, as intended by Atsumi and Little, but constitute instead a wider systemic change.

  16. Brucellosis Vaccines: Assessment of Brucella melitensis Lipopolysaccharide Rough Mutants Defective in Core and O-Polysaccharide Synthesis and Export

    PubMed Central

    González, David; Grilló, María-Jesús; De Miguel, María-Jesús; Ali, Tara; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Delrue, Rose-May; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Muñoz, Pilar; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite; Marín, Clara-M.; Weintraub, Andrej; Widmalm, Göran; Zygmunt, Michel; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Blasco, José-María; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Background The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that rough vaccines are

  17. O sub 2 -dependent methionine auxotrophy in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.C.; Kosman, D.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which lack functional Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) do not grow aerobically unless supplemented with methionine. The molecular basis of this O2-dependent auxotrophy in one of the mutants, Dscd1-1C, has been investigated. Sulfate supported anaerobic but not aerobic mutant growth. On the other hand, cysteine and homocysteine supported aerobic growth while serine, O-acetylserine, and homoserine did not, indicating that the interconversion of cysteine and methionine (and homocysteine) was not impaired. Thiosulfate (S2O3)2- and sulfide (S2-) also supported aerobic growth; the activities of thiosulfate reductase and sulfhydrylase in the aerobic mutant strain were at wild-type levels. Although the levels of SO4(2-) and adenosine-5'-sulfate (the first intermediate in the SO4(2-) assimilation pathway) were elevated in the aerobically incubated mutant strain, this condition could be attributed to a decrease in protein synthesis caused by the de facto sulfur starvation and not to a block in the pathway. Therefore, the activation of SO4(2-) (to form 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate) appeared to be O2 tolerant. Sulfite reductase activity and substrate concentrations (( NADPH) and (SO3(2-))) were not significantly different in aerobically grown mutant cultures and anaerobic cultures, indicating that SOD-1- mutant strains could reductively assimilate sulfur oxides. However, the mutant strain exhibited an O2-dependent sensitivity to SO3(2-) concentrations of less than 50 microM not exhibited by any SOD-1+ strain or by SOD-1- strains supplemented with a cytosolic O2(-)-scavenging activity.

  18. A Dictyostelium mutant deficient in severin, an F-actin fragmenting protein, shows normal motility and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A severin deficient mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum has been isolated by the use of colony immunoblotting after chemical mutagenesis. In homogenates of wild-type cells, severin is easily detected as a very active F-actin fragmenting protein. Tests for severin in the mutant, HG1132, included viscometry for the assay of F- actin fragmentation in fractions from DEAE-cellulose columns, labeling of blots with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and immunofluorescent-labeling of cryosections. Severin could not be detected in the mutant using these methods. The mutation in HG1132 is recessive and has been mapped to linkage group VII. The mutant failed to produce the normal severin mRNA, but small amounts of a transcript that was approximately 100 bases larger than the wild-type mRNA were detected in the mutant throughout all stages of development. On the DNA level a new Mbo II restriction site was found in the mutant within the coding region of the severin gene. The severin deficient mutant cells grew at an approximately normal rate, aggregated and formed fruiting bodies with viable spores. By the use of an image processing system, speed of cell movement, turning rates, and precision of chemotactic orientation in a stable gradient of cyclic AMP were quantitated, and no significant differences between wild-type and mutant cells were found. Thus, under the culture conditions used, severin proved to be neither essential for growth of D. discoideum nor for any cell function that is important for aggregation or later development. PMID:2537840

  19. Effects of PKC412, nilotinib and imatinib against GIST-associated PDGFRA mutants with differential imatinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Wright, Renee D.; Jiang, Jingrui; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Manley, Paul W.; Fabbro, Doriano; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Catley, Laurie; Podar, Klaus; Kung, Andrew L.; Griffin, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Activating mutations in platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) have been reported in a subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients who do not express mutant stem cell factor receptor, c-KIT. The responsiveness of mutant PDGFRA-positive GIST to imatinib depends on the location of the PDGFRA mutation; for example, the V561D juxtamembrane domain mutation is more sensitive to imatinib than the D842V kinase domain mutation. In this study, we compare the effects of three tyrosine kinase inhibitors, PKC412 and nilotinib, and imatinib, on two GIST-related PDGFRA mutants, V561D and D842V, which possess differential sensitivity to imatinib. Methods The effects of PKC412, nilotinib, and imatinib, alone and in combination, were evaluated via in vitro proliferation studies performed with V561D- or D842V-PDGFRA mutants. The effects of nilotinib and PKC412, alone and combined, were investigated in vivo. Results PKC412 potently inhibited the V561D-PDGFRA mutant in vitro and the D842V-PDGFRA mutant in vitro and in vivo. Both imatinib and nilotinib displayed potent activity in vitro against the V561D-PDGFRA mutant, but were significantly less efficacious against D842V-PDGFRA. However, when combined with either imatinib or PKC412, nilotinib showed no evidence for antagonism and acted in a cooperative fashion against D842V-PDGFRA. Conclusions Our findings support the clinical testing of PKC412 for treatment of mutant PDGFRA-GIST. The data also support the use of nilotinib as a treatment option for V561D-PDGFRA-associated GIST, although the reduced sensitivity of D842V-PDGFRA probably limits the potential of nilotinib monotherapy for D842V-PDGFRA-associated GIST. PMID:17087936

  20. Effect of Inoculation and Nitrogen on Isoflavonoid Concentration in Wild-Type and Nodulation-Mutant Soybean Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Myeong-Je; Harper, James E.

    1991-01-01

    The isoflavones, daidzein and genistein, have been isolated and identified as the major inducers of nod genes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The common nod genes of rhizobia are in turn responsible for stimulating root hair curling and cortical root cell division, the earliest steps in the host response. This study evaluated whether there was a relationship between root isoflavonoid production and the hypernodulation phenotype of selected soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) mutants. Three independently selected hypernodulating soybean mutants (NOD1-3, NOD2-4, and NOD3-7) and a nonnodulating mutant (NN5) were compared with the Williams parent for isoflavonoid concentrations. High performance liquid chromatographic analyses of soybean root extracts showed that all lines increased in daidzein, genistein, and coumestrol concentrations throughout the 12-day growth period after transplanting of both inoculated and noninoculated plants; transplanting and inoculation were done 6 days after planting. No significant differences were detected in the concentration of these compounds among the three noninoculated hypernodulating mutants and the Williams parent. In response to inoculation, the three hypernodulating mutants had higher isoflavonoid concentrations than did the Williams control at 9 to 12 days after inoculation when grown at 0 millimolar N level. However, the inoculated nonnodulating mutant also had higher isoflavonoid concentrations than did Williams. N application [urea, (NH4)2SO4 and NO3−] decreased the concentration of all three isoflavonoid compounds in all soybean lines. Application of NO3− was most inhibitory to isoflavonoid concentrations, and inhibition by NO3− was concentration dependent. These results are consistent with a conclusion that differential NO3− inhibition of nodulation may be partially due to changes in isoflavonoid levels, although the similar response of the nonnodulating mutant brings this conclusion into question. Alternatively, the

  1. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  2. Mutants of Myxococcus xanthus dsp defective in fibril binding.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B Y; Dworkin, M

    1996-01-01

    The dsp mutant of Myxococcus xanthus lacks extracellular fibrils and as a result is unable to undergo cohesion, group motility, or development (J. W. Arnold and L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 170:5765-5770, 1983; J. W. Arnold and L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 170:5771-5777, 1983; R. M. Behmlander and M. Dworkin, J. Bacteriol. 173:7810-7821, 1991; L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 166:837-841, 1986; L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 166:842-848, 1986). However, cohesion and development can be phenotypically restored by the addition of isolated fibrils (R. M. Behmlander, Ph.D. thesis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1994; B.-Y. Chang and M. Dworkin, J. Bacteriol. 176:7190-7196, 1994). As part of our attempts to examine the interaction of fibrils and cells of M. xanthus, we have isolated a series of secondary mutants of M. xanthus dsp in which cohesion, unlike that of the parent strain, could not be rescued by the addition of isolated fibrils. Cells of M. xanthus dsp were mutagenized either by ethyl methanesulfonate or by Tn5 insertions. Mutagenized cultures were enriched by selection of those cells that could not be rescued, i.e., that failed to cohere in the presence of isolated fibrils. Seven mutants of M. xanthus dsp, designated fbd mutants, were isolated from 6,983 colonies; these represent putative fibril receptor-minus mutants. The fbd mutants, like the parent dsp mutant, still lacked fibrils, but displayed a number of unexpected properties. They regained group motility and the ability to aggregate but not the ability to form mature fruiting bodies. In addition, they partially regained the ability to form myxospores. The fbd mutant was backcrossed into the dsp mutant by Mx4 transduction. Three independently isolated transconjugants showed essentially the same properties as the fbd mutants--loss of fibril rescue of cohesion, partial restoration of myxospore morphogenesis, and restoration of group motility. These results suggest that the physical presence of fibrils

  3. Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica defective in lysine catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardin, C; Fournier, P; Sylvestre, G; Heslot, H

    1976-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica are able to use lysine as a carbon or a nitrogen source, but not as a unique source for both. Mutants were selected that could not use lysine either as a nitrogen or as a carbon source. Some of them, however, utilized N-6-acetyllysine or 5-aminovaleric acid. Many of the mutants appeared to be blocked in both utilizations, suggesting a unique pathway for lysine degradation (either as a carbon or as a nitrogen source). Genetic characterization of these mutants was achieved by complementation and recombination tests. PMID:1245461

  4. A dinoflagellate mutant with higher frequency of multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Lam, C M; Chong, C; Wong, J T

    2001-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler propagates by both binary and multiple fission. By a newly developed mutagenesis protocol based on using ethyl methanesulfonate and a cell size screening method, a cell cycle mutant, mf2, was isolated with giant cells which predominantly divide by multiple fission. The average cell size of the mutant mf2 is larger than the control C. cohnii. Cell cycle synchronization experiments suggest that mutant mf2, when compared with the control strain, has a prolonged G1 phase with a corresponding delay of the G2 + M phase.

  5. Third-chromosome mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.B.; Golino, M.D.; Shaw, K.E.S.; Osgood, C.J.; Green, M.M.

    1981-03-01

    A total of 34 third chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster that render homozygous larvae hypersensitive to killing by chemical mutagens have been isolated. Genetic analyses have placed responsible mutations in more than eleven complementation groups. Mutants in three complementation groups are strongly sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate, those in one are sensitive to nitrogen mustard, and mutants in six groups are hypersensitive to both mutagens. Eight of the ten loci mapped fall within 15% of the genetic map that encompasses the centromere of chromosome 3. Mutants from four of the complementation groups are associated with moderate to strong meiotic effects in females. Preliminary biochemical analyses have implicated seven of these loci in DNA metabolism.

  6. Sensorimotor learning in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2011-04-15

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex and neocortex were compared with non-ataxic controls on two tests of motor coordination: rotorod and grid climbing. Even at the minimal speed of 4 rpm and unlike controls, none of the Dab1(scm) mutants reached criterion on the constant speed rotorod. In contrast, Dab1(scm) mutants improved their performances on the vertical grid over the course of the same number of trials. Thus, despite massive cerebellar degeneration, sensorimotor learning for equilibrium is still possible, indicating the potential usefulness of the grid-climbing test in determining residual functions in mice with massive cerebellar damage.

  7. Immunological roles of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) using a PMT mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jung; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Jang, Eun Jin; Jung, Bock Gie; Lee, Jae Il; Lee, Bong Joo

    2007-08-01

    The immunological role of the Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in mice was examined using a PMT mutant strain. After a nasal inoculation, the mutant strain failed to induce interstitial pneumonia. Moreover, PMT had no significant effect on the populations of CD4+, CD8+, CD3+, and CD19+ immunocytes in blood or on the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes (P<0.01). However, there was a significant increase in the total number of cells in the BAL samples obtained from the wild-type P. multocida-inoculated mice. On the other hand, the level of IL-1 expression decreased when the macrophages from the bronchio-alveolar lavage were stimulated with PMT. Overall, PMT appears to play some role (stimulating and/or inhibiting) in the immunological responses but further studies will be required to confirm this.

  8. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on the motility, catalase and superoxide dismutase of dam and/or seqA mutant of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Messaoudi, Nadia; Mihoub, Mouadh; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their role in the virulence attenuation of Salmonella and other pathogens, dam or seqA genes increase the sensitivity towards hydrogen peroxide. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of H(2)O(2) on the motility, the catalase and superoxide dismutase activities of dam and/or seqA mutants of Salmonella typhimurium. Our findings showed significant differences of the effects of H(2)O(2) on the motility between wild type strain and all of mutants. Hydrogen peroxide changes SOD isoenzyme profile of these mutants by disappearance of Fe-SOD. Concerning the catalase, an increase of its activity was observed in the wild type, dam and seqA mutant. However, H(2)O(2) decreases the activity of this enzyme in the double mutant strain. We can suggest that the dam gene, together with seqA, play a protective role in the oxidative stress response of Salmonella typhimurium.

  9. The Proteomic Response to Mutants of the Escherichia coli RNA Degradosome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    pathway of RNA degradation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE (SF298) (Continuation Sheet) Continuation for Block 13 ARO Report Number The proteomic response...of the bacterial proteome and provide the first large-scale proteomic description of the response to perturbation of this major pathway of RNA...truncation mutant11 (rightmost column). Significant function enrichments (adjusted P-value o 0.01, compared to entire E. coli genome) are indicated

  10. Elevated Mutagenesis Does Not Explain the Increased Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Mutants in Starved Aging Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutants resistant to the antibiotic rifampicin has been shown to increase in aging (starved), compared to young colonies of Eschierchia coli. These increases in resistance frequency occur in the absence of any antibiotic exposure, and similar increases have also been observed in response to additional growth limiting conditions. Understanding the causes of such increases in the frequency of resistance is important for understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance emergence and spread. Increased frequency of rifampicin resistant mutants in aging colonies is cited widely as evidence of stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM), a mechanism thought to allow bacteria to increase mutation rates upon exposure to growth-limiting stresses. At the same time it has been demonstrated that some rifampicin resistant mutants are relatively fitter in aging compared to young colonies, indicating that natural selection may also contribute to increased frequency of rifampicin resistance in aging colonies. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of mutants resistant to both rifampicin and an additional antibiotic (nalidixic-acid) significantly increases in aging compared to young colonies of a lab strain of Escherichia coli. We then use whole genome sequencing to demonstrate conclusively that SIM cannot explain the observed magnitude of increased frequency of resistance to these two antibiotics. We further demonstrate that, as was previously shown for rifampicin resistance mutations, mutations conferring nalidixic acid resistance can also increase fitness in aging compared to young colonies. Our results show that increases in the frequency of antibiotic resistant mutants in aging colonies cannot be seen as evidence of SIM. Furthermore, they demonstrate that natural selection likely contributes to increases in the frequency of certain antibiotic resistance mutations, even when no selection is exerted due to the presence of antibiotics. PMID:24244205

  11. A neurodegenerative disease affecting synaptic connections in Drosophila mutant for the tumor suppressor morphogen Patched

    PubMed Central

    Gazi, Michal; Shyamala, Baragur V.; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2009-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor morphogen, Patched (Ptc), has extensive homology to the Niemann-Pick-C 1 (NPC1) protein. The NPC disease is a paediatric, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder thought to be due to an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in neurons. Here, we report that patched mutant adults develop a progressive neurodegenerative disease and their brain contains membranous and lamellar inclusions. There is also a significant reduction in the number of synaptic terminals in the brain of the mutant adults. Interestingly, feeding cholesterol to wild type flies generates inclusions in the brain, but does not cause the disease. However, feeding cholesterol to mutant flies increases synaptic connections and suppresses the disease. Our results suggest that sequestration of cholesterol in the mutant brain in the form of membranous material and inclusions affects available pool of cholesterol for cellular functions. This, in turn, negatively affects the synaptic number and contributes to the disease-state. Consistent with this, in ptc mutants there is a reduction in the pool of cholesterol esters, and cholesterol-mediated suppression of the disease accompanies an increase in cholesterol esters. We further show that Ptc does not function directly in this process since gain-of-function for Hedgehog also induces the same disease with a reduction in the level of cholesterol esters. We believe that loss of function for ptc causes neurodegeneration via two distinct ways: de-repression of genes that interfere with lipid trafficking, and de-repression of genes outside of the lipid trafficking; the functions of both classes of genes ultimately converge on synaptic connections. PMID:19635474

  12. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L) showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW), width of funicles (WFN), seed width (SW) and seed height (SH) were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ) or an abscission-less zone (ALZ) forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def) controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat. PMID:22078070

  13. Mutant IDH1 expression is associated with down-regulation of monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Najac, Chloe; Izquierdo, Jose L.; Pankov, Aleksandr; Hong, Chibo; Eriksson, Pia; Costello, Joseph F.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are characteristic of low-grade gliomas. We recently showed that mutant IDH1 cells reprogram cellular metabolism by down-regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Reduced pyruvate metabolism via PDH could lead to increased pyruvate conversion to lactate. The goal of this study was therefore to investigate the impact of the IDH1 mutation on the pyruvate-to-lactate flux. We used 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate to [1-13C]-lactate in immortalized normal human astrocytes expressing mutant or wild-type IDH1 (NHAIDHmut and NHAIDHwt). Our results indicate that hyperpolarized lactate production is reduced in NHAIDHmut cells compared to NHAIDHwt. This reduction was associated with lower expression of the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 in NHAIDHmut cells. Furthermore, hyperpolarized lactate production was comparable in lysates of NHAIDHmut and NHAIDHwt cells, wherein MCTs do not impact hyperpolarized pyruvate delivery and lactate production. Collectively, our findings indicated that lower MCT expression was a key contributor to lower hyperpolarized lactate production in NHAIDHmut cells. The SLC16A3 (MCT4) promoter but not SLC16A1 (MCT1) promoter was hypermethylated in NHAIDHmut cells, pointing to possibly different mechanisms mediating reduced MCT expression. Finally analysis of low-grade glioma patient biopsy data from The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed that MCT1 and MCT4 expression was significantly reduced in mutant IDH1 tumors compared to wild-type. Taken together, our study shows that reduced MCT expression is part of the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH1 gliomas. This finding could impact treatment and has important implications for metabolic imaging of mutant IDH1 gliomas. PMID:27144334

  14. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank

    PubMed Central

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Lamont, Elise A.; Harris, N. Beth; Fenton, Robert J.; Zinniel, Denise K.; Liu, Xiaofei; Sotos, Josh; Feng, Zhengyu; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Shpigel, Nahum Y.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95%) was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated. PMID:25360421

  15. A Hydrophobic Mutant of Rhizobium etli Altered in Nodulation Competitiveness and Growth in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ricardo S.; Robleto, Eduardo A.; Handelsman, Jo

    1994-01-01

    We isolated and characterized CE3003, a Tn5-induced mutant with altered colony morphology derived from Rhizobium etli CE3. CE3003 produced domed colonies and was highly hydrophobic as indicated by its ability to partition into hexadecane, whereas its parent produced flat colonies and was hydrophilic. On bean plants, CE3003 induced nodules and reduced acetylene. CE3003 and CE3 grew at similar rates when they were grown separately or together in culture medium or inoculated singly onto bean seeds. However, when they were mixed at a 1:1 ratio and applied to seeds, CE3003 achieved significantly lower populations than CE3 in the rhizosphere. Five days after coinoculation of CE3 and CE3003, the population of the mutant was less than 10% of the population of CE3 in the bean rhizosphere. To determine the nodulation competitiveness of the mutant, it was coinoculated with CE3 at various ratios at planting, and the ratio of the nodules occupied by each strain was determined 21 days later. A 17,000-fold excess of CE3003 in mixed inocula was required to obtain equal nodule occupancy by the two strains. A genomic library of strain CE3 was mobilized into CE3003, and we identified a cosmid, pRA3003, that restored the parental colony morphology and hydrophilicity to the mutant. Restoration of the parental colony morphology was accompanied by recovery of the ability to grow competitively in the rhizosphere and to compete for nodulation of beans. The data show an association between cell surface hydrophobicity, nodulation competitiveness, and competitive growth in the rhizosphere in mutant CE3003. Images PMID:16349248

  16. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C; Neff, N

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous mutations in a large number of loci. Mutations in two of the recessive loci, van1-18 and van2-93, resulted in alterations in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins. The mutant van1-18 gene also showed an increase in plasma membrane ATPase activity in vitro and a lowered basal phosphatase activity under alkaline conditions. Cells containing the van2-93 mutant allele had normal levels of plasma membrane ATPase activity, but this activity was not inhibited by vanadate. Both of these mutants failed to enter stationary phase, were heat shock sensitive, showed lowered long-term viability, and sporulated on rich medium in the presence of 2% glucose. The wild-type VAN1 gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 522 amino acids, with no significant homology to any genes that have been identified. Diploid cells that contained two mutant alleles of this gene demonstrated defects in spore viability. These data suggest that the VAN1 gene product is involved in regulation of the phosphorylation of a number of proteins, some of which appear to be important in cell growth control. Images PMID:2137555

  17. Acute intermittent porphyria: expression of mutant and wild-type porphobilinogen deaminase in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mustajoki, S.; Laine, M.; Lahtela, M.; Mustajoki, P.; Peltonen, L.; Kauppinen, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results from the partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Patients with AIP can experience acute attacks consisting of abdominal pain and various neuropsychiatric symptoms. Although molecular biological studies on the porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) gene have revealed several mutations responsible for AIP, the properties of mutant PBGD in eukaryotic expression systems have not been studied previously. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven mutations were analyzed using transient expression of the mutated polypeptides in COS-1 cells. The properties of mutated polypeptides were studied by enzyme activity measurement, Western blot analysis, pulse-chase experiments, and immunofluorescence staining. RESULTS: Of the mutants studied, R26C, R167W, R173W, R173Q, and R225X resulted in a decreased enzyme activity (0-5%), but R225G and 1073delA (elongated protein) displayed a significant residual activity of 16% and 50%, respectively. In Western blot analysis, the polyclonal PBGD antibody detected all mutant polypeptides except R225X, which was predicted to result in a truncated protein. In the pulse-chase experiment, the mutant polypeptides were as stable as the wild-type enzyme. In the immunofluorescence staining both wild-type and mutant polypeptides were diffusely dispersed in the cytoplasm and, thus, no accumulation of mutated proteins in the cellular compartments could be observed. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm the causality of mutations for the half normal enzyme activity measured in the patients' erythrocytes. In contrast to the decreased enzyme activity, the majority of the mutations produced a detectable polypeptide, and the stability and the intracellular processing of the mutated polypeptides were both comparable to that of the wild-type PBGD and independent of the cross-reacting immunological material (CRIM) class. PMID:11055586

  18. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further. PMID:23802650

  19. Brain dopamine and amino acid concentrations in Lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Reader, T A; Strazielle, C; Botez, M I; Lalonde, R

    1998-03-15

    Lurcher mutant mice are characterized by massive degeneration of the cerebellum, including Purkinje cells and granule cells, as well as for the loss of neurons from the inferior olive. Concentrations of dopamine and two of its metabolites and of several amino acid neurotransmitters were determined in the cerebellum and in other brain regions of these mutants. By comparison to wild-type mice of the same background strain, glutamate and taurine concentrations were reduced in the Lurcher cerebellum. No decrease was found for aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, as well as dopamine and its metabolites. Moreover, no neurochemical alterations occurred in the brain stem, thalamus, or neostriatum of Lurcher mutants. A selective reduction of glutamate concentration was found in the hippocampus, while all amino acids measured were decreased in the entorhinal-piriform areas. These results indicate region-selective reductions of neurotransmitter concentrations in a mouse mutant with a defined cerebellar cortical pathology.

  20. Endospore degradation in an oligosporogenic, crystalliferous mutant of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Martínez, Pável; Ibarra, Jorge E; de la Torre, Mayra; Olmedo, Gabriela

    2004-02-01

    We isolated a new oligosporogenic mutant from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD73 that retains the ability to produce insecticidal crystal inclusions. Sporulation in this mutant initiates in a manner similar to the wild-type strain, and under the electron microscope endospores are seen, but these do not reach maturity (except for 0.2% of them). At a late stage, the coat surrounding the forespore seems to lack shape and to be empty. Most mutant cells exhibit a well-formed bipyramidal crystal but are completely devoid of the forespore. The mutant has a functional SigK holoenzyme, which is required for the expression of genes involved in the formation of spore coat and cortex and for cry1A transcription from the BtII promoter. Defective maturation of spores could be due to an inadequate forespore coat or cortex structure resulting in the arrest of sporulation at late stage III or early stage IV.

  1. Overproduction of threonine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to hydroxynorvaline.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, C; Calderon, I L

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce threonine from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutants were selected for resistance to the threonine analog alpha-amino-beta-hydroxynorvalerate (hydroxynorvaline), and, of these, the ones able to excrete threonine to the medium were chosen. The mutant strains produce between 15 and 30 times more threonine than the wild type does, and, to a lesser degree, they also accumulate isoleucine. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that the threonine overproduction is, in all cases studied, associated with the presence in the strain of a HOM3 allele coding for a mutant aspartate kinase that is totally or partially insensitive to feedback inhibition by threonine. This enzyme seems, therefore, to be crucial in the regulation of threonine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The results obtained suggest that this strategy could be efficiently applied to the isolation of threonine-overproducing strains of yeasts other than S. cerevisiae, even those used industrially. PMID:1622238

  2. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  3. Genetic analysis of sex chromosomal meiotic mutants in Drosophilia melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baker, B S; Carpenter, A T

    1972-06-01

    A total of 209 ethyl methanesulfonate-treated X chromosomes were screened for meiotic mutants that either (1) increased sex or fourth chromosome nondisjunction at either meiotic division in males; (2) allowed recombination in such males; (3) increased nondisjunction of the X chromosome at either meiotic division in females; or (4) caused such females, when mated to males heterozygous for Segregation-Distorter (SD) and a sensitive homolog to alter the strength of meiotic drive in males.-Twenty male-specific meiotic mutants were found. Though the rates of nondisjunction differed, all twenty mutants were qualitatively similar in that (1) they alter the disjunction of the X chromosome from the Y chromosome; (2) among the recovered sex-chromosome exceptional progeny, there is a large excess of those derived from nullo-XY as compared to XY gametes; (3) there is a negative correlation between the frequency of sex-chromosome exceptional progeny and the frequency of males among the regular progeny. In their effects on meiosis these mutants are similar to In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), which is deleted for the basal heterochromatin. These mutants, however, have normal phenotypes and viabilities when examined as X/0 males, and furthermore, a mapping of two of the mutants places them in the euchromatin of the X chromosome. It is suggested that these mutants are in genes whose products are involved in insuring the proper functioning of the basal pairing sites which are deleted in In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), and in addition that there is a close connection, perhaps causal, between the disruption of normal X-Y pairing (and, therefore, disjunction) and the occurrence of meiotic drive in the male.-Eleven mutants were found which increased nondisjunction in females. These mutants were characterized as to (1) the division at which they acted; (2) their effect on recombination; (3) their dominance; (4) their effects on disjunction of all four chromosome pairs. Five female mutants caused a nonuniform

  4. A mouse B16 melanoma mutant deficient in glycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, S; Nakajo, N; Sakiyama, H; Hirabayashi, Y

    1994-01-01

    Mouse B16 melanoma cell line, GM-95 (formerly designated as MEC-4), deficient in sialyllactosylceramide was examined for its primary defect. Glycolipids from the mutant cells were analyzed by high-performance TLC. No glycolipid was detected in GM-95 cells, even when total lipid from 10(7) cells was analyzed. In contrast, the content of ceramide, a precursor lipid molecule of glycolipids, was normal. Thus, the deficiency of glycolipids was attributed to the first glucosylation step of ceramide. The ceramide glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.80) activity was not detected in GM-95 cells. There was no significant difference of sialyllactosylceramide synthase activity, however, between GM-95 and the parental cells. The deficiency of glycolipids in GM-95 cells was associated with changes of the cellular morphology and growth rate. The parental cells showed irregular shapes and tended to overlap each other. On the other hand, GM-95 cells exhibited an elongated fibroblastic morphology and parallel arrangement. The population-doubling times of GM-95 and the parental cells in serum-free medium were 28 hr and 19 hr, respectively. Images PMID:8146177

  5. Heat shock protein 70 chaperone overexpression ameliorates phenotypes of the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mouse model by reducing nuclear-localized mutant androgen receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Sang, Chen; Pagoulatos, Gerassimos; Angelidis, Charalampos; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2003-03-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR). The nuclear inclusions consisting of the mutant AR protein are characteristic and combine with many components of ubiquitin-proteasome and molecular chaperone pathways, raising the possibility that misfolding and altered degradation of mutant AR may be involved in the pathogenesis. We have reported that the overexpression of heat shock protein (HSP) chaperones reduces mutant AR aggregation and cell death in a neuronal cell model (Kobayashi et al., 2000). To determine whether increasing the expression level of chaperone improves the phenotype in a mouse model, we cross-bred SBMA transgenic mice with mice overexpressing the inducible form of human HSP70. We demonstrated that high expression of HSP70 markedly ameliorated the motor function of the SBMA model mice. In double-transgenic mice, the nuclear-localized mutant AR protein, particularly that of the large complex form, was significantly reduced. Monomeric mutant AR was also reduced in amount by HSP70 overexpression, suggesting the enhanced degradation of mutant AR. These findings suggest that HSP70 overexpression ameliorates SBMA phenotypes in mice by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR, probably caused by enhanced mutant AR degradation. Our study may provide the basis for the development of an HSP70-related therapy for SBMA and other polyQ diseases.

  6. Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII: cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the nei structural gene and characterization of nei and nei nth mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, D; Hatahet, Z; Blaisdell, J O; Melamede, R J; Wallace, S S

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses two DNA glycosylase/apurinic lyase activities with overlapping substrate specificities, endonuclease III and endonuclease VIII, that recognize and remove oxidized pyrimidines from DNA. Endonuclease III is encoded by the nth gene. Endonuclease VIII has now been purified to apparent homogeneity, and the gene, nei, has been cloned by using reverse genetics. The gene nei is located at 16 min on the E. coli chromosome and encodes a 263-amino-acid protein which shows significant homology in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions to five bacterial Fpg proteins. A nei partial deletion replacement mutant was constructed, and deletion of nei was confirmed by genomic PCR, activity analysis, and Western blot analysis. nth nei double mutants were hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide but not as sensitive as mutants devoid of base excision repair (xth nfo). Single nth mutants exhibited wild-type sensitivity to X rays, while nei mutants were consistently slightly more sensitive than the wild type. Double mutants lacking both endonucleases III and VIII exhibited a strong spontaneous mutator phenotype (about 20-fold) as determined by a rifampin forward mutation assay. In contrast to nth mutants, which showed a weak mutator phenotype, nei single mutants behaved as the wild type. PMID:9171429

  7. Immunological profiling of molecularly classified high-risk endometrial cancers identifies POLE-mutant and microsatellite unstable carcinomas as candidates for checkpoint inhibition.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Florine A; Van Gool, Inge C; Leary, Alexandra; Pollock, Pamela M; Crosbie, Emma J; Mileshkin, Linda; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Adam, Julien; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David N; Creutzberg, Carien L; De Bruyn, Marco; Nijman, Hans W; Bosse, Tjalling

    2017-01-01

    High-risk endometrial cancer (EC) is an aggressive disease for which new therapeutic options are needed. Aims of this study were to validate the enhanced immune response in highly mutated ECs and to explore immune profiles in other EC subgroups. We evaluated immune infiltration in 116 high-risk ECs from the TransPORTEC consortium, previously classified into four molecular subtypes: (i) ultramutated POLE exonuclease domain-mutant ECs (POLE-mutant); (ii) hypermutated microsatellite unstable (MSI); (iii) p53-mutant; and (iv) no specific molecular profile (NSMP). Within The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) EC cohort, significantly higher numbers of predicted neoantigens were demonstrated in POLE-mutant and MSI tumors compared with NSMP and p53-mutants. This was reflected by enhanced immune expression and infiltration in POLE-mutant and MSI tumors in both the TCGA cohort (mRNA expression) and the TransPORTEC cohort (immunohistochemistry) with high infiltration of CD8(+) (90% and 69%), PD-1(+) (73% and 69%) and PD-L1(+) immune cells (100% and 71%). Notably, a subset of p53-mutant and NSMP cancers was characterized by signs of an antitumor immune response (43% and 31% of tumors with high infiltration of CD8(+) cells, respectively), despite a low number of predicted neoantigens. In conclusion, the presence of enhanced immune infiltration, particularly high numbers of PD-1 and PD-L1 positive cells, in highly mutated, neoantigen-rich POLE-mutant and MSI endometrial tumors suggests sensitivity to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  8. In vivo brain microdialysis studies on the striatal dopamine and serotonin release in zitter mutant rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Nishimura, Akira; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Joyce, Jeffery N; Yoshida, Toshihide; Hioki, Chizuko; Kogure, Akinori; Ueda, Shuichi

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, using in vivo brain microdialysis, we investigated the basal extracellular dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release in the caudal striatum (cSTR) of young (4-6 months old) and aged (10-12 months old) zitter mutant rats. The basal extracellular levels of DA release in both young and aged zitter rats were significantly lower than that of age-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, whereas only aged zitter rats showed a significant difference in the basal 5-HT release. Dopaminergic neurons were more vulnerable than serotonergic neurons in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats during aging. Perfusion of 60 mM potassium (K+) enhanced the extracellular levels of cSTR DA in the young zitter rats and the extracellular levels of both DA and 5-HT in the cSTR of the aged zitter rats. The firing rate of K+-stimulated monoamine release in the cSTR was significantly higher in the zitter rats than in the age-matched SD rats. These findings suggest that there are innate quantitative differences in the releasable pool and the availability of monoamines in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats.

  9. Resistant mechanism study of benzalkonium chloride selected Salmonella Typhimurium mutants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Haoyan

    2014-02-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is one of the invaluable biocides that is extensively used in healthcare settings as well as in the food processing industry. After exposing wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s or its AcrAB inactivation mutant to gradually increasing levels of benzalkonium chloride, resistance mutants S-41, S-150, S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 were selected and these mutants also showed a 2-64-fold stable minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. In S-41 and S-150, the expression of acrB was increased 2.7- and 7.6-fold, and ΔtolC or ΔacrAB mutants of S-41 and S-150 showed the same MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the equivalent Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s mutants. However, in S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73, the expression of acrF was increased 96-, 230-, and 267-fold, respectively, and ΔtolC or ΔacrEF mutants of S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 showed the similar MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the ΔtolC mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s. Our data showed that constitutively over-expressed AcrAB working through TolC was the main resistance mechanism in ST14028s benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants. However, after AcrAB had been inactivated, benzalkonium chloride-resistant mutants could still be selected and constitutively over-expressed, AcrEF became the dominant efflux pump working through TolC and being responsible for the increasing antimicrobial resistance. These data indicated that different mechanisms existed for acrB and acrF constitutive over-expression. Since exposure to benzalkonium chloride may lead to Salmonella mutants with a decreased susceptibility to quinolones, which is currently one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of life-threatening salmonelosis, research into the pathogenesis and epidemiology of the benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants will be of increasing importance.

  10. Mutant Kras copy number defines metabolic reprogramming and therapeutic susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Emma M; Gaude, Edoardo; Turrell, Frances K; Frezza, Christian; Martins, Carla P

    2016-03-03

    The RAS/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling pathway is frequently deregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer, often through KRAS activating mutations. A single endogenous mutant Kras allele is sufficient to promote lung tumour formation in mice but malignant progression requires additional genetic alterations. We recently showed that advanced lung tumours from Kras(G12D/+);p53-null mice frequently exhibit Kras(G12D) allelic enrichment (Kras(G12D)/Kras(wild-type) > 1) (ref. 7), implying that mutant Kras copy gains are positively selected during progression. Here we show, through a comprehensive analysis of mutant Kras homozygous and heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts and lung cancer cells, that these genotypes are phenotypically distinct. In particular, Kras(G12D/G12D) cells exhibit a glycolytic switch coupled to increased channelling of glucose-derived metabolites into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glutathione biosynthesis, resulting in enhanced glutathione-mediated detoxification. This metabolic rewiring is recapitulated in mutant KRAS homozygous non-small-cell lung cancer cells and in vivo, in spontaneous advanced murine lung tumours (which display a high frequency of Kras(G12D) copy gain), but not in the corresponding early tumours (Kras(G12D) heterozygous). Finally, we demonstrate that mutant Kras copy gain creates unique metabolic dependences that can be exploited to selectively target these aggressive mutant Kras tumours. Our data demonstrate that mutant Kras lung tumours are not a single disease but rather a heterogeneous group comprising two classes of tumours with distinct metabolic profiles, prognosis and therapeutic susceptibility, which can be discriminated on the basis of their relative mutant allelic content. We also provide the first, to our knowledge, in vivo evidence of metabolic rewiring during lung cancer malignant progression.

  11. Thymidine kinase mutants obtained by random sequence selection.

    PubMed

    Munir, K M; French, D C; Loeb, L A

    1993-05-01

    Knowledge of the catalytic properties and structural information regarding the amino acid residues that comprise the active site of an enzyme allows one, in principle, to use site-specific mutagenesis to construct genes that encode enzymes with altered functions. However, such information about most enzymes is not known and the effects of specific amino acid substitutions are not generally predictable. An alternative approach is to substitute random nucleotides for key codons in a gene and to use genetic selection to identify new and interesting enzyme variants. We describe here the construction, selection, and characterization of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase mutants either with different catalytic properties or with enhanced thermostability. From a library containing 2 x 10(6) plasmid-encoded herpes thymidine kinase genes, each with a different nucleotide sequence at the putative nucleoside binding site, we obtained 1540 active mutants. Using this library and one previously constructed, we identified by secondary selection Escherichia coli harboring thymidine kinase mutant clones that were unable to grow in the presence of concentrations of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) that permits colony formation by E. coli harboring the wild-type plasmid. Two of the mutant enzymes exhibited a reduced Km for AZT, one of which displayed a higher catalytic efficiency for AZT over thymidine relative to that of the wild type. We also identified one mutant with enhanced thermostability. These mutants may have clinical potential as the promise of gene therapy is increasingly becoming a reality.

  12. Mutant huntingtin impairs immune cell migration in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Wanda; Träger, Ulrike; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chou, Austin; Bouchard, Jill; Andre, Ralph; Miller, Aaron; Weiss, Andreas; Giorgini, Flaviano; Cheah, Christine; Möller, Thomas; Stella, Nephi; Akassoglou, Katerina; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    In Huntington disease (HD), immune cells are activated before symptoms arise; however, it is unclear how the expression of mutant huntingtin (htt) compromises the normal functions of immune cells. Here we report that primary microglia from early postnatal HD mice were profoundly impaired in their migration to chemotactic stimuli, and expression of a mutant htt fragment in microglial cell lines was sufficient to reproduce these deficits. Microglia expressing mutant htt had a retarded response to a laser-induced brain injury in vivo. Leukocyte recruitment was defective upon induction of peritonitis in HD mice at early disease stages and was normalized upon genetic deletion of mutant htt in immune cells. Migration was also strongly impaired in peripheral immune cells from pre-manifest human HD patients. Defective actin remodeling in immune cells expressing mutant htt likely contributed to their migration deficit. Our results suggest that these functional changes may contribute to immune dysfunction and neurodegeneration in HD, and may have implications for other polyglutamine expansion diseases in which mutant proteins are ubiquitously expressed. PMID:23160193

  13. Antigenic and virulence properties of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, S F; Chidambaram, M; Illyes, E F; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M; Reese, C P

    1995-01-01

    Antigenic properties of two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica, strains 59B0071 and 59B0072, that do not produce detectable leukotoxin were investigated. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a number of polyclonal sera from animals recovering from pasteurellosis revealed that both mutants secreted a variety of antigens that were also present in cultures of several wild-type strains. These antigens ranged from about 100 to 15 kDa. Mutant strain 59B0071 was found to be totally deficient in leukotoxin, as judged not only by Western blotting but also by cytotoxicity assays with bovine lymphoma (BL-3) cells or bovine polymorphonuclear cells as targets. The mutant strain 59B0071 had normal levels of a secreted sialylglycoprotease, however. When strains were tested for virulence in goat and cattle challenge experiments, a reduction in mortality and lung lesions was observed with the mutant 59B0071 in comparison with results obtained with wild-type strains. These results are consistent with an important role for leukotoxin in P. haemolytica virulence and suggest that leukotoxin-negative mutants may be useful tools in the investigation of other virulence properties involved in P. haemolytica infections. PMID:7868224

  14. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis. PMID:27746791

  15. RECOMBINATIONS OF MUTANT PHAGES OF BACILLUS MEGATHERIUM 899A

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James S.

    1953-01-01

    A group of mutant phages stemming from the virus of B. megatherium 899a (lysogenic), growing on a sensitive B. megatherium strain (KM), have been studied with respect to their recombination reactions. All these mutants and many of their recombinations can be recognized by a characteristic plaque morphology. A similar group of phages have been isolated directly from a culture of B. megatherium 899a in this laboratory. Previous work has shown that when two different plaque mutant phages both infect essentially all the bacteria in a culture, a characteristic per cent of recombinants is produced. This percentage depends on the two recombinants used, each pair having its own value. Hershey and coworkers (2–5) have demonstrated with coli-phage T2, that the percentages of recombination found can be handled mathematically and that they demonstrate the existence of a relationship between the mutations entirely comparable to crossover percentages as used in gene locus maps in genetics. This has been found to hold true for the phages studied in the present work. Only one "linkage group" has been detected and all the mutants studied showed low percentages of recombination (0.8 to 7.6). B. megatherium 899a phage and some of its mutants have been examined with an electron microscope and no differences have been detected between the different mutant strains. PMID:13109115

  16. Biofilm formation-defective mutants in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aroa; Leal-Morales, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Platero, Ana I; Bardallo-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Romero, Alberto; Acemel, Rafael D; Illán, Juan M; Jiménez-López, Julia; Govantes, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Out of 8000 candidates from a genetic screening for Pseudomonas putida KT2442 mutants showing defects in biofilm formation, 40 independent mutants with diminished levels of biofilm were analyzed. Most of these mutants carried insertions in genes of the lap cluster, whose products are responsible for synthesis, export and degradation of the adhesin LapA. All mutants in this class were strongly defective in biofilm formation. Mutants in the flagellar regulatory genes fleQ and flhF showed similar defects to that of the lap mutants. On the contrary, transposon insertions in the flagellar structural genes fliP and flgG, that also impair flagellar motility, had a modest defect in biofilm formation. A mutation in gacS, encoding the sensor element of the GacS/GacA two-component system, also had a moderate effect on biofilm formation. Additional insertions targeted genes involved in cell envelope function: PP3222, encoding the permease element of an ABC-type transporter and tolB, encoding the periplasmic component of the Tol-OprL system required for outer membrane stability. Our results underscore the central role of LapA, suggest cross-regulation between motility and adhesion functions and provide insights on the role of cell envelope trafficking and maintenance for biofilm development in P. putida.

  17. Quantitative analysis of triple-mutant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven to be effective for characterizing cellular functions, but it can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, which is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principal actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double-mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1,536 single mutants.

  18. A poliovirus 2A(pro) mutant unable to cleave 3CD shows inefficient viral protein synthesis and transactivation defects.

    PubMed Central

    Ventoso, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-01-01

    Four poliovirus mutants with modifications of tyrosine 88 in 2A(pro) were generated and introduced into the cloned poliovirus genome. Mutants Y88P and Y88L were nonviable, mutant Y88F showed a wild-type (WT) phenotype, and mutant Y88S showed a delayed cytopathic effect and formed small plaques in HeLa cells. Growth of Y88S in HeLa cells was restricted, giving rise to about 20% of the PFU production of the WT poliovirus. The 2A (Y88S) mutant synthesized significantly lower levels of viral proteins in HeLa cells than did the WT poliovirus, while the kinetics of p220 cleavage were identical for both viruses. Strikingly, the 2A (Y88S) mutant was unable to cleave 3CD, as shown by analysis of poliovirus proteins labeled with [35S]methionine or immunoblotted with a specific anti-3C serum. The ability of the Y88S mutant to form infectious virus and cleave 3CD can be complemented by the WT poliovirus. Synthesis of viral RNA was diminished in the Y88S mutant but less than the inhibition of translation of viral RNA. Experiments in which guanidine was used to inhibit poliovirus RNA synthesis suggest that the primary defect of the Y88S mutant virus is at the level of poliovirus RNA translation, while viral genome replication is much less affected. Transfection of HeLa cells infected with the WT poliovirus with a luciferase mRNA containing the poliovirus 5' untranslated sequence gives rise to a severalfold increase in luciferase activity. This enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA was not observed when the transfected cells were infected with the 2A (Y88S) mutant. Moreover, cotransfection with mRNA encoding WT poliovirus 2A(pro) enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA. This enhancement was much lower upon transfection with mRNA encoding 2A(Y88S), 2A(Y88L), or 2A(Y88P). These findings support the view that 2A(pro) itself, rather than the 3C' and/or 3D' products, is necessary for efficient translation of poliovirus RNA in HeLa cells. PMID:7666528

  19. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes

  20. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE PAGES

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; ...

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are

  1. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Oh; Wang, Yi; Lu, Ting; Jin, Yong-Su; Blaschek, Hans P

    2017-01-01

    Spo0A is a master regulator that governs the metabolic shift of solventogenic Clostridium species such as Clostridium beijerinckii. Its disruption can thus potentially cause a significant alteration of cellular physiology as well as metabolic patterns. To investigate the specific effect of spo0A disruption in C. beijerinckii, a spo0A mutant of C. beijerinckii was characterized in this study. In a batch fermentation with pH control at 6.5, the spo0A mutant accumulated butyrate and butanol up to 8.96 g/L and 3.32 g/L, respectively from 60 g/L glucose. Noticing the unique phenotype of the spo0A mutant accumulating both butyrate and butanol at significant concentrations, we decided to use the spo0A mutant for the production of butyl butyrate that can be formed by the condensation of butyrate and butanol during the ABE fermentation in the presence of the enzyme lipase. Butyl butyrate is a value-added chemical that has numerous uses in the food and fragrance industry. Moreover, butyl butyrate as a biofuel is compatible with Jet A-1 aviation kerosene and used for biodiesel enrichment. In an initial trial of small-scale extractive batch fermentation using hexadecane as the extractant with supplementation of lipase CalB, the spo0A mutant was subjected to acid crash due to the butyrate accumulation, and thus produced only 98 mg/L butyl butyrate. To alleviate the butyrate toxicity, the biphasic medium was supplemented with 10 g/L CaCO3 and 5 g/L butanol. The butyl butyrate production was then increased up to 2.73 g/L in the hexadecane layer. When continuous agitation was performed to enhance the esterification and extraction of butyl butyrate, 3.32 g/L butyl butyrate was obtained in the hexadecane layer. In this study, we successfully demonstrated the use of the C. beijerinckii spo0A mutant for the butyl butyrate production through the simultaneous ABE fermentation, condensation, and extraction. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 106-112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  2. Fruit cuticle lipid composition during development in tomato ripening mutants.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Isaacson, Tal; Lü, Shiyou; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Jenks, Matthew A

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that fruit cuticle is an important contributing factor to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit shelf life and storability. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that variation in fruit cuticle composition may underlie differences in traits such as fruit resistance to desiccation and microbial infection. To gain a better understanding of cuticle lipid composition diversity during fruit ontogeny and to assess if there are common features that correlate with ripening, we examined developmental changes in fruit cuticle wax and cutin monomer composition of delayed-ripening tomato fruit mutants, ripening inhibitor (rin) and non-ripening (nor) and delayed-ripening landrace Alcobaça. Previous reports show that fruit ripening processes such as climacteric ethylene production, cell wall degradation and color change are significantly delayed, or do not occur, in these lines. In the study presented here, however, we show that fruits from rin, nor and Alcobaça have cuticle lipid compositions that differ significantly from normal fruits of Ailsa Craig (AC) even at very early stages in fruit development, with continuing impacts throughout ripening. Moreover, rin, nor and the Alcobaça lines show quite different wax profiles from AC and each other throughout fruit development. Although cutin monomer composition differed much less than wax composition among the genotypes, all delayed-ripening lines possessed higher relative amounts of C(18) monomers than AC. Together, these results reveal new genetic associations between cuticle and fruit development processes and define valuable genetic resources to further explore the importance of cuticle in fruit shelf life.

  3. Characterization of a multi-seeded (msd) mutant of sorghum that displays significant enhancement in seed number

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) cultivars and germplasm display branched inflorescence or panicle, characterized by spikelets composed of a single sessile, fertile floret that develop into viable seed and one or two adjacent sterile pedicellate florets (Monoseeded [MSD] trait). Based on total nu...

  4. A Comparative Proteome Analysis of Escherichia coli ΔrelA Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Sónia; Villas-Bôas, Silas; Ferreira, Eugénio C.; Rocha, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RelA-dependent stringent response exerts a strong influence over various processes. In this work, the impact of the relA gene mutation in Escherichia coli cells was evaluated by a quantitative proteomics analysis, employing stable-isotope labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Chemostat cultures of E. coli W3110 and ΔrelA mutant strains were performed at two dilution rates (0.1 and 0.2 h−1) to assess the influence of the relA gene mutation in steady-state protein levels. A total of 121 proteins showed significant alterations in their abundance when comparing the proteome of mutant to wild-type cells. The relA gene mutation induced changes on key cellular processes, including the amino acids and nucleotide biosynthesis, the lipid metabolism, transport activities, transcription and translation processes, and responses to stress. Furthermore, some of those changes were more pronounced under specific growth conditions, as the most significant differences in protein ratios were observed at one of the dilution rates. An effect of the relA gene mutation in the acetate overflow was also observed, which confers interesting characteristics to this mutant strain that could be useful in the production of recombinant proteins. Overall, these results provide a valuable insight into the E. coli stringent response under defined steady-state conditions, suggesting that this stress response might influence multiple metabolic processes like the acetate overflow or the catabolite repression. PMID:27833909

  5. BET and BRAF inhibitors act synergistically against BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Paoluzzi, Luca; Hanniford, Douglas; Sokolova, Elena; Osman, Iman; Darvishian, Farbod; Wang, Jinhua; Bradner, James E; Hernando, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Despite major advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, treatment failure is still inevitable in most cases. Manipulation of key epigenetic regulators, including inhibition of Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) family members impairs cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo in different cancers, including melanoma. Here, we investigated the effect of combining the BET inhibitor JQ1 with the BRAF inhibitor Vemurafenib in in vitro and in vivo models of BRAF-mutant melanoma. We performed cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, and a xenograft mouse model to determine the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of JQ1 in combination with Vemurafenib against BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines. Further, to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of combined treatment, we conducted antibody arrays of in vitro drug-treated cell lines and RNA sequencing of drug-treated xenograft tumors. The combination of JQ1 and Vemurafenib acted synergistically in BRAF-mutant cell lines, resulting in marked apoptosis in vitro, with upregulation of proapoptotic proteins. In vivo, combination treatment suppressed tumor growth and significantly improved survival compared to either drug alone. RNA sequencing of tumor tissues revealed almost four thousand genes that were uniquely modulated by the combination, with several anti-apoptotic genes significantly down-regulated. Collectively, our data provide a rationale for combined BET and BRAF inhibition as a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma.

  6. Evaluation of novel starch-deficient mutants of Chlorella sorokiniana for hyper-accumulation of lipids

    PubMed Central

    Vonlanthen, Sofie; Dauvillée, David; Purton, Saul

    2015-01-01

    When green algae are exposed to physiological stresses such as nutrient deprivation, growth is arrested and the cells channel fixed carbon instead into storage compounds, accumulating first starch granules and then lipid bodies containing triacylglycerides. In recent years there has been significant interest in the commercial exploitation of algal lipids as a sustainable source of biodiesel. Since starch and lipid biosynthesis involves the same C3 precursor pool, it has been proposed that mutations blocking starch accumulation should result in increased lipid yields, and indeed several studies have supported this. The fast-growing, thermotolerant alga Chlorella sorokiniana represents an attractive strain for industrial cultivation. We have therefore generated and characterized starch-deficient mutants of C. sorokiniana and determined whether lipid levels are increased in these strains under stress conditions. One mutant (ST68) is shown to lack isoamylase, whilst two others (ST3 and ST12) are defective in starch phosphorylase. However, we find no significant change in the accumulation or profile of fatty acids in these mutants compared to the wild-type, suggesting that a failure to accumulate starch per se is not sufficient for the hyper-accumulation of lipid, and that more subtle regulatory steps underlie the partitioning of carbon to the two storage products. PMID:26865991

  7. A low, adaptive dose of gamma-rays reduced the number and altered the spectrum of S1- mutants in human-hamster hybrid AL cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Gustafson, D. L.; Wong, J. C.; Waldren, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of a low, adaptive dose of 137Cs-gamma-irradiation (0.04 Gy) on the number and kinds of mutants induced in AL human-hamster hybrid cells by a later challenge dose of 4 Gy. The yield of S1- mutants was significantly less (by 53%) after exposure to both the adaptive and challenge doses compared to the challenge dose alone. The yield of hprt- mutants was similarly decreased. Incubation with cycloheximide (CX) or 3-aminobenzamide largely negated the decrease in mutant yield. The adaptive dose did not perturb the cell cycle, was not cytotoxic, and did not of itself increase the mutant yield above background. The adaptive dose did, however, alter the spectrum of S1- mutants from populations exposed only to the adaptive dose, as well as affecting the spectrum of S1- mutants generated by the challenge dose. The major change in both cases was a significant increase in the proportion of complex mutations compared to small mutations and simple deletions.

  8. Yeast omnipotent supressor SUP1 (SUP45): nucleotide sequence of the wildtype and a mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Breining, P; Piepersberg, W

    1986-07-11

    The primary structures of the yeast recessive omnipotent suppressor gene SUP1 (SUP45) and one of its mutant alleles (sup1-ts36) was determined. The gene codes for a protein of 49 kD. The mutant protein differs from the wildtype form in one amino acid residue (Ser instead of Leu) in the N-terminal part. The codon usage differs significantly from that of yeast ribosomal protein genes. However, an upstream element resembling a conserved oligonucleotide in the region 5' to ribosomal protein genes in S. cerevisiae has been found. A DNA probe internal to the SUP1 gene does not exhibit detectable homology to genomic DNA neither from higher eucaryotes nor from eu- or archaebacteria. The hypothetical function of this protein in control of translational fidelity is discussed.

  9. Intermittent high-dose treatment with erlotinib enhances therapeutic efficacy in EGFR-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Jakob; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Volz, Caroline; Siobal, Maike; Florin, Alexandra; Rokitta, Dennis; Hinze, Yvonne; Dietlein, Felix; Plenker, Dennis; König, Katharina; Albus, Kerstin; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Rauh, Daniel; Franz, Thomas; Neumaier, Bernd; Fuhr, Uwe; Heukamp, Lukas C; Ullrich, Roland T

    2015-11-17

    Treatment with EGFR kinase inhibitors improves progression-free survival of patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancer. However, all patients with initial response will eventually acquire resistance and die from tumor recurrence. We found that intermittent high-dose treatment with erlotinib induced apoptosis more potently and improved tumor shrinkage significantly than the established low doses. In mice carrying EGFR-mutant xenografts intermittent high-dose treatment (200 mg/kg every other day) was tolerable and prolonged progression-free survival and reduced the frequency of acquired resistance. Intermittent EGFR-targeted high-dose schedules induce more profound as well as sustained target inhibition and may afford enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles.

    PubMed

    Farshidfar, Farshad; Zheng, Siyuan; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Newton, Yulia; Shih, Juliann; Robertson, A Gordon; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine A; Gibb, Ewan A; Roszik, Jason; Covington, Kyle R; Wu, Chia-Chin; Shinbrot, Eve; Stransky, Nicolas; Hegde, Apurva; Yang, Ju Dong; Reznik, Ed; Sadeghi, Sara; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Hess, Julian M; Auman, J Todd; Rhie, Suhn K; Bowlby, Reanne; Borad, Mitesh J; Zhu, Andrew X; Stuart, Josh M; Sander, Chris; Akbani, Rehan; Cherniack, Andrew D; Deshpande, Vikram; Mounajjed, Taofic; Foo, Wai Chin; Torbenson, Michael S; Kleiner, David E; Laird, Peter W; Wheeler, David A; McRee, Autumn J; Bathe, Oliver F; Andersen, Jesper B; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Roberts, Lewis R; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2017-03-14

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.

  11. Analysis on the DNA Fingerprinting of Aspergillus Oryzae Mutant Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fan; Wang, Kai; Shen, Si-Le; Liu, Bing-Bing; Zou, Bo; Zou, Guang-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The mutant strains of aspergillus oryzae (HP300a) are screened under 300 MPa for 20 min. Compared with the control strains, the screened mutant strains have unique properties such as genetic stability, rapid growth, lots of spores, and high protease activity. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) are used to analyze the DNA fingerprinting of HP300a and the control strains. There are 67.9% and 51.3% polymorphic bands obtained by these two markers, respectively, indicating significant genetic variations between HP300a and the control strains. In addition, comparison of HP300a and the control strains, the genetic distances of random sequence and simple sequence repeat of DNA are 0.51 and 0.34, respectively.

  12. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  13. Correlation of mutant menin stability with clinical expression of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and its incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Satoko; Nagamura, Yuko; Yaguchi, Hiroko; Ohkura, Naganari; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2011-11-01

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene MEN1 are found not only in typical multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) but also in its incomplete forms such as familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and apparently sporadic parathyroid tumor (ASPT). No definitive genotype-phenotype correlation has been established between these clinical forms and MEN1 gene mutations. We previously demonstrated that mutant menin proteins associated with MEN1 are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To examine whether the intracellular stability of mutant menin is correlated with clinical phenotypes, we developed a method of evaluating menin stability and examined 20 mutants associated with typical MEN1 (17 missense, two in-frame deletion, one nonsense) and 21 mutants associated with FIHP or ASPT (19 missense, two in-frame deletion). All tested mutants associated with typical MEN1 showed reduced stability. Some missense and in-frame deletion mutants (G28A, R171W, T197I, E255K, E274A, Y353del and E366D) associated with FIHP or ASPT were almost as stable as or only slightly less stable than wild-type menin, while others were as unstable as those associated with typical MEN1. Some stable mutants exhibited substantial biological activities when tested by JunD-dependent transactivation assay. These findings suggest that certain missense and in-frame mutations are fairly stable and retain intrinsic biological activity, and might be specifically associated with incomplete clinical phenotypes. The menin stability test will provide useful information for the management of patients carrying germline MEN1 mutations especially when they have missense or in-frame variants of ambiguous clinical significance.

  14. Isolation and characterisation of transport-defective substrate-binding mutants of the tetracycline antiporter TetA(B)

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David J.; Tate, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline antiporter TetA(B) is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily which confers tetracycline resistance to cells by coupling the efflux of tetracycline to the influx of protons down their chemical potential gradient. Although it is a medically important transporter, its structure has yet to be determined. One possibility for why this has proven difficult is that the transporter may be conformationally heterogeneous in the purified state. To overcome this, we developed two strategies to rapidly identify TetA(B) mutants that were transport-defective and that could still bind tetracycline. Up to 9 amino acid residues could be deleted from the loop between transmembrane α-helices 6 and 7 with only a slight decrease in affinity of tetracycline binding as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, although the mutant was transport-defective. Scanning mutagenesis where all the residues between 2 and 389 were mutated to either valine, alanine or glycine (VAG scan) identified 15 mutants that were significantly impaired in tetracycline transport. Of these mutants, 12 showed no evidence of tetracycline binding by isothermal titration calorimetry performed on the purified transporters. In contrast, the mutants G44V and G346V bound tetracycline 4–5 fold more weakly than TetA(B), with Kds of 28 μM and 36 μM, respectively, whereas the mutant R70G bound tetracycline 3-fold more strongly (Kd 2.1 μM). Systematic mutagenesis is thus an effective strategy for isolating transporter mutants that may be conformationally constrained and which represent attractive targets for crystallisation and structure determination. PMID:26143388

  15. Gravitropism in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis: implications for the starch-statolith theory of gravity sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspar, T.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The starch-statolith theory of gravity reception has been tested with a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which, lacking plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity, does not synthesize starch. The hypocotyls and seedling roots of the mutant were examined by light and electron microscopy to confirm that they did not contain starch. In upright wild-type (WT) seedlings, starch-filled plastids in the starch sheath of the hypocotyl and in three of the five columellar layers of the root cap were piled on the cell floors, and sedimented to the ceilings when the plants were inverted. However, starchless plastids of the mutant were not significantly sedimented in these cells in either upright or inverted seedlings. Gravitropism of light-grown seedling roots was vigorous: e.g., 10 degrees curvature developed in mutants rotated on a clinostat following a 5 min induction at 1 g, compared with 14 degrees in the WT. Curvatures induced during intervals from 2.5 to 30 min were 70% as great in the mutant as the WT. Thus under these conditions the presence of starch and the sedimentation of plastids are unnecessary for reception of gravity by Arabidopsis roots. Gravitropism by hypocotyls of light-grown seedlings was less vigorous than that by roots, but the mutant hypocotyls exhibited an average of 70-80% as much curvature as the WT. Roots and hypocotyls of etiolated seedlings and flower stalks of mature plants were also gravitropic, although in these cases the mutant was generally less closely comparable to the WT. Thus, starch is also unnecessary for gravity reception in these tissues.

  16. Quantitative dynamics and increased variability of segmentation gene expression in the Drosophila Krüppel and knirps mutants.

    PubMed

    Surkova, Svetlana; Golubkova, Elena; Manu; Panok, Lena; Mamon, Lyudmila; Reinitz, John; Samsonova, Maria

    2013-04-01

    Here we characterize the response of the Drosophila segmentation system to mutations in two gap genes, Kr and kni, in the form of single or double homozygotes and single heterozygotes. Segmentation gene expression in these genotypes was quantitatively monitored with cellular resolution in space and 6.5 to 13min resolution in time. As is the case with wild type, we found that gene expression domains in the posterior portion of the embryo shift to the anterior over time. In certain cases, such as the gt posterior domain in Kr mutants, the shifts are significantly larger than is seen in wild type embryos. We also investigated the effects of Kr and kni on the variability of gene expression. Mutations often produce variable phenotypes, and it is well known that the cuticular phenotype of Kr mutants is variable. We sought to understand the molecular basis of this effect. We find that throughout cycle 14A the relative levels of eve and ftz expression in stripes 2 and 3 are variable among individual embryos. Moreover, in Kr and kni mutants, unlike wild type, the variability in positioning of the posterior Hb domain and eve stripe 7 is not decreased or filtered with time. The posterior Gt domain in Kr mutants is highly variable at early times, but this variability decreases when this domain shifts in the anterior direction to the position of the neighboring Kni domain. In contrast to these findings, positional variability throughout the embryo does not decrease over time in double Kr;kni mutants. In heterozygotes the early expression patterns of segmentation genes resemble patterns seen in homozygous mutants but by the onset of gastrulation they become similar to the wild type patterns. Finally, we note that gene expression levels are reduced in Kr and kni mutant embryos and have a tendency to decrease over time. This is a surprising result in view of the role that mutual repression is thought to play in the gap gene system.

  17. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  18. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62–65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments. PMID:27667026

  19. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-26

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62-65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments.

  20. Modifications of the Helper Component-Protease of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus for Generation of Attenuated Mutants for Cross Protection Against Severe Infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shun; Wu, Hui-Wen; Jan, Fuh-Jyh; Hou, Roger F; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT A nonpathogenic mild strain is essential for control of plant viruses by cross protection. Three amino acid changes, Arg(180)-->Ile(180) (GA mutation), Phe(205)-->Leu(205) (GB mutation), and Glu(396)-->Asn(396) (GC mutation), of the conserved motifs of the helper component-protease (HC-Pro) of a severe strain TW-TN3 of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, were generated from an infectious cDNA clone that carried a green fluorescent protein reporter. The infectivity of individual mutants containing single, double, or triple mutations was assayed on local and systemic hosts. On Chenopodium quinoa plants, the GB mutant induced necrotic lesions; the GA, GC, and GBC mutants induced chlorotic spots; and the GAB and GAC mutants induced local infection only visualized by fluorescence microscopy. On squash plants, the GA, GB, GC, and GBC mutants caused milder mosaic; the GAC mutant induced slight leaf mottling followed by recovering; and the GAB mutant did not induce conspicuous symptoms. Also, the GAC mutant, but not the GAB mutant, conferred complete cross protection against the parental virus carrying a mite allergen as a reporter. When tested on transgene-silenced transgenic squash, the ability of posttranscriptional gene silencing suppression of the mutated HC-Pro of GAC was not significantly affected. We concluded that the mutations of the HC-Pro of ZYMV reduce the degrees of pathogenicity on squash and also abolish the ability for eliciting the hypersensitive reaction on C. quinoa, and that the mutant GAC is a useful mild strain for cross protection.

  1. Role of various enterotoxins in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis: generation of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants and evaluation of their enterotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kozlova, E V; Chopra, A K

    2002-04-01

    Three enterotoxins from the Aeromonas hydrophila diarrheal isolate SSU have been molecularly characterized in our laboratory. One of these enterotoxins is cytotoxic in nature, whereas the other two are cytotonic enterotoxins, one of them heat labile and the other heat stable. Earlier, by developing an isogenic mutant, we demonstrated the role of a cytotoxic enterotoxin in causing systemic infection in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the role of these three enterotoxins in evoking diarrhea in a murine model by developing various combinations of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants by marker-exchange mutagenesis. A total of six isogenic mutants were prepared in a cytotoxic enterotoxin gene (act)-positive or -negative background strain of A. hydrophila. We developed two single knockouts with truncation in either the heat-labile (alt) or the heat-stable (ast) cytotonic enterotoxin gene; three double knockouts with truncations of genes encoding (i) alt and ast, (ii) act and alt, and (iii) act and ast genes; and a triple-knockout mutant with truncation in all three genes, act, alt, and ast. The identity of these isogenic mutants developed by double-crossover homologous recombination was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that the expression of different enterotoxin genes in the mutants was correspondingly abrogated. We tested the biological activity of these mutants in a diet-restricted and antibiotic-treated mouse model with a ligated ileal loop assay. Our data indicated that all of these mutants had significantly reduced capacity to evoke fluid secretion compared to that of wild-type A. hydrophila; the triple-knockout mutant failed to induce any detectable level of fluid secretion. The biological activity of selected A. hydrophila mutants was restored after complementation. Taken together, we have established a role for three enterotoxins in A. hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis in a mouse model with the greatest

  2. Competitive growth experiments with a high-lipid Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain and its wild-type to predict industrial and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Russo, David A; Beckerman, Andrew P; Pandhal, Jagroop

    2017-12-01

    Key microalgal species are currently being exploited as biomanufacturing platforms using mass cultivation systems. The opportunities to enhance productivity levels or produce non-native compounds are increasing as genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering tools are rapidly advancing. Regardless of the end product, there are both environmental and industrial risks associated to open pond cultivation of mutant microalgal strains. A mutant escape could be detrimental to local biodiversity and increase the risk of algal blooms. Similarly, if the cultivation pond is invaded by a wild-type (WT) microalgae or the mutant reverts to WT phenotypes, productivity could be impacted. To investigate these potential risks, a response surface methodology was applied to determine the competitive outcome of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains, a WT (CC-124) and a high-lipid accumulating mutant (CC-4333), grown in mixotrophic conditions, with differing levels of nitrogen and initial WT to mutant ratios. Results of the growth experiments show that mutant cells have double the exponential growth rate of the WT in monoculture. However, due to a slower transition from lag phase to exponential phase, mutant cells are outcompeted by the WT in every co-culture treatment. This suggests that, under the conditions tested, outdoor cultivation of the C. reinhardtii cell wall-deficient mutant strains does not carry a significant environmental risk to its WT in an escape scenario. Furthermore, lipid results show the mutant strain accumulates over 200% more TAGs per cell, at 50 mg L(-1) NH4Cl, compared to the WT, therefore, the fragility of the mutant strain could impact on overall industrial productivity.

  3. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and its mutants in soils.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A Mark; Yi, Xuan; Wang, Haizhen; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Crowley, David E; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 in the environment poses a serious threat to public health. However, the role of Shiga toxins and other virulence factors in the survival of E. coli O157:H7 is poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine if the virulence factors, stx₁, stx₂, stx₁₋₂, and eae in E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 play any significant role in the growth of this pathogen in rich media and in soils. Isogenic deletion mutants that were missing one of four virulence factors, stx₁, stx₂, stx₁₋₂, and eae in E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 were constructed, and their growth in rich media and survival in soils with distinct texture and chemistry were characterized. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double Weibull model, and the modeling parameters of the mutant strains were not significantly different from those of the wild type. The calculated T(d) (time needed to reach the detection limit, 100 CFU/g soil) for loamy sand, sandy loam, and silty clay was 32, 80, and 110 days, respectively. It was also found that T(d) was positively correlated with soil structure (e.g. clay content), and soil chemistry (e.g. total nitrogen, total carbon, and water extractable organic carbon). The results of this study showed that the possession of Shiga toxins and intimin in E. coli O157:H7 might not play any important role in its survival in soils. The double deletion mutant of E. coli O157:H7 (stx₁⁻stx₂⁻) may be a good substitute to use for the investigation of transport, fate, and survival of E. coli O157:H7 in the environment where the use of pathogenic strains are prohibited by law since the mutants showed the same characteristics in both culture media and environmental samples.

  4. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Its Mutants in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A. Mark; Yi, Xuan; Wang, Haizhen; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Crowley, David E.; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 in the environment poses a serious threat to public health. However, the role of Shiga toxins and other virulence factors in the survival of E. coli O157:H7 is poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine if the virulence factors, stx1, stx2, stx1–2, and eae in E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 play any significant role in the growth of this pathogen in rich media and in soils. Isogenic deletion mutants that were missing one of four virulence factors, stx1, stx2, stx1–2, and eae in E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 were constructed, and their growth in rich media and survival in soils with distinct texture and chemistry were characterized. The survival data were successfully analyzed using Double Weibull model, and the modeling parameters of the mutant strains were not significantly different from those of the wild type. The calculated Td (time needed to reach the detection limit, 100 CFU/g soil) for loamy sand, sandy loam, and silty clay was 32, 80, and 110 days, respectively. It was also found that Td was positively correlated with soil structure (e.g. clay content), and soil chemistry (e.g. total nitrogen, total carbon, and water extractable organic carbon). The results of this study showed that the possession of Shiga toxins and intimin in E. coli O157:H7 might not play any important role in its survival in soils. The double deletion mutant of E. coli O157:H7 (stx1−stx2−) may be a good substitute to use for the investigation of transport, fate, and survival of E. coli O157:H7 in the environment where the use of pathogenic strains are prohibited by law since the mutants showed the same characteristics in both culture media and environmental samples. PMID:21826238

  5. Metabolite profiling of two novel low phytic acid (lpa) soybean mutants.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Nörenberg, Svenja; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-07-22

    A GC-based approach was applied to compare the metabolite profiles of two low phytic acid (lpa) soybean mutants and their respective wild-types. The lpa mutants (Gm-lpa-TW75-1 and Gm-lpa-ZC-2) were grown together with the wild-types (Taiwan 75 and Zhechun no. 3) in three and four field trials, respectively. HPLC analysis revealed a phytic acid reduction of -53% for Gm-lpa-TW75-1 and of -46% for Gm-lpa-ZC-2. For Gm-lpa-TW75-1, no accumulation of lower inositol phosphates was observed, whereas Gm-lpa-ZC-2 exhibited significantly increased contents of the lower inositol phosphates InsP(3), InsP(4), and InsP(5) compared to the corresponding wild-type. The metabolite profiling revealed that compared to the wild-types, 40% (Gm-lpa-TW75-1) and 21% (Gm-lpa-ZC-2) of the detected peaks were statistically significantly different in the lpa mutants grown at one field trial. However, the majority of these differences were shown to be related to environmental impact and natural variability rather than to the mutation event. Identification of consistent metabolic changes in the lpa mutants revealed decreased contents of myo-inositol, galactinol, raffinose, stachyose, and the galactosyl cyclitols galactopinitol A, galactopinitol B, and fagopyritol B1 compared to the wild-type. These consistently pronounced changes in Gm-lpa-TW75-1 confirmed the suggested mutation target. Consideration of the metabolic changes observed for Gm-lpa-ZC-2 (accumulation of lower inositol phosphates and increased myo-inositol contents) indicated a mutation event affecting the latter biosynthetic steps leading to phytic acid. The study demonstrated the applicability of metabolite profiling for the detection of changes in the metabolite phenotype induced by mutation breeding and its power in assisting in the elucidation of mutation events.

  6. Severe hearing loss in Dlxl mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Polley, Daniel B; Cobos, Inma; Merzenich, Michael M; Rubenstein, John L R

    2006-04-01

    The Dlx homeobox gene family participates in regulating middle and inner ear development. A significant role for Dlxl, in particular,has been demonstrated in the development of the middle ear ossicles, but the functional consequences of Dlx.l gene mutation on hearing thresholds has not been assessed. The present study characterizes auditory brainstem responses to click and tonal stimuli in a non-lethal variant of a Dlxl gene knockout. We found that peripheral hearing thresholds for click and tonal stimuli were significantly elevated in homozygous Dlxl knockout (Dlxl-/ ) compared to both heterozygous (Dlxl+/ ) and wild type (Dlxl+/+) mice. Thus, abnormal mor-phogenesis of the incus and stapes that has been documented previously with histological measures is now known to result in a severe peripheral hearing deficit.

  7. Altered ethylene levels and ethylene-related transcripts are seen in developing seeds of two sugar mutants in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we explore maize kernel development with focus on sugar metabolism and starch production. Specifically, we use sugar metabolism mutants miniature1-1 (mn1-1, cell-wall-invertase deficient) and sugary1 (su1, starch-synthase deficient) to understand the possible significance of sugar sig...

  8. Inhibition of DNA Methyltransferases Blocks Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yanchun; Daito, Takuji; Sasaki, Yo; Chung, Yong Hee; Xing, Xiaoyun; Pondugula, Santhi; Swamidass, S. Joshua; Wang, Ting; Kim, Albert H.; Yano, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic abnormalities have been described in Huntington’s disease (HD), the causal epigenetic mechanisms driving neurodegeneration in HD cortex and striatum remain undefined. Using an epigenetic pathway-targeted drug screen, we report that inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), decitabine and FdCyd, block mutant huntingtin (Htt)-induced toxicity in primary cortical and striatal neurons. In addition, knockdown of DNMT3A or DNMT1 protected neurons against mutant Htt-induced toxicity, together demonstrating a requirement for DNMTs in mutant Htt-triggered neuronal death and suggesting a neurodegenerative mechanism based on DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional repression. Inhibition of DNMTs in HD model primary cortical or striatal neurons restored the expression of several key genes, including Bdnf, an important neurotrophic factor implicated in HD. Accordingly, the Bdnf promoter exhibited aberrant cytosine methylation in mutant Htt-expressing cortical neurons. In vivo, pharmacological inhibition of DNMTs in HD mouse brains restored the mRNA levels of key striatal genes known to be downregulated in HD. Thus, disturbances in DNA methylation play a critical role in mutant Htt-induced neuronal dysfunction and death, raising the possibility that epigenetic strategies targeting abnormal DNA methylation may have therapeutic utility in HD. PMID:27516062

  9. AraC regulatory protein mutants with altered effector specificity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang-Yan; Fazelinia, Hossein; Cirino, Patrick C

    2008-04-16

    The AraC regulatory protein of the Escherichia coli ara operon has been engineered to activate transcription in response to D-arabinose and not in response to its native effector L-arabinose. Two different AraC mutant libraries, each with four randomized binding pocket residues, were subjected to FACS-mediated dual screening using a GFP reporter. Both libraries yielded mutants with the desired switch in effector specificity, and one mutant we describe maintains tight repression in the absence of effector. The presence of 100 mM L-arabinose does not influence the response of the reported mutants to D-arabinose, and the mutants are not induced by other sugars tested (D-xylose, D-fucose, D-lyxose). Co-expression of the FucP transporter in E. coli enabled induction by D-arabinose in the 0.1 mM range. Our results demonstrate the power of dual screening for altering AraC inducer specificity and represent steps toward the design of customized in vivo molecular reporters and gene switches for metabolic engineering.

  10. Autolysis and autoaggregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa colony morphology mutants.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, David A; Calfee, M Worth; Rainey, Paul B; Pesci, Everett C

    2002-12-01

    Two distinctive colony morphologies were noted in a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposon insertion mutants. One set of mutants formed wrinkled colonies of autoaggregating cells. Suppressor analysis of a subset of these mutants showed that this was due to the action of the regulator WspR and linked this regulator (and the chemosensory pathway to which it belongs) to genes that encode a putative fimbrial adhesin required for biofilm formation. WspR homologs, related in part by a shared GGDEF domain, regulate cell surface factors, including aggregative fimbriae and exopolysaccharides, in diverse bacteria. The second set of distinctive insertion mutants formed colonies that lysed at their center. Strains with the most pronounced lysis overproduced the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), an extracellular signal that interacts with quorum sensing. Autolysis was suppressed by mutation of genes required for PQS biosynthesis, and in one suppressed mutant, autolysis was restored by addition of synthetic PQS. The mechanism of autolysis may involve activation of the endogenous prophage and phage-related pyocins in the genome of strain PAO1. The fact that PQS levels correlated with autolysis suggests a fine balance in natural populations of P. aeruginosa between survival of the many and persistence of the few.

  11. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Miller, Darla R; Rinchik, Eugene M; Williams, Robert; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.

  12. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T; Gainor, Justin F; Corcoran, Ryan B; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Rudin, Charles M; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-06-30

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proved difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, a MEK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, which acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signalling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumour cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities: it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS-