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Sample records for mutant vaccine strain

  1. Characterization of Brucella abortus mutant strain Δ22915, a potential vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanqing; Tian, Mingxing; Li, Peng; Liu, Jiameng; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2017-04-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella spp., is an important zoonosis worldwide. Vaccination is an effective strategy for protection against Brucella infection in livestock in developing countries and in wildlife in developed countries. However, current vaccine strains including S19 and RB51 are pathogenic to humans and pregnant animals, limiting their use. In this study, we constructed the Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S2308 mutant strain Δ22915, in which the putative lytic transglycosylase gene BAB_RS22915 was deleted. The biological properties of mutant strain Δ22915 were characterized and protection of mice against virulent S2308 challenge was evaluated. The mutant strain Δ22915 showed reduced survival within RAW264.7 cells and survival in vivo in mice. In addition, the mutant strain Δ22915 failed to escape fusion with lysosomes within host cells, and caused no observable pathological damage. RNA-seq analysis indicated that four genes associated with amino acid/nucleotide transport and metabolism were significantly upregulated in mutant strain Δ22915. Furthermore, inoculation of ∆22915 at 10(5) colony forming units induced effective host immune responses and long-term protection of BALB/c mice. Therefore, mutant strain ∆22915 could be used as a novel vaccine candidate in the future to protect animals against B. abortus infection.

  2. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in birds by using live vaccine candidate containing attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Berchieri, Angelo

    2010-04-01

    The ideal live vaccine to control Salmonella in commercial chicken flocks should engender protection against various strains. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the attenuation of a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) mutant strain with deletion on genes cobS and cbiA, that are involved in the biosynthesis of cobalamin. Furthermore, evaluate its use as a live vaccine against Salmonella. For the evaluation of the vaccine efficacy, two experiments were conducted separately. Birds from a commercial brown line of chickens were used to perform challenge with SG wild type strain and birds from a commercial white line of chickens were used to perform challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) wild type strain. In both experiments, the birds were separated in three groups (A, B and C). Birds were orally vaccinated with the SG mutant as the following programme: group A, one dose at 5 days of age; group B, one dose at 5 days of age and a second dose at 25 days of age; and group C, birds were kept unvaccinated as controls. At 45 days of age, birds from all groups, including the control, were challenged orally by SG wild type (brown line) or SE wild type (white line). Lastly, another experiment was performed to evaluate the use of the SG mutant strain to prevent caecal colonization by SE wild type on 1-day-old broiler chicks. Mortality and systemic infection by SG wild type strain were assessed in brown chickens; faecal shedding and systemic infection by SE wild type were assessed in white chickens and caecal colonization was assessed in broiler chicks. Either vaccination with one or two doses of SG mutant, were capable to protect brown chickens against SG wild type. In the experiment with white chickens, only vaccination with two doses of SG mutant protected the birds against challenge with SE wild type. Although, SG mutant could not prevent caecal colonization in 1-day-old broiler chicks by the challenge strain SE wild type. Overall, the results indicated that SG mutant

  3. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish.

  4. Equine herpesvirus type 1 mutant defective in glycoprotein E gene as candidate vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    TSUJIMURA, Koji; SHIOSE, Tomoki; YAMANAKA, Takashi; NEMOTO, Manabu; KONDO, Takashi; MATSUMURA, Tomio

    2009-11-01

    An equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) mutant, DeltagE, defective in glycoprotein E (gE) was evaluated as a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. Colostrum-deprived Thoroughbred foals inoculated intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with DeltagE did not exhibit any clinical signs of respiratory disease except for a mild nasal discharge in 1 i.n. inoculated foal on Days 1 and 3 post-infection. In contrast, the intranasal inoculation of foals with the revertant of DeltagE resulted in biphasic pyrexia, mucopurulent nasal discharge and swelling of submandibular lymph nodes. These results indicated that gE plays an important role as regards EHV-1 virulence in horses. The ability of DeltagE to protect against wild type EHV-1 challenge infection was assessed using i.m. vaccinated foals. Foals inoculated twice i.m. with 10(5) or 10(6) plaque-forming units (pfu) of DeltagE at an interval of 3 weeks exhibited no clinical evidence of local inflammation, respiratory disease or deleterious systemic responses. Remarkable increases in SN antibody titer to EHV-1 were observed in all vaccinated foals after the 2nd inoculation with DeltagE. Following a wild type EHV-1 challenge infection, vaccinated foals showed milder clinical symptoms than foals vaccinated with a placebo. Specifically, 1 of 3 foals vaccinated with 10(6) pfu of DeltagE exhibited no clinical symptoms other than a mild nasal discharge for 1 day. Additionally, the virus load of nasal shedding and viremia were reduced by vaccination. These results suggest that DeltagE would be a good candidate as an MLV vaccine.

  5. Residual virulence and immunogenicity of CGV26 and CGV2631 B. melitensis Rev. 1 deletion mutant strains in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Laurence A; Laroucau, Karine; Olivier, Michel; Grillo, Maria Jesus; Marin, Clara M; Verger, Jean-Michel; Blasco, Jose-Maria

    2006-04-24

    The CGV26 and CGV2631 strains are novel engineered Brucella melitensis Rev.1 mutant strains deleted for the bp26 gene or for both bp26 and omp31 genes, respectively, coding for proteins of diagnostic significance. The residual virulence and immunogenicity of both mutants were compared to the parental Rev.1 strain in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination. The deletion of the bp26 gene or both bp26 and omp31 genes had no significant effect on the intracellular survival of the Rev.1 strain in ovine macrophage cultures. The kinetics of infection induced by both mutants in sheep was similar to the Rev.1 strain, and inoculation by the subcutaneous route produced wider and more generalized infections than the conjunctival route. All strains were cleared from lymph nodes and organs within 3 months after inoculation. The CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants induced both specific systemic antibody response and lymphoproliferation in sheep. The kinetics of the responses induced by the mutants was quite similar to that of the parental Rev.1 strain, except for the intensity of the lymphoproliferative response, which was attenuated for the CGV2631 mutant. In conclusion, the residual virulence of both CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants in sheep was similar to that of the parental Rev.1 vaccine strain. These mutants induced also significant specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity in sheep and are suitable to be evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections in sheep.

  6. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccines derived from mutant strains engineered to express factor H binding proteins from antigenic variant groups 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Giuntini, Serena; Seubert, Anja; Granoff, Dan M

    2009-02-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines, which are treated with detergents to decrease endotoxin activity, are safe and effective in humans. However, the vaccines elicit serum bactericidal antibody responses largely directed against PorA, which is antigenically variable. We previously prepared a native (non-detergent-treated) OMV vaccine from a mutant of group B strain H44/76 in which the lpxL1 gene was inactivated, which resulted in penta-acylated lipid A with attenuated endotoxin activity. To enhance protection, we overexpressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) from the antigenic variant 1 group. The vaccine elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses in mice against strains with fHbp variant 1 (approximately 70% of group B isolates) but not against strains with variant 2 or 3. In the present study, we constructed a mutant of group B strain NZ98/254 with attenuated endotoxin that expressed both endogenous variant 1 and heterologous fHbp variant 2. A mixture of the two native OMV vaccines from the H44/76 and NZ98/254 mutants stimulated proinflammatory cytokine responses by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells similar to those stimulated by control, detergent-treated OMV vaccines from the wild-type strains. In mice, the mixture of the two native OMV vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses against strains with heterologous PorA and fHbp in the variant 1, 2, or 3 group. By adsorption studies, the principal bactericidal antibody target was determined to be fHbp. Thus, native OMV vaccines from mutants expressing fHbp variants have the potential to be safe for humans and to confer broad protection against meningococcal disease from strains expressing fHbp from each of the antigenic variant groups.

  7. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  8. Detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows based on a TaqMan real-time PCR discriminating wild type strains from an lppQ− mutant vaccine strain used for DIVA-strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vilei, Edy M.; Frey, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is the most serious cattle disease in Africa, caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type (SC). CBPP control strategies currently rely on vaccination with a vaccine based on live attenuated strains of the organism. Recently, an lppQ− mutant of the existing vaccine strain T1/44 has been developed (Janis et al., 2008). This T1lppQ− mutant strain is devoid of lipoprotein LppQ, a potential virulence attribute of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. It is designated as a potential live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine strain allowing both serological and etiological differentiation. The present paper reports on the validation of a control strategy for CBPP in cattle, whereby a TaqMan real-time PCR based on the lppQ gene has been developed for the direct detection of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows and for the discrimination of wild type strains from the lppQ− mutant vaccine strain. PMID:20381545

  9. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  10. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 104 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Conclusions/Significance Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis. PMID:26114445

  11. Genetic stability and mutant selection in Sabin 2 strain of oral poliovirus vaccine grown under different cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Taffs, R E; Chumakov, K M; Rezapkin, G V; Lu, Z; Douthitt, M; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1995-06-01

    Mutations that consistently accumulated in the attenuated Sabin 2 strain of poliovirus during propagation in cell cultures were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Eight additional sites previously identified in stool isolates were also examined by MAPREC in the virus passages. The pattern of selectable mutations and the rate of their accumulation depended on the type and confluence of the cell culture and the temperature of virus growth. Five unstable genomic sites were identified in Sabin 2 virus passaged 10 times at 34 degrees in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, with the mutations accumulating in the range 1 to 24%. Accumulation of these mutations did not appear to result in a loss of attenuated phenotype since the virus passaged under these conditions passed the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT). The content of the 481-G revertant known to be related to neurovirulence in monkeys did not increase. Thus, our results suggest that upon growth of Sabin 2 virus in AGMK cells at 34 degrees, the key determinant(s) of attenuation remained stable, and the mutations that occurred did not affect monkey neurovirulence. In virus passaged 10 times at 37 degrees in AGMK cells, 4 unstable genomic sites were identified, in some of them accumulating up to 12% of the mutants. This virus sample severely failed the MNVT. Virus passaged in Vero cells at 34 and 37 degrees accumulated mutants at 7 and 14 genomic sites, respectively, including 481-G in both cases, with almost complete substitution of the original nucleotides at some of the sites. We tested 44 commercial monopools of Type 2 OPV and found out that all of them contained 481-G revertants in the range 0.4-1.1%. An increase in the 481-G revertants in passaged viruses to the level of 4% and above correlated with failure of these samples by the MNVT. Since the pattern of selectable mutations differed in viruses grown in the two

  12. Vaccination with Brucella abortus rough mutant RB51 protects BALB/c mice against virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Jones, S M; Blasco, J M; Enright, F M; Schurig, G G; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with live Brucella abortus RB51, a stable rough mutant, produced protection against challenge with virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis. Passive-transfer experiments indicated that vaccinated mice were protected against B. abortus 2308 through cell-mediated immunity, against B. ovis PA through humoral immunity, and against B. melitensis 16M through both forms of immunity. Live bacteria were required for the induction of protective cell-mediated immunity; vaccination with whole killed cells of strain RB51 failed to protect mice against B. abortus 2308 despite development of good delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Protective antibodies against the heterologous species were generated in vaccinated mice primarily through anamnestic responses following challenge infections. Growth of the antigenically unrelated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in the spleens of vaccinated mice indicated that nonspecific killing by residual activated macrophages contributed minimally to protection. These results encourage the continued investigation of strain RB51 as an alternative vaccine against heterologous Brucella species. However, its usefulness against B. ovis would be limited if, as suggested here, epitopes critical for protective cell-mediated immunity are not shared between B. abortus and B. ovis. Images PMID:7927779

  13. Protective effects of recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin type C mutant vaccine against experimental bovine infection by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Byoung Sun; Moon, Jin San; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Young-In; Lee, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Jong-Duk; Lee, Byung-Saeng; Koo, Hye Cheong; Park, Yong Ho

    2008-04-16

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiological agents of bovine mastitis; however, antibiotics that are effective against bovine strains of S. aureus are not currently available. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type C (SEC), a superantigen, is the enterotoxin most frequently expressed by bovine strains of S. aureus and one of immunogenic determinants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protective effectiveness of recombinant SEC mutant vaccine (MastaVactrade mark) against experimentally induced bovine infection. Three representative SEC secreting strains were selected from 9 candidate isolates that showed various intensities of pathogenicity on mice and inoculated into 5 lactating dairy cattle at a concentration of 50-5.0x10(8) CFU per quarter. The optimal experimental bovine subclinical mastitis model was produced by inoculation with 50 CFU of S. aureus 409 per quarter, a level which was not lethal to mice. After the experimental model was determined, other 3 cattle were intramuscularly administered three doses of vaccine at day 0, at 2 wks and at 6 wks. Nine quarters of 3 vaccinated cattle and 8 quarters of 3 control cattle were then challenged with S. aureus 409. An SEC-specific ELISA test conducted at 4 wks post-immunization confirmed the presence of a high antibody titer against SEC in all vaccinated cattle. The somatic cell counts from the vaccinated group remained relatively low, whereas those of control group increased significantly after challenge with S. aureus. After challenge, S. aureus was not isolated from any cattle in the vaccinated group, whereas it was isolated from 75% of the cattle in the control group. These results indicate that recombinant SEC mutant vaccine had a protective effect against S. aureus intramammary infection in lactating cattle.

  14. Genetic stability of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-mutant (temperature-sensitive) live influenza virus genes: analysis by oligonucleotide mapping of recombinant vaccine strains before and after replication in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cox, N J; Kendal, A P

    1984-02-01

    Ten cold-adapted (ca) recombinant influenza viruses that had been derived by reassortment between the ca temperature-sensitive (ts) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant and selected wild-type viruses were examined by RNA oligonucleotide mapping for the presence or absence of several previously identified oligonucleotide markers. These markers comprise oligonucleotides that appeared only in the mutant donor strain after cold adaptation and other oligonucleotides present only in the parent A/Ann Arbor/6/60 wild-type virus. The markers in the mutant donor strain were transferred without change to the recombinant ca vaccine strains, and reversion causing a reappearance of markers for the wild-type A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus did not occur. Furthermore, examination by oligonucleotide mapping of 10 isolates from vaccinated, seronegative children revealed a high degree of genetic stability of the viral genome; an oligonucleotide change was detected in only one of the 10 isolates examined.

  15. Towards a vaccine for attaching/effacing Escherichia coli: a LEE encoded regulator (ler) mutant of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is attenuated, immunogenic, and protects rabbits from lethal challenge with the wild-type virulent strain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengru; Feng, Shuzhang; Thate, Timothy E; Kaper, James B; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2006-05-01

    attenuated ler mutant strains may have potential for use as oral vaccines, or as vaccine vectors for delivery of foreign antigens. It remains to be determined whether such regulatory mutants can protect against infection with A/E bacteria of differing serotypes affecting different hosts.

  16. Safety, infectivity, immunogenicity, and in vivo stability of two attenuated auxotrophic mutant strains of Salmonella typhi, 541Ty and 543Ty, as live oral vaccines in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Herrington, D; Murphy, J R; Morris, J G; Losonsky, G; Tall, B; Lindberg, A A; Svenson, S; Baqar, S; Edwards, M F

    1987-01-01

    Two Salmonella typhi mutants, 541Ty (Vi+) and 543Ty (Vi-), auxotrophic for p-aminobenzoate and adenine, were evaluated as live oral vaccines. 33 volunteers ingested single doses of 10(8), 10(9), or 10(10) vaccine organisms, while four others received two 2 X 10(9) organism doses 4 d apart. No adverse reactions were observed. Vaccine was recovered from coprocultures of 29 of 37 vaccinees (78%) and from duodenal string cultures of two; repeated blood cultures were negative. The humoral antibody response to S. typhi O, H, Vi, and lysate antigens in serum and intestinal fluid was meager. In contrast, all vaccinees manifested cell-mediated immune responses. After vaccination, 69% of vaccinees overall and 89% of recipients of doses greater than or equal to 10(9) responded to S. typhi particulate or purified O polysaccharide antigens in lymphocyte replication studies but not to antigens of other Salmonella or Escherichia coli. All individuals, postvaccination, demonstrated a significant plasma-dependent mononuclear cell inhibition of wild S. typhi. PMID:3818953

  17. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Vaccine Strain CVD 1204 Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I and Mutant Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koprowski, Hilary; Levine, Myron M.; Anderson, Richard J.; Losonsky, Genevieve; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Barry, Eileen M.

    2000-01-01

    A multivalent live oral vaccine against both Shigella spp. and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is being developed based on the hypothesis that protection can be achieved if attenuated shigellae express ETEC fimbrial colonization factors and genetically detoxified heat-labile toxin from a human ETEC isolate (LTh). Two detoxified derivatives of LTh, LThK63 and LThR72, were engineered by substitution—serine to lysine at residue 63, or lysine to arginine at residue 72. The genes encoding these two derivatives were cloned separately on expression plasmids downstream from the CFA/I operon. Following electroporation into S. flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, coexpression of CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, GM1 binding assays, and agglutination with anti-CFA/I antiserum. Hemagglutination and electron microscopy confirmed surface expression of CFA/I. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally on days 0 and 15 with CVD 1204 expressing CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 exhibited high titers of both serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA anti-CFA/I; 40% of the animals produced antibodies directed against LTh. All immunized guinea pigs also produced mucosal IgA (in tears) and serum IgG anti-S. flexneri 2a O antibodies. Furthermore, all immunized animals were protected from challenge with wild-type S. flexneri 2a. This prototype Shigella-ETEC hybrid vaccine demonstrates the feasibility of expressing multiple ETEC antigens on a single plasmid in an attenuated Shigella vaccine strain and engendering immune responses against both the heterologous antigens and vector strain. PMID:10948101

  18. Vaccination of Chickens with SPI1-lon and SPI1-lon-fliC Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is gradually decreasing in poultry flocks in the EU, which may result in the demand for a vaccine that allows for the differentiation of vaccinated flocks from those infected by wild-type S. Enteritidis. In this study, we therefore constructed a (Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1) SPI1-lon mutant with or without fliC encoding for S. Enteritidis flagellin. The combination of SPI1-lon mutations resulted in attenuated but immunogenic mutant suitable for oral vaccination of poultry. In addition, the vaccination of chickens with the SPI1-lon-fliC mutant enabled the serological differentiation of vaccinated and infected chickens. The absence of fliC therefore did not affect the immunogenicity of the vaccine strain and allowed for serological differentiation of the vaccinated chickens. The SPI1-lon-fliC mutant is therefore a suitable marker vaccine strain for oral vaccination of poultry. PMID:23785484

  19. O-Antigen-Deficient Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Mutants Are Ingested via an Aberrant Form of Looping Phagocytosis and Show Altered Kinetics of Intracellular Trafficking in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the uptake and intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and LVS with disruptions of wbtDEF and wbtI genes essential for synthesis of the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. Unlike parental bacteria, O-antigen-deficient LVS is efficiently killed by serum with intact complement but not by serum lacking terminal complement components. Opsonization of O-antigen-deficient LVS in serum lacking terminal complement components allows efficient uptake of these live bacteria by macrophages. In the presence of complement, whereas parental F. tularensis LVS is internalized within spacious pseudopod loops, mutant LVS is internalized within tightly juxtaposed multiple onion-like layers of pseudopodia. Without complement, both parental and mutant LVSs are internalized within spacious pseudopod loops. Thus, molecules other than O antigen are important in triggering dramatic pseudopod extensions and uptake by spacious pseudopod loops. Following uptake, both parental and mutant LVSs enter compartments that show limited staining for the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein CD63 and little fusion with secondary lysosomes. Subsequently, both parental and mutant LVSs lose their CD63 staining. Whereas the majority of parental LVS escapes into the cytosol by 6 h after uptake, mutant LVS shows a marked lag but does escape by 1 day after uptake. Despite the altered kinetics of phagosome escape, both mutant and parental strains grow to high levels within human macrophages. Thus, the O antigen plays a role in the morphology of uptake in the presence of complement and the kinetics of intracellular growth but is not essential for escape, survival, altered membrane trafficking, or intramacrophage growth. PMID:22202123

  20. The complete nucleotide sequence of two cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive attenuated mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3).

    PubMed

    Stokes, A; Tierney, E L; Sarris, C M; Murphy, B R; Hall, S L

    1993-10-01

    Two cold-passaged mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS wild-type (wt) strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) have been sequenced. These mutant viruses display the cold-adapted (ca), temperature-sensitive (ts), and attenuation (att) phenotypes. Sequence data indicate that both cp12 and cp45 sustained nucleotide substitutions during cold passage and subsequent cloning. Fifteen nucleotide changes were present in cp12 and 18 in cp45. Of these changes, some were present in the sequence of the prototype wt strain (Wash/47885/57) or were non-coding changes present in the open reading frames (ORFs). These were considered unlikely to be of significance in contributing to phenotypic differences between the mutants and the JS wt. There were nine remaining changes in cp12 and eight in cp45 that would most likely contribute to their phenotypes. For cp12, two were non-coding changes in regulatory regions, one in the 3' genome leader and one in the NP gene transcription start signal. The remaining seven changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in NP, F, HN, and L. For cp45, two mutations were in a non-coding regulatory region, the 3' genome leader. The remaining six changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in F, HN, and L. Only one amino acid substitution was conserved between cp12 and cp45 (a valine to alanine change at position 384 of the HN gene). These results should prove useful in the future in understanding the genetic basis of attenuation of the cold-passaged PIV3 candidate vaccine viruses.

  1. Experimental trial in heifers vaccinated with Staphylococcus aureus avirulent mutant against bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Matías; Giraudo, Jose; Raspanti, Claudia; Nagel, Rosa; Odierno, Liliana; Primo, Valeria; Bogni, Cristina

    2008-02-05

    Staphylococcus aureus, is the most frequently isolated pathogen from cases of bovine mastitis. Vaccination against S. aureus seems to be a rational approach for the control of staphylococcal mastitis. In the present work we evaluate the response of heifers vaccinated with a S. aureus avirulent mutant to the intramammary challenge with a S. aureus virulent strain. Clinical signs, production of milk, shedding of S. aureus cells, somatic cell count (SCC) and antigen-specific IgG in blood and milk, were determined. Two subcutaneous doses of a culture of the mutant, used as vaccine, was administered to four pregnant heifers 30 and 10 days before calving. The vaccinated heifers and four non-vaccinated were challenged 10 days after calving with the homologous virulent S. aureus strain, which was inoculated by intramammary route into two quarters of each animal. No local tissue damage was observed due to the administration of the vaccine. A significantly increase of specific IgG to S. aureus RC122 was detected in blood and milk of vaccinate heifers as well as a slight increase in daily milk yield during the trial. No significant difference on shedding of bacteria in milk and SCC were found among groups. In conclusion, vaccination of heifers before calving by an avirulent mutant vaccine of S. aureus, induced specific and significant antibody responses and provide better post-challenge conditions in vaccinated heifers.

  2. Isolation and characterization of mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Nakai, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kume, K

    1988-01-01

    Mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, named B-42, B-76, B-84, and B-119, were obtained after serial passages of a parent strain, L3, on Bordet-Gengou agar plates containing 20% horse blood and 200 micrograms of nalidixic acid per ml (BGN-20 agar plates) at 42 degrees C. Mutant strains completely lacked dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability, and lethal activity of the strains for mice was apparently reduced compared with that of strain L3. Mutant strains were able to grow at 42 degrees C, and the strains were nalidixic acid resistant. The mutant strains showed domed (Dom+) colony morphology with smooth texture (Scs+) and no production of zone of hemolysis (Hly-), but the agglutinability of these strains to antiserum prepared with Dom+ Scs+ Hly+ organisms of strain L3 was the same as that of strain L3. When strain B-42 was inoculated intramuscularly or intranasally into guinea pigs, all the animals survived without manifesting clinical signs and produced a high-level of serum agglutination antibodies against strain L3. These inoculated animals were protected against intranasal challenge with strain L3. These properties of mutant strains are hereditarily stable after 50 subcultures on BGN-20 agar plates or 20 passages in mice. These data suggest that the mutant strains lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability can be used as a live attenuated vaccine against swine atrophic rhinitis. PMID:3182989

  3. Evaluation of a protease activation mutant of Sendai virus as a potent live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Maru, M; Haraguchi, M; Sato, K; Hotta, H; Homma, M

    1992-01-01

    A protease activation mutant of Sendai virus, TR-5, was investigated as a candidate for a live vaccine. Vaccination with TR-5 which had been activated by chymotrypsin beforehand (active TR-5) elicited protective immunity against otherwise lethal challenge infection with wild-type Sendai virus in DBA/2, C3H and ICR strains of mice. Less of the active TR-5 was required to confer protection on mice compared with an ordinary ether-inactivated Sendai virus vaccine (split vaccine). The protective immunity elicited by TR-5 lasted longer and the booster effect was more prominent compared to the split vaccine. No seroconversion was observed with contact mice when housed in a cage with mice vaccinated with the active TR-5. The overall results show that the active TR-5 is an effective and safe live vaccine of Sendai virus in mice.

  4. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers.

  5. Immuogenicity and safety of a natural rough mutant of Brucella suis as a vaccine for swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and clearance of the natural rough mutant of Brucella suis strain 353-1 (353-1) as a vaccine in domestic swine. In three studies encompassing 155 animals, pigs were inoculated with 353-1 by conjunctival (5 x 10**7 CFU), p...

  6. Expression and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Diphtheria Toxin Molecule, CRM197, and Its Fragments in Salmonella typhi Vaccine Strain CVD 908-htrA

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nadav; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    Mutant diphtheria toxin molecule CRM197 and fragments thereof were expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA, and the constructs were tested for their ability to induce serum antitoxin. Initially, expressed proteins were insoluble, and the constructs failed to induce neutralizing antitoxin. Soluble CRM197 was expressed at low levels by utilizing the hemolysin A secretion system from Escherichia coli. PMID:10417208

  7. Cold-adapted vaccine strains of influenza A virus act as dominant negative mutants in mixed infections with wild-type influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Whitaker-Dowling, P; Lucas, W; Youngner, J S

    1990-04-01

    The cold-adapted reassortant of influenza A, which is a candidate live virus vaccine, interfered with the replication of parental wild-type virus in mixed infections of either MDCK cells or embryonated eggs. The interference occurred at either the permissive or nonpermissive temperature for the cold-adapted virus. In doubly infected cells, the yield of the wild-type virus was reduced by as much as 3000-fold and the protein synthesis phenotype expressed was that of the cold-adapted virus. The interference was detected even when infection with wild-type virus was carried out at a 9-fold excess or 2 hr before infection with the cold-adapted virus. As well as interfering with its wild-type parental virus, the cold-adapted virus also inhibited the replication of a heterologous influenza A subtype. In addition to its immunogenic potential, the ability to interfere with the replication of wild-type viruses is a desirable trait for any live, attenuated virus vaccine.

  8. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development.

  9. Genetic strain modification of a live rabies virus vaccine widely used in Europe for wildlife oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, Florence; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Picard Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    In Europe, the main reservoir and vector of rabies has been the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Oral immunization of foxes with live vaccines, using attenuated rabies strains (SAD B19, SAD Bern), apathogenic mutants of an attenuated strain (SAG2) and the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine (V-RG), has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. Among all vaccines currently used for wildlife oral vaccination, one vaccine (marketed as SAD Bern strain) has been widely used in Europe since 1992 with the distribution of 17million of baits in 2011. Because of the potential environmental safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the full genome sequencing of this vaccine was undertaken and the sequence was characterized and compared with those of referenced rabies viruses. The vaccine showed higher similarity to the strains belonging to the SAD B19 vaccine virus strains than to the SAD Bern vaccines. This study is the first one reporting on virus strain identity changes in this attenuated vaccine.

  10. A heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain capB mutant and recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing F. tularensis IglC induces potent protective immunity in mice against virulent F. tularensis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2013-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS.

  11. A Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy Comprising the Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain capB Mutant and Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes Expressing F. tularensis IglC Induces Potent Protective Immunity in Mice against Virulent F. tularensis Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS. PMID:23439306

  12. Efficacy of immunization against bovine mastitis using a Staphylococcus aureus avirulent mutant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Matías; Giraudo, Jose; Raspanti, Claudia; Odierno, Liliana; Bogni, Cristina

    2010-06-17

    Bovine mastitis is responsible of major economic losses on dairy farms worldwide. In Argentine dairy herds, Staphylococcus aureus is the main causative agent of the disease. The ineffectiveness of some current practices to control S. aureus infections, often leads to a chronic and recurrent infection with persistent bacterial reservoir within a herd. Vaccination against S. aureus seems to be a rational approach for the control of the disease. In the present study, we investigate the response of dairy heifers after a combined immunization schedule with the avirulent mutant RC122 S. aureus vaccine. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated heifers were challenged 40 days after calving with the parental virulent strain. After challenge, and during the study period, milk bacterial recovery was significantly higher in non-vaccinated heifers than vaccinates. Importantly, inoculated bacteria could not be isolated from the milk of vaccinated heifers until 72 h after challenge, and the overall percentage of infected quarters in these animals was significantly lower. An increase in the level of specific IgG was observed in blood and milk of vaccinated heifers during the trial. At calving, IgG(2) was the main antibody isotype found in blood. Immune sera from vaccinated heifers increased phagocytosis over sera from non-vaccinated heifers and were able to opsonize heterologous S. aureus strains. Results demonstrated that immunization of dairy heifers with strain RC122 was able to elicit a significant opsonic antibody production in blood and milk and provides protection by a significant reduction in bacterial shedding after challenge. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic characterization of measles vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Bankamp, Bettina; Takeda, Makoto; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wenbo; Rota, Paul A

    2011-07-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 9 measles vaccine strains were compared with the sequence of the Edmonston wild-type virus. AIK-C, Moraten, Rubeovax, Schwarz, and Zagreb are vaccine strains of the Edmonston lineage, whereas CAM-70, Changchun-47, Leningrad-4 and Shanghai-191 were derived from 4 different wild-type isolates. Nucleotide substitutions were found in the noncoding regions of the genomes as well as in all coding regions, leading to deduced amino acid substitutions in all 8 viral proteins. Although the precise mechanisms involved in the attenuation of individual measles vaccines remain to be elucidated, in vitro assays of viral protein functions and recombinant viruses with defined genetic modifications have been used to characterize the differences between vaccine and wild-type strains. Although almost every protein contributes to an attenuated phenotype, substitutions affecting host cell tropism, virus assembly, and the ability to inhibit cellular antiviral defense mechanisms play an especially important role in attenuation.

  14. The effect of T and B lymphocyte depletion on the protection of mice vaccinated with a Gal E mutant of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. A.; Wray, C.; Sojka, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents were used to determine the relative importance of T and B lymphocytes in conferring protection to mice vaccinated with a live gal E mutant of Salmonella typhimurium, strain G30D. Lymphocyte transformation and serum agglutination tests showed that while cyclophosphamide (CPA) suppressed B lymphocytes, antilymphocyte sea (ALS) suppressed both T and B cells. The humoral response of vaccinated animals treated with ALS was therefore supplemented by the i.v. injection of serum from untreated vaccinated mice. CPA-treated mice could not control multiplication of the vaccinal strain which eventually killed them. There was little multiplication of the vaccinal strain in the controls and ALS-treated mice, all of which survived to challenge. The vaccinated controls and vaccinated ALS treated groups each survived infection with the challenge strain which was gradually eliminated. It was concluded that humoral immunity was of greater importance than cellular immunity in mice vaccinated i.p. with strain G30D. PMID:782501

  15. Immunogenicity of a temperature sensitive mutant Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine.

    PubMed

    Whithear, K G; Soeripto; Harrigan, K E; Ghiocas, E

    1990-05-01

    The immunogenicity of the ts-11 vaccine strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum was assessed following eye drop or coarse aerosol administration in chickens of various ages. Protection was evalualted following intra-abdominal (IA) or fine droplet aerosol administration of virulent M. gallisepticum, usually the Ap3AS strain and was measured mainly by the scoring of gross air sac lesions or by egg production. Vaccination of chickens with ts-11 did not elicit a substantial serum antibody response as measured by rapid serum agglutination test, or ELISA. Protection was never demonstrated when no M. gallisepticum serum antibody response was detected in a vaccinated group of chickens. Failure to protect occurred usually, although not invariably, following aerosol administration of the vaccine. Vaccination by eye drop usually, although not invariably provided protection against challenge. In one experiment, chickens vaccinated by eye drop at 8-weeks were as susceptible as non vaccinated controls when challenged by IA inoculation at 13-weeks-of-age. Yet other birds from the same vaccinated group were resistant when challenged in an identical way at 23-weeks. No measurable increase in M. gallisepticum specific serum antibody concentrations occurred in the intervening period. Equally surprising was the response of another group of birds in the same experiment that had been vaccinated with a higher dose of ts-11. An antibody response was detected in this group, but they were susceptible to challenge at 23-weeks. Interestingly, a drop in egg production commenced 4 weeks after challenge, 2 weeks later than that observed in a non vaccinated group challenged at the same time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Mutant Native Outer Membrane Vesicles Combined with a Serogroup A Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine for Prevention of Meningococcal Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Fergus, Andrew M.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) polysaccharide conjugate vaccine used in Sub-Saharan Africa does not prevent disease caused by MenW or MenX strains, which also cause epidemics in the region. We investigated the vaccine-potential of native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed factor H-binding protein (NOMV-fHbp), which targeted antigens in African meningococcal strains, and was combined with a MenA polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings The NOMV-fHbp vaccine was prepared from a mutant African MenW strain with PorA P1.5,2, attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1), deleted capsular genes, and over-expressed fHbp in variant group 1. The NOMV-fHbp was adsorbed with Al(OH)3 and used to reconstitute a lyophilized MenA conjugate vaccine, which normally is reconstituted with liquid MenC, Y and W conjugates in a meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine (MCV4-CRM, Novartis). Mice immunized with the NOMV-fHbp vaccine alone developed serum bactericidal (human complement) activity against 13 of 15 African MenA strains tested; 10 of 10 African MenX strains, 7 of 7 African MenW strains, and 6 of 6 genetically diverse MenB strains with fHbp variant group 1 (including 1 strain from The Gambia). The combination NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine elicited high serum bactericidal titers against the two MenA strains tested that were resistant to bactericidal antibodies elicited by the NOMV-fHbp alone; the combination elicited higher titers against the MenA and MenW strains than those elicited by a control MCV4-CRM vaccine (P<0.05); and high titers against MenX and MenB strains. For most strains, the titers elicited by a control NOMV-fHbp knock out vaccine were <1∶10 except when the strain PorA matched the vaccine (titers >1∶000). Conclusion/Significance The NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine provided similar or higher coverage against MenA and MenW strains than a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and extended protection against Men

  17. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine.

  18. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  19. Next-generation outer membrane vesicle vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis based on nontoxic LPS mutants.

    PubMed

    van der Ley, Peter; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie

    2011-08-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been used extensively as experimental vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis. Classical meningococcal OMV vaccines contain wildtype lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a hexa-acylated lipid A moiety, which is a very potent activator of the TLR4 receptor. While this may make the LPS an effective "internal" adjuvant, it also contributes to vaccine reactogenicity. Reduction of endotoxic activity has therefore been essential for the application of meningococcal OMV vaccines in humans. Classical OMV vaccines have a reduced LPS content as a result of detergent extraction, mostly with deoxycholate. An alternative method is the use of meningococcal strains with genetically detoxified LPS, in particular where mutation in the lpxL1 gene has resulted in penta-acylated lipid A with strongly attenuated endotoxic activity. This allows the use of native OMVs without any need for LPS removal by detergent extraction, making it a much easier to produce and more versatile vaccine platform. Several groups have now started the development of native OMV vaccines based on non-toxic LPS mutants, and this Commentary provides an overview of the various approaches and results thus far.

  20. Evaluation of Brucella abortus Phosphoglucomutase (pgm) Mutant as a New Live Rough-Phenotype Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Comerci, Diego José; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2003-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 is the vaccine most frequently used against bovine brucellosis. Although it induces good protection levels, it cannot be administered to pregnant cattle, revaccination is not advised due to interference in the discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals during immune-screening procedures, and the vaccine is virulent for humans. Due to these reasons, there is a continuous search for new bovine vaccine candidates that may confer protection levels comparable to those conferred by S19 but without its disadvantages. A previous study characterized the phenotype associated with the phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene disruption in Brucella abortus S2308, as well as the possible role for the smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in virulence and intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells (J. E. Ugalde, C. Czibener, M. F. Feldman, and R. A. Ugalde, Infect. Immun. 68:5716-5723, 2000). In this report, we analyze the protection, proliferative response, and cytokine production induced in BALB/c mice by a Δpgm deletion strain. We show that this strain synthesizes O antigen with a size of approximately 45 kDa but is rough. This is due to the fact that the Δpgm strain is unable to assemble the O side chain in the complete LPS. Vaccination with the Δpgm strain induced protection levels comparable to those induced by S19 and generated a proliferative splenocyte response and a cytokine profile typical of a Th1 response. On the other hand, we were unable to detect a specific anti-O-antigen antibody response by using the fluorescence polarization assay. In view of these results, the possibility that the Δpgm mutant could be used as a vaccination strain is discussed. PMID:14573645

  1. Novel BVDV-2 mutants as new candidates for modified-live vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zemke, Johanna; König, Patricia; Mischkale, Katrin; Reimann, Ilona; Beer, Martin

    2010-04-21

    Protection against Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 2 infection of commercially available vaccines is often limited due to marked genetic and antigenic differences between BVDV types 1 (BVDV-1) and 2 (BVDV-2). Therefore, the immunogenicity of selected BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 mutants derived from infectious full-length cDNA clones and their use as modified-live vaccine candidates against challenge infection with a virulent heterologous BVDV-2 field isolate were investigated. Deletion mutants of BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 lacking a part of the N(pro) gene (BVDV-1DeltaN(pro)/BVDV-2DeltaN(pro)) were used as well as a packaged replicon with a deletion in the structural core protein encoding region (BVDV-2DeltaC-pseudovirions). The 25 calves used in this vaccination/challenge trial were allocated in five groups (n=5/group). One group received BVDV-1DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), one group BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), one group received both, BVDV-1DeltaN(pro) and BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), and one group was immunised with the BVDV-2DeltaC-pseudovirions (2 shots). The fifth group served as non-vaccinated control group. All groups were challenged intranasally with the BVDV-2 strain HI916 and monitored for signs of clinical disease, virus shedding and viremia. All tested BVDV vaccine candidates markedly reduced the outcome of the heterologous virulent BVDV-2 challenge infection showing graduated protective effects. The BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) mutant was able to induce complete protection and a "sterile immunity" upon challenge. Thus it represents a promising candidate for an efficacious future live vaccine.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus avirulent mutant vaccine induces humoral and cellular immune responses on pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, M; Rodriguez, N; Vivas, A; Giraudo, J; Bogni, C

    2016-06-17

    Bovine mastitis produces economic losses, attributable to the decrease in milk production, reduced milk quality, costs of treatment and replacement of animals. A successful prophylactic vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus should elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. In a previous report we evaluated the effectiveness of a live vaccine to protect heifers against challenge with a virulent strain. In the present study the immunological response of heifers after combined immunization schedule was investigated. In a first experimental trial, heifers were vaccinated with 3 subcutaneous doses of avirulent mutant S. aureus RC122 before calving and one intramammary dose (IMD) after calving. Antibodies concentration in blood, bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and lymphocyte proliferation was determined. The levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in colostrum and the lymphocyte proliferation index were significantly higher in vaccinated respect to non-vaccinated group throughout the experiment. The second trial, where animals were inoculated with different vaccination schedules, was carried out to determine the effect of the IMD on the level of antibodies in blood and milk, cytokines (IL-13 and IFN-γ) concentration and milk's SCC and bacteriology. The bacterial growth of the S. aureus strains was totally inhibited at 1-3×10(6) and 1-3×10(3)cfu/ml, when the strains were mixed with pooled serum diluted 1/40. The results shown that IMD has not a significant effect on the features determinate. In conclusion, a vaccination schedule involving three SC doses before calving would be enough to stimulate antibodies production in milk without an IMD. Furthermore, the results showed a bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and this provides further evidence about serum functionality. Immune responses, humoral (antigen-specific antibodies and Th2 type cytokines) and cellular (T-lymphocyte proliferation responses and Th1 type cytokines), were

  3. A new vaccine escape mutant of hepatitis B virus causes occult infection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    There is growing public concern regarding assay sensitivity to HBsAg mutants in clinical diagnosis and vaccine escape. The aim of this study is to introduce a new HBsAg mutant strain. The serum samples were those of patient X at the age of 3 months and 3 years respectively, and of her mother immediately before parturition, which were used to amplify the HBsAg-coding DNA fragments by PCR. The HBsAg DNA sequences were translated into their corresponding amino acid sequences and then aligned in pubmed with nucleotide blast. The sequencing data of S coding regions shows that patient X has been infected by a new HBV variant with an A to C substitution at nt431, resulting in an Asp(GAC)to Ala(GCC) substitution at aa144 of major protein; CC to AA substitution at nt359 and nt360, resulting in an Pro(CCC) to Gln(CAA) substitution at aa120 of pre "a" epitope; A to G substitution at nt491, resulting in an Glu(GAG) to Gly(GGG) substitution at aa164 of post "a" epitope. Three new mutations (S171F, S174N and Q181R) at the antigenic epitopes of HBV presented by HLA class I molecules are found. The HBV mutant strain causes vaccine escape and occult infection.

  4. Rescue of a vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus: In vivo evaluation and comparison with standard vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Buczkowski, Hubert; Batten, Carrie; Banyard, Ashley C.; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Across the developing world peste des petits ruminants virus places a huge disease burden on agriculture, primarily affecting the production of small ruminant. The disease is most effectively controlled by vaccinating sheep and goats with live attenuated vaccines that provide lifelong immunity. However, the current vaccines and serological tests are unable to enable Differentiation between naturally Infected and Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). This factor precludes meaningful assessment of vaccine coverage and epidemiological surveillance based on serology, in turn reducing the efficiency of control programmes. The availability of a recombinant PPRV vaccine with a proven functionality is a prerequisite for the development of novel vaccines that may enable the development of DIVA tools for PPRV diagnostics. In this study, we have established an efficient reverse genetics system for PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain and, further rescued a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain that expresses eGFP as a novel transcription cassette and a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain with mutations in the haemagglutinin (H) gene to enable DIVA through disruption of binding to H by the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the competitive (c) H-ELISA. All three rescued viruses showed similar growth characteristics in vitro in comparison to parent vaccine strain and, following in vivo assessment the H mutant provided full protection in goats. Although the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the cH-ELISA was unable to bind to the mutated form of H in vitro, the mutation was not sufficient to enable DIVA in vivo. PMID:25444790

  5. Rescue of a vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus: In vivo evaluation and comparison with standard vaccine.

    PubMed

    Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Buczkowski, Hubert; Batten, Carrie; Banyard, Ashley C; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-09

    Across the developing world peste des petits ruminants virus places a huge disease burden on agriculture, primarily affecting the production of small ruminant. The disease is most effectively controlled by vaccinating sheep and goats with live attenuated vaccines that provide lifelong immunity. However, the current vaccines and serological tests are unable to enable Differentiation between naturally Infected and Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). This factor precludes meaningful assessment of vaccine coverage and epidemiological surveillance based on serology, in turn reducing the efficiency of control programmes. The availability of a recombinant PPRV vaccine with a proven functionality is a prerequisite for the development of novel vaccines that may enable the development of DIVA tools for PPRV diagnostics. In this study, we have established an efficient reverse genetics system for PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain and, further rescued a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain that expresses eGFP as a novel transcription cassette and a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain with mutations in the haemagglutinin (H) gene to enable DIVA through disruption of binding to H by the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the competitive (c) H-ELISA. All three rescued viruses showed similar growth characteristics in vitro in comparison to parent vaccine strain and, following in vivo assessment the H mutant provided full protection in goats. Although the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the cH-ELISA was unable to bind to the mutated form of H in vitro, the mutation was not sufficient to enable DIVA in vivo.

  6. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  7. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  8. Introduction of an update system for vaccine strains of veterinary influenza vaccines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Gamoh, Koichiro; Nakamura, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    The basic countermeasures used to control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) are early detection procedures and the culling of affected chickens. However, if successive HPAI outbreaks occur, the vaccination may be an option for controlling HPAI. Therefore, avian influenza (AI) vaccines are stocked by the Japanese government. By contrast, equine influenza (EI) vaccine is an effective tool for preventing or controlling EI. Because antigenic drifts affect the efficacy of AI and EI vaccines, the vaccine strains should be updated rapidly. However, the development and registration of veterinary vaccines usually takes several years. In response to this issue, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries (MAFF) established a system that allows AI and EI vaccine strains to be updated rapidly. National Veterinary Assay Laboratory, MAFF, established a vaccine strains selection committee for veterinary influenza vaccine. The main agendas involve determining whether the current vaccine strains need to be updated and selecting the most appropriate vaccine strains. The committee concluded that A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007(H5N1) was added to the strains of stockpiled AI vaccines and that the EI vaccine strains did not need to be changed, but that the clade 2 viruses of the Florida sub-lineage strain, A/equine/Yokohama/aq13/2010(H3N8) was added to the EI vaccine strain.

  9. A Yersinia pestis lpxM-mutant live vaccine induces enhanced immunity against bubonic plague in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, V A; Pan'kina, L N; Savostina, E P; Sayapina, L V; Motin, V L; Dentovskaya, S V; Shaikhutdinova, R Z; Ivanov, S A; Lindner, B; Kondakova, A N; Bystrova, O V; Kocharova, N A; Senchenkova, S N; Holst, O; Pier, G B; Knirel, Y A; Anisimov, A P

    2007-11-01

    The lpxM mutant of the live vaccine Yersinia pestis EV NIIEG strain synthesising a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide was found to be avirulent in mice and guinea pigs, notably showing no measurable virulence in Balb/c mice which do retain some susceptibility to the parental strain itself. Twenty-one days after a single injection of the lpxM-mutant, 85-100% protection was achieved in outbred mice and guinea pigs, whereas a 43% protection rate was achieved in Balb/c mice given single low doses (10(3) to 2.5 x 10(4) CFU) of this vaccine. A subcutaneous challenge with 2000 median lethal doses (equal to 20,000 CFU) of fully virulent Y. pestis 231 strain, is a 6-10-fold higher dose than that which the EV NIIEG itself can protect against.

  10. Assessment of protective efficacy of live and killed vaccines based on a non-encapsulated mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, Henk J; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Hilgers, Luuk A T; Smith, Hilde E

    2002-01-03

    The protective efficacy of a live and killed non-encapsulated isogenic mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 was determined in pigs, and compared with the efficacy of the capsulated wild-type strain. SPF pigs were vaccinated twice intramuscularly at 4 and 7 weeks of age with a dose of 1 x 10(9) formalin-killed CFU of the wild-type (WT-BAC), formalin-killed non-encapsulated mutant (CM-BAC) or live non-encapsulated mutant (CM-LIVE) strain. After 2 weeks, vaccinated pigs and non-vaccinated controls were challenged intravenously with 1 x 10(7) CFU of the homologous, wild-type S. suis serotype 2 strain. Protection was evaluated by clinical, bacteriological, serological and post-mortem examinations. All pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC were completely protected against challenge with the homologous serotype. Pigs vaccinated with CM-BAC were partially protected. Although all pigs vaccinated with CM-BAC survived the challenge, four out of five pigs developed clinical signs of disease for several days. Compared to the WT-BAC and CM-BAC, the CM-LIVE vaccine was less protective. Two out of five pigs vaccinated with CM-LIVE died in the course of the experiment and all of them developed specific clinical signs of disease for several days. The protective efficacy of the vaccines could be associated with serum antibody titers. Antibody titers against cells of wild-type and non-encapsulated mutant strains as well as against muramidase-released proteins (MRP) were high in pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC and CM-BAC. Pigs vaccinated with CM-LIVE showed lower antibody titers. Antibody titers against purified capsular polysaccharides (CPS) of S. suis serotype 2 were only found in pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC. These findings indicate that CPS and other bacterial components of WT-BAC are probably essential for full protection against homologous challenge.

  11. Mutants of plant genes for developing cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Massa, Silvia; Paolini, Francesca; Spanò, Laura; Franconi, Rosella; Venuti, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Preventive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is an expensive practice and it may be an insufficient tool to tackle cervical cancer worldwide. Therapeutic intervention is seeking for safe/effective vaccines inducing the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that is required to clear the tumor. Linking a tumor-specific antigen (i.e. the E7 oncoprotein of the 'high risk' HPVs) to molecules able to increase its immune 'visibility' represents a strategy to force the immune system to fight cancer. We focused on plants as sources of innovative immunostimulatory sequences. We have already shown the anti-cancer activity obtained by fusing E7GGG (a mutagenized E7 gene from the high risk HPV type 16) to the coat protein of a plant virus, the Potato Virus X. We are now investigating plant-derived carriers, such as the 'Ribosome inactivating proteins' (RIPs), so far used to develop immunotoxins for targeted cancer therapy. Beside toxicity, RIPs have other features (i.e. immunogenicity, ability to modulate immune functions and apoptosis induction) that could be useful tools to use in tumor immunotherapy. A non toxic mutant of saporin (SAP-KQ) was used as a carrier for the E7GGG gene in the context of a DNA-based vaccine. We show here that fusion constructs of SAP-KQ with E7GGG can induce E7-specific Immunoglobulins (IgGs), CTLs and Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) affecting the growth of E7-expressing tumors in mice. These data demonstrate that mutant plant genes hold promise to improve the poor immunogenicity of tumor-associated cancer antigens and could contribute to the evolution of new cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Salmonella Gallinarum field isolates from laying hens are related to the vaccine strain SG9R.

    PubMed

    Van Immerseel, F; Studholme, D J; Eeckhaut, V; Heyndrickx, M; Dewulf, J; Dewaele, I; Van Hoorebeke, S; Haesebrouck, F; Van Meirhaeghe, H; Ducatelle, R; Paszkiewicz, K; Titball, R W

    2013-10-09

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Gallinarum can cause severe systemic disease in chickens and a live Salmonella Gallinarum 9R vaccine (SG9R) has been used widely to control disease. Using whole-genome sequencing we found point mutations in the pyruvate dehydrogenase (aceE) and/or lipopolysaccharide 1,2-glucosyltransferase (rfaJ) genes that likely explain the attenuation of the SG9R vaccine strain. Molecular typing using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis showed that strains isolated from different layer flocks in multiple countries and the SG9R vaccine strain were similar. The genome of one Salmonella Gallinarum field strain, isolated from a flock with a mortality peak and selected on the basis of identical PFGE and MLVA patterns with SG9R, was sequenced. We found 9 non-silent single-nucleotide differences distinguishing the field strain from the SG9R vaccine strain. Our data show that a Salmonella Gallinarum field strain isolated from laying hens is almost identical to the SG9R vaccine. Mutations in the aceE and rfaJ genes could explain the reversion to a more virulent phenotype. Our results highlight the importance of using well defined gene deletion mutants as vaccines.

  13. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-08-12

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis.

  14. Characterization of glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide structure mutant strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ana L S; Farage, Layla; Melo, Manuel N; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo S; Guerardel, Yann; Coddeville, Bernadete; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, Jose O

    2007-06-01

    In fungi, glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide (GIPC) biosynthetic pathway produces essential molecules for growth, viability, and virulence. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans synthesizes a complex family of xylose-(Xyl) branched GIPCs, all of which have not been previously reported in fungi. As an effort to understand the biosynthesis of these sphingolipids, we have now characterized the structures of GIPCs from C. neoformans wild-type (KN99alpha) and mutant strains that lack UDP-Xyl, by disruption of either UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (NE321) or UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (NE178). The structures of GIPCs were determined by a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, tandem mass spectrometry (MS), and gas chromatography-MS. The main and largest GIPC from wild-type strain was identified as an alpha-Manp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp[beta-Xylp(1 --> 2)]alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2) Ins-1-P-Ceramide, whereas the most abundant GIPC from both mutant strains was found to be an alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2)Ins-1-P-Ceramide. The ceramide moieties of C. neoformans wild-type and mutant strains were composed of a C(18) phytosphingosine, which was N-acylated with 2-hydroxy tetra-, or hexacosanoic acid, and 2,3-dihydroxy-tetracosanoic acid. Our structural analysis results indicate that the C. neoformans mutant strains are unable to complete the assembly of the GIPC-oligosaccharide moiety due the absence of Xyl side chain.

  15. Deletion of Major Nonessential Genomic Regions in the Vaccinia Virus Lister Strain Enhances Attenuation without Altering Vaccine Efficacy in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Dimier, Julie; Ferrier-Rembert, Audrey; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Hebben, Matthias; Spehner, Danièle; Favier, Anne-Laure; Gratier, Danielle; Garin, Daniel; Crance, Jean-Marc; Drillien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) Lister strain was one of the vaccine strains that enabled smallpox eradication. Although the strain is most often harmless, there have been numerous incidents of mild to life-threatening accidents with this strain and others. In an attempt to further attenuate the Lister strain, we investigated the role of 5 genomic regions known to be deleted in the modified VACV Ankara (MVA) genome in virulence in immunodeficient mice, immunogenicity in immunocompetent mice, and vaccine efficacy in a cowpox virus challenge model. Lister mutants were constructed so as to delete each of the 5 regions or various combinations of these regions. All of the mutants replicated efficiently in tissue culture except region I mutants, which multiplied more poorly in human cells than the parental strain. Mutants with single deletions were not attenuated or only moderately so in athymic nude mice. Mutants with multiple deletions were more highly attenuated than those with single deletions. Deleting regions II, III, and V together resulted in total attenuation for nude mice and partial attenuation for SCID mice. In immunocompetent mice, the Lister deletion mutants induced VACV specific humoral responses equivalent to those of the parental strain but in some cases lower cell-mediated immune responses. All of the highly attenuated mutants protected mice from a severe cowpox virus challenge at low vaccine doses. The data suggest that several of the Lister mutants combining multiple deletions could be used in smallpox vaccination or as live virus vectors at doses equivalent to those used for the traditional vaccine while displaying increased safety. PMID:21367889

  16. Candidate cytomegalovirus strain for human vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, S A; Furukawa, T; Zygraich, N; Huygelen, C

    1975-01-01

    A strain of human cytomegalovirus called Towne was isolated in WI-38 human fibrolast cell cultures from the urine of an infected infant. It was then passaged 125 times in WI-38, including three clonings, and a pool was prepared in the same cell substrate for use as a potential live attenuated vaccine. The Towne virus has a broad antigenicity and cross-reacts with the AD-169 strain. Several markers of the Towne virus were found which differentiated it from fresh isolates. One of these was resistance of the former to trypsin. The Towne virus was tested for freedom from oncogenicity or other harmful effects in preparation for tests in humans. PMID:170203

  17. A Yersinia pestis YscN ATPase mutant functions as a live attenuated vaccine against bubonic plague in mice.

    PubMed

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Webster, Wendy; Bassett, Anthony; Tobery, Steven; Little, Stephen; Swietnicki, Wieslaw

    2012-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent responsible for bubonic and pneumonic plague. The bacterium uses the pLcr plasmid-encoded type III secretion system to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Delivery requires ATP hydrolysis by the YscN ATPase encoded by the yscN gene also on pLcr. A yscN mutant was constructed in the fully virulent CO92 strain containing a nonpolar, in-frame internal deletion within the gene. We demonstrate that CO92 with a yscN mutation was not able to secrete the LcrV protein (V-Antigen) and attenuated in a subcutaneous model of plague demonstrating that the YscN ATPase was essential for virulence. However, if the yscN mutant was complemented with a functional yscN gene in trans, virulence was restored. To evaluate the mutant as a live vaccine, Swiss-Webster mice were vaccinated twice with the ΔyscN mutant at varying doses and were protected against bubonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to F1 capsule but not to LcrV were detected in sera from the vaccinated mice. These preliminary results suggest a proof-of-concept for an attenuated, genetically engineered, live vaccine effective against bubonic plague. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Haemophilus influenzae serotype b and a capsule-deficient type mutant (b-) invasive disease in a partially vaccinated child in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Nathalia G S; de Filippis, Ivano; Arruda, Tânia Catão; Real, Maria Eulália Côrte; de Jesus, Alice Batalha; de Almeida, Antonio Eugenio C C

    2013-04-01

    We report a rare case of infection by two different types of Haemophilus influenzae strains in a child who received only one dose of the H. influenzae serotype b (Hib) conjugate vaccine (DTwP+Hib). The strains were recovered from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and were phenotypically identified as Hib and non-typable H. influenzae, respectively, after serological tests. The two strains were characterized by PCR capsular typing, multilocus sequence typing and PFGE. Our results suggest that the infection was caused by the bloodstream invasion by a single Hib strain, followed by the diffusion of the bacteria across the blood-brain barrier and into the CSF. The strain recovered from the CSF, however, was identified as a capsule-deficient type mutant (b(-)) strain. Despite the high efficacy of the Hib conjugate vaccine, the increase in the numbers of strains able to escape the immune system of the vaccinated population advocates continued surveillance.

  19. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  20. Frequency of Adverse Events after Vaccination with Different Vaccinia Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Wallinga, Jacco; Teunis, Peter; Xing, Shuqin; Mikolajczyk, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Background Large quantities of smallpox vaccine have been stockpiled to protect entire nations against a possible reintroduction of smallpox. Planning for an appropriate use of these stockpiled vaccines in response to a smallpox outbreak requires a rational assessment of the risks of vaccination-related adverse events, compared to the risk of contracting an infection. Although considerable effort has been made to understand the dynamics of smallpox transmission in modern societies, little attention has been paid to estimating the frequency of adverse events due to smallpox vaccination. Studies exploring the consequences of smallpox vaccination strategies have commonly used a frequency of approximately one death per million vaccinations, which is based on a study of vaccination with the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) strain of vaccinia virus. However, a multitude of historical studies of smallpox vaccination with other vaccinia strains suggest that there are strain-related differences in the frequency of adverse events after vaccination. Because many countries have stockpiled vaccine based on the Lister strain of vaccinia virus, a quantitative evaluation of the adverse effects of such vaccines is essential for emergency response planning. We conducted a systematic review and statistical analysis of historical data concerning vaccination against smallpox with different strains of vaccinia virus. Methods and Findings We analyzed historical vaccination data extracted from the literature. We extracted data on the frequency of postvaccinal encephalitis and death with respect to vaccinia strain and age of vaccinees. Using a hierarchical Bayesian approach for meta-analysis, we estimated the expected frequencies of postvaccinal encephalitis and death with respect to age at vaccination for smallpox vaccines based on the NYCBH and Lister vaccinia strains. We found large heterogeneity between findings from different studies and a time-period effect that showed

  1. Characterization of Russian rabies virus vaccine strain RV-97.

    PubMed

    Metlin, A; Paulin, L; Suomalainen, S; Neuvonen, E; Rybakov, S; Mikhalishin, V; Huovilainen, A

    2008-03-01

    The RV-97 rabies virus vaccine strain is widely used in Russia as a component of the live attenuated oral anti-rabies vaccine "Sinrab". This vaccine has also been used in some other countries, such as Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Ukraine. Entire genome sequencing is an effective tool for studying the genetic properties of virus strains. In this study, a simple technique for obtaining the entire genome sequence of the rabies virus was used. The entire genome sequence and the deduced amino acid sequences of the major viral proteins were compared with those of other rabies vaccine virus strains. The RV-97 strain forms a separate phylogenetic branch and seems to be phylogenetically more related to the group of Japanese vaccine strains. It also contains several unique amino acid changes in known immunodominant sites of G and P proteins.

  2. An Improved Vaccine for Prevention of Respiratory Tularemia Caused by Francisella tularensis SchuS4 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Malik, Meenakshi; Mahawar, Manish; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S.; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Palmer, Lance E.; Furie, Martha B.; Singh, Rajendra; Melendez, J. Andres; Sellati, Timothy J.; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination of mice with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) mutants described so far have failed to induce protection in C57BL/6 mice against challenge with the virulent strain F. tularensis SchuS4. We previously have reported that a mutant of F. tularensis LVS deficient in iron superoxide dismutase (sodBFt) is hypersensitive to oxidative stress and attenuated for virulence in mice. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of this mutant as a vaccine candidate against respiratory tularemia caused by F. tularensis SchuS4. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) with the sodBFt mutant and challenged i.n. with lethal doses of F. tularensis SchuS4. The level of protection against SchuS4 challenge was higher in sodBFt vaccinated group as compared to the LVS vaccinated mice. SodBFt vaccinated mice following SchuS4 challenge exhibited significantly reduced bacterial burden in lungs, liver and spleen, regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and less severe histopathological lesions compared to the LVS vaccinated mice. The sodBFt vaccination induced a potent humoral immune response and protection against SchuS4 required both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the vaccinated mice. SodBFt mutants revealed upregulated levels of chaperonine proteins DnaK, GroEL and Bfr that have been shown to be important for generation of a potent immune response against Francisella infection. Collectively, this study describes an improved live vaccine candidate against respiratory tularemia that has an attenuated virulence and enhanced protective efficacy than the LVS. PMID:18692537

  3. Influenza virus surveillance, vaccine strain selection, and manufacture.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Klaus; Bucher, Doris; Colgate, Tony; Wood, John

    2012-01-01

    As outlined in other chapters, the influenza virus, existing laboratory diagnostic abilities, and disease epidemiology have several peculiarities that impact on the timing and processes for the annual production of influenza vaccines. The chapter provides an overview on the key biological and other factors that influence vaccine production. They are the reason for an "annual circle race" beginning with global influenza surveillance during the influenza season in a given year to the eventual supply of vaccines 12 months later in time before the next seasonal outbreak and so on. As influenza vaccines are needed for the Northern and Southern Hemisphere outbreaks in fall and spring, respectively, global surveillance and vaccine production has become a year round business. Its highlights are the WHO recommendations on vaccine strains in February and September and the eventual delivery of vaccine doses in time before the coming influenza season. In between continues vaccine strain and epidemiological surveillance, preparation of new high growth reassortments, vaccine seed strain preparation and development of standardizing reagents, vaccine bulk production, fill-finishing and vaccine release, and in some regions, clinical trials for regulatory approval.

  4. Short-chain lipopolysaccharide mutants of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis of potential value for production of outer membrane vesicle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Andersen, S R; Bjune, G; Lyngby, J; Bryn, K; Jantzen, E

    1995-09-01

    Four lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants (Mu-1 to Mu-4) were isolated after exposing Neisseria meningitidis strain 44/76 to pyocins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Parent strain LPS contained one major SDS-PAGE band expressing the immunotype determinants of L3, L3,7 and L3,7,9 and a minor band of higher mobility expressing the immunotype determinants of L8, L8a, L1,8,10 and L11. Each mutant LPS appeared as one SDS-PAGE band of higher mobility than the bands of the parent strain. None of these LPSs expressed the immunotype determinants of the parent strain, except Mu-4 LPS which reacted with the L11-specific MAb 4C4. Strain 44/76 LPS was found to contain galactose (Gal), glucose (Glc), heptose (Hep), glucosamine (GlcN), and 2-keto-3-deoxy-octulosonic acid (Kdo) in the molar ratios of 1.9:1.3:1.7:3.5:2.1. The corresponding ratios of the mutants were: Mu-4, 0:1.7:1.7:2.8:2.0; Mu-3, 0:0:1.7:2.4:1.6; Mu-2, 0:0:2.1:1.8:2.0, Mu-1, 0:0:1.8:1.9. Thus, all mutant LPSs lacked Gal and possessed less GlcN as compared to strain 44/76 LPS. Consequently, these mutants do not express the lacto-N-neo-tetraose (Gal1-4GlcN1-3Gal1-4Glc) commonly found as a part of meningococcal LPS and also on structures of human erythrocytes. These LPS mutants will be considered for use in production of OMV vaccines without host-like antigens, which might favour induction of antibodies to more conserved epitopes of meningococcal LPS.

  5. Rotavirus vaccine strain transmission by vaccinated infants in the foster home.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Sugata, Ken; Koshiyama, Nozomi; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the transmission of rotavirus vaccine strains from vaccinated children to nonvaccinated siblings. We sought to fully elucidate the safety of rotavirus (RV) vaccination in closed contact circumstance, such as the foster home for future assessment of the vaccine safety in an neonatal intensive care unit. Stool samples were collected from 4 RV vaccinated (160 samples) and 23 unvaccinated (766 samples) infants. RV viral RNA loads were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RV vaccine strain RNA was persistently detected in stool samples collected from the four vaccine recipients and one unvaccinated infant, but not in the stool samples collected from the 22 other unvaccinated infants. The unvaccinated infant who tested positive for the RV vaccine strain was vaccinated prior to enrollment in this study. The quantitative real-time RT-PCR data revealed a peak viral RNA load 1 week after vaccination followed by a gradual decrease. The current study suggests that RV vaccination may be safe in a close contact environment because there was limited transmission from RV vaccinated to unvaccinated infants. J. Med. Virol. 89:79-84, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of human immune responses following Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) Francisella Tularensis vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Claudette L.; Brittingham, Katherine C.; Porter, Mark W.; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Petitt, Patricia L.; Pittman, Phillip R.; Bavari, Sina

    2007-01-01

    The live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis is the only vaccine against tularemia available for humans, yet its mechanism of protection remains unclear. We probed human immunological responses to LVS vaccination with transcriptome analysis using PBMC samples from volunteers at timepoints pre- and post-vaccination. Gene modulation was highly uniform across all time points, implying commonality of vaccine responses. Principal components analysis revealed three highly distinct principal groupings: pre-vaccination (−144 h), early (+18 and +48 h), and late post-vaccination (+192 and +336 h). The most significant changes in gene expression occurred at early post-vaccination timepoints (≤48 h), specifically in the induction of pro-inflammatory- and innate immunity-related genes. Evidence supporting modulation of innate effector function, specifically antigen processing and presentation by dendritic cells, was especially apparent. Our data indicate that the LVS strain of F. tularensis invokes a strong early response upon vaccination. This pattern of gene regulation may provide insightful information regarding both vaccine efficacy and immunopathogenesis that may provide insight into infection with virulent strains of F. tularensis. Additionally, we obtained valuable information that should prove useful in evaluation of vaccine lots as well as efficacy testing of new anti- F. tularensis vaccines. PMID:17349694

  7. Identification of a mutant bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) in post-arrival outbreaks of IBR in feedlot calves and protection with conventional vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S; Myers, D; Doig, P A; Karvonen, B; Habermehl, M; Babiuk, L A; Jelinski, M; Van Donkersgoed, J; Schlesinger, K; Rinehart, C

    2001-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) have recently been observed in vaccinated feedlot calves in Alberta a few months post-arrival. To investigate the cause of these outbreaks, lung and tracheal tissues were collected from calves that died of IBR during a post-arrival outbreak of disease. Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), the causative agent of IBR, was isolated from 6 out of 15 tissues. Of these 6 isolates, 5 failed to react with a monoclonal antibody specific for one of the epitopes on glycoprotein D, one of the most important antigens of BHV-1. The ability of one of these mutant BHV-1 isolates to cause disease in calves vaccinated with a modified-live IBR vaccine was assessed in an experimental challenge study. After one vaccination, the majority of the calves developed humoral and cellular immune responses. Secondary vaccination resulted in a substantially enhanced level of immunity in all animals. Three months after the second vaccination, calves were either challenged with one of the mutant isolates or with a conventional challenge strain of BHV-1. Regardless of the type of virus used for challenge, vaccinated calves experienced significantly (P < 0.05) less weight loss and temperature rises, had lower nasal scores, and shed less virus than non-vaccinated animals. The only statistically significant (P < 0.05) difference between the 2 challenge viruses was the amount of virus shed, which was higher in non-vaccinated calves challenged with the mutant virus than in those challenged with the conventional virus. These data show that calves vaccinated with a modified-live IBR vaccine are protected from challenge with either the mutant or the conventional virus. Images Figure 1. PMID:11346260

  8. Proteomic analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The persistence and displacement abilities of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F (F-strain) are well documented. Understanding the mechanism(s) of colonization and persistence of F-strain will aid in the current intervention strategies to diagnose and control MG infections in poultry. In ...

  9. Mutant prevention concentrations of pradofloxacin for susceptible and mutant strains of Escherichia coli with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Marcusson, Linda L; Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Olofsson, Sara K; Hughes, Diarmaid; Cars, Otto

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacodynamic and mutant prevention properties of the fluoroquinolone pradofloxacin (PRA) were measured against a set of 17 Escherichia coli strains carrying no, one or two known mutations conferring reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility. The strains included susceptible wild-types, isogenic constructed mutants, isogenic selected mutants and clinical isolates. The effectiveness of PRA was determined with regard to preventing the selection of resistant mutants, using static and changing concentrations of drug. Ciprofloxacin was used as a reference drug. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) of PRA for the susceptible wild-type strains were in the range 0.012-0.016mg/L and 0.2-0.3mg/L, respectively, giving a mean±standard deviation mutant prevention index (MPI=MPC/MIC) of 17.7±1.1. The mean MPI PRA of the 14 mutant strains was 19.2±12, and the mean MPI across all 17 strains was 18.9±10.8. In an in vitro kinetic model in which PRA was diluted with a half-life of 7h to mimic in vivo conditions, an initial concentration of PRA of 1.6-2.4mg/L (8-10× MPC), giving a PRA AUC/MPC ratio of 73-92, and a T>MPC of 21-23h was sufficient to prevent the selection of resistant mutants from the three susceptible wild-type strains. Dosing to reduce selection for antibiotic resistance in veterinary therapy has a role in reducing the reservoir of resistant mutants. We conclude that a level of dosing that prevents the selection of resistant mutants during therapy should be achievable in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Trials with a live attenuated rubella virus vaccine, Cendehill strain

    PubMed Central

    Grant, L.; Belle, E. A.; Provan, G.; King, S. D.; Sigel, M. M.

    1970-01-01

    This report summarizes closed, family, and open studies conducted sequentially over a 10 month period with the Cendehill rubella virus vaccine in more than 16,000 children and adolescents. This strain of rubella was attenuated by serial propagation on primary rabbit kidney cell cultures. Inoculation of the Cendehill vaccine produced seroconversion in 97% of the 3589 susceptible (seronegative) vaccinated persons. There was no spread of the virus to susceptible controls living in close contact with those vaccinated. The vaccine was well tolerated. No arthritis or arthralgia occurred in 860 female subjects 13-18 years of age who were included in the study. The Cendehill vaccine would appear to meet the requirements of an acceptable vaccine. PMID:5272349

  11. Mutants of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9 affected in dimorphism.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, F; San-Blas, G

    1992-01-01

    Morphological mutants were isolated after nitrosoguanidine treatment of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9. Two of these mutants, Pb257 and Pb258, developed a typical mycelia at 23 degrees C, however, the yeast cells which developed at 37 degrees C were indistinguishable from those of the parental strain. A third mutant, strain Pb267, was thermosensitive, grew as yeast-like cells at 23 degrees C, but was unable to survive at 37 degrees C. Morphological observations as well as serological and segregation tests confirmed that the mutant strains originated from P. brasiliensis. Cell wall chemical analyses of the mutant strains grown at 23 degrees C indicated the presence of alkali-soluble, acid-insoluble polysaccharides absent in the parental wild-type strain Pb9 grown under the same conditions. The phenotypes shown by the mutant strains may be related to deficiencies in the proper synthesis of cell wall components of the mycelial phase of this fungus.

  12. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  13. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21794145

  14. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  15. Construction and Characterization of an Attenuated Purine Auxotroph in a Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pechous, Roger; Celli, Jean; Penoske, Renee; Hayes, Stanley F.; Frank, Dara W.; Zahrt, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen and is the etiological agent of tularemia. It is capable of escaping from the phagosome, replicating to high numbers in the cytosol, and inducing apoptosis in macrophages of a variety of hosts. F. tularensis has received significant attention recently due to its potential use as a bioweapon. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against F. tularensis, although a partially protective live vaccine strain (LVS) that is attenuated in humans but remains fully virulent for mice was previously developed. An F. tularensis LVS mutant deleted in the purMCD purine biosynthetic locus was constructed and partially characterized by using an allelic exchange strategy. The F. tularensis LVS ΔpurMCD mutant was auxotrophic for purines when grown in defined medium and exhibited significant attenuation in virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. Growth and virulence defects were complemented by the addition of the purine precursor hypoxanthine or by introduction of purMCDN in trans. The F. tularensis LVS ΔpurMCD mutant escaped from the phagosome but failed to replicate in the cytosol or induce apoptotic and cytopathic responses in infected cells. Importantly, mice vaccinated with a low dose of the F. tularensis LVS ΔpurMCD mutant were fully protected against subsequent lethal challenge with the LVS parental strain. Collectively, these results suggest that F. tularensis mutants deleted in the purMCD biosynthetic locus exhibit characteristics that may warrant further investigation of their use as potential live vaccine candidates. PMID:16861631

  16. Biofilm formation by exopolysaccharide mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. A set of mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Another mutant of NRRL B-1355, strain R1510, produces ...

  17. A Meningococcal NOMV-FHbp Vaccine for Africa Elicits Broader Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses Against Serogroup B and non-B Strains than a Licensed Serogroup B Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Lujan, Eduardo; Granoff, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Meningococcal epidemics in Sub-Sahara caused by serogroup A strains are controlled by a group A polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Strains with serogroups C, W and X continue to cause epidemics. Protein antigens in licensed serogroup B vaccines are shared among serogroup B and non-B strains. Purpose Compare serum bactericidal antibody responses elicited by an investigational native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed Factor H binding protein (NOMV-FHbp) and a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) against African serogroup A, B, C, W and X strains. Methods Human Factor H (FH) transgenic mice were immunized with NOMV-FHbp prepared from a mutant African meningococcal strain containing genetically attenuated endotoxin and a mutant sub-family B FHbp antigen with low FH binding, or with MenB-4C, which contains a recombinant sub-family B FHbp antigen that binds human FH, and three other antigens, NHba, NadA and PorA P1.4, capable of eliciting bactericidal antibody. Results The NOMV-FHbp elicited serum bactericidal activity against 12 of 13 serogroup A, B, W or X strains from Africa, and four isogenic serogroup B mutants with subfamily B FHbp sequence variants. There was no activity against a serogroup B mutant with sub-family A FHbp, or two serogroup C isolates from a recent outbreak in Northern Nigeria, which were mismatched for both PorA and sub-family of the FHbp vaccine antigen. For MenB-4C, NHba was expressed by all 16 African isolates tested, FHbp sub-family B in 13, and NadA in five. However, MenB-4C elicited titers ≥1:10 against only one isolate, and against only two of four serogroup B mutant strains with sub-family B FHbp sequence variants. Conclusions NOMV-FHbp has greater potential to confer serogroup-independent protection in Africa than the licensed MenB-4C vaccine. However, the NOMV-FHbp vaccine will require inclusion of sub-family A FHbp for coverage against recent serogroup C strains causing outbreaks in Northern Nigeria. PMID

  18. Symptomatic infection and detection of vaccine and vaccine-reassortant rotavirus strains in 5 children: a case series.

    PubMed

    Boom, Julie A; Sahni, Leila C; Payne, Daniel C; Gautam, Rashi; Lyde, Freda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Bowen, Michael D; Tate, Jacqueline E; Rench, Marcia A; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh D; Baker, Carol J

    2012-10-01

    Vaccine or vaccine-reassortant rotavirus strains were detected in fecal specimens from 5 of 106 (4.7%) immunocompetent children who required treatment for rotavirus gastroenteritis at a large pediatric hospital in Texas in 2009-2010. Four strains were related to pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, whereas one was related to monovalent rotavirus vaccine. The contribution of these strains to each patient's illness was unclear given that 2 patients had prominent respiratory symptoms and 2 were concurrently infected with another pathogen (group F adenovirus and norovirus). Continued monitoring is necessary to assess the role of vaccine strains and vaccine-reassortant strains in pediatric rotavirus infections.

  19. Symptomatic Infection and Detection of Vaccine and Vaccine-Reassortant Rotavirus Strains in 5 Children: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Boom, Julie A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Payne, Daniel C.; Gautam, Rashi; Lyde, Freda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Bowen, Michael D.; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Rench, Marcia A.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Baker, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine or vaccine-reassortant rotavirus strains were detected in fecal specimens from 5 of 106 (4.7%) immunocompetent children who required treatment for rotavirus gastroenteritis at a large pediatric hospital in Texas in 2009–2010. Four strains were related to pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, whereas one was related to monovalent rotavirus vaccine. The contribution of these strains to each patient’s illness was unclear given that 2 patients had prominent respiratory symptoms and 2 were concurrently infected with another pathogen (group F adenovirus and norovirus). Continued monitoring is necessary to assess the role of vaccine strains and vaccine-reassortant strains in pediatric rotavirus infections. PMID:22872730

  20. Vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) by using attenuated mutants selected by neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberti, K.A.; Rohovec, J.S.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutralizing monoclonal antibody against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was used to select neutralization-resistant mutants from isolates of virus obtained from adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss returning to the Round Butte Hatchery (RB mutants) on the Deschutes River in Oregon, USA, and from rainbow trout (nonanadromous O. mykiss) at a commercial hatchery in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA (193-110 mutants). Two of the mutants, RB-1 and 193-110-4, were significantly (P 0.05) in protection among fish exposed to the RB-1 vaccine strain at a dose of 1 x 105 TCID50/mL for periods of either 1, 12, or 24 h, held for 14 d, and then challenged with the wild-type RB isolate, although the 1-h exposure seemed to be somewhat less effective. Fish were vaccinated with the RB-1 strain at 1 x 103-1 x 105 TCID50/mL for 24 h then challenged after 1, 7, 14, or 21 d with the wild-type RB isolate. No significant (P > 0.1) protection was observed at 1 d postvaccination, but the relative percent survival increased progressively at each subsequent challenge period, becoming statistically significant by day 7 (P < 0.001) and beyond. These results suggested that resistance to challenge with wild-type virus resulted from development of IHNV-specific immunity and not from viral interference or interferon induction, and they reinforce the potential of an attenuated vaccine to control this important disease.

  1. Identification of Strain-Specific Sequences That Distinguish a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Strain from Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Camir; Pickler, Larissa; Maurer, John; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; García, Maricarmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite attempts to control avian mycoplasmosis through management, vaccination, and surveillance, Mycoplasma gallisepticum continues to cause significant morbidity, mortality, and economic losses in poultry production. Live attenuated vaccines are commonly used in the poultry industry to control avian mycoplasmosis; unfortunately, some vaccines may revert to virulence and vaccine strains are generally difficult to distinguish from natural field isolates. In order to identify genome differences among vaccine revertants, vaccine strains, and field isolates, whole-genome sequencing of the M. gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 and several “ts-11-like” strains isolated from commercial flocks was performed using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing and the sequenced genomes compared to the M. gallisepticum Rlow reference genome. The collective contigs for each strain were annotated using the fully annotated Mycoplasma reference genome. The analysis revealed genetic differences among vlhA alleles, as well as among genes annotated as coding for a cell wall surface anchor protein (mg0377) and a hypothetical protein gene, mg0359, unique to M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain. PCR protocols were designed to target 5 sequences unique to the M. gallisepticum ts-11 strain: vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.04b, vlhA3.05, mg0377, and mg0359. All ts-11 isolates were positive for the five gene alleles tested by PCR; however, 5 to 36% of field isolates were also positive for at least one of the alleles tested. A combination of PCR tests for vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.05, and mg0359 was able to distinguish the M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain from field isolates. This method will further supplement current approaches to quickly distinguish M. gallisepticum vaccine strains from field isolates. PMID:27847370

  2. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-03-03

    The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important.

  3. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important. PMID:26317639

  4. [Genetic recombination in vaccine poliovirus: comparative study in strains excreted in course of vaccination by oral poliovirus vaccine and circulating strains].

    PubMed

    Haddad-Boubaker, S; Ould-Mohamed-Abdallah, M V; Ben-Yahia, A; Triki, H

    2010-12-01

    Recombination is one of the major mechanisms of evolution in poliovirus. In this work, recombination was assessed in children during vaccination with OPV and among circulating vaccine strains isolated in Tunisia during the last 15 years in order to identify a possible role of recombination in the response to the vaccine or the acquisition of an increased transmissibility. This study included 250 poliovirus isolates: 137 vaccine isolates, excreted by children during primary vaccination with OPV and 113 isolates obtained from acute flaccid paralytic (AFP) cases and healthy contacts. Recombination was first assessed using a double PCR-RFLP, and sequencing. Nineteen per cent of recombinant strains were identified: 20% of strains excreted by vaccinees among 18% of circulating strains. The proportion of recombinant in isolates of serotype1 was very low in the two groups while the proportions of recombinants in serotypes 2 and 3 were different. In vaccinees, the frequency of recombinants in serotype3 decreased during the course of vaccination: 54% after the first dose, 32% after the second and 14% after the third dose. These results suggest that recombination enhances the ability of serotype3 vaccine strains to induce an immune response. Apart from recent vaccination, it may contribute to a more effective transmissibility of vaccine strains among human population. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A carAB mutant of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli serogroup O2 is attenuated and effective as a live oral vaccine against colibacillosis in turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Kwaga, J K; Allan, B J; van der Hurk, J V; Seida, H; Potter, A A

    1994-01-01

    Colibacillosis is a serious and economically important disease of the respiratory tract of chickens and turkeys. The serogroups of Escherichia coli commonly associated with colibacillosis in poultry are O1, O2, and O78. Although previous attempts to develop a vaccine have not been very successful, vaccination is still considered the most effective way of controlling the disease. Therefore, our laboratory has been involved in the development of an attenuated live vaccine that will be effective in the prevention of colibacillosis. The carAB operon coding for carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, an essential enzyme in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, was selected for study. Generalized transduction was used to transfer a Tn10-generated mutation from a laboratory strain to virulent avian field isolates of E. coli. Molecular techniques were used to determine the point of Tn10 insertion within the carAB operon. The insertion mutants were then cured of the tetracycline resistance gene of the transposon to select for antibiotic-sensitive and stable carAB mutants. The degree of attenuation obtained by the mutation was determined in day-old chickens. Typically, when 100-fold the 50% lethal dose (for the wild type) was given, no more than 50% mortality in the day-old chickens was observed. The deletion mutant of serotype O2 was also found to be avirulent in turkeys rendered susceptible to infection with hemorrhagic enteritis virus A. Turkey poults vaccinated orally at 4 weeks old with either the wild-type E. coli EC317 strain or its carAB mutant EC751 were completely protected from infection following challenge with the homologous wild-type strain. Our data indicate that carAB mutants of virulent avian strains of E. coli will be effective and safe as live oral vaccines for prevention of colibacillosis in poultry. Images PMID:8063392

  6. Assay of oral vaccination of dogs against rabies in Tunisia with the vaccinal strain SADBern.

    PubMed

    Haddad, N; Ben Khelifa, R; Matter, H; Kharmachi, H; Aubert, M F; Wandeler, A; Blancou, J

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of immunizing dogs orally against rabies, using SADBern, an attenuated strain, was tested on dogs in the field in Tunisia. This strain induced high neutralizing antibody titres and conferred to all vaccinated dogs total resistance against a challenge with a Maghrebian strain. However, an excretion of virus of vaccinal origin was observed in one dog, hampering the use of SADBern in dogs. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates for the first time that dogs in developing countries, especially those which are inaccessible to parenteral vaccination, could be efficiently immunized against rabies by the oral route.

  7. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  8. Hereditary hemochromatosis restores the virulence of plague vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Quenee, Lauriane E; Hermanas, Timothy M; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-10-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv(-/-)) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv(-/-) mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv(-/-) mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines.

  9. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens.

  10. Selection and characterization of vaccine strain for Enterovirus 71 vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Peng; Tsai, Hutchinson Hau-Pong; Lee, Chen-Dou; Lian, Wei-Cheng; Ih-Jen-Su; Sai, I-Hsi; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Lu, Ya-Jung; Chen, Ching-Yao; Lee, Pi-Hsiu; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2012-01-17

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has recently emerged as an important neurotropic virus in Asia because effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are not available. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, the Vero cell-based chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate could be developed. Identification of EV71 vaccine strain which can grow to high titer in Vero cell and induce cross-genotype virus neutralizing antibody responses represents the first step in vaccine development. In this report we describe the characterization and validation of a clinical isolate E59 belonging to B4 sub-genotype based on VP1 genetic analysis. Before selected as the vaccine strain, the genetic stability of E59 in passage had been analyzed based on the nucleotide sequences obtained from the Master Virus Seed, Working Seed banks and the virus harvested from the production lots, and found to be identical to those found in the original isolate. These results indicate that E59 vaccine strain has strong genetic stability in passage. Using this vaccine strain the prototype EV71 vaccine candidate was produced from 20L of Vero cell grown in serum-containing medium. The production processes were investigated, characterized and quantified to establish the potential vaccine manufacturing process including the time for virus harvest, the membrane for diafiltration and concentration, the gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification, and the methods for viral inactivation. Finally, the inactivated virion vaccine candidate containing sub-microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant was found to induce strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in mice and rabbits. Therefore, these results provide valuable information for cell-based EV71 vaccine development.

  11. Rhizobium japonicum mutant strains unable to grow chemoautotrophically with H2.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J

    1981-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strain SR grows chemoautotrophically on a mineral salts medium when incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow or that grow very poorly chemoautotrophically with H2 have been isolated from strain SR. The mutant isolation procedure involved mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate, penicillin selection under chemoautotrophic growth conditions, and plating of the survivors onto medium containing carbon. The resulting colonies were replica plated onto medium that did not contain carbon, and the plates were incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow under these conditions were chosen. Over 100 mutant strains with defects in chemoautotrophic metabolism were obtained. The phenotypes of the mutants fall into various classes. These include strains unable to oxidize H2 and strains deficient in CO2 uptake. Some of the mutant strains were capable of oxidizing H2 only when artificial electron acceptors were provided. Two mutant strains specifically lack activity of the key CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Other mutant strains lack both H2-oxidizing ability and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6780521

  12. Identification of an IS711 Element Interrupting the wboA Gene of Brucella abortus Vaccine Strain RB51 and a PCR Assay To Distinguish Strain RB51 from Other Brucella Species and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; McQuiston, John R.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Halling, Shirley M.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 is a natural stable attenuated rough mutant derived from the virulent strain 2308. The genetic mutations that are responsible for the roughness and the attenuation of strain RB51 have not been identified until now. Also, except for an assay based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no other simple method to differentiate strain RB51 from its parent strain 2308 is available. In the present study, we demonstrate that the wboA gene encoding a glycosyltransferase, an enzyme essential for the synthesis of O antigen, is disrupted by an IS711 element in B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Exploiting this feature, we developed a PCR assay that distinguishes strain RB51 from all other Brucella species and strains tested. PMID:10473532

  13. Dominance of Human Innate Immune Responses in Primary Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Vaccination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    Diseases, Bacteriology Division, 425 Porter St, Frederick , MD 21702-5011. Dr Brittingham is the recipient of the National Research Council Fellowship...tularemia vaccine strain) infection by the sera of human recipients of the live tula- remia vaccine. Am J Med Sci 1994;308:83-7. 10. Herzberg VL

  14. Assessment of a strain 19 brucellosis vaccination program in elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maichak, Eric J.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Cross, Paul C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Edwards, William H.; Wise, Benjamin; Smith, Scott G.; Kreeger, Terry J.

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic diseases in wildlife present substantial challenges and risks to host populations, susceptible domestic livestock populations, and affected stakeholders. Brucellosis, a disease caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus, is endemic among elk (Cervus canadensis) attending winter feedgrounds and adjacent areas of western Wyoming, USA. To minimize transmission of brucellosis from elk to elk and elk to livestock, managers initiated a B. abortus strain 19 ballistic vaccination program in 1985. We used brucellosis prevalence (1971–2015) and reproductive outcome (2006–2015) data collected from female elk attending feedgrounds to assess efficacy of the strain 19 program while controlling for potentially confounding factors such as site and age. From our generalized linear models, we found that seroprevalence of brucellosis was 1) not lower following inception of vaccination; 2) not inversely associated with proportion of juveniles vaccinated over time; 3) not inversely associated with additional yearlings and adults vaccinated over time; and 4) associated more with feeding end-date than proportion of juveniles vaccinated. Using vaginal implant transmitters in adult females that were seropositive for brucellosis, we found little effect of vaccination coverage at reducing reproductive failures (i.e., abortion or stillbirth). Because we found limited support for efficacy of the strain 19 program, we support research to develop an oral vaccine and suggest that continuing other spatio-temporal management actions will be most effective to minimize transmission of brucellosis and reduce dependency of elk on supplemental winter feeding.

  15. Commercial PCV2a-based vaccines are effective in protecting naturally PCV2b-infected finisher pigs against experimental challenge with a 2012 mutant PCV2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Halbur, Patrick G; Matzinger, Shannon R; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-07-23

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are all based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and disease. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in vaccinated herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of three commercial PCV2a-based vaccines administered in the presence of an ongoing PCV2b infection and passively-acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 11 weeks of age. Fifty naturally PCV2b-infected 2-week-old pigs were divided into five treatment groups with 10 pigs each. Pigs were unvaccinated (positive and negative controls) or vaccinated at 3 (VAC-A, VAC-B, VAC-C) and at 5 weeks of age (VAC-C). At 11 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative controls were challenged with a 2012 U.S. strain of mPCV2. The experiment was terminated 21 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas non-vaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2 infection was demonstrated in all positive controls and 3/10 had microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative controls infected with PCV2b alone did not develop PCVAD. The results indicate that concurrent PCV2b/mPCV2 infection can trigger PCVAD development and that commercial vaccines are effective in protecting conventional pigs against emerging mPCV2 strains.

  16. Mutant Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 Unable to Form Ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Gibson, F.; Pittard, James

    1968-01-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli was isolated which was unable to form ubiquinone. This mutant was obtained by selecting strains unable to grow on malate as sole source of carbon. Such strains were further screened by examination of the quinone content of cells grown on a glucose medium. A mutant unable to form vitamin K was also isolated by this procedure. A genetic analysis of the ubiquinoneless strain showed that it possessed two mutations affecting ubiquinone biosynthesis. Images PMID:4870277

  17. Stable Salmonella live vaccine strains with two or more attenuating mutations and any desired level of attenuation.

    PubMed

    Linde, K; Beer, J; Bondarenko, V

    1990-06-01

    Mutants optimally attenuated for highly susceptible hosts and protecting after a single oral vaccination are often overattenuated for host species being less susceptible. Therefore, to select vaccine strains optimally attenuated for the particular host species it is essential that a range of mutants with graded levels of attenuation be provided so as to permit lesser susceptibility to be compensated for by a correspondingly lower level of attenuation. This, while guaranteeing the stability through two-marker or multi-marker attenuation, can be suitably accomplished by slightly to moderately virulence-reducing mutations. Aspartic acid auxotrophy and, in particular, 'metabolic drift' mutations, possibly by additionally incorporating antiepidemic markers, are adopted for the mouse model to demonstrate stepwise production of S. typhimurium and S. typhi vaccine candidate strains with graded attenuation or any level of attenuation desirable. It is emphasized that this basic approach is relevant to practice.

  18. Genomic comparison between attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus vaccine strains and their parental virulent strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuai; Lin, Yuezhi; Jiang, Chenggang; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Liping; Lv, Xiaoling; Wang, Fenglong; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2011-02-01

    A lentiviral vaccine, live attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, was developed in the 1970s, and this has made tremendous contributions to the control of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. Four key virus strains were generated during the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine: the original Liao-Ning strain (EIAV(LN40)), a donkey-adapted virulent strain (EIAV(DV117)), a donkey-leukocyte-attenuated vaccine strain (EIAV(DLV121)), and a fetal donkey dermal cell (FDD)-adapted vaccine strain (EIAV(FDDV13)). In this study, we analyzed the proviral genomes of these four EIAV strains and found a series of consensus substitutions among these strains. These mutations provide useful information for understanding the genetic basis of EIAV attenuation. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in a variety of genes in our attenuated EIAV vaccines not only provide a basis for virulence attenuation and induction of protective immunity but also greatly reduce the risk of reversion to virulence.

  19. Vaccination with a defined Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida pathogenicity island mutant (DeltaiglB) induces protective immunity against homotypic and heterotypic challenge.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M Neal; Berton, Michael T; Seshu, Janakiram; Klose, Karl E; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2009-09-18

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia and a potential bioweapon. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against this organism. We have characterized the efficacy of a defined F. tularensis subsp. novicida mutant (DeltaiglB) as a live attenuated vaccine against pneumonic tularemia. Replication of the iglB mutant (KKF235) in murine macrophages was significantly lower than the wild type novicida strain U112, and exhibited an LD(50) greater than 10(6)-fold (>10(7)CFU vs <10CFU) in an intranasal challenge model. Mice immunized with KKF235 intranasally or orally induced robust antigen-specific splenic IFN-gamma recall responses, as well as the production of systemic and mucosal antibodies. Intranasal vaccination with KKF235 protected mice from subsequent homotypic challenge with U112 as well as heterotypic challenge with F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (LVS). Moreover, protected animals also exhibited minimal pathological changes compared with mock-vaccinated and challenged animals. The protection conferred by KKF235 vaccination was shown to be highly dependent on endogenous IFN-gamma production. Most significantly, oral immunization with KKF235 protected mice from a highly lethal subsp. tularensis (SCHU S4) pulmonary challenge. Collectively, these results further suggest the feasibility of using defined pathogenicity island mutants as live vaccine candidates against pneumonic tularemia.

  20. Update of inactivated equine influenza vaccine strain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    GAMOH, Koichiro; NAKAMURA, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-01

    Japan established a vaccine selection system, in which a committee evaluates veterinary influenza vaccines to determine if the vaccine should be updated. In 2013, it was concluded that the present equine influenza vaccine strains did not have to be updated, but clade 2 (Fc2) viruses of the Florida sublineage should be included. We collected three Fc2 viruses as candidates and conducted comparative tests. Results indicated that A/equine/Carlow/2011 (H3N8) is not suitable, because of its unstable antigenic characteristics. A comparison between A/equine/Richmond/1/2007 (H3N8) (Richmond/07) and A/equine/Yokohama/aq13/2010 (H3N8) (Yokohama/10) in eggs showed that they shared equal growth properties. Immunogenicity test in mice showed that Yokohama/10 induced higher HI antibody titers than Richmond/07. Therefore, we concluded that Yokohama/10 was the most suitable strain. PMID:28163276

  1. Bird to Human Transmission Biases and Vaccine Escape Mutants in H5N1 Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Kshitij; Bhatia, Aatish; Greenbaum, Benjamin D.; Bhanot, Gyan

    2014-01-01

    Background The avian influenza A H5N1 virus occasionally infects humans, with high mortality rates. Although all current human infections are from avian-to-human transmission, it has been shown that H5N1 can be evolved to transmit between mammals, and is therefore a pandemic threat. For H5N1 surveillance, it is of interest to identify the avian isolates most likely to infect humans. In this study, we develop a method to identify mutations significantly associated with avian to human transmission. Method Using protein sequences for the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin from avian and human H5N1 isolates in China, Egypt, and Indonesia from the years 1996–2011, we used Principle Component Analysis and a Maximum Likelihood Multinomial method to identify mutations associated with avian to human transmission. In each geographic region, transmission bias residues were identified using two signatures: a) significantly different amino-acid frequencies in human isolates compared to avian isolates from the same year, and b) significantly low probability of neutral evolution of the human isolates from the avian viral pool of the previous year. Results In each geographic region, we find specific transmission bias mutations associated with human infections. These mutations are located in antigenic regions and receptor binding, glycosylation and polybasic cleavage sites of HA. We show that human isolates derive from a limited, subset of the avian pool characterized by geography specific mutations. In Egypt, two of three PCA clusters have very few human isolates but are highly enriched in mutations associated with a vaccine escape mutant H5N1 avian sub-clade that is known to be resistant to the Mexican H5N2 vaccine Furthermore, at these transmission bias associated residues, the mutations characteristic of these two clusters are distinct from those associated with the cluster enriched in human isolates, suggesting that vaccine resistant avian strains are unable to infect humans

  2. Gastrointestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Mutant Strains in Antibiotic-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Stephen M.; Jechorek, Robert P.; Garni, Robb M.; Bendel, Catherine M.; Wells, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic-treated mice orally inoculated with one of three Candida albicans strains (including two mutant strains) or indigenous Candida pelliculosa showed levels of candidal gastrointestinal colonization that were strain specific. However, regardless of strain, the numbers of viable candida were intermediate to high in the stomach, were consistently lowest in the upper small intestine, and increased progressively down the intestinal tract. PMID:11139219

  3. Generation of a Genetically Stable High-Fidelity Influenza Vaccine Strain.

    PubMed

    Naito, Tadasuke; Mori, Kotaro; Ushirogawa, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Naoki; Nobusawa, Eri; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Nagata, Kyosuke; Saito, Mineki

    2017-03-15

    Vaccination is considered the most effective preventive means for influenza control. The development of a master virus with high growth and genetic stability, which may be used for the preparation of vaccine viruses by gene reassortment, is crucial for the enhancement of vaccine performance and efficiency of production. Here, we describe the generation of a high-fidelity and high-growth influenza vaccine master virus strain with a single V43I amino acid change in the PB1 polymerase of the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) master virus. The PB1-V43I mutation was introduced to increase replication fidelity in order to design an H1N1 vaccine strain with a low error rate. The PR8-PB1-V43I virus exhibited good replication compared with that of the parent PR8 virus. In order to compare the efficiency of egg adaptation and the occurrence of gene mutations leading to antigenic alterations, we constructed 6:2 genetic reassortant viruses between the A(H1N1)pdm09 and the PR8-PB1-V43I viruses; hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) were from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, and the other genes were from the PR8 virus. Mutations responsible for egg adaptation mutations occurred in the HA of the PB1-V43I reassortant virus during serial egg passages; however, in contrast, antigenic mutations were introduced into the HA gene of the 6:2 reassortant virus possessing the wild-type PB1. This study shows that the mutant PR8 virus possessing the PB1 polymerase with the V43I substitution may be utilized as a master virus for the generation of high-growth vaccine viruses with high polymerase fidelity, low error rates of gene replication, and reduced antigenic diversity during virus propagation in eggs for vaccine production.IMPORTANCE Vaccination represents the most effective prophylactic option against influenza. The threat of emergence of influenza pandemics necessitates the ability to generate vaccine viruses rapidly. However, as the influenza virus exhibits a high mutation rate

  4. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  5. Brunenders: a partially attenuated historic poliovirus type I vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Liu, Ying; Brandjes, Alies; van Hoek, Vladimir; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2015-09-01

    Brunenders, a type I poliovirus (PV) strain, was developed in 1952 by J. F. Enders and colleagues through serial in vitro passaging of the parental Brunhilde strain, and was reported to display partial neuroattenuation in monkeys. This phenotype of attenuation encouraged two vaccine manufacturers to adopt Brunenders as the type I component for their inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) in the 1950s, although today no licensed IPV vaccine contains Brunenders. Here we confirmed, in a transgenic mouse model, the report of Enders on the reduced neurovirulence of Brunenders. Although dramatically neuroattenuated relative to WT PV strains, Brunenders remains more virulent than the attenuated oral vaccine strain, Sabin 1. Importantly, the neuroattenuation of Brunenders does not affect in vitro growth kinetics and in vitro antigenicity, which were similar to those of Mahoney, the conventional type I IPV vaccine strain. We showed, by full nucleotide sequencing, that Brunhilde and Brunenders differ at 31 nucleotides, eight of which lead to amino acid changes, all located in the capsid. Upon exchanging the Brunenders capsid sequence with that of the Mahoney capsid, WT neurovirulence was regained in vivo, suggesting a role for the capsid mutations in Brunenders attenuation. To date, as polio eradication draws closer, the switch to using attenuated strains for IPV is actively being pursued. Brunenders preceded this novel strategy as a partially attenuated IPV strain, accompanied by decades of successful use in the field. Providing data on the attenuation of Brunenders may be of value in the further construction of attenuated PV strains to support the grand pursuit of the global eradication of poliomyelitis.

  6. The efficacy of Mycoplasma gallisepticum K-strain live vaccine in broiler and layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Noel, N M; Williams, S M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine candidate (K-strain) was compared to commercially available vaccines in broiler-type chickens (Trial 1) and layer-type chickens (Trial 2). In Trial 1, three-week-old broiler-type chickens were vaccinated via aerosol with K-strain or an F-strain vaccine. The vaccinated chickens and 10 non-vaccinated controls were subsequently challenged with virulent R-strain via aerosol at six weeks post vaccination; both K-strain and F-strain vaccination resulted in significant protection from air sac and tracheal lesions, as well as R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). In Trial 2, commercial layer-type chickens were vaccinated with ts-11 (via eye drop) or K-strain (via aerosol) at 12 weeks of age. At 25 weeks of age these birds were challenged with R-strain via aerosol. The ts-11 and K-strain vaccinated groups both had significantly lower air sac lesion scores and a lower prevalence of ovarian regression after challenge as compared to non-vaccinated chickens (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain vaccination also prevented significant tracheal lesions and R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain shows great potential as a highly efficacious live MG vaccine in broiler and layer-type chickens for protection of the respiratory and reproductive systems as well as prevention of infection with field strains.

  7. Genetic and antigenic characterization of a newly emerging porcine circovirus type 2b mutant first isolated in cases of vaccine failure in Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hwi Won; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Ikjae; Choi, Kyuhyung; Jeong, Jiwoon; Park, Su-Jin; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-11-01

    This study describes the genetic and antigenic characterization of a newly emerging porcine circovirus type 2b (PCV2b) mutant first isolated in cases of vaccine failure in Korea. The full genome of the PCV2b isolates (SNUVR130689 and SNUVR140004) is 1,767 base pairs (bp) in length. The size of ORF1 is 945 bp, encoding a protein of 314 amino acids (aa), and the size of ORF2 is 705 bp, encoding a protein of 234 aa, which is 1 aa longer than that of the common PCV2 (233 aa). Korean PCV2b mutant strains had higher levels of nucleotide sequence identity to other PCV2b mutant strains (99.7-99.8 %) than to reference PCV2a (94.5-95.0 %) and PCV2b (95.5-96.1 %) strains. There was no difference in antigenic reactivity among PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2b mutant strains to the polyclonal and monoclonal PCV2a antibodies. PCV2b mutant strains have distinct genetic characteristics but similar antigenic reactivity when compared to common PCV2a and 2b strains.

  8. Selection and evaluation of the immunogenicity of protective antigen mutants as anthrax vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Roehrl, Michael H; Basar, Emre; Wang, Julia Y

    2008-02-13

    Protective antigen (PA) is a central component of anthrax toxin and a major antigen in anthrax vaccines. However, the use of native PA as a vaccine is not optimal. If administered to people who have been freshly exposed to anthrax, PA may actually aid in anthrax toxin formation and thus may pose a serious safety concern for postexposure vaccination applications. A non-functional PA mutant may be a much safer alternative. To identify an improved anthrax vaccine antigen, we examined four non-functional mutants of PA, each being impaired in a critical step of the cellular intoxication pathway of PA. These mutants were Rec(-) (unable to bind PA-receptors), SSSR (resistant to activation by furin), Oligo(-) (unable to form oligomers), and DNI (Dominant Negative Inhibitory, unable to form endosomal transmembrane pores). When tested in mice and after three doses of immunization, all four mutants were highly potent in eliciting PA-specific, toxin-neutralizing antibodies, with immunogenicity increasing in the order of PAvaccines could be improved both in terms of safety and efficacy by strategic mutations that not only render PA non-functional but also simultaneously enhance its immunogenic potency. Recombinant PA mutants, particularly DNI, hold great promise as better and safer antigens than wild-type PA for use in postexposure

  9. Oral Immunization Against Experimental Salmonellosis I. Development of Temperature-Sensitive Mutant Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, K. J.; Cooper, G. N.

    1970-01-01

    Mutant strains of Salmonella enteritidis were selected for their inability to proliferate at 37 C; when exposed to this temperature, these organisms formed tangled masses of long filaments in liquid media, presumably as a result of their inability to form cross septa. The mutants were also incapable of synthesizing flagella protein. A study of the biological charateristics of the mutants indicated that in most respects they resembled the parent strain of S. enteritidis; however, they were avirulent for mice, presumably because of the restriction of growth imposed by the body temperature of the animal. Preliminary studies have suggested that these mutants are highly effective in inducing protection against severe challenge infections of S. enteritidis; of especial interest is the fact that, when given orally, the mutants conferred a substantial degree of protection against oral infection with the virulent strain. PMID:16557726

  10. Oral immunization against experimental salmonellosis I. Development of temperature-sensitive mutant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fahey, K J; Cooper, G N

    1970-03-01

    Mutant strains of Salmonella enteritidis were selected for their inability to proliferate at 37 C; when exposed to this temperature, these organisms formed tangled masses of long filaments in liquid media, presumably as a result of their inability to form cross septa. The mutants were also incapable of synthesizing flagella protein. A study of the biological charateristics of the mutants indicated that in most respects they resembled the parent strain of S. enteritidis; however, they were avirulent for mice, presumably because of the restriction of growth imposed by the body temperature of the animal. Preliminary studies have suggested that these mutants are highly effective in inducing protection against severe challenge infections of S. enteritidis; of especial interest is the fact that, when given orally, the mutants conferred a substantial degree of protection against oral infection with the virulent strain.

  11. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Reference Strains 134 and 10536

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Burroughs, Mark; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Rowe, Lori; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine formulations and vaccination programs against whooping cough (pertussis) vary worldwide. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two divergent Bordetella pertussis reference strains used in the production of pertussis vaccines. PMID:27635001

  13. Comparison of adhesion, invasion, motility, and toxin production of Campylobacter strains and their resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, Salman; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Kempf, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells, motility, and toxin production characteristics of Campylobacter-susceptible strains and their fluoroquinolone- or macrolide-resistant mutants. Susceptible strains and resistant mutants demonstrated similar adhesion capacities to epithelial cells. For Campylobacter coli, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants with Thr86Ile or Asp90Asn substitutions showed a higher rate of invasion of Caco-2 cells than their isogenic parental strain. Fluoroquinolone resistance did not impact C. coli motility. Mutants harboring Asp90Asn had greater cytotoxic activity than the parental strain. Macrolide resistance had no impact on the studied characteristics of C. coli. For Campylobacter jejuni, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants had slightly different invasiveness levels and significantly lower motility than the isogenic parental strain. C. jejuni macrolide-resistant mutants with A2074G substitution in the 23S rRNA gene had a higher invasiveness level than its parental strain, but mutants with A2074C in 23S rRNA and G221A in rplD showed reduced motility and similar invasion levels to the susceptible strains. Neither fluoroquinolone nor macrolide resistance appears to affect C. jejuni cytotoxicity. In conclusion, mutations that are frequently encountered in Campylobacter-resistant strains can enhance the invasiveness in Caco-2 cells.

  14. Development and Evaluation of Adeno-HTLV-III Hybrid Virus and Non- Cytopathic HTLV-III Mutant for Vaccine Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-28

    AD_______________ DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF ADENO- HTLV -III HYBRID VIRUS AND NON- (V) CYTOPATHIC HTLV -III MUTANT FOR VACCINE USE Lf In Annual...Development and Evaluation of Adeno- HTLV -III Hybrid Virus and Non-Cytopathic HTLV -III Mutant for Vaccine Use 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lubet, Martha Turner...HIV virus. Assessment of vaccine efficacy against the virus challenge will include T4/T8 ratios, Interleukin-2 production, HTLV -IJT serology and ability

  15. Vaccination with an Attenuated Ferritin Mutant Protects Mice against Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Pandey, Ruchi; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rodriguez, G Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of tuberculosis affects millions of people worldwide. New tools for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis are urgently needed. We previously showed that a ferritin (bfrB) mutant of M. tuberculosis has altered iron homeostasis and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and to microbicidal effectors produced by activated macrophages. Most importantly, M. tuberculosis lacking BfrB is strongly attenuated in mice, especially, during the chronic phase of infection. In this study, we examined whether immunization with a bfrB mutant could confer protection against subsequent infection with virulent M. tuberculosis in a mouse model. The results show that the protection elicited by immunization with the bfrB mutant is comparable to BCG vaccination with respect to reduction of bacterial burden. However, significant distinctions in the disease pathology and host genome-wide lung transcriptome suggest improved containment of Mtb infection in animals vaccinated with the bfrB mutant, compared to BCG. We found that downmodulation of inflammatory response and enhanced fibrosis, compared to BCG vaccination, is associated with the protective response elicited by the bfrB mutant.

  16. A natural vaccine candidate strain against cholera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Q; Qi, G M; Wang, S X; Yu, Y M; Duan, G C; Zhang, L J; Gao, S Y

    1995-12-01

    E1 Tor Vibrio cholerae (EVC) strains may be classified into two kinds-epidemigenic (EEVC) strains and non-epidemigenic (NEEVC) strains-based on a phage-biotyping system. A large number of EEVC strains have been screened for toxigenic and putative colonization attributes. One such naturally occurring strains (designated IEM101) has been found which is devoid of genes encoding cholera toxin (CT), accessory cholera enterotoxin (ACE), zonula occludens toxin (ZOT), but possesses RS1 sequences and toxin-coregulated pilus A gene (icpA) although icpA is poorly expressed. It expresses type B pili but does not possess type C pili. It is an E1 Tor Ogawa strain and does not cause fluid accumulation in rabbit ilcal loop tests. Active immunization of rabbits with strain IEM101 elicited good protection against challenge with virulent strains of V. cholerae O1. Oral administration caused no side effects in 15 human volunteers, colonized the gut for four to ten days and elicited good immune responses.

  17. Susceptibility of lipopolysaccharide-defective mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO to dyes, detergents, and antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kropinski, A M; Chan, L; Milazzo, F H

    1978-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-defective mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophages. These mutants have been differentiated by their agglutination in NaCl and acriflavine, phage sensitivity, and chemical analysis of the lipopolysaccharides. The susceptibility of the wild-type strain and four mutants to a series of twenty-six agents, including dyes, detergents, antibiotics, and lysozyme, was examined. The roughest mutant (AK-43) exhibited increased susceptibility to sodium deoxycholate, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, ampicillin, penicillin G, erythromycin, colymycin, and polymyxin B. The role of cell envelope fractions in antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa is discussed. PMID:122525

  18. A Brucella melitensis M5-90 wboA deletion strain is attenuated and enhances vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Shi, Jing-Xue; Fu, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zhen; Li, Tian-Sen; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative intracellular pathogens of both humans and animals that cause great economic burdens in developing countries. Live attenuated vaccines are the most efficient means for the prevention and control of animal Brucellosis. However, Brucella vaccines (strain M5-90 and others) have several drawbacks and do not allow serological differentiation between vaccinated and infected animals. A wboA mutant was derived from Brucella melitensis (B. melitensis) vaccine strain M5-90 and tested for virulence and protective efficiency. T-cell responses (CD4(+), CD8(+)), levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cytokine production were observed. WboA was also assessed as a diagnostic marker for Brucellosis. B. melitensis strain M5-90ΔwboA exhibited reduced survival in murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and BALB/c mice and induced protective immunity in mice comparable to that from the parental strain M5-90. In mice, the wboA mutant elicited an anti-Brucella-specific IgG response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). In sheep, M5-90ΔwboA immunization induced the secretion of IFN-γ, and serum samples from sheep inoculated with M5-90ΔwboA were negative by Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) and Standard Tube Agglutination Test (STAT). In mice, probes against WboA antigen allowed for serological differentiation between natural infection and vaccination. The M5-90ΔwboA mutant is a potential attenuated live vaccine candidate against virulent B. melitensis 16M infection. It will be further evaluated in livestock.

  19. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Christopher L.; Mott, Tiffany M.; Muruato, Laura A.; Sbrana, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. PMID:27271739

  20. Molecular construction and characterization of nif mutants of the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus sp. strain 6.

    PubMed Central

    Toukdarian, A E; Lidstrom, M E

    1984-01-01

    We describe here a method for constructing mutants in bacteria that are not amenable to mutant isolation by conventional means. A one-step marker exchange procedure was used to construct nitrogen fixation (nif) mutants of the obligate methane-utilizing bacterium Methylosinus sp. strain 6, using transposon 5 (Tn5)-containing nif genes cloned into pBR325. The resultant mutants appeared to contain defects in nif structural genes, and DNA hybridization analysis showed that although one out of five had apparently been produced as a result of double-crossover homologous recombination, a variety of molecular events had led to the production of the other four mutants. Images PMID:6321452

  1. [New cold-adapted donor strains for live influenza vaccine].

    PubMed

    Gendon, Iu Z; Markushin, S G; Tsfasman, T M; Akopova, I I; Akhmatova, N K; Koptiaeva, I B

    2013-01-01

    Cold-adapted (CA) strains A/Krasnodar/35 and B/Victoria/63 were isolated using passages of A/Krasnodar/101/59 and B/Victoria/2/87 wild type strains at low temperatures. The resulting CA strains possessed TS and CA phenotypes and had a reduced ability to reproduce in mouse lungs and nasal turbinates. They displayed a high protective efficacy in experiments on mice. The two CA strains reproduced well in chick embryos and MDCK cell line without change of TS and CA markers. The CA A/Krasnodar/35 strain during passages at low temperature acquired 13 mutations in the 6 internal genes, 8 of those mutations led to amino acid changes. The CA B/Victoria/63 strain acquired 8 mutations in the internal genes, 6 of which led to amino acid changes. The intranasal vaccination of mice with the CA A/Krasnodar/35 strain led to a transitory suppression of various lymphocyte subpopulations, as well as to an increase in the number of some other cell types. The CA strains in question may be used in the future as attenuation donors for live influenza vaccines.

  2. Efficacy of vaccination with La Sota strain vaccine to control Newcastle disease in village chickens in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sulochana; Dhawan, Mamta; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste

    2017-02-01

    The efficacy of vaccination with Newcastle disease (ND) La Sota and R2B (Mukteswar) modified live strain vaccines was determined by experimental challenge and with ND La Sota vaccine under field conditions in Nepal. Booster vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine after a primary vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine, induced a geometric mean titre (GMT) of 5.0 log2 haemagglutination inhibition (HI) units, compared to a GMT of 6.0 log2 HI units following booster vaccination with R2B vaccine 1 month after primary vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine. Both vaccines provided 100% protection against challenge with a local field ND strain. Furthermore, booster vaccination with ND La Sota vaccine induced protective levels of antibody after field use in villages in Jhapa, and no outbreaks of ND occurred during the study period. The ND La Sota modified live vaccine is immunogenic and efficacious and is a suitable vaccine for use in vaccination programmes in village chickens in the rural areas of Nepal.

  3. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  4. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  5. Generation of a live rabies vaccine strain attenuated by multiple mutations and evaluation of its safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Keisuke; Ito, Naoto; Masatani, Tatsunori; Abe, Masako; Yamaoka, Satoko; Ito, Yuki; Okadera, Kota; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2012-05-21

    An amino acid substitution at position 333 in rabies virus G protein is known to determine the pathogenicity: strains with Arg or Lys at that position kill adult mice after intracerebral inoculation, whereas strains with other amino acids cause non-lethal infection. Based on those findings, attenuated rabies virus strains have been established and used for oral vaccines mainly for wild animals. However, considering the possibility of back-mutation to the virulent phenotype, a strain that is attenuated by multiple mutations not only in the G protein but also in other viral proteins would be more appropriate as a safe live vaccine. We previously demonstrated that the fixed rabies virus Ni-CE strain, which causes only transient body weight loss in adult mice after intracerebral inoculation, is mainly attenuated by mutations in the N, P and M proteins, while this strain has virulent-type Arg at position 333 in the G protein. In this study, to obtain a live vaccine strain that is attenuated by multiple mutations, we generated Ni-CE mutant, Ni-CE(G333Glu) strain, which has an Arg-to-Glu mutation at position 333 in the G protein, and examined its pathogenicity and immunogenicity. We found that, in contrast to Ni-CE strain, Ni-CE(G333Glu) strain did not cause transient body weight loss in adult mice after intracerebral inoculation. The attenuated phenotype of Ni-CE(G333Glu) strain did not change even after 10 serial intracerebral passages in suckling mice. We also demonstrated that inoculation of Ni-CE(G333Glu) strain induced virus-neutralizing antibody in immunized mice and protected the mice from lethal challenge. These results indicate that Ni-CE(G333Glu) strain is a promising candidate for development of a live rabies vaccine with a high safety level.

  6. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  7. Vaccine potential of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant with an essential glycoprotein deleted.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, H E; McLean, C S; Harley, C; Efstathiou, S; Inglis, S; Minson, A C

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches to the production of vaccines to human herpesviruses have been proposed. Subunit vaccines, subunits delivered by live vectors, and rationally attenuated vaccines have all been shown to be efficacious in animal models but suffer from uncertainties as to the roles of individual genes involved in pathogenesis and the most relevant components of the immune response required for protection in humans and the target antigens involved. With these problems in mind, we examined the vaccine potential of a fully disabled herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant that is capable of only a single round of replication, since a virus of this type should induce the full spectrum of immune responses but has no pathogenic potential. A virus has been described which lacks essential glycoprotein H (gH) and can be propagated in a cell line which supplies gH in trans (A. Forrester, H. Farrell, G. Wilkinson, J. Kaye, N. Davis-Poynter, and T. Minson, J. Virol. 66:341-348, 1992). Infection of normal cells with this mutant is indistinguishable from a wild-type infection, except that the resulting progeny are gH negative and noninfectious: the virus is self-limiting. Infection of mice by the ear pinna route was similarly self-limiting in that input infectivity decreased rapidly at the inoculation site and no infectivity was detected in sensory ganglia. Animals given a wide range of doses of the gH-negative mutant produced both humoral and T-cell responses to herpes simplex virus type 1 and proved solidly resistant to challenge with a high dose of wild-type virus. The gH-negative mutant is presumably capable of establishing a latent infection, but since no infectious virus was detected in numerous attempts to reactivate the mutant, the risk of a pathogenic outcome is minimal. Images PMID:8289395

  8. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  9. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  10. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  11. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  12. Oral re-vaccination of Eurasian wild boar with Mycobacterium bovis BCG yields a strong protective response against challenge with a field strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Field vaccination trials with Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated mutant of M. bovis, are ongoing in Spain, where the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) is regarded as the main driver of animal tuberculosis (TB). The oral baiting strategy consists in deploying vaccine baits twice each summer, in order to gain access to a high proportion of wild boar piglets. The aim of this study was to assess the response of wild boar to re-vaccination with BCG and to subsequent challenge with an M. bovis field strain. Results BCG re-vaccinated wild boar showed reductions of 75.8% in lesion score and 66.9% in culture score, as compared to unvaccinated controls. Only one of nine vaccinated wild boar had a culture-confirmed lung infection, as compared to seven of eight controls. Serum antibody levels were highly variable and did not differ significantly between BCG re-vaccinated wild boar and controls. Gamma IFN levels differed significantly between BCG re-vaccinated wild boar and controls. The mRNA levels for IL-1b, C3 and MUT were significantly higher in vaccinated wild boar when compared to controls after vaccination and decreased after mycobacterial challenge. Conclusions Oral re-vaccination of wild boar with BCG yields a strong protective response against challenge with a field strain. Moreover, re-vaccination of wild boar with BCG is not counterproductive. These findings are relevant given that re-vaccination is likely to happen under real (field) conditions. PMID:24766746

  13. Genogrouping of vaccine breakdown strains (VBS) of feline calicivirus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohe, K; Sakai, S; Takahasi, T; Sunaga, F; Murakami, M; Kiuchi, A; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Hara, M; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2007-05-01

    Although prevention of feline calcivirus (FCV) infection by vaccination has been attempted, and isolation of FCV, development of the disease, and a few fatal cases in vaccinated cats have been reported. Fifteen FCV strains isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with commercially available FCV vaccines (F9, FCV-255, and FC-7) were genogrouped. Molecular analysis of viral genomes involved the construction of a phylogenetic tree of capsid genes using the NJ method. Cat anti-F9 serum and rabbit anti-FCV-255 serum were used for virus neutralization tests. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of 15 virus isolates and those of the previously published and GenBank-deposited 9 global and 14 Japanese strains showed that 8 (53%) of the 15 virus isolates as well as the vaccine strains F9 and FCV-255 belonged to genogroup I (G(A)I), and 7 (47%) belonged to genogroup II (G(A)II). Of the 8 G(A)I strains, 2 were isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with an F9 strain live vaccine, 5 from cats vaccinated with an FCV-255-derived vaccine, and 1 from a cat vaccinated with an FC-7-derived vaccine. Of the 7 GAll strains, 5 were isolated from cats that had been vaccinated with the F9 strain live vaccine, 1 from a cat vaccinated with the FCV-255-derived vaccine, and 1 from a cat vaccinated with the FC-7-derived vaccine. These results indicate that more vaccine breakdown strains isolated from the cats vaccinated with the F9 strain-derived vaccine belong to G(A)II than to G(A)I, whereas more vaccine breakdown strains isolated from the cats vaccinated with the FCV-255 strain-derived vaccine belong to G(A)I than to G(A)II, and that when the FC-7 strain-derived vaccine is used, the vaccine breakdown strains belong almost equally to G(A)I and G(A)II. Thus, the genogroups of virus isolates varied with the vaccine strain used (p < 0.05). On the other hand, the neutralizing titres of feline anti-F9 serum and rabbit anti-FCV-255 serum against the 15 isolates were

  14. Brucellosis Vaccines: Assessment of Brucella melitensis Lipopolysaccharide Rough Mutants Defective in Core and O-Polysaccharide Synthesis and Export

    PubMed Central

    González, David; Grilló, María-Jesús; De Miguel, María-Jesús; Ali, Tara; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Delrue, Rose-May; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Muñoz, Pilar; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite; Marín, Clara-M.; Weintraub, Andrej; Widmalm, Göran; Zygmunt, Michel; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Blasco, José-María; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Background The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that rough vaccines are

  15. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis KIM as a vaccine against plague.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Six, David; Kuang, Xiaoying; Roland, Kenneth L; Raetz, Christian R H; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-04-05

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a potential weapon of bioterrorism. Y. pestis evades the innate immune system by synthesizing tetra-acylated lipid A with poor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-stimulating activity at 37°C, whereas hexa-acylated lipid A, a potent TLR4 agonist, is made at lower temperatures. Synthesis of Escherichia coli LpxL, which transfers the secondary laurate chain to the 2'-position of lipid A, in Y. pestis results in production of hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C, leading to significant attenuation of virulence. Previously, we described a Y. pestis vaccine strain in which crp expression is under the control of the arabinose-regulated araC P(BAD) promoter, resulting in a 4-5 log reduction in virulence. To reduce the virulence of the crp promoter mutant further, we introduced E. coli lpxL into the Y. pestis chromosome. The χ10030(pCD1Ap) (ΔlpxP32::P(lpxL)lpxL ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD)crp) construct likewise produced hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C and was significantly more attenuated than strains harboring each individual mutation. The LD(50) of the mutant in mice, when administered subcutaneously or intranasally was >10(7)-times and >10(4)-times greater than wild type, respectively. Mice immunized subcutaneously with a single dose of the mutant were completely protected against a subcutaneous challenge of 3.6×10(7) wild-type Y. pestis and significantly protected (80% survival) against a pulmonary challenge of 1.2×10(4) live cells. Intranasal immunization also provided significant protection against challenges by both routes. This mutant is an immunogenic, highly attenuated live Y. pestis construct that merits further development as a vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of clinical coliform mastitis in dairy cows by a mutant Escherichia coli vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    González, R N; Cullor, J S; Jasper, D E; Farver, T B; Bushnell, R B; Oliver, M N

    1989-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken in two commercial California dairies. The treatment group, 246 cows, received three doses of a whole cell bacterin of J5 Escherichia coli (mutant of E. coli O111:B4) plus Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine (two in the dry period and one after calving) while 240 unvaccinated cows served as controls. Thirty-five cases of clinical coliform mastitis were diagnosed, six in vaccinated cows and 29 in unvaccinated cows. Bacteria isolated from the clinical cases included 15 E. coli five Klebsiella pneumoniae, three K. oxytoca, three K. ozaenae, five Enterobacter aerogenes, three Serratia marcescens and one Serratia spp. Four control cows were culled, three of them because of chronic coliform mastitis and one because of postcoliform infection agalactia. Incidence rate of clinical gram-negative mastitis was 2.57% in vaccinated cows and 12.77% in unvaccinated cows. The estimated risk ratio, the measure of risk of having clinical gram-negative mastitis for vaccinated cows to unvaccinated cows, was 0.20 (p less than 0.005), indicating a strong relationship between vaccination and lack of clinical gram-negative mastitis. The results of this trial indicate that the administration of the E. coli J5 vaccine is protective against natural challenge to gram-negative bacteria, and reduces the incidence of clinical gram-negative mastitis in dairy cows during the first three months of lactation. PMID:2670166

  17. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  18. Evaluation of a Brucella melitensis mutant deficient in O-polysaccharide export system ATP-binding protein as a rough vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Niu, Jian Rui; Wang, Xiao Lei; Wu, Tong Lei; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Lin; Wu, Qing Min

    2014-08-01

    Rough Brucella mutants have been sought as vaccine candidates that do not interfere with the conventional serological diagnosis of brucellosis. In this study, a rough mutant of Brucella melitensis was generated by the disruption of the wzt gene, which encodes the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) export system ATP-binding protein. In vivo, the mutant 16MΔwzt was attenuated and conferred a level of protection against B. melitensis 16M challenge similar to that conferred by the vaccine strain B. melitensis M5 in mice. In pregnant sheep, the mutant 16MΔwzt did not induce abortion. In vitro, 16MΔwzt was more susceptible to polymyxin B and complement-mediated killing than B. melitensis 16M was. Most importantly, although 16MΔwzt had a rough phenotype, it was able to synthesize O-PS and did not induce detectable specific antibodies in sheep. These results suggested that 16MΔwzt deserved to further systematic evaluation as a vaccine for target animal hosts due to its promising features.

  19. Titration of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine without neutralization.

    PubMed

    Sirinonthanawech, Naraporn; Surichan, Somchaiya; Namsai, Aphinya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert; Kongchanagul, Alita

    2016-11-01

    Formulation and quality control of trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine requires titration of infectivity of individual strains in the trivalent mix. This is usually performed by selective neutralization of two of the three strains and titration of the un-neutralized strain in cell culture or embryonated eggs. This procedure requires standard sera with high neutralizing titer against each of the three strains. Obtaining standard sera, which can specifically neutralize only the corresponding strain of influenza viruses and is able to completely neutralize high concentration of virus in the vaccine samples, can be a problem for many vaccine manufacturers as vaccine stocks usually have very high viral titers and complete neutralization may not be obtained. Here an alternative approach for titration of individual strain in trivalent vaccine without the selective neutralization is presented. This was done by detecting individual strains with specific antibodies in an end-point titration of a trivalent vaccine in cell culture. Similar titers were observed in monovalent and trivalent vaccines for influenza A H3N2 and influenza B strains, whereas the influenza A H1N1 strain did not grow well in cell culture. Viral interference among the vaccine strains was not observed. Therefore, providing that vaccine strains grow well in cell culture, this assay can reliably determine the potency of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccines.

  20. Characterization of a spontaneous adhesion-defective mutant of Ruminococcus albus strain 20.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, P; Gaillard-Martinie, B

    2001-07-01

    A spontaneous adhesion-defective mutant (mutant D5) of Ruminococcus albus strain 20 was isolated and compared to the parent to investigate the impact of the mutation on cellulolysis and to identify the adhesion mechanism of R. albus. The comparison of kinetics of cellulose degradation by strain 20 and mutant D5 showed that the mutation delayed and reduced bacterial growth on cellulose and cellulose degradation. These results were partly explained by a twofold lower cellulase activity in the mutant than in the parent. The glycocalyx of strain 20, observed by transmission electron microscopy, was large and homogeneous, and linked cells to cellulose. The mutant glycocalyx was aggregated at its periphery and cells attached loosely to cellulose. A glycoprotein of 25 kDa (GP25), present in the membrane fraction and the extracellular medium of strain 20, was not detected in the same fractions of mutant D5. Though glycoprotein GP25 did not bind to cellulose, it may be involved in adhesion as an intermediate component. Different cell-surface features of mutant D5 (cellulases, glycoprotein GP25, glycocalyx) were thus affected, any or all of which may be involved in its adhesion-defective phenotype. These results suggest that adhesion and cellulolysis are linked and that adhesion is a multifactorial phenomenon that involves at least the extracellular glycocalyx.

  1. Development of live attenuated influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza strains.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen L; Luke, Catherine J; Jin, Hong; Talaat, Kawsar R

    2014-07-01

    Avian and animal influenza viruses can sporadically transmit to humans, causing outbreaks of varying severity. In some cases, further human-to-human virus transmission does not occur, and the outbreak in humans is limited. In other cases, sustained human-to-human transmission occurs, resulting in worldwide influenza pandemics. Preparation for future pandemics is an important global public health goal. A key objective of preparedness is to gain an understanding of how to design, test, and manufacture effective vaccines that could be stockpiled for use in a pandemic. This review summarizes results of an ongoing collaboration to produce, characterize, and clinically test a library of live attenuated influenza vaccine strains (based on Ann Arbor attenuated Type A strain) containing protective antigens from influenza viruses considered to be of high pandemic potential.

  2. Vaccine-induced rabies case in a cow (Bos taurus): Molecular characterisation of vaccine strain in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Vuta, Vlad; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Barboi, Gheorghe; Motiu, Razvan; Barbuceanu, Florica; Vlagioiu, Constantin; Cliquet, Florence

    2016-09-22

    Rabies is a fatal neuropathogenic zoonosis caused by the rabies virus of the Lyssavirus genus, Rhabdoviridae family. The oral vaccination of foxes - the main reservoir of rabies in Europe - using a live attenuated rabies virus vaccine was successfully conducted in many Western European countries. In July 2015, a rabies vaccine strain was isolated from the brain tissues of a clinically suspect cow (Bos taurus) in Romania. The nucleotide analysis of both N and G gene sequences showed 100% identity between the rabid animal, the GenBank reference SAD B19 strain and five rabies vaccine batches used for the national oral vaccination campaign targeting foxes.

  3. Late Onset Hypomorphic RAG2 Deficiency Presentation with Fatal Vaccine-Strain VZV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dutmer, Cullen M; Asturias, Edwin J; Smith, Christiana; Dishop, Megan K; Schmid, D Scott; Bellini, William J; Tirosh, Irit; Lee, Yu Nee; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2015-11-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 are associated with significant clinical heterogeneity and symptoms of immunodeficiency or autoimmunity may be late in appearance. As a result, immunosuppressive medications may be introduced that can have life-threatening consequences. We describe a previously healthy 13-month-old girl presenting with rash and autoimmune hemolytic anemia, while highlighting the importance of vigilance and consideration of an underlying severe immunodeficiency disease prior to instituting immunosuppressive therapy. Given clinical deterioration of the patient and a temporal association with recently administered vaccinations, virus genotyping was carried out via 4 real-time Forster Resonance Energy Transfer PCR protocols targeting vaccine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood and analyzed via the next-generation sequencing method of sequencing-by-synthesis. Immune function studies included immunophenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes, mitogen-induced proliferation and TLR ligand-induced production of TNFα. Analysis of recombination activity of wild-type and mutant RAG2 constructs was performed. Virus genotyping revealed vaccine-strain VZV, mumps, and rubella. Next-generation sequencing identified heterozygosity for RAG2 R73H and P180H mutations. Profound lymphopenia was associated with intense corticosteroid therapy, with some recovery after steroid reduction. Residual, albeit low, RAG2 protein activity was demonstrated. Because of the association of RAG deficiency with late-onset presentation and autoimmunity, live virus vaccination and immunosuppressive therapies are often initiated and can result in negative consequences. Here, hypomorphic RAG2 mutations were linked to disseminated vaccine-strain virus infections following institution of corticosteroid therapy for autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  4. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-infected patients after hepatitis B virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Mohraz, Minoo; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Banifazl, Mohammad; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Karami, Afsaneh; Foroughi, Maryam; Ramezani, Amitis

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is recommended for HIV patients. Despite the relative success of HBV vaccination, breakthrough infections can occur infrequently in patients, and it can be due to occult HBV infection, vaccine unresponsiveness and/or emergence of escape mutants. This study assessed the presence of occult HBV infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-positive patients after HBV vaccination. Ninety-two HIV-positive patients were enrolled in this study, including 52 responders to HBV vaccine and 40 non-responders. All of the cases received HBV vaccine according to routine HBV vaccination protocols. The presence of HBV-DNA was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In HBV-DNA positive samples, the most conserved regions of S gene sequences were amplified by nested PCR and PCR products were sequenced. Occult HBV infection was detected in two cases. Glycine to arginine mutation at residue 145 (G145R) within the 'a' region of the S gene was detected in one of the occult HBV infection cases who was in the non-responder group. This study showed that the prevalence of occult HBV infection and vaccine escape mutants was low in our HBV-vaccinated HIV-positive patients in both responder and non-responder groups, so there was no alarming evidence indicating breakthrough HBV infection in our vaccinated HIV-positive cases. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. A Wide Extent of Inter-Strain Diversity in Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Alphaherpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Szpara, Moriah L.; Tafuri, Yolanda R.; Parsons, Lance; Shamim, S. Rafi; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Legendre, Matthieu; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are widespread in the human population, and include herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and 2, and varicella zoster virus (VZV). These viral pathogens cause epithelial lesions, and then infect the nervous system to cause lifelong latency, reactivation, and spread. A related veterinary herpesvirus, pseudorabies (PRV), causes similar disease in livestock that result in significant economic losses. Vaccines developed for VZV and PRV serve as useful models for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine. We present full genome sequence comparisons of the PRV vaccine strain Bartha, and two virulent PRV isolates, Kaplan and Becker. These genome sequences were determined by high-throughput sequencing and assembly, and present new insights into the attenuation of a mammalian alphaherpesvirus vaccine strain. We find many previously unknown coding differences between PRV Bartha and the virulent strains, including changes to the fusion proteins gH and gB, and over forty other viral proteins. Inter-strain variation in PRV protein sequences is much closer to levels previously observed for HSV-1 than for the highly stable VZV proteome. Almost 20% of the PRV genome contains tandem short sequence repeats (SSRs), a class of nucleic acids motifs whose length-variation has been associated with changes in DNA binding site efficiency, transcriptional regulation, and protein interactions. We find SSRs throughout the herpesvirus family, and provide the first global characterization of SSRs in viruses, both within and between strains. We find SSR length variation between different isolates of PRV and HSV-1, which may provide a new mechanism for phenotypic variation between strains. Finally, we detected a small number of polymorphic bases within each plaque-purified PRV strain, and we characterize the effect of passage and plaque-purification on these polymorphisms. These data add to growing evidence that even plaque-purified stocks of stable DNA viruses exhibit limited sequence

  6. Immune responses of elk to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Kreeger, Terry J; Palmer, Mitchell V

    2002-10-01

    In a study conducted from January to August 2000, elk (Cervus elaphus) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51, n = 6) or injected with 0.15 M NaCl solution (n = 3) at approximately 6 mo of age. Beginning at 2 wk and continuing to 25 wk after vaccination, SRB51-vaccinated elk had greater antibody responses (P < 0.05) to SRB51 when compared to nonvaccinated elk. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from SRB51-vaccinated elk had greater (P < 0.05) proliferative responses to SRB51 at 18 wk after vaccination when compared to responses of nonvaccinated elk. Strain RB51 was recovered from blood samples of all vaccinates at 2 wk, and three of six vaccinates at 4 wk after vaccination. The SRB51 vaccine strain was recovered from the superficial cervical lymph node of all vaccinates sampled at 6 wk after vaccination. but not from lymph node samples obtained from vaccinates at 12 or 18 wk after vaccination. At 34 wk after vaccination, SRB51 was recovered from the bronchial lymph node of one of five vaccinates but not from other tissues. Strain RB51 was not recovered at any time from samples obtained from nonvaccinated elk. This study suggests that following vaccination with SRB51, elk remain bacteremic for a prolonged period of time, rapidly develop high antibody titers, and are slower to develop detectable proliferative responses in PBMC when compared to responses of cattle or bison (Bison bison).

  7. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  8. A dual-strain feline calicivirus vaccine stimulates broader cross-neutralization antibodies than a single-strain vaccine and lessens clinical signs in vaccinated cats when challenged with a homologous feline calicivirus strain associated with virulent systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengjin; Hess, Jennifer; Gill, Michael; Hustead, David

    2010-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes an array of clinical disease in cats. Traditionally this disease has been associated with respiratory disease, limping, or chronic stomatitis. Within the last 10 years, virulent systemic feline calicivirus (VS-FCV) has been recognized which causes additional clinical signs and has a higher fatality rate. A dual-strain FCV vaccine containing a strain of FCV associated with traditional respiratory disease and a VS-FCV strain stimulates serum cross-neutralization antibodies when tested against field strains from Europe and VS-FCV strains from USA. Following challenge with a homologous VS-FCV strain, vaccinated cats had significantly reduced clinical signs.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Japanese Vaccine Strain LA-AKO of Rinderpest Virus

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Hitomi; Terui, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Rinderpest vaccine strain LA-AKO, which is less virulent especially to highly susceptible Asian cattle breeds, was established from a lapinized vaccine strain by further passages in rabbit and chick embryos. Here, we report the genome sequence of LA-AKO, which currently remains active for the production of an emergent vaccine in Japan. PMID:26337882

  10. Electrical Phenotypes of Calcium Transport Mutant Strains of a Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the electrical phenotypes of mutants with mutations in genes encoding calcium transporters—a mechanosensitive channel homolog (MscS), a Ca2+/H+ exchange protein (cax), and Ca2+-ATPases (nca-1, nca-2, nca-3)—as well as those of double mutants (the nca-2 cax, nca-2 nca-3, and nca-3 cax mutants). The electrical characterization used dual impalements to obtain cable-corrected current-voltage measurements. Only two types of mutants (the MscS mutant; the nca-2 mutant and nca-2-containing double mutants) exhibited lower resting potentials. For the nca-2 mutant, on the basis of unchanged conductance and cyanide-induced depolarization of the potential, the cause is attenuated H+-ATPase activity. The growth of the nca-2 mutant-containing strains was inhibited by elevated extracellular Ca2+ levels, indicative of lesions in Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the net Ca2+ effluxes of the nca-2 mutant, measured noninvasively with a self-referencing Ca2+-selective microelectrode, were similar to those of the wild type. All of the mutants exhibited osmosensitivity similar to that of the wild type (the turgor of the nca-2 mutant was also similar to that of the wild type), suggesting that Ca2+ signaling does not play a role in osmoregulation. The hyphal tip morphology and tip-localized mitochondria of the nca-2 mutant were similar to those of the wild type, even when the external [Ca2+] was elevated. Thus, although Ca2+ homeostasis is perturbed in the nca-2 mutant (B. J. Bowman et al., Eukaryot. Cell 10:654–661, 2011), the phenotype does not extend to tip growth or to osmoregulation but is revealed by lower H+-ATPase activity. PMID:22408225

  11. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  12. Construction of a Streptococcus agalactiae phoB mutant and evaluation of its potential as an attenuated modified live vaccine in golden pompano, Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohui; Wang, Bei; Peng, Yinhui; Li, Yuan; Lu, Yishan; Huang, Yucong; Jian, Jichang; Wu, Zaohe

    2016-11-21

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a Gram-positive pathogen that can survive inside professional phagocytes and nonphagocytic cells to cause septicemia and meningoencephalitis in freshwater and marine fish. However, vaccines based on extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole S. agalactiae cells, as well as subunit vaccine are unable to protect fish from infection by variant serotypes S. agalactiae. The search for live attenuated vaccine with highly conserved and virulent-related genes is essential for producing a vaccine to help understand and control streptococcosis In this study, the phoB gene was cloned from pathogenic S. agalactiae TOS01 strain and the mutant strain SAΔphoB was constructed via allelic exchange mutagenesis. The results showed that the deduced amino acid of S. agalactiae TOS01 shares high similarities with other Streptococcus spp. and has high conserved response regulator receiver domain (REC) and DNA-binding effector domain of two-component system response regulators (Trans_reg_C). Cell adherence and invasion assays, challenge experiments and histopathological changes post-vaccination were performed and observed, the results showed that the mutant strain SAΔphoB has a lower adherence and invasion rate and less virulent than the wild type strain in golden pompano, and it doesn't induce clinical symptoms and obvious pathological changes in golden pompano, thereby indicating that the deletion of phoB affects the virulence and infectious capacity of S. agalactiae. Golden pompano vaccinated via intraperitoneal injection SAΔphoB had the relative percent survival value of 93.1% after challenge with TOS01, demonstrating its high potential as an effective attenuated live vaccine candidate. Real-time PCR assays showed that the SAΔphoB was able to enhance the expression of immune-related genes, including MHC-I, MyD88, IL-22 and IL-10 after vaccination, indicating that the SAΔphoB is able to induce humoral and cell-mediated immune response in

  13. Characterization of mutant strains of Candida albicans deficient in expression of a surface determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Chaffin, W L; Collins, B; Marx, J N; Cole, G T; Morrow, K J

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17E4 reacts with a surface carbohydrate determinant and agglutinates cells of Candida albicans. Using this MAb, we have isolated N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced nonagglutinating mutants. Eleven of these were characterized for the presence and expression of the surface antigen recognized by MAb 17E4 by immunoblot analysis of whole cells and by fluorescence flow cytometry. Soluble cell wall extracts from five mutant strains were negative by immunoblot analysis. The reactivities of the strains with several other MAbs and commercial antisera (Candida Check; Iatron Laboratories, Tokyo, Japan) which also recognize carbohydrate determinants were examined by immunoblot analysis of whole cells. Mutant strains showed no or reduced expression of the MAb 17E4 antigen and could be placed into at least two distinct phenotypic classes. Recognition by the other MAbs tested showed a similar pattern, while recognition by the commercial antisera was unchanged in the mutant strains. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of mannan prepared from the wild type and nonexpressing mutant-strain 4A showed that the spectra from the mutant strain were simpler than those of the wild type. Most of the beta-1,2 linkages and all of the C-1 phosphate linkages were absent in the 4A mannan spectra, which suggested that the mutant mannan lacked the phosphate-bound beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides. The effect of the surface defect on the ability of mutant strain 4A to adhere and to invade host tissue was examined in two murine models. In ex vivo binding assays, strain 4A showed reduced binding to the marginal zone and increased binding to the white pulp of splenic tissue, decreased binding to kidney tissue, and no change in binding to liver tissue compared with the wild type. In vivo, no difference was observed in translocation of the wild type or strain 4A to liver following immuno-compromising treatment of infant mice which had been

  14. Fulminant encephalitis associated with a vaccine strain of rubella virus.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Felipe Augusto Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Alves, Venancio A F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Sato, Helena Keico; Arantes, Benedito A F; Curti, Suely Pires; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide

    2013-12-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is common in measles, but rare in rubella. However, rubella virus (RV) can cause a variety of central nervous system syndromes, including meningitis, encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and sub acute sclerosing panencephalitis. We report the occurrence of one fatal case of the encephalitis associated with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine during an immunization campaign in São Paulo, Brazil. A 31 year-old-man, previously in good health, was admitted at emergency room, with confusion, agitation, inability to stand and hold his head up. Ten days prior to admission, he was vaccinated with combined MR vaccine (Serum Institute of India) and three days later he developed 'flu-like' illness with fever, myalgia and headache. Results of clinical and laboratory exams were consistent with a pattern of viral encephalitis. During hospitalization, his condition deteriorated rapidly with tetraplegia and progression to coma. On the 3rd day of hospitalization he died. Histopathology confirmed encephalitis and immunohistochemistry was positive for RV on brain tissue. RV was also detected by qPCR and virus isolation in cerebrospinal fluid, brain and other clinical samples. The sequence obtained from the isolated virus was identical to that of the RA 27/3 vaccine strain.

  15. Safety and protective efficacy of a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum as a live attenuated vaccine for fowl typhoid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhao; Yin, Junlei; Kang, Xilong; Geng, Shizhong; Hu, Maozhi; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-08-01

    With an aim to develop a safe, immunogenic fowl typhoid (FT) vaccine, the safety and efficacy of 1009ΔspiCΔcrp, a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum, were evaluated in chickens. Three-day-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized with 1009ΔspiCΔcrp (1×10(7)CFU) and boosted 7days later (at 10-days old) with the same dose and via the same route (vaccinated group). The vaccinated group showed no clinical symptoms and no differences in body weight compared to the unvaccinated control group. 1009ΔspiCΔcrp bacteria colonized and persisted in the liver and spleen of vaccinated chickens for >14days, and significant specific humoral and cellular immune responses were induced. Vaccinated chickens were challenged with S. gallinarum strain SG9 at 21days post-immunization (24-day-old chickens), and efficient protection was observed based on the mortality and clinical symptoms, as compared to those in the control group. These results demonstrate that 1009ΔspiCΔcrp can be used as a live attenuated vaccine.

  16. Increased immunity to cottontail rabbit papillomavirus infection in EIII/JC inbred rabbits after vaccination with a mutant E6 that correlates with spontaneous regression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Christensen, Neil D

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that a progressive cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) strain containing a single amino acid change in E6 (E6G252E) induced papilloma regression in EIII/JC inbred rabbits. This finding implied that the point mutation might cause an increase in the antigenicity of the mutant versus the wild-type E6. To test this hypothesis, groups of four EIII/JC inbred rabbits were immunized with wild-type CRPVE6, CRPVE6G252E, CRPV E5, or with vector alone. A gene gun delivery system was used to deliver the DNA vaccines. Two of four rabbits from both E6G252E- and wild-type E6-vaccinated groups were free of papillomas at week 12 after viral challenge. Significantly smaller papillomas were found on E6G252E-vaccinated rabbits than on E6-, E5-, and control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p = 0.01, unpaired Student t test) and these small papillomas regressed at week 20 after viral challenge. E5 vaccination failed to provide protection against viral challenge, and the mean papilloma size was also comparable to that of the control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p > 0.05, unpaired Student t test). We conclude that a single amino acid change in the CRPV E6 protein (G252E) increased protection against wild-type infectious CRPV.

  17. Effects of a Mutant Strain and a Wild Type Strain of Verticillium lecanii on Heterodera glycines Populations in the Greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Meyer, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A wild type strain ofVerticillium lecanii and a mutant strain with increased tolerance to the fungicide benomyl were evaluated in greenhouse experiments for effects on Heterodera glycines populations. Nematodes were applied at 300 eggs and juveniles per 4,550-cm³ pot (two soybean plants in 4,990 g loamy sand per pot) and at both 300 and 10,000 eggs and juveniles per 1,720-cm³ pot (one soybean plant in 2,060 g sand per pot). With 300 nematodes added per pot, both V. lecanii strains significantly reduced nematode populations in loamy sand (fungus applied at 0.02% dry weight per dry weight loamy sand) and sand (0.006% and 0.06% fungus application rates). The mutant strain applied at 0.002% to sand also significantly reduced cyst numbers. When 10,000 nematodes were added per pot, only the mutant strain at 0.06% significantly decreased population. Various media were tested for isolation of the fungus strains from prills, loamy sand, and sand, but the fungi were recovered from few of the greenhouse pots. PMID:19277306

  18. Evaluation in mice of Brucella ovis attenuated mutants for use as live vaccines against B. ovis infection.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Pilar; Tejedor, Carmen; Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2014-06-04

    Brucella ovis causes ram contagious epididymitis, a disease for which a specific vaccine is lacking. Attenuated Brucella melitensis Rev 1, used as vaccine against ovine and caprine brucellosis caused by B. melitensis, is also considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of B. ovis infection, but its use for this purpose has serious drawbacks. In this work, two previously characterized B. ovis attenuated mutants (Δomp25d and Δomp22) were evaluated in mice, in comparison with B. melitensis Rev 1, as vaccines against B. ovis. Similarities, but also significant differences, were found regarding the immune response induced by the three vaccines. Mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants developed anti-B. ovis antibodies in serum of the IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses and their levels were higher than those observed in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. After an antigen stimulus with B. ovis cells, splenocytes obtained from all vaccinated mice secreted similar levels of TNF-α and IL12(p40) and remarkably high amounts of IFN-γ, a crucial cytokine in protective immunity against other Brucella species. By contrast, IL-1α -an enhancer of T cell responses to antigen- was present at higher levels in mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants, while IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was significantly more abundant in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. Additionally, the B. ovis mutants showed appropriate persistence, limited splenomegaly and protective efficacy against B. ovis similar to that observed with B. melitensis Rev 1. These characteristics encourage their evaluation in the natural host as homologous vaccines for the specific prophylaxis of B. ovis infection.

  19. Evaluation of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Pathogenicity Island 2 Mutant as a Candidate Live Attenuated Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junlei; Cheng, Zhao; Wang, Xiaochun; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Qiuchun; Geng, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is a highly adapted pathogen that causes pullorum disease (PD), an important systemic disease of poultry that causes severe economic losses in developing countries. In the interests of developing a safe and immunogenic oral vaccine, the efficacy of a Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2)-deleted mutant of S. Pullorum (S06004ΔSPI2) was evaluated in chickens. S06004ΔSPI2 was severely less virulent than the parental wild-type strain S06004 as determined by the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for 3-day-old chickens when injected intramuscularly. Two-day-old chickens immunized with a single oral dose of S06004ΔSPI2 showed no differences in body weight or clinical symptoms compared with those in the negative-control group. S06004ΔSPI2 bacteria were not isolated from livers or spleens of immunized chickens after a short period of time, and specific humoral and cellular immune responses were significantly induced. Immunized chickens were challenged with S. Pullorum strain S06004 and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum) strain SG9 at 10 days postimmunization (dpi), and efficient protection against the challenges was observed. None of the immunized chickens died, the clinical symptoms were slight and temporary following challenge in immunized chickens compared with those in the control group, and these chickens recovered by 3 to 5 dpi. Overall, these results demonstrate that S06004ΔSPI2 can be used as a live attenuated oral vaccine. PMID:25924763

  20. Phosphoregulation of an Inner Dynein Arm Complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Is Altered in Phototactic Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a further understanding of axonemal dynein regulation, mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had defects in both phototactic behavior and flagellar motility were identified and characterized. ptm1, ptm2, and ptm3 mutant strains exhibited motility phenotypes that resembled those of known inner dynein arm region mutant strains, but did not have biochemical or genetic phenotypes characteristic of other inner dynein arm mutations. Three other mutant strains had defects in the f class of inner dynein arms. Dynein extracts from the pf9-4 strain were missing the entire f complex. Strains with mutations in pf9/ida1, ida2, or ida3 failed to assemble the f dynein complex and did not exhibit phototactic behavior. Fractionated dynein from mia1-1 and mia2-1 axonemes exhibited a novel f class inner dynein arm biochemical phenotype; the 138-kD f intermediate chain was present in altered phosphorylation forms. In vitro axonemal dynein activity was reduced by the mia1-1 and mia2-1 mutations. The addition of kinase inhibitor restored axonemal dynein activity concomitant with the dephosphorylation of the 138-kD f intermediate chain. Dynein extracts from uni1-1 axonemes, which specifically assemble only one of the two flagella, contained relatively high levels of the altered phosphorylation forms of the 138-kD intermediate chain. We suggest that the f dynein complex may be phosphoregulated asymmetrically between the two flagella to achieve phototactic turning. PMID:9008712

  1. Simultaneous analysis of the nasal shedding kinetics of field and vaccine strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Iemura, R; Tsukatani, R; Micallef, M J; Taneno, A

    2009-12-26

    Groups of four two-week-old puppies were administered serial dilutions of an intranasal vaccine containing live Bordetella bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza virus vaccine and housed individually in isolator cages. Three vaccinated groups and one unvaccinated control group were exposed to virulent B bronchiseptica four weeks after vaccination and evaluated. Nasal swabs for bacterial culture and sera for agglutination tests were taken from all the dogs every week for four weeks. The bacteria isolated were identified by growth on specific agar and by specific PCR to distinguish between vaccine and challenge strains. The vaccine strain persisted in the nasal cavity after vaccination but no adverse reactions were observed. Serum agglutination titres were raised in the vaccinated dogs at challenge. Vaccine strains were not isolated after the challenge from most of the vaccinated dogs. The challenge strain was shed in the dogs vaccinated with the lowest dose (10(6.0) cfu/dose) for two to three weeks but the other vaccinated groups (10(7.0) and 10(8.0) cfu/dose) shed the challenge strain transiently or not at all. Only the group vaccinated with 10(6.0) cfu/dose exhibited clinical signs after challenge.

  2. Bivalent vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in domestic sheep and goats with modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutants of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Robert E; Hauglund, Melissa J; Maheswaran, Samuel K; Tatum, Fred M

    2013-11-01

    A temperature-sensitive shuttle vector, pBB80C, was utilized to generate in-frame deletion mutants of the leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12. Culture supernatants from the mutants contained a truncated protein with an approximate molecular weight of 66 kDa which was reactive to anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody. No protein reactive to anti-LktA monoclonal antibody was detected at the molecular weight 100-105 kDa of native LktA. Sheep and goats vaccinated intramuscularly with a mixture of serotypes 5 and 6 mutants were resistant to virulent challenge with a mixture of the wild-type parent strains. These vaccinates responded serologically to both vaccine serotypes and exhibited markedly-reduced lung lesion volume and pulmonary infectious load compared to control animals. Control animals yielded a mixture of serotypes from lung lobes, but the proportion even within an individual animal varied widely from 95% serotype 5-95% serotype 6. Cultures recovered from liver were homogeneous, but two animals yielded serotype 5 and the other two yielded serotype 6 in pure culture.

  3. DIVERGENCE, NOT DIVERSITY OF AN ATTENUATED EQUINE LENTIVIRUS VACCINE STRAIN CORRELATES WITH PROTECTION FROM DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Barnes, Shannon; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported an attenuated EIAV vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral envelope sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study [1] demonstrated for the first time the failure of an ancestral vaccine to protect and revealed a significant, inverse, linear relationship between envelope divergence and protection from disease. In the current study we examine in detail the evolution of the attenuated vaccine strain utilized in this previous study. We demonstrate here that the attenuated strain progressively evolved during the six-month pre-challenge period and that the observed protection from disease was significantly associated with divergence from the original vaccine strain. PMID:20955830

  4. Ability of vaccine strain induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates of caliciviruses from Swedish cats.

    PubMed

    Wensman, Jonas Johansson; Samman, Ayman; Lindhe, Anna; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Berndtsson, Louise Treiberg; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-12-12

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in cats worldwide. Its characteristically high mutation rate leads to escape from the humoral immune response induced by natural infection and/or vaccination and consequently vaccines are not always effective against field isolates. Thus, there is a need to continuously investigate the ability of FCV vaccine strain-induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates. Seventy-eight field isolates of FCV isolated during the years 2008-2012 from Swedish cats displaying clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease were examined in this study. The field isolates were tested for cross-neutralization using a panel of eight anti-sera raised in four pairs of cats following infection with four vaccine strains (F9, 255, G1 and 431). The anti-sera raised against F9 and 255 neutralised 20.5 and 11.5 %, and 47.4 and 64.1 % of field isolates tested, respectively. The anti-sera against the more recently introduced vaccine strains G1 and 431 neutralized 33.3 and 55.1 % (strain G1) or 69.2 and 89.7 % (strain 431) of the field isolates with titres ≥5. [corrected]. Dual vaccine strains displayed a higher cross-neutralization. This study confirms previous observations that more recently introduced vaccine strains induce antibodies with a higher neutralizing capacity compared to vaccine strains that have been used extensively over a long period of time. This study also suggests that dual FCV vaccine strains might neutralize more field isolates compared to single vaccine strains. Vaccine strains should ideally be selected based on updated knowledge on the antigenic properties of field isolates in the local setting, and there is thus a need for continuously studying the evolution of FCV together with the neutralizing capacity of vaccine strain induced antibodies against field isolates at a national and/or regional level.

  5. Engineered alphavirus replicon vaccines based on known attenuated viral mutants show limited effects on immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Shaw, Christine A; Otten, Gillis R; Mason, Peter W; Beard, Clayton W

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of alphavirus replicon vaccines is determined by many factors including the level of antigen expression and induction of innate immune responses. Characterized attenuated alphavirus mutants contain changes to the genomic 5' UTR and mutations that result in altered non-structural protein cleavage timing leading to altered levels of antigen expression and interferon (IFN) induction. In an attempt to create more potent replicon vaccines, we engineered a panel of Venezuelan equine encephalitis-Sindbis virus chimeric replicons that contained these attenuating mutations. Modified replicons were ranked for antigen expression and IFN induction levels in cell culture and then evaluated in mice. The results of these studies showed that differences in antigen production and IFN induction in vitro did not correlate with large changes in immunogenicity in vivo. These findings indicate that the complex interactions between innate immune response and the replicon's ability to express antigen complicate rational design of more potent alphavirus replicons.

  6. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  7. Antifolate Agents Against Wild and Mutant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, M. S.; Rana, J.; Gaikwad, D.; Leartsakulpanich, U.; Ambre, Premlata K.; Pissurlenkar, R. R. S.; Coutinho, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase is an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of the classic antifolate drugs cycloguanil and pyrimethamine. In this paper we report new dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors identified using molecular modelling principles with the goal of designing new antifolate agents active against both wild and tetramutant dihydrofolate reductase strains three series of trimethoprim analogues were designed, synthesised and tested for biological activity. Pyrimethamine and cycloguanil have been reported to loose efficacy because of steric repulsion in the active site pocket produced due to mutation in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase. The synthesised molecules have sufficient flexibility to withstand this steric repulsion to counteract the resistance. The molecules have been synthesised by conventional techniques and fully characterised by spectroscopic methods. The potency of these molecules was evaluated by in vitro enzyme specific assays. Some of the molecules were active in micromolar concentrations and can easily be optimised to improve binding and activity. PMID:24843184

  8. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Rahul; Graham, Andrea L.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging ‘universal’ vaccines—targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus—offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in vaccination

  9. Safe Live Oral Salmonella Vaccines; Use of aro- Strains.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-20

    Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. 7, S"|ECuRITY CLASSIFICATION Or THIS PAGE (W*PR Deem Enteewd) REPORT...properties justifying trial as oral-route vaccine in human volunteers will soon he completed. If such a strain gives satisfactory results, in respect of...biosynthetic (aro) both in biotype and in that it is virulent for calves’?. A nLn- pathway. A complete block at any .step of this pathway should reverting

  10. Experimental study of a further attenuated live measles vaccine of the Sugiyama strain in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirchamsy, H.; Shafyi, A.; Rafyi, M. R.; Bahrami, S.; Nazari, P.; Fatemie, S.

    1974-01-01

    After encouraging results of the mass vaccination programme in Iran, in which 5 million children in rural areas were vaccinated with the Japanese Sugiyama strain at its 82nd passage in baby calf kidney, and a progressive decrease in the incidence of measles as well as a reduction of excessive infant mortality, a further attenuated vaccine, produced with the same strain, cloned in Japan, was compared in a field trial with the parent vaccine. The new strain caused fewer reactions than the original strain. Seroconversion with a geometric mean antibody titre of 6·1 was observed in 95% of susceptible children. PMID:4522721

  11. Oral vaccination of badgers (Meles meles) against tuberculosis: comparison of the protection generated by BCG vaccine strains Pasteur and Danish.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Denise; Costello, Eamon; Aldwell, Frank E; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Fitzsimons, Tara; Corner, Leigh A L; Gormley, Eamonn

    2014-06-01

    Vaccination of badgers by the subcutaneous, mucosal and oral routes with the Pasteur strain of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has resulted in significant protection against experimental infection with virulent M. bovis. However, as the BCG Danish strain is the only commercially licensed BCG vaccine for use in humans in the European Union it is the vaccine of choice for delivery to badger populations. As all oral vaccination studies in badgers were previously conducted using the BCG Pasteur strain, this study compared protection in badgers following oral vaccination with the Pasteur and the Danish strains. Groups of badgers were vaccinated orally with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) BCG Danish 1331 (n = 7 badgers) or 10(8) CFU BCG Pasteur 1173P2 (n = 6). Another group (n = 8) served as non-vaccinated controls. At 12 weeks post-vaccination, the animals were challenged by the endobronchial route with 6 × 10(3) CFU M. bovis, and at 15 weeks post-infection, all of the badgers were euthanased. Vaccination with either BCG strain provided protection against challenge compared with controls. The vaccinated badgers had significantly fewer sites with gross pathology and significantly lower gross pathological severity scores, fewer sites with histological lesions and fewer sites of infection, significantly lower bacterial counts in the thoracic lymph node, and lower bacterial counts in the lungs than the control group. No differences were observed between either of the vaccine groups by any of the pathology and bacteriology measures. The ELISPOT analysis, measuring production of badger interferon - gamma (IFN-γ), was also similar across the vaccinated groups.

  12. Vaccine protection by a triple deletion mutant of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wyand, M S; Manson, K H; Garcia-Moll, M; Montefiori, D; Desrosiers, R C

    1996-01-01

    Twelve rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with SIVmac316 delta nef (lacking nef sequences), and 12 were vaccinated with SIVmac239 delta3 (lacking nef, vpr, and upstream sequences in U3). SIVmac316 and SIVmac239 differ by only eight amino acids in the envelope; these changes render SIVmac316 highly competent for replication in macrophages. Seventeen of the animals developed persistent infections with the vaccine viruses. Seven of the 24 vaccinated animals, however, developed infections that were apparently transient in nature. Six of these seven yielded virus from peripheral blood when tested at weeks 2 and/or 3, three of the seven had transient antibody responses, but none of the seven had persisting antibody responses. The 24 monkeys were challenged in groups of four with 10 rhesus monkey infectious doses of wild-type, pathogenic SIVmac251 at weeks 8, 20, and 79 following receipt of vaccine. None of the seven with apparently transient infections with vaccine virus were protected upon subsequent challenge. Analysis of cell-associated viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and viral gene sequences present in peripheral blood in the remainder of the monkeys following challenge allowed a number of conclusions. (i) There was a trend toward increased protection with length of time of vaccination. (ii) Solid vaccine protection was achieved by 79 weeks with the highly attenuated SIV239 delta3. (iii) Solid long-term protection was achieved in at least two animals in the absence of complete sterilizing immunity. (iv) Genetic backbone appeared to influence protective capacity; animals vaccinated with SIV239 delta3 were better protected than animals receiving SIV316 delta nef. This better protection correlated with increased levels of the replicating vaccine strain. (v) The titer of virus-neutralizing activity in serum on the day of challenge correlated with protection when measured against a primary stock of SIVmac251 but not when measured against a laboratory-passaged stock. The level

  13. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Construction of a Streptococcus iniae sortase A mutant and evaluation of its potential as an attenuated modified live vaccine in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zou, L L; Li, A X

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a major Gram-positive aquatic pathogen, which causes invasive diseases in cultured fish worldwide. The identification of potential virulence determinants of streptococcal infections will help to understand and control this disease, but only a few have been confirmed in S. iniae. Sortase A (srtA) is the key enzyme that anchors pre-mature cell wall-attached proteins to peptidoglycan and it can affect the correct positioning of surface proteins, as well as the course of Gram-positive bacterial infection, thereby making it a potential target in the study of virulence factors and disease control. In this study, the 759 bp srtA gene was cloned from pathogenic S. iniae TBY-1 strain and the mutant strain TBY-1ΔsrtA was constructed via allelic exchange mutagenesis. We found that srtA shares high similarities with sortase A from other Streptococcus spp. Direct survival rate assay and challenge experiments were performed, which showed that the mutant strain TBY-1ΔsrtA had a lower survival capacity in healthy tilapia blood and it was less virulent than the wild type strain in tilapia, thereby indicating that the deletion of sortase A affects the virulence and infectious capacity of S. iniae. The mutant strain TBY-1ΔsrtA was used as a live vaccine, which was administered via intraperitoneal injection, and it provided the relative percent survival value of 95.5% in Nile tilapia, thereby demonstrating its high potential as an effective attenuated live vaccine candidate.

  15. Structure-based design of NS2 mutants for attenuated influenza A virus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Akarsu, Hatice; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Noda, Takeshi; Kawakami, Eiryo; Katsura, Hiroaki; Baudin, Florence; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    We previously characterized the matrix 1 (M1)-binding domain of the influenza A virus NS2/nuclear export protein (NEP), reporting a critical role for the tryptophan (W78) residue that is surrounded by a cluster of glutamate residues in the C-terminal region that interacts with the M1 protein (Akarsu et al., 2003). To gain further insight into the functional role of this interaction, here we used reverse genetics to generate a series of A/WSN/33 (H1N1)-based NS2/NEP mutants for W78 or the C-terminal glutamate residues and assessed their effect on virus growth. We found that simultaneous mutations at three positions (E67S/E74S/E75S) of NS2/NEP were important for inhibition of influenza viral polymerase activity, although the W78S mutant and other glutamate mutants with single substitutions were not. In addition, double and triple substitutions in the NS2/NEP glutamine residues, which resulted in the addition of seven amino acids to the C-terminus of NS1 due to gene overlapping, resulted in virus attenuation in mice. Animal studies with this mutant suggest a potential benefit to incorporating these NS mutations into live vaccines. PMID:20970464

  16. A Web-Based Platform for Designing Vaccines against Existing and Emerging Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Vir, Pooja; Singla, Deepak; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for saving millions of premature deaths every year due to tuberculosis. This paper describes a web portal developed for assisting researchers in designing vaccines against emerging Mtb strains using traditional and modern approaches. Firstly, we annotated 59 genomes of Mycobacterium species to understand similarity/dissimilarity between tuberculoid, non-tuberculoid and vaccine strains at genome level. Secondly, antigen-based vaccine candidates have been predicted in each Mtb strain. Thirdly, epitopes-based vaccine candidates were predicted/discovered in above antigen-based vaccine candidates that can stimulate all arms of immune system. Finally, a database of predicted vaccine candidates at epitopes as well at antigen level has been developed for above strains. In order to design vaccine against a newly sequenced genome of Mtb strain, server integrates three modules for identification of strain-, antigen-, epitope-specific vaccine candidates. We observed that 103522 unique peptides (9mers) had the potential to induce an antibody response and/or promiscuous binder to MHC alleles and/or have the capability to stimulate T lymphocytes. In summary, this web-portal will be useful for researchers working on designing vaccines against Mtb including drug-resistant strains. Availability: The database is available freely at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/mtbveb/. PMID:27096425

  17. Immune Responses of Bison and Efficacy after Booster Vaccination with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J. L.; Sacco, R. E.; Hennager, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 1010 CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against brucellosis in

  18. Failure of Surface Ring Mutant Strains of Helicobacter mustelae To Persistently Infect the Ferret Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, M. M.; O'Toole, P. W.; Forester, N. T.; Noonan, B.; Trust, T. J.; Xu, S.; Taylor, N. S.; Marini, R. P.; Ihrig, M. M.; Fox, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter mustelae, the gastric pathogen of ferrets, produces an array of surface ring structures which have not been described for any other member of the genus Helicobacter, including H. pylori. The unique ring structures are composed of a protein named Hsr. To investigate whether the Hsr rings are important for colonization of the ferret stomach, ferrets specific pathogen free for H. mustelae were inoculated with an Hsr-deficient mutant strain or the wild-type H. mustelae strain. Quantitative cultures from antral biopsy specimens obtained at 3, 6, and 9 weeks postinoculation demonstrated no significant difference in the levels of bacteria in the ferrets that received the Hsr-negative strain and the ferrets infected with the parent strain. However, when the ferrets were biopsied at 12 and 15 weeks and necropsied at 18 weeks after infection, the levels of bacteria of the Hsr-negative strain in the stomach antrum were significantly reduced. This decline contrasted the robust antral colonization by the wild-type strain. The Hsr-negative strain did not efficiently colonize the gastric body of the study ferrets. Histological examination at 18 weeks postinoculation revealed minimal gastric inflammation in the animals that received the mutant H. mustelae strain, a finding consistent with its waning infection status, whereas lesions characteristic of helicobacter infection were present in ferrets infected with the wild-type strain. Scant colonization by the Hsr-negative H. mustelae strain at the end of the 18-week study, despite initial successful colonization, indicates an inability of the mutant to persist, perhaps due to a specific host response. PMID:12704104

  19. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Vaccine Strain Rev 1 and a Virulent Strain, 16M

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A.; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V.; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1. PMID:12193611

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev 1 and a virulent strain, 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-09-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1.

  1. Mechanical properties of elytra from Tribolium castaneum wild-type and body color mutant strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cuticle tanning in insects involves simultaneous cuticular hardening and pigmentation. The dynamic mechanical properties of the highly modified and cuticle-rich forewings (elytra) from Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle) body color mutant strains were investigated to determine the relationship b...

  2. Humoral response to calicivirus in captive tigers given a dual-strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Harrison, Scott H; Sikarskie, James G; Armstrong, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The current feline vaccine with a single strain of calicivirus has been used for captive tigers, yet it may not protect against virulent systemic calicivirus infections. A cross-institutional study investigated the humoral response to a new dual-strain, killed-virus calicivirus vaccine for nine captive tigers. The subspecies of these tigers were Amur (Panthera tigris altaica), Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris), and Malayan (Panthera tigris jacksoni). Serum neutralization titers for virulent feline calicivirus strain FCV-DD1 were higher following dual-strain vaccine administration. There were no reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Dual-strain vaccination may afford broadened cross-protection against different calicivirus strains and is desirable to reduce the risk of virulent systemic calicivirus disease in tigers.

  3. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  4. A gE-negative BHV1 vaccine virus strain cannot perpetuate in cattle populations.

    PubMed

    Mars, M H; de Jong, M C; van Oirschot, J T

    2000-04-14

    Three identical transmission experiments were successively performed to quantitatively evaluate the possible transmission of a gE-negative bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) vaccine strain among cattle. After intranasal inoculation, the vaccine virus was excreted in high titers in nasal fluids. However, the vaccine virus was transmitted to only one sentinel in one experiment, and not to any of the 10 sentinel cattle in the other two experiments. Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the expected number of cases per vaccine-inoculated animal, i.e. the transmission ratio R(0) of the vaccine strain, is significantly below 1. The R(0) was estimated to be 0.14. After intramuscular inoculation, shedding of vaccine virus was not detected. Therefore, we concluded that it is highly unlikely that this live gE-negative BHV1 vaccine strain will perpetuate in the cattle population.

  5. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  6. Salmonella abortusovis, strain Rv6, a new vaccinal vehicle for small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bourgogne, A; Sanchis, R; Clément, J M; Pépin, M

    1998-03-31

    Salmonella abortusovis strain Rv6 (Sao Rv6) is a live attenuated vaccine used for a few years to protect ewes against abortive salmonellosis. As Salmonellae, particularly Salmonella aro mutants, have considerable potential as vehicles for the presentation of heterologous vaccine antigens, Sao Rv6 was tested in order to develop a vaccinal vehicle for small ruminants. Five vector plasmids were tested in Sao Rv6; these plasmids, which carry Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) expressed as protein, but differ in their promotors, had been previously tested in S. typhimurium strain SL3261, and were transferred into Sao Rv6. The five plasmids were stable in vitro, and the recombinant Sao Rv6 expressed MBP at various levels. Intraperitoneal infection of OF1 mice with the recombinant bacteria did not modify the characteristics of Sao Rv6; dissemination and infection levels were similar in all groups and all mice developed antibodies to Salmonella antigens as measured by ELISA. In contrast, only animals immunized with Sao Rv6 carrying the pNTE plasmid developed a serum antibody response to MBP. This plasmid was then tested in sheep; following subcutaneous immunization with Sao Rv6-pNTE, dissemination and infection levels were not modified in comparison with sheep immunized with Sao Rv6 lacking plasmid. Antibodies specific to MBP were detected in sera of sheep immunized with Sao Rv6-pNTE, purified MBP, and with S. typhimurium SL3261-pNTE as positive controls. These results demonstrate that Sao Rv6 can be used as a vehicle for heterologous antigens in sheep with pNTE as plasmid vector.

  7. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors.

  8. Clinical trials with Alice strain, live, attenuated, serum inhibitor-resistant intranasal influenza A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Spencer, M J; Cherry, J D; Powell, K R; Sumaya, C V; Garakian, A J

    1975-10-01

    Two clinical trials with Alice strain intranasal influenza vaccine were performed. In study no. 1 (utilizing random selection and double-blind control), 50 subjects received a bivalent inactivated influenza vaccine intramuscularly, 99 subjects received Alice strain vaccine intranasally, and 50 subjects received a placebo intranasally. No symptomatology could be attributed to the intranasal route of immunization. Convalescent-phase geometric mean titers of hemagglutination inhibition antibody were higher after intramuscular vaccination; seroconversion occurred in 16 or 17 recipients of the Alice strain, with initial titers of less than 1:8. Clinical and virologic surveillance for 20 weeks after vaccination revealed no influenza A illnesses in participants of the study. In study no. 2, 75% of the subjects with initial nasal antibody titers of less than 1:3 developed measurable nasal antibody after receiving Alice strain vaccine.

  9. Selenite-stress selected mutant strains of probiotic bacteria for Se source production.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István; Prokisch, József

    2015-04-01

    Selenium deficiency is a major health problem worldwide for about 1 billion people. Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity. The selenite treatment increased further these values in L. casei mutant strain pointing at a different selenite reduction pathway and/or stress response in this organism. Considerable conversion of selenite to cell bound selenium forms with a concomitant high biomass production was detected in E. faecium and B. animalis ssp. lactis cultures. Possible application of these strains as food and feed supplements is under investigation.

  10. Protective efficacy of a live, attenuated, influenza virus vaccine (‘Alice’ strain)

    PubMed Central

    Prinzie, A.; Delem, A.; Huygelen, C.

    1976-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated the high degree of efficacy and broad protection of ‘Alice’ vaccine against various heterologous H3N2 influenza virus strains. Similarly, challenge studies carried out in volunteers have confirmed the high degree of efficacy of ‘Alice’ vaccine versus homologous and heterologous influenza A virus strains. PMID:785431

  11. Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine against Endemic Hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis W Strain, England

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Biolchi, Alessia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Ramsay, Mary E.; Borrow, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Serum samples from children immunized with a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine demonstrated potent serum bactericidal antibody activity against the hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W strain circulating in England. The recent introduction of this vaccine into the United Kingdom national immunization program should also help protect infants against this endemic strain. PMID:26811872

  12. Spontaneous Gac Mutants of Pseudomonas Biological Control Strains: Cheaters or Mutualists? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, William W.; Pepper, John W.; Pierson, Leland S.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria rely on a range of extracellular metabolites to suppress competitors, gain access to resources, and exploit plant or animal hosts. The GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system positively controls the expression of many of these beneficial external products in pseudomonad bacteria. Natural populations often contain variants with defective Gac systems that do not produce most external products. These mutants benefit from a decreased metabolic load but do not appear to displace the wild type in nature. How could natural selection maintain the wild type in the presence of a mutant with enhanced growth? One hypothesis is that Gac mutants are “cheaters” that do not contribute to the public good, favored within groups but selected against between groups, as groups containing more mutants lose access to ecologically important external products. An alternative hypothesis is that Gac mutants have a mutualistic interaction with the wild type, so that each variant benefits by the presence of the other. In the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 30-84, Gac mutants do not produce phenazines, which suppress competitor growth and are critical for biofilm formation. Here, we test the predictions of these alternative hypotheses by quantifying interactions between the wild type and the phenazine- and biofilm-deficient Gac mutant within growing biofilms. We find evidence that the wild type and Gac mutants interact mutualistically in the biofilm context, whereas a phenazine-defective structural mutant does not. Our results suggest that the persistence of alternative Gac phenotypes may be due to the stabilizing role of local mutualistic interactions. PMID:21873476

  13. Effect of polymyxin B and environmental conditions on isolation of Brucella species and the vaccine strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allen E; Halling, Shirley M

    2010-03-01

    Brucella are resistant to polymyxin B (PB), but their relative susceptibility to PB and its derivative, colistin (COL) has not been rigorously or systematically studied. Comparative susceptibility of Brucella reference strains, vaccine strain RB51, and Brucella isolates from marine mammals to these two cationic peptides were determined by Etest. Vast differences among Brucella species were found in susceptibility to both PB and COL. Brucella demonstrated similar pattern of relative susceptibility to PB as that of COL, but they were less susceptible to COL. Both B. melitensis and B. suis were the least susceptible to polymyxins and rough strains were more susceptible to both PB and COL than the smooth except for the BvrR mutant. Strains were generally less susceptible to PB when cultured in CO(2) rather than ambient air; some became more susceptible in acidified medium. Results show that environment cultural conditions must be considered when selecting for CO(2)-independent strains of Brucella especially the vaccine strain RB51 on selective media containing PB. Our observations extend basic knowledge of the differential resistance of Brucella to polymyxins.

  14. [Ribosome engineering of streptomyces sp. FJ3 from Three Gorges reservoir area and metabolic product of the selected mutant strain].

    PubMed

    Hai, Le; Huang, Yuqi; Liao, Guojian; Hu, Changhua

    2011-07-01

    To explore new resource from inactive actinomycete strains, we screened resistant mutant strains by ribosome engineering, and analyzed the products derived from the selected mutant strains. Three Gorges reservoir area-derived actinomycete strains including BD20, FJ3, WZ20 and FJ5 were used as initial strains, which showed no-antibacterial activities. The streptomycin-resistant (str(R)) mutants and rifampicin-resistant (rif(R)) mutants were screened by single colony isolation on streptomycin-containing plates and rifampicin-containing plates according to the method for obtaining drug-resistant mutants in ribosome engineering. The four initial strains and their str(R)-mutants and rif(R)-mutants were fermented in a liquid medium with the same composition. Mutants with anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity were obtained by paper chromatography. The components of fermentation broth were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, FJ3 strain was identified by 16S rDNA and morphology. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of streptomycin and rifampicin for FJ3 was: 0.5 microg/mL and 110 microg/mL, respectively. Twenty-four strR-mutant strains and 20 rif(R)-mutant strains of FJ3 mutant strains were selected for bioassay. The result of the antibacterial activity screening demonstrated that six strains inhibited bacteria. Two strains (FJ3-2 and FJ3-6) were screened from the streptomycin-resistance mutants of inactive strain FJ3. The result of bioassay showed that the fermentation broth of FJ3-2 and FJ3-6 exhibited obvious anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity. The assay of paper chromatography showed that the active substance may be nucleic acid class antibiotic via using solvent system Doskochilova. Moreover, the results of HPLC and LC-MS exhibited that this substance may be thiolutin. Ribosome engineering for changing the secondary metabolic function of the inactive wild

  15. Herpes zoster caused by vaccine-strain varicella zoster virus in an immunocompetent recipient of zoster vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hung Fu; Schmid, D Scott; Harpaz, Rafael; LaRussa, Philip; Jensen, Nancy J; Rivailler, Pierre; Radford, Kay; Folster, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    We report the first laboratory-documented case of herpes zoster caused by the attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) contained in Zostavax in a 68-year-old immunocompetent adult with strong evidence of prior wild-type VZV infection. The complete genome sequence of the isolate revealed that the strain carried 15 of 42 (36%) recognized varicella vaccine-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms, including all 5 of the fixed vaccine markers present in nearly all of the strains in the vaccine. The case of herpes zoster was relatively mild and resolved without complications.

  16. Controversial results of the genetic analysis of a canine distemper vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Zoltán; Palade, Elena Alina; Hornyák, Akos; Rusvai, Miklós

    2010-05-19

    Canine distemper (CD) is a highly contagious, often fatal, multisystemic viral disease of receptive carnivores. The presence of a PsiI cleavage site on a specific location of the hemagglutinin (H) gene was found to be a hallmark of vaccine strains, thus, a previously published restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) test using PsiI theoretically allows the distinction between all currently used vaccine strains and virulent field strains. The RFLP test was carried out on all brands of CD vaccines available in Hungary. The present work describes the extensive sequencing and phylogenetic study of the strain present in Vanguard (Pfizer Animal Health) vaccines, which following the PsiI based RFLP test reacted as a wild-type strain. Based on the product description provided by the manufacturer, all batches should have contained a virus strain (Snyder Hill) belonging to the group of vaccine strains (America-1). Extensive genetic analysis involving the full nucleic acid sequence of four other genes (N, M, P and F) of the CDV genome revealed that the incriminated virus strain showed a higher level of genetic identity to wild-type strains from the America-2 group than to any of the strains belonging to America-1 group, therefore the vaccine does not contain the virus strain stated by the manufacturer in its product description and has not been containing it since at least 1992.

  17. Microevolution of Sabin 1 strain in vitro and genetic stability of oral poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rezapkin, G V; Chumakov, K M; Lu, Z; Ran, Y; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1994-07-01

    Mutants consistently accumulating in Sabin 1 poliovirus during serial passaging in vitro were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantitated using mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Only four unstable genomic sites were identified in virus passaged 10 times in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, and eight sites in virus passaged in Vero cells. Mutations accumulated both in untranslated regions of RNA (nucleotides 480, 525 and 7441) and in coding sequences, as missense (nucleotides 1449, 4944, and 6203) or silent (nucleotides 1123 and 1141) mutations. The most prominent selectable mutations were found at complementary nucleotides 480 and 525 of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the Sabin strain, changing the G:U pair in F-domain to either A:U or G:C variants. These two variants have been shown previously to have an increased neurovirulence in monkeys. The G:C variant accumulated during passage in Vero cells, while A:U variant accumulated in CV-1 cells. Virus passaged in AGMK cells accumulated both variants. Higher temperature (37 instead of 34 degrees) strongly favored selection of mutants in Vero cells, had a smaller effect on mutant accumulation in AGMK cells, and had no effect in CV-1 cells. Monopools of type 1 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) made by seven manufacturers were found to contain both 480-A and 525-C revertants at a combined level of 1.1-2.7%. Viral samples with increased amounts of these revertants had higher neurovirulence in monkeys. Our results suggest that quantitation of these reversions by MAPREC may be prognostic for results of the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT) and can be used for monitoring type 1 OPV consistency.

  18. Immunological responses induced by asd and wzy/asd mutant strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hong Hua; Tam, Vo Thi Minh; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Phil Youl; Kim, Soo Young; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Choy, Hyon E; Kim, Suhng Wook; Hong, Yeongjin

    2010-08-01

    Attenuated bacteria have long been developed as vaccine candidates but can have some disadvantages, such as the potential for damage to immune organs due to insufficient clearance. To minimize these disadvantages, we generated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants SHJ2104 (asd::cm) and HTSaYA (wzy::km, asd::cm). The wzy gene codes for the O-antigen polymerase, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, and asd codes for aspartate beta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, which participates in cell wall formation. The strains synthesized LPS with a short-chain length, and showed lower cytotoxicity and reduced intracellular proliferation in animal cells compared to wild-type bacteria. After oral infection, the mutants were cleared in immune tissues, including the Peyer's patch, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen, within 5 days. The LD50 of the mutants in Balb/c mice was estimated to be 10(6) higher than wild-type bacteria when administered either via an oral or i.p. route, indicating that the two strains are highly attenuated. To compare the immune response to and protective effects of the mutants against wild-type bacterial infection, we inoculated the mutants into mice via an oral (1x10(10)CFU) or i.p. (1x10(7) CFU) route once or twice at a two week interval. All immune responses, such as serum IgG and secretory IgA levels, cytokine production, and delayed hypersensitivity, were highly induced by two rounds of immunization. HTSaYA and SHJ2104 induced similar immune responses, and mice immunized with HTSaYA or SHJ2104 via an i.p. route were protected against wild-type Salmonella infection even at 100-fold of the LD(50) (5x10(6) CFU). Taken together, these data indicate that HTSaYA and SHJ2104 could be developed as live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidates.

  19. Development of a duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weifeng; Wu, Chao; Kang, Chao; Cai, Chengzhi; Jin, Meilin

    2017-02-01

    The differentiation of vaccine strains from wild type strains is important for disease control. A duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains was developed based on the DNA polymerase IV gene. This duplex PCR was sensitive and specific. The detection results were coincident with that of a single nucleotide polymorphisms based PCR but the detection process was more rapid. In conclusion, this duplex PCR was a useful tool for Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections' differential diagnosis in China.

  20. Keratinase production and keratin degradation by a mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Cheng-gang; Lou, Bing-gan; Zheng, Xiao-dong

    2008-01-01

    A new feather-degrading bacterium was isolated from a local feather waste site and identified as Bacillus subtilis based on morphological, physiochemical, and phylogenetic characteristics. Screening for mutants with elevated keratinolytic activity using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis resulted in a mutant strain KD-N2 producing keratinolytic activity about 2.5 times that of the wild-type strain. The mutant strain produced inducible keratinase in different substrates of feathers, hair, wool and silk under submerged cultivation. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the degradation of feathers, hair and silk by the keratinase. The optimal conditions for keratinase production include initial pH of 7.5, inoculum size of 2% (v/v), age of inoculum of 16 h, and cultivation at 23 °C. The maximum keratinolytic activity of KD-N2 was achieved after 30 h. Essential amino acids like threonine, valine, methionine as well as ammonia were produced when feathers were used as substrates. Strain KD-N2, therefore, shows great promise of finding potential applications in keratin hydrolysis and keratinase production. PMID:18196614

  1. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  2. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  3. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  4. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3)

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production. PMID:28338018

  5. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3).

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J; Heipieper, Hermann J; Nørholm, Morten H H; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-03-24

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production.

  6. Comparative analysis of salt-tolerant gene HOG1 in a Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mutant strain and its parent strain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yonghua; Wang, Cong; Wang, Meng; Cao, Xiaohong; Hou, Lihua

    2013-08-30

    A higher-salt-tolerant mutant strain Zygosaccharomyces rouxii 3-2 (strain S3-2) that could be used for improving the flavour of high-salt liquid state soy sauce was previously constructed from parent strain Z. rouxii (strain S) by genome shuffling. However, whether the mutations in this strain affect HOG1 encoding MAPK Hog1p and improve intracellular glycerol production remains to be elucidated. Although two mutations in the ORF and one in the promoter of the HOG1 gene sequence of strain S3-2 occurred compared with that of strain S, there was no significant difference in secondary and tertiary structures between S3-2Hog1p and SHog1p. It was found that the expression level of S3-2HOG1 was higher than that of SHOG1 in YPDN medium with high salt concentration. Furthermore, overexpression of S3-2HOG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A could improve the salt tolerance and osmotolerance of engineered yeast compared with that of SHOG1. Enhancement of the transcription level of HOG1 induced by mutation in the promoter region may be one of the main reasons for the improved salt tolerance of strain S3-2 compared with that of strain S. Considering food security, the conservation of S3-2HOG1 would be beneficial for application of strain S3-2 in the fermentation of soy sauce. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis attenuated vaccine strain A16R used for human in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiankai; Qi, Xinpeng; Zhu, Li; Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Deng, Haijun; Wu, Weili; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-09-20

    An attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain for human use, A16R, was obtained in China after ultraviolet radiation treatment and continuous subculture of the wild-type strain A16. A16R can synthesize the exotoxin, but without a capsule. We sequenced and annotated the A16R genome to encourage the use of this strain. The genome sequencing of the wild-type strain A16 is underway and the genomic comparison between the two strains will help to illustrate the attenuating mechanism of the A16R vaccine strain.

  8. Rovac is the possible ancestor of the Russian lapinized vaccines LK-VNIVViM and CS strains but not the Chinese strain (C-strain) vaccine against classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiguang; Gao, Shandian; Podgórska, Katarzyna; Stadejek, Tomasz; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Yin, Hong; Drew, Trevor; Liu, Lihong

    2014-11-20

    Classical swine fever (CSF), or hog cholera, is a highly contagious disease that emerged in the first half of the nineteenth century. To fight against the disease and protect pigs, different vaccines were developed, including early generation of lapinized Rovac strain and the later development of the “Chinese” strain (C-strain). However, details of the development of these vaccines are lost in history. In order to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between the Rovac and other lapinized vaccines, this study determined the genome sequence of the Rovac, which comprised 12,304 nucleotides, notably with the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) containing a 13-nucleotide insertion. The near-complete genome of Russian vaccine strain LK-VNIVViM was determined by next-generation sequencing on Illumina MiSeq platform. Whole genome phylogenetic analysis revealed a closer relationship of the Rovac strain with the Russian LK-VNIVViM, CS strain and its derivative RUCSFPLUM (genotype 1.2), rather than with the C-strain (genotype 1.1). In addition, it demonstrated an ancestry role of the LK-VNIVViM in relation to the CS strain and RUCSFPLUM. The study suggested that the Rovac vaccine is the possible ancestor of the Russian vaccine strains but not the C-strain vaccine.

  9. Selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    H3N2 human influenza A virus causes epidemics of influenza mainly in the winter season in temperate regions. Since the antigenicity of this virus evolves rapidly, several attempts have been made to predict the major amino acid sequence of hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) in the target season of vaccination. However, the usefulness of predicted sequence was unclear because its relationship to the antigenicity was unknown. Here the antigenic model for estimating the degree of antigenic difference (antigenic distance) between amino acid sequences of HA1 was integrated into the process of selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus. When the effectiveness of a potential vaccine strain for a target season was evaluated retrospectively using the average antigenic distance between the strain and the epidemic viruses sampled in the target season, the most effective vaccine strain was identified mostly in the season one year before the target season (pre-target season). Effectiveness of actual vaccines appeared to be lower than that of the strains randomly chosen in the pre-target season on average. It was recommended to replace the vaccine strain for every target season with the strain having the smallest average antigenic distance to the others in the pre-target season. The procedure of selecting vaccine strains for future epidemic seasons described in the present study was implemented in the influenza virus forecasting system (INFLUCAST) (http://www.nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp/~yossuzuk/influcast.html).

  10. Production of a thermal stress resistant mutant Euglena gracilis strain using Fe-ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Marukawa, Yuka; Arashida, Ryo; Abe, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Euglena gracilis is a common phytoplankton species, which also has motile flagellate characteristics. Recent research and development has enabled the industrial use of E. gracilis and selective breeding of this species is expected to further expand its application. However, the production of E. gracilis nuclear mutants is difficult because of the robustness of its genome. To establish an efficient mutation induction procedure for E. gracilis, we employed Fe-ion beam irradiation in the RIKEN RI beam factory. A decrease in the survival rate was observed with the increase in irradiation dose, and the upper limit used for E. gracilis selective breeding was around 50 Gy. For a practical trial of Fe-ion irradiation, we conducted a screening to isolate high-temperature-tolerant mutants. The screening yielded mutants that proliferated faster than the wild-type strain at 32 °C. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation on E. gracilis selective breeding.

  11. A comparison of monovalent Hong Kong influenza virus vaccine with vaccines containing only pre-1968 Asian strains in adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, D.; Baker, F. A.; Chivers, C. P.; Reed, Sylvia E.; Sharp, D.

    1970-01-01

    A total of 1601 adult industrial workers were vaccinated with either monovalent inactivated vaccine of the Hong Kong strain of influenza A virus, or with polyvalent vaccine containing only pre-1968 Asian viruses. Serological investigations on a random sample of volunteers showed that 53/56 (95%) given Hong Kong vaccine developed a significant rise in specific haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody; final titres were 1/48 or greater in 39 (70%) and the GMT (geometric mean titre) was 96·5. After polyvalent Asian vaccine, 40/67 (60%) also produced antibody against Hong Kong virus, but only 21 (31%) had final titres of 1/48 or above, and the GMT rose only to 14·1. An intranasal spray of the Hong Kong vaccine in addition to injected Asian vaccine gave no additional increase in antibody. Each type of vaccine stimulated a recall of pre-existing antibody against Asian viruses. The possible significance of heterologous responses to the two vaccines is discussed. The incidence of clinical influenza in the trial population was sporadic, and the infection rates were too low to allow any accurate estimate of the protective efficiency of the two vaccines. PMID:4917915

  12. Immunological roles of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) using a PMT mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jung; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Jang, Eun Jin; Jung, Bock Gie; Lee, Jae Il; Lee, Bong Joo

    2007-08-01

    The immunological role of the Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in mice was examined using a PMT mutant strain. After a nasal inoculation, the mutant strain failed to induce interstitial pneumonia. Moreover, PMT had no significant effect on the populations of CD4+, CD8+, CD3+, and CD19+ immunocytes in blood or on the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes (P<0.01). However, there was a significant increase in the total number of cells in the BAL samples obtained from the wild-type P. multocida-inoculated mice. On the other hand, the level of IL-1 expression decreased when the macrophages from the bronchio-alveolar lavage were stimulated with PMT. Overall, PMT appears to play some role (stimulating and/or inhibiting) in the immunological responses but further studies will be required to confirm this.

  13. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism is altered in a glnB mutant strain of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Amar, M; Patriarca, E J; Manco, G; Bernard, P; Riccio, A; Lamberti, A; Defez, R; Iaccarino, M

    1994-02-01

    We isolated a Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strain altered in the glnB gene. This event, which has never been described in the Rhizobiaceae, is rare in comparison to mutants isolated in the contiguous gene, glnA. The glnB mutation removes the glnBA promoter but in vivo does not prevent glnA expression from its own promoter, which is not nitrogen regulated. The glnB mutant strain does not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source and it is Nod+, Fix+. Two -24/-12 promoters, for the glnII and glnBA genes, are constitutively expressed in the glnB mutant, while two -35/-10-like promoters for glnA and ntrBC are unaffected. We propose that the glnB gene product, the PII protein, plays a negative role in the ability of NtrC to activate transcription from its target promoters and a positive role in the mechanism of nitrate utilization.

  14. Oral vaccination against mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine using a live Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strain as a vector.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yohsuke; Oishi, Eiji; Muneta, Yoshihiro; Sano, Akiyuki; Hikono, Hirokazu; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Yagi, Yukio; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2009-07-16

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15 strain, the live swine erysipelas vaccine for subcutaneous injection, has been shown to colonize the tonsils of pigs after oral inoculation. We thus evaluated the possible use of the strain as a vector for oral vaccination against mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine. Recombinant E. rhusiopathiae strains expressing the C-terminal domain of the P97 adhesin of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were constructed and examined for vaccine efficacy in mice and pigs. Mice subcutaneously inoculated with the recombinant strains were protected from challenge exposure to a virulent E. rhusiopathiae. Administration of milk replacer containing recombinant E. rhusiopathiae expressing the M. hyopneumoniae protein protected pigs from death after exposure to E. rhusiopathiae and significantly reduced the severity of pneumonic lung lesions caused by infection with M. hyopneumoniae.

  15. Cytological characterization of an Aspergillus Nidulans mutant from a strain with chromosomic duplication

    PubMed Central

    Giancoli, Ágata Cristiane Huppert; de Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    A development mutant, named V103, was obtained spontaneously from the A strain of A. nidulans. The A strain contains a duplicated segment of chromosome I that has undergone translocation to chromosome II (I II). It is mitotically unstable and generates phenotypically deteriorated types, some with enhanced stability. The deteriorated variants of A. nidulans show abnormal development, exhibiting slower colony growth, variations in colony pigmentation and changes in conidiophore structure. The alterations observed in the conidiophore include fewer metulae and phialides, further elongation and ramification of these structures, delayed nuclear migration and the presence of secondary conidiophores. PMID:24031489

  16. A cysG mutant strain of Rhizobium etli pleiotropically defective in sulfate and nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, R; Riccio, A; Iaccarino, M; Patriarca, E J

    1997-01-01

    By its inability to grow on sulfate as the sole sulfur source, a mutant strain (CTNUX8) of Rhizobium etli carrying Tn5 was isolated and characterized. Sequence analysis showed that Tn5 is inserted into a cysG (siroheme synthetase)-homologous gene. By RNase protection assays, it was established that the cysG-like gene had a basal level of expression in thiosulfate- or cysteine-grown cells, which was induced when sulfate or methionine was used. Unlike its wild-type parent (strain CE3), the mutant strain, CTNUX8, was also unable to grow on nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and was unable to induce a high level of nitrite reductase. Despite its pleiotropic phenotype, strain CTNUX8 was able to induce pink, effective (N2-fixing) nodules on the roots of Phaseolus vulgaris plants. However, mixed inoculation experiments showed that strain CTNUX8 is significantly different from the wild type in its ability to nodulate. Our data support the notion that sulfate (or sulfite) is the sulfur source of R. etli in the rhizosphere, while cysteine, methionine, or glutathione is supplied by the root cells to bacteria growing inside the plant. PMID:9393698

  17. New modified trichothecenes accumulated in solid culture by mutant strains of Fusarium sporotrichioides.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, S P; Taylor, S L; Plattner, R D; Beremand, M N

    1989-01-01

    Mutant strains of Fusarium sporotrichioides NRRL 3299 deficient in the ability to synthesize T-2 toxin were examined on solid rice medium. Five novel alicyclic trichothecenes were isolated: 11 alpha-hydroxytrichodiene; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,11 alpha-triol; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,8 alpha,11 alpha-tetraol; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,8 beta,11 alpha-tetraol; and tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,11 alpha,16-tetraol. PMID:2802605

  18. Live Attenuated Mutants of Francisella tularensis Protect Rabbits against Aerosol Challenge with a Virulent Type A Strain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection. PMID:24614653

  19. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  20. Predicted Strain Coverage of a New Meningococcal Multicomponent Vaccine (4CMenB) in Spain: Analysis of the Differences with Other European Countries.

    PubMed

    Abad, Raquel; Medina, Verónica; Stella, Maria; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Vázquez, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    is really important in countries like Spain where most of the strains are predicted to be covered by only one vaccine antigen and the chance for escape mutants to emerge with vaccine use is higher. Based on the observed data, cc213 should receive special attention as it is associated with low predicted strain coverage, and has recently emerged in Spain.

  1. Experimental Infection of Horses with an Attenuated Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Vaccine (Strain TC-83)

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Thomas E.; Alvarez, Otto; Buckwalter, Ross M.; Johnson, Karl M.

    1972-01-01

    Ten horses (Equus caballus) were vaccinated with strain TC-83 Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) virus vaccine. Febrile responses and leukopenia due to a reduction of lymphocytes and neutrophils were observed in all animals. Viremias were demonstrable in eight horses, with a maximum of 103.5 median tissue culture infectious dose units per ml of serum in two horses. Clinical illness with depression and anorexia were observed in five horses. Neutralizing (N), hemagglutination-inhibiting, and complement-fixing antibodies to the vaccine virus were demonstrable by 5, 6.5, and 7 days, respectively, after vaccination. Differential titrations of serum to six VEE strains revealed high titers of N antibody to vaccine virus, moderate titers to the epizootic Trinidad donkey no. 1 strain (VEE antigenic subtype I, variant A) from which TC-83 was derived, and low titers to two other epizootic strains (subtype I, variants B and C) in all horses at 1 month after vaccination; some animals responded with low levels of N antibody to the enzootic viruses (subtype I, variants D and E). Fourteen months after vaccination, six animals with detectable N antibody were challenged with MF-8 (subtype I, variant B), an epidemic-epizootic strain isolated in 1969 from a man in Honduras. All horses resisted challenge with the equine pathogenic strain of VEE. Marked increases of N antibody in most horses were demonstrable to some VEE strains when tested 1 month after challenge. PMID:4637604

  2. Design of Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Mutant Vaccines That Do Not Bind Human Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates. PMID:22615247

  3. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  4. Immunization of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) with an auxotrophic Edwardsiella tarda mutant harboring the VHSV DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2012-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to find more powerful promoter for DNA vaccines in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and to evaluate the availability of the auxotrophic Edwardsiella tarda mutant (Δalr Δasd E. tarda) as a delivery vehicle for DNA vaccine against VHSV in olive flounder. The marine medaka (Oryzias dancena) β-actin promoter was clearly stronger than cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter when the vectors were transfected to Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells or injected into the muscle of olive flounder, suggesting that marine medaka β-actin promoter would be more appropriate promoter for DNA vaccines in olive flounder than CMV promoter. Olive flounder immunized with the Δalr Δasd E. tarda harboring viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) DNA vaccine vector driven by the marine medaka β-actin promoter showed significantly higher serum neutralization titer and higher survival rates against challenge with VHSV than fish immunized with the bacteria carrying VHSV DNA vaccine vector driven by CMV promoter. These results indicate that auxotrophic E. tarda mutant harboring marine medaka β-actin promoter-driven DNA vaccine vectors would be a potential system for prophylactics of infectious diseases in olive flounder.

  5. Genetic characterisation of attenuated SAD rabies virus strains used for oral vaccination of wildlife.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Schares, Susann; Schnick, Christina; Kliemt, Jeannette; Beckert, Aline; Freuling, Conrad; Conraths, Franz J; Hoffmann, Bernd; Zanoni, Reto; Marston, Denise; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Fooks, Anthony R; Tordo, Noel; Müller, Thomas

    2008-06-19

    The elimination of rabies from the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Western Europe has been achieved by the oral rabies vaccination (ORV) of wildlife with a range of attenuated rabies virus strains. With the exception of the vaccinia rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine (VRG), all strains were originally derived from a common ancestor; the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) field strain. However, after more than 30 years of ORV it is still not possible to distinguish these vaccine strains and there is little information on the genetic basis for their attenuation. We therefore sequenced and compared the full-length genome of five commercially available SAD vaccine viruses (SAD B19, SAD P5/88, SAG2, SAD VA1 and SAD Bern) and four other SAD strains (the original SAD Bern, SAD VA1, ERA and SAD 1-3670 Wistar). Nucleotide sequencing allowed identifying each vaccine strain unambiguously. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of the currently used commercial attenuated rabies virus vaccines appear to be derived from SAD B19 rather than from SAD Bern. One commercially available vaccine virus did not contain the SAD strain mentioned in the product information of the producer. Two SAD vaccine strains appeared to consist of mixed genomic sequences. Furthermore, in-del events targeting A-rich sequences (in positive strand) within the 3' non-coding regions of M and G genes were observed in SAD-derivates developed in Europe. Our data also supports the idea of a possible recombination that had occurred during the derivation of the European branch of SAD viruses. If confirmed, this recombination event would be the first one reported among RABV vaccine strains.

  6. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain.

    PubMed

    Martella, V; Blixenkrone-Møller, M; Elia, G; Lucente, M S; Cirone, F; Decaro, N; Nielsen, L; Bányai, K; Carmichael, L E; Buonavoglia, C

    2011-02-01

    Both egg- and cell-adapted canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines are suspected to retain residual virulence, especially if administered to immuno-suppressed animals, very young pups or to highly susceptible animal species. In the early 1980s, post-vaccine encephalitis was reported in dogs from various parts of Britain after administration of a particular batch of combined CDV Rockborn strain/canine adenovirus type-1 vaccine, although incrimination of the Rockborn strain was subsequently retracted. Notwithstanding, this, and other reports, led to the view that the Rockborn strain is less attenuated and less safe than other CDV vaccines, and the Rockborn strain was officially withdrawn from the markets in the mid 1990s. By sequencing the H gene of the strain Rockborn from the 46th laboratory passage, and a commercial vaccine (Candur(®) SH+P, Hoechst Rousell Vet GmbH), the virus was found to differ from the commonly used vaccine strain, Onderstepoort (93.0% nt and 91.7% aa), and to resemble more closely (99.6% nt and 99.3% aa) a CDV strain detected in China from a Lesser Panda (Ailurus fulgens). An additional four CDV strains matching (>99% nt identity) the Rockborn virus were identified in the sequence databases. Also, Rockborn-like strains were identified in two vaccines currently in the market. These findings indicate that Rockborn-like viruses may be recovered from dogs or other carnivores with distemper, suggesting cases of residual virulence of vaccines, or circulation of vaccine-derived Rockborn-like viruses in the field.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  8. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine. PMID:26193302

  9. Complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine protects guinea pigs from three strains of Marburg virus challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Danher; Hevey, Michael; Juompan, Laure Y.; Trubey, Charles M.; Raja, Nicholas U.; Deitz, Stephen B.; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Luo Min; Yu Hong; Swain, Benjamin M.; Moore, Kevin M.; Dong, John Y. . E-mail: dongj@genphar.com

    2006-09-30

    The Marburg virus (MARV), an African filovirus closely related to the Ebola virus, causes a deadly hemorrhagic fever in humans, with up to 90% mortality. Currently, treatment of disease is only supportive, and no vaccines are available to prevent spread of MARV infections. In order to address this need, we have developed and characterized a novel recombinant vaccine that utilizes a single complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine (cAdVax) to overexpress a MARV glycoprotein (GP) fusion protein derived from the Musoke and Ci67 strains of MARV. Vaccination with the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine led to efficient production of MARV-specific antibodies in both mice and guinea pigs. Significantly, guinea pigs vaccinated with at least 5 x 10{sup 7} pfu of cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine were 100% protected against lethal challenges by the Musoke, Ci67 and Ravn strains of MARV, making it a vaccine with trivalent protective efficacy. Therefore, the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine serves as a promising vaccine candidate to prevent and contain multi-strain infections by MARV.

  10. Altered Regulation of Escherichia coli Biotin Biosynthesis in BirA Superrepressor Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chakravartty, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is directly regulated by the biotin protein ligase BirA, the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein, which is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (biotinoyl-5′-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the ligation reaction. Although several aspects of this regulatory system are well understood, no BirA superrepressor mutant strains had been isolated. Such superrepressor BirA proteins would repress the biotin operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations well below those needed for repression by wild-type BirA. We isolated mutant strains having this phenotype by a combined selection-screening approach and resolved multiple mutations to give several birA superrepressor alleles, each having a single mutation, all of which showed repression dominant over that of the wild-type allele. All of these mutant strains repressed bio operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations that gave derepression of the wild-type strain and retained sufficient ligation activity for growth when overexpressed. All of the strains except that encoding G154D BirA showed derepression of bio operon transcription upon overproduction of a biotin-accepting protein. In BirA, G154D was a lethal mutation in single copy, and the purified protein was unable to transfer biotin from enzyme-bound biotinoyl-adenylate either to the natural acceptor protein or to a biotin-accepting peptide sequence. Consistent with the transcriptional repression data, each of the purified mutant proteins showed increased affinity for the biotin operator DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Surprisingly, although most of the mutations were located in the catalytic domain, all of those tested, except G154D BirA, had normal ligase activity. Most of the mutations that gave superrepressor phenotypes altered residues

  11. Attenuated and Replication-Competent Vaccinia Virus Strains M65 and M101 with Distinct Biology and Immunogenicity as Potential Vaccine Candidates against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Replication-competent poxvirus vectors with an attenuation phenotype and with a high immunogenic capacity of the foreign expressed antigen are being pursued as novel vaccine vectors against different pathogens. In this investigation, we have examined the replication and immunogenic characteristics of two vaccinia virus (VACV) mutants, M65 and M101. These mutants were generated after 65 and 101 serial passages of persistently infected Friend erythroleukemia (FEL) cells. In cultured cells of different origins, the mutants are replication competent and have growth kinetics similar to or slightly reduced in comparison with those of the parental Western Reserve (WR) virus strain. In normal and immune-suppressed infected mice, the mutants showed different levels of attenuation and pathogenicity in comparison with WR and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) strains. Wide genome analysis after deep sequencing revealed selected genomic deletions and mutations in a number of viral open reading frames (ORFs). Mice immunized in a DNA prime/mutant boost regimen with viral vectors expressing the LACK (Leishmania homologue for receptors of activated C kinase) antigen of Leishmania infantum showed protection or a delay in the onset of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Protection was similar to that triggered by MVA-LACK. In immunized mice, both polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype were activated by the two mutants, but the DNA-LACK/M65-LACK protocol preferentially induced CD4+ whereas DNA-LACK/M101-LACK preferentially induced CD8+ T cell responses. Altogether, our findings showed the adaptive changes of the WR genome during long-term virus-host cell interaction and how the replication competency of M65 and M101 mutants confers distinct biological properties and immunogenicity in mice compared to those of the MVA strain. These mutants could have applicability for understanding VACV biology and as potential vaccine vectors against pathogens and tumors. PMID

  12. Challenges of selecting seasonal influenza vaccine strains for humans with diverse pre-exposure histories

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccine strains are routinely updated when influenza viruses acquire mutations in exposed regions of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase glycoproteins. Ironically, although thousands of viral isolates are sequenced each year, today's influenza surveillance community places less emphasis on viral genetic information and more emphasis on classical serological assays when choosing vaccine strains. Here, I argue that these classical serological assays are oversimplified and that they fail to detect influenza mutations that facilitate escape of particular types of human antibodies. I propose that influenza vaccine strains should be updated more frequently even when classical serological assays fail to detect significant antigenic alterations. PMID:25108824

  13. Challenges of selecting seasonal influenza vaccine strains for humans with diverse pre-exposure histories.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccine strains are routinely updated when influenza viruses acquire mutations in exposed regions of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase glycoproteins. Ironically, although thousands of viral isolates are sequenced each year, today's influenza surveillance community places less emphasis on viral genetic information and more emphasis on classical serological assays when choosing vaccine strains. Here, I argue that these classical serological assays are oversimplified and that they fail to detect influenza mutations that facilitate escape of particular types of human antibodies. I propose that influenza vaccine strains should be updated more frequently even when classical serological assays fail to detect significant antigenic alterations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Attenuation, persistence, and vaccine potential of an Edwardsiella ictaluri purA mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M L; Cooper, R K; Thune, R L

    1997-01-01

    In this study, an adenine-auxotrophic strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri was constructed and its virulence, tissue persistence, and vaccine efficacy were evaluated. A clone containing the purA gene was isolated from an E. ictaluri genomic library, sequenced, and shown to have an overall sequence identity of 79.3% at the nucleotide level and 85.7% at the amino acid level with the Escherichia coli purA gene. The cloned E. ictaluri purA gene was mutated by deleting a 598-bp segment of the gene and inserting the kanamycin resistance gene from Tn903 into the gap. The delta purA::Km(r) gene was subcloned into the suicide plasmid pGP704, and the resulting plasmid was used to deliver the modified gene into a virulent strain of E. ictaluri by conjugation. Homologous recombination replaced the chromosomal purA gene with the mutated gene to create an adenine-auxotrophic strain (LSU-E2). Compared to wild-type E. ictaluri, LSU-E2 was highly attenuated by the injection, immersion, and oral routes of exposure. By the injection route, LSU-E2 had a 50% lethal dose (LD50) that was greater than 5 logs10 higher than the LD50 for wild-type E. ictaluri. In a tissue persistence study, LSU-E2 was able to invade channel catfish by the immersion route and persist in internal organs for at least 48 h. Channel catfish that were vaccinated with a single immersion dose of LSU-E2 had mortality significantly lower (P < 0.01) following a wild-type E. ictaluri challenge than that of nonvaccinated fish. PMID:9353045

  15. N-acetylcysteine potentiates diclofenac toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: stronger potentiation in ABC transporter mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Al-Attrache, Houssein; Chamieh, Hala; Hamzé, Monzer; Morel, Isabelle; Taha, Samir; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad

    2017-05-15

    Diclofenac (DCF) adverse reactions involve diverse mechanisms in different models. We recently demonstrated that DCF-induced toxicity in HepaRG decreases as they express DCF-metabolizing enzymes. DCF metabolism promotes toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing heterologous cytochromes-P450. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is used to treat diverse medical conditions due to its multiple properties (antioxidant, metal chelator, thiol-disulfide disruption). The latter property accounts for its mucolytic effects and broadens its potential molecular targets to signal transduction proteins, ABC transporters and others. Interaction of NAC with DCF effects depends on the experimental model. This study aims to investigate NAC/DCF interaction and the involvement of ABC transporters in wild type and mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DCF inhibited yeast growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the cells started adapting to DCF 24-h post-treatment. NAC potentiated DCF-induced toxicity if added prior or parallel to DCF. Pretreatment with NAC increased its potentiation effect and compromised cells adaption to DCF. Post-treatment with NAC potentiated DCF toxicity without compromising adaptation. Moreover, mutant strains in ABC transporters Pdr5, Yor1, Bpt1 or Pdr15, were more sensitive to DCF; while mutant strains in Pdr5, Vmr1 or Pdr12 were more sensitive to NAC/DCF interaction. DCF ± NAC elicited on the mutant strain in Yap1, an oxidative stress-related protein, the same effects as on the wild type. Therefore, oxidative stress does not seem to be key actor in DCF toxicity in our model. Our hypothesis is that NAC potentiation effect is at least due to its ability to disrupt disulfide bridge in proteins required to overcome DCF toxicity in yeast.

  16. Interaction of mutant lpr gene with background strain influences renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kelley, V E; Roths, J B

    1985-11-01

    The mutant gene lpr on the MRL/Mp strain of mice is responsible for converting a late onset glomerulonephritis into an early, aggressive, and fatal renal disease. This gene induces the proliferation of a unique subset of lymphocytes, the production of a variety of autoantibodies and shortened survival in MRL/Mp as well as in the genetically distinct strains C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The present study examined in detail the role of the lpr gene in the formation of lupus nephritis. The results show that C3H-lpr and B6-lpr mice do not develop nephritis while the AKR-lpr strain has a mild form of renal disease. None of these newly constructed congenic mutant strains have the severity of proteinuria or the degree of renal pathology characteristic of MRL-lpr mice. Thus, the lpr gene alone is insufficient in producing severe renal injury. The interaction of the lpr gene with other factors is required for the induction of life-threatening lupus nephritis.

  17. Genotype characterization of commonly used Newcastle disease virus vaccine strains of India.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sohini; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Gaikwad, Satish; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease is an avian pathogen causing severe economic losses to the Indian poultry industry due to recurring outbreaks in vaccinated and unvaccinated flocks. India being an endemic country, advocates vaccination against the virus using lentogenic and mesogenic strains. Two virus strains which are commonly used for vaccination are strain F (a lentogenic virus) and strain R2B (a mesogenic virus). Strain F is given to 0-7 days old chicks and R2B is given to older birds which are around 6-8 weeks old. To understand the genetic makeup of these two strains, a complete genome study and phylogenetic analysis of the F, HN genes of these vaccine strains were carried out. Both the viral strains had a genome length of 15,186 nucleotides and consisted of six genes with conserved complimentary 3' leader and 5' trailer regions. The fusion protein cleavage site of strain F is GGRQGRL and strain R2B is RRQKRF. Although both the viral strains had different virulence attributes, the length of the HN protein was similar with 577 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of F, HN and complete genome sequences grouped these two strains in genotype II category which are considered as early genotypes and corroborated with their years of isolation.

  18. Field study of vaccination of cattle with Brucella abortus strains RB51 and 19 under high and low disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lord, V R; Schurig, G G; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G E

    1998-08-01

    To assess humoral and protective immunity in cattle vaccinated by 12 months with Brucella abortus vaccine strains RB51 and 19 under field conditions of high and low brucellosis prevalence. 450 seronegative female cattle: 330 three to eight months old (calves), and 120 ten to twelve months old (heifers). Ranch A had high prevalence (39%) of brucellosis, and ranch B had low prevalence (2%), as determined by results of conventional serologic testing: agar gel immunodiffusion and the ring test. Seronegative cattle were vaccinated once or twice with 5 x 10(9) colony-forming units of B abortus strain RB51 or once with strain 19. After vaccinating 285 cattle with strain RB51 and 165 with strain 19, 74 (26%) and 30 (18%), respectively, were bred to seropositive bulls, then were kept within the infected herd of origin. All cattle vaccinated with strain 19 seroconverted 30 days later. All 285 cattle vaccinated with strain RB51 had negative results for all serologic tests, including agar gel immunodiffusion. All RB51-vaccinated cattle that became pregnant had negative results for the ring test and for conventional serologic tests after their first calving. Strain RB51 can be used as a live organism vaccine without inducing antibody titers that interfere with serodiagnosis, and induced 100% protection against field strain B abortus-induced abortion in cattle vaccinated at least 1 year before mating to an infected bull. Vaccination with strain 19 under similar conditions was less effective than vaccination with strain RB51.

  19. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  20. Divergence, not diversity of an attenuated equine lentivirus vaccine strain correlates with protection from disease.

    PubMed

    Craigo, Jodi K; Barnes, Shannon; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2010-11-29

    We recently reported an attenuated EIAV vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral envelope sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study [1] demonstrated for the first time the failure of an ancestral vaccine to protect and revealed a significant, inverse, linear relationship between envelope divergence and protection from disease. In the current study we examine in detail the evolution of the attenuated vaccine strain utilized in this previous study. We demonstrate here that the attenuated strain progressively evolved during the six-month pre-challenge period and that the observed protection from disease was significantly associated with divergence from the original vaccine strain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Vaccination with the C-Strain Vaccine on Immune Cells and Cytokines of Pigs Against Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Fan, Xue-Zheng; Zhao, Qi-Zu; Zhang, Zheng-Xing; Chen, Kai; Ning, Yi-Bao; Zhang, Qian-Yi; Zou, Xing-Qi; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Cui; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Qin

    2017-05-17

    The attenuated C-strain vaccine against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of the safest and most effective attenuated vaccines. However, little is known of the host immune response after vaccination with the C-strain vaccine. Blood samples from vaccinated pigs were collected to evaluate the number of immune cells, the level of specific CSFV antibody, and related cytokines induced by the vaccination of C-strain vaccine. The C-strain nucleic acid was gradually removed and specific antibody to vaccine kept increasing; the amount of the lymphocyte, Tc cell, and Th cell increased; some inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α mainly showed downregulated trends, but IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated greatly; IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-12p40, IL-13, interferon (IFN)-I, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) kept high expression level after 28 days postvaccination (dpv); IFN-γ was upregulated slightly at 5 and 9 dpv, respectively. These results suggest that the C-strain vaccine induces a Th2 cell response to produce the specific antibody. The vaccine virus replicates at very low level. C-strain vaccine burden has close relationship with the expression of TLRs. The overexpression of TLRs initiates the innate immune system to clear up the vaccine. Meanwhile, ILs expressed by immune system induce the differentiation of B cells and produce specific antibody.

  2. M.tuberculosis Mutants Lacking Oxygenated Mycolates Show Increased Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy as Compared to M. bovis BCG Vaccine in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Dorsaf; Denis, Olivier; Barkan, Daniel; Daffé, Mamadou; Glickman, Michael S.; Huygen, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The existing vaccine against tuberculosis (M. bovis BCG) exerts some protection against the extrapulmonary forms of the disease, particularly in young children, but is not very effective against the pulmonary form of TB, which often results from the reactivation of a latent M. tuberculosis (M.tb)infection. Among the new approaches in TB vaccine development, live attenuated M.tb mutants are a promising new avenue. Here we report on the vaccine potential of two highly attenuated M.tb mutants, MGM1991 and M.tbhma::hyg (HMA), lacking all oxygenated mycolates in their cell wall. In C57BL/6 mice, stronger Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and IL-17 responses could be induced following subcutaneous vaccination with either of the two mutants, than following vaccination with M. bovis BCG. Significantly more mycobacteria specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ and particularly CD8+ T cells could be detected by intracellular cytokine staining in mice vaccinated with the M.tb mutants. Finally, vaccination with either of the two mutants conferred stronger protection against intratracheal M.tb challenge than vaccination with BCG, as indicated by reduced bacterial replication in lungs at 4 to 12 weeks after challenge. Protection against M. tb dissemination, as indicated by reduced bacterial numbers in spleen, was comparable for both mutants to protection conferred by BCG. PMID:24146869

  3. Gluco-oligosaccharides synthesized by glucosyltransferases from constitutive mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28.

    PubMed

    Iliev, I; Vassileva, T; Ignatova, C; Ivanova, I; Haertlé, T; Monsan, P; Chobert, J-M

    2008-01-01

    To find different types of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28 and its mutant forms, and to check the effectiveness of gluco-oligosaccharide synthesis using maltose as the acceptor. Constitutive mutants were obtained after chemical mutagenesis by ethyl methane sulfonate. Lm M281 produced more active GTFs than that obtained by the parental strain cultivated on sucrose. GTF from Lm M286 produced a resistant glucan, based on endo-dextranase and amyloglucosidase hydrolysis. The extracellular enzymes from Lm M286 catalyse acceptor reactions and transfer the glucose unit from sucrose to maltose to produce gluco-oligosaccharides (GOS). By increasing the sucrose/maltose ratio, it was possible to catalyse the synthesis of oligosaccharides of increasing degree of polymerization (DP). Different types of GTFs (dextransucrase, alternansucrase and levansucrase) were produced from new constitutive mutants of Leuc. mesenteroides. GTFs from Lm M286 can catalyse the acceptor reaction in the presence of maltose, leading to the synthesis of branched oligosaccharides. Conditions were optimized to synthesize GOS by using GTFs from Lm M286, with the aim of producing maximum quantities of branched-chain oligosaccharides with DP 3-5. This would allow the use of the latter as prebiotics.

  4. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Evaluation of the G145R Mutant of the Hepatitis B Virus as a Minor Strain in Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Umetsu, Shuichiro; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutant G145R, with a single change in amino acid 145 of the surface protein, as a minor population remains unknown in mother-to-child transmission. The minor strain as well as the major strain of the G145R mutant were evaluated in three cohorts using a locked nucleic acid probe-based real-time PCR. The breakthrough cohort consisted of children who were born to HBV carrier mothers and became HBV carriers despite immnoprophylaxis (n = 25). The control cohort consisted of HBV carriers who had no history of receiving the hepatitis B vaccine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin or antiviral treatment (n = 126). The pregnant cohort comprised pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (n = 31). In the breakthrough cohort, 6 showed positive PCR results (major, 2; minor, 4). In the control cohort, 13 showed positive PCR results (major, 0; minor, 13). HBeAg-positive patients were prone to have the G145R mutant as a minor population. Deep sequencing was performed in a total of 32 children (PCR positive, n = 13; negative, n = 19). In the breakthrough cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.54% to 6.58%. In the control cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.42% to 4.1%. Of the 31 pregnant women, 4 showed positive PCR results (major, n = 0; minor, n = 4). All of the pregnant women were positive for HBeAg and showed a high viral load. Three babies born to 3 pregnant women with the G145R mutant were evaluated. After the completion of immunoprophylaxis, 2 infants became negative for HBsAg. The remaining infant became negative for HBsAg after the first dose of HB vaccine. G145R was detected in one-fourth of the children with immunoprophylaxis failure. However, the pre-existence of the G145R mutant as a minor population in pregnant women does not always cause breakthrough infection in infants. PMID:27812178

  6. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in cross bred cattle calves in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Basera, Sanjay Singh; Tewari, Kamal; Yadav, Shweta; Joshi, Sumit; Singh, Brajesh; Mukherjee, Falguni

    2012-03-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine has been evaluated in an organised dairy farm in India. All the cattle (r = 29) vaccinated with strain RB51 'responded' to the vaccine as demonstrated by iELISA using acetone killed strain RB51 antigen. The percentage responders at day 35, 60 and 90 post vaccination were 100%, 95% and 20%, respectively. Strain RB51 was able to elicit a good IFN-gamma response from vaccinated animals. The post-vaccination time point analysis indicated that the cumulative IFN-gamma response of whole blood from vaccinates stimulated with heat killed RB51 antigen was elicited in 80% of calves at 60 days post vaccination. Absence of strain RB51 in the secretions and excretion and lack of local or systemic reaction indicated the safety of the vaccine.

  8. Vaccine-strain herpes zoster found in the trigeminal nerve area in a healthy child: A case report.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Sayaka; Motokura, Kouji; Honda, Yoshitaka; Mikami, Masamitsu; Hata, Daisuke; Hata, Atsuko

    2016-12-01

    A previously healthy 2-year-old girl, vaccinated for varicella at 17 months, was admitted because of left-sided facial herpes zoster caused by vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus (VZV). She recovered fully with no complication after intravenous treatment using acyclovir. Earlier reports have described that herpes zoster (HZ) rashes caused by vaccine-strain VZV tend to occur on the dermis corresponding to the skin area where the varicella vaccine was received. However, rashes appeared on this girl only in the trigeminal nerve area, which is unrelated to the vaccinated site. Results underscore the importance of distinguishing vaccine-strain VZV from wild-type VZV whenever encountering HZ cases after vaccination, even in immunocompetent children, irrespective of the skin lesion site. Monitoring vaccine-strain HZ incidence rates is expected to elucidate many aspects of varicella vaccine safety.

  9. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination.

  10. Colonization of gnotobiotic piglets by a luxS mutant strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Dianna M; Sperandio, Vanessa; Kaper, James B; Dean-Nystrom, Evelyn A; Moon, Harley W

    2005-02-01

    Gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, its luxS mutant derivative, or nonpathogenic E. coli were evaluated for attaching and effacing lesions. Although no differences in clinical symptoms were seen between pigs inoculated with the parent and those inoculated with the luxS mutant, the luxS mutant-inoculated pigs had a lower frequency of attaching and effacing lesions in the spiral colon than parent strain-inoculated pigs.

  11. Fatal varicella due to the vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jessica; Siegel, Subhadra; Jones, James F; Schulte, Cynthia; Blog, Debra; Scott Schmid, D; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-01-01

    We describe a death in a 15-mo-old girl who developed a varicella-like rash 20 d after varicella vaccination that lasted for 2 mo despite acyclovir treatment. The rash was confirmed to be due to vaccine-strain varicella-zoster virus (VZV). This is the first case of fatal varicella due to vaccine-strain VZV reported from the United States. The patient developed severe respiratory complications that worsened with each new crop of varicella lesions; vaccine-strain VZV was detected in the bronchial lavage specimen. Sepsis and multi-organ failure led to death. The patient did not have a previously diagnosed primary immune deficiency, but her failure to thrive and repeated hospitalizations early in life (starting at 5 mo) for presumed infections and respiratory compromise treated with corticosteroids were suggestive of a primary or acquired immune deficiency. Providers should monitor for adverse reactions after varicella vaccination. If severe adverse events develop, acyclovir should be administered as soon as possible. The possibility of acyclovir resistance and use of foscarnet should be considered if lesions do not improve after 10 d of treatment (or if they become atypical [e.g., verrucous]). Experience with use of varicella vaccine indicates that the vaccine has an excellent safety profile and that serious adverse events are very rare and mostly described in immunocompromised patients. The benefit of vaccination in preventing severe disease and mortality outweigh the low risk of severe events occurring after vaccination. PMID:23982221

  12. Application of reverse genetics for producing attenuated vaccine strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    In this study, reverse genetics was applied to produce vaccine candidate strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5N1 subtype. The H5 subtype vaccine strains were generated by a reverse genetics method in a biosafety level 2 facility. The strain contained the HA gene from the H5N1 subtype HPAIV attenuated by genetic modification at the cleavage site, the NA gene derived from the H5N1 subtype HPAI or the H5N3 subtype of avian influenza virus and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Vaccination with an inactivated recombinant virus with oil-emulsion completely protected chickens from a homologous viral challenge with a 640 HAU or 3,200 HAU/vaccination dose. Vaccination with a higher dose of antigen, 3,200 HAU, was effective at increasing survival and efficiently reduced viral shedding even when challenged by a virus of a different HA clade. The feasibility of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) was demonstrated against a challenge with H5N1 HPAIVs when the recombinant H5N3 subtype viruses were used as the antigens of the vaccine. Our study demonstrated that the use of reverse genetics would be an option to promptly produce an inactivated vaccine with better matching of antigenicity to a circulating strain.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Reference Strains from Serum Institute of India

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Gairola, Sunil; Kumar, Rakesh; Shaligram, Umesh; Gowrishankar, Ramnath; Moura, Hercules; Rees, Jon; Schieltz, David M.; Williamson, Yulanda; Woolfitt, Adrian; Barr, John; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Serum Institute of India is among the world’s largest vaccine producers. Here, we report the complete genome sequences for four Bordetella pertussis strains used by Serum Institute of India in the production of whole-cell pertussis vaccines. PMID:28007855

  14. Experimental studies with homologous subtype vaccines produced with multiple antigenically different seed strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to the high antigenic variability of avian influenza virus, vaccines need to be continually updated to maintain adequate protection to evolving field strains. One possible approach, to mitigating the effects of antigenic change, is to use vaccines containing more than one isolate of the same su...

  15. In vitro permissivity of bovine cells for wild-type and vaccinal myxoma virus strains.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Allemandou, Aude; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2007-09-27

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe, non-replicative vaccine vector for non-host species. However, there is very little information concerning infection of non-laboratory animals species cells with MYXV. In this study, we investigated interactions between bovine cells and respectively a wild type strain (T1) and a vaccinal strain (SG33) of MYXV. We showed that bovine KOP-R, BT and MDBK cell lines do not support MYXV production. Electron microscopy observations of BT-infected cells revealed the low efficiency of viral entry and the production of defective virions. In addition, infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) occurred at a very low level, even following non-specific activation, and was always abortive. We did not observe significant differences between the wild type strain and the vaccinal strain of MYXV, indicating that SG33 could be used for new bovine vaccination strategies.

  16. Genomic variations associated with attenuation in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) whole cell vaccines have been widely used tools in the control of Johne’s disease in animals despite being unable to provide complete protection. Current vaccine strains derive from stocks created many decades ago; however their genotypes, underlying mechanisms and relative degree of their attenuation are largely unknown. Results Using mouse virulence studies we confirm that MAP vaccine strains 316 F, II and 2e have diverse but clearly attenuated survival and persistence characteristics compared with wild type strains. Using a pan genomic microarray we characterise the genomic variations in a panel of vaccine strains sourced from stocks spanning over 40 years of maintenance. We describe multiple genomic variations specific for individual vaccine stocks in both deletion (26–32 Kbp) and tandem duplicated (11–40 Kbp) large variable genomic islands and insertion sequence copy numbers. We show individual differences suitable for diagnostic differentiation between vaccine and wild type genotypes and provide evidence for functionality of some of the deleted MAP-specific genes and their possible relation to attenuation. Conclusions This study shows how culture environments have influenced MAP genome diversity resulting in large tandem genomic duplications, deletions and transposable element activity. In combination with classical selective systematic subculture this has led to fixation of specific MAP genomic alterations in some vaccine strain lineages which link the resulting attenuated phenotypes with deficiencies in high reactive oxygen species handling. PMID:23339684

  17. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  18. Screening of mutant strain Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 for (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jakeline Trejos; Sturdíková, Maria; Brezová, Vlasta; Svajdlenka, Emil; Novotová, Marta

    2012-12-01

    Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 was isolated from the root system of higher plant Taxus baccata and produced metabolite identified as (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin according to LC/MS/MS analysis. In our screening program for improvements of bioactive secondary metabolites from plant associate streptomycetes, mutation was used as a tool for the induction of genetic variations for selection of higher (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin producers of isolates. S. mediolani sp. AC37 was treated with UV irradiation and chemical mutagenic treatment (N-nitroso-N-methyl-urea). The radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin and extracts isolated from mutants were tested using EPR spin trapping technique and ABTS(·+) assay. Comparison of electron microscopic images of Streptomyces sp. AC37 and mutant strains of Streptomyces sp. AC37 revealed substantial differences in morphology and ultrastructure.

  19. Biosafety aspects of the recombinant live oral Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Viret, Jean-François; Dietrich, Guido; Favre, Didier

    2004-06-23

    The development of live attenuated vaccines, allowing for the safe and effective immunisation at mucosal surfaces, is a strategy of great interest for vaccinologists. The main advantage of this approach over conventional parenteral vaccines is the induction of strong mucosal immune responses, allowing targeting of the pathogen at the initial point of contact with the host. Further advantages include the ease of administration, high acceptance by vaccines, and relatively low production costs. Finally, well-characterised, safe and immunogenic vaccine strains are well suited as vectors for the mucosal delivery of foreign vaccine antigens and of DNA vaccines. However, such vaccines, when based on or containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are facing new and specific regulatory hurdles, particularly regarding the potential risks for humans and the environment. In this contribution we address selected aspects of the risk assessment of live attenuated bacterial vaccines covered in the course of the registration of vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR as a recombinant live oral vaccine against cholera.

  20. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  1. Enhanced production of thrombinase by Streptomyces venezuelae: kinetic studies on growth and enzyme production of mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Balakrishnan; Gopinath, Kannapan Panchamoorthy; Sakthiselvan, Punniavan; Partha, Nagarajan

    2012-05-01

    This investigation provides the enhanced production of thrombinase, a fibrinolytic enzyme using mutant Streptomyces venezuelae. Initially the mutagenesis of the marine isolate was done by UV and Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and their mutational efficiencies were compared. The mutants were selected based on their high thrombinase activity and used for further studies. The mutant was found to be more halo and thermo tolerant comparing to wild. The effect of Dissolved oxygen level was also determined and the mutant offered the maximum specific growth rate as 0.2404 (h(-1)). The mutant showed high resistance to higher initial lactose concentration and the inhibition concentration was found to be 155.1mg/mL. The effect of S(0)/X(0) ratio on specific substrate consumption and production rate were also investigated. Both mutant and wild showed increase in specific substrate consumption and production rate at higher S(0)/X(0) ratio but the mutant showed better values than the wild strain.

  2. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  3. [Construction of hpaA gene-engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Senlin; Chen, Minhu; Chen, Jie; Hu, Pinjin; Li, Guoqing

    2002-02-01

    To express Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine vehicle, and elucidate the potential value of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium as a vector expressing Helicobacter pylori antigens, by means of molecular biology, 783 bp hpaA gene was cloned into NcoI-SalI site of a procaryotic expression plasmid pTrc99A, and the recombinant plasmid was then used to transform an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. HpaA expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Two and 10 days after recombinant strain intragastric immunization, the C57BL/6 mice was sacrificed, and the spleen and terminal ileum was cultured for recombinant strain. The results showed that a recombinant procaryotic expression plasmid pTrc99A-hpaA was constructed, and the recombinant plasmid was then introduced into an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261 successfully. HpaA was expressed in the recombinant strains as a 30 kD protein, and also its immunogenicity was confirmed by Western blot. Recombinant strain was found in both spleen and terminal ileum of each mouse two and ten days after intragastric immunization. We concluded that a recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing Helicobacter pylori hpaA gene was constructed and identified, and this work will help to develop oral recombinant live vaccine strains against Helicobacter pylori infection.

  4. Production and downstream processing of (1→3)-β-D-glucan from mutant strain of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a mutant that produced higher levels of curdlan than the wild strain Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750 by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain produced 66 g/L of curdlan in 120 h with a yield of (0.88) while, the wild strain produced 41 g/L in 120 h with a yield of (0.62) in a stirred bioreactor. The mutant could not produce curdlan when the pH was shifted from 7.0 to 5.5 after nitrogen depletion as followed for wild strain. In contrast, pH optimum for cell growth and curdlan production for mutant was found to be 7.0. We optimized the downstream processing of curdlan by varying different volumes of NaOH and HCl for extraction and precipitation of curdlan. The molecular weight of the purified curdlan from the wild and mutant strain was 6.6 × 105 Da and 5.8 × 105 Da respectively. The monosaccharide analyses confirm that curdlan from both wild and mutant strain contains only glucose units. From the NMR and FTIR data, it has been confirmed that curdlan was exclusively composed of β (1 → 3)-D-glucan residues. PMID:22681895

  5. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. [Attenuation of a strain of rinderpest virus: potential homologous live vaccine].

    PubMed

    Diallo, A; Taylor, W P; Lefèvre, P C; Provost, A

    1989-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants frequently associated with severe mortality in these hosts. In countries where it occurs, PPR represents an important constraint to the improved productivity of sheep and goats. Until now the only way to combat this plague has been the use of heterologous rinderpest vaccine; all attempts to develop a homologous vaccine have ended in failure. The present communication describes the attenuation of the Nigerian strain PPRV Nig 75/1 by serial passage in Vero cells. The avirulent virus obtained has the same characteristics as Plowright and Ferris' rinderpest vaccine. The virus is advanced as a potential homologous vaccine against PPR.

  7. Mathematical model of tuberculosis transmission in a two-strain with vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainggolan, J.; Supian, S.; Supriatna, A. K.; Anggriani, N.

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical analysis of the spread of tuberculosis with vaccination in a two-strain model. The vaccination reproduction ratio (Rrs) and equilibria quantities for the models are determined and stability of the solution is analyzed. We prove that if the vaccination reproduction ratio Rrs < 1 the disease free equilibrium is locally and asymptotically stable on the nonnegative orthant and if Rrs > 1 of the other equilibria is locally and asymptotically stable. At the end of this study, the numerical computation presented and it shows that vaccination and treatment capable to reduce the number of exposed and infected compartments.

  8. Progress towards Rapid Detection of Measles Vaccine Strains: a Tool To Inform Public Health Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jill K

    2017-03-01

    Rapid differentiation of vaccine from wild-type strains in suspect measles cases is a valuable epidemiological tool that informs the public health response to this highly infectious disease. Few public health laboratories sequence measles virus-positive specimens to determine genotype, and the vaccine-specific real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay described by F. Roy et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 55:735-743, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01879-16) offers a rapid, easily adoptable method to identify measles vaccine strains in suspect cases. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Progress towards Rapid Detection of Measles Vaccine Strains: a Tool To Inform Public Health Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid differentiation of vaccine from wild-type strains in suspect measles cases is a valuable epidemiological tool that informs the public health response to this highly infectious disease. Few public health laboratories sequence measles virus-positive specimens to determine genotype, and the vaccine-specific real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) assay described by F. Roy et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 55:735–743, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01879-16) offers a rapid, easily adoptable method to identify measles vaccine strains in suspect cases. PMID:28003421

  10. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyesun; Ngunjiri, John M.; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants) are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN) responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens. PMID:27257989

  11. A Novel Non-Replication-Competent Cytomegalovirus Capsid Mutant Vaccine Strategy Is Effective in Reducing Congenital Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, K. Yeon; Root, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV infection. A novel CMV vaccine was investigated as an intervention strategy against congenital guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) infection. In this disabled infectious single-cycle (DISC) vaccine strategy, a GPCMV mutant virus was used that lacked the ability to express an essential capsid gene (the UL85 homolog GP85) except when grown on a complementing cell line. In vaccinated animals, the GP85 mutant virus (GP85 DISC) induced an antibody response to important glycoprotein complexes considered neutralizing target antigens (gB, gH/gL/gO, and gM/gN). The vaccine also generated a T cell response to the pp65 homolog (GP83), determined via a newly established guinea pig gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. In a congenital infection protection study, GP85 DISC-vaccinated animals and a nonvaccinated control group were challenged during pregnancy with wild-type GPCMV (105 PFU). The pregnant animals carried the pups to term, and viral loads in target organs of pups were analyzed. Based on live pup births in the vaccinated and control groups (94.1% versus 63.6%), the vaccine was successful in reducing mortality (P = 0.0002). Additionally, pups from the vaccinated group had reduced CMV transmission, with 23.5% infected target organs versus 75.9% in the control group. Overall, these preliminary studies indicate that a DISC CMV vaccine strategy has the ability to induce an immune response similar to that of natural virus infection but has the increased safety of a non-replication-competent virus, which makes this approach attractive as a CMV vaccine strategy. IMPORTANCE Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. An effective vaccine against CMV remains an elusive goal despite over 50 years of CMV research. The guinea pig, with

  12. A Novel Non-Replication-Competent Cytomegalovirus Capsid Mutant Vaccine Strategy Is Effective in Reducing Congenital Infection.

    PubMed

    Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-09-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV infection. A novel CMV vaccine was investigated as an intervention strategy against congenital guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) infection. In this disabled infectious single-cycle (DISC) vaccine strategy, a GPCMV mutant virus was used that lacked the ability to express an essential capsid gene (the UL85 homolog GP85) except when grown on a complementing cell line. In vaccinated animals, the GP85 mutant virus (GP85 DISC) induced an antibody response to important glycoprotein complexes considered neutralizing target antigens (gB, gH/gL/gO, and gM/gN). The vaccine also generated a T cell response to the pp65 homolog (GP83), determined via a newly established guinea pig gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. In a congenital infection protection study, GP85 DISC-vaccinated animals and a nonvaccinated control group were challenged during pregnancy with wild-type GPCMV (10(5) PFU). The pregnant animals carried the pups to term, and viral loads in target organs of pups were analyzed. Based on live pup births in the vaccinated and control groups (94.1% versus 63.6%), the vaccine was successful in reducing mortality (P = 0.0002). Additionally, pups from the vaccinated group had reduced CMV transmission, with 23.5% infected target organs versus 75.9% in the control group. Overall, these preliminary studies indicate that a DISC CMV vaccine strategy has the ability to induce an immune response similar to that of natural virus infection but has the increased safety of a non-replication-competent virus, which makes this approach attractive as a CMV vaccine strategy. Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. An effective vaccine against CMV remains an elusive goal despite over 50 years of CMV research. The guinea pig, with a placenta

  13. Abortion and premature birth in cattle following vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Fluegel Dougherty, Amanda M; Cornish, Todd E; O'Toole, Donal; Boerger-Fields, Amy M; Henderson, Owen L; Mills, Ken W

    2013-09-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is the vaccine strain currently licensed for immunizing cattle against brucellosis in the United States. Most cattle are vaccinated as heifer calves at 4-12 months of age. Adult cattle may be vaccinated in selected high-risk situations. Two herds of pregnant adult cattle in the brucellosis-endemic area of Wyoming were vaccinated with a standard label dose (1.0-3.4 × 10(10) organisms) of RB51. Reproductive losses in the vaccinated herds were 5.3% (herd A) and 0.6% (herd B) and included abortions, stillbirths, premature calves, and unbred cows (presumed early abortion). Brucella abortus was cultured from multiple tissues of aborted and premature calves (7/9), and from placenta. Isolates were identified as B. abortus strain RB51 by standard strain typing procedures and a species-specific polymerase chain reaction. Bronchopneumonia with intralesional bacteria and placentitis were observed microscopically. There was no evidence of involvement of other infectious or toxic causes of abortion. Producers, veterinarians, and laboratory staff should be alert to the risk of abortion when pregnant cattle are vaccinated with RB51, to potential human exposure, and to the importance of distinguishing field from vaccinal strains of B. abortus.

  14. Genetic Determinants of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Strain SA14-14-2 That Govern Attenuation of Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2015-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of the live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) SA14-14-2 vaccine are attributed to mutations that accumulated in the viral genome during its derivation. However, little is known about the contribution that is made by most of these mutations to virulence attenuation and vaccine immunogenicity. Here, we generated recombinant JEV (rJEV) strains containing JEV SA14-14-2 vaccine-specific mutations that are located in the untranslated regions (UTRs) and seven protein genes or are introduced from PCR-amplified regions of the JEV SA14-14-2 genome. The resulting mutant viruses were evaluated in tissue culture and in mice. The authentic JEV SA14-14-2 (E) protein, with amino acid substitutions L107F, E138K, I176V, T177A, E244G, Q264H, K279M, A315V, S366A, and K439R relative to the wild-type rJEV clone, was essential and sufficient for complete attenuation of neurovirulence. Individually, the nucleotide substitution T39A in the 5' UTR (5'-UTR-T39A), the capsid (C) protein amino acid substitution L66S (C-L66S), and the complete NS1/2A genome region containing 10 mutations each significantly reduced virus neuroinvasion but not neurovirulence. The levels of peripheral virulence attenuation imposed by the 5'-UTR-T39A and C-L66S mutations, individually, were somewhat mitigated in combination with other vaccine strain-specific mutations, which might be compensatory, and together did not affect immunogenicity. However, a marked reduction in immunogenicity was observed with the addition of the NS1/2A and NS5 vaccine virus genome regions. These results suggest that a second-generation recombinant vaccine can be rationally engineered to maximize levels of immunogenicity without compromising safety. The live-attenuated JEV SA14-14-2 vaccine has been vital for controlling the incidence of disease caused by JEV, particularly in rural areas of Asia where it is endemic. The vaccine was developed >25 years ago by passaging wild-type JEV strain SA14 in tissue

  15. Establishment of markerless gene deletion tools in thermophilic Bacillus smithii and construction of multiple mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Elleke F; van de Weijer, Antonius H P; van der Vlist, Laurens; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John; van Kranenburg, Richard

    2015-07-07

    Microbial conversion of biomass to fuels or chemicals is an attractive alternative for fossil-based fuels and chemicals. Thermophilic microorganisms have several operational advantages as a production host over mesophilic organisms, such as low cooling costs, reduced contamination risks and a process temperature matching that of commercial hydrolytic enzymes, enabling simultaneous saccharification and fermentation at higher efficiencies and with less enzymes. However, genetic tools for biotechnologically relevant thermophiles are still in their infancy. In this study we developed a markerless gene deletion method for the thermophile Bacillus smithii and we report the first metabolic engineering of this species as a potential platform organism. Clean deletions of the ldhL gene were made in two B. smithii strains (DSM 4216(T) and compost isolate ET 138) by homologous recombination. Whereas both wild-type strains produced mainly L-lactate, deletion of the ldhL gene blocked L-lactate production and caused impaired anaerobic growth and acid production. To facilitate the mutagenesis process, we established a counter-selection system for efficient plasmid removal based on lacZ-mediated X-gal toxicity. This counter-selection system was applied to construct a sporulation-deficient B. smithii ΔldhL ΔsigF mutant strain. Next, we demonstrated that the system can be used repetitively by creating B. smithii triple mutant strain ET 138 ΔldhL ΔsigF ΔpdhA, from which also the gene encoding the α-subunit of the E1 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is deleted. This triple mutant strain produced no acetate and is auxotrophic for acetate, indicating that pyruvate dehydrogenase is the major route from pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In this study, we developed a markerless gene deletion method including a counter-selection system for thermophilic B. smithii, constituting the first report of metabolic engineering in this species. The described markerless gene deletion system

  16. Evaluation of an attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, Nir; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; van Straten, Michael; Harrus, Shimon

    2012-12-17

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is an important tick-borne disease worldwide. No commercial vaccine for the disease is currently available and tick control is the main preventive measure against the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a multi-passaged attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis to serve as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and to assess the use of azithromycin in the treatment of acute ehrlichiosis. Twelve beagle dogs were divided into 3 groups of 4 dogs. Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated (vaccinated) with an attenuated strain of E. canis (#611A) twice or once, respectively. The third group consisted of naïve dogs which served as controls. All 3 groups were challenged with a wild virulent strain of E. canis by administering infected dog-blood intravenously. Transient thrombocytopenia was the only hematological abnormality observed following inoculation of dogs with the attenuated strain. Challenge with the virulent strain resulted in severe disease in all 4 control dogs while only 3 of 8 vaccinated dogs presented mild transient fever. Furthermore, the mean blood rickettsial load was significantly higher in the control group (27-92-folds higher during days 14-19 post challenge with the wild the strain) as compared to the vaccinated dogs. The use of azithromycin was assessed as a therapeutic agent for the acute disease. Four days treatment resulted in further deterioration of the clinical condition of the dogs. Molecular comparison of 4 genes known to express immunoreactive proteins and virulence factors (p30, gp19, VirB4 and VirB9) between the attenuated strain and the challenge wild strain revealed no genetic differences between the strains. The results of this study indicate that the attenuated E. canis strain may serve as an effective and secure future vaccine for canine ehrlichiosis.

  17. Ability of Brucella abortus rough vaccine strains to elicit DC and innate immunity in lung using a murine respiratory model.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Zimmerman, Kurt; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Lawler, Heather; Heid, Bettina; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2010-10-08

    Brucella abortus strains RB51 and RB51SOD are live attenuated vaccine strains which protect mice against virulent B. abortus strain 2308 intraperitoneal challenge. By comparison, limited information is available on how Brucella vaccines stimulate pulmonary immunity against respiratory infection, another route of exposure in humans. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the ability of intranasally delivered vaccine strains RB51 and RB51SOD to induce innate immunity. Based on parameters assessed, rough strain RB51 induces a better innate immune response in lung versus strain RB51SOD. Additional studies to further delineate strain RB51's ability to stimulate DC and adaptive immunity are warranted.

  18. Foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease mutant L127P: Implications for FMD vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Puckette, Michael; Clark, Benjamin A; Smith, Justin D; Turecek, Traci; Martel, Erica; Gabbert, Lindsay; Pisano, Melia; Hurtle, William; Pacheco, Juan M; Barrera, José; Neilan, John G; Rasmussen, Max

    2017-09-06

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) afflicts livestock in more than 80 countries limiting food production and global trade. Production of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines requires cytosolic expression of the FMDV 3C protease to cleave the P1 polyprotein into mature capsid proteins, but the FMDV 3C protease is toxic to host cells. To identify less toxic isoforms of the FMDV 3C protease, we screened 3C mutants for increased transgene output over wild-type 3C using a Gaussia luciferase reporter system. The novel point-mutation 3C(L127P) increased yields of recombinant FMDV subunit proteins in mammalian and bacterial cells expressing P1-3C transgenes and retained the ability to process P1 polyproteins from multiple FMDV serotypes. The 3C(L127P) mutant produced crystalline-arrays of FMDV virus-like particles in mammalian and bacterial cells, potentially providing a practical method of rapid, inexpensive FMD vaccine production in bacteria.Importance: The mutant FMDV 3C protease L127P significantly increased yields of recombinant FMDV subunit antigens and produced virus-like particles in mammalian and bacterial cells. The L127P mutation provides a novel advancement for economical FMD vaccine production. Copyright © 2017 Puckette et al.

  19. A test of antigenicity for the selection of strains for inclusion in cholera vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Richard A.; Pongpairojana, Smarn

    1968-01-01

    The antigenicity of a large number of cholera vibrio strains was compared, in groups of rabbits, by evaluating the serological responses to single limited doses of vaccines prepared from the strains. On the basis of these tests, it was possible to construct 2 quadrivalent (El Tor and classical, Inaba and Ogawa) vaccines which differed significantly in antigenicity for rabbits but which were indistinguishable in the “standard” mouse-protection test. The advisability of using a test of antigenicity for selection of strains and laboratory evaluation of vaccines is considered. Application of the proposed antigenicity test would depend on further comparisons of human response to vaccines which differ in antigenicity for the rabbit. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:5303406

  20. Potential of a sequence-based antigenic distance measure to indicate equine influenza vaccine strain efficacy.

    PubMed

    Daly, Janet M; Elton, Debra

    2013-12-09

    The calculation of p(epitope) values, a sequence-based measure of antigenic distance between strains, was developed for human influenza. The potential to apply the p(epitope) value to equine influenza vaccine strain selection was assessed. There was a negative correlation between p(epitope) value and vaccine efficacy for pairs of vaccine and challenge strains used in cross-protection studies in ponies that just reached statistical significance (p=0.046) only if one pair of viruses was excluded from the analysis. Thus the p(epitope) value has potential to provide additional data to consider in the decision-making process for updating equine influenza vaccine strains. However, further work is required to define the epitopes of the equine H3N8 haemagglutinin protein recognised by equine antibodies, which could lead to refinement of the p(epitope) value calculation. Furthermore, other factors such as vaccine potency and virulence of circulating strains may also influence vaccine efficacy.

  1. Enhancement of photohydrogen production using phbC deficient mutant Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain M23.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Fang; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2011-05-01

    This study used a DNA recombination method to knock out the poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis gene phbC in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5. The experimental results indicated that the mutant strain Rps. palustris M23 could be successfully screened. Fluorescent observation with Nile blue staining showed no significant PHB granule accumulation in the mutant cells. Batch mode experiments using acetic acid as a carbon source revealed a 29.1% and 25.9% hydrogen gas content from M23 and WP3-5, respectively. However, this trend did not appear when using propionic acid as carbon source. Under continuous operation, the hydrogen gas content from M23 could be maintained above 72%. The average hydrogen production rates of the WP3-5 and M23 strains were 264 mL-H(2)/L/day and 457 mL-H(2)/L/day, respectively. The total biogas volume collected from M23 was 1.7 times higher than that from the wild type. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of dynamic behavior of mutant strains from limited wild-type data.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic engineering is the field of introducing genetic changes in organisms so as to modify their function towards synthesizing new products of high impact to society. However, engineered cells frequently have impaired growth rates thus seriously limiting the rate at which such products are made. The problem is attributable to inadequate understanding of how a metabolic network functions in a dynamic sense. Predictions of mutant strain behavior in the past have been based on steady state theories such as flux balance analysis (FBA), minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA), and regulatory on/off minimization (ROOM). Such predictions are restricted to product yields and cannot address productivity, which is of focal interest to applications. We demonstrate that our framework ( [Song and Ramkrishna, 2010] and [Song and Ramkrishna, 2011]), based on a “cybernetic” view of metabolic systems, makes predictions of the dynamic behavior of mutant strains of Escherichia coli from a limited amount of data obtained from the wild-type. Dynamic frameworks must necessarily address the issue of metabolic regulation, which the cybernetic approach does by postulating that metabolism is an optimal dynamic response of the organism to the environment in driving reactions towards ensuring survival. The predictions made in this paper are without parallel in the literature and lay the foundation for rational metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A mutant Tat protein inhibits infection of human cells by strains from diverse HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rustanti, Lina; Jin, Hongping; Lor, Mary; Lin, Min Hsuan; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David

    2017-03-14

    Nullbasic is a mutant HIV-1 Tat protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication via three independent mechanisms that disrupts 1) reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a DNA copy, 2) HIV-1 Rev protein function required for viral mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and 3) HIV-1 mRNA transcription by RNA Polymerase II. The Nullbasic protein is derived from the subtype B strain HIV-1BH10 and has only been tested against other HIV-1 subtype B strains. However, subtype B strains only account for ~10% of HIV-1 infections globally and HIV-1 Tat sequences vary between subtypes especially for subtype C, which is responsible for ~50% HIV-1 infection worldwide. These differences could influence the ability of Tat to interact with RNA and cellular proteins and thus could affect the antiviral activity of Nullbasic. Therefore, Nullbasic was tested against representative HIV-1 strains from subtypes C, D and A/D recombinant to determine if it can inhibit their replication. Nullbasic was delivered to human cells using a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retroviral system. We evaluated Nullbasic-mCherry (NB-mCh) fusion protein activity against the HIV-1 strains in TZM-bl cell lines for inhibition of transactivation and virus replication. We also examined antiviral activity of Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein against the same strains in primary CD4(+) T cells. The Nullbasic expression was monitored by western blot and flow cytometry. The effects of Nullbasic on primary CD4(+) T cells cytotoxicity, proliferation and apoptosis were also examined. The results show that Nullbasic inhibits Tat-mediated transactivation and virus replication of all the HIV-1 strains tested in TZM-bl cells. Importantly, Nullbasic inhibits replication of the HIV-1 strains in primary CD4(+) T cells without affecting cell proliferation, cytotoxicity or level of apoptotic cells. A SIN-based γ-retroviral vector used to express Nullbasic fusion proteins improved protein expression

  4. The establishment of sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents for BCG vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dagg, Belinda; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Ho, Mei M.

    2014-01-01

    As the latest addition to the sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine, an international collaborative study was completed to evaluate the suitability of a candidate BCG Moreau-RJ sub-strain as a WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine. This follows the recent replacement of the WHO 1st International Reference Preparation for BCG vaccine, by three sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine (Danish 1331, Tokyo 172-1 and Russian BCG-I) in order to complete the coverage of most predominant sub-strains used for BCG vaccine production and distribution for use worldwide. The study used cultural viable count and modified ATP assays to quantify the preparation and multiplex PCR to confirm the identity of the sub-strain. The establishment of this WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine of Moreau-RJ sub-strain was approved by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization meeting in October 2012. This preparation is available for distribution by NIBSC-MHRA, UK. The data from real-time stability monitoring demonstrated that these Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine are very stable in storage condition at −20 °C. They serve as the valuable source of BCG Reference Reagents for use as comparators (1) for viability assays (such as cultural viable count and modified ATP assays); (2) for in vivo assays (such as the absence of virulent mycobacteria, dermal reactivity and protection assays) in the evaluation of candidate TB vaccines in non-clinical models; (3) for identity assays using molecular biology techniques. PMID:25312272

  5. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  6. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  7. Induction of various autoantibodies by mutant gene lpr in several strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Izui, S; Kelley, V E; Masuda, K; Yoshida, H; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the autosomal mutant gene lpr (lymphoproliferation) on the development of various autoantibodies and immune complex (IC) glomerulonephritis was investigated in four genetically distinct strains of mice: MRL/ MpJ , C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The presence of the lpr gene not only enhanced the production of autoantibodies in the autoimmune MRL/ MpJ strain, but also induced the formation of various kinds of autoantibodies in the three other strains of mice without any apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies induced by the lpr gene included anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-single-stranded DNA, anti-IgG, anti-thymocyte, and anti-serum glycoprotein gp70. This indicates that the action of the lpr gene on the development of autoantibody response does not require the particular abnormalities of the MRL genome. The differences in amounts and types of autoantibodies among the lpr strains reflect the difference in the background genome of each strain, suggesting the participation of other genes or factors determining the quantity and/or specificity of autoantibodies. In addition to the development of autoantibodies, the three nonautoimmune strains of mice produced high levels of unidentified IC in the presence of the lpr gene, detectable by the C1q and the conglutinin binding tests. Their glomerular lesions, however, were relatively limited when compared with MRL/ MpJ -lpr/lpr mice, which developed severe glomerulonephritis early in their life. These results suggest that the lpr gene is able to induce the formation of various autoantibodies and IC at significant concentrations in nonautoimmune mice, but for the full manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus there may be a requirement for supplemental genetic abnormalities or factors.

  8. A comparative study of live attenuated F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  9. Genome Sequence of the Soviet/Russian Bacillus anthracis Vaccine Strain 55-VNIIVViM

    PubMed Central

    Kotorashvili, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis strain 55-VNIIVViM is a live-attenuated nonencapsulated Soviet/Russian veterinary anthrax vaccine strain. We report here the genome of 55-VNIIVViM and confirm its phylogenetic placement in the global population structure of B. anthracis. PMID:28007853

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Attenuated Novobiocin-Resistant Streptococcus iniae Vaccine Strain ISNO

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dunhua; Zhang, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae ISNO is an attenuated novobiocin-resistant vaccine strain. Its full genome is 2,070,182 bp in length. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identify potential virulence genes important for pathogenesis of S. iniae and potential mechanisms associated with novobiocin resistance in this strain. PMID:24874684

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Hypervirulent and Vaccine Candidate Streptococcus suis Strain SC19

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lin; Dong, Xingxing; Zhou, Yang; Li, Zhiwei; Deng, Limei; Chen, Huanchun; Wang, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus suis, a zoonotic bacterium found primarily in pigs, has been recognized recently as an emerging pathogen of humans. Herein, we describe the genome of Streptococcus suis strain SC19, a hypervirulent and vaccine candidate strain isolated from a pig amid the 2005 outbreak in China. PMID:28104658

  12. Identification of vaccine-derived rotavirus strains in children with acute gastroenteritis in Japan, 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Mei; Takanashi, Sayaka; Thongprachum, Aksara; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Nagasawa, Koo; Kimura, Hirokazu; Okitsu, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Two live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and RotaTeq, have been introduced as voluntary vaccination in Japan since 2011 and 2012, respectively. Effectiveness of the vaccines has been confirmed, whereas concerns such as shedding of the vaccine strains and gastroenteritis cases caused by vaccine strains are not well assessed. We aimed to identify the vaccine strains in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to investigate the prevalence of AGE caused by vaccination or horizontal transmission of vaccine strains. A total of 1,824 stool samples were collected from children with AGE at six outpatient clinics in 2012-2015. Among all, 372 group A rotavirus (RVA) positive samples were screened for vaccine components by real-time RT-PCR which were designed to differentiate vaccine strains from rotavirus wild-type strains with high specificity. For samples possessing both vaccine and wild-type strains, analyses by next-generation sequencing (NGS) were conducted to characterize viruses existed in the intestine. As a result, Rotarix-derived strains were identified in 6 of 372 (1.6%) RVA positive samples whereas no RotaTeq strain was detected. Among six samples, four possessed Rotarix-derived strains while two possessed both Rotarix-derived strains and wild-type strains. In addition, other pathogens such as norovirus, enterovirus and E.coli were detected in four samples. The contribution of these vaccine strains to each patient's symptoms was unclear as all of the cases were vaccinated 2-14 days before sample collection. Proportion of average coverage for each segmented gene by NGS strongly suggested the concurrent infection of the vaccine-derived strain and the wild-type strain rather than reassortment of these two strains in one sample. This is the first study to report the prevalence of vaccine-derived strains in patients with RVA AGE in Japan as 1.6% without evidence of horizontal transmission. The results emphasized the importance of continuous monitoring on

  13. Anaplasma marginale Yucatan (Mexico) Strain. Assessment of low virulence and potential use as a live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Camarillo, Sergio D; García Ortiz, Miguel Angel; Rojas Ramírez, Edmundo E; Cantó Alarcón, Germinal J; Preciado de la Torre, Jesús F; Rosario Cruz, Rodrigo; Ramos Aragón, Juan A; Aboytes Torres, Ramón

    2008-12-01

    Anaplasma marginale Yucatan strain was found to have low virulence in cattle. We studied the virulence of this isolate by experimental inoculation of 113 susceptible cattle at increasing doses, after which only one animal required treatment for clinical disease. Subsequently, 104 cattle received a live vaccine of this strain by inoculation, which induced immunoprotection after heterologous challenged exposure with a different A. marginale isolate. In this study 14% of the immunized cattle required treatment as compared with the control nonimmunized cattle, in which 56% required treatment. The A. marginale vaccine strains used for the immunization studies had MSP1a variable regions that were different from those used for the challenge exposure.

  14. Response of layer and broiler strain chickens to parenteral administration of a live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine.

    PubMed

    Groves, Peter J; Sharpe, Sue M; Cox, Julian M

    2015-07-01

    Responses to the parenteral administration of a live aroA deletion Salmonella serovar Typhimurium vaccine given to three brown egg layer strains and two broiler strains were studied. Twenty-five birds of each strain were reared together in floor pens to 6 weeks of age and then moved as individual strains to new floor pens and injected with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per bird of the vaccine bacteria intramuscularly or subcutaneously, 10(6) CFU per bird subcutaneously, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) subcutaneously as a vaccination control. Three birds of one layer strain were injected intramuscularly with 0.5mg/ bird S. Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evaluate whether response was similar for vaccine and endotoxin. Birds were weighed, and rectal temperatures recorded at the time of injection, then observed over 24 hours. Rectal temperatures were measured and blood samples collected for serum IL-6 assay at 3 hours post injection (PI). At 12 hours PI blood samples were drawn for analyses for plasma phosphorus (P), glucose (Glu), cholesterol (Cho), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (Ptn) and creatinine kinase (CK). Blood was sampled 14 days PI and tested for serum antibody to S. Typhimurium. Vaccination resulted in significant seroconversion by 14 days PI in all strains compared to the controls. The three layer strains exhibited a clinical malaise, evident within 90 minutes of injection, lasting for 12 hours, with complete recovery by 24 hours PI. Only the 10(8) CFU dose given subcutaneously produced an increase in rectal temperature 3 hours PI. Vaccination had no effect on IL-6 or Ptn. All vaccine doses increased P and the higher dose by either route decreased Cho in all bird strains. The 10(8) vaccine dose increased Glu and intramuscular injection markedly elevated CK only in the layer strains. The response was not completely congruous with that to LPS alone. The results highlight the need for consideration of differences in response of

  15. Toward the development of a stable, freeze-dried formulation of Helicobacter pylori killed whole cell vaccine adjuvanted with a novel mutant of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin.

    PubMed

    Summerton, Nancy A; Welch, Richard W; Bondoc, Laureano; Yang, Huei-Hsiung; Pleune, Brett; Ramachandran, Naryaswamy; Harris, Andrea M; Bland, Desiree; Jackson, W James; Park, Sukjoon; Clements, John D; Nabors, Gary S

    2010-02-03

    No vaccine exists for the prevention of infection with the ubiquitous gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, and drug therapy for the infection is complicated by poor patient compliance, the high cost of treatment, and ineffectiveness against drug-resistant strains. A new medical advancement is required to reduce the incidence of peptic ulcer disease and stomach cancer, two conditions caused by infection with H. pylori. Clinical trials have been performed with a formalin-inactivated H. pylori whole cell (HWC) vaccine, given orally in combination with the mucosal adjuvant mLT(R192G), a mutant of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin. Following the initial dose of this vaccine, some subjects experienced gastrointestinal side effects. To reduce side effects and potentially further increase the amount of adjuvant that can safely be administered with the HWC vaccine, experiments were performed with a form of LT that carried two mutations in the A subunit, a substitution of G for R at position 192, and A for L at position 211. The double mutant LT (dmLT) adjuvant stimulated immune responses as effectively as the single mutant LT in mice. Additionally, following a challenge infection, the dmLT-adjuvanted vaccine was as effective as single mutant LT in reducing gastric urease levels (diagnostic for H. pylori infection), and H. pylori colonization in the stomach as assessed by quantitative analysis of stomach homogenates. A lyophilized formulation of HWC was developed to improve stability and to potentially reduce reliance on cold chain maintenance. It was observed that a dmLT-adjuvanted lyophilized vaccine was equally as protective in the mouse model as the liquid formulation as assessed by gastric urease analysis and analysis of stomach homogenates for viable H. pylori. No readily detectable effect of tonicity or moisture content was observed for the lyophilized vaccine within the formulation limits evaluated. In an accelerated stability study performed at 37 degrees C the

  16. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella.

  17. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  18. Differential ability of novel attenuated targeted deletion mutants of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis strain SCHU S4 to protect mice against aerosol challenge with virulent bacteria: effects of host background and route of immunization

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, J. Wayne; Shen, Hua; Golovliov, Igor; Zingmark, Carl; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Chen, Wangxue; House, Robert V.; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen of humans and a potential biological weapon. A live vaccine strain, F. tularensis LVS, was developed more than 50 years ago by pragmatic attenuation of a strain of the less virulent holarctica subspecies. LVS was demonstrated to be highly effective in human volunteers who were exposed to intradermal challenge with fully virulent subsp. tularensis, but was less effective against aerosol exposure. LVS faces regulatory hurdles that to date have prevented its licensure for general use. Therefore, a better defined and more effective vaccine is being sought. To this end we have created gene deletion mutants in the virulent subsp. tularensis strain and tested them for their ability to elicit a protective immune response against systemic or aerosol challenge with the highly virulent wild-type subsp. tularensis strain, SCHU S4. Both oral and Intradermal (ID) primary vaccination routes were assessed in BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice as was oral boosting. One SCHU S4 mutant missing the heat shock gene, clpB, was significantly more attenuated than LVS whereas a double deletion mutant missing genes FTT0918 and capB was as attenuated as LVS. In general mice immunized with SCHU S4ΔclpB were significantly better protected against aerosol challenge than mice immunized with LVS. A single ID immunization of BALB/c mice with SCHU S4ΔclpB was at least as effective as any other regimen examined. Mice immunized with SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB were generally protected to a similar degree as mice immunized with LVS. A preliminary examination of immune responses to vaccination with LVS, SCHU S4ΔclpB, or SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB provided no obvious correlate to their relative efficacies. PMID:20018266

  19. Safety of classical swine fever virus vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Byounghan; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Jung-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-12

    The present study aimed to evaluate the safety of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows. Pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody were inoculated with a commercial LOM vaccine during early pregnancy (day 38; n=3) or mid-pregnancy (days 49-59; n=11). In pregnant sows vaccinated during the early stages of gestation, abortion (day 109) was observed in one case, with two stillbirths and seven mummified fetuses. The viability of live-born piglets was 34.9% in sows vaccinated during mid-pregnancy compared with 81.8% in the control group. Post-mortem examination of the organs of the sows and piglets did not reveal any pathological lesions caused by CSFV; however, CSFV RNA was detected in the organs of several vaccinated sows and their litters. The LOM strain was transmitted from sows with free CSFV antibody to their fetus, but did not appear to induce immune tolerance in the offspring from vaccinated pregnant sows. Side effects were not observed in pregnant sows with antibody to the LOM strain: transmission from sow to their litters and stillbirth or mummified fetuses. The LOM strain may induce sterile immunity and provide rapid, long-lasting, and complete protection against CSFV; however, it should be contraindicated in pregnant sows due to potential adverse effects in pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody.

  20. Molecular relationship between field and vaccine strain of measles virus and its persistence in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Countrywide 5.9 million, 0-11 Month old children are immunized annually by EPI (Expended Program on Immunization) against 8 vaccine preventable diseases including measles and so on. Unfortunately the basic immunity centers are not uniform throughout the country. Each center provides services to about 27000 people which is inadequate. The purpose of this study was to explore the development of EPI Pakistan in terms of immunization of measles. Methods Nucleotide sequences were analyzed by neighbor joining method (bootstrap test) using Bio- edit and MEGA-5 software to find evolutionary relationship between wild type measles strain and vaccine strain (Edmonston strain) used in Pakistan. For statistical analysis of data SPSS 16 was used. Results Currently 1.3 vaccinators are working at each U C (union council) which according to national EPI policy should be at least 2. About 56% and 44% children of age 0-11 months did not received second dose of measles in the last two years respectively. Out of these 4231 cases which were reported last year, 1370 have received their first dose of measles vaccine. Conclusion Seroconversion and seroprevalence study of the vaccine and field strain of measles virus is needed to confirm whether its failure is due to service unavailability or vaccine in-affectivity. PMID:22284834

  1. Evaluation of European tick-borne encephalitis virus vaccine against recent Siberian and far-eastern subtype strains.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, D; Goto, A; Yoshii, K; Mizutani, T; Kariwa, H; Takashima, I

    2001-09-14

    To evaluate the efficacy of the European TBE vaccine in east-Siberian and far-eastern regions of Russia, we examined the immune responses of the vaccine against recent TBE virus Siberian (Irkutsk) and far-eastern (Khabarovsk and Vladivostok) isolates. The sera of vaccinated humans showed efficient neutralizing antibody titers (> or =20) against Siberian and far-eastern strains. To evaluate the efficacy of the vaccine in vivo, mice were vaccinated and challenged with lethal doses of the viruses. All vaccinated mice survived each virus challenge. These results suggest that the European vaccine can prevent the TBE virus infection in east-Siberian and far-eastern regions of Russia.

  2. Gas exchange in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 and Its hydrogenase-deficient mutant strain NHM5.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Pia; Lindblad, Peter; Cournac, Laurent

    2004-04-01

    Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a nitrogen-fixing, heterocystous cyanobacterium of symbiotic origin. During nitrogen fixation, it produces molecular hydrogen (H(2)), which is recaptured by an uptake hydrogenase. Gas exchange in cultures of N. punctiforme ATCC 29133 and its hydrogenase-free mutant strain NHM5 was studied. Exchange of O(2), CO(2), N(2), and H(2) was followed simultaneously with a mass spectrometer in cultures grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Isotopic tracing was used to separate evolution and uptake of CO(2) and O(2). The amount of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed was found to vary with light conditions, high light giving a greater increase in H(2) production than N(2) fixation. The ratio under low light and high light was approximately 1.4 and 6.1 molecules of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed, respectively. Incubation under high light for a longer time, until the culture was depleted of CO(2), caused a decrease in the nitrogen fixation rate. At the same time, hydrogen production in the hydrogenase-deficient strain was increased from an initial rate of approximately 6 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) to 9 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) after about 50 min. A light-stimulated hydrogen-deuterium exchange activity stemming from the nitrogenase was observed in the two strains. The present findings are important for understanding this nitrogenase-based system, aiming at photobiological hydrogen production, as we have identified the conditions under which the energy flow through the nitrogenase can be directed towards hydrogen production rather than nitrogen fixation.

  3. A Quantitative Survey of Gravity Receptor Function in Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Yu, Heping; Erway, Lawrence C.; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Pollak, Natasha; Jones, Timothy A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify vestibular deficits in mice using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEP thresholds, peak latencies, and peak amplitudes from 24 strains with known genetic mutations and 6 inbred background strains have been analyzed and descriptive statistics generated for each strain. Response parameters from mutant homozygotes were compared with heterozygote and/or background controls, and all strain averages were contrasted to normative ranges. Previous work established average values for normal screening VsEP parameters at +6 dB re: 1.0 g/ms: P1 = 1.3 ms, P2 = 2.2 ms, P3 = 2.8 ms; P1/N1 = 2 μV; P2/N2 = 1.6 μV. Normal thresholds averaged −8 dB re: 1.0 g/ms. Homozygotes of the following recessive mutations had absent VsEPs at the ages tested: Espnje, Atp2b2dfw-2J, Spnb4qv-lnd2J, Spnb4qv-3J, Myo7ash1, Tmiesr, Myo6sv, jc, Pcdh15av-J, Pcdh15av-2J, Pcdh15av-3J, Cdh23v-2J, Sansjs, hr, Kcne1pkr, and Pou3f4del. These results suggest profound gravity receptor deficits for these homozygotes, which is consistent with the structural deficits that have been documented for many of these strains. Homozygotes of Catna2cdf, Grid2ho4J, Wnt1sw, qk, and Mbpshi strains and heterozygotes of Grid2lc had measurable VsEPs, but one or more response parameters differed from the respective control group (heterozygote or background strain) or were outside normal ranges. For example, qk and Mbpshi homozygotes showed significantly prolonged latencies consistent with the abnormal myelin that has been described for these strains. Prolonged latencies may suggest deficits in neural conduction; elevated thresholds suggest reduced sensitivity, and reduced amplitudes may be suggestive for reduced neural synchrony. One mutation, Otx1jv, had all VsEP response parameters within normal limits, an expected finding because the abnormality in Otx1jv is presumably restricted to the lateral semicircular canal. Interestingly, some heterozygote groups also

  4. Genotypic diversity in Babesia bovis field isolates and vaccine strains from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Combrink, M P; Troskie, P C; Pienaar, R; Latif, A A; Mans, B J

    2014-01-31

    Genotypic diversity in Babesia bovis (cause of Asiatic redwater in cattle) vaccine strains and field isolates from South Africa were investigated using the Bv80 gene as well as microsatellites. The S11 vaccine strain possessed both A and B alleles of the Bv80 gene, as well as genotypic diversity within each allele type as defined by repeat variation resulting in different amplicon sizes. Rapid serial passage of vaccine strain from passage S10 to S24 resulted in loss of genotypic diversity that yielded a single allele A genotype with an amplicon size of 558 bp. This suggested that clonal selection occurred during rapid passaging. Extensive genotypic diversity exists in 44 field isolates characterized with both Bv80 A and B alleles, but can be readily distinguished from the S24 vaccine strain using either the Bv80 allele specific PCR assays or using multi-locus micro-satellite typing. This indicated that no recent documented clinical cases of Asiatic redwater were caused by the reversion to virulence of the current vaccine strain.

  5. Development of a highly immunogenic Newcastle disease virus chicken vaccine strain of duck origin.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Kye, S J; Lee, H J; Gaikwad, S; Lee, H S; Jung, S C; Choi, K S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDRL0901 was developed as a live vaccine candidate for control of Newcastle disease. NDV isolate KR/duck/13/07 (DK1307) of duck origin was used as the selected vaccine strain. DK1307 was passaged 6 times in chickens. Then a single clone from the chicken-adapted virus (DK1307C) was finally selected, and the vaccine strain was named NDRL0901. DK1307C and the clone NDRL0901 viruses showed enhanced immunogenicity compared to the DK1307 virus. Principal component analysis based on fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes revealed the codon usage pattern in the dataset is distinct separating duck viral sequences and avian sequences, and passage of the duck origin virus into the chicken host causes deviation in the codon usage pattern. The NDRL0901 virus was avirulent and did not acquire viral virulence even after 7 back passages in chickens. When day-old chicks were vaccinated with the NDRL0901 virus via spray, eye drops, and drinking water, the vaccinated birds showed no clinical signs and had significant protection efficacy (>80%) against very virulent NDV (Kr005 strain) infection regardless of the administration route employed. The results indicate that the NDRL0901 strain is safe in chickens and can offer protective immunity.

  6. Recovery of Nonpathogenic Mutant Bacteria from Tumors Caused by Several Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strains: a Frequent Event?▿

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M.

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  7. Effect of vaccination of pigs against experimental infection with high and low virulence Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, I; Maes, D; Vranckx, K; Calus, D; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F

    2011-02-17

    This study investigated the infection pattern and lung lesion development in pigs caused by a low and highly virulent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain at 4 and 8 weeks (w) post infection (PI). It also determined the efficacy of a commercial inactivated whole-cell vaccine against infection with each one of these M. hyopneumoniae strains. Ninety piglets free of M. hyopneumoniae were selected, and 40 of them were randomly vaccinated during their first week of life. At weaning, all piglets were allocated to 10 different groups and housed in pens with absolute filters. At 4 weeks of age, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with either a highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain, a low virulent strain or with sterile culture medium. Half of all animals were euthanized at 4 w PI, while the remaining half was euthanized at 8 w PI. Coughing was assessed daily, and lung lesions, immunofluorescence (IF), bacteriological analysis and nested PCR were assessed after necropsy. It was demonstrated that contrary to the highly virulent strain, the low virulent strain required more than 4 weeks PI (commonly accepted as the standard infection model) to reach maximum clinical symptoms. Vaccination significantly reduced clinical symptoms, macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions in pigs infected with the highly virulent strain. This effect was more pronounced at 4 than at 8 weeks PI. Protective efficacy was also observed in pigs infected with the low virulent strain, but the effect was less pronounced than on the highly virulent strain.

  8. Strain-specific protective immunity following vaccination against experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Haolla, Filipe A; Claser, Carla; de Alencar, Bruna C G; Tzelepis, Fanny; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silvério, Jaline C; Machado, Alexandre V; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena B P; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-09-18

    Immunisation with Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (asp-2) and trans-sialidase (ts) genes induces protective immunity in highly susceptible A/Sn mice, against infection with parasites of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Based on immunological and biological strain variations in T. cruzi parasites, our goal was to validate our vaccination results using different parasite strains. Due to the importance of the CD8(+) T cells in protective immunity, we initially determined which strains expressed the immunodominant H-2K(k)-restricted epitope TEWETGQI. We tested eight strains, four of which elicited immune responses to this epitope (Y, G, Colombian and Colombia). We selected the Colombian and Colombia strains for our studies. A/Sn mice were immunised with different regimens using both T. cruzi genes (asp-2 and ts) simultaneously and subsequently challenged with blood trypomastigotes. Immune responses before the challenge were confirmed by the presence of specific antibodies and peptide-specific T cells. Genetic vaccination did not confer protective immunity against acute infection with a lethal dose of the Colombian strain. In contrast, we observed a drastic reduction in parasitemia and a significant increase in survival, following challenge with an otherwise lethal dose of the Colombia strain. In many surviving animals with late-stage chronic infection, we observed alterations in the heart's electrical conductivity, compared to naive mice. In summary, we concluded that immunity against T. cruzi antigens, similar to viruses and bacteria, may be strain-specific and have a negative impact on vaccine development.

  9. Comparison of the Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D-204 Strain to Its Virulent Parental Strain Asibi by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Wood, Thomas G.; Widen, Steven G.; Ryman, Kate D.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. Methods. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Results. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Conclusions. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence. PMID:24141982

  10. Comparison of the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D-204 strain to its virulent parental strain Asibi by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Ryman, Kate D; Barrett, Alan D T

    2014-02-01

    The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence.

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus 2 ICP0− Mutant Viruses Are Avirulent and Immunogenic: Implications for a Genital Herpes Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Halford, William P.; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0− mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0− mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0− mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0− mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0ΔNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0ΔNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0ΔNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0ΔNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0ΔNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0− mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes. PMID:20808928

  12. Herpes simplex virus 2 ICP0 mutant viruses are avirulent and immunogenic: implications for a genital herpes vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halford, William P; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0(-) mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0(-) mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0(-) mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0DeltaNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0DeltaNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes.

  13. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; Tamim, Sana; McAllen, John K; Kirkness, Ewen F; Akopov, Asmik; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction) to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out.

  14. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Tamim, Sana; McAllen, John K.; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Akopov, Asmik; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction) to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out. PMID:28070453

  15. Mutant human myocilin induces strain specific differences in ocular hypertension and optic nerve damage in mice.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Colleen M; Luan, Tomi; Zhang, Zhang; Putliwala, Tasneem; Wordinger, Robert J; Millar, J Cameron; John, Simon W M; Pang, Iok-Hou; Clark, Abbot F

    2012-07-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a causative risk factor for the development and progression of glaucoma. Glaucomatous mutations in myocilin (MYOC) damage the trabecular meshwork and elevate IOP in humans and in mice. Animal models of glaucoma are important to discover and better understand molecular pathogenic pathways and to test new glaucoma therapeutics. Although a number of different animal models of glaucoma have been developed and characterized, there are no true models of human primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The overall goal of this work is to develop the first inducible mouse model of POAG using a human POAG relevant transgene (i.e. mutant MYOC) expression in mouse eyes to elevate IOP and cause pressure-induced damage to the optic nerve. Four mouse strains (A/J, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, and C3H/HeJ) were used in this study. Ad5.MYOC.Y437H (5 × 10(7) pfu) was injected intravitreally into one eye, with the uninjected contralateral eye serving as the control eye. Conscious IOP measurements were taken using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Optic nerve damage was determined by scoring PPD stained optic nerve cross sections. Retinal ganglion cell and superior colliculus damage was assessed by Nissl stain cell counts. Intravitreal administration of viral vector Ad5.MYOC.Y437H caused a prolonged, reproducible, and statistically significant IOP elevation in BALB/cJ, A/J, and C57BL/6J mice. IOPs increased to approximately 25 mm Hg for 8 weeks (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the C3H/HeJ mouse strain was resistant to Ad5.MYOC.Y437H induced IOP elevation for the 8-week time period. IOPs were stable (12-15 mm Hg) in the uninjected control eyes. We also determined whether there were any strain differences in pressure-induced optic nerve damage. Even though IOP was similarly elevated in three of the strains tested (BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, and A/J) only the A/J strain had considerable and significant optic nerve damage at the end of 8 weeks with optic nerve damage score of 2.64

  16. Characterization of xanthan gum produced from glycerol by a mutant strain Xanthomonas campestris CCTCC M2015714.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Wu, Jianrong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2017-02-10

    Xanthan gum was produced by a mutant strain X. campestris CCTCC M2015714 with glycerol as the sole carbon source. The monosaccharide composition and molar ratio of xanthan gum produced from glycerol are glucose: mannose: glucuronic acid=2.0:1.65:1.0. Meanwhile, chemical structure of xanthan gum produced from glycerol is similar to that of the commercial xanthan through FT-IR and NMR. Remarkably, the molecular weight of xanthan gum produced using our method (3.0±0.14×10(6)Da) is about half that of the commercial one (5.8±0.25×10(6)Da), and the consistency index (K) of which is less than 1/10 that of the commercial xanthan. This work paves the way for xanthan production from glycerol and is useful for studying the structure/application of xanthan gum.

  17. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  18. Purification and characterisation of α-amylase produced by mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Roheena; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase produced by a mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18 has been purified to homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyle sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was purified by using 70% ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex column and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. An enzyme purification factor of 9.5-fold was achieved with a final specific activity of 1987.7 U/mg protein and overall yield of 23.8%. The molecular weight of purified α-amylase was estimated to be 48 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme revealed an optimum assay temperature and pH 40°C and 5.0, respectively. Except Ca(++) all other metal ions such as Mg, Mn, Na, Zn, Ni, Fe, Cu, Co and Ba were found to be inhibitory to enzyme activity.

  19. Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination in elk. I. Efficacy of reduced dosage.

    PubMed

    Cook, Walter E; Williams, Elizabeth S; Thorne, E Tom; Kreeger, Terry J; Stout, Glen; Bardsley, Katie; Edwards, Hank; Schurig, Gerhardt; Colby, Lesley A; Enright, Fred; Elzer, Philip H

    2002-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a serious zoonotic disease affecting some populations of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and bison (Bison bison) in the Greater Yellowstone Area, USA. The fear that elk and/or bison may spread Brucella abortus to livestock has prompted efforts to reduce or eliminate the disease in wildlife. Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine has recently been approved for use in cattle. Unlike strain 19 vaccine, RB51 does not cause false positive reactions on standard brucellosis serologic tests. If effective, it may become the vaccine of choice for wildlife. In February 1995, 45 serologically negative female elk calves were trapped and taken to the Sybille Wildlife Research and Conservation Education Unit near Wheatland, Wyoming, USA. In May 1995, 16 of these elk calves were hand-vaccinated with 1 x 10(9) colony forming units (CFU) of RB51, 16 were vaccinated with 1 x 10(8) CFU RB51 by biobullet, and 13 were given a saline placebo. The elk were bred in fall of 1996 and they were challenged with 1 x 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival inoculation in March 1997. Thirteen (100%) control elk aborted, 14 (88%) hand-vaccinated elk aborted, and 12 (75%) biobullet vaccinated elk aborted or produced nonviable calves. These results suggest that a single dose of 1 x 10(8) to 1 x 10(9) CFU RB51 does not provide significant protection against B. abortus induced abortion in elk. However, the vaccine appears to be safe at this dose and additional study may reveal a more effective RB51 vaccine regimen for elk.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Bordetella pertussis Brazilian Vaccine Strain.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, M A; Nishiyama, M Y; Morone, M; Oliveira, U C; Bezerra, M F B; Sakauchi, M A; Raw, I; Junqueira de Azevedo, I L M; Kitajima, J P; Carvalho, E; Ho, P L

    2015-02-19

    Despite the reduction in incidence after vaccination, pertussis disease is still considered a public health problem worldwide, mainly due to recent and potential new outbreaks. We report here the complete genome of the Bordetella pertussis Butantan strain used in the Brazilian National Immunization Program as a whole-cell pertussis antigen to compose vaccines such as DTwP (diphtheria, tetanus, and whole-cell pertussis). Copyright © 2015 Akamatsu et al.

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Bordetella pertussis Brazilian Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, M. A.; Nishiyama, M. Y.; Morone, M.; Oliveira, U. C.; Bezerra, M. F. B.; Sakauchi, M. A.; Raw, I.; Junqueira de Azevedo, I. L. M.; Kitajima, J. P.; Ho, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the reduction in incidence after vaccination, pertussis disease is still considered a public health problem worldwide, mainly due to recent and potential new outbreaks. We report here the complete genome of the Bordetella pertussis Butantan strain used in the Brazilian National Immunization Program as a whole-cell pertussis antigen to compose vaccines such as DTwP (diphtheria, tetanus, and whole-cell pertussis). PMID:25700409

  2. Sensitivity of dark mutants of various strains of luminescent bacteria to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lyzeń, Robert; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that bioluminescence of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may both stimulate DNA repair and contribute to detoxification of deleterious oxygen derivatives. Therefore, it was also proposed that these reactions can be considered biological roles of bacterial luminescence and might act as evolutionary drives in development of luminous systems. However, experimental evidence for the physiological role of luciferase in protection of cells against oxidative stress has been demonstrated only in one bacterial species, raising the question whether this is a specific or a more general phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that in the presence of various oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, cumene hydroperoxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide and ferrous ions) growth of dark mutants of different strains of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi is impaired relative to wild-type bacteria, though to various extents. Deleterious effects of oxidants on the mutants could be reduced (with different efficiency) by addition of antioxidants, A-TEMPO or 4OH-TEMPO. These results support the hypotheses that (1) activities of bacterial luciferases may detoxify deleterious oxygen derivatives, and (2) significantly different efficiencies of this reaction are characteristic for various luciferases.

  3. Immune Responses and Safety after Dart or Booster Vaccination of Bison with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C.

    2012-01-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 1010 to 2.0 × 1010 CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 1010 CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 1010 CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) immunologic responses at various times after vaccination than nonvaccinated bison. Booster vaccination with RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity. PMID:22461528

  4. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C

    2012-05-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 10(10) to 2.0 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 10(10) CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) immunologic responses at various times after vaccination than nonvaccinated bison. Booster vaccination with RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity.

  5. Differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains by nucleotide sequence analysis of a hypervariable region in the spaA gene: discrimination of a live vaccine strain from field isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Shinya; To, Ho; Kanda, Akira

    2008-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae causes erysipelas in swine and is considered a reemerging disease contributing substantially to economic losses in the swine industry. Since an attenuated live vaccine was commercialized in 1974 in Japan, outbreaks of acute septicemia or subacute urticaria of erysipelas have decreased dramatically. In contrast, a chronic form of erysipelas found during meat inspections in slaughterhouses has been increasing. In this study, a new strain-typing method was developed based on nucleotide sequencing of a hypervariable region in the surface protective antigen (spaA) gene for discrimination of the live vaccine strain from field isolates. Sixteen strains isolated from arthritic lesions found in slaughtered pigs were segregated into 4 major patterns: 1) identical nucleotide sequence with the vaccine strain: 3 isolates; 2) 1 nucleotide substitution (C to A) at position 555: 5 isolates; 3) 1 nucleotide substitution at various positions: 5 isolates; and 4) 2 nucleotide substitutions: 3 isolates. Isolates with the same nucleotide sequence as the vaccine strain were further characterized by other properties, including the mouse pathogenicity test. One strain isolated from pigs on a farm where the live vaccine had been used was found to be closely related to the vaccine strain. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the spaA sequence suggests that the evolutionary distance of the isolates is related to the pathogenicity in mice. The new strain-typing system based on nucleotide sequencing of the spaA region is useful to discriminate the vaccine strain from field isolates.

  6. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  7. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.; Micoli, Francesca; Rondini, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189) and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618) strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine production. The

  8. Differentiation of wild-type varicella-zoster strains from India and the Oka vaccine strain using a VZV open reading frame - 62 based PCR-RFLP technique.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Karishma S; Lahiri, Kunal K; Kapila, Ketoki; Kumar, Satish; Gupta, Rajiv M; Karade, Santosh

    2008-08-01

    Since the introduction of varicella vaccination in India, surveillance of circulating VZV strains has gained significance. Differentiating wild-type VZV strains from the Oka vaccine strain can be achieved only by molecular genotyping methods. The development of PCR methods for VZV strain differentiation has been hampered by the fact that the VZV genome is highly conserved. We used VZV ORF 62 PCR-RFLP analysis to identify and differentiate wild-type VZV strains in India from the Oka vaccine strain. Digestion of VZV ORF 62 amplicons with SmaI, enabled accurate strain differentiation; the Oka strain was positive for three SmaI sites, compared to two SmaI sites in the wild-type VZV strains that we tested.

  9. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differences affect BCG efficacy remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed comparative analyses of the virulence and efficacy of 13 BCG strains, representing different genetic lineages, in SCID and BALB/c mice. Our results show that BCG strains of the DU2 group IV (BCG-Phipps, BCG-Frappier, BCG-Pasteur, and BCG-Tice) exhibit the highest levels of virulence, and BCG strains of the DU2 group II (BCG-Sweden, BCG-Birkhaug) are among the least virulent group. These distinct levels of virulence may be explained by strain-specific duplications and deletions of genomic DNA. There appears to be a general trend that more virulent BCG strains are also more effective in protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Our findings have important implications for current BCG vaccine programs and for future TB vaccine development. PMID:26643797

  10. Vaccination with a modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1a vaccine completely protected calves against challenge with BVDV type 1b strains.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Umbaugh, Jerry; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-12-10

    Vaccination plays a significant role in the control of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection and spread. Recent studies revealed that type 1b is the predominant BVDV type 1 subgenotype, representing more than 75% of field isolates of BVDV-1. However, nearly all current, commercially available BVDV type 1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. Previous studies have indicated that anti-BVDV sera, induced by BVDV-1a viruses, show less neutralization activity to BVDV-1b isolates than type 1a. Therefore, it is critically important to evaluate BVDV-1a vaccines in their ability to prevent BVDV-1b infection in calves. In current studies, calves were vaccinated subcutaneously, intradermally or intranasally with a single dose of a multivalent, modified-live viral vaccine containing a BVDV-1a strain, and were challenged with differing BVDV-1b strains to determine the efficacy and duration of immunity of the vaccine against these heterologous virus strains. Vaccinated calves, in all administration routes, were protected from respiratory disease caused by the BVDV-1b viruses, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding and greater white blood cell counts than non-vaccinated control animals. The BVDV-1a vaccine elicited efficacious protection in calves against each BVDV-1b challenge strain, with a duration of immunity of at least 6 months.

  11. FMD virus isolates: the candidate strains for polyvalent vaccine development in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayelet, G; Soressa, M; Sisay, T; Belay, A; Gelaye, E; Jembere, S; Skjerve, E; Asmare, K

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viruses with the aim of selecting appropriate vaccinal strain to control of FMD in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in two-dimensional virus neutralization assay to determine the antigenic relationship 'r' value between the candidate vaccine strains and field isolates. A total of 21 serotype O, 7 serotype A, and 8 serotype SAT 2 FMD viruses, which were isolated from cattle and swine. A couple of isolates from each serotype were identified as vaccine candidates in the trial (O-ETH/38/2005, O-ETH/58/2008, A-ETH/7/2008, A-ETH/6/2000, SAT2-ETH/76/2009 and SAT2-ETH/64/2009). The finding revealed all the vaccine candidate depicted high antigenic similarity, above the mean "r" value, to their own serotypes in the studied serotype population except for one serotype A field isolate, A-ETH/13/1981, with "r" value=0.14 and 0.25) which is significantly lower than the minimum requirement. In general, the result indicated that these candidate vaccinal strains can be used for polyvalent vaccine production in the country. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A diagnostic protocol to identify water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tittarelli, Manuela; Atzeni, Marcello; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Ferri, Nicola; Marchi, Enrico; Martucciello, Alessandra; De Massis, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The use of live vaccine strain RB51 for vaccination of domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) at risk of infection with Brucella abortus is permitted notwithstanding the plans for the eradication and only under strict veterinary control. The antibodies induced by RB51 vaccination are not detectable using conventional diagnostic techniques; therefore, it is necessary to have a specific diagnostic tool able to discriminate vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The combination of a complement fixation test (CFT) with specific RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT) and a brucellin skin test has been demonstrated to be a reliable diagnostic system to identify single cattle (Bos taurus) vaccinated with RB51. So far, no data are available in the international scientific literature regarding the use of this test association in water buffalo. For this reason the suitability of this test combination has been evaluated in a water buffalo herd. One hundred twenty-seven animals farmed in a herd of Salerno province (Campania, Southern Italy), in the context of a presumptive unauthorized use of RB51 vaccine were chosen for this study. All tested animals resulted negative to Rose Bengal test (RBT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for the detection of specific antibodies against Brucella field strains. Seventy-one animals (56%) developed RB51 antigen-specific CFT (RB51-CFT) antibodies against RB51 vaccine in a first sampling, while 104 animals (82%) gave positive result to a second serum sampling conducted 11 days after the intradermal inoculation of the RB51 brucellin. One hundred and seven animals (84%) showed a positive reaction to the RB51-CFT in at least 1 sampling, while 111 animals (87%) resulted positive to the RB51 brucellin skin test. Thus, analysing the results of the 3 testing in parallel, 119 animals (94%) were positive to at least 1 of the performed tests. The results suggest that the use in parallel of the RB51 brucellin skin test with RB51-CFT may represent a reliable

  13. [Production of a vaccine against enterotoxemia from Clostridium perfringens strains isolated in the field].

    PubMed

    Cherfaoui, S; Kadra, B

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated eight strains of C. perfringens from cases of enterotoxaemia. Five of these strains have revealed themselves toxic with respective types (type "A":2, type "C":2, type "D":1). In order to produce anti-enterotoxaemia vaccine, we have proceeded at the cultivation in fermenter of isolated strains and reference strains CWA 35, CWC and CWD AF. At the end of fermentation, we have evaluated the two following parameters: obtained biomass, and toxin titers. With the two classes of strains we reached an important biomass but toxins titers relatively weak comparatively to that which is usually required. It will be necessary then, to demonstrate the immunogen value of the produced vaccines by testing their efficacity.

  14. Live Oral Cholera Vaccine: Evaluation of the Clinical Effectiveness of Two Strains in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Richard A.; Music, Stanley I.; Libonati, Joseph P.; Schwartz, Andrew R.; Hornick, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    El Tor Ogawa C14-S5 and EW-6, two live vaccine candidate strains, were given to volunteers in varying doses with and without bicarbonate. Vibrios were found in the stool of one of 32 men given the vaccine strain, and only three men developed a significant titer rise (fourfold or greater) at 2 weeks of vibriocidal or antitoxic antibody. Five men who had previously received 109 organisms of the C14-S5 strain were challenged subsequently with virulent Ogawa 395 Vibrio cholerae. The rate of clinical infection in these men was no different than in unvaccinated controls. It was demonstrated that the live oral cholera vaccines did not remain viable in the intestine long enough to act antigenically. PMID:4426706

  15. Live oral cholera vaccine: evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of two strains in humans.

    PubMed

    Cash, R A; Music, S I; Libonati, J P; Schwartz, A R; Hornick, R B

    1974-10-01

    El Tor Ogawa C14-S5 and EW-6, two live vaccine candidate strains, were given to volunteers in varying doses with and without bicarbonate. Vibrios were found in the stool of one of 32 men given the vaccine strain, and only three men developed a significant titer rise (fourfold or greater) at 2 weeks of vibriocidal or antitoxic antibody. Five men who had previously received 10(9) organisms of the C14-S5 strain were challenged subsequently with virulent Ogawa 395 Vibrio cholerae. The rate of clinical infection in these men was no different than in unvaccinated controls. It was demonstrated that the live oral cholera vaccines did not remain viable in the intestine long enough to act antigenically.

  16. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h- or h+ Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Meade, James H.; Gutz, Herbert

    1976-01-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h+ and h- strains. We have isolated additional h+ and h- mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h - mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1- allele of h90 strains can mutate to mat1+ but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat20 in that it can mutate to mat2+. PMID:17248713

  17. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h or h Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Meade, J H; Gutz, H

    1976-06-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h(+) and h(-) strains. We have isolated additional h(+) and h(- ) mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h( -) mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1(-) allele of h(90) strains can mutate to mat1(+) but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat2(0) in that it can mutate to mat2(+).

  18. Oral vaccination with microencapsuled strain 19 vaccine confers enhanced protection against Brucella abortus strain 2308 challenge in red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-10-01

    Bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), USA, are infected with Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, and they serve as a wildlife reservoir for the disease. Bovine brucellosis recently has been transmitted from infected elk to cattle in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho and has resulted in their loss of brucellosis-free status. An efficacious Brucella vaccine with a delivery system suitable for wildlife would be a valuable tool in a disease prevention and control program. We evaluated Strain 19 (S19) in a sustained release vehicle consisting of alginate microspheres containing live vaccine. In a challenge study using red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) as a model for elk, alginate, a naturally occurring polymer combined with a protein of Fasciola hepatica vitelline protein B was used to microencapsulate S19. Red deer were orally or subcutaneously immunized with 1.5 x 10(10) colony-forming units (CFUs) using microencapsulated S19. Humoral and cellular profiles were analyzed bimonthly throughout the study. The vaccinated red deer and nonvaccinated controls were challenged 1 yr postimmunization conjunctivally with 1 x 10(9) CFUs of B. abortus strain 2308. Red deer vaccinated with oral microencapsulated S19 had a statistically significant lower bacterial tissue load compared with controls. These data indicate for the first time that protection against Brucella-challenge can be achieved by combining a commonly used vaccine with a novel oral delivery system such as alginate-vitelline protein B microencapsulation. This system is a potential improvement for efficacious Brucella-vaccine delivery to wildlife in the GYA.

  19. Inactivation of SAM-methyltransferase is the mechanism of attenuation of a historic louse borne typhus vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Bin; Weinstock, George; Walker, David H; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Louse borne typhus (also called epidemic typhus) was one of man's major scourges, and epidemics of the disease can be reignited when social, economic, or political systems are disrupted. The fear of a bioterrorist attack using the etiologic agent of typhus, Rickettsia prowazekii, was a reality. An attenuated typhus vaccine, R. prowazekii Madrid E strain, was observed to revert to virulence as demonstrated by isolation of the virulent revertant Evir strain from animals which were inoculated with Madrid E strain. The mechanism of the mutation in R. prowazekii that affects the virulence of the vaccine was not known. We sequenced the genome of the virulent revertant Evir strain and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of its parental strain, Madrid E. We found that only a single nucleotide in the entire genome was different between the vaccine strain Madrid E and its virulent revertant strain Evir. The mutation is a single nucleotide insertion in the methyltransferase gene (also known as PR028) in the vaccine strain that inactivated the gene. We also confirmed that the vaccine strain E did not cause fever in guinea pigs and the virulent revertant strain Evir caused fever in guinea pigs. We concluded that a single nucleotide insertion in the methyltransferase gene of R. prowazekii attenuated the R. prowazekii vaccine strain E. This suggested that an irreversible insertion or deletion mutation in the methyl transferase gene of R. prowazekii is required for Madrid E to be considered a safe vaccine.

  20. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  1. Hepatitis C genotype 1 mosaic vaccines are immunogenic in mice and induce stronger T-cell responses than natural strains.

    PubMed

    Yusim, Karina; Dilan, Rebecca; Borducchi, Erica; Stanley, Kelly; Giorgi, Elena; Fischer, William; Theiler, James; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H

    2013-02-01

    Despite improved hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments, vaccines remain an effective and economic option for curtailing the epidemic. Mosaic protein HCV genotype 1 vaccine candidates designed to address HCV diversity were immunogenic in mice. They elicited stronger T-cell responses to NS3-NS4a and E1-E2 proteins than did natural strains, as assessed with vaccine-matched peptides.

  2. Evaluation of a thermostable Newcastle disease virus strain TS09-C as an in-ovo vaccine for chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In-ovo vaccination is an attractive immunization approach for poultry industry. However, most of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine strains used after hatch are unsafe, as in-ovo vaccines, due to their high pathogenicity for chicken embryos. In this study, we evaluated the safety and immunoge...

  3. Single-cycle replicable Rift Valley fever virus mutants as safe vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Tercero, Breanna R; Makino, Shinji

    2016-05-02

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus circulating between ruminants and mosquitoes to maintain its enzootic cycle. Humans are infected with RVFV through mosquito bites or direct contact with materials of infected animals. The virus causes Rift Valley fever (RVF), which was first recognized in the Great Rift Valley of Kenya in 1931. RVF is characterized by a febrile illness resulting in a high rate of abortions in ruminants and an acute febrile illness, followed by fatal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Initially, the virus was restricted to the eastern region of Africa, but the disease has now spread to southern and western Africa, as well as outside of the African continent, e.g., Madagascar, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. There is a serious concern that the virus may spread to other areas, such as North America and Europe. As vaccination is an effective tool to control RVFV epidemics, formalin-inactivated vaccines and live-attenuated RVFV vaccines have been used in endemic areas. The formalin-inactivated vaccines require boosters for effective protection, whereas the live-attenuated vaccines enable the induction of protective immunity by a single vaccination. However, the use of live-attenuated RVFV vaccines for large human populations having a varied health status is of concern, because of these vaccines' residual neuro-invasiveness and neurovirulence. Recently, novel vaccine candidates have been developed using replication-defective RVFV that can undergo only a single round of replication in infected cells. The single-cycle replicable RVFV does not cause systemic infection in immunized hosts, but enables the conferring of protective immunity. This review summarizes the properties of various RVFV vaccines and recent progress on the development of the single-cycle replicable RVFV vaccines.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancerous Scopularide Production by a Marine Microascus brevicaulis Strain and Its UV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Annemarie; Beck, Hans Christian; Kumar, Abhishek; Kristensen, Lars Peter; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Labes, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The marine fungus Microascus brevicaulis strain LF580 is a non-model secondary metabolite producer with high yields of the two secondary metabolites scopularides A and B, which exhibit distinct activities against tumour cell lines. A mutant strain was obtained using UV mutagenesis, showing faster growth and differences in pellet formation besides higher production levels. Here, we show the first proteome study of a marine fungus. Comparative proteomics were applied to gain deeper understanding of the regulation of production and of the physiology of the wild type strain and its mutant. For this purpose, an optimised protein extraction protocol was established. In total, 4759 proteins were identified. The central metabolic pathway of strain LF580 was mapped using the KEGG pathway analysis and GO annotation. Employing iTRAQ labelling, 318 proteins were shown to be significantly regulated in the mutant strain: 189 were down- and 129 upregulated. Proteomics are a powerful tool for the understanding of regulatory aspects: The differences on proteome level could be attributed to limited nutrient availability in the wild type strain due to a strong pellet formation. This information can be applied for optimisation on strain and process level. The linkage between nutrient limitation and pellet formation in the non-model fungus M. brevicaulis is in consensus with the knowledge on model organisms like Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. PMID:26460745

  5. Mitochondrial genome expression in a mutant strain of D. subobscura, an animal model for large scale mtDNA deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Beziat, F; Morel, F; Volz-Lingenhol, A; Saint Paul, N; Alziari, S

    1993-01-01

    A mitochondrial mutant strain of D. subobscura has two mitochondrial genome populations (heteroplasmy): the first (20-30% of the population, 15.9 kb) is the same as could be found in the wild type; the second (70-80% of the population, 11 kb) has lost by deletion several genes coding for complex I and III subunits, and four tRNAs. In human pathology, this kind of mutation has been correlated with severe diseases such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome, but the mutant strain, does not seem to be affected by the mutation (1). Studies reported here show that: a) Transcripts from genes not concerned by the mutation are present at the same level in both strains. b) In contrast, transcript concentrations from genes involved in the deletion are significantly decreased (30-50%) in the mutant. c) Deleted DNA was expressed as shown by the detection of the fusion transcript. d) The mtDNA/nuc.DNA ratio is 1.5 times higher in the mutant strain than in the wild type. The mutation leads to change in the transcript level equilibrium. The apparent innocuousness of the mutation may suggest some post-transcriptional compensation mechanisms. This drosophila strain is an interesting model to study the consequence of this type of mitochondrial genome deletion. Images PMID:8441651

  6. A pandemic influenza vaccine in India: from strain to sale within 12 months.

    PubMed

    Dhere, Rajeev; Yeolekar, Leena; Kulkarni, Prasad; Menon, Ravi; Vaidya, Vivek; Ganguly, Milan; Tyagi, Parikshit; Barde, Prajakt; Jadhav, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    In the event of a highly pathogenic influenza pandemic, the Indian subcontinent would need 1.2 billion doses of vaccine to immunize its entire population, double if two doses were required to assure immunity. Serum Institute of India Limited (SII) thus became one of six initial grantees of the World Health Organization (WHO) technology transfer initiative to create capacity in developing countries to manufacture H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. At the outbreak of the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza pandemic, experience gained from the H5N1 project was used to develop a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), since this was the only option for the level of surge capacity required for a large-scale immunization campaign in India. SII took <12 months to develop and market its LAIV intranasal vaccine from receipt of the seed strain from WHO. As of November 2010, over 2.5 million persons have been vaccinated with Nasovac(®) with no serious adverse reactions or vaccine failure after 3 months' post-marketing surveillance. The product has been submitted for prequalification by WHO for purchase by United Nations agencies. In parallel, SII also developed an inactivated influenza vaccine, and is currently looking to ensure the sustainability of its influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity.

  7. Efficient method for generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants of Streptococcus thermophilus yoghurt and mozzarella strains.

    PubMed

    Mills, S; Coffey, A; McAuliffe, O E; Meijer, W C; Hafkamp, B; Ross, R P

    2007-07-01

    Bacteriophage infection of Streptococcus thermophilus is becoming increasingly problematic in many industry fermentations such as yoghurt and mozzarella manufacture. This study describes the development of an efficient and rapid 3-step approach for the generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIMs) of these starter strains. The method initially involves infection of a culture in solid media at a multiplicity of infection (M.O.I.) of 10 which is then incubated in milk overnight. BIMs are then isolated following successive rounds (20-25) of growth in 10% reconstituted skimmed milk (RSM) in the presence of high phage titres. The method selects for BIMs which can grow efficiently in milk. Using this approach BIMs of two industrial strains were generated, whose starter performance was comparable to the parent starters in terms of performance in milk. Genomic fingerprinting used to validate the identity of each BIM, revealed a number of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in two of the resultant BIMs. This method provides a simple and reliable method for generation of BIMs of industrial starters which does not require any specialised equipment and should be widely applicable.

  8. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms.

  9. Brucella suis strain 2 vaccine is safe and protective against heterologous Brucella spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangquan; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Nan; Ding, Jiabo; Suo, Xun

    2016-01-12

    Brucellosis is a wide spread zoonotic disease that causes abortion and infertility in mammals and leads to debilitating, febrile illness in humans. Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis are the major pathogenic species to humans. Vaccination with live attenuated B. suis strain 2 (S2) vaccine is an essential and critical component in the control of brucellosis in China. The S2 vaccine is very effective in preventing brucellosis in goats, sheep, cattle and swine. However, there are still debates outside of China whether the S2 vaccine is able to provide protection against heterologous virulent Brucella species. We investigated the residual virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the S2 vaccine in BALB/c mice by determining bacteria persistence in spleen, serum antibody response, cellular immune response and protection against a heterologous virulent challenge. The S2 vaccine was of low virulence as there were no bacteria recovered in spleen four weeks post vaccination. The vaccinated mice developed Brucella-specific IgG in 2-3 weeks, and a burst production of IFN-γ at one week as well as a two-fold increase in TNF-α production. The S2 vaccine protected mice from a virulent challenge by B. melitensis M28, B. abortus 2308 and B. suis S1330, and the S2 vaccinated mice did not develop any clinical signs or tissue damage. Our study demonstrated that the S2 vaccine is of low virulence, stimulates good humoral and cellular immunity and protects animals against infection by heterologous, virulent Brucella species.

  10. Development and Characterization of attenuated Mutant Candidate Vaccines for Control of Paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative pathogen of Johne’s disease, a chronic inflammatory wasting disease in ruminants. The disease has been difficult to control because of the lack of an effective vaccine. To develop a live attenuated vaccine for Map, as well as for the...

  11. Bacterial survival, lymph node pathology, and serological responses of bison (Bison bison) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or strain 19.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Cheville, N F; Kunkle, R A; Palmer, M V; Jensen, A E

    1997-01-01

    From August 1993 to June 1994, 3 month-old bison (Bison bison) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51, n = 6), strain 19 (S19, n = 3), or with saline (n = 1) and serologic responses and persistence of vaccine strains within lymph nodes were monitored. Bison vaccinated with S19 had granulomatous lymphadenitis and greater peak numbers of B. abortus than those vaccinated with SRB51. Bison vaccinated with RB51 had similar histological lesions and B. abortus were still present in lymph nodes at 16 weeks. Although antibodies against RB51 were produced, standard tube agglutination test responses of RB51-vaccinates remained negative. The histological lesions of B. abortus infections in bison were similar to those observed in cattle, but bison did not clear SRB51 as rapidly as cattle.

  12. [Immunogenicity and safety of vaccine preparations based on circulating Bordetella pertussis strains].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtsev, E M; Mertsalova, N Iu; Britsina, M V; Ozeretskovskaia, M N; Bazhanova, I G; Shinkarev, A S; Poddubikov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Study specific activity and safety ofvaccine preparations based on circulating B. pertussis strains with currently predominating allele variants of pertussis toxin (ptxA1) and pertactin (prn2) genes. B. pertussis strains isolated from pertussis patients in Moscow in 2001-2010 were grown in dense and liquid media. The content of separate antigens in B. pertussis strains was determined by EIA. Immunogenicity and safety of the preparations was determined in F1(CBAxC57B16) line mice. All the studied circulating B. pertussis strains expressed pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and agglutinogens corresponding to the serovar. Whole-cell and acellular pertussis vaccines were prepared based on the circulating strains, and a highly productive recently isolated toxigenic B.pertussis strain that could be used for production ofpertussis vaccines was selected as a result of studies ofimmunogenic, toxic and sensibilizing properties. Vaccine preparations based on a B. pertussis strain adapted to growth in liquid media with pertussis toxin and pertactin ptxAl1 - prn2 gene allele variation characteristic for contemporary population are specifically active and safe.

  13. Human vaccination against Plasmodium vivax Duffy-binding protein induces strain-transcending antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ruth O.; Silk, Sarah E.; Elias, Sean C.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Rawlinson, Thomas A.; Llewellyn, David; Shakri, A. Rushdi; Jin, Jing; Labbé, Geneviève M.; Edwards, Nick J.; Poulton, Ian D.; Roberts, Rachel; Farid, Ryan; Jørgensen, Thomas; Alanine, Daniel G.W.; de Cassan, Simone C.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Otto, Thomas D.; McCarthy, James S.; de Jongh, Willem A.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Moyle, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Berrie, Eleanor; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Lawrie, Alison M.; Draper, Simon J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread human malaria geographically; however, no effective vaccine exists. Red blood cell invasion by the P. vivax merozoite depends on an interaction between the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) and region II of the parasite’s Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP_RII). Naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies against this interaction associate with clinical immunity, but it is unknown whether these responses can be induced by human vaccination. METHODS. Safety and immunogenicity of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) viral vectored vaccines targeting PvDBP_RII (Salvador I strain) were assessed in an open-label dose-escalation phase Ia study in 24 healthy UK adults. Vaccines were delivered by the intramuscular route in a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen using an 8-week interval. RESULTS. Both vaccines were well tolerated and demonstrated a favorable safety profile in malaria-naive adults. PvDBP_RII–specific ex-vivo IFN-γ T cell, antibody-secreting cell, memory B cell, and serum IgG responses were observed after the MVA boost immunization. Vaccine-induced antibodies inhibited the binding of vaccine homologous and heterologous variants of recombinant PvDBP_RII to the DARC receptor, with median 50% binding-inhibition titers greater than 1:100. CONCLUSION. We have demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that strain-transcending antibodies can be induced against the PvDBP_RII antigen by vaccination in humans. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy against the blood-stage P. vivax parasite. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01816113. FUNDING. Support was provided by the UK Medical Research Council, UK National Institute of Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, and the Wellcome Trust. PMID:28614791

  14. Genetic characterisation of the rabies virus vaccine strains used for oral immunization of foxes in Poland to estimate the effectiveness of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Anna; Żmudziński, Jan Franciszek

    2015-02-01

    The main reservoir of rabies virus in Poland has been the red fox. To control rabies in wildlife, oral immunization of foxes was introduced in 1993. The vaccine is effective when it confers immunity against the virus circulating in the environment. To assess the above issue, a study of the molecular characteristics of 570-bp fragments of the N and G genes of vaccine strains SAD B19 and SAD Bern against street virus strains was performed. The results confirmed the similarity of the vaccine strains and rabies virus strains circulating in the environment and also demonstrate the genetic stability of vaccine strains that have been distributed in Poland for 20 years.

  15. Case report: probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus to an infant via breast milk.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Susan; Twele-Montecinos, Loreto; MacDonald, Judy; Webster, Patricia; Law, Barbara

    2011-03-08

    The 17D yellow fever vaccine is a live-virus vaccine that has been in use since the 1940s. The incidence of encephalitis after yellow fever vaccination among young infants is much higher than among children older than nine months of age. Until recently, avoidance of vaccination by breastfeeding women who have received yellow fever vaccine had been based on theoretical grounds only. We report the probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus from a mother to her infant through breastfeeding.

  16. Enhancing cellulase production by overexpression of xylanase regulator protein gene, xlnR, in Talaromyces cellulolyticus cellulase hyperproducing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Naoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    We obtained strains with the xylanase regulator gene, xlnR, overexpressed (HXlnR) and disrupted (DXlnR) derived from Talaromyces cellulolyticus strain C-1, which is a cellulase hyperproducing mutant. Filter paper degrading enzyme activity and cellobiohydrolase I gene expression was the highest in HXlnR, followed by C-1 and DXlnR. These results indicate that the enhancement of cellulase productivity was succeeded by xlnR overexpression.

  17. Protective immune response of chickens to oral vaccination with thermostable live Fowlpox virus vaccine (strain TPV-1) coated on oiled rice.

    PubMed

    Wambura, Philemon N; Godfrey, S K

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop and evaluate a local vaccine (strain TPV-1) against Fowl pox (FP) in chickens. Two separate groups of chickens were vaccinated with FP vaccine through oral (coated on oiled rice) and wing web stab routes, respectively. The results showed that the haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titres in both vaccinated groups were comparable and significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control chickens. It was further revealed that 14 days after vaccination HI GMT of > or =2 log(2) was recorded in chickens vaccinated by oral and wing web stab routes whereas 35 days after vaccination the HI antibody titres reached 5.6 log(2) and 6.3 log(2), respectively. Moreover, in both groups the birds showed 100% protection against challenge virus at 35 days after vaccination. The findings from the present study have shown that oral route is equally effective as wing web stab route for vaccination of chickens against FP. However, the oral route can be used in mass vaccination of birds thus avoid catching individual birds for vaccination. It was noteworthy that strain TPV-1 virus could be propagated by a simple allantoic cavity inoculation and harvesting of allantoic fluid where it survived exposure at 57 degrees C for 2 hours. If the oral vaccination technique is optimized it may be used in controlling FP in scavenging and feral chickens. In conclusion, the present study has shown that FP vaccine (strain TPV-1) was safe, thermostable, immunogenic and efficacious in vaccinated chickens.

  18. The haematological profile of female bronze turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) vaccinated with various commercial strains of Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elizabeth M d S; Santos, Ivan F C; Paulillo, António C; Martins, Gislaine R V; Denadai, Janine; Lapela, Ivan M

    2014-08-25

    The effects of vaccination on avian blood parameters are poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate whether different strains (Ulster 2C, B1, live LaSota and inactivated LaSota) of Newcastle disease vaccines had an effect on the haematological profile of female turkeys. Seventy-five female turkeys were allocated to treatment groups according to vaccination strain. All the birds, except those in the control group, were vaccinated at 32 weeks of age and revaccinated at 40 and 48 weeks of age. Blood samples were obtained for haematological analyses and serum samples for the haemagglutination inhibition test. Haemoglobin concentration was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in vaccinated female turkeys than in the control birds 28 days after vaccination. Monocytes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in 44-week-old female turkeys vaccinated with inactivated LaSota strain compared with the other groups. Turkeys vaccinated with the B1 strain showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) total white blood cell counts compared with the other groups vaccinated with various commercial strains of the Newcastle disease virus. In conclusion, female turkeys showed significant differences in haemoglobin concentrations, monocytes and white blood cell counts when vaccinated against Newcastle disease.

  19. A Vero-cell-adapted vaccine donor strain of influenza A virus generated by serial passages.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weibin; Zhang, Hong; Han, Qinglin; Li, Li; Chen, Yixin; Xia, Ningshao; Chen, Ze; Shu, Yuelong; Xu, Ke; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-03

    A cell culture-based vaccine production system is preferred for the large-scale production of influenza vaccines and has advantages for generating vaccines against highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. Vero cells have been widely used in human vaccine manufacturing, and the safety of these cells has been well demonstrated. However, the most commonly used influenza-vaccine donor virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) virus, does not grow efficiently in Vero cells. Therefore, we adapted the PR8 virus to Vero cells by continuous passaging, and a high-growth strain was obtained after 20 passages. Sequence analysis and virological assays of the adapted strain revealed that mutations in four viral internal genes (NP, PB1, PA and NS1) were sufficient for adaptation. The recombinant virus harboring these mutations (PR8-4mut) displayed accelerated viral transport into the nucleus and increased RNP activity. Importantly, the PR8-4mut could serve as a backbone donor virus to support the growth of the H7N1, H9N2 and H5N1 avian viruses and the H1N1 and H3N2 human viruses in Vero cells without changing its pathogenicity in either chicken embryos or mice. Thus, our work describes the generation of a Vero-adapted, high-yield PR8-4mut virus that may serve as a promising candidate for an influenza-vaccine donor virus.

  20. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three capripoxvirus vaccine strains against lumpy skin disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gari, Getachew; Abie, Getnet; Gizaw, Daniel; Wubete, Alehegn; Kidane, Membere; Asgedom, Hagos; Bayissa, Berecha; Ayelet, Gelagay; Oura, Christopher A L; Roger, Francois; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M

    2015-06-22

    The safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three commercially available vaccines against lumpy skin disease (LSD) in cattle have been evaluated using a combination of vaccine challenge experiments and the monitoring of immune responses in vaccinated animals in the field. The three vaccines evaluated in the study included two locally produced (Ethiopian) vaccines (lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) Neethling and Kenyan sheep and goat pox (KSGP) O-180 strain vaccines) and a Gorgan goat pox (GTP) vaccine manufactured by Jordan Bio-Industries Centre (JOVAC). The latter vaccine was evaluated for the first time in cattle against LSDV. The Ethiopian Neethling and KSGPO-180 vaccines failed to provide protection in cattle against LSDV, whereas the Gorgan GTP vaccine protected all the vaccinated calves from clinical signs of LSD. There was no significant difference in protective efficacy detected between two dosage levels (P=0.2, P=0.25, and P=0.1 for KSGP, Neethling and Gorgan vaccines, respectively). Additionally, the Gorgan GTP vaccinated cattle showed stronger levels of cellular immune responses measured using Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions at the vaccination site indicating higher levels of immunogenicity produced by the GTPV vaccine in cattle, as opposed to the other two vaccines. This study indicated, for the first time, that the Gorgan GTP vaccine can effectively protect cattle against LSDV and that the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine were not protective. The results emphasise the need for molecular characterization of the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine seed viruses used for vaccine production in Ethiopia. In addition, the potency and efficacy testing process of the Ethiopian LSD Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccines should be re-evaluated.

  1. Functional analysis of an feoB mutant in Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    PubMed

    Awad, Milena M; Cheung, Jackie K; Tan, Joanne E; McEwan, Alastair G; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens have adopted numerous mechanisms for acquiring iron from host proteins during an infection, including the direct acquisition of ferric iron from heme-associated proteins or from iron-scavenging siderophores. Ferric iron then is transported into the cytosol, where it can be utilized by the bacterial pathogen. Under anaerobic conditions bacteria can also transport ferrous iron using the transmembrane complex FeoAB, but little is known about iron transport systems in anaerobic bacteria such as the pathogenic clostridia. In this study we sought to characterize the iron acquisition process in Clostridium perfringens. Bioinformatic analysis of the Clostridium perfringens strain 13 genome sequence revealed that it has seven potential iron acquisition systems: three siderophore-mediated systems, one ferric citrate uptake system, two heme-associated acquisition systems and one ferrous iron uptake system (FeoAB). The relative level of expression of these systems was determined using quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays that were specific for one gene from each system. Each of these genes was expressed, with the feoAB genes generating the most abundant iron-uptake related transcripts. To further examine the role of this system in the growth of C. perfringens, insertional inactivation was used to isolate a chromosomal feoB mutant. Growth of this mutant in the presence and absence of iron revealed that it had altered growth properties and a markedly reduced total iron and manganese content compared to the wild type; effects that were reversed upon complementation with the wild-type feoB gene. These studies suggest that under anaerobic conditions FeoB is the major protein required for the uptake of iron into the cell and that it may play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination.

  3. Genetic Vaccination against Experimental Infection with Myotropic Parasite Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Adriano Fernando; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Ersching, Jonatan; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Machado, Alexandre Vieira; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Soares, Milena Botelho; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies, we reported that a heterologous prime-boost regimen using recombinant plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector, both containing Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding trans-sialidase (TS) and amastigote surface protein (ASP) 2, provided protective immunity against experimental infection with a reticulotropic strain of this human protozoan parasite. Herein, we tested the outcome of genetic vaccination of F1 (CB10XBALB/c) mice challenged with myotropic parasite strains (Brazil and Colombian). Initially, we determined that the coadministration during priming of a DNA plasmid containing the murine IL-12 gene improved the immune response and was essential for protective immunity elicited by the heterologous prime-boost regimen in susceptible male mice against acute lethal infections with these parasites. The prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination of resistant female mice led to a drastic reduction in the number of inflammatory infiltrates in cardiac and skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of infection with either strain. Analysis of the electrocardiographic parameters showed that prophylactic vaccination reduced the frequencies of sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block. Our results confirmed that prophylactic vaccination using the TS and ASP-2 genes benefits the host against acute and chronic pathologies caused by T. cruzi and should be further evaluated for the development of a veterinary or human vaccine against Chagas disease. PMID:25061263

  4. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  5. Comparison of the metabolic activities of four wild-type Clostridium perfringens strains with their gatifloxacin-selected resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Park, Miseon; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Camacho, Luisa

    2009-12-01

    The production of short-chain fatty acids, reductive enzymes, and hydrolytic enzymes by four gatifloxacin-selected, fluoroquinolone-resistant, mutant strains of C. perfringens, with stable mutations either in DNA gyrase or in both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, was compared with that produced by the wild-type parent strains to investigate the effect of mutations associated with the selection of gatifloxacin resistance on bacterial metabolic activities. The mutants differed from their respective wild-type parent strains in the enzymatic activities of azoreductase, nitroreductase, and beta-glucosidase and in the ratio of butyric acid to acetic acid production. Microarray analysis of one wild type and the corresponding mutant revealed different levels of mRNA expression for the enzymes involved in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) synthesis and for beta-glucosidase and oxidoreductases. In addition to mutations in the target genes, selection of resistance to gatifloxacin resulted in strain-specific physiological changes in the resistant mutants of C. perfringens that affected their metabolic activities.

  6. Simplifying multidimensional fermentation dataset analysis and visualization: One step closer to capturing high-quality mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Dan; Jiang, Ting-Ting

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum, an organism used in a broad range of industrial processes related to biofuel production, to facilitate future studies of bioreactor and bioprocess design and scale-up, which are very important research projects for industrial microbiology applications. To accomplish this, we generated 329 mutant strains and applied principal component analysis (PCA) to fermentation data gathered from these strains to identify a core set of independent features for comparison. By doing so, we were able to explain the differences in the mutant strains’ fermentation expression states and simplify the analysis and visualization of the multidimensional datasets related to the strains. Our study has produced a high-efficiency PCA application based on a data analytics tool that is designed to visualize screening results and to support several hundred sets of data on fermentation interactions to assist researchers in more precisely screening and capturing high-quality mutant strains. More importantly, although this study focused on the use of PCA in microbial fermentation engineering, its results are broadly applicable. PMID:28045110

  7. Synthesis of nitrogenase in mutants of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 affected in heterocyst development or metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, A; Black, T; Cai, Y; Panoff, J M; Tiwari, D N; Wolk, C P

    1992-01-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that are incapable of sustained growth with air as the sole source of nitrogen were generated by using Tn5-derived transposons. Nitrogenase was expressed only in mutants that showed obvious morphological signs of heterocyst differentiation. Even under rigorously anaerobic conditions, nitrogenase was not synthesized in filaments that were unable to develop heterocysts. These results suggest that competence to synthesize nitrogenase requires a process that leads to an early stage of visible heterocyst development and are consistent with the idea that synthesis of nitrogenase is under developmental control (J. Elhai and C. P. Wolk, EMBO J. 9:3379-3388, 1990). We isolated mutants in which differentiation was arrested at an intermediate stage of heterocyst formation, suggesting that differentiation proceeds in stages; those mutants, as well as mutants with aberrant heterocyst envelopes and a mutant with defective respiration, expressed active nitrogenase under anaerobic conditions only. These results support the idea that the heterocyst envelope and heterocyst respiration are required for protection of nitrogenase from inactivation by oxygen. In the presence of air, such mutants contained less nitrogenase than under anaerobic conditions, and the Fe-protein was present in a posttranslationally modified inactive form. We conclude that internal partial oxygen pressure sufficient to inactivate nitrogenase is insufficient to repress synthesis of the enzyme completely. Among mutants with an apparently intact heterocyst envelope and normal respiration, three had virtually undetectable levels of dinitrogenase reductase under all conditions employed. However, three others expressed oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase activity, suggesting that respiration and barrier to diffusion of gases may not suffice for oxygen protection of nitrogenase in these mutants; two of these mutants reduced acetylene to ethylene and ethane. Images PMID:1328150

  8. The Annona muricata leaf ethanol extract affects mobility and reproduction in mutant strain NB327 Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bustos, A V Gualteros; Jiménez, M Gómez; Mora, R M Sánchez

    2017-07-01

    The C. elegans NB327 mutant strain is characterized for the knockdown of the dic-1 gene. The dic-1 gene is homologous to the dice-1 gene in humans, encoding the protein DICE-1 as a tumor suppressor. Absence or under-regulation of the dice-1 gene can be reflected in lung and prostate cancer [17], [18]. This study evaluated the effect of EEAML on the C. elegans NB327 mutant strain. Phenotypic aspects such as morphology, body length, locomotion, and reproductive behaviour were analyzed. It is important to emphasize that the strain presents a phenotype characteristic with respect to egg laying and hatching. Reported studies showed that Annona muricata extract and its active components evidence anti-cancer and anti-tumor effects, through experimentation in vivo and in vitro models. However, neurotoxicity has been reported as a side effect. The results showed that the mutant strain NB327 was exposed to EEAML (5 mg/ml) concentration, it showed a significant decrease in average locomotion, resulting in 13 undulations in 30 s. This contrasts with the control strain's 17.5 undulations in 30 s. Similarly, the number of progenies was reduced from 188 progenies (control strain) to 114 and 92 progenies at the dose of (1 mg/ml and 5 mg/m) EEAML. The results of this study suggest that EEAML has a possible neurotoxic effect in concentrations equal to or greater than 5 mg/ml. Also, it does not have positive effects on the mutant strain of Caenorhabditis elegans NB327 phenotype.

  9. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Choice of High-Efficacy Strains for the Annual Influenza Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a model of protein evolution to explain limitations in the immune system response to vaccination and disease [1]. The phenomenon of original antigenic sin, wherein vaccination creates memory sequences that can increase susceptibility to future exposures to the same disease, is explained as stemming from localization of the immune system response in antibody sequence space. This localization is a result of the roughness in sequence space of the evolved antibody affinity constant for antigen and is observed for diseases with high year-to-year mutation rates, such as influenza. We show that the order parameter within this theory correlates well with efficacies of the H3N2 influenza A component of the annual vaccine between 1971 and 2004 [2,3]. This new measure of antigenic distance predicts vaccine efficacy significantly more accurately than do current state-of-the-art phylogenetic sequence analyses or ferret antisera inhibition assays. We discuss how this new measure of antigenic distance may be used in the context of annual influenza vaccine design and monitoring of vaccine efficacy. 1) M. W. Deem and H. Y. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 068101. 2) E. T. Munoz and M. W. Deem,q-bio.BM/0408016. 3) V. Gupta, D. J. Earl, and M. W. Deem, ``Choice of High-Efficacy Strains for the Annual Influenza Vaccine,'' submitted.

  11. Microevolution of type 3 Sabin strain of poliovirus in cell cultures and its implications for oral poliovirus vaccine quality control.

    PubMed

    Rezapkin, G V; Norwood, L P; Taffs, R E; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S; Chumakov, K M

    1995-08-20

    Screening for sequence heterogeneities in Sabin Type 3 strains of attenuated poliovirus demonstrated mutations that consistently accumulate to significant levels following 10 passages in cultures of primary African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells or continuous cultures of Vero cells. Fourteen newly identified mutations were quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage in passages and in batches of commercial vaccines made in AGMK and Vero cells from the Sabin original (SO) seed virus and from a seed virus rederived by RNA plaque purification (RSO or "Pfizer" seed). Nine of the 14 mutations were reproducibly observed in more than one series of passages. Although 5 other mutations were observed in only one set of passages each, their content gradually increased to a high percentage, suggesting that all the mutations that we found accumulated consistently. SO-derived samples accumulated more mutations than did RSO-derived ones, and the number of mutations and the rates of their accumulation were higher in Vero than in AGMK cells. While the rates of accumulation of most mutations were higher when passaging was performed at 37 degrees, a U-->C transition at nucleotide 5832 occurred faster at 34 degrees, the temperature used for vaccine production. Analysis of Type 3 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) monopools made by six manufacturers found only 5 of these newly identified mutations in vaccine batches (nucleotides 3956, 4935, 5357, 5788, and 5832). Some of the mutations were found in trace amounts (less than 0.1%) while others were present at up to 1.8% levels. The pattern of these mutations was characteristic for the type of seed virus and the cell substrate but demonstrated no correlation with results of the monkey neurovirulence test. Therefore the only mutation occurring in Type 3 OPV which contributed to neurovirulence in monkeys was the previously described reversion at nucleotide 472. Quantitation of reversion at nucleotide 472 can be

  12. Oral vaccination against bubonic plague using a live avirulent Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain.

    PubMed

    Blisnick, Thierry; Ave, Patrick; Huerre, Michel; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the possibility of using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a live vaccine against plague because it shares high genetic identity with Y. pestis while being much less virulent, genetically much more stable, and deliverable orally. A total of 41 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were screened by PCR for the absence of the high pathogenicity island, the superantigens YPM, and the type IV pilus and the presence of the pYV virulence plasmid. One strain (IP32680) fulfilled these criteria. This strain was avirulent in mice upon intragastric or subcutaneous inoculation and persisted for 2 months in the mouse intestine without clinical signs of disease. IP32680 reached the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver without causing major histological lesions and was cleared after 13 days. The antibodies produced in vaccinated animals recognized both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis antigens efficiently. After a subcutaneous challenge with Y. pestis CO92, bacteria were found in low amounts in the organs and rarely in the blood of vaccinated animals. One oral IP32680 inoculation protected 75% of the mice, and two inoculations induced much higher antibody titers and protected 88% of the mice. Our results thus validate the concept that an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain can be an efficient, inexpensive, safe, and easy-to-produce live vaccine for oral immunization against bubonic plague.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  14. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant Y30A-Y196A as a recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Hall, Charlotte A.; Vance, Charlotte; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Savva, Christos G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Basak, Ajit K.; Moss, David S.; Titball, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens toxinotypes B and D and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxemia, a severe, often fatal disease of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to the farming industry worldwide. This study aimed to determine the potential of a site-directed mutant of Etx (Y30A-Y196A) to be exploited as a recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. Replacement of Y30 and Y196 with alanine generated a stable variant of Etx with significantly reduced cell binding and cytotoxic activities in MDCK.2 cells relative to wild type toxin (>430-fold increase in CT50) and Y30A-Y196A was inactive in mice after intraperitoneal administration of trypsin activated toxin at 1000× the expected LD50 dose of trypsin activated wild type toxin. Moreover, polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against Y30A-Y196A provided protection against wild type toxin in an in vitro neutralisation assay. These data suggest that Y30A-Y196A mutant could form the basis of an improved recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. PMID:24709588

  15. The effect of gamma irradiation on astaxanthin synthetase encoding gene in two mutant strains of Phaffia rhodozyma

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Naeimeh; Hosseini, Ramin; Ahmadi, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Astaxanthin, an orange-red carotenoid pigment, acts as a protective agent against oxidative damage to cells in vivo. The astaxanthin synthetase gene (crtS) size consists of 3995 bp. This gene has been suggested to catalyse β-carotene to astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma. The aim of this research was to find any possible changes in this gene in two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 (with high astaxanthin pigment production), previously created by gamma irradiation. Materials and Methods The astaxanthin synthetase gene sequence of Phaffia rhodozyma in the NCBI Gene bank was used to design primer. In Gam1, this gene was amplified using primers Asta F1, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R4. In Gam2, primers asta F1, asta R4 were used to amplify the gene. The amplified fragments were 8 sequenced using primers Asta F1, Asta R1, Asta F2, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R3 and Asta F4, Asta R4. Astaxanthin synthetase gene from two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 were amplified using PCR. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using the ClustalW software. Conclusion The comparison of this gene showed 98% and 99% similarities between the reference sequence and Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains, respectively, whereas the comparison of this gene in Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains showed 97% similarity. However, the deduced proteins showed 78% and 83% between the reference protein obtained from the wild type and Gam1 and Gam2, respectively. This similarity was 75% between the mutant strains. PMID:24475339

  16. Evaluation of vaccine candidate potential of deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Hansda, Dhananjoy; Alam, Javed; Babu, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Mehtab Z; Agrawal, Ravi K; Sharma, Gautam

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi), a host adapted Salmonella causes abortions, still births and foal mortality in equids. Though known since more than 100 years, it is still a problem in many of the developing countries including India. There is dearth of really good vaccine affording immunity lasting at least for one full gestation. In search of a potential vaccine candidate, three defined deletion mutants (deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA) of S. Abortusequi were tested in guinea pig model for attenuation, safety, immunogenicity, humoral immune response, protective efficacy and persistence in host. The deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants were found to be safe on oral inoculation in doses as high as 4.2 x 10(9) cfu/animal. Also through subcutaneous inoculation deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant did not induce any abortion in pregnant guinea pigs. All the three mutants did not induce any illness or death in 1-2 week-old baby guinea pigs except deltahtrA mutant which caused mortality on intraperitoneal inoculation. Inoculation with mutants protected against challenge and increased breeding efficiency of guinea pigs. After >4.5 months of mutant inoculation, guinea pigs were protected against abortifacient dose of wild type S. Abortusequi and mother guinea pigs also conferred resistance to their babies to the similar challenge. Early humoral immune response of S. Abortusequi mutants was characteristic. Faecal excretion of deltaaroA and htrA mutants was detected up to 45 days of inoculation in guinea pigs while deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant could not be detected after 21 days of inoculation. The results indicated that the double deletion mutant (deltaaroAdeltahtrA) was the most effective and safe candidate for vaccination against S. Abortusequi through mucosal route of inoculation.

  17. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  18. Cellulase production and saccharification of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1.

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-01-01

    The production of cellulase using solid-state fermentation of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1 was studied. Optimization of culture conditions, such as the nitrogen source, pH, and temperature, resulted in a maximum filter paper cellulase activity of 44.15 U g(-1) substrate, a carboxymethylcellulase activity of 324.6 U g(-1) substrate, and a β-glucosidase activity of 7.45 U g(-1) substrate. Saccharification of untreated, 1% H(2)SO(4)-treated, and 2.5% NaOH-treated rice straw using the RSC1 cellulase resulted in 19, 17, and 34 g L(-1) of reducing sugar, respectively. Further studies on the morphological and compositional changes of rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase by scanning electron microscopy analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the disruption of the arrangement of fibers and changes in the functional groups that occur in cellulose. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a reduction in crystallinity of the rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase. Our study shows that H. koningii RSC1 could be a good choice for the production of cellulase and reducing sugars from rice straw.

  19. Screening vaccine candidate strains against Streptococcus agalactiae of tilapia based on PFGE genotype.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Rui; Li, Li-Ping; Liang, Wan-Wen; Li, Jian; Huang, Yan; Lei, Ai-Ying; Huang, Wei-Yi; Gan, Xi

    2012-09-14

    The immunogenicity identification of epidemic strain is important for the development and application of vaccine. In this study, 85 Streptococcus agalactiae prevalent strains from the tilapia main cultured areas of China were distributed among 10 distinct PFGE genotypes (A-J). For each genotype, one representative strain (S.a(A)-S.a(J)) was selected to develop an inactivated whole-cell bacterial vaccine (V(A)-V(J)), which then underwent a protective immunity test. V(A)-V(J) showed similar relative percent survival (RPS) to the homologous or heterologous strains with the identical genotype, while the average RPS among V(A)-V(J) protecting against itself genotype strains showed large differences (44.71-98.81%). The RPS of V(A)-V(J) vaccinated fish against infections by the mixture of S.a(A)-S.a(J) at 15 days post vaccination (dpv) was ranged from 13.33% to 60.00%, and V(B), V(D), V(F), and V(G) showed the highest RPS of 60.00%, 46.67%, 53.33% and 60.00% respectively. V(B), V(D) and V(G) have their own specific protection scope, V(B) showed strong protective immunity to infections caused by A-D, F, G and J (53.57-100%), and V(G) showed strong protective immunity to C-H and J (50.00-100%), whereas V(D) showed weak protective immunity to all non-self genotype strains (14.81-36.67%). The results of the combined vaccination showed that V(G)+V(B) group had wider protection scope and higher RPS value than V(G)+V(D) group. Our results demonstrated that the protective immunity of S. agalactiae from tilapia was not only associated with their serotypes, but also related to their PFGE genotypes. It is difficult to acquire a single vaccine candidate strain that can protect against all genotype strains from the same serotype.

  20. Comparison of Antigenic Dominants of VP7 in G9 and G1 Rotavirus Strains Circulating in La Rioja, Argentina, with the Vaccine Strains.

    PubMed

    Cuffia, Valeria I; Díaz Ariza, María Del Carmen; Silvera, Alejandro; Sabini, Liliana I; Cordoba, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    A massive vaccination in Argentina was implemented recently. The antigenic dominants of VP7 in G9 and G1 rotavirus strains, circulating in La Rioja, Argentina with strain vaccines were compared. From 2000 to 2010 in several attention centers of La Rioja, at northwestern Argentina, 418 stool samples from children younger than 5 years old were collected. Ninety were positive by immunochromatography and 51 were genotyped by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction followed by nested-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with type-specific primers. Six G9 strains and four G1 strains were sequenced by MACROGEN Korea. The phylogenetic analysis was conducted in MEGA 6.0. The 940 bp were aligned using CLUSTALW and the tree was inferred using the UPGMA method. The antigenic dominants of VP7, 7-1a, 7-1b, and 7-2 were studied using BioEdit, 7.2.5. In the comparison between G9-lineage III d rotavirus (RV) strains circulating in La Rioja with ROTAVAC vaccine strain, three differences were detected corresponding to 100, 211, and 145 positions. In the comparison between G1-Lineage 1 strains and G1 Rotarix and G1 RotaTeq, three differences were observed in 94, 123, and 217 positions. All these positions were important for the escape to neutralization for study with monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, the differences between the G1 strains in La Rioja, Argentina and the G1 components of the RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccine strains are few, but important for the escape immunologic, and need to be monitored for appropriate evaluation of long-term impact of vaccine used in Argentina. Nevertheless, the VP7 antigenic regions of G9 RV strains circulating in La Rioja and ROTAVAC vaccine strains are different to other zones of Argentina and could play an important role in the failure of vaccine response in these regions and Argentina.

  1. Vaccination-challenge studies with a Port Chalmers/73 (H3N2)-based swine influenza virus vaccine: Reflections on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Qiu, Yu; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-05-11

    The human A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2) influenza virus strain, the supposed ancestor of European H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), was used in most commercial SIV vaccines in Europe until recently. If manufacturers want to update vaccine strains, they have to perform laborious intratracheal (IT) challenge experiments and demonstrate reduced virus titres in the lungs of vaccinated pigs. We aimed to examine (a) the ability of a Port Chalmers/73-based commercial vaccine to induce cross-protection against a contemporary European H3N2 SIV and serologic cross-reaction against H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America and (b) the validity of intranasal (IN) challenge and virus titrations of nasal swabs as alternatives for IT challenge and titrations of lung tissue in vaccine potency tests. Pigs were vaccinated with Suvaxyn Flu(®) and challenged by the IT or IN route with sw/Gent/172/08. Post-vaccination sera were examined in haemagglutination-inhibition assays against vaccine and challenge strains and additional H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America, including an H3N2 variant virus. Tissues of the respiratory tract and nasal swabs were collected 3 days post challenge (DPCh) and from 0-7 DPCh, respectively, and examined by virus titration. Two vaccinations consistently induced cross-reactive antibodies against European H3N2 SIVs from 1998-2012, but minimal or undetectable antibody titres against North American viruses. Challenge virus titres in the lungs, trachea and nasal mucosa of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced after both IT and IN challenge. Yet the reduction of virus titres and nasal shedding was greater after IT challenge. The Port Chalmers/73-based vaccine still offered protection against a European H3N2 SIV isolated 35 years later and with only 86.9% amino acid homology in its HA1, but it is unlikely to protect against H3N2 SIVs that are endemic in North America. We use our data to reflect on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

  2. Genetic and antigenic analyses of a Puumala virus isolate as a potential vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Abu Daude, Nur Hardy; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Tkachenko, Evgeniy; Dzagurnova, Tamara; Medvedkina, Olga; Tkachenko, Petr; Ishizuka, Mariko; Seto, Takahiro; Miyashita, Daisuke; Sanada, Takahiro; Nakauchi, Mina; Yoshii, Kentaro; Maeda, Akihiko; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo

    2008-11-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), is prevalent in Europe and European Russia. No vaccine has been developed for PUUV-associated HFRS, primarily because of the low viral yield in cultured cells. A PUUV strain known as DTK/Ufa-97 was isolated in Russia and adapted for growth in Vero E6 cells maintained in serum-free medium. The DTK/Ufa-97 strain produced a higher viral titer in serum-free medium, suggesting that it may prove useful in the development of an HFRS vaccine. When PUUV-infected Vero E6 cells were grown in serum-free medium, the DTK/Ufa-97 strain yielded more copies of intracellular viral RNA and a higher viral titer in the culture fluid than did the Sotkamo strain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PUUVs can be classified into multiple lineages according to geographical origin, and that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is a member of the Bashkiria-Saratov lineage. The deduced amino acid sequences of the small, medium, and large segments of the DTK/Ufa-97 strain were 99.2% to 100%, 99.3% to 99.8%, and 99.8% identical, respectively, to those of the Bashkirian PUUV strains and 96.9%, 92.6%, and 97.4% identical, respectively, to those of the Sotkamo strain, indicating that the PUUVs are genetically diverse. However, DTK/Ufa-97 and other strains of PUUV exhibited similar patterns of binding to a panel of monoclonal antibodies against Hantaan virus. In addition, diluted antisera (i.e., ranging from 1:160 to 1:640) specific to three strains of PUUV neutralized both homologous and heterologous viruses. These results suggest that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is capable of extensive growth and is antigenically similar to genetically distant strains of PUUV.

  3. Evaluation of a thermostable Newcastle disease virus strain TS09-C as an in-ovo vaccine for chickens

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qingzhong; Wang, Hongling; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Tengfei; Zhang, Rongrong; Zhang, Wanpo; Shao, Huabin

    2017-01-01

    In-ovo vaccination is an attractive immunization approach for poultry industry. However, most of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine strains used after hatch are unsafe, as in-ovo vaccines, due to their high pathogenicity for chicken embryos. In this study, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a thermostable NDV strain TS09-C, derived from V4 strain, as in-ovo vaccine. Chickens in-ovo vaccinated with the parental V4 strain displayed greatly reduced hatchability and severe histopathological lesions in both trachea and intestine tissues, while the hatchability was not affected by in-ovo vaccination withTS09-C strain. The safe dose that infected all chicken embryos without obviously histopathological lesions was 103.0 EID50 per bird. In-ovo vaccination of chickens with TS09-C virus conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge. Results suggest that the thermostable NDV strain TS09-C is a safe and immunogenic in-ovo vaccine candidate that can be delivered quickly and uniformly, and induce earlier immune response. PMID:28234989

  4. How direct competition shapes coexistence and vaccine effects in multi-strain pathogen systems.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Valente, Carina; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Gomes, M Gabriela M

    2016-01-07

    We describe an integrated modeling framework for understanding strain coexistence in polymorphic pathogen systems. Previous studies have debated the utility of neutral formulations and focused on cross-immunity between strains as a major stabilizing mechanism. Here we convey that direct competition for colonization mediates stable coexistence only when competitive abilities amongst pathogen clones satisfy certain pairwise asymmetries. We illustrate our ideas with nested SIS models of single and dual colonization, applied to polymorphic pneumococcal bacteria. By fitting the models to cross-sectional prevalence data from Portugal (before and after the introduction of a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine), we are able to not only statistically compare neutral and non-neutral epidemiological formulations, but also estimate vaccine efficacy, transmission and competition parameters simultaneously. Our study highlights that the response of polymorphic pathogen populations to interventions holds crucial information about strain interactions, which can be extracted by suitable nested modeling.

  5. Vaccination with a BCG Strain Overexpressing Ag85B Protects Cattle against Mycobacterium bovis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, Caroline; Bianco, María Verónica; Blanco, Federico Carlos; Soria, Marcelo; Gravisaco, María José; Montenegro, Valeria; Vagnoni, Lucas; Buddle, Bryce; Garbaccio, Sergio; Delgado, Fernando; Leal, Karen Silva; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Bigi, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle but also infects other animals, including humans. Previous studies in cattle have demonstrated that the protection induced by BCG is not complete. In order to improve the protection efficacy of BCG, in this study we overexpressed Ag85B in a BCG Pasteur strain, by using an expression system based on the use of an auxotrophic strain for the leucine amino acid, and complementation with leuD. We found that vaccination of cattle with BCG overexpressing Ag85B induced higher production of IL-17 and IL-4 mRNA upon purified protein derivative (PPDB) stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than vaccination with BCG. Moreover, the IL-17 mRNA expression after vaccination negatively correlated with disease severity resulting from a subsequent challenge with M. bovis, suggesting that this cytokine is a potential biomarker of cattle protection against bovine tuberculosis. Importantly, vaccination with the recombinant BCG vaccine protected cattle better than the wild-type BCG Pasteur. PMID:23251517

  6. In vitro induction and selection of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of Streptococcus pyogenes strains with multiple emm types.

    PubMed

    Billal, Dewan S; Fedorko, Daniel P; Yan, S Steve; Hotomi, Muneki; Fujihara, Keiji; Nelson, Nancy; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2007-01-01

    To perform a systematic analysis of point mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase genes of emm type 6 and other emm types of Streptococcus pyogenes strains after in vitro exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations of levofloxacin. Twelve parent strains of S. pyogenes, each with a different emm type, were chosen for stepwise exposure to increasing levels of levofloxacin followed by selection of resistant mutants. The QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE correlating to mutants with increased MICs were analysed for point mutations. Multiple mutants with significantly increased MICs were generated from each strain. The amino acid substitutions identified were consistent regardless of emm type and were similar to the mechanisms of resistance reported in clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. The number of induction/selection cycles required for the emergence of key point mutations in gyrA and parC was variable among strains. For each parent-mutant set, when MIC increased, serine-81 of gyrA and serine-79 of parC were the primary targets for amino acid substitutions. No point mutations were found in the QRDRs of gyrB and parE in any of the resistant mutants sequenced. Despite its intrinsic polymorphism in the QRDR of parC, emm type 6 is not more likely to develop high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones when compared with other emm types. All emm types seem equally inducible to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.

  7. Genetic characterization of vaccine and field strains of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus from India.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, J K; Pawar, S S; Tosh, C; Subramaniam, S; Palsamy, R; Sanyal, A; Hemadri, D; Pattnaik, B

    2011-01-01

    Extreme antigenic and genetic heterogeneity of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) population has resulted in change of vaccine strains in India twice in the last decade. In such a situation, complete characterization of the vaccine strains is imperative. With regard to the frequent outbreaks of this disease, FMDV field strains are also of interest. Therefore three vaccine strains and two field strains of type A FMDV from India were completely sequenced and the obtained sequences were subjected to sequence and phylogenetic analyses. Based on the complete coding region, all the Indian strains clustered in the Asia topotype and exhibited a more than 11% nt divergence from the other Asian strains. The 5'-UTR of some Indian strains revealed block deletions of 43 and 86 nt corresponding to the pseudoknot region. Amino acids S44 in VP2 and F164 in VP1 were found to be the exclusive signatures for the Asia topotype. The vaccine strains differed at 65 aa positions in the capsid region, 13 of them antigenically critical. Variability at such positions is likely to affect the antigenic profile of these strains. Complete genome sequences of the vaccine strains presented here could serve as the reference for any comparative genomics in future.

  8. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  9. Propagation of the Israeli vaccine strain of Anaplasma centrale in tick cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Palomar, Ana M; Bradford, Emma L; Shkap, Varda

    2015-09-30

    Anaplasma centrale has been used in cattle as a live blood vaccine against the more pathogenic Anaplasma marginale for over 100 years. While A. marginale can be propagated in vitro in tick cell lines, facilitating studies on antigen production, immunisation and vector-pathogen interaction, to date there has been no in vitro culture system for A. centrale. In the present study, 25 cell lines derived from 13 ixodid tick species were inoculated with the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale and monitored for at least 12 weeks by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained cytocentrifuge smears. Infection of 19 tick cell lines was subsequently attempted by transfer of cell-free supernate from vaccine-inoculated tick cells. In two separate experiments, rickettsial inclusions were detected in cultures of the Rhipicephalus appendiculatus cell line RAE25 28-32 days following inoculation with the vaccine. Presence of A. centrale in the RAE25 cells was confirmed by PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA, groEL and msp4 genes; sequenced PCR products were 100% identical to published sequences of the respective genes in the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale. A. centrale was taken through three subcultures in RAE25 cells over a 30 week period. In a single experiment, the Dermacentor variabilis cell line DVE1 was also detectably infected with A. centrale 11 weeks after inoculation with the vaccine. Availability of an in vitro culture system for A. centrale in tick cells opens up the possibility of generating a safer and more ethical vaccine for bovine anaplasmosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamics of Photosynthesis in a Glycogen-Deficient glgC Mutant of Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Simon A.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial glycogen-deficient mutants display impaired degradation of light-harvesting phycobilisomes under nitrogen-limiting growth conditions and secrete a suite of organic acids as a putative reductant-spilling mechanism. This genetic background, therefore, represents an important platform to better understand the complex relationships between light harvesting, photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and carbon/nitrogen metabolisms. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of photosynthesis as a function of reductant sink manipulation in a glycogen-deficient glgC mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The glgC mutant showed increased susceptibility to photoinhibition during the initial phase of nitrogen deprivation. However, after extended periods of nitrogen deprivation, glgC mutant cells maintained higher levels of photosynthetic activity than the wild type, supporting continuous organic acid secretion in the absence of biomass accumulation. In contrast to the wild type, the glgC mutant maintained efficient energy transfer from phycobilisomes to photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers, had an elevated PSII/PSI ratio as a result of reduced PSII degradation, and retained a nitrogen-replete-type ultrastructure, including an extensive thylakoid membrane network, after prolonged nitrogen deprivation. Together, these results suggest that multiple global signals for nitrogen deprivation are not activated in the glgC mutant, allowing the maintenance of active photosynthetic complexes under conditions where photosynthesis would normally be abolished. PMID:26150450

  11. Mutant strains of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis to increase the efficiency of micro-ecological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Igor

    The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an advanced idea for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). Despite the hostility of both lunar and Martian environments to unprotected life, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic bacteria using closed bioreactors illuminated and heated by solar energy. Such reactors might be employed in critical processes, e.g. air revitalization, foodcaloric and protein source, as well as an immunomodulators production. The MELiSSA team suggested cyanobacterium Spirulina as most appropriate agent to revitalize air and produce a simple "fast" food. This is right suggestion because Spirulina was recently shown to be an oxygenic organism with the highest level of O2 production per unit mass (Ananyev et al., 2005). Chemical composition of Spirulina includes proteins (55Aiming to make Spirulina cultivation in life support systems like MELiSSA more efficient, we selected Spirulina mutant strains with increased fraction of methionine in the biomass of this cyanobacterium and compared the effect of parental wild strain of Spirulina and its mutants on the tendency of such experimental illnesses as radiationinduced lesions and hemolythic anemia. Results: It was found that mutant strains 198B and 27G contain higher quantities of total protein, essential amino acids, c-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a than parental wild strain of S. platensis. The strain 198B is also characterized with increased content of carotenoids. Revealed biochemical peculiarities of mutant strains suggest that these strains can serve as an additional source of essential amino acids as well as phycobiliproteins and carotenoids for the astronauts. Feeding animals suffering from radiation-induced lesions, c-phycocyanin, extracted from strain 27G, led to a correction in deficient dehydrogenase activity and energy-rich phosphate levels

  12. Review of Meningococcal Group B Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    No broadly effective vaccines are available for prevention of group B meningococcal disease, which account for > 50% of all cases. The group B capsule is an autoantigen and is not a suitable vaccine target. Outer-membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines appear to be safe and effective but serum bactericidal (SBA) responses of infants are specific for a porin protein (PorA), which is antigenically variable. To broaden protection, OMV vaccines have been prepared from more than 1 strain; from mutants with more than 1 PorA; or mutants with genetically detoxified endotoxin and overexpressed desirable antigens such as factor H-binding protein (fHbp). Also, recombinant protein vaccines such as fHbp, given alone or combined with other antigens, are in late-stage clinical development and may be effective against the majority of group B strains. Thus, the prospects have never been better for developing vaccines for prevention of meningococcal disease, including group B strains. PMID:20144017

  13. Molecular characteristics of Polish field strains of Marek's disease herpesvirus isolated from vaccinated chickens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Twenty-nine Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains were isolated during a 3 year period (2007-2010) from vaccinated and infected chicken flocks in Poland. These strains had caused severe clinical symptoms and lesions. In spite of proper vaccination with mono- or bivalent vaccines against Marek's disease (MD), the chickens developed symptoms of MD with paralysis. Because of this we decided to investigate possible changes and mutations in the field strains that could potentially increase their virulence. We supposed that such mutations may have been caused by recombination with retroviruses of poultry - especially reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV). Methods In order to detect the possible reasons of recent changes in virulence of MDV strains, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses for meq oncogene and for long-terminal repeat (LTR) region of REV were conducted. The obtained PCR products were sequenced and compared with other MDV and REV strains isolated worldwide and accessible in the GeneBank database. Results Sequencing of the meq oncogene showed a 68 basepair insertion and frame shift within 12 of 24 field strains. Interestingly, the analyses also showed 0.78, 0.8, 0.82, 1.6 kb and other random LTR-REV insertions into the MDV genome in 28 of 29 of strains. These genetic inserts were present after passage in chicken embryo kidney cells suggesting LTR integration into a non-functional region of the MDV genome. Conclusion The results indicate the presence of a recombination between MDV and REV under field conditions in Polish chicken farms. The genetic changes within the MDV genome may influence the virus replication and its features in vivo. However, there is no evidence that meq alteration and REV insertions are related to the strains' virulence. PMID:21320336

  14. Antigen sparing with adjuvanted inactivated polio vaccine based on Sabin strains

    PubMed Central

    Westdijk, Janny; Koedam, Patrick; Barro, Mario; Steil, Benjamin P.; Collin, Nicolas; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; van der Ley, Peter; Kersten, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Six different adjuvants, each in combination with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) produced with attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), were evaluated for their ability to enhance virus neutralizing antibody titers (VNTs) in the rat potency model. The increase of VNTs was on average 3-, 15-, 24-fold with adjuvants after one immunization (serotype 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Also after a boost immunization the VNTs of adjuvanted sIPV were on average another 7- 20- 27 times higher than after two inoculations of sIPV without adjuvant. The results indicate that it is feasible to increase the potency of inactivated polio vaccines by using adjuvants. PMID:23313617

  15. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  16. The live attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae triple-deletion mutant ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1 strain, SLW05, Immunizes pigs against lethal challenge with Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng

    2013-02-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine.

  17. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  18. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-06-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism.

  19. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-01-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism. PMID:3570471

  20. Phenotypic analysis of mutant and overexpressing strains of lipid metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: implication in growth at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, María; Chiva, Rosana; Rozes, Nicolas; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The growing demand for wines with a more pronounced aromatic profile calls for low temperature alcoholic fermentations (10-15°C). However, there are certain drawbacks to low temperature fermentations such as reduced growth rate, long lag phase and sluggish or stuck fermentations. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. The aim of this study was to detect lipid metabolism genes involved in cold adaptation. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts in phospholipids, sterols and sphingolipids, from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4742 strain at low and optimal temperatures. Growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted or overexpressed in a derivative haploid of a commercial wine strain. We identified genes involved in the phospholipid (PSD1 and OPI3), sterol (ERG3 and IDI1) and sphingolipid (LCB3) pathways, whose deletion strongly impaired growth at low temperature and whose overexpression reduced generation or division time by almost half. Our study also reveals many phenotypic differences between the laboratory strain and the commercial wine yeast strain, showing the importance of constructing mutant and overexpressing strains in both genetic backgrounds. The phenotypic differences in the mutant and overexpressing strains were correlated with changes in their lipid composition. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Construction and Evaluation of V. cholerae O139 Mutant, VCUSM21P, as a Safe Live Attenuated Cholera Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Murugaiah, Chandrika; Nik Mohd Noor, Nik Zuraina; Mustafa, Shyamoli; Manickam, Ravichandran; Pattabhiraman, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is a major infectious disease, affecting millions of lives annually. In endemic areas, implementation of vaccination strategy against cholera is vital. As the use of safer live vaccine that can induce protective immunity against Vibrio cholerae O139 infection is a promising approach for immunization, we have designed VCUSM21P, an oral cholera vaccine candidate, which has ctxA that encodes A subunit of ctx and mutated rtxA/C, ace and zot mutations. VCUSM21P was found not to disassemble the actin of HEp2 cells. It colonized the mice intestine approximately 1 log lower than that of the Wild Type (WT) strain obtained from Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. In the ileal loop assay, unlike WT challenge, 1×106 and 1×108 colony forming unit (CFU) of VCUSM21P was not reactogenic in non-immunized rabbits. Whereas, the reactogenicity caused by the WT in rabbits immunized with 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P was found to be reduced as evidenced by absence of fluid in loops administered with 1×102–1×107 CFU of WT. Oral immunization using 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P induced both IgA and IgG against Cholera Toxin (CT) and O139 lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The serum vibriocidal antibody titer had a peak rise of 2560 fold on week 4. Following Removable Intestinal Tie Adult Rabbit Diarrhoea (RITARD) experiment, the non-immunized rabbits were found not to be protected against lethal challenge with 1×109 CFU WT, but 100% of immunized rabbits survived the challenge. In the past eleven years, V. cholerae O139 induced cholera has not been observed. However, attenuated VCUSM21P vaccine could be used for vaccination program against potentially fatal endemic or emerging cholera caused by V. cholerae O139. PMID:24505241

  2. Development and Characterization of recA Mutants of Campylobacter jejuni for Inclusion in Attenuated Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    993. ol-o936 tinuet Nach .amkin, M. J. Blaser, and L. S. Tompkins (ed.), Campylobacier C~ampylobacterjejuni in the initiation of Guillain - Barre syndrome...colitis, reactive arthritis, and Guillain - An alternative approach to enteric vaccines is the develop- Barr6 syndrome (5. 36). An estimated 400 million

  3. Characterization of a vraG Mutant in a Genetically Stable Staphylococcus aureus Small-Colony Variant and Preliminary Assessment for Use as a Live-Attenuated Vaccine against Intrammamary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Gravel, Julie; Brouillette, Eric; Obradović, Nataša; Ster, Céline; Talbot, Brian G.; Malouin, François

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bovine intramammary infections (IMIs) that can evolve into difficult-to-treat chronic mastitis. To date, no vaccine formulation has shown high protective efficacy against S. aureus IMI, partly because this bacterium can efficiently evade the immune system. For instance, S. aureus small colony variants (SCVs) have intracellular abilities and can persist without producing invasive infections. As a first step towards the development of a live vaccine, this study describes the elaboration of a novel attenuated mutant of S. aureus taking advantage of the SCV phenotype. A genetically stable SCV was created through the deletion of the hemB gene, impairing its ability to adapt and revert to the invasive phenotype. Further attenuation was obtained through inactivation of gene vraG (SACOL0720) which we previously showed to be important for full virulence during bovine IMIs. After infection of bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), the double mutant (ΔvraGΔhemB) was less internalized and caused less cell destruction than that seen with ΔhemB and ΔvraG, respectively. In a murine IMI model, the ΔvraGΔhemB mutant was strongly attenuated, with a reduction of viable counts of up to 5-log10 CFU/g of mammary gland when compared to the parental strain. A complete clearance of ΔvraGΔhemB from glands was observed whereas mortality rapidly (48h) occurred with the wild-type strain. Immunization of mice using subcutaneous injections of live ΔvraGΔhemB raised a strong immune response as judged by the high total IgG titers measured against bacterial cell extracts and by the high IgG2a/IgG1 ratio observed against the IsdH protein. Also, ΔvraGΔhemB had sufficient common features with bovine mastitis strains so that the antibody response also strongly recognized strains from a variety of mastitis associated spa types. This double mutant could serve as a live-attenuated component in vaccines to improve cell-mediated immune responses

  4. Characterization of a vraG Mutant in a Genetically Stable Staphylococcus aureus Small-Colony Variant and Preliminary Assessment for Use as a Live-Attenuated Vaccine against Intrammamary Infections.

    PubMed

    Côté-Gravel, Julie; Brouillette, Eric; Obradović, Nataša; Ster, Céline; Talbot, Brian G; Malouin, François

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bovine intramammary infections (IMIs) that can evolve into difficult-to-treat chronic mastitis. To date, no vaccine formulation has shown high protective efficacy against S. aureus IMI, partly because this bacterium can efficiently evade the immune system. For instance, S. aureus small colony variants (SCVs) have intracellular abilities and can persist without producing invasive infections. As a first step towards the development of a live vaccine, this study describes the elaboration of a novel attenuated mutant of S. aureus taking advantage of the SCV phenotype. A genetically stable SCV was created through the deletion of the hemB gene, impairing its ability to adapt and revert to the invasive phenotype. Further attenuation was obtained through inactivation of gene vraG (SACOL0720) which we previously showed to be important for full virulence during bovine IMIs. After infection of bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), the double mutant (ΔvraGΔhemB) was less internalized and caused less cell destruction than that seen with ΔhemB and ΔvraG, respectively. In a murine IMI model, the ΔvraGΔhemB mutant was strongly attenuated, with a reduction of viable counts of up to 5-log10 CFU/g of mammary gland when compared to the parental strain. A complete clearance of ΔvraGΔhemB from glands was observed whereas mortality rapidly (48h) occurred with the wild-type strain. Immunization of mice using subcutaneous injections of live ΔvraGΔhemB raised a strong immune response as judged by the high total IgG titers measured against bacterial cell extracts and by the high IgG2a/IgG1 ratio observed against the IsdH protein. Also, ΔvraGΔhemB had sufficient common features with bovine mastitis strains so that the antibody response also strongly recognized strains from a variety of mastitis associated spa types. This double mutant could serve as a live-attenuated component in vaccines to improve cell-mediated immune responses

  5. Genotype analysis of ORF 62 identifies varicella-zoster virus infections caused by a vaccine strain in children.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Byung Ok; Lee, Hoan Jong; Kang, Hyun Mi; Oh, Chi Eun; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2017-02-15

    This study was performed to differentiate vaccine-type strains from wild-type strains and determine the genotype of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 51 Korean children. A sequencing analysis of ORF 62 identified two cases of herpes zoster caused by the vaccine-type virus, without a previous history of varicella, 22 months and 5 months after VZV vaccination. The wild-type strain was identified in the remaining children. A genotype analysis of ORF 22 amino acids revealed genotype J in all children except one. Genotype E was identified in an infant with varicella imported from Egypt.

  6. High definition viral vaccine strain identity and stability testing using full-genome population data--The next generation of vaccine quality control.

    PubMed

    Höper, Dirk; Freuling, Conrad M; Müller, Thomas; Hanke, Dennis; von Messling, Veronika; Duchow, Karin; Beer, Martin; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2015-10-26

    Vaccines are the most effective prophylactic public health tools. With the help of vaccines, prevention of infectious disease spread and, in concert with other measures, even eradication has become possible. Until now, licensing and quality control require the determination of consensus genome sequences of replication competent infectious agents contained in vaccines. Recent improvements in sequencing technologies now enable the sequencing of complete genomes and the genetic analysis of populations with high reliability and resolution. The latter is particularly important for RNA viruses, which consist of fluctuating heterogeneous populations rather than genetically stable entities. This information now has to be integrated into the existing regulatory framework, challenging both licensing authorities and vaccine producers to develop new quality control criteria. Commercially available modified-live oral rabies vaccines and their precursor strains were deep-sequenced to assess strain identity and relations between strains based on population diversity. Strain relations were inferred based on the Manhattan distances calculated between the compositions of the viral populations of the strains. We provide a novel approach to assess viral strain relations with high resolution and reliability by deep sequencing with subsequent analysis of the overall genetic diversity within the viral populations. A comparison of our novel approach of inferring strain relations based on population data with consensus sequence analysis clearly shows that consensus sequence analysis of diverse viral populations can be misleading. Therefore, for quality control of viral vaccines deep sequencing analysis is to be preferred over consensus sequence analysis. The presented methodology allows for routine integration of deep sequencing data in vaccine quality control and licensing for highly reliable assessment of strain identity and stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Binding of purified and radioiodinated capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A strains to capsule-free mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Small, J.M.; Mitchell, T.G.

    1986-12-01

    Strains 6, 15, 98, 110, and 145 of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A vary in capsule size, animal virulence, and susceptibility to in vitro phagocytosis. The isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) differ in monosaccharide composition ratios and molecular size, as determined by gel filtration. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the binding of CPSs to capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans and to examine CPSs from these strains for differences in their ability to bind, to determine whether such differences might explain the variation in the pathobiology of these strains. CPSs were partially periodate oxidized, tyraminated, iodinated with /sup 125/I, and used in binding studies with two capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans, strain 602 and Cap59. Binding was specific for yeast species and for polysaccharide and was saturable, which is consistent with a receptor-mediated mechanism of attachment. Binding occurred rapidly and was only slowly reversible. Binding was also independent of pH from pH 5.5 to 8, of cation concentrations, and of competition by sugars up to 1.0 M concentrations. Only a portion of CPS was capable of binding, and strains varied in the extent to which their CPS bound. CPS-15-IV (peak IV was the major polysaccharide peak on DEAE-cellulose chromatography of CPS from strain 15) had the highest proportion of binding (40%), followed by CPS from strains 98, 6, 145, 110, and 15-III (peak III was an earlier eluting fraction of CPS from strain 15). The CPSs differed similarly in their ability to competitively inhibit binding. Treatment of CPS, but not yeast cells, with proteinase XIV abolished binding without altering the CPS gross structure. Treatment of yeast cells with proteases, heat, or formaldehyde did not alter binding, and both strain 602 and Cap59 bound CPS similarly. Binding to encapsulated yeast cells was minimal.

  8. Vaccination of Lewis rats with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mycoplasma pulmonis: adoptive transfer of immunity by spleen cells but not by sera.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, W C; Bennett, M; Lu, Y S; Pakes, S P

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutant vaccines protect rats against Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. The role of the humoral or cellular immune response in resistance to mycoplasma infection was investigated by adoptive-transfer experiments. Spleen cells from Lewis rats vaccinated but not challenged with wild-type organisms (vaccinated) and spleen cells from rats vaccinated (or not) and challenged were effective in preventing syngeneic recipients from developing respiratory disease. There was also a significant reduction in the incidence and number of challenging organisms in the respiratory system. In contrast, sera from the same donors had no detectable effect on the number of mycoplasmas recovered or on lesion development in the respiratory tract. We conclude that cellular immunity rather than humoral immunity generated in vaccinated rats confers protection against subsequent infection. PMID:1987049

  9. Intranasal Immunization with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccines with Nontoxic Mutants of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxins as Adjuvants Protects Mice against Invasive Pneumococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Håvard; Schulz, Dominique; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Jónsdóttir, Ingileif

    1999-01-01

    Host defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae depend largely on phagocytosis following opsonization by polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and complement. Since colonization of the respiratory mucosa is the first step in pneumococcal pathogenesis, mucosal immune responses may play a significant role. In addition to inducing systemic immune responses, mucosal vaccination with an effective adjuvant has the advantage of inducing mucosal IgA antibodies. The heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli is a well-studied mucosal adjuvant, and adjuvant activity of nontoxic LT mutants has been demonstrated for several protein antigens. We investigated the immunogenicity of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PNC) of serotypes 1 and 3 in mice after intranasal (i.n.) immunization by using as an adjuvant the nontoxic LT mutant LT-K63 or LT-R72, which has minimal residual toxicity. Pneumococcal serotype-specific antibodies were measured in serum (IgM, IgG, and IgA) and saliva (IgA), and vaccine-induced protection was evaluated by i.n. challenge with virulent pneumococci of the homologous serotype. When administered with LT mutants, i.n. immunization with both conjugates induced systemic and mucosal immune responses, and serum IgG antibody levels were significantly higher than after subcutaneous immunization. All mice immunized i.n. with PNC-1 and LT mutants were protected against bacteremia and cleared the pneumococci from the lung 24 h after i.n. challenge; pneumococcal density correlated significantly with serum IgG antibody levels. Similarly, the survival of mice immunized i.n. with PNC-3 and LT mutants was significantly prolonged. These results demonstrate that i.n. vaccination with PNC and potent adjuvants can protect mice against invasive and lethal pneumococcal infections, indicating that mucosal vaccination with PNC may be an alternative vaccination strategy for humans. PMID:10531245

  10. Behavior of two Tannerella forsythia strains and cell surface mutants in multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Susanne; Thurnheer, Thomas; Murakami, Yukitaka; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-04-05

    As a member of subgingival multispecies biofilms, Tannerella forsythia is commonly associated with periodontitis. The bacterium has a characteristic cell surface (S-) layer modified with a unique O-glycan. Both the S-layer and the O-glycan were analyzed in this study for their role in biofilm formation by employing an in vitro multispecies biofilm model mimicking the situation in the oral cavity. Different T. forsythia strains and mutants with characterized defects in cell surface composition were incorporated into the model, together with nine species of select oral bacteria. The influence of the T. forsythia S-layer and attached glycan on the bacterial composition of the biofilms was analyzed quantitatively using colony forming unit counts and quantitative real-time PCR, as well as qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This revealed that changes of the T. forsythia cell surface did not affect the quantitative composition of the multispecies consortium, with the exception of Campylobacter rectus cell numbers. The localization of T. forsythia within the bacterial agglomeration varied depending on changes in the S-layer glycan, and this also affected its aggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis. This suggests a selective role for the glycosylated T. forsythia S-layer in the positioning of this species within the biofilm, its co-localization with P. gingivalis, and the prevalence of C. rectus. These findings might translate into a potential role of T. forsythia cell surface structures in the virulence of this species when interacting with host tissues and immune system, from within or beyond the biofilm. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Possible outcomes of reassortment in vivo between wild type and live attenuated influenza vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, Irina; Dubrovina, Irina; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Ekaterina; Larionova, Natalie; Rudenko, Larisa

    2012-12-07

    Reassortment of influenza viruses in nature has been well documented. Genetic reassortment plays a key role in emergence of new influenza A strains, including pandemic viruses. Permissive host can be simultaneously coinfected with multiple influenza viruses. During genetic reassortment gene segments are exchanged between parental viruses that may lead to some enhancement of virulence of reassortant progeny. At present, vaccination with live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccine (LAIV) is used as an effective public health measure for influenza prophylaxis. However, there are concerns about a potential of simultaneous infection of human host with ca and wild type (wt) influenza viruses which might produce progeny that contain novel, more virulent genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate potential consequences of reassortment of wt with LAIV strains in vivo. We demonstrated that reassortment of wt viruses with ca strains in guinea pigs have resulted in progeny virus which caused reduced macroscopic lesions of chicken embryos. According to phenotypical data 95% (19 out of 20) isolated reassortants were restricted in replication at elevated temperature of 40°C. None of reassortants were more virulent than wt parents, or revealed significantly higher macroscopic lesions than wt parental viruses. Our results suggest that genetic reassortment between wt and vaccine strain is unlikely to lead to virulent reassortant progeny. These findings provide additional support of LAIV safety data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for Western Australia during a period of vaccine and virus strain stability, 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Levy, Avram; Sullivan, Sheena G; Tempone, Simone S; Wong, Kerry L M; Regan, Annette K; Dowse, Gary K; Effler, Paul V; Smith, David W

    2014-10-29

    During 2010-2012 the strain composition of the influenza vaccine in the Southern Hemisphere did not change, but the circulating virus type/subtype did. We pooled data for these years from the Western Australian sentinel medical practice surveillance system for influenza to estimate vaccine effectiveness (VE) by influenza virus type and subtype. A case test-negative design was used with VE estimated as (1-odds ratio)×100%. There were 2182 patients included in the analysis across the 3 years studied. The predominant subtype was A/H1pdm09 in 2010 and 2011, and A/H3 in 2012. The overall adjusted VE estimate against all influenza for 2010-2012 was 51% (95% CI: 36, 63). Estimates were highest against A/H1pdm09 at 74% (95% CI: 47, 87), followed by 56% (95% CI: 33, 71) for influenza B and lowest against A/H3 at 39% (95% CI: 13, 57). When analyses were restricted to compare influenza-positive patients with patients who tested positive for a non-influenza virus, overall adjusted VE was 59% (95% CI: 39, 72). These results suggest moderate protection against influenza by vaccination in Western Australia over the period 2010-2012, and are consistent with findings from other settings.

  13. A novel sequence-based antigenic distance measure for H1N1, with application to vaccine effectiveness and the selection of vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Subieta, Krystina C.; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    H1N1 influenza causes substantial seasonal illness and was the subtype of the 2009 influenza pandemic. Precise measures of antigenic distance between the vaccine and circulating virus strains help researchers design influenza vaccines with high vaccine effectiveness. We here introduce a sequence-based method to predict vaccine effectiveness in humans. Historical epidemiological data show that this sequence-based method is as predictive of vaccine effectiveness as hemagglutination inhibition assay data from ferret animal model studies. Interestingly, the expected vaccine effectiveness is greater against H1N1 than H3N2, suggesting a stronger immune response against H1N1 than H3N2. The evolution rate of hemagglutinin in H1N1 is also shown to be greater than that in H3N2, presumably due to greater immune selection pressure. PMID:21123189

  14. Absence of light-induced proton extrusion in a cotA-less mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Sonoda, M; Katoh, H; Ogawa, T

    1996-09-01

    cotA of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was isolated as a gene that complemented a mutant defective in CO2 transport and is homologous to cemA that encodes a chloroplast envelope membrane protein (A. Katoh, K.S. Lee, H. Fukuzawa, K. Ohyama, and T. Ogawa, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:4006-4010, 1996). A mutant (M29) constructed by replacing cotA in the wild-type (WT) Synechocystis strain with the omega fragment was unable to grow in BG11 medium (approximately 17 mM Na+) at pH 6.4 or at any pH in a low-sodium medium (100 microM Na+) under aeration with 3% (vol/vol) CO2 in air. The WT cells grew well in the pH range between 6.4 and 8.5 in BG11 medium but only at alkaline pH in the low-sodium medium. Illumination of the WT cells resulted in an extrusion followed by an uptake of protons. In contrast, only proton uptake was observed for the M29 mutant in the light without proton extrusion. There was no difference in sodium uptake activity between the WT and mutant. The mutant still possessed 51% of the WT CO2 transport activity in the presence of 15 mM NaCl. On the basis of these results we concluded that cotA has a role in light-induced proton extrusion and that the inhibition of CO2 transport in the M29 mutant is a secondary effect of the inhibition of proton extrusion.

  15. Efficacy of one dose vaccination against experimental infection with two Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Annelies; Arsenakis, Ioannis; Boyen, Filip; Krejci, Roman; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek

    2017-08-29

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) is the primary agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs. Pigs are often infected with different M. hyopneumoniae strains. This study assessed the efficacy of vaccination against experimental infection with two genetically different M. hyopneumoniae strains in weaned piglets. At 33 days of age (D0), 45 M. hyopneumoniae-free piglets were randomly assigned to three different groups: 1) negative control group (NCG; n = 5): not vaccinated, not infected, 2) positive control group (PCG; n = 20): not vaccinated, infected, and 3) vaccination group (VG; n = 20): single vaccination with an inactivated whole-cell M. hyopneumoniae vaccine (Hyogen®, Ceva) (D1), infected. The PCG and VG were endotracheally inoculated with 7 × 10(7) CCU in 7 ml of the highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain F7.2C (D24) and 7 × 10(7) CCU in 7 ml low virulent strain F1.12A (D25). A respiratory disease score (RDS) was assessed from D24 until D53. At D53 (euthanasia), macroscopic lung lesions (MLL) were scored, log copies of M. hyopneumoniae DNA (qPCR) and IL-1 and IL-6-concentrations (ELISA) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. The RDS and MLL at euthanasia were respectively 0, 1.20 and 0.55 (P < 0.001) and 0, 7.56 and 0.68 (P < 0.001) for NCG, PCG and VG, respectively. The qPCR results for PCG and VG were 3.99 and 1.78 log copies (P < 0.001), respectively, with a significant difference between PCG and VG. The IL-1 and IL-6 results at euthanasia for NCG, PCG and VG were 17.61, 1283.39 and 53.04 pg/ml (P < 0.001) and 148.10, 493.35 and 259.80 pg/ml (P = 0.004), respectively with a significant difference between PCG and VG. Vaccination with Hyogen® in pigs was efficacious against an experimental challenge with both a low and highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain as the vaccinated pigs coughed significantly less, and showed significantly less lung lesions compared to the non-vaccinated challenged pigs: the vaccinated

  16. Vector Development for the Expression of Foreign Proteins in the Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Vigliocco, Ana M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    A vector for the expression of foreign antigens in the vaccine strain Brucella abortus S19 was developed by using a DNA fragment containing the regulatory sequences and the signal peptide of the Brucella bcsp31 gene. This fragment was cloned in broad-host-range plasmid pBBR4MCS, resulting in plasmid pBEV. As a reporter protein, a repetitive antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. The recombinant fusion protein is stably expressed and secreted into the Brucella periplasmic space, inducing a good antibody response against the T. cruzi antigen. The expression of the repetitive antigen in Brucella neither altered its growth pattern nor generated a toxic or lethal effect during experimental infection. The application of this strategy for the generation of live recombinant vaccines and the tagging of B. abortus S19 vaccine is discussed. This is the first time that a recombinant protein has been expressed in the periplasm of brucellae. PMID:9673273

  17. Multi-omics approach to study global changes in a triclosan-resistant mutant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Chong, Patrick; Singh, Manu; Spicer, Victor; Unger, Mark; Loewen, Peter C; Westmacott, Garrett; Kumar, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii AB042, a triclosan-resistant mutant strain, was examined for modulated gene expression using whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics in order to understand the mechanism of triclosan resistance as well as its impact on A. baumannii. Data revealed modulated expression of the fatty acid metabolism pathway, co-factors known to play a role in the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as several transcriptional regulators. The membrane composition of the mutant revealed a decrease in C18 with a corresponding increase in C16 fatty acids compared with the parent strain A. baumannii ATCC 17978. These data indicate that A. baumannii responds to triclosan by altering the expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, antibiotic resistance and amino acid metabolism.

  18. Anthraquinone dyes decolorization capacity of anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 strain and its HRP-like negative mutants.

    PubMed

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Rybczyńska, Kamila

    2014-06-01

    Cultures of the anamorphic fungus Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 decolorizing, in stationary cultures, 0.01 % solutions of carminic acid and Poly R-478, were characterised by a strong increase in the activity of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP-like) and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) at a low activity of lignin peroxidase. Genotypically modified mutants of B. adusta CCBAS 930: 930-5 and 930-14, with total or partial loss of decolorization capabilities relative to anthraquinonic dyes, showed inhibition of the activity of HRP-like peroxidase and MnP. Whereas, compared to the parental strain, in the mutant cultures there was an increase in the activity of lignin peroxidase and laccase. The paper presents a discussion of the role of the studied enzymatic activities in the process of decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes by the strain B. adusta CCBAS 930.

  19. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions.

  20. Antibody Response from Whole-Cell Pertussis Vaccine Immunized Brazilian Children against Different Strains of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Alexandre; Pietro Pereira, Aparecida S.; Silva, Célio Lopes; de Melo Rocha, Gutemberg; Lebrun, Ivo; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2010-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a gram-negative bacillus that causes the highly contagious disease known as pertussis or whooping cough. Antibody response in children may vary depending on the vaccination schedule and the product used. In this study, we have analyzed the antibody response of cellular pertussis vaccinated children against B. pertussis strains and their virulence factors, such as pertussis toxin, pertactin, and filamentous hemagglutinin. After the completion of the immunization process, according to the Brazilian vaccination program, children serum samples were collected at different periods of time, and tested for the presence of specific antibodies and antigenic cross-reactivity. Results obtained show that children immunized with three doses of the Brazilian whole-cell pertussis vaccine present high levels of serum antibodies capable of recognizing the majority of the components present in vaccinal and non-vaccinal B. pertussis strains and their virulence factors for at least 2 years after the completion of the immunization procedure. PMID:20348518

  1. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    PubMed

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena.

  2. The Use of NF1 and NF2 Mutant Mouse Strains in the Investigation of Gene Function and Disease Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    percentage of which show features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). Importantly, human NFl patients also develop MPNSTs at high...significant subset (at least 50%) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). This evaluation is based on the presence of S 100 staining...percentage of MPNSTs that develop in NF1 patients have mutations in p53. Thus, the Nfl/p53 mutant strain represents an animal model of the more malignant

  3. Expression of the cloned Escherichia coli O9 rfb gene in various mutant strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, T; Kido, N; Komatsu, T; Ohta, M; Kato, N

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effect of chromosomal mutation on the synthesis of rfe-dependent Escherichia coli O9 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the cloned E. coli O9 rfb gene was introduced into Salmonella typhimurium strains defective in various genes involved in the synthesis of LPS. When E. coli O9 rfb was introduced into S. typhimurium strains possessing defects in rfb or rfc, they synthesized E. coli O9 LPS on their cell surfaces. The rfe-defective mutant of S. typhimurium synthesized only very small amounts of E. coli O9 LPS after the introduction of E. coli O9 rfb. These results confirmed the widely accepted idea that the biosynthesis of E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide does not require rfc but requires rfe. By using an rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene, the mechanism of transfer of the synthesized E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide from antigen carrier lipid to the R-core of S. typhimurium was investigated. The rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene failed to direct the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the rfc mutant strain of S. typhimurium, in which rfaL and rfbT functions are intact, but directed the synthesis of the precursor. Because the intact E. coli O9 rfb gene directed the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the same strain, it was suggested that the rfaL product of S. typhimurium and rfbT product of E. coli O9 cooperate to synthesize E. coli O9 LPS in S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1987133

  4. B-cell responses after intranasal vaccination with the novel attenuated Bordetella pertussis vaccine strain BPZE1 in a randomized phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Maja; Amu, Sylvie; Ljungman, Margaretha; Wehlin, Lena; Chiodi, Francesca; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille; Thorstensson, Rigmor

    2014-06-05

    Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis is still a global concern in infant morbidity and mortality, and improved pertussis vaccines are needed. A live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain, named BPZE1, was designed as an intranasal vaccine candidate and has recently been tested in man in a phase I clinical trial. Here, we report the evaluation of the B-cell responses after vaccination with BPZE1. Forty-eight healthy males with no previous pertussis-vaccination were randomized into one of three dose-escalating groups or into a placebo group. Plasma blast- and memory B-cell responses were evaluated by ELISpot against three different pertussis antigens: pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin and pertactin. Seven out of the 36 subjects who had received the vaccine were colonized by BPZE1, and significant increases in the memory B-cell response were detected against all three tested antigens in the culture-positive subjects between days 0 and 28 post-vaccination. The culture-positive subjects also mounted a significant increase in the filamentous haemagglutinin-specific plasma blast response between days 7 and 14 post-vaccination. No response could be detected in the culture-negatives or in the placebo group post-vaccination. These data show that BPZE1 is immunogenic in humans and is therefore a promising candidate for a novel pertussis vaccine. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01188512).

  5. Chinese border disease virus strain JSLS12-01 infects piglets and down-regulates the antibody responses of classical swine fever virus C strain vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Li, Wenliang; Liu, Xia; Hao, Fei; Yang, Leilei; Deng, Jiawu; Zhang, Wenwen; Wei, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-31

    During 2012 and 2013, several border disease virus (BDV) strains were identified from Chinese goat and sheep herds. At the same time, pigs from the same areas were found to be seropositive to BDV by ELISA, without showing clinical signs (unpublished data). To examine the susceptibility of pigs to the Chinese BDV strains, BDV isolate JSLS12-01, isolated from naturally infected sheep, was used to infect pigs. Antibody responses, viremia, clinical signs and pathological changes of the infected animals were examined. It confirmed that the current BDV strain could infect the domestic pigs, the animals showed viremia during 4 to 14 days post infection (dpi) and sero-conversion from 14dpi; no clinical and pathological changes were observed. In addition, CSFV maternal antibody did not influence BDV infection. Subsequently, pigs were infected with the BDV isolate and vaccinated with Hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV) 21 days later to determine the effect of BDV infection on antibody induction of CSFV vaccination. The specific CSFV antibody and neutralizing antibody titers of the BDV infected group remained negative after the primary vaccination. Even after the boost vaccination, they were still significantly lower than those of the uninfected groups (p<0.05). These results indicated that BDV infection could down-regulate the antibody responses of CSFV C-strain vaccination. It should be paid attention that BDV prevalence in pig herds and in live vaccines might hamper the vaccination of CSF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Mosaic Vaccines Are Immunogenic in Mice and Induce Stronger T-Cell Responses than Natural Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dilan, Rebecca; Borducchi, Erica; Stanley, Kelly; Giorgi, Elena; Fischer, William; Theiler, James; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite improved hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments, vaccines remain an effective and economic option for curtailing the epidemic. Mosaic protein HCV genotype 1 vaccine candidates designed to address HCV diversity were immunogenic in mice. They elicited stronger T-cell responses to NS3-NS4a and E1-E2 proteins than did natural strains, as assessed with vaccine-matched peptides. PMID:23221002

  7. Emergence of mosaic recombinant strains potentially associated with vaccine JXA1-R and predominant circulating strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in different provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huajian; Han, Qinggong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wu, Yufeng; Shen, Hong; Jiang, Ping

    2017-04-04

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused several outbreaks in China since 2006. However, the genetic diversity of PRRSV in China has greatly increased by rapid evolution or recombination events. Modified live-attenuated vaccines are widely used to control this disease worldwide. Although the risk and inefficacy of the vaccine has been reported, the genetic diversity between epidemic field strains and vaccine strains in China has not been completely elucidated. A total of 293 clinical samples were collected from 72 pig farms in 16 provinces of China in 2015 for PRRSV detection. A total of 28 infected samples collected from 24 pig farms in nine provinces were further selected for immunohistochemical analysis and whole genome sequencing of PRRSV. Phylogenetic analysis and recombination screening were performed with the full genome sequences of the 28 strains and other 623 reference sequences of PRRSV. Of 293 clinical samples, 117 (39.93%) were positive for PRRSV by RT-PCR. Phylogenetic results showed that the 28 strains were nested into sublineage 10.5 (classic highly pathogenic [HP]-PRRSV), sublineage 10.6 (HP-PRRSV-like strains and related recombinants), sublineage 10.7 (potential vaccine JXA1-R-like strains), and lineage 9 (NADC30-like strains and recombinants of NADC30-like strains), respectively, suggesting that multiple subgenotypes of PRRSV currently circulate in China. Recombination analyses showed that nine of 28 isolates and one isolate from other laboratory were potential complicated recombinants between the vaccine JXA1-R-like strains and predominant circulating strains. These results indicated an increase in recombination rates of PRRSV under current vaccination pressure and a more pressing situation for PRRSV eradication and control in China.

  8. Construction of an Efficient Mutant Strain of Trichosporonoides oedocephalis with HOG1 Gene Deletion for Production of Erythritol.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangzhi; Yang, Tianyi; Guo, Weiqiang; Ju, Xin; Hu, Cuiying; Tang, Bingyu; Fu, Jiaolong; Gu, Jingsheng; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-04-28

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase HOG1 (high-osmolarity glycerol response pathway) plays a crucial role in the response of yeast to hyperosmotic shock. Trichosporonoides oedocephalis produces large amounts of polyols (,e.g., erythritol and glycerol) in a culture medium. However, the effects of HOG1 gene knockout and environmental stress on the production of these polyols have not yet been studied. In this study, a To-HOG1 null mutation was constructed in T. oedocephalis using the loxP-Kan-loxP/Cre system as replacement of the targeted genes, and the resultant mutants showed much smaller colonies than the wild-type controls. Interestingly, compared with the wild-type strains, the results of shake-flask culture showed that To-HOG1 null mutation increased erythritol production by 1.44-fold while decreasing glycerol production by 71.23%. In addition, this study investigated the effects of citric acid stress on the T. oedocephalis HOG1 null mutants and the wild-type strain. When the supplementation of citric acid in the fermentation medium was controlled at 0.3% (w/v), the concentration of erythritol produced from the wild-type and To-HOG1 knockout mutant strains improved by 18.21% and 21.65%, respectively.

  9. Effects of Pyrogallol on Growth and Cytotoxicity of Wild-Type and katG Mutant Strains of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ju Young; Kim, Choon-Mee; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Kim, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a causative agent of fatal septicemia and necrotic wound infection and the pathogen infection became an important public health problem in many counties. Vibrio vulnificus causes RtxA1 toxin-induced acute cell death. We tried to identify natural products that inhibit the acute cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus using a lactate hydrogenase assay. A polyphenol pyrogallol protected HeLa cells from V. vulnificus-induced cytotoxicity. Pyrogallol also decreased the growth of V. vulnificus; this inhibitory effect was more significant during log phase than stationary phase. To further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism, pyrogallol-induced toxicity was compared between a V. vulnificus catalase-peroxidase mutant (katG−) and the isogenic wild-type MO6-24/O strains. No growth was observed for the katG− mutant in the presence of pyrogallol (50 μg/mL) even after 24 h, whereas the wild-type strain demonstrated growth recovery following a prolonged lag phase. Pyrogallol-mediated growth inhibition of the katG− mutant strain was partially rescued by exogenous catalase treatment. These results indicate that the mechanism by which pyrogallol inhibits the growth and cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus likely involves polyphenol-induced prooxidant damage. Taken together, these results suggest that pyrogallol has potential for development as a new paradigm drug to treat infectious diseases. PMID:27936080

  10. Free mycolic acid accumulation in the cell wall of the mce1 operon mutant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sally A; Leavell, Michael D; Marjanovic, Olivera; Iavarone, Anthony T; Leary, Julie A; Riley, Lee W

    2013-10-01

    The lipid-rich cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of tuberculosis, serves as an effective barrier against many chemotherapeutic agents and toxic host cell effector molecules, and it may contribute to the mechanism of persistence. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains mutated in a 13-gene operon called mce1, which encodes a putative ABC lipid transporter, induce aberrant granulomatous response in mouse lungs. Because of the postulated role of the mce1 operon in lipid importation, we compared the cell wall lipid composition of wild type and mce1 operon mutant M. tuberculosis H37Rv strains. High resolution mass spectrometric analyses of the mce1 mutant lipid extracts showed unbound mycolic acids to accumulate in the cell wall. Quantitative analysis revealed a 10.7 fold greater amount of free mycolates in the mutant compared to that of the wild type strain. The free mycolates were comprised of alpha, methoxy and keto mycolates in the ratio 1:0.9:0.6, respectively. Since the mce1 operon is regulated in vivo, the free mycolates that accumulate during infection may serve as a barrier for M. tuberculosis against toxic products and contribute to the pathogen's persistence.

  11. The effects of strain heterology on the epidemiology of equine influenza in a vaccinated population.

    PubMed Central

    Park, A. W.; Wood, J. L. N.; Daly, J. M.; Newton, J. R.; Glass, K.; Henley, W.; Mumford, J. A.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    We assess the effects of strain heterology (strains that are immunologically similar but not identical) on equine influenza in a vaccinated population. Using data relating to individual animals, for both homologous and heterologous vaccinees, we estimate distributions for the latent and infectious periods, quantify the risk of becoming infected in terms of the quantity of cross-reactive antibodies to a key surface protein of the virus (haemagglutinin) and estimate the probability of excreting virus (i.e. becoming infectious) given that infection has occurred. The data suggest that the infectious period, the risk of becoming infected (for a given vaccine-induced level of cross-reactive antibodies) and the probability of excreting virus are increased for heterologously vaccinated animals when compared with homologously vaccinated animals. The data are used to parameterize a modified susceptible, exposed, infectious and recovered/resistant (SEIR) model, which shows that these relatively small differences combine to have a large effect at the population level, where populations of heterologous vaccinees face a significantly increased risk of an epidemic occurring. PMID:15306299

  12. A national reference for inactivated polio vaccine derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Haruko; Someya, Yuichi; Ochiai, Masaki; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Motohide; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakabayashi, Kengo; Ouchi, Yasumitsu; Ota, Yoshihiro; Tano, Yoshio; Abe, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Shudo; Wakita, Takaji

    2014-09-08

    As one aspect of its campaign to eradicate poliomyelitis, the World Health Organization (WHO) has encouraged development of the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) derived from the Sabin strains (sIPV) as an option for an affordable polio vaccine, especially in low-income countries. The Japan Poliomyelitis Research Institute (JPRI) inactivated three serotypes of the Sabin strains and made sIPV preparations, including serotypes 1, 2 and 3 D-antigens in the ratio of 3:100:100. The National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan, assessed the immunogenic stability of these sIPV preparations in a rat potency test, according to an evaluation method recommended by the WHO. The immunogenicity of the three serotypes was maintained for at least 4 years when properly stored under -70°C. Based on these data, the sIPV preparations made by JPRI have been approved as national reference vaccines by the Japanese national control authority and used for the quality control of the tetracomponent sIPV-containing diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis combination vaccines that were licensed for a routine polio immunization in Japan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sheathless Mutant of Cyanobacterium Gloeothece sp. Strain PCC 6909 with Increased Capacity To Remove Copper Ions from Aqueous Solutions▿

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Ernesto; Pereira, Sara; Mannelli, Francesca; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tamagnini, Paula; De Philippis, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Gloeothece sp. strain PCC 6909 and its sheathless mutant were tested for their abilities to remove copper ions from aqueous solutions, with the aim of defining the role of the various outermost polysaccharidic investments in the removal of the metal ions. Microscopy studies and chemical analyses revealed that, although the mutant does not possess a sheath, it releases large amounts of polysaccharidic material (released exocellular polysaccharides [RPS]) into the culture medium. The RPS of the wild type and the mutant are composed of the same 11 sugars, although they are present in different amounts, and the RPS of the mutant possesses a larger amount of acidic sugars and a smaller amount of deoxysugars than the wild type. Unexpectedly, whole cultures of the mutant were more effective in the removal of the heavy metal than the wild type (46.3 ± 3.1 and 26.7 ± 1.5 mg of Cu2+ removed per g of dry weight, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of the sheath to the metal-removal capacity of the wild type is scarce and that the RPS of the mutant is more efficient in removing copper. This suggests that the metal ions are preferably bound to the cell wall and to RPS functional groups rather than to the sheath. Therefore, the increased copper binding efficiency observed with the sheathless mutant can be attributed to the release of a polysaccharide containing larger amounts and/or more accessible functional groups (e.g., carboxyl and amide groups). PMID:18326679

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of New Zealand strain meningococcal serogroup B OMV vaccine in healthy adults: beginning of epidemic control.

    PubMed

    Thornton, V; Lennon, D; Rasanathan, K; O'Hallahan, J; Oster, P; Stewart, J; Tilman, S; Aaberge, I; Feiring, B; Nokleby, H; Rosenqvist, E; White, K; Reid, S; Mulholland, K; Wakefield, M J; Martin, D

    2006-02-27

    As the first step towards control of a strain specific epidemic of meningococcal disease in New Zealand (NZ), this study, an observer-blind, randomised controlled trial in 75 healthy adults, evaluated safety and immunogenicity of two different dosages of a meningococcal group B vaccine administered in a three dose regime. The "tailor-made" outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine (candidate vaccine) developed using a New Zealand meningococcal group B strain (B:4:P1.7b,4) was well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Similar local and systemic reactions were observed in those receiving the New Zealand candidate vaccine and the control parent Norwegian vaccine (MenBvac). A four-fold rise in serum bactericidal antibodies (SBAb) against the vaccine strain 4-6 weeks after the third vaccination was achieved in 100% of New Zealand candidate vaccine 2,519 microg participants and in 87% of 50 microg participants. The safety and immunogenicity profile observed in this study of healthy adults enabled studies in children to be initiated using 25 microg dosage.

  15. Live attenuated herpes simplex virus 2 glycoprotein E deletion mutant as a vaccine candidate defective in neuronal spread.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Si, Huaxin; Wang, Fushan; Shaw, Carolyn E; Cai, Michael; Lubinski, John M; Barrett, Shana M; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bryan, Janine T; Friedman, Harvey M

    2012-04-01

    A herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein E deletion mutant (gE2-del virus) was evaluated as a replication-competent, attenuated live virus vaccine candidate. The gE2-del virus is defective in epithelial cell-to-axon spread and in anterograde transport from the neuron cell body to the axon terminus. In BALB/c and SCID mice, the gE2-del virus caused no death or disease after vaginal, intravascular, or intramuscular inoculation and was 5 orders of magnitude less virulent than wild-type virus when inoculated directly into the brain. No infectious gE2-del virus was recovered from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after multiple routes of inoculation; however, gE2-del DNA was detected by PCR in lumbosacral DRG at a low copy number in some mice. Importantly, no recurrent vaginal shedding of gE2-del DNA was detected in immunized guinea pigs. Intramuscular immunization outperformed subcutaneous immunization in all parameters evaluated, although individual differences were not significant, and two intramuscular immunizations were more protective than one. Immunized animals had reduced vaginal disease, vaginal titers, DRG infection, recurrent genital lesions, and recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA; however, protection was incomplete. A combined modality immunization using live virus and HSV-2 glycoprotein C and D subunit antigens in guinea pigs did not totally eliminate recurrent lesions or recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA. The gE2-del virus used as an immunotherapeutic vaccine in previously HSV-2-infected guinea pigs greatly reduced the frequency of recurrent genital lesions. Therefore, the gE2-del virus is safe, other than when injected at high titer into the brain, and is efficacious as a prophylactic and immunotherapeutic vaccine.

  16. [Isolation of a strain from the Bataviae pathogenic complex in patient vaccinated against copenhageni, canicola and mozdok].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Hildefonso Cabezas; Gómez, Omar Cabezas; Fonte, Laura Marta Bencomo; Quintana, Quintana Pérez

    2005-01-01

    A Leptospira strain was isolated from a hemoculture of a patient admitted with suspicion of leptospirosis that had been previously vaccinated. It corresponded to the Bataviae pathogenic complex. This result shows that there exists immunogenic specificity and that other serogroups should be incorporated to the current vaccine.

  17. Persistent Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia in an immunocompetent infant and genetic comparison of clinical isolates with kennel cough vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara A; Register, Karen B; Wall, Jeffrey; Sokol, Dawn M; Van Dyke, Russell B

    2008-03-15

    An infant who experienced recurrent episodes of respiratory failure received a diagnosis of pertussis on the basis of immunofluorescence testing, but culture revealed macrolide-resistant Bordetella bronchiseptica. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the child was not infected with a kennel cough vaccine strain, although the family's dog had recently been vaccinated. The infection cleared with imipenem therapy.

  18. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  19. Some results of the work on mass immunization in the Soviet Union with live poliovirus vaccine prepared from Sabin strains*

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, M. P.; Voroshilova, M. K.; Drozdov, S. G.; Dzagurov, S. G.; Lashkevich, V. A.; Mironova, L. L.; Ralph, N. M.; Gagarina, A. V.; Ashmarina, E. E.; Shirman, G. A.; Fleer, G. P.; Tolskaya, E. A.; Sokolova, I. S.; Elbert, L. B.; Sinyak, K. M.

    1961-01-01

    In the course of campaigns for the mass immunization of large segments of the population of the Soviet Union with live poliovirus vaccine prepared in the USSR from attenuated Sabin strains, some 15 200 000 persons received oral vaccine in 1959 and over 77 478 800 persons (mainly between 2 months and 20 years old) in 1960. Approximately 95% of these were given the vaccine incorporated in dragées. The present paper gives data on the safety and immunological activity of the live vaccine, on virus carriage and transmission of the vaccine virus to contacts, and on virus interference. In a comparison between poliomyelitis incidence in 1960 in regions where mass live vaccine immunization had been carried out and the incidence in areas where inactivated Salk vaccine was used in 1958-60, it is shown that, while the Salk vaccine did not fundamentally influence the epidemic process, the Sabin live vaccine brought about a sharp reduction in incidence and prevented the usual summer-autumn rise in the number of poliomyelitis cases. It is concluded from the two years' experience in the mass use of live vaccine from Sabin strains that poliomyelitis epidemics can be prevented. PMID:13879389

  20. Constitutive expression of the tzs gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens virG mutant strains is responsible for improved transgenic plant regeneration in cotton meristem transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xudong; Chen, Yurong; Wan, Yuechun; Hong, Yun-Jeong; Ruebelt, Martin C; Gilbertson, Larry A

    2016-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : virG mutant strains of a nopaline type of Agrobacterium tumefaciens increase the transformation frequency in cotton meristem transformation. Constitutive cytokinin expression from the tzs gene in the virG mutant strains is responsible for the improvement. Strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for their ability to improve cotton meristem transformation frequency. Two disarmed A. tumefaciens nopaline strains with either a virGN54D constitutively active mutation or virGI77V hypersensitive induction mutation significantly increased the transformation frequency in a cotton meristem transformation system. The virG mutant strains resulted in greener explants after three days of co-culture in the presence of light, which could be attributed to a cytokinin effect of the mutants. A tzs knockout strain of virGI77V mutant showed more elongated, less green explants and decreased cotton transformation frequency, as compared to a wild type parental strain, suggesting that expression of the tzs gene is required for transformation frequency improvement in cotton meristem transformation. In vitro cytokinin levels in culture media were tenfold higher in the virGN54D strain, and approximately 30-fold higher in the virGI77V strain, in the absence of acetosyringone induction, compared to the wild type strain. The cytokinin level in the virGN54D strain is further increased upon acetosyringone induction, while the cytokinin level in the virGI77V mutant is decreased by induction, suggesting that different tzs gene expression regulation mechanisms are present in the two virG mutant strains. Based on these data, we suggest that the increased cytokinin levels play a major role in increasing Agrobacterium attachment and stimulating localized division of the attached plant cells.