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Sample records for mutants provide protection

  1. Cross-protection provided by live Shigella mutants lacking major antigens.

    PubMed

    Szijártó, Valéria; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Eva; Emődy, Levente; Pál, Tibor; Nagy, Gábor

    2013-05-01

    The immune response elicited by Shigella infections is dominated by serotype-specific antibodies recognizing the LPS O-antigens. Although a marked antibody response to invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa-s) shared by all virulent strains is also induced, the varying level of immunity elicited by natural infections is serotype-restricted. Previous vaccines have tried to mimic and achieve this serotype-specific, infection-induced immunity. As, however, the four Shigella species can express 50 different types of O-antigens, current approaches with the aim to induce a broad coverage use a mixture of the most common O-antigens combined in single vaccines. In the current study we present data on an alternative approach to generate immunity protective against multiple serotypes. Mutants lacking both major immune-determinant structures (i.e. the Ipa and O-antigens) were not only highly attenuated, but, unlike their avirulent counterparts still expressing these antigens, elicited a protective immune response to heterologous serotypes in a murine model. Evidence is provided that protection was mediated by the enhanced immunogenic potential of minor conserved antigens. Furthermore, the rough, non-invasive double mutants triggered an immune response different from that induced by the smooth, invasive strains regarding the isotype of antibodies generated. These non-invasive, rough mutants may represent promising candidates for further development into live vaccines for the prophylaxis of bacillary dysentery in areas with multiple endemic serotypes.

  2. Huperzine A Provides Robust and Sustained Protection against Induced Seizures in Scn1a Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Dutton, Stacey B. B.; Collins, Stephen D.; Schachter, Steven; Escayg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    De novo loss-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) SCN1A (encoding Nav1.1) are the main cause of Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic early-life encephalopathy associated with prolonged and recurrent early-life febrile seizures (FSs), refractory afebrile epilepsy, cognitive and behavioral deficits, and a 15–20% mortality rate. SCN1A mutations also lead to genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), which is an inherited disorder characterized by early-life FSs and the development of a range of adult epilepsy subtypes. Current antiepileptic drugs often fail to protect against the severe seizures and behavioral and cognitive deficits found in patients with SCN1A mutations. To address the need for more efficacious treatments for SCN1A-derived epilepsies, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A, a naturally occurring reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. In CF1 mice, Hup A (0.56 or 1 mg/kg) was found to confer protection against 6 Hz-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizures. Robust protection against 6 Hz-, MES-, and hyperthermia-induced seizures was also achieved following Hup A administration in mouse models of DS (Scn1a+/−) and GEFS+ (Scn1aRH/+). Furthermore, Hup A-mediated seizure protection was sustained during 3 weeks of daily injections in Scn1aRH/+ mutants. Finally, we determined that muscarinic and GABAA receptors play a role in Hup A-mediated seizure protection. These findings indicate that Hup A might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing seizure resistance in DS and GEFS+, and more broadly, in other forms of refractory epilepsy. PMID:27799911

  3. Enterobacterial Common Antigen Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Establish a Persistent Infection and Provide Protection against Subsequent Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Colvocoresses Dodds, Jennifer; Rick, Paul D.; Soloski, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella spp. is a significant source of disease globally. A substantial proportion of these infections are caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Here, we characterize the role of the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), a surface glycolipid ubiquitous among enteric bacteria, in S. Typhimurium pathogenesis. Construction of a defined mutation in the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase gene, wecA, in two clinically relevant strains of S. Typhimurium, TML and SL1344, resulted in strains that were unable to produce ECA. Loss of ECA did not affect the gross cell surface ultrastructure, production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), flagella, or motility. However, the wecA mutant strains were attenuated in both oral and intraperitoneal mouse models of infection (P < 0.001 for both routes of infection; log rank test), and virulence could be restored by complementation of the wecA gene in trans. Despite the avirulence of the ECA-deficient strains, the wecA mutant strains were able to persistently colonize systemic sites (spleen and liver) at moderate levels for up to 70 days postinfection. Moreover, immunization with the wecA mutant strains provided protection against a subsequent lethal oral or intraperitoneal challenge with wild-type S. Typhimurium. Thus, wecA mutant (ECA-negative) strains of Salmonella may be useful as live attenuated vaccine strains or as vehicles for heterologous antigen expression. PMID:22025511

  4. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana nucleosidase mutants provide new insights into nucleoside degradation

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Heike; Geserick, Claudia; Zrenner, Rita

    2011-01-01

    A central step in nucleoside and nucleobase salvage pathways is the hydrolysis of nucleosides to their respective nucleobases. In plants this is solely accomplished by nucleosidases (EC 3.2.2.x). To elucidate the importance of nucleosidases for nucleoside degradation, general metabolism, and plant growth, thorough phenotypic and biochemical analyses were performed using Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutants lacking expression of the previously identified genes annotated as uridine ribohydrolases (URH1 and URH2). Comprehensive functional analyses of single and double mutants demonstrated that both isoforms are unimportant for seedling establishment and plant growth, while one participates in uridine degradation. Rather unexpectedly, nucleoside and nucleotide profiling and nucleosidase activity screening of soluble crude extracts revealed a deficiency of xanthosine and inosine hydrolysis in the single mutants, with substantial accumulation of xanthosine in one of them. Mixing of the two mutant extracts, and by in vitro activity reconstitution using a mixture of recombinant URH1 and URH2 proteins, both restored activity, thus providing biochemical evidence that at least these two isoforms are needed for inosine and xanthosine hydrolysis. This mutant study demonstrates the utility of in vivo systems for the examination of metabolic activities, with the discovery of the new substrate xanthosine and elucidation of a mechanism for expanding the nucleosidase substrate spectrum. PMID:21599668

  6. New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163384.html New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection Made without live ... HealthDay News) -- A single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine protected mice and monkeys from the virus, ...

  7. Identification of new dominant-negative mutants of anthrax protective antigen using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaobing; Feng, Chunfang; Cao, Sha; Guo, Aizhen; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-11-01

    The anthrax toxin is composed of three proteins: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema toxin (EF). The PA moiety carries EF and LF into the cytosol of mammalian cells via a mechanism that depends on the oligomerization of PA and transmembrane pore formation by the PA oligomer. Certain mutants of PA, termed dominant-negative (DN) mutants, can co-oligomerize with wild-type PA and disrupt the translocation ability of the pore. Here, we constructed a PA mutant library by introducing random mutations into domain II of PA and screened three new DN mutants of PA: V377E, T380S, and I432C. All the mutants inhibited the anthrax toxin action against sensitive cells. V377E had the strongest inhibitory effect and was further confirmed to be able to protect mice against a challenge with anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, we functionally characterized these mutants. The result showed that these mutations did not impair proteolytic activation or oligomer formation of PA, but impeded the prepore-pore conversion of the oligomer. These DN mutants of PA identified in our study may provide valuable information for elucidating the structure-function relationship of PA and for designing therapeutics for anthrax treatment.

  8. Characterization and protective property of Brucella abortus cydC and looP mutants.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Kim, Suk; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Brucella abortus readily multiplies in professional or nonprofessional phagocytes in vitro and is highly virulent in mice. Isogenic mutants of B. abortus biovar 1 strain IVKB9007 lacking the ATP/GDP-binding protein motif A (P-loop) (named looP; designated here the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 mutant) and the ATP-binding/permease protein (cydC; designated here the IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutant) were identified and characterized by transposon mutagenesis using the mini-Tn5Km2 transposon. Both mutants were found to be virtually incapable of intracellular replication in both murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and the HeLa cell line, and their virulence was significantly impaired in BALB/c mice. Respective complementation of the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants restored their ability to survive in vitro and in vivo to a level comparable with that of the wild type. These findings indicate that the cydC and looP genes play important roles in the virulence of B. abortus. In addition, intraperitoneal immunization of mice with a dose of the live IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants provided a high degree of protection against challenge with pathogenic B. abortus strain 544. Both mutants should be evaluated further as a live attenuated vaccine against bovine brucellosis for their ability to stimulate a protective immune response.

  9. High strength concrete provides joint protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, P. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a joint fill material applied on the 24-in. pipe used by Iroquois Gas Transmission Project for its 26-mile Long Island Sound crossing which provides effective joint protection. The 3.35-in. joint fill, made of high instant strength concrete, met stringent requirements for both strength and weight coating, and is environmentally clean to protect the sensitive marine ecosystem. The offshore section, from Bridgeport, Conn., to Long Island, was laid by McDermott, Inc. The high instant strength concrete supplied joint strength and protection during the laying operation, and on the barge itself, where pipe joints are most vulnerable to damage. With joint fill density the same as the concrete already on the pipe, the submerged weight was uniform along the entire length of the marine line, for an essentially seamless coating.

  10. Personal Protective Equipment - Protecting Healthcare Providers in an Ebola Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current Ebola epidemic that has devastated West Africa has infected and killed more healthcare providers than any other outbreak in the history of this virus. An improved understanding of pathogen transmission and the institution of strategies to protect infection healthcare providers are needed in infectious disease outbreak. This review connects what is known about Ebola virus transmission with personal protective equipment designed to arrest nosocomial transmission. Methods Articles pertaining to filovirus transmission and personal protective equipment in filovirus outbreaks were reviewed and are presented. Additionally, studies evaluating PPE as well as donning and doffing strategies are also presented. Findings Personal Protective equipment is one step in a comprehensive infection prevention and control strategy that is required to protect healthcare providers. Given that the Ebola virus is primarily transmitted through direct contact of mucous membranes and cuts in the skin with infected patients and/or their bodily fluids, it is necessary to cover these potential portals of infection with PPE as part of a structured and instructed donning and doffing procedure. Implications Current recommendations about PPE and the donning and doffing processes are based on anecdotal experience. However the use of non-human viruses can help provide evidence based guidelines on both PPE and processes. PMID:26452427

  11. Protective properties of rifampin-resistant rough mutants of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F; Marianelli, C; Tarantino, M; Pistoia, C; Marcon, G; Petrucci, P; Francia, M; Riccardi, G; Pasquali, P

    2005-07-01

    Vaccination against Brucella infections in animals is usually performed by administration of live attenuated smooth B. abortus strain S19 and B. melitensis strain Rev1. They are proven effective vaccines against B. abortus in cattle and against B. melitensis and B. ovis in sheep and goats, respectively. However, both vaccines have the main drawback of inducing O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies that interfere with serologic diagnosis of disease. In addition, they retain residual virulence, being a cause of abortion in pregnant animals and infection in humans. To overcome these problems, one approach is to develop defined rough mutant Brucella strains lacking O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. B. abortus rough strain RB51, a rifampin-resistant mutant of virulent strain B. abortus 2308, is used as a vaccine against B. abortus infection in cattle in some countries. However, RB51 is not effective in sheep, and there is only preliminary evidence that it is effective in goats. In this study, we tested the efficacies of six rifampin-resistant rough strains of B. melitensis in protecting BALB/c mice exposed to B. melitensis infection. The protective properties, as well as both humoral and cellular immune responses, were assessed in comparison with those provided by B. melitensis Rev1 and B. abortus RB51 vaccines. The results indicated that these rough mutants were able to induce a very good level of protection against B. melitensis infection, similar to that provided by Rev1 and superior to that of RB51, without inducing antibodies to O antigen. In addition, all B. melitensis mutants were able to stimulate good production of gamma interferon. The characteristics of these strains encourage further evaluation of them as alternative vaccines to Rev1 in primary host species.

  12. Protective Properties of Rifampin-Resistant Rough Mutants of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Adone, R.; Ciuchini, F.; Marianelli, C.; Tarantino, M.; Pistoia, C.; Marcon, G.; Petrucci, P.; Francia, M.; Riccardi, G.; Pasquali, P.

    2005-01-01

    Vaccination against Brucella infections in animals is usually performed by administration of live attenuated smooth B. abortus strain S19 and B. melitensis strain Rev1. They are proven effective vaccines against B. abortus in cattle and against B. melitensis and B. ovis in sheep and goats, respectively. However, both vaccines have the main drawback of inducing O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies that interfere with serologic diagnosis of disease. In addition, they retain residual virulence, being a cause of abortion in pregnant animals and infection in humans. To overcome these problems, one approach is to develop defined rough mutant Brucella strains lacking O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. B. abortus rough strain RB51, a rifampin-resistant mutant of virulent strain B. abortus 2308, is used as a vaccine against B. abortus infection in cattle in some countries. However, RB51 is not effective in sheep, and there is only preliminary evidence that it is effective in goats. In this study, we tested the efficacies of six rifampin-resistant rough strains of B. melitensis in protecting BALB/c mice exposed to B. melitensis infection. The protective properties, as well as both humoral and cellular immune responses, were assessed in comparison with those provided by B. melitensis Rev1 and B. abortus RB51 vaccines. The results indicated that these rough mutants were able to induce a very good level of protection against B. melitensis infection, similar to that provided by Rev1 and superior to that of RB51, without inducing antibodies to O antigen. In addition, all B. melitensis mutants were able to stimulate good production of gamma interferon. The characteristics of these strains encourage further evaluation of them as alternative vaccines to Rev1 in primary host species. PMID:15972510

  13. Antihistamine provides sex-specific radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.

    1981-04-01

    Rats suffer an early transient performance decrement immediately after a sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation. However, it has been shown that males experience a more severe incapacitation than females. This sex difference has been attributed to the low estrogen levels in the male. In support of this notion, supplemental estrogens in castrated male rats have produced less-severe performance decrements post-irradiation. Antihistamines have also previously been shown to alleviate radiation's effect on behavior. The present study revealed that antihistamines are only effective in altering the behavioral incapacitation of sexually intact male subjects. This contrasts with previous work which indicates that estrogens can only benefit gonadectomized rats. These findings suggest that different mechanisms may underly antihistamine and estrogen radiation protection.

  14. Cross-protective Immunity Against Leptospirosis Elicited by a Live, Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Srikram, Amporn; Zhang, Kunkun; Bartpho, Thanatchaporn; Lo, Miranda; Hoke, David E.; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Adler, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Background. Leptospira species cause leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease found worldwide. Current vaccines against leptospirosis provide protection only against closely related serovars. Methods. We evaluated an attenuated transposon mutant of Leptospira interrogans serovar Manilae (M1352, defective in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis) as a live vaccine against leptospirosis. Hamsters received a single dose of vaccine and were challenged with the homologous serovar (Manilae) and a serologically unrelated heterologous serovar (Pomona). Comparisons were made with killed vaccines. Potential cross-protective antigens against leptospirosis were investigated. Results. Live M1352 vaccine induced superior protection in hamsters against homologous challenge. The live vaccine also stimulated cross-protection against heterologous challenge, with 100% survival (live M1352) versus 40% survival (killed vaccine). Hamsters receiving either vaccine responded to the dominant membrane proteins LipL32 and LipL41. Hamsters receiving the live vaccine additionally recognized LA3961/OmpL36 (unknown function), Loa22 (OmpA family protein, recognized virulence factor), LA2372 (general secretory protein G), and LA1939 (hypothetical protein). Manilae LigA was recognized by M1352 vaccinates, whereas LipL36 was detected in Pomona. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that a live, attenuated vaccine can stimulate cross-protective immunity to L. interrogans and has identified antigens that potentially confer cross-protection against leptospirosis. PMID:21220775

  15. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyesun; Ngunjiri, John M.; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants) are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN) responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens. PMID:27257989

  16. Deletion Mutants of Schmallenberg Virus Are Avirulent and Protect from Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kraatz, Franziska; Wernike, Kerstin; Hechinger, Silke; König, Patricia; Granzow, Harald; Reimann, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since its emergence, Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel insect-transmitted orthobunyavirus which predominantly infects ruminants, has caused a large epidemic in European livestock. Newly developed inactivated vaccines are available, but highly efficacious and safe live vaccines are still not available. Here, the properties of novel recombinant SBV mutants lacking the nonstructural protein NSs (rSBVΔNSs) or NSm (rSBVΔNSm) or both of these proteins (rSBVΔNSs/ΔNSm) were tested in vitro and in vivo in type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR−/−) and in a vaccination/challenge trial in cattle. As for other bunyaviruses, both nonstructural proteins of SBV are not essential for viral growth in vitro. In interferon-defective BHK-21 cells, rSBVΔNSs and rSBVΔNSm replicated to levels comparable to that of the parental rSBV; the double mutant virus, however, showed a mild growth defect, resulting in lower final virus titers. Additionally, both mutants with an NSs deletion induced high levels of interferon and showed a marked growth defect in interferon-competent sheep SFT-R cells. Nevertheless, in IFNAR−/− mice, all mutants were virulent, with the highest mortality rate for rSBVΔNSs and a reduced virulence for the NSm-deleted virus. In cattle, SBV lacking NSm caused viremia and seroconversion comparable to those caused by the wild-type virus, while the NSs and the combined NSs/NSm deletion mutant induced no detectable virus replication or clinical disease after immunization. Furthermore, three out of four cattle immunized once with the NSs deletion mutant and all animals vaccinated with the virus lacking both nonstructural proteins were fully protected against a challenge infection. Therefore, the double deletion mutant will provide the basis for further developments of safe and efficacious modified live SBV vaccines which could be also a model for other viruses of the Simbu serogroup and related orthobunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE SBV induces only

  17. 25 CFR 20.402 - When are protective services provided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.402 When are protective services provided? Protective services are provided when children or adults: (a) Are deprived temporarily or permanently of needed supervision by responsible adults; (b) Are neglected, abused or...

  18. 25 CFR 20.402 - When are protective services provided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.402 When are protective services provided? Protective services are provided when children or adults: (a) Are deprived temporarily or permanently of needed supervision by responsible adults; (b) Are neglected, abused or...

  19. 25 CFR 20.402 - When are protective services provided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.402 When are protective services provided? Protective services are provided when children or adults: (a) Are deprived temporarily or permanently of needed supervision by responsible adults; (b) Are neglected, abused or...

  20. INFRAFRONTIER—providing mutant mouse resources as research tools for the international scientific community

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is a key model organism to investigate mechanism and therapeutics of human disease. The number of targeted genetic mouse models of disease is growing rapidly due to high-throughput production strategies employed by the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) and the development of new, more efficient genome engineering techniques such as CRISPR based systems. We have previously described the European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA) resource and how this international infrastructure provides archiving and distribution worldwide for mutant mouse strains. EMMA has since evolved into INFRAFRONTIER (http://www.infrafrontier.eu), the pan-European research infrastructure for the systemic phenotyping, archiving and distribution of mouse disease models. Here we describe new features including improved search for mouse strains, support for new embryonic stem cell resources, access to training materials via a comprehensive knowledgebase and the promotion of innovative analytical and diagnostic techniques. PMID:25414328

  1. Peripheral neuropathy via mutant tRNA synthetases: Inhibition of protein translation provides a possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of protein translation may be a common pathogenic mechanism for peripheral neuropathy associated with mutant tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). aaRSs are enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNA, thus catalyzing the first step of translation. Dominant mutations in five distinct aaRSs cause Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy, characterized by length‐dependent degeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. Surprisingly, loss of aminoacylation activity is not required for mutant aaRSs to cause CMT. Rather, at least for some mutations, a toxic‐gain‐of‐function mechanism underlies CMT‐aaRS. Interestingly, several mutations in two distinct aaRSs were recently shown to inhibit global protein translation in Drosophila models of CMT‐aaRS, by a mechanism independent of aminoacylation, suggesting inhibition of translation as a common pathogenic mechanism. Future research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the translation defect induced by CMT‐mutant aaRSs should provide novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these incurable diseases. PMID:27352040

  2. Attenuated Francisella asiatica iglC mutant induces protective immunity to francisellosis in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Wiles, Judy; Elzer, Philip; Macaluso, Kevin; Hawke, John P

    2011-01-10

    Francisella asiatica is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that causes fish francisellosis. Fish francisellosis is a severe sub-acute to chronic granulomatous disease with high mortalities and high infectivity rates in cultured and wild fish. To date, there is no approved vaccine for this widespread emergent disease. The goal of this study was to characterize the efficacy of a defined F. asiatica mutant (ΔiglC) as a live attenuated vaccine against subsequent immersion challenge with the wild-type (WT) organism. In previous work, the ΔiglC was found to be attenuated upon intraperitoneal injection and immersion challenges. In vitro, the ΔiglC exhibited reduced growth in tilapia head-kidney derived macrophages, and was significantly attenuated (p<0.001) as demonstrated by cytopathogenic and apoptosis assays. In this study, the ΔiglC was tested to determine its ability to protect tilapia against challenge with high doses (lethal dose 80) of WT bacteria. Naïve tilapia vaccinated by immersion with a suspension of the ΔiglC and subsequently challenged with WT F. asiatica were protected (90% mean percent survival) from the lethal challenges. F. asiatica-specific antibodies produced in response to immunization with the ΔiglC were subsequently found to protect naïve tilapia against high-dose F. asiatica challenge in passive immunization experiments. Significant protection (p<0.001) was obtained when fish were passively immunized and challenged with 10(4) and 10(5)CFU/fish of WT F. asiatica; but not when challenged with 10(6)CFU/fish. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated strain providing protection against F. asiatica in fish.

  3. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induce protection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, W; Hooke, A M

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae 4074, serotype 1, were isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and enrichment with penicillin and D-cycloserine. Of the four temperature-sensitive mutants evaluated in mice, one (A-1) had a tight phenotype (i.e., it ceased replication immediately after transfer to the nonpermissive temperature [37 degrees C]) and three (1-2, 4-1, and 12-1) were coasters that continued replication for up to three generations after transfer to 37 degrees C. The reversion frequencies ranged from 10(-6) to 10(-9), and cutoff temperatures ranged from 33 to 35 degrees C. No major changes were detected in the biochemical profiles; agglutination reactions; electrophoretic profiles of the lipopolysaccharides, outer membrane proteins, and hemolysin proteins; hemolytic titers; or CAMP factor reactions of the mutants and the wild-type bacteria. Groups of 3- to 5-week-old, female ICR mice were immunized intranasally with three doses of 3.5 x 10(6) CFU of the mutants over 3 weeks and subsequently challenged intranasally with 5 50% lethal doses of the parental wild-type. Protection was induced by both the tight and the coaster mutants, with the 4-1 and 12-1 coasters eliciting greater protection (67 and 82%, respectively) than that induced by the A-1 tight mutant (57%). Intranasal immunization with both phenotypes induced serum antibody responses against the surface antigens and the hemolysin protein. PMID:9169752

  4. Vaccination with an Attenuated Ferritin Mutant Protects Mice against Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Pandey, Ruchi; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rodriguez, G Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of tuberculosis affects millions of people worldwide. New tools for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis are urgently needed. We previously showed that a ferritin (bfrB) mutant of M. tuberculosis has altered iron homeostasis and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and to microbicidal effectors produced by activated macrophages. Most importantly, M. tuberculosis lacking BfrB is strongly attenuated in mice, especially, during the chronic phase of infection. In this study, we examined whether immunization with a bfrB mutant could confer protection against subsequent infection with virulent M. tuberculosis in a mouse model. The results show that the protection elicited by immunization with the bfrB mutant is comparable to BCG vaccination with respect to reduction of bacterial burden. However, significant distinctions in the disease pathology and host genome-wide lung transcriptome suggest improved containment of Mtb infection in animals vaccinated with the bfrB mutant, compared to BCG. We found that downmodulation of inflammatory response and enhanced fibrosis, compared to BCG vaccination, is associated with the protective response elicited by the bfrB mutant.

  5. Differential PERP regulation by TP63 mutants provides insight into AEC pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Veronica G; Pathak, Navneeta; Koster, Maranke I; Attardi, Laura D

    2009-09-01

    Ankyloblepharon Ectodermal Dysplasia and Cleft Lip/Palate (AEC) or Hay-Wells Syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a variety of phenotypes in ectodermal derivatives, including severe skin erosions, ankyloblepharon, coarse and wiry hair, scalp dermatitis, and dystrophic nails. AEC is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the TP63 transcription factor, specifically in the Sterile Alpha Motif (SAM) domain. The exact mechanism, however, by which these specific TP63 mutations lead to the observed spectrum of phenotypes is unclear. Analysis of individual TP63 target genes provides a means to understand specific aspects of the phenotypes associated with AEC. PERP is a TP63 target critical for cell-cell adhesion due to its participation in desmosomal adhesion complexes. As PERP null mice display symptoms characteristic of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, we hypothesized that PERP dysfunction might contribute to AEC. Using luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrate here that PERP induction is in fact compromised with some, but not all, AEC-patient derived TP63 mutants. Through analysis of skin biopsies from AEC patients, we show further that a subset of these display aberrant PERP expression, suggesting the possibility that PERP dysregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. These findings demonstrate that distinct AEC TP63 mutants can differentially compromise expression of downstream targets, providing a rationale for the variable spectra of symptoms seen in AEC patients. Elucidating how specific TP63 target genes contribute to the pathogenesis of AEC will ultimately help design novel approaches to diagnose and treat AEC. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Glass encapsulation provides extra protection for IC semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelp, W. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Oxide-passivated semiconductor chip is given protective glass coating by means of vapor deposition over metallic substrate of integrated circuit (IC). Method provides more reliable oxide-passivation and hermetic sealing in current use. Chips and scratches incurred during dicing, testing, and assembly are markedly reduced.

  7. Providing health care to improve community perceptions of protected areas.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Colin A; van Bavel, Bianca; Boodman, Carl; Ghai, Ria R; Gogarten, Jan F; Hartter, Joel; Mechak, Lauren E; Omeja, Patrick A; Poonawala, Sofia; Tuli, Dan; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-10-01

    Impoverished communities often turn to illegal extraction of resources from protected areas to alleviate economic pressures or to make monetary gains. Such practices can cause ecological damage and threaten animal populations. These communities also often face a high disease burden and typically do not have access to affordable health care. Here we argue that these two seemingly separate challenges may have a common solution. In particular, providing health care to communities adjacent to protected areas may be an efficient and effective way to reduce the disease burden while also improving local perceptions about protected areas, potentially reducing illegal extraction. We present a case study of a health centre on the edge of Kibale National Park, Uganda. The centre has provided care to c. 7,200 people since 2008 and its outreach programme extends to c. 4,500 schoolchildren each year. Contrasting the provision of health care to other means of improving community perceptions of protected areas suggests that health clinics have potential as a conservation tool in some situations and should be considered in future efforts to manage protected areas.

  8. Providing health care to improve community perceptions of protected areas

    PubMed Central

    van Bavel, Bianca; Boodman, Carl; Ghai, Ria R.; Gogarten, Jan F.; Hartter, Joel; Mechak, Lauren E.; Omeja, Patrick A.; Poonawala, Sofia; Tuli, Dan; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Impoverished communities often turn to illegal extraction of resources from protected areas to alleviate economic pressures or to make monetary gains. Such practices can cause ecological damage and threaten animal populations. These communities also often face a high disease burden and typically do not have access to affordable health care. Here we argue that these two seemingly separate challenges may have a common solution. In particular, providing health care to communities adjacent to protected areas may be an efficient and effective way to reduce the disease burden while also improving local perceptions about protected areas, potentially reducing illegal extraction. We present a case study of a health centre on the edge of Kibale National Park, Uganda. The centre has provided care to c. 7,200 people since 2008 and its outreach programme extends to c. 4,500 schoolchildren each year. Contrasting the provision of health care to other means of improving community perceptions of protected areas suggests that health clinics have potential as a conservation tool in some situations and should be considered in future efforts to manage protected areas. PMID:26456977

  9. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Fitts, Eric C.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens. PMID:27891321

  10. Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants.

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Kirtley, Michelle L; Fitts, Eric C; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Andersson, Jourdan A; Cong, Yingzi; Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route. These mutants were deleted either for the Braun lipoprotein genes (lppA and lppB) or in combination with the msbB gene, which encodes an acetyltransferase required for lipid A modification of lipopolysaccharide. Both the mutants were attenuated (100% animal survival) and triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Comparable levels of IgG and its isotypes were produced in mice infected with wild-type (WT) S. typhimurium or its aforementioned mutant strains. The ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized animals resulted in the production of higher levels of fecal IgA and serum cytokines during later stages of vaccination (adaptive response). A significant production of interleukin-6 from T-cells was also noted in the ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutant-immunized mice when compared to that of the ΔlppAB mutant. On the other hand, IL-17A production was significantly more in the serum of ΔlppAB mutant-immunized mice (innate response) with a stronger splenic T-cell proliferative and tumor-necrosis factor-α production. Based on 2-dimensional gel analysis, alterations in the levels of several proteins were observed in both the mutant strains when compared to that in WT S. typhimurium and could be associated with the higher immunogenicity of the mutants. Finally, both ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants provided complete protection to immunized mice against a lethal oral challenge dose of WT S. typhimurium. Thus, these mutants may serve as excellent vaccine candidates and also provide a platform for delivering heterologous antigens.

  11. Reducing canonical Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway confers protection against mutant Huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pascale; Besson, Marie-Thérèse; Devaux, Jérôme; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by movement disorders, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. HD is caused by expanded CAG tract within the coding region of Huntingtin protein. Despite major insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to HD, no effective cure is yet available. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) has been reported to alter the stability and levels of β-Catenin, a key molecule in cell adhesion and signal transduction in Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway. However it remains to establish whether manipulation of Wg/Wnt signaling can impact HD pathology. We here investigated the phenotypic interactions between mHtt and Wg/Wnt signaling by using the power of Drosophila genetics. We provide compelling evidence that reducing Armadillo/β-Catenin levels confers protection and that this beneficial effect is correlated with the inactivation of the canonical Wg/Wnt signaling pathway. Knockdowns of Wnt ligands or of the downstream transcription factor Pangolin/TCF both ameliorate the survival of HD flies. Similarly, overexpression of one Armadillo/β-Catenin destruction complex component (Axin, APC2 or Shaggy/GSK-3β) increases the lifespan of HD flies. Loss of functional Armadillo/β-Catenin not only abolishes neuronal intrinsic but also glia-induced alterations in HD flies. Our findings highlight that restoring canonical Wg/Wnt signaling may be of therapeutic value.

  12. Parkin Protects Against LRRK2 G2019S Mutant-induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee-Hoe; Mok, Shaun Z.S.; Koh, Cherlyn; Ouyang, Xuezhi; Fivaz, Marc L.; Tan, Eng-King; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Yu, Fengwei; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinas e 2 (LRRK2) gene are currently recognized as the most common genetic cause of parkinsonism. Among the large number of LRRK2 mutations identified to date, the G2019S variant is the most common. In Asia however, another LRRK2 variant, G2385R, appears to occur more frequently. To better understand the contribution of different LRRK2 variants towards disease pathogenesis, we generated transgenic Drosophila over-expressing various human LRRK2 alleles, including wild type, G2019S, Y1699C and G2385R LRRK2. We found that transgenic flies harboring G2019S, Y1699C or G2385R LRRK2 variant, but not the wild type protein, exhibit late-onset loss of DA neurons in selected clusters that is accompanied by locomotion deficits. Further, LRRK2 mutant flies also display reduced lifespan and increased sensitivity to rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. Importantly, co-expression of human parkin in LRRK2 G2019S-expressing flies provides significant protection against DA neurodegeneration that occurs with age or in response to rotenone. Taken together, our results suggest a potential link between LRRK2, parkin and mitochondria in the pathogenesis of LRRK2-related parkinsonism. PMID:19741132

  13. Cystatin C protects neuronal cells against mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Hayakawa, T; Wakasugi, K; Yamanaka, K

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and progressive loss of motor neurons. Cystatin C (CysC), an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is a major protein component of Bunina bodies observed in the spinal motor neurons of sporadic ALS and is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of ALS patients. Despite prominent deposition of CysC in ALS, the roles of CysC in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we identified the neuroprotective activity of CysC against ALS-linked mutant Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1)-mediated toxicity. We found that exogenously added CysC protected neuronal cells including primary cultured motor neurons. Moreover, the neuroprotective property of CysC was dependent on the coordinated activation of two distinct pathways: autophagy induction through AMPK-mTOR pathway and inhibition of cathepsin B. Furthermore, exogenously added CysC was transduced into the cells and aggregated in the cytosol under oxidative stress conditions, implying a relationship between the neuroprotective activity of CysC and Bunina body formation. These data suggest CysC is an endogenous neuroprotective agent and targeting CysC in motor neurons may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. PMID:25356866

  14. Selection and evaluation of the immunogenicity of protective antigen mutants as anthrax vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Roehrl, Michael H; Basar, Emre; Wang, Julia Y

    2008-02-13

    Protective antigen (PA) is a central component of anthrax toxin and a major antigen in anthrax vaccines. However, the use of native PA as a vaccine is not optimal. If administered to people who have been freshly exposed to anthrax, PA may actually aid in anthrax toxin formation and thus may pose a serious safety concern for postexposure vaccination applications. A non-functional PA mutant may be a much safer alternative. To identify an improved anthrax vaccine antigen, we examined four non-functional mutants of PA, each being impaired in a critical step of the cellular intoxication pathway of PA. These mutants were Rec(-) (unable to bind PA-receptors), SSSR (resistant to activation by furin), Oligo(-) (unable to form oligomers), and DNI (Dominant Negative Inhibitory, unable to form endosomal transmembrane pores). When tested in mice and after three doses of immunization, all four mutants were highly potent in eliciting PA-specific, toxin-neutralizing antibodies, with immunogenicity increasing in the order of PAprotective epitopes of PA. Our study demonstrates that PA-based vaccines could be improved both in terms of safety and efficacy by strategic mutations that not only render PA non-functional but also simultaneously enhance its immunogenic potency. Recombinant PA mutants, particularly DNI, hold great promise as better and safer antigens than wild-type PA for use in postexposure

  15. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine.

  16. Protection of rabbits against enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) using an intimin null mutant

    PubMed Central

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vandekerchove, Dominique; Mariën, Jonas; Laevens, Hans; Imberechts, Hein; Peeters, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Background Diarrhea and mortality resulting from infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are of major economic importance in the rabbit meat industry. There is a growing need for an effective vaccine to cope with these problems and to reduce the use of antibiotics. EPEC are characterized by an attaching and effacing virulence mechanism. This is partly mediated by the intimate binding between an adhesin, called intimin, and a translocated receptor (Tir) of prokaryote origin. We constructed an intimin deletion mutant of the rabbit EPEC (REPEC) wild-type strain 97/241.6 (bio-/serogroup 3-/O15) and examined its protective capacity. Results After verifying its complete loss of virulence, we used the attenuated strain in vaccination-challenge experiments in which complete protection against a homologous, but virulent, strain was observed. The attenuated strain was able to persist in the intestinal lumen, where it elicited an immune response against EPEC-related virulence proteins, as was shown using an EspB-specific ELISA. Despite the priming of an immune response and the generation of specific antibodies, the intimin mutant was not able to fully protect rabbits against challenges with REPEC strains of other bio-/serogroups. Conclusion These data indicate that protection against REPEC infections is at least partly bio-/serogroup dependent and a multivalent vaccine may be needed for protection against the full range of REPEC types. Such a combination vaccine may be developed using intimin null mutants, as the latter were clearly shown to be safe and effective against homologous infections. PMID:16796739

  17. An updated Declaration of Helsinki will provide more protection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cecil B

    2013-06-01

    Almost 50 years ago, the World Medical Association adopted the Declaration of Helsinki as an ethical guide for research involving human subjects. There are now proposed revisions under consideration that will provide additional protection for study participants as well as increased clarity regarding the responsibilities of those conducting the research. Making these changes is important in a complex environment where what is ethical is not always self-evident.

  18. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  19. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Elicit Protective Immune Responses to Homologous and Heterologous Serovars in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dueger, E. L.; House, J. K.; Heithoff, D. M.; Mahan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella DNA adenine methylase (Dam) mutants that lack or overproduce Dam are highly attenuated for virulence in mice and confer protection against murine typhoid fever. To determine whether vaccines based on Dam are efficacious in poultry, a Salmonella Dam− vaccine was evaluated in the protection of chicken broilers against oral challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serovars. A Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccine strain was attenuated for virulence in day-of-hatch chicks more than 100,000-fold. Vaccination of chicks elicited cross-protective immune responses, as evidenced by reduced colonization (10- to 10,000-fold) of the gastrointestinal tract (ileum, cecum, and feces) and visceral organs (bursa and spleen) after challenge with homologous (Typhimurium F98) and heterologous (Enteritidis 4973 and S. enterica O6,14,24: e,h-monophasic) Salmonella serovars that are implicated in Salmonella infection of poultry. The protection conferred was observed for the organ or the maximum CFU/tissue/bird as a unit of analysis, suggesting that Dam mutant strains may serve as the basis for the development of efficacious poultry vaccines for the containment of Salmonella. PMID:11705984

  20. Medical Provider Ballistic Protection at Active Shooter Events.

    PubMed

    Stopyra, Jason P; Bozeman, William P; Callaway, David W; Winslow, James; McGinnis, Henderson D; Sempsrott, Justin; Evans-Taylor, Lisa; Alson, Roy L

    2016-01-01

    There is some controversy about whether ballistic protective equipment (body armor) is required for medical responders who may be called to respond to active shooter mass casualty incidents. In this article, we describe the ongoing evolution of recommendations to optimize medical care to injured victims at such an incident. We propose that body armor is not mandatory for medical responders participating in a rapid-response capacity, in keeping with the Hartford Consensus and Arlington Rescue Task Force models. However, we acknowledge that the development and implementation of these programs may benefit from the availability of such equipment as one component of risk mitigation. Many police agencies regularly retire body armor on a defined time schedule before the end of its effective service life. Coordination with law enforcement may allow such retired body armor to be available to other public safety agencies, such as fire and emergency medical services, providing some degree of ballistic protection to medical responders at little or no cost during the rare mass casualty incident. To provide visual demonstration of this concept, we tested three "retired" ballistic vests with ages ranging from 6 to 27 years. The vests were shot at close range using police-issue 9mm, .40 caliber, .45 caliber, and 12-gauge shotgun rounds. Photographs demonstrate that the vests maintained their ballistic protection and defeated all of these rounds. 2016.

  1. An innovative method of providing total breaker failure protection

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, N.T.; Waser, D.

    1995-12-31

    Breaker failure relaying has been generally achieved through the use of a current monitoring relay to determine whether current continues to flow into a fault after a breaker has been instructed to interrupt the circuit. If current continues to flow after a predefined period of time, the circuit breaker is considered to have failed. Steps must then be taken to trip the next set of upstream breakers in the power system to remove the faulted circuit and prevent system damage. However, with industrial power systems, this may be the utility`s breakers on the feeding transmission line. Regardless, breaker failure schemes must be designed to isolate both the faulted circuit and the failed circuit breaker. This paper discusses a new and innovative method of protecting a circuit breaker from the failure described above, plus other failures that go unprotected with conventional schemes, thus providing ``total`` breaker failure protection.

  2. An innovative method of providing total breaker failure protection

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, N.T.; Waser, D.

    1996-09-01

    Breaker failure relaying has been generally achieved through the use of a current monitoring relay to determine whether current continues to flow into a fault after a breaker has been instructed to interrupt the circuit. If current continues to flow after a predefined period of time, the circuit breaker is considered to have failed. Steps must then be taken to trip the next set of upstream breakers in the power system to remove the faulted circuit and prevent system damage. However, with industrial power systems, this may be the utility`s breakers on the feeding transmission line. Regardless, breaker failure schemes must be designed to isolate both the faulted circuit and the failed circuit breaker. This paper discusses a new and innovative method of protecting a circuit breaker from the failure described above, plus other failures that go unprotected with conventional schemes, this providing total breaker failure protection.

  3. Overexpressed mutant G93A superoxide dismutase protects calcineurin from inactivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shipeng; Wang, Xutong; Klee, Claude B; Krieger, Charles

    2004-06-18

    Previous studies have claimed that there is a failure of a mutant form of superoxide dismutase (mSOD) to protect the protein phosphatase, calcineurin (CN), against inactivation in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as determined in a murine model of ALS resulting from overexpression of mSOD (G93A). In contrast to previous studies, we find that mice overexpressing G93A mSOD have no statistically significant differences in the expression, or activity, of CN. However, CN from G93A mSOD overexpressing mice is significantly more protected against inactivation than non-transgenic mice that do not overexpress SOD. This reduced inactivation of CN is a consequence of increased expression of G93A mSOD. Thus, like wild-type SOD, G93A mSOD protects CN against inactivation.

  4. Pathogenicity and protective activity in pregnant goats of a Brucella melitensis Deltaomp25 deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M D; Cloeckaert, A; Hagius, S D; Samartino, L E; Fulton, W T; Walker, J V; Enright, F M; Booth, N J; Elzer, P H

    2002-06-01

    The Brucella melitensis mutant BM 25, which lacks the major 25 kDa outer membrane protein Omp25, has previously been found to be attenuated in the murine brucellosis model. In the present study, the capacity of the Deltaomp25 mutant to colonise and cause abortions in the caprine host was evaluated. The vaccine potential of BM 25 was also investigated in goats. Inoculation of nine pregnant goats in late gestation with the B. melitensis mutant resulted in 0/9 abortions, while the virulent parental strain, B. melitensis 16M, induced 6/6 dams to abort (P<0.001, n=6). BM 25 also colonised fewer adults (P<0.05, n=6) and kids (P<0.01, n=6) than strain 16M. The Deltaomp25 mutant was found capable of transient in vivo colonisation of non-pregnant goats for two weeks post-infection. Owing to the ability of BM 25 to colonise both non-pregnant and pregnant adults without inducing abortions, a vaccine efficacy study was performed. Vaccination of goats prior to breeding with either BM 25 or the current caprine vaccine B. melitensis strain Rev. 1 resulted in 100 per cent protection against abortion following challenge in late gestation with virulent strain 16M (P<0.05, n=7). However, unlike strain Rev. 1, BM 25 does not appear to cause abortions in late gestation based on this study with a small number of animals. The B. melitensis Deltaomp25 mutant, BM 25, may be a safe and efficacious alternative to strain Rev. 1 when dealing with goat herds of mixed age and pregnancy status.

  5. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, Forrest B.; Jones, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  6. Corrosion Protection Provided by PV Module Packaging Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G. J.; Kempe, M. D.; Terwilliger, K. M.; McMahon, T. J.

    2005-11-01

    The ability of glass/glass and glass/breathable backsheet constructions laminated with various encapsulant and/or edge seal materials to protect thin-film aluminum coatings deposited onto glass substrates was assessed. Although they provide the best moisture barrier available, glass/glass laminate constructions can trap harmful compounds that catalyze moisture-driven corrosion of the aluminum. Constructions with breathable backsheets allow higher rates of moisture ingress, but also allow egress of deleterious substances that can result in decreased corrosion.

  7. Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, R.S.; Freeman, S.; Clifton, D.R.; Morrel, J.; Brown, G.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) 'plant-defense' response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and -susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1 colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.

  8. Biochemical analysis of plant protection afforded by a nonpathogenic endophytic mutant of Colletotrichum magna

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, R.S.; Rodriguez, R.J. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA . Dept. of Botany); Clifton, D.R.; Morrel, J.; Brown, G. ); Freeman, S. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-02-01

    A nonpathogenic mutant of Colletotrichum magna (path-1) was previously shown to protect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings from anthracnose disease elicited by wild-type C. magna. Disease protection was observed in stems of path-1-colonized cucurbits but not in cotyledons, indicating that path-1 conferred tissue-specific and/or localized protection. Plant biochemical indicators of a localized and systemic (peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, lignin, and salicylic acid) plant-defense response were investigated in anthracnose-resistant and-susceptible cultivars of cucurbit seedlings exposed to four treatments: (1) water (control), (2) path-1 conidia, (3) wild-type conidia, and (4) challenge conditions (inoculation into path-1 conidia for 48 h and then exposure to wild-type conidia). Collectively, these analyses indicated that disease protection in path-1-colonized plants was correlated with the ability of these plants to mount a defense response more rapidly and to equal or greater levels than plants exposed to wild-type C. magna alone. Watermelon plants colonized with path-1 were also protected against disease caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare and Fusarium oxysporum. A model based on the kinetics of plant-defense activation is presented to explain the mechanism of path-1-conferred disease protection.

  9. Antisocial luxO Mutants Provide a Stationary-Phase Survival Advantage in Vibrio fischeri ES114

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrough, John H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The squid light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri controls bioluminescence using two acyl-homoserine lactone pheromone-signaling (PS) systems. The first of these systems to be activated during host colonization, AinS/AinR, produces and responds to N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-AHL). We screened activity of a PainS-lacZ transcriptional reporter in a transposon mutant library and found three mutants with decreased reporter activity, low C8-AHL output, and other traits consistent with low ainS expression. However, the transposon insertions were unrelated to these phenotypes, and genome resequencing revealed that each mutant had a distinct point mutation in luxO. In the wild type, LuxO is phosphorylated by LuxU and then activates transcription of the small RNA (sRNA) Qrr, which represses ainS indirectly by repressing its activator LitR. The luxO mutants identified here encode LuxU-independent, constitutively active LuxO* proteins. The repeated appearance of these luxO mutants suggested that they had some fitness advantage during construction and/or storage of the transposon mutant library, and we found that luxO* mutants survived better and outcompeted the wild type in prolonged stationary-phase cultures. From such cultures we isolated additional luxO* mutants. In all, we isolated LuxO* allelic variants with the mutations P41L, A91D, F94C, P98L, P98Q, V106A, V106G, T107R, V108G, R114P, L205F, H319R, H324R, and T335I. Based on the current model of the V. fischeri PS circuit, litR knockout mutants should resemble luxO* mutants; however, luxO* mutants outcompeted litR mutants in prolonged culture and had much poorer host colonization competitiveness than is reported for litR mutants, illustrating additional complexities in this regulatory circuit. IMPORTANCE Our results provide novel insight into the function of LuxO, which is a key component of pheromone signaling (PS) cascades in several members of the Vibrionaceae. Our results also contribute to an

  10. Protective effect of glutathione S-transferase-fused mutant staphylococcal enterotoxin C against Staphylococcus aureus-induced bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bao-Jun; Lin, Yan-Chun; Wang, Quan-Kai; Qian, Ai-Dong; Nakane, Akio; Hu, Dong-Liang; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2010-05-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that immunization with nontoxic mutant staphylococcal enterotoxin C (mSEC) provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection in mouse models. In the present study, we investigated whether vaccination with a glutathione S-transferase-fused SEC (GST-mSEC) can protect against S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis. Cows were immunized with the GST-mSEC plus alum adjuvant and then challenged with viable S. aureus by an intramammary route. The results showed that immunization with GST-mSEC-induced production of SEC-specific antibodies in sera and the high titers of antibodies could persist for over 12 weeks. Importantly, immunization with GST-mSEC also induced production of SEC-specific antibodies in milk. The somatic cell counts in the milk from S. aureus challenged quarters of vaccinated lactating cows were significantly lower than those of the non-vaccinated control animals. Furthermore, the sera from GST-mSEC-immunized cows significantly inhibited interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from mouse spleen cells induced by wild-type SEC. These results suggest that vaccination with GST-mSEC provides protection against S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis and that the protection might be mediated by SEC-neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Individual insurance: how much financial protection does it provide?

    PubMed

    Gabel, Jon; Dhont, Kelley; Whitmore, Heidi; Pickreign, Jeremy

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the comparative financial protection provided by individual and group health insurance. Data sources include two national surveys of employer-based health plans and e-health insurance listings for individual coverage on the World Wide Web. Data on the use and cost of services are from the National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES), a national household survey of Americans. We estimate that individual insurance pays on average 63 percent of the health care bill, whereas group health insurance pays 75 percent. Deductibles are much higher in individual insurance, and covered benefits are more meager. At 200 percent of poverty, the top 25 percent of health care users with individual coverage would spend 11 percent of their income for out-of-pocket health care expenses, as opposed to 6 percent for persons with group coverage.

  12. Self-contained clothing system provides protection against hazardous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Self-contained clothing system protects personnel against hazardous environments. The clothing has an environmental control system and a complete protection envelope consisting of an outer garment, inner garment, underwear, boots, gloves, and helmet.

  13. Protective and therapeutic effects of the resuscitation-promoting factor domain and its mutants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanmin; Song, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Yong; Qiu, Yi; Mao, Fengfeng; Zhang, Caiqin; Bai, Bing; Zhang, Hai; Wu, Shaoping; Shi, Changhong

    2015-04-01

    The resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), a secretory protein first reported in Micrococcus luteus, plays a critical role in mycobacterial survival and infection. There are five functionally redundant Rpf-like proteins identified in M. tuberculosis (Mtb). All these Rpfs share a conserved Rpf domain (Rpfd) composed of approximately 70 amino acids, which possesses the same biological functions as the full-length Rpf protein. Glutamic acid at position 54 in Rpfd (E54) has been implicated in mediating multiple physiological processes, and a single amino acid substitution at residue E54 can affect the protein biological activity. In order to determine the effects of different amino acid substitutions of E54 in Rpfd on its immunogenic activity, we generated three recombinant Rpfd mutants, Rpfd1 (E54K), Rpfd2 (E54A) and Rpfd3 (E54K and D48A), based on T-cell epitope prediction and tested their potential protective/therapeutic effects against Mtb in mice. Our results demonstrated that replacement of E54 by different amino acids in Rpfd distinctively influenced its resuscitation-promoting activities and Th1-type immune responses induced in mice. Administration of Rpfd2 mutant enhanced Th1-type cellular responses (IFN-γ and IL-2) in mice (P < 0.05, Rpfd2 versus control) and provided effective protection against Mtb in mice by significantly inhibiting the growth of Mtb during the initial stage of infection. Four weeks after the challenge, the slightest pathological injury in lung was observed in the Rpfd2-immunized group among all three Rfpd mutant-immunized groups. Furthermore, Rpfd2 therapy significantly decreased the bacterial load in lung and alleviated histopathological damage in Mtb-infected mice. Together, our results suggest Rpfd2 as a novel effective vaccine candidate against Mtb. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. EPA Provides $1 Million to Protect Wetlands in New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $1,073,000 to Ocean County College, the New Jersey Sports and Exhibition Authority, and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to better protect wetlands throughout New Je

  15. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  16. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies.

  17. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever.

    PubMed

    Warimwe, George M; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K; Al-dubaib, Musaad A; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-02-05

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A 'One Health' vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs.

  18. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  19. Tomato mutants altered in bacterial disease resistance provide evidence for a new locus controlling pathogen recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Salmeron, J M; Barker, S J; Carland, F M; Mehta, A Y; Staskawicz, B J

    1994-01-01

    We have employed a genetic approach to study the resistance of tomato to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. Resistance to P. s. tomato depends upon expression of the Pto locus in tomato, which encodes a protein with similarity to serine/threonine protein kinases and recognizes pathogen strains expressing the avirulence gene avrPto. Eleven tomato mutants were isolated with altered resistance to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. We identified mutations both in the Pto resistance locus and in a new locus designated Prf (for Pseudomonas resistance and fenthion sensitivity). The genetic approach allowed us to dissect the roles of these loci in signal transduction in response to pathogen attack. Lines carrying mutations in the Pto locus vary 200-fold in the degree to which they are susceptible to P. s. tomato strains expressing avrPto. The pto mutants retain sensitivity to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion; this trait segregates with Pto in genetic crosses. This result suggested that contrary to previous hypotheses, the Pto locus controls pathogen recognition but not fenthion sensitivity. Interestingly, mutations in the prf locus result in both complete susceptibility to P. s. tomato and insensitivity to fenthion, suggesting that Prf plays a role in tomato signaling in response to both pathogen elicitors and fenthion. Because pto and prf mutations do not alter recognition of Xanthomonas campestris strains expressing avrBsP, an avirulence gene recognized by all tested tomato cultivars, Prf does not play a general role in disease resistance but possibly functions specifically in resistance against P. s. tomato. Genetic analysis of F2 populations from crosses of pto and prf homozygotes indicated that the Pto and Prf loci are tightly linked. PMID:7911348

  20. Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 protects against mutant huntingtin-induced abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and neuronal damage in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2015-12-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the protective effects of the mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi1) in striatal neurons that stably express mutant Htt (STHDhQ111/Q111) and wild-type (WT) Htt (STHDhQ7/Q7). Using gene expression analysis, biochemical methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal microscopy methods, we studied (i) mitochondrial and synaptic activities by measuring mRNA and the protein levels of mitochondrial and synaptic genes, (ii) mitochondrial function and (iii) ultra-structural changes in mutant Htt neurons relative to WT Htt neurons. We also studied these parameters in Mdivil-treated and untreated WT and mutant Htt neurons. Increased expressions of mitochondrial fission genes, decreased expression of fusion genes and synaptic genes were found in the mutant Htt neurons relative to the WT Htt neurons. Electron microscopy of the mutant Htt neurons revealed a significantly increased number of mitochondria, indicating that mutant Htt fragments mitochondria. Biochemical analysis revealed defective mitochondrial functioning. In the Mdivil-treated mutant Htt neurons, fission genes were down-regulated, and fusion genes were up-regulated, suggesting that Mdivil decreases fission activity. Synaptic genes were up-regulated, and mitochondrial function was normal in the Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Immunoblotting findings of mitochondrial and synaptic proteins agreed with mRNA findings. The TEM studies revealed that increased numbers of structurally intact mitochondria were present in Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Increased synaptic and mitochondrial fusion genes and decreased fission genes were found in the Mdivi1-treated WT Htt neurons, indicating that Mdivi1 beneficially affects healthy neurons. Taken together, these findings suggest that Mdivi1 is protective against mutant Htt-induced mitochondrial and synaptic damage in HD neurons and that Mdivi1 may be a promising molecule for the treatment of HD patients.

  1. Wild type but not mutant APP is involved in protective adaptive responses against oxidants.

    PubMed

    Cenini, Giovanna; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Lanni, Cristina; Bonini, Sara Anna; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Butterfield, David Allan; Memo, Maurizio; Uberti, Daniela

    2010-06-01

    This study points out different behaviour between HEK cells overexpressing wild-type or mutant APP when exposed to oxidative insult. Although apparently both APPwt and APPmut overexpression conferred resistance to oxidative insult, some differences in terms of degree of protection was observed in the two clones. We found that the two clones differed, especially, in terms of redox profile. HEK-APPmut cells were characterized by higher levels of oxidative markers in comparison with HEK-APPwt. In addition, SOD activity appeared more efficient in HEK-APPwt than in HEK-APPmut, thus justifying the differences in terms of cell survival in the two clones. We suggest that, according to "hormesis theory", in HEK-APPwt cells low amount of oxidative stress can exert a beneficial effect that at a higher intensity results harmful. In contrast, HEK-APPmut cells lost this stress resistance probably because the degree of oxidative stress is too high and the antioxidant enzymes are themselves compromised.

  2. Protection of rainbow trout against yersiniosis by lpxD mutant Yersinia ruckeri.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Ozturk, Rafet C; Kahraman, Umit C; Capkin, Erol

    2016-08-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is a Gram negative bacteria causing yersiniosis in freshwater and marine fish. Lipid A, important for pathogenesis of Gram negative bacteria, biosynthesis pathway requires nine enzyme catalyzed steps. Although there are nine genes encoding lipid A biosynthesis in bacteria, biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides relies on lpxD gene that encodes the third pathway enzyme. The roles of LpxD in Y. ruckeri virulence have not been studied. In the present study, in-frameshift deletion of lpxD gene and their role in Y. ruckeri virulence in rainbow trout were determined. For this purpose, 92% of the Y. ruckeri lpxD genes were deleted by homologous recombination. After running in SDS-PAGE and staining with silver stain, no LPS was detectable in the Y. ruckeri ΔlpxD mutant. Virulence and immunogenicity of the Y. ruckeri ΔlpxD mutant (YrΔlpxD) were determined in rainbow trout. Rainbow trout immunized with YrΔlpxD with immersion, or intraperitoneal injection method displayed superior protection (relative percentage survival ≥ 84%) after exposure to wild type Y. ruckeri. In conclusion, our results indicated that deletion of the lpxD gene causes significant attenuation of Y. ruckeri in rainbow trout, and LPS deficient YrΔlpxD could be used as a live attenuated vaccine against Y. ruckeri in rainbow trout. This vaccine can protect fish and it can be applied to fish with different methods such as immersion or injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Personal Protective Equipment: Protecting Health Care Providers in an Ebola Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Weber, David; Wohl, David A

    2015-11-01

    The recent Ebola epidemic that devastated West Africa has infected and killed more health care providers than any other outbreak in the history of this virus. An improved understanding of pathogen transmission and the institution of strategies to protect health care providers against infection are needed in infectious disease outbreaks. This review connects what is known about Ebola virus transmission with personal protective equipment (PPE) designed to arrest nosocomial transmission. Articles pertaining to filovirus transmission and PPE in filovirus outbreaks were reviewed and findings are presented. In addition, studies that evaluated PPE and donning and doffing strategies are presented. PPE is one step in a comprehensive infection prevention and control strategy that is required to protect health care providers. Given that the Ebola virus is primarily transmitted through direct contact of mucous membranes and cuts in the skin with infected patients and/or their bodily fluids, it is necessary to cover these potential portals of infection with PPE as part of a structured and instructed donning and doffing procedure. Current recommendations about PPE and the donning and doffing processes are based on anecdotal experience. However, the use of non-human viruses can help provide evidence-based guidelines on both PPE and donning and doffing processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endothelin-2-Mediated Protection of Mutant Photoreceptors in Inherited Photoreceptor Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bramall, Alexa N.; Szego, Michael J.; Pacione, Laura R.; Chang, Inik; Diez, Eduardo; D'Orleans-Juste, Pedro; Stewart, Duncan J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; McInnes, Roderick R.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the Endothelin-2 (Edn2) mRNA is greatly increased in the photoreceptors (PRs) of mouse models of inherited PR degeneration (IPD). To examine the role of Edn2 in mutant PR survival, we generated Edn2−/− mice carrying homozygous Pde6brd1 alleles or the Tg(RHO P347S) transgene. In the Edn2−/− background, PR survival increased 110% in Pde6brd1/rd1 mice at post-natal (PN) day 15, and 60% in Tg(RHO P347S) mice at PN40. In contrast, PR survival was not increased in retinal explants of Pde6brd1/rd1; Edn2−/− mice. This finding, together with systemic abnormalities in Edn2−/− mice, suggested that the increased survival of mutant PRs in the Edn2−/− background resulted at least partly from the systemic EDN2 loss of function. To examine directly the role of EDN2 in mutant PRs, we used a scAAV5-Edn2 cDNA vector to restore Edn2 expression in Pde6brd1/rd1; Edn2−/− PRs and observed an 18% increase in PR survival at PN14. Importantly, PR survival was also increased after injection of scAAV5-Edn2 into Pde6brd1/rd1 retinas, by 31% at PN15. Together, these findings suggest that increased Edn2 expression is protective to mutant PRs. To begin to elucidate Edn2-mediated mechanisms that contribute to PR survival, we used microarray analysis and identified a cohort of 20 genes with >4-fold increased expression in Tg(RHO P347S) retinas, including Fgf2. Notably, increased expression of the FGF2 protein in Tg(RHO P347S) PRs was ablated in Tg(RHO P347S); Edn2−/− retinas. Our findings indicate that the increased expression of PR Edn2 increases PR survival, and suggest that the Edn2-dependent increase in PR expression of FGF2 may contribute to the augmented survival. PMID:23469133

  5. 25 CFR 20.402 - When are protective services provided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.402 When are protective... or permanently of needed supervision by responsible adults; (b) Are neglected, abused or...

  6. 25 CFR 20.402 - When are protective services provided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.402 When are protective... or permanently of needed supervision by responsible adults; (b) Are neglected, abused or...

  7. Hyper-attenuated MTBVAC erp mutant protects against tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Solans, Luis; Uranga, Santiago; Aguilo, Nacho; Arnal, Carmen; Gomez, Ana Belen; Monzon, Marta; Badiola, Juan Jose; Gicquel, Brigitte; Martin, Carlos

    2014-09-08

    Safety of individuals at risk of immune suppression is an important concern for live vaccines. The new-generation tuberculosis vaccine candidate MTBVAC, a genetically engineered doubly attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutant with deletions in phoP and fadD26 virulence genes has demonstrated comparable safety in different relevant animal models and superior protection in mice as compared to the only currently licensed tuberculosis vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Here we describe the construction of a highly attenuated MTBVAC-based live vaccine by an additional gene inactivation generated in erp of MTBVAC. The gene product of erp is an exported repeated protein (Erp), a virulence factor described to be involved in intracellular replication of M. tuberculosis. The resultant strain, MTBVAC erp(-), was tested in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model showing to be severely attenuated when compared to BCG and MTBVAC. Experiments conducted in immunocompetent mice revealed that the hyper-attenuated profile observed with MTBVAC erp(-) strain did not compromise its protective efficacy profile in comparison with BCG. These results postulate MTBVAC erp(-) as a potential tuberculosis vaccine candidate for use in high-risk populations of immune suppression (e.g., due to HIV infection), where the use of BCG is not recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  9. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  10. Barley Brassinosteroid Mutants Provide an Insight into Phytohormonal Homeostasis in Plant Reaction to Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Damian; Janeczko, Anna; Dziurka, Michal; Pociecha, Ewa; Oklestkova, Jana; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of steroid phytohormones, which regulate various processes of morphogenesis and physiology—from seed development to regulation of flowering and senescence. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that BRs take part in regulation of physiological reactions to various stress conditions, including drought. Many of the physiological functions of BRs are regulated by a complicated, and not fully elucidated network of interactions with metabolic pathways of other phytohormones. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize phytohormonal homeostasis in barley (Hordeum vulgare) in reaction to drought and validate role of BRs in regulation of this process. Material of this study included the barley cultivar “Bowman” and five Near-Isogenic Lines (NILs) representing characterized semi-dwarf mutants of several genes encoding enzymes participating in BR biosynthesis and signaling. Analysis of endogenous BRs concentrations in these NILs confirmed that their phenotypes result from abnormalities in BR metabolism. In general, concentrations of 18 compounds, representing various classes of phytohormones, including brassinosteroids, auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid were analyzed under control and drought conditions in the “Bowman” cultivar and the BR-deficient NILs. Drought induced a significant increase in accumulation of the biologically active form of BRs—castasterone in all analyzed genotypes. Another biologically active form of BRs—24-epi-brassinolide—was identified in one, BR-insensitive NIL under normal condition, but its accumulation was drought-induced in all analyzed genotypes. Analysis of concentration profiles of several compounds representing gibberellins allowed an insight into the BR-dependent regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis. The concentration of the gibberellic acid GA7 was significantly lower in all NILs when compared with the “Bowman” cultivar

  11. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  12. Pathological Features in the LmnaDhe/+ Mutant Mouse Provide a Novel Model of Human Otitis Media and Laminopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Heping; Xu, Min; Han, Fengchan; Tian, Cong; Kim, Suejin; Fredman, Elisha; Zhang, Jin; Benedict-Alderfer, Cindy; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2013-01-01

    Genetic predisposition is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in otitis media (OM) and associated diseases. Mutant Lmna mice heterozygous for the disheveled hair and ears allele (LmnaDhe/+) exhibit early-onset, profound hearing deficits and other pathological features mimicking human laminopathy associated with the LMNA mutation. We assessed the effects of the LmnaDhe/+ mutation on development of OM and pathological abnormalities characteristic of laminopathy. Malformation and abnormal positioning of the eustachian tube, accompanied by OM, were observed in all of the LmnaDhe/+ mice (100% penetrance) as early as postnatal day P12. Scanning electronic microscopy revealed ultrastructural damage to the cilia in middle ears that exhibited OM. Hearing assessment revealed significant hearing loss, paralleling that in human OM. Expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, and TGF-β, which correlated with inflammation and/or bony development, was up-regulated in the ears or in the peritoneal macrophages of LmnaDhe/+ mice. Rugous, disintegrative, and enlarged nuclear morphology of peritoneal macrophages and hyperphosphatemia were found in LmnaDhe/+ mutant mice. Taken together, these features resemble the pathology of human laminopathies, possibly revealing some profound pathology, beyond OM, associated with the mutation. The LmnaDhe/+ mutant mouse provides a novel model of human OM and laminopathy. PMID:22819531

  13. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  14. Allele-Specific Suppression of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides: Providing a Therapeutic Option for All Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Skotte, Niels H.; Southwell, Amber L.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Warby, Simon C.; Doty, Crystal N.; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P.; Bennett, C. Frank; Swayze, Eric E.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  15. Method for providing mirror surfaces with protective strippable polymeric film

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Charlene C.; Day, Jack R.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for forming a protective, strippable, elastomeric film on a highly reflective surface. The method is especially well suited for protecting diamond-machined metallic mirrors, which are susceptible not only to abrasion and mechanical damage but also to contamination and corrosion by various fluids. In a typical use of the invention, a diamond-machined copper mirror surface is coated uniformly with a solution comprising a completely polymerized and completely cured thermoplastic urethane elastomer dissolved in tetrahydrofuran. The applied coating is evaporated to dryness, forming a tough, adherent, impermeable, and transparent film which encapsulates dust and other particulates on the surface. The film may be left in place for many months. When desired, the film may be stripped intact, removing the entrapped particulates and leaving no residue on the mirror surface.

  16. [Radiation protection agents to provide the radiation safety of astronauts].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Ivanov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Taking into consideration the complexity of radiation factors and stressogenic factors of non-radiation nature in cosmic flights and prognostic difficulties of radiation situation, the authors propose to distinguish several stages of pharmacological protection for cosmonauts. The preparatory stage is realized on the Earth. The next stage is monitoring and correction of radioresistance during a flight. A possible stage consists of treatment of the radiation damage using a traditional protocol. The permanent stage includes pharmacological prevention of the distant consequences of irradiation.

  17. Dimethylglycine Provides Salt and Temperature Stress Protection to Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Abdallah; Hoffmann, Tamara; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Glycine betaine is a potent osmotic and thermal stress protectant of many microorganisms. Its synthesis from glycine results in the formation of the intermediates monomethylglycine (sarcosine) and dimethylglycine (DMG), and these compounds are also produced when it is catabolized. Bacillus subtilis does not produce sarcosine or DMG, and it cannot metabolize these compounds. Here we have studied the potential of sarcosine and DMG to protect B. subtilis against osmotic, heat, and cold stress. Sarcosine, a compatible solute that possesses considerable protein-stabilizing properties, did not serve as a stress protectant of B. subtilis. DMG, on the other hand, proved to be only moderately effective as an osmotic stress protectant, but it exhibited good heat stress-relieving and excellent cold stress-relieving properties. DMG is imported into B. subtilis cells primarily under osmotic and temperature stress conditions via OpuA, a member of the ABC family of transporters. Ligand-binding studies with the extracellular solute receptor (OpuAC) of the OpuA system showed that OpuAC possesses a moderate affinity for DMG, with a Kd value of approximate 172 μM; its Kd for glycine betaine is about 26 μM. Docking studies using the crystal structures of the OpuAC protein with the sulfur analog of DMG, dimethylsulfonioacetate, as a template suggest a model of how the DMG molecule can be stably accommodated within the aromatic cage of the OpuAC ligand-binding pocket. Collectively, our data show that the ability to acquire DMG from exogenous sources under stressful environmental conditions helps the B. subtilis cell to cope with growth-restricting osmotic and temperature challenges. PMID:24561588

  18. 44 CFR 65.14 - Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection. 65.14 Section 65.14 Emergency... HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.14 Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood...

  19. 44 CFR 65.14 - Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection. 65.14 Section 65.14 Emergency... HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.14 Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood...

  20. 44 CFR 65.14 - Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection. 65.14 Section 65.14 Emergency... HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.14 Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood...

  1. 44 CFR 65.14 - Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection. 65.14 Section 65.14 Emergency... HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.14 Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood...

  2. 44 CFR 65.14 - Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood protection. 65.14 Section 65.14 Emergency... HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.14 Remapping of areas for which local flood protection systems no longer provide base flood...

  3. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Angela M; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian; Kalb, Robert G

    2015-10-21

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as "anti-chaperones" uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514286-21$15.00/0.

  4. Succinate dehydrogenase mutant of Listonella anguillarum protects rainbow trout against vibriosis.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Karsi, Attila

    2015-10-13

    Listonella anguillarum is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic rod causing hemorrhagic septicemia in marine and rarely in freshwater fish. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) plays an important role in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by oxidizing succinate to fumarate while reducing ubiquinone to ubiquinol. Recent studies indicate that central metabolic pathways, including the TCA cycle, contribute to bacterial virulence. However, the role of SDH in L. anguillarum virulence has not been studied. Here, we report in-frame deletion of the succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDHB) and its role in L. anguillarum virulence in rainbow trout. To accomplish this goal, upstream and downstream regions of the L. anguillarum sdhB gene were amplified in-frame and cloned into a suicide plasmid. The chromosomal sdhB gene of L. anguillarum was deleted by homologous recombination. Virulence and immunogenicity of the L. anguillarum ΔsdhB mutant (LaΔsdhB) were determined in rainbow trout. Results show that LaΔsdhB was highly attenuated in rainbow trout, and fish immunized with LaΔsdhB displayed high relative survival rate after exposure to wild type L. anguillarum. These findings indicate SDH is important in L. anguillarum virulence in rainbow trout, and LaΔsdhB could be used as an immersion, oral, or injection vaccine to protect rainbow trout against vibriosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Survivin Mutant Protects Differentiated Dopaminergic SK-N-SH Cells Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Baratchi, Sara; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is due to an imbalance of antioxidant/pro-oxidant homeostasis and is associated with the progression of several neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, oxidative stress is responsible for the neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with disease pathogenesis. Survivin is a member of the inhibitors of the apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins, but its neuroprotective effects have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that SurR9-C84A, a survivin mutant, has neuroprotective effects against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity. Our results show that H2O2 toxicity is associated with an increase in cell death, mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, and the expression of cyclin D1 and caspases 9 and 3. In addition, pre-treatment with SurR9-C84A reduces cell death by decreasing both the level of mitochondrial depolarisation and the expression of cyclin D1 and caspases 9 and 3. We further show that SurR9-C84A increases the antioxidant activity of GSH-peroxidase and catalase, and effectively counteracts oxidant activity following exposure to H2O2. These results suggest for the first time that SurR9-C84A is a promising treatment to protect neuronal cells against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:21249229

  6. Functional in situ evaluation of photosynthesis-protecting carotenoids in mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Lutz; Vioque, Agustin; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacteria possess different carotenoids as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In Synechocystis PCC6803, zeaxanthin, echinenone, beta-carotene and myxoxanthophyll are synthesized. By disruption of the ketolase and hydroxylase genes, it was possible to obtain mutants devoid of either zeaxanthin, echinenone, or a combination of both carotenoids. With these mutants, their function in protecting photosynthetic electron transport under high light stress as well as chlorophyll and carotenoid degradation after initiation of singlet oxygen or radical formation was analyzed. Wild type Synechocystis is very well protected against high light-mediated photooxidation. Absence of echinenone affects photosynthetic electron transport to only a small extent. However, complete depletion of zeaxanthin together with a modification of myxoxanthophyll resulted in strong photoinhibition of overall photosynthetic electron transport as well as the photosystem II reaction. In the double mutant lacking both carotenoids the effects were additive. The light saturation curves of photosynthetic electron transport of the high light-treated mutants exhibited not only a lower saturation value but also smaller slopes. Using methylviologen or methylene blue as a radical or singlet oxygen generators, respectively, massive degradation of chlorophyll and carotenoids, indicative of photooxidative destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus, was observed, especially in the mutants devoid of zeaxanthin.

  7. Pleiotropic phenotypes of the sticky peel mutant provide new insight into the role of CUTIN DEFICIENT2 in epidermal cell function in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Pollard, Mike; Kosma, Dylan K; Allen, Charles; Ohlrogge, John B; Barry, Cornelius S

    2012-07-01

    Plant epidermal cells have evolved specialist functions associated with adaptation to stress. These include the synthesis and deposition of specialized metabolites such as waxes and cutin together with flavonoids and anthocyanins, which have important roles in providing a barrier to water loss and protection against UV radiation, respectively. Characterization of the sticky peel (pe) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) revealed several phenotypes indicative of a defect in epidermal cell function, including reduced anthocyanin accumulation, a lower density of glandular trichomes, and an associated reduction in trichome-derived terpenes. In addition, pe mutant fruit are glossy and peels have increased elasticity due to a severe reduction in cutin biosynthesis and altered wax deposition. Leaves of the pe mutant are also cutin deficient and the epicuticular waxes contain a lower proportion of long-chain alkanes. Direct measurements of transpiration, together with chlorophyll-leaching assays, indicate increased cuticular permeability of pe leaves. Genetic mapping revealed that the pe locus represents a new allele of CUTIN DEFICIENT2 (CD2), a member of the class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper gene family, previously only associated with cutin deficiency in tomato fruit. CD2 is preferentially expressed in epidermal cells of tomato stems and is a homolog of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ANTHOCYANINLESS2 (ANL2). Analysis of cuticle composition in leaves of anl2 revealed that cutin accumulates to approximately 60% of the levels observed in wild-type Arabidopsis. Together, these data provide new insight into the role of CD2 and ANL2 in regulating diverse metabolic pathways and in particular, those associated with epidermal cells.

  8. Pleiotropic Phenotypes of the sticky peel Mutant Provide New Insight into the Role of CUTIN DEFICIENT2 in Epidermal Cell Function in Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Pollard, Mike; Kosma, Dylan K.; Allen, Charles; Ohlrogge, John B.; Barry, Cornelius S.

    2012-01-01

    Plant epidermal cells have evolved specialist functions associated with adaptation to stress. These include the synthesis and deposition of specialized metabolites such as waxes and cutin together with flavonoids and anthocyanins, which have important roles in providing a barrier to water loss and protection against UV radiation, respectively. Characterization of the sticky peel (pe) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) revealed several phenotypes indicative of a defect in epidermal cell function, including reduced anthocyanin accumulation, a lower density of glandular trichomes, and an associated reduction in trichome-derived terpenes. In addition, pe mutant fruit are glossy and peels have increased elasticity due to a severe reduction in cutin biosynthesis and altered wax deposition. Leaves of the pe mutant are also cutin deficient and the epicuticular waxes contain a lower proportion of long-chain alkanes. Direct measurements of transpiration, together with chlorophyll-leaching assays, indicate increased cuticular permeability of pe leaves. Genetic mapping revealed that the pe locus represents a new allele of CUTIN DEFICIENT2 (CD2), a member of the class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper gene family, previously only associated with cutin deficiency in tomato fruit. CD2 is preferentially expressed in epidermal cells of tomato stems and is a homolog of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ANTHOCYANINLESS2 (ANL2). Analysis of cuticle composition in leaves of anl2 revealed that cutin accumulates to approximately 60% of the levels observed in wild-type Arabidopsis. Together, these data provide new insight into the role of CD2 and ANL2 in regulating diverse metabolic pathways and in particular, those associated with epidermal cells. PMID:22623518

  9. Protection from latent inhibition provided by a conditioned inhibitor.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Bridget L; Wheeler, Daniel S; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Miller, Ralph R

    2009-10-01

    Two conditioned suppression experiments with rats investigated the influence on latent inhibition of compounding a Pavlovian conditioned inhibitor with the target cue during preexposure treatment. Results were compared with those of subjects that received conventional latent inhibition training, no preexposure, or preexposure to the target cue in compound with a neutral stimulus. In Experiment 1, greater attenuation of the latent inhibition effect was observed in subjects that received target preexposure in compound with a Pavlovian conditioned inhibitor relative to subjects that received preexposure with a neutral stimulus or to the target alone. In Experiment 2, this protection from latent inhibition was attenuated if the excitor that was used to train the conditioned inhibitor was extinguished between preexposure and target training. The results are consistent with an account offered by the extended comparator hypothesis.

  10. Contamination during doffing of personal protective equipment by healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Mi; Cha, Won Chul; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Jo, Ik Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to describe the processes of both the donning and the doffing of personal protective equipment for Ebola and evaluate contamination during the doffing process. Methods We recruited study participants among physicians and nurses of the emergency department of Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. Participants were asked to carry out doffing and donning procedures with a helper after a 50-minute brief training and demonstration based on the 2014 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention protocol. Two separate cameras with high-density capability were set up, and the donning and doffing processes were video-taped. A trained examiner inspected all video recordings and coded for intervals, errors, and contaminations defined as the outside of the equipment touching the clinician’s body surface. Results Overall, 29 participants were enrolled. Twenty (68.9%) were female, and the mean age was 29.2 years. For the donning process, the average interval until the end was 234.2 seconds (standard deviation [SD], 65.7), and the most frequent errors occurred when putting on the outer gloves (27.5%), respirator (20.6%), and hood (20.6%). For the doffing process, the average interval until the end was 183.7 seconds (SD, 38.4), and the most frequent errors occurred during disinfecting the feet (37.9%), discarding the scrubs (17.2%), and putting on gloves (13.7%), respectively. During the doffing process, 65 incidences of contamination occurred (2.2 incidents/person). The most vulnerable processes were removing respirators (79.2%), removing the shoe covers (65.5%), and removal of the hood (41.3%). Conclusion A significant number of contaminations occur during the doffing process of personal protective equipment. PMID:27752591

  11. Respiratory Protection Provided by Five New Contagion Masks

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, H. Gerald; Decker, Herbert M.

    1963-01-01

    The effectiveness of five recently developed contagion masks in filtering air-borne particles (1 to 5 μ diam) has been reported. One mask, available in four sizes, was 99% efficient. This mask can be reused after sterilization. The other four masks are available in only one size and are intended to be used one time only. Two of these four disposable types were more than 90% efficient but the variability of their respective test results was much greater than that for the reusable mask. The two remaining disposable types were less than 80% efficient. Two of these contagion-mask types were worn by hospital personnel for periods of up to 8 hr to determine the effect of such prolonged use on aerosol filtration efficiency. No significant decrease in filtration efficiency was noted. Physicians, nurses, and other hospital personnel who wear masks will benefit from the increased individual respiratory protection afforded by improved contagion masks. Concurrently, the incidence of hospital patient air-borne infections should be greatly reduced. Images FIG. 1 PMID:13951516

  12. Ursolic Acid Provides Kidney Protection in Diabetic Rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Jinping, Lu; Xia, Li; Renyong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. However, the treatment of DN is still a problem in the world. Inflammatory process plays a critical role in the development of DN. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatment of DN is worth exploring now and in the future. Objective The study aimed to evaluate the impact of ursolic acid (UA) on renal function in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with UA for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, urine albumin excretion, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were measured. In addition, renal oxidative stress level, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, P-selectin expression, and kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Results Sixteen weeks following streptozotocin injection, the rats produced significant alteration in renal function and increased oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression in the kidneys. Interestingly, UA significantly prevented biochemical and histopathologic changes in the kidneys associated with diabetes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, UA treatment lowered urine albumin excretion, renal oxidative stress level, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression. Moreover, UA treatment also improved renal histopathologic changes in rats with diabetes. Conclusions UA treatment exhibited a protective effect on kidneys in diabetic rats, implying that UA could be a potential treatment for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24465045

  13. Ursolic Acid provides kidney protection in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Jinping, Lu; Xia, Li; Renyong, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. However, the treatment of DN is still a problem in the world. Inflammatory process plays a critical role in the development of DN. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatment of DN is worth exploring now and in the future. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of ursolic acid (UA) on renal function in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with UA for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, urine albumin excretion, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were measured. In addition, renal oxidative stress level, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, P-selectin expression, and kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Sixteen weeks following streptozotocin injection, the rats produced significant alteration in renal function and increased oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression in the kidneys. Interestingly, UA significantly prevented biochemical and histopathologic changes in the kidneys associated with diabetes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, UA treatment lowered urine albumin excretion, renal oxidative stress level, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression. Moreover, UA treatment also improved renal histopathologic changes in rats with diabetes. UA treatment exhibited a protective effect on kidneys in diabetic rats, implying that UA could be a potential treatment for diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) provides antioxidant protection for boar semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Malo, C; Gil, L; Cano, R; González, N; Luño, V

    2012-05-01

    Boar semen is extremely vulnerable to cold shock and it is also sensitive to peroxidation due to the high content of unsaturated fatty acids in the plasma membrane. Antioxidants exert a protective effect on the plasma membrane of frozen boar sperm. Fennel has been shown to contain antioxidant substances. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of fennel added to the freezing extender on boar semen quality and lipid peroxidation after thawing. Semen collected from four boars was cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying concentration of fennel essences: low (LF); medium (MF); high (HF). Analysis of data clearly indicated that higher concentrations of fennel produced significant improvement in total motility. Moreover, when fennel was included in the extender, a dose-dependent tendency to increase sperm viability was observed. In contrast, the addition of fennel had no effect on acrosome integrity or hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) compared with the control. Malondialdehyde (MDA) formation decreased significantly in fennel groups, yielding similar results for MF and HF. Fennel seems a new antioxidant for use in sperm cryopreservation, but its particular effects on sperm physiology must be further studied, especially the causes of motility stimulation and its effect on lipoxidation.

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Preconditioning Provides Preliminary Protection Against Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan, Orhan; Karahan, Oguz; Alan, Mustafa; Ekinci, Cenap; Yavuz, Celal; Demirtas, Sinan; Ekinci, Aysun; Caliskan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Background Doxorubicin (DOX) is generally recognized to have important cardiotoxic side effects. Studies are contradictory about the interaction between hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy and doxorubicin-induced cardiomyotoxicity. Recent data suggests that HBO2 therapy can lead to preconditioning of myocardium while generating oxidative stress. Herein we have investigated the effect of HBO2 therapy in a DOX-induced cardiomyocyte injury animal model. Methods Twenty-one rats were divided into three equal groups as follows: 1) Group 1 is a control group (without any intervention), used for evaluating the basal cardiac structures and determining the normal value of cardiacs and serum oxidative markers; 2) Group 2 is the doxorubicin group (single dose i.p. 20 mg/kg doxorubicin) for detecting the cardiotoxic and systemic effects of doxorubicin; 3) Group 3 is the doxorubicin and HBO2 group (100% oxygen at 2.5 atmospheric for 90 minutes, daily), for evaluating the effect of HBO2 in doxorubicin induced cardiotoxicity. At the end of the protocols, the hearts were harvested and blood samples (2 ml) were obtained. Results The doxorubicin treated animals (Group 2) had increased oxidative stress markers (both cardiac and serum) and severe cardiac injury as compared to the basal findings in the control group. Nevertheless, the highest cardiac oxidative stress index was detected in Group 3 (control vs. Group 3, p = 0.01). However, histological examination revealed that cardiac structures were well preserved in Group 3 when compared with Group 2. Conclusions Our results suggest that HBO2 preconditioning appears to be protective in the doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity model. Future studies are required to better elucidate the basis of this preconditioning effect of HBO2. PMID:28344418

  16. Could Heterozygous Beta Thalassemia Provide Protection Against Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Cikrikcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Ozcan, Muhammed Emin; Halac, Gulistan; Gultepe, Ilhami; Celik, Kenan; Sekin, Yahya; Eser, Elif Ece; Burhan, Sebnem; Cetin, Guven; Uysal, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterozygous beta thalassemia (HBT) has been proposed to increase the risk of developing autoimmune disease. Our aim in this study was to examine the prevalence of HBT among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Material/Methods HBT frequency was investigated in our MS group (243 patients with MS). Hemoglobin electrophoresis (HE) was carried out if MS patients had a mean corpuscular volume of (MCV) <80 fL and a mean corpuscular hemoglobin level of (MCH) <27 pg/L according to a complete blood count (CBC). If MCV was lower than 80 fL, MCH was lower than 27 pg/L, and Hemoglobin A2 equal to or higher than 3.5%, a diagnosis of HBT was established. The frequency of patients with HBT in our MS patient group was statistically compared with the prevalence of HBT in the city of Istanbul, where our MS patients lived. Results The HBT prevalence was 0.823% (2 patients) in the MS patient group. The prevalence of HBT in Istanbul has been reported to be 4.5%. According to the z-test, the HBT prevalence in our MS patient group was significantly lower than that in Istanbul (Z=6.3611, two-sided p value <0.0001, 95% confidence interval of prevalence of HBT in our MS patient group: 0.000998–0.029413). Conclusions Contrary to our hypothesis at the outset of study, the reduced HBT prevalence in the MS group compared to HBT frequency in the city of Istanbul might indicate that HBT is protective against MS. PMID:27941710

  17. ROBOTIC CRAWLER PROVIDES RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN HAZARDOUS ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    HAM, J.E.

    2002-01-31

    A robotic crawler was deployed into the process cells at the 224-T Building to perform cell characterization. The most significant hazard was the potential for criticality upon introduction of a moderating material. Due to the unknown fissile inventory in the cells and the potential moderation affects of a person, manned entry was considered too high of a risk, and a robotic crawler was determined to be the best option for the initial characterization. The robotic crawler provided maneuverability, allowing access to areas in the cells where debris was found. It provided visual inspection in areas with little light, using a low lux pan and tilt camera system. Also, it provided fissile inventory measurements using a non-destructive assay (NDA) detector. The NDA detector supplied real-time data to maintain criticality control. Other technologies used during the cell characterization were water-cooled suits and a thin water resistant synthetic anti-contamination coverall, used for heat stress reduction. Also, an aluminum framed shelter provided a weather barrier, allowing work to continue under conditions which would have stopped work without it.

  18. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew D; Wilder, Julie A; Mega, William M; Hutt, Julie A; Kuehl, Philip J; Valderas, Michelle W; Chew, Lawrence L; Liang, Bertrand C; Squires, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg.

  19. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Matthew D.; Wilder, Julie A.; Mega, William M.; Hutt, Julie A.; Kuehl, Philip J.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Chew, Lawrence L.; Liang, Bertrand C.; Squires, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg. PMID:26207820

  20. A redox-resistant sirtuin-1 mutant protects against hepatic metabolic and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Shao, Di; Fry, Jessica L; Han, Jingyan; Hou, Xiuyun; Pimentel, David R; Matsui, Reiko; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2014-03-14

    Sirtuin-1 (SirT1), a member of the NAD(+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase family, is inactivated in vitro by oxidation of critical cysteine thiols. In a model of metabolic syndrome, SirT1 activation attenuated apoptosis of hepatocytes and improved liver function including lipid metabolism. We show in SirT1-overexpressing HepG2 cells that oxidants (nitrosocysteine and hydrogen peroxide) or metabolic stress (high palmitate and high glucose) inactivated SirT1 by reversible oxidative post-translational modifications (OPTMs) on three cysteines. Mutating these oxidation-sensitive cysteines to serine preserved SirT1 activity and abolished reversible OPTMs. Overexpressed mutant SirT1 maintained deacetylase activity and attenuated proapoptotic signaling, whereas overexpressed wild type SirT1 was less protective in metabolically or oxidant-stressed cells. To prove that OPTMs of SirT1 are glutathione (GSH) adducts, glutaredoxin-1 was overexpressed to remove this modification. Glutaredoxin-1 overexpression maintained endogenous SirT1 activity and prevented proapoptotic signaling in metabolically stressed HepG2 cells. The in vivo significance of oxidative inactivation of SirT1 was investigated in livers of high fat diet-fed C57/B6J mice. SirT1 deacetylase activity was decreased in the absence of changes in SirT1 expression and associated with a marked increase in OPTMs. These results indicate that glutathione adducts on specific SirT1 thiols may be responsible for dysfunctional SirT1 associated with liver disease in metabolic syndrome.

  1. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis ΔyscB provides protection against bubonic and pneumonic plagues in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuecan; Qi, Zhizhen; Du, Zongmin; Bi, Yujing; Zhang, Qingwen; Tan, Yafang; Yang, Huiying; Xin, Youquan; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2013-05-24

    To develop a safe and effective live plague vaccine, the ΔyscB mutant was constructed based on Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201 that is avirulent to humans, but virulent to mice. The virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the ΔyscB mutant were evaluated in this study. The results showed that the ΔyscB mutant was severely attenuated, elicited a higher F1-specific antibody titer and provided protective efficacy against bubonic and pneumonic plague in mouse model. The ΔyscB mutant could induce the secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Taken together, the ΔyscB mutant represented a potential vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and to provide good protection against both subcutaneous and intranasal Y. pestis challenge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutants in the lipopolysaccharide of Brucella ovis are attenuated and protect against B. ovis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Soler-Lloréns, Pedro; Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Zabalza-Baranguá, Ana; Iriarte, Maite; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; San Román, Beatriz; Zygmunt, Michel S; Vizcaíno, Nieves; Cloeckaert, Axel; Grilló, María-Jesús; Moriyón, Ignacio; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2014-07-17

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that behave as facultative intracellular parasites of a variety of mammals. This genus includes smooth (S) and rough (R) species that carry S and R lipopolysaccharides (LPS), respectively. S-LPS is a virulence factor, and mutants affected in the S-LPS O-polysaccharide (R mutants), core oligosaccharide or both show attenuation. However, B. ovis is naturally R and is virulent in sheep. We studied the role of B. ovis LPS in virulence by mutating the orthologues of wadA, wadB and wadC, three genes known to encode LPS core glycosyltransferases in S brucellae. When mapped with antibodies to outer membrane proteins (Omps) and R-LPS, wadB and wadC mutants displayed defects in LPS structure and outer membrane topology but inactivation of wadA had little or no effect. Consistent with these observations, the wadB and wadC but not the wadA mutants were attenuated in mice. When tested as vaccines, the wadB and wadC mutants protected mice against B. ovis challenge. The results demonstrate that the LPS core is a structure essential for survival in vivo not only of S brucellae but also of a naturally R Brucella pathogenic species, and they confirm our previous hypothesis that the Brucella LPS core is a target for vaccine development. Since vaccine B. melitensis Rev 1 is S and thus interferes in serological testing for S brucellae, wadB mutant represents a candidate vaccine to be evaluated against B. ovis infection of sheep suitable for areas free of B. melitensis.

  3. Mutants in the lipopolysaccharide of Brucella ovis are attenuated and protect against B. ovis infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that behave as facultative intracellular parasites of a variety of mammals. This genus includes smooth (S) and rough (R) species that carry S and R lipopolysaccharides (LPS), respectively. S-LPS is a virulence factor, and mutants affected in the S-LPS O-polysaccharide (R mutants), core oligosaccharide or both show attenuation. However, B. ovis is naturally R and is virulent in sheep. We studied the role of B. ovis LPS in virulence by mutating the orthologues of wadA, wadB and wadC, three genes known to encode LPS core glycosyltransferases in S brucellae. When mapped with antibodies to outer membrane proteins (Omps) and R-LPS, wadB and wadC mutants displayed defects in LPS structure and outer membrane topology but inactivation of wadA had little or no effect. Consistent with these observations, the wadB and wadC but not the wadA mutants were attenuated in mice. When tested as vaccines, the wadB and wadC mutants protected mice against B. ovis challenge. The results demonstrate that the LPS core is a structure essential for survival in vivo not only of S brucellae but also of a naturally R Brucella pathogenic species, and they confirm our previous hypothesis that the Brucella LPS core is a target for vaccine development. Since vaccine B. melitensis Rev 1 is S and thus interferes in serological testing for S brucellae, wadB mutant represents a candidate vaccine to be evaluated against B. ovis infection of sheep suitable for areas free of B. melitensis. PMID:25029920

  4. Brucella abortusΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants are highly attenuated and confer long-term protective immunity against virulent Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Kim, Kiju; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-01-04

    We constructed double deletion (ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD) mutants from virulent Brucella abortus biovar 1 field isolate (BA15) by deleting the genes encoding an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter (cydC and cydD genes) and a phosphoribosylamine-glycine ligase (purD). Both BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages or in BALB/c mice. Both double-mutants were readily cleared from spleens by 4 weeks post-inoculation even when inoculated at the dose of 10(8) CFU per mouse. Moreover, the inoculated mice showed no splenomegaly, which indicates that the mutants are highly attenuated. Importantly, the attenuation of in vitro and in vivo growth did not impair the ability of these mutants to confer long-term protective immunity in mice against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308. Vaccination of mice with either mutant induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and provided significantly better protection than commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. These results suggest that highly attenuated BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD mutants can be used effectively as potential live vaccine candidates against bovine brucellosis.

  5. How to Provide for Their Future: Suggestions for Parents Concerned with Providing Lifetime Protection for a Child with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

    The booklet offers suggestions for parents concerned with providing lifetime protection for a child with mental retardation. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship between the child's prospective needs of social and/or economic supports and the formal mechanisms which can be brought to bear on them. Four major topics are addressed: (1)…

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of a Cross-Protective Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK-1 dam Mutant Identifies a Set of Genes More Transcriptionally Active Compared to Wild-Type, and Stably Transcribed across Biologically Relevant Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Claire B.; Pierlé, Sebastian Aguilar; Brayton, Kelly A.; Ochoa, Jennine N.; Shah, Devendra H.; Lahmers, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methyltransferase confers cross-protective immunity against multiple Salmonella serotypes. The mechanistic basis is thought to be associated with the de-repression of genes that are tightly regulated when transiting from one microenvironment to another. This de-repression provides a potential means for the production of a more highly expressed and stable antigenic repertoire capable of inducing cross-protective immune responses. To identify genes encoding proteins that may contribute to cross-protective immunity, we used a Salmonella Typhimurium DNA adenine methyltransferase mutant strain (UK-1 dam mutant) derived from the parental UK-1 strain, and assessed the transcriptional profile of the UK-1 dam mutant and UK-1 strain grown under conditions that simulate the intestinal or endosomal microenvironments encountered during the infective process. As expected, the transcriptional profile of the UK-1 dam mutant identified a set of genes more transcriptionally active when compared directly to UK-1, and stably transcribed in biologically relevant culture conditions. Further, 22% of these genes were more highly transcribed in comparison to two other clinically-relevant Salmonella serovars. The strategy employed here helps to identify potentially conserved proteins produced by the UK-1 dam mutant that stimulate and/or modulate the development of cross-protective immune responses toward multiple Salmonella serotypes. PMID:25364573

  7. Induction of the SOS response by hydrogen peroxide in various Escherichia coli mutants with altered protection against oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Goerlich, O; Quillardet, P; Hofnung, M

    1989-01-01

    The induction of the SOS response by H2O2 was measured in Escherichia coli by means of a sfiA::lacZ operon fusion. The effects of mutations in genes involved in DNA repair or DNA metabolism on the SOS response were investigated. We found that in an uvrA mutant, H2O2 induced the SOS response at lower concentrations than in the uvr+ parent strain, indicating that some lesions induced by H2O2 may be repaired by the uvrABC-dependent excision repair system. A nth mutation, yielding deficiency in thymine glycol DNA glycosylase, had no detectable effect on SOS induction, indicating that thymine glycol, a DNA lesion expected to be induced by H2O2, does not participate detectably in the induction of the SOS response by this chemical under our conditions. H2O2 still induced the SOS response in a dnaC(Ts) uvrA double mutant under conditions in which no DNA replication proceeds, suggesting that this chemical induces DNA strand breaks. Induction of the SOS response by H2O2 was also assayed in various mutants affected in genes suspected to be important for protection against oxidative stress. Mutations in the catalase genes, katE and katG, had only minor effects. However, in an oxyR deletion mutant, in which the adaptative response to H2O2 does not occur, SOS induction occurred at much lower H2O2 concentrations than in the oxyR+ parent strain. These results indicate that some enzymes regulated by the oxyR gene are, under our conditions, more important than catalase for protection against the H2O2-induced DNA damages which trigger the SOS response. PMID:2681154

  8. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  9. Retinitis pigmentosa mutants provide insight into the role of the N-terminal cap in rhodopsin folding, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Opefi, Chikwado A; South, Kieron; Reynolds, Christopher A; Smith, Steven O; Reeves, Philip J

    2013-11-22

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mutants (T4K, N15S, T17M, V20G, P23A/H/L, and Q28H) in the N-terminal cap of rhodopsin misfold when expressed in mammalian cells. To gain insight into the causes of misfolding and to define the contributions of specific residues to receptor stability and function, we evaluated the responses of these mutants to 11-cis-retinal pharmacological chaperone rescue or disulfide bond-mediated repair. Pharmacological rescue restored folding in all mutants, but the purified mutant pigments in all cases were thermo-unstable and exhibited abnormal photobleaching, metarhodopsin II decay, and G protein activation. As a complementary approach, we superimposed this panel of ADRP mutants onto a rhodopsin background containing a juxtaposed cysteine pair (N2C/D282C) that forms a disulfide bond. This approach restored folding in T4K, N15S, V20G, P23A, and Q28H but not T17M, P23H, or P23L. ADRP mutant pigments obtained by disulfide bond repair exhibited enhanced stability, and some also displayed markedly improved photobleaching and signal transduction properties. Our major conclusion is that the N-terminal cap stabilizes opsin during biosynthesis and contributes to the dark-state stability of rhodopsin. Comparison of these two restorative approaches revealed that the correct position of the cap relative to the extracellular loops is also required for optimal photochemistry and efficient G protein activation.

  10. Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Vaccination Provides Long-Term Protection against Nasal Rabbitpox Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dorothy I; McGee, Charles E; Sample, Christopher J; Sempowski, Gregory D; Pickup, David J; Staats, Herman F

    2016-07-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) is a smallpox vaccine candidate. This study was performed to determine if MVA vaccination provides long-term protection against rabbitpox virus (RPXV) challenge, an animal model of smallpox. Two doses of MVA provided 100% protection against a lethal intranasal RPXV challenge administered 9 months after vaccination.

  11. Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Vaccination Provides Long-Term Protection against Nasal Rabbitpox Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dorothy I.; McGee, Charles E.; Sample, Christopher J.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Pickup, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) is a smallpox vaccine candidate. This study was performed to determine if MVA vaccination provides long-term protection against rabbitpox virus (RPXV) challenge, an animal model of smallpox. Two doses of MVA provided 100% protection against a lethal intranasal RPXV challenge administered 9 months after vaccination. PMID:27146001

  12. 30 CFR 206.62 - Does MMS protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does MMS protect information I provide? 206.62 Section 206.62 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 206.62 Does MMS protect information I provide? The MMS will...

  13. 30 CFR 206.365 - Does MMS protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does MMS protect information I provide? 206.365 Section 206.365 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 206.365 Does MMS protect information I provide? Certain...

  14. 30 CFR 206.108 - Does MMS protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does MMS protect information I provide? 206.108 Section 206.108 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 206.108 Does MMS protect information I provide? Certain...

  15. 75 FR 3939 - Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) Provides Notice of Opportunity To File Amicus Briefs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... BOARD Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) Provides Notice of Opportunity To File Amicus Briefs AGENCY..., the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) is providing notice of the opportunity to file amicus briefs... eligibility for employment in a sensitive position. Interested parties may submit amicus briefs or other...

  16. Measurements of the UVR protection provided by hats used at school.

    PubMed

    Gies, Peter; Javorniczky, John; Roy, Colin; Henderson, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The importance of protection against solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in childhood has lead to SunSmart policies at Australian schools, in particular primary schools, where children are encouraged and in many cases required to wear hats at school. Hat styles change regularly and the UVR protection provided by some of the hat types currently used and recommended for sun protection by the various Australian state cancer councils had not been previously evaluated. The UVR protection of the hats was measured using UVR sensitive polysulphone film badges attached to different facial sites on rotating headforms. The sun protection type hats included in this study were broad-brimmed hats, "bucket hats" and legionnaires hats. Baseball caps, which are very popular, were also included. The broad-brimmed hats and bucket hats provided the most UVR protection for the six different sites about the face and head. Legionnaires hats also provided satisfactory UVR protection, but the caps did not provide UVR protection to many of the facial sites. The highest measured UVR protection factors for facial sites other than the forehead were 8 to 10, indicating that, while some hats can be effective, they need to be used in combination with other forms of UVR protection.

  17. Characterization and cross-protection evaluation of M949_1603 gene deletion Riemerella anatipestifer mutant RA-M1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiechi; Wang, Xiaolan; Ding, Chan; Tian, Mingxing; Han, Xiangan; Wang, Shaohui; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-12-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer infection causes high mortality for ducks which results in major economic losses in the duck industry. In this study, we identified a mutant strain RA-M1 by Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis, in which the M949_1603 gene encoding glycosyl transferase was inactivated. PCR analysis revealed that M949_1603 gene is specifically existed in R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strains. RA-M1 presented no reactivity to the anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) MAb in an indirect ELISA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting demonstrated that RA-M1 LPS had a deficiency in ladder-like binding pattern to rabbit antiserum against R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain CH3, indicating that the O-antigen structure of RA-M1 was changed. RA-M1 showed significant attenuated virulence in ducks and higher sensitivity to normal duck serum, compared with its parent strain CH3. Furthermore, cross-protection of RA-M1 for R. anatipestifer serotypes 1, 2, and 10 strains was evaluated. Ducks that received two immunizations with inactivated RA-M1 vaccine were 100% protected from challenge with R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain WJ4, serotype 2 strain Yb2, and serotype 10 strain HXb2. No changes were observed in the liver, heart, or spleen samples from the protected ducks during autopsy and histological examination. Furthermore, vaccination generated high antibody titers of 1:12,800 against serotypes 1, 2, and 10 strains and enhanced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 in ducks. These results suggested that M949_1603 gene is associated with serotype 1 O-antigen biosynthesis, and mutant RA-M1 could be used as a novel cross-protection vaccine candidate to protect ducks against R. anatipestifer infection.

  18. The acid tolerance response of Salmonella typhimurium provides protection against organic acids.

    PubMed

    Baik, H S; Bearson, S; Dunbar, S; Foster, J W

    1996-11-01

    Salmonella typhimurium encounters a variety of acid stress situations during pathogenesis and in the natural environment. These include the extreme low pH encountered in the stomach and a less acidic intestinal environment containing large amounts of organic weak acids (volatile fatty acids). The acid tolerance response (ATR) is a complex defence system that can minimize the lethal effects of extreme low pH (pH3). The data presented illustrate that the ATR can also defend against weak acids such as butyric, acetic or propionic acids. Although an acid shock of pH 4.4 induced the ATR, growth in subinhibitory concentrations of weak acids did not. Various mutations shown to affect tolerance to extreme acid conditions (pH 3) were tested for their effects on tolerance to weak acids. An rpoS mutant lacking the alternative sigma factor sigma s failed to protect cells against weak acids as well as extreme acid pH. The fur (ferric uptake regulator) and atp (Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase) mutants defective in extreme acid tolerance showed no defects in their tolerance to weak acids. Curiously, the atbR mutant that exhibits increased tolerance to extreme acid pH proved sensitive to weak acids. Several insertions that rendered cells sensitive to organic acids were isolated, all of which proved to be linked to the rpoS locus.

  19. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants Provide Insight into the Role of the N-terminal Cap in Rhodopsin Folding, Structure, and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Opefi, Chikwado A.; South, Kieron; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Smith, Steven O.; Reeves, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) mutants (T4K, N15S, T17M, V20G, P23A/H/L, and Q28H) in the N-terminal cap of rhodopsin misfold when expressed in mammalian cells. To gain insight into the causes of misfolding and to define the contributions of specific residues to receptor stability and function, we evaluated the responses of these mutants to 11-cis-retinal pharmacological chaperone rescue or disulfide bond-mediated repair. Pharmacological rescue restored folding in all mutants, but the purified mutant pigments in all cases were thermo-unstable and exhibited abnormal photobleaching, metarhodopsin II decay, and G protein activation. As a complementary approach, we superimposed this panel of ADRP mutants onto a rhodopsin background containing a juxtaposed cysteine pair (N2C/D282C) that forms a disulfide bond. This approach restored folding in T4K, N15S, V20G, P23A, and Q28H but not T17M, P23H, or P23L. ADRP mutant pigments obtained by disulfide bond repair exhibited enhanced stability, and some also displayed markedly improved photobleaching and signal transduction properties. Our major conclusion is that the N-terminal cap stabilizes opsin during biosynthesis and contributes to the dark-state stability of rhodopsin. Comparison of these two restorative approaches revealed that the correct position of the cap relative to the extracellular loops is also required for optimal photochemistry and efficient G protein activation. PMID:24106275

  20. Construction and physiological analysis of a Xanthomonas mutant to examine the role of the oxyR gene in oxidant-induced protection against peroxide killing.

    PubMed

    Mongkolsuk, S; Sukchawalit, R; Loprasert, S; Praituan, W; Upaichit, A

    1998-08-01

    We constructed and characterized a Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli oxyR mutant. The mutant was hypersensitive to H2O2 and menadione killing and had reduced aerobic plating efficiency. The oxidants' induction of the catalase and ahpC genes was also abolished in the mutant. Analysis of the adaptive responses showed that hydrogen peroxide-induced protection against hydrogen peroxide was lost, while menadione-induced protection against hydrogen peroxide was retained in the oxyR mutant. These results show that X. campestris pv. phaseoli oxyR is essential to peroxide adaptation and revealed the existence of a novel superoxide-inducible peroxide protection system that is independent of OxyR.

  1. Characterization of vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin) mutant provides new insight into the role of MACROCALYX in regulating inflorescence development of tomato

    PubMed Central

    Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Quinet, Muriel; Fernández-Lozano, Antonia; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Inflorescence development is a key factor of plant productivity, as it determines flower number. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflorescence architecture is critical for reproductive success and crop yield. In this study, a new mutant, vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin), was isolated from the screening of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) T-DNA mutant collection. The mc-vin mutant developed inflorescences that reverted to vegetative growth after forming two to three flowers, indicating that the mutated gene is essential for the maintenance of inflorescence meristem identity. The T-DNA was inserted into the promoter region of the MACROCALYX (MC) gene; this result together with complementation test and expression analyses proved that mc-vin is a new knock-out allele of MC. Double combinations between mc-vin and jointless (j) and single flower truss (sft) inflorescence mutants showed that MC has pleiotropic effects on the reproductive phase, and that it interacts with SFT and J to control floral transition and inflorescence fate in tomato. In addition, MC expression was mis-regulated in j and sft mutants whereas J and SFT were significantly up-regulated in the mc-vin mutant. Together, these results provide new evidences about MC function as part of the genetic network regulating the development of tomato inflorescence meristem. PMID:26727224

  2. Characterization of vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin) mutant provides new insight into the role of MACROCALYX in regulating inflorescence development of tomato.

    PubMed

    Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Quinet, Muriel; Fernández-Lozano, Antonia; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-04

    Inflorescence development is a key factor of plant productivity, as it determines flower number. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflorescence architecture is critical for reproductive success and crop yield. In this study, a new mutant, vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin), was isolated from the screening of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) T-DNA mutant collection. The mc-vin mutant developed inflorescences that reverted to vegetative growth after forming two to three flowers, indicating that the mutated gene is essential for the maintenance of inflorescence meristem identity. The T-DNA was inserted into the promoter region of the MACROCALYX (MC) gene; this result together with complementation test and expression analyses proved that mc-vin is a new knock-out allele of MC. Double combinations between mc-vin and jointless (j) and single flower truss (sft) inflorescence mutants showed that MC has pleiotropic effects on the reproductive phase, and that it interacts with SFT and J to control floral transition and inflorescence fate in tomato. In addition, MC expression was mis-regulated in j and sft mutants whereas J and SFT were significantly up-regulated in the mc-vin mutant. Together, these results provide new evidences about MC function as part of the genetic network regulating the development of tomato inflorescence meristem.

  3. Immunization with Pneumococcal Surface Protein K of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Provides Protection in a Mouse Model of Colonization.

    PubMed

    Keller, Lance E; Luo, Xiao; Thornton, Justin A; Seo, Keun-Seok; Moon, Bo Youn; Robinson, D Ashley; McDaniel, Larry S

    2015-11-01

    Current vaccinations are effective against encapsulated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, but they do not protect against nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp), which is increasing in colonization and incidence of pneumococcal disease. Vaccination with pneumococcal proteins has been assessed for its ability to protect against pneumococcal disease, but several of these proteins are not expressed by NESp. Pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK), an NESp virulence factor, has not been assessed for immunogenic potential or host modulatory effects. Mammalian cytokine expression was determined in an in vivo mouse model and in an in vitro cell culture system. Systemic and mucosal mouse immunization studies were performed to determine the immunogenic potential of PspK. Murine serum and saliva were collected to quantitate specific antibody isotype responses and the ability of antibody and various proteins to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion. Host cytokine response was not reduced by PspK. NESp was able to colonize the mouse nasopharynx as effectively as encapsulated pneumococci. Systemic and mucosal immunization provided protection from colonization by PspK-positive (PspK(+)) NESp. Anti-PspK antibodies were recovered from immunized mice and significantly reduced the ability of NESp to adhere to human epithelial cells. A protein-based pneumococcal vaccine is needed to provide broad protection against encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci in an era of increasing antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape mutants. We demonstrate that PspK may serve as an NESp target for next-generation pneumococcal vaccines. Immunization with PspK protected against pneumococcal colonization, which is requisite for pneumococcal disease.

  4. 25 CFR 63.24 - What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees? 63.24 Section 63.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of...

  5. 25 CFR 63.24 - What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees? 63.24 Section 63.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of...

  6. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I...

  7. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I...

  10. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect...

  11. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect...

  12. 30 CFR 1206.365 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.365 Section 1206.365 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 1206.365 Does ONRR protect...

  13. 30 CFR 1206.108 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.108 Section 1206.108 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 1206.108 Does ONRR protect information I...

  14. 30 CFR 1206.62 - Does ONRR protect information I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does ONRR protect information I provide? 1206.62 Section 1206.62 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Oil § 1206.62 Does ONRR protect information I...

  15. 25 CFR 63.24 - What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What protections must employers provide to applicants, volunteers and employees? 63.24 Section 63.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character...

  16. Modifications of the Helper Component-Protease of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus for Generation of Attenuated Mutants for Cross Protection Against Severe Infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Shun; Wu, Hui-Wen; Jan, Fuh-Jyh; Hou, Roger F; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT A nonpathogenic mild strain is essential for control of plant viruses by cross protection. Three amino acid changes, Arg(180)-->Ile(180) (GA mutation), Phe(205)-->Leu(205) (GB mutation), and Glu(396)-->Asn(396) (GC mutation), of the conserved motifs of the helper component-protease (HC-Pro) of a severe strain TW-TN3 of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, were generated from an infectious cDNA clone that carried a green fluorescent protein reporter. The infectivity of individual mutants containing single, double, or triple mutations was assayed on local and systemic hosts. On Chenopodium quinoa plants, the GB mutant induced necrotic lesions; the GA, GC, and GBC mutants induced chlorotic spots; and the GAB and GAC mutants induced local infection only visualized by fluorescence microscopy. On squash plants, the GA, GB, GC, and GBC mutants caused milder mosaic; the GAC mutant induced slight leaf mottling followed by recovering; and the GAB mutant did not induce conspicuous symptoms. Also, the GAC mutant, but not the GAB mutant, conferred complete cross protection against the parental virus carrying a mite allergen as a reporter. When tested on transgene-silenced transgenic squash, the ability of posttranscriptional gene silencing suppression of the mutated HC-Pro of GAC was not significantly affected. We concluded that the mutations of the HC-Pro of ZYMV reduce the degrees of pathogenicity on squash and also abolish the ability for eliciting the hypersensitive reaction on C. quinoa, and that the mutant GAC is a useful mild strain for cross protection.

  17. Vaccine protection by a triple deletion mutant of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wyand, M S; Manson, K H; Garcia-Moll, M; Montefiori, D; Desrosiers, R C

    1996-01-01

    Twelve rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with SIVmac316 delta nef (lacking nef sequences), and 12 were vaccinated with SIVmac239 delta3 (lacking nef, vpr, and upstream sequences in U3). SIVmac316 and SIVmac239 differ by only eight amino acids in the envelope; these changes render SIVmac316 highly competent for replication in macrophages. Seventeen of the animals developed persistent infections with the vaccine viruses. Seven of the 24 vaccinated animals, however, developed infections that were apparently transient in nature. Six of these seven yielded virus from peripheral blood when tested at weeks 2 and/or 3, three of the seven had transient antibody responses, but none of the seven had persisting antibody responses. The 24 monkeys were challenged in groups of four with 10 rhesus monkey infectious doses of wild-type, pathogenic SIVmac251 at weeks 8, 20, and 79 following receipt of vaccine. None of the seven with apparently transient infections with vaccine virus were protected upon subsequent challenge. Analysis of cell-associated viral loads, CD4+ cell counts, and viral gene sequences present in peripheral blood in the remainder of the monkeys following challenge allowed a number of conclusions. (i) There was a trend toward increased protection with length of time of vaccination. (ii) Solid vaccine protection was achieved by 79 weeks with the highly attenuated SIV239 delta3. (iii) Solid long-term protection was achieved in at least two animals in the absence of complete sterilizing immunity. (iv) Genetic backbone appeared to influence protective capacity; animals vaccinated with SIV239 delta3 were better protected than animals receiving SIV316 delta nef. This better protection correlated with increased levels of the replicating vaccine strain. (v) The titer of virus-neutralizing activity in serum on the day of challenge correlated with protection when measured against a primary stock of SIVmac251 but not when measured against a laboratory-passaged stock. The level

  18. New meter probes provide protection from high current power sources at potentials up to 600 volts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, H.; Getsug, J.

    1972-01-01

    Meter probes incorporating integral fuse holder which contains limitation fuse of 600 V, 5A, with interruption rating of 50,000 KVA. provide required protection and minimize danger incurred by defective or improperly operated meter.

  19. Regulation for the enforcement of federal health care provider conscience protection laws. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-02-23

    The Department of Health and Human Services issues this final rule which provides that enforcement of the federal statutory health care provider conscience protections will be handled by the Department's Office for Civil Rights, in conjunction with the Department's funding components. This Final Rule rescinds, in part, and revises, the December 19, 2008 Final Rule entitled "Ensuring That Department of Health and Human Services Funds Do Not Support Coercive or Discriminatory Policies or Practices in Violation of Federal Law" (the "2008 Final Rule"). Neither the 2008 final rule, nor this final rule, alters the statutory protections for individuals and health care entities under the federal health care provider conscience protection statutes, including the Church Amendments, Section 245 of the Public Health Service Act, and the Weldon Amendment. These federal statutory health care provider conscience protections remain in effect.

  20. M.tuberculosis Mutants Lacking Oxygenated Mycolates Show Increased Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy as Compared to M. bovis BCG Vaccine in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Dorsaf; Denis, Olivier; Barkan, Daniel; Daffé, Mamadou; Glickman, Michael S.; Huygen, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The existing vaccine against tuberculosis (M. bovis BCG) exerts some protection against the extrapulmonary forms of the disease, particularly in young children, but is not very effective against the pulmonary form of TB, which often results from the reactivation of a latent M. tuberculosis (M.tb)infection. Among the new approaches in TB vaccine development, live attenuated M.tb mutants are a promising new avenue. Here we report on the vaccine potential of two highly attenuated M.tb mutants, MGM1991 and M.tbhma::hyg (HMA), lacking all oxygenated mycolates in their cell wall. In C57BL/6 mice, stronger Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and IL-17 responses could be induced following subcutaneous vaccination with either of the two mutants, than following vaccination with M. bovis BCG. Significantly more mycobacteria specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ and particularly CD8+ T cells could be detected by intracellular cytokine staining in mice vaccinated with the M.tb mutants. Finally, vaccination with either of the two mutants conferred stronger protection against intratracheal M.tb challenge than vaccination with BCG, as indicated by reduced bacterial replication in lungs at 4 to 12 weeks after challenge. Protection against M. tb dissemination, as indicated by reduced bacterial numbers in spleen, was comparable for both mutants to protection conferred by BCG. PMID:24146869

  1. Advax-Adjuvanted Recombinant Protective Antigen Provides Protection against Inhalational Anthrax That Is Further Enhanced by Addition of Murabutide Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax adjuvant afforded significantly greater protection against aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain 7702 than three immunizations with PA alone. Murabutide had a weaker adjuvant effect than Advax when used alone, but when murabutide was formulated together with Advax, an additive effect on immunogenicity and protection was observed, with complete protection after just two doses. The combined adjuvant formulation stimulated a robust, long-lasting B-cell memory response that protected mice against an aerosol challenge 18 months postimmunization with acceleration of the kinetics of the anamnestic IgG response to B. anthracis as reflected by ∼4-fold-higher anti-PA IgG titers by day 2 postchallenge versus mice that received PA with Alhydrogel. In addition, the combination of Advax plus murabutide induced approximately 3-fold-less inflammation than Alhydrogel as measured by in vivo imaging of cathepsin cleavage resulting from injection of ProSense 750. Thus, the combination of Advax and murabutide provided enhanced protection against inhalational anthrax with reduced localized inflammation, making this a promising next-generation anthrax vaccine adjuvanting strategy. PMID:24554695

  2. Advax-adjuvanted recombinant protective antigen provides protection against inhalational anthrax that is further enhanced by addition of murabutide adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Merkel, Tod J

    2014-04-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax adjuvant afforded significantly greater protection against aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain 7702 than three immunizations with PA alone. Murabutide had a weaker adjuvant effect than Advax when used alone, but when murabutide was formulated together with Advax, an additive effect on immunogenicity and protection was observed, with complete protection after just two doses. The combined adjuvant formulation stimulated a robust, long-lasting B-cell memory response that protected mice against an aerosol challenge 18 months postimmunization with acceleration of the kinetics of the anamnestic IgG response to B. anthracis as reflected by ∼4-fold-higher anti-PA IgG titers by day 2 postchallenge versus mice that received PA with Alhydrogel. In addition, the combination of Advax plus murabutide induced approximately 3-fold-less inflammation than Alhydrogel as measured by in vivo imaging of cathepsin cleavage resulting from injection of ProSense 750. Thus, the combination of Advax and murabutide provided enhanced protection against inhalational anthrax with reduced localized inflammation, making this a promising next-generation anthrax vaccine adjuvanting strategy.

  3. Equine herpesvirus 1 mutants devoid of glycoprotein B or M are apathogenic for mice but induce protection against challenge infection.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, A; Beer, M; Brandmüller, C; Kaaden, O R; Osterrieder, N

    1997-12-08

    Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) mutants devoid of the open reading frames (ORFs) of either glycoprotein (g) B or M were constructed and tested for their immunogenic potential in a murine model of EHV-1 infection. The mutant viruses were engineered using the virulent EHV-1 strain RacL11 or the modified live vaccine strain RacH by inserting the Escherichia coli LacZ gene into the viral ORFs. RacL11-infected mice showed signs typical of an EHV-1 infection, whereas mice infected with the EHV-1 gB- or gM-negative mutants or with RacH did not develop disease. No difference in the pathogenic potential of RacL11 gB- and gM-negative viruses was observed after application of either phenotypically completed or negative viruses. However, revertant RacL11 viruses in which the gB or gM gene had been restored caused EHV-1-related symptoms that were indistinguishable from those induced by RacL11. Mice that had been immunized with phenotypically negative gB- and gM-deficient EHV-1 were challenged with the RacL11 virus 25 days after immunization. Mock-immunized mice developed EHV-1 disease and high virus loads in their lungs were observed. In contrast, mice developed not exhibit EHV-1-caused disease. It was concluded (i) that deletion of either gB or gM abolished the virulence of strain RacL11 and (ii) that immunization with gB- or gM-negative EHV-1 elicited a protective immunity that was reflected by both virus-neutralizing antibodies and EHV-1-specific T-cells in spleens of immunized mice.

  4. Integrated metabolomics and genomics analysis provides new insights into the fiber elongation process in Ligon lintless-2 mutant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait characteristic that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. The cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber mutation, Ligon lintless-2, is controlled by a single dominant gene (Li2) and results in extremely shortened lint fibers on mature seeds with no visible pleiotropic effects on vegetative growth and development. The Li2 mutant phenotype provides an ideal model system to study fiber elongation. To understand metabolic processes involved in cotton fiber elongation, changes in metabolites and transcripts in the Li2 mutant fibers were compared to wild-type fibers during development. Results Principal component analysis of metabolites from GC-MS data separated Li2 mutant fiber samples from WT fiber samples at the WT elongation stage, indicating that the Li2 mutation altered the metabolome of the mutant fibers. The observed alterations in the Li2 metabolome included significant reductions in the levels of detected free sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar acids, and sugar phosphates. Biological processes associated with carbohydrate biosynthesis, cell wall loosening, and cytoskeleton were also down-regulated in Li2 fibers. Gamma-aminobutyric acid, known as a signaling factor in many organisms, was significantly elevated in mutant fibers. Higher accumulation of 2-ketoglutarate, succinate, and malate suggested higher nitrate assimilation in the Li2 line. Transcriptional activation of genes involved in nitrogen compound metabolism along with changes in the levels of nitrogen transport amino acids suggested re-direction of carbon flow into nitrogen metabolism in Li2 mutant fibers. Conclusions This report provides the first comprehensive analysis of metabolite and transcript changes in response to the Li2 mutation in elongating fibers. A number of factors associated with cell elongation found in this study will facilitate further research in understanding metabolic processes of cotton fiber elongation. PMID

  5. bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows severe growth defect and imparts protection against tuberculosis in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Ritika; Nangpal, Prachi; Mathur, Shubhita; Singh, Swati

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the devastation caused by tuberculosis along with the unsatisfactory performance of the Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccine, a more efficient vaccine than BCG is required for the global control of tuberculosis. A number of studies have demonstrated an essential role of biotin biosynthesis in the growth and survival of several microorganisms, including mycobacteria, through deletion of the genes involved in de novo biotin biosynthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that a bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbΔbioA) is highly attenuated in the guinea pig model of tuberculosis when administered aerogenically as well as intradermally. Immunization with MtbΔbioA conferred significant protection in guinea pigs against an aerosol challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, when compared with the unvaccinated animals. Booster immunization with MtbΔbioA offered no advantage over a single immunization. These experiments demonstrate the vaccinogenic potential of the attenuated M. tuberculosis bioA mutant against tuberculosis. PMID:28658275

  6. bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows severe growth defect and imparts protection against tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kar, Ritika; Nangpal, Prachi; Mathur, Shubhita; Singh, Swati; Tyagi, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the devastation caused by tuberculosis along with the unsatisfactory performance of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, a more efficient vaccine than BCG is required for the global control of tuberculosis. A number of studies have demonstrated an essential role of biotin biosynthesis in the growth and survival of several microorganisms, including mycobacteria, through deletion of the genes involved in de novo biotin biosynthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that a bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbΔbioA) is highly attenuated in the guinea pig model of tuberculosis when administered aerogenically as well as intradermally. Immunization with MtbΔbioA conferred significant protection in guinea pigs against an aerosol challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, when compared with the unvaccinated animals. Booster immunization with MtbΔbioA offered no advantage over a single immunization. These experiments demonstrate the vaccinogenic potential of the attenuated M. tuberculosis bioA mutant against tuberculosis.

  7. Irsogladine maleate, a gastric mucosal protectant, suppresses intestinal polyp development in Apc-mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Wakana; Tomono, Susumu; Miyamoto, Shinngo; Fujii, Gen; Hamoya, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Fukai, Fumio; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify gastric mucosal protectants that suppress intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model. We chose six gastric mucosal protectants (ecabet sodium hydrate, irsogladine maleate, rebamipide, sofalcone, teprenone and troxipide) and examined their effects on the activity of oxidative stress-related transcriptional factors, including AP-1, NF-jB, NRF2, p53 and STAT3, in Caco-2 cells using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Among the six protectants, irsogladine maleate clearly inhibited NF-jB and AP-1 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the chemopreventive property of irsogladine maleate was examined in a Min mouse model of familial adenomatous polyposis. Treatment with irsogladine maleate at doses of 5 and 50 ppm significantly reduced the number of intestinal polyps to 69% and 66% of the untreated control value, respectively. In these polyps, mRNA levels of the downstream targets of NF-jB, such as IL-1β and IL-6, were decreased by irsogladine maleate treatment. Moreover, the levels of oxidative stress-related markers, reactive carbonyl species, in the livers of Min mice were clearly decreased following the administration of irsogladine maleate. This study demonstrated that irsogladine maleate suppresses intestinal polyp formation in Min mice partly through the NF-jB signaling pathway, thus reducing oxidative stress. PMID:26840084

  8. Irsogladine maleate, a gastric mucosal protectant, suppresses intestinal polyp development in Apc-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Wakana; Tomono, Susumu; Miyamoto, Shinngo; Fujii, Gen; Hamoya, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Fukai, Fumio; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2016-02-23

    This study aimed to identify gastric mucosal protectants that suppress intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model. We chose six gastric mucosal protectants (ecabet sodium hydrate, irsogladine maleate, rebamipide, sofalcone, teprenone and troxipide) and examined their effects on the activity of oxidative stress-related transcriptional factors, including AP-1, NF-jB, NRF2, p53 and STAT3, in Caco-2 cells using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Among the six protectants, irsogladine maleate clearly inhibited NF-jB and AP-1 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the chemopreventive property of irsogladine maleate was examined in a Min mouse model of familial adenomatous polyposis. Treatment with irsogladine maleate at doses of 5 and 50 ppm significantly reduced the number of intestinal polyps to 69% and 66% of the untreated control value, respectively. In these polyps, mRNA levels of the downstream targets of NF-jB, such as IL-1β and IL-6, were decreased by irsogladine maleate treatment. Moreover, the levels of oxidative stress-related markers, reactive carbonyl species, in the livers of Min mice were clearly decreased following the administration of irsogladine maleate. This study demonstrated that irsogladine maleate suppresses intestinal polyp formation in Min mice partly through the NF-jB signaling pathway, thus reducing oxidative stress.

  9. A Nonintegrative Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Sterile Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Coutant, Frédéric; Sanchez David, Raul Yusef; Félix, Tristan; Boulay, Aude; Caleechurn, Laxmee; Souque, Philippe; Thouvenot, Catherine; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Trials testing the RTS,S candidate malaria vaccine and radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) have shown that protective immunity against malaria can be induced and that an effective vaccine is not out of reach. However, longer-term protection and higher protection rates are required to eradicate malaria from the endemic regions. It implies that there is still a need to explore new vaccine strategies. Lentiviral vectors are very potent at inducing strong immunological memory. However their integrative status challenges their safety profile. Eliminating the integration step obviates the risk of insertional oncogenesis. Providing they confer sterile immunity, nonintegrative lentiviral vectors (NILV) hold promise as mass pediatric vaccine by meeting high safety standards. In this study, we have assessed the protective efficacy of NILV against malaria in a robust pre-clinical model. Mice were immunized with NILV encoding Plasmodium yoelii Circumsporozoite Protein (Py CSP) and challenged with sporozoites one month later. In two independent protective efficacy studies, 50% (37.5–62.5) of the animals were fully protected (p = 0.0072 and p = 0.0008 respectively when compared to naive mice). The remaining mice with detectable parasitized red blood cells exhibited a prolonged patency and reduced parasitemia. Moreover, protection was long-lasting with 42.8% sterile protection six months after the last immunization (p = 0.0042). Post-challenge CD8+ T cells to CSP, in contrast to anti-CSP antibodies, were associated with protection (r = −0.6615 and p = 0.0004 between the frequency of IFN-g secreting specific T cells in spleen and parasitemia). However, while NILV and RAS immunizations elicited comparable immunity to CSP, only RAS conferred 100% of sterile protection. Given that a better protection can be anticipated from a multi-antigen vaccine and an optimized vector design, NILV appear as a promising malaria vaccine. PMID:23133649

  10. A Coccidioides posadasii CPS1 Deletion Mutant Is Avirulent and Protects Mice from Lethal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Narra, Hema P.; Shubitz, Lisa F.; Mandel, M. Alejandra; Trinh, Hien T.; Griffin, Kurt; Buntzman, Adam S.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Galgiani, John N.

    2016-01-01

    The CPS1 gene was identified as a virulence factor in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus. Hypothesizing that the homologous gene in Coccidioides posadasii could be important for virulence, we created a Δcps1 deletion mutant which was unable to cause disease in three strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c, or the severely immunodeficient NOD-scid,γcnull [NSG]). Only a single colony was recovered from 1 of 60 C57BL/6 mice following intranasal infections of up to 4,400 spores. Following administration of very high doses (10,000 to 2.5 × 107 spores) to NSG and BALB/c mice, spherules were observed in lung sections at time points from day 3 to day 10 postinfection, but nearly all appeared degraded with infrequent endosporulation. Although the role of CPS1 in virulence is not understood, phenotypic alterations and transcription differences of at least 33 genes in the Δcps1 strain versus C. posadasii is consistent with both metabolic and regulatory functions for the gene. The in vitro phenotype of the Δcps1 strain showed slower growth of mycelia with delayed and lower spore production than C. posadasii, and in vitro spherules were smaller. Vaccination of C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice with live Δcps1 spores either intranasally, intraperitoneally, or subcutaneously resulted in over 95% survival with mean residual lung fungal burdens of <1,000 CFU from an otherwise lethal C. posadasii intranasal infection. Considering its apparently complete attenuation of virulence and the high degree of resistance to C. posadasii infection when used as a vaccine, the Δcps1 strain is a promising vaccine candidate for preventing coccidioidomycosis in humans or other animals. PMID:27481239

  11. 49 CFR 371.111 - Must I provide individual shippers with Federal consumer protection information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... methods: (1) Provide a hyperlink on your Internet Web site to the FMCSA Web site containing the... section, and elects to access the same information via the hyperlink on the Internet as provided in... protection information on the Internet. (c) You must obtain a signed, dated, electronic or paper...

  12. The transrepression arm of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is protective in mutant huntingtin-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Breda, C; Smalley, J L; Butterworth, M; Farrow, S N; Giorgini, F; Cohen, G M

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs following the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and orchestrates an intricate balance between its prosurvival and apoptotic arms to restore cellular homeostasis and integrity. However, in certain neurodegenerative diseases, the apoptotic arm of the UPR is enhanced, resulting in excessive neuronal cell death and disease progression, both of which can be overcome by modulating the UPR. Here, we describe a novel crosstalk between glucocorticoid receptor signaling and the apoptotic arm of the UPR, thus highlighting the potential of glucocorticoid therapy in treating neurodegenerative diseases. Several glucocorticoids, but not mineralocorticoids, selectively antagonize ER stress-induced apoptosis in a manner that is downstream of and/or independent of the conventional UPR pathways. Using GRT10, a novel selective pharmacological modulator of glucocorticoid signaling, we describe the importance of the transrepression arm of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we also observe the protective effects of glucocorticoids in vivo in a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease (HD), wherein treatment with different glucocorticoids diminished rhabdomere loss and conferred neuroprotection. Finally, we find that growth differentiation factor 15 has an important role downstream of glucocorticoid signaling in antagonizing ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells, as well as in preventing HD-mediated neurodegeneration in flies. Thus, our studies demonstrate that this novel crosstalk has the potential to be effectively exploited in alleviating several neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25656655

  13. Balance Billing by Health Care Providers: Assessing Consumer Protections Across States.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Kevin; Hoadley, Jack; Williams, Ashley

    2017-06-01

    ISSUE: Privately insured consumers expect that if they pay premiums and use in-network providers, their insurer will cover the cost of medically necessary care beyond their cost-sharing. However, when obtaining care at emergency departments and in-network hospitals, patients treated by an out-of-network provider may receive an unexpected "balance bill" for an amount beyond what the insurer paid. With no explicit federal protections against balance billing, some states have stepped in to protect consumers from this costly and confusing practice. GOAL: To better understand the scope of state laws to protect consumers from balance billing. METHODS: Analysis of laws in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and interviews with officials in eight states. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Most states do not have laws that directly protect consumers from balance billing by an out-of-network provider for care delivered in an emergency department or in-network hospital. Of the 21 states offering protections, only six have a comprehensive approach to safeguarding consumers in both settings, and gaps remain even in these states. Because a federal policy solution might prove difficult, states may be better positioned in the short term to protect consumers.

  14. Niacinamide leave-on formulation provides long-lasting protection against bacteria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mathapathi, Mruthyunjaya Swamy; Mallemalla, Prathyusha; Vora, Shilpa; Iyer, Vidula; Tiwari, Jyoti Kumar; Chakrabortty, Amit; Majumdar, Amitabha

    2017-01-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form a part of the skin's innate immune system. Their primary activity is to provide antimicrobial benefits and hence protect from infections. AMPs that are present on human skin include psoriasin (S100A7), RNase 7, lysozyme, LL-37 and defensins. Niacinamide is a well-known cosmetic ingredient that has been used traditionally for multiple skin benefits. Recent data indicate that niacinamide treatment can boost AMPs in human gut epithelial cells and in neutrophils. Treatment with niacinamide in mice also provided protection from skin infections by enhancing AMPs. In this article, we find that treatment with niacinamide formulation provides long-lasting protection against bacteria, potentially through the activation of an AMP response.

  15. Trichome-Related Mutants Provide a New Perspective on Multicellular Trichome Initiation and Development in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingwang; Bartholomew, Ezra; Cai, Yanling; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-01-01

    Trichomes are specialized epidermal cells located in aerial parts of plants that function in plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. The simple unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis serve as an excellent model to study the molecular mechanism of cell differentiation and pattern formation in plants. Loss-of-function mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana have suggested that the core genes GL1 (which encodes a MYB transcription factor) and TTG1 (which encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein) are important for the initiation and spacing of leaf trichomes, while for normal trichome initiation, the genes GL3, and EGL3 (which encode a bHLH protein) are needed. However, the positive regulatory genes involved in multicellular trichrome development in cucumber remain unclear. This review focuses on the phenotype of mutants (csgl3, tril, tbh, mict, and csgl1) with disturbed trichomes in cucumber and then infers which gene(s) play key roles in trichome initiation and development in those mutants. Evidence indicates that MICT, TBH, and CsGL1 are allelic with alternative splicing. CsGL3 and TRIL are allelic and override the effect of TBH, MICT, and CsGL1 on the regulation of multicellular trichome development; and affect trichome initiation. CsGL3, TRIL, MICT, TBH, and CsGL1 encode HD-Zip proteins with different subfamilies. Genetic and molecular analyses have revealed that CsGL3, TRIL, MICT, TBH, and CsGL1 are responsible for the differentiation of epidermal cells and the development of trichomes. Based on current knowledge, a positive regulator pathway model for trichome development in cucumber was proposed and compared to a model in Arabidopsis. These data suggest that trichome development in cucumber may differ from that in Arabidopsis. PMID:27559338

  16. A Mutant Small Heat Shock Protein with Increased Thylakoid Association Provides an Elevated Resistance Against UV-B Damage in Synechocystis 6803*

    PubMed Central

    Balogi, Zsolt; Cheregi, Ottilia; Giese, Kim C.; Juhász, Kata; Vierling, Elizabeth; Vass, Imre; Vígh, László; Horváth, Ibolya

    2008-01-01

    Besides acting as molecular chaperones, the amphitropic small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are suggested to play an additional role in membrane quality control. We investigated sHsp membrane function in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PPC 6803 using mutants of the single sHsp from this organism, Hsp17. We examined mutants in the N-terminal arm, L9P and Q16R, for altered interaction with thylakoid and lipid membranes and examined the effects of these mutations on thylakoid functions. These mutants are unusual in that they retain their oligomeric state and chaperone activity in vitro but fail to confer thermotolerance in vivo. We found that both mutant proteins had dramatically altered membrane/lipid interaction properties. Whereas L9P showed strongly reduced binding to thylakoid and model membranes, Q16R was almost exclusively membrane-associated, properties that may be the cause of reduced heat tolerance of cells carrying these mutations. Among the lipid classes tested, Q16R displayed the highest interaction with negatively charged SQDG. In Q16R cells a specific alteration of the thylakoid-embedded Photosystem II (PSII) complex was observed. Namely, the binding of plastoquinone and quinone analogue acceptors to the QB site was modified. In addition, the presence of Q16R dramatically reduced UV-B damage of PSII activity because of enhanced PSII repair. We suggest these effects occur at least partly because of increased interaction of Q16R with SQDG in the PSII complex. Our findings further support the model that membrane association is a functional property of sHsps and suggest sHsps as a possible biotechnological tool to enhance UV protection of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:18574246

  17. In vivo differences in the virulence, pathogenicity, and induced protective immunity of wboA mutants from genetically different parent Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Niu, Jianrui; Wang, Shuangshan; Lv, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2013-02-01

    To explore the effects of the genetic background on the characteristics of wboA gene deletion rough mutants generated from different parent Brucella sp. strains, we constructed the rough-mutant strains Brucella melitensis 16 M-MB6, B. abortus 2308-SB6, B. abortus S19-RB6, and B. melitensis NI-NB6 and evaluated their survival, pathogenicity, and induced protective immunity in mice and sheep. In mice, the survival times of the four mutants were very different in the virulence assay, from less than 6 weeks for B. abortus S19-RB6 to 11 weeks for B. abortus 2308-SB6 and B. melitensis NI-NB6. However, B. abortus S19-RB6 and B. melitensis 16 M-MB6, with a shorter survival time in mice, offered better protection against challenges with B. abortus 2308 in protection tests than B. abortus 2308-SB6 and B. melitensis NI-NB6. It seems that the induced protective immunity of each mutant might not be associated with its survival time in vivo. In the cross-protection assay, both B. melitensis 16 M-MB6 and B. abortus S19-RB6 induced greater protection against homologous challenges than heterologous challenges. When pregnant sheep were inoculated with B. abortus S19-RB6 and B. melitensis 16 M-MB6, B. abortus S19-RB6 did not induce abortion, whereas B. melitensis 16 M-MB6 did. These results demonstrated the differences in virulence, pathogenicity, and protective immunity in vivo in the wboA deletion mutants from genetically different parent Brucella spp. and also indicated that future rough vaccine strain development could be promising if suitable parent Brucella strains and/or genes were selected.

  18. A powerful molecular engineering tool provided efficient Chlamydomonas mutants as bio-sensing elements for herbicides detection.

    PubMed

    Lambreva, Maya D; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rambaldi, Irene; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Husu, Ivan; Johanningmeier, Udo; Rea, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    This study was prompted by increasing concerns about ecological damage and human health threats derived by persistent contamination of water and soil with herbicides, and emerging of bio-sensing technology as powerful, fast and efficient tool for the identification of such hazards. This work is aimed at overcoming principal limitations negatively affecting the whole-cell-based biosensors performance due to inadequate stability and sensitivity of the bio-recognition element. The novel bio-sensing elements for the detection of herbicides were generated exploiting the power of molecular engineering in order to improve the performance of photosynthetic complexes. The new phenotypes were produced by an in vitro directed evolution strategy targeted at the photosystem II (PSII) D1 protein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using exposures to radical-generating ionizing radiation as selection pressure. These tools proved successful to identify D1 mutations conferring enhanced stability, tolerance to free-radical-associated stress and competence for herbicide perception. Long-term stability tests of PSII performance revealed the mutants capability to deal with oxidative stress-related conditions. Furthermore, dose-response experiments indicated the strains having increased sensitivity or resistance to triazine and urea type herbicides with I(50) values ranging from 6 × 10(-8) M to 2 × 10(-6) M. Besides stressing the relevance of several amino acids for PSII photochemistry and herbicide sensing, the possibility to improve the specificity of whole-cell-based biosensors, via coupling herbicide-sensitive with herbicide-resistant strains, was verified.

  19. Stand structure influences nekton community composition and provides protection from natural disturbance in Micronesian mangroves

    Treesearch

    Richard A. MacKenzie; Nicole. Cormier

    2012-01-01

    Structurally complex mangrove roots are thought to provide foraging habitat, predation refugia, and typhoon protection for resident fish, shrimp, and crabs. The spatially compact nature of Micronesian mangroves results in model ecosystems to test these ideas. Tidal creek nekton assemblages were compared among mangrove forests impacted by Typhoon Sudal and differing in...

  20. Specific serum antibody responses in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) provide limited protection against Streptococcus ictaluri challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Passive immunization has been shown to provide a spectrum of protection against certain piscine pathogens, and studies were conducted to determine the role of specific antibodies in immunity to Streptococcus ictaluri. Adult Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were injected i.p. with tryptic soy br...

  1. Outer membrane vesicles from flagellin-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induce cross-reactive immunity and provide cross-protection against heterologous Salmonella challenge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiangmin; Curtiss, Roy; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) isolated from Salmonella Typhimurium are potentially useful for developing subunit vaccines because of high immunogenicity and protective efficacy. However, flagella might remain in OMV pellets following OMV purification, resulting in non-essential immune responses and counteraction of bacterial protective immune responses when developing a vaccine against infection of multiple serotypes Salmonella. In this study, a flagellin-deficient S. Typhimurium mutant was constructed. Lipopolysaccharide profiles, protein profiles and cryo-electron microscopy revealed that there were no significant differences between the wild-type and mutant OMVs, with the exception of a large amount of flagellin in the wild-type OMVs. Neither the wild-type OMVs nor the non-flagellin OMVs were toxic to macrophages. Mice immunized with the non-flagellin OMVs produced high concentrations of IgG. The non-flagellin OMVs elicited strong mucosal antibody responses in mice when administered via the intranasal route in addition to provoking higher cross-reactive immune responses against OMPs isolated from S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis. Both intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization with the non-flagellin OMVs provided efficient protection against heterologous S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge. Our results indicate that the flagellin-deficient OMVs may represent a new vaccine platform that could be exploited to facilitate the production of a broadly protective vaccine. PMID:27698383

  2. A Powerful Molecular Engineering Tool Provided Efficient Chlamydomonas Mutants as Bio-Sensing Elements for Herbicides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rambaldi, Irene; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Husu, Ivan; Johanningmeier, Udo; Rea, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    This study was prompted by increasing concerns about ecological damage and human health threats derived by persistent contamination of water and soil with herbicides, and emerging of bio-sensing technology as powerful, fast and efficient tool for the identification of such hazards. This work is aimed at overcoming principal limitations negatively affecting the whole-cell-based biosensors performance due to inadequate stability and sensitivity of the bio-recognition element. The novel bio-sensing elements for the detection of herbicides were generated exploiting the power of molecular engineering in order to improve the performance of photosynthetic complexes. The new phenotypes were produced by an in vitro directed evolution strategy targeted at the photosystem II (PSII) D1 protein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using exposures to radical-generating ionizing radiation as selection pressure. These tools proved successful to identify D1 mutations conferring enhanced stability, tolerance to free-radical-associated stress and competence for herbicide perception. Long-term stability tests of PSII performance revealed the mutants capability to deal with oxidative stress-related conditions. Furthermore, dose-response experiments indicated the strains having increased sensitivity or resistance to triazine and urea type herbicides with I50 values ranging from 6×10−8 M to 2×10−6 M. Besides stressing the relevance of several amino acids for PSII photochemistry and herbicide sensing, the possibility to improve the specificity of whole-cell-based biosensors, via coupling herbicide-sensitive with herbicide-resistant strains, was verified. PMID:23613953

  3. Nebulized Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Provides Protection in Ferrets at a Reduced Dose

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer Humberd; Papania, Mark; Knaus, Darin; Brooks, Paula; Haas, Debra L.; Mair, Raydel; Barry, James; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is delivered to vaccine recipients using a nasal spray syringe. LAIV delivered by this method is immunogenic at current doses; however, improvements in nasal delivery might allow for significant dose reduction. We investigated LAIV vaccination in ferrets using a high efficiency nebulizer designed for nasal delivery. LAIV nasal aerosol elicited high levels of serum neutralizing antibodies and protected ferrets from homologous virus challenge at conventional (107 TCID50) and significantly reduced (103 TCID50) doses. Aerosol LAIV also provided a significant level of subtype-specific cross protection. These results demonstrate the dose-sparing potential of nebulizer-based nasal aerosol LAIV delivery. PMID:22075083

  4. Vaccines based on structure-based design provide protection against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sunil; Luxon, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Vaccines elicit immune responses, provide protection against microorganisms and are considered as one of the most successful medical interventions against infectious diseases. Vaccines can be produced using attenuated virus or bacteria, recombinant proteins, bacterial polysaccharides, carbohydrates or plasmid DNA. Conventional vaccines rely on the induction of immune responses against antigenic proteins to be effective. The genetic diversity of microorganisms, coupled with the high degree of sequence variability in antigenic proteins, presents a challenge to developing broadly effective conventional vaccines. The observation that whole protein antigens are not necessarily essential for inducing immunity has led to the emergence of a new branch of vaccine design termed 'structural vaccinology'. Structure-based vaccines are designed on the rationale that protective epitopes should be sufficient to induce immune responses and provide protection against pathogens. Recent studies demonstrated that designing structure-based vaccine candidates with multiple epitopes induce a higher immune response. As yet there are no commercial vaccines available based on structure-based design and most of the structure-based vaccine candidates are in the preclinical stages of development. This review focuses on recent advances in structure-based vaccine candidates and their application in providing protection against infectious diseases.

  5. Sun protection provided by regulation school uniforms in Australian schools: an opportunity to improve personal sun protection during childhood.

    PubMed

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is linked to excessive pigmented mole development and melanoma risk. Clothing provides a physical barrier, protecting skin from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Extending sleeves to elbow length and shorts to knee length has been shown to significantly reduce mole acquisition in preschoolers from tropical Queensland. We used publicly available uniform images and guidelines from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.25°S, n = 43 schools), Cairns (16.87°S, n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.26°S, n = 23) in tropical Australia to objectively determine the body surface proportion covered by regulation school uniforms. Uniforms of nongovernment, large (≥800 students), urban, educationally advantaged schools with comprehensive sun protection policies covered more skin than those of government schools (63.2% vs 62.0%; P < 0.001), smaller schools (63.4% vs 62.3%; P = 0.009), rural (62.7% vs 61.9%; P = 0.002) and educationally disadvantaged schools (62.8% vs 62.3%; P < 0.001) with underdeveloped sun protection policies (62.8% vs 62.2%; P = 0.002). Overall, SunSmart and non-SunSmart school uniforms covered identical body surface proportions (62.4%, P = 0.084). Although wearing regulation school uniforms is mandatory at most Australian primary schools, this opportunity to improve children's sun protection is largely overlooked. Recent evidence suggests that even encouraging minor alterations to school uniforms (e.g. slightly longer sleeves/dresses/skirts/shorts) to increase skin coverage may reduce mole acquisition and melanoma risk, especially in high-risk populations. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. Protection From Mosquito Biting Provided by Permethrin-Treated Military Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Frances, Stephen P; Sferopoulos, Rodi; Lee, Bin

    2014-11-01

    A study to evaluate the protection provided by permethrin-treated fabric following cold-water washing against biting by mosquitoes is reported. Australian Defense Force (ADF) disruptive pattern combat uniform (DPCU) shirt fabric and entire shirts were treated by dipping in a 0.6% emulsion (Perigen Defense, containing 500 g/liter permethrin), and commercial factory treatment in the United States (Factory A) and Europe (Factory B). Protection was recorded after 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 50 washes. The treated fabric provided 100% protection against bites of Anopheles farauti Laveran for at least 50 washes, although only 4.8-19.0% of this species fed through untreated DPCU. The protection provided by each type of permethrin treatment against Aedes aegypti (L.) biting was variable; however, there were no significant differences between the percentage of mosquitoes biting between 1 and 10 washes. A comparison between the two factory treatments for 1-50 washes also showed no statistical difference in Ae. aegypti feeding. Chemical analysis of fabric was conducted using gas chromatography and showed that the initial dose was 0.125 mg/cm(2) for Perigen-treated fabric, which fell to 0.004 mg/cm(2) after 10 washes. By contrast, factory treatments resulted in initial dose rates of 0.20 mg/cm(2) for Factory A and 0.19 mg/cm(2) for Factory B. After 10 washes, Factory A-treated fabric had 0.09 mg/cm(2) and Factory B 0.15 mg/cm(2) of permethrin. Despite the higher concentrations of permethrin in the fabric, there was not a commensurate increase in biting protection provided by the factory-treated fabric, compared with fabric treated by dipping in permethrin emulsion.

  7. GroEL provides protection against Bacillus anthracis infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Kanchan; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) of the HSP60 and HSP70 family are highly conserved and essential to all living organisms. Hsps are immunodominant in numerous microbial infections and have been investigated for their vaccine potential. We investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of GroEL and DnaK of B. anthracis in murine model. Both Hsps were found to be highly immunogenic with mixed antibody response (both IgG1 and IgG2a), indicating stimulation of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Cytokine profile also confirmed robust T-cell response with increase in lymphocyte proliferation. Immunization with GroEL conferred 100% protection to mice against B. anthracis infection whereas DnaK couldn't provide protection.

  8. Assessment of protective efficacy of live and killed vaccines based on a non-encapsulated mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, Henk J; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Hilgers, Luuk A T; Smith, Hilde E

    2002-01-03

    The protective efficacy of a live and killed non-encapsulated isogenic mutant of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 was determined in pigs, and compared with the efficacy of the capsulated wild-type strain. SPF pigs were vaccinated twice intramuscularly at 4 and 7 weeks of age with a dose of 1 x 10(9) formalin-killed CFU of the wild-type (WT-BAC), formalin-killed non-encapsulated mutant (CM-BAC) or live non-encapsulated mutant (CM-LIVE) strain. After 2 weeks, vaccinated pigs and non-vaccinated controls were challenged intravenously with 1 x 10(7) CFU of the homologous, wild-type S. suis serotype 2 strain. Protection was evaluated by clinical, bacteriological, serological and post-mortem examinations. All pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC were completely protected against challenge with the homologous serotype. Pigs vaccinated with CM-BAC were partially protected. Although all pigs vaccinated with CM-BAC survived the challenge, four out of five pigs developed clinical signs of disease for several days. Compared to the WT-BAC and CM-BAC, the CM-LIVE vaccine was less protective. Two out of five pigs vaccinated with CM-LIVE died in the course of the experiment and all of them developed specific clinical signs of disease for several days. The protective efficacy of the vaccines could be associated with serum antibody titers. Antibody titers against cells of wild-type and non-encapsulated mutant strains as well as against muramidase-released proteins (MRP) were high in pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC and CM-BAC. Pigs vaccinated with CM-LIVE showed lower antibody titers. Antibody titers against purified capsular polysaccharides (CPS) of S. suis serotype 2 were only found in pigs vaccinated with WT-BAC. These findings indicate that CPS and other bacterial components of WT-BAC are probably essential for full protection against homologous challenge.

  9. A new potent natural antioxidant mixture provides global protection against oxidative skin cell damage.

    PubMed

    Jorge, A T S; Arroteia, K F; Lago, J C; de Sá-Rocha, V M; Gesztesi, J; Moreira, P L

    2011-04-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when there is an over production of free radicals and cells are not able to neutralize them by their own antioxidant mechanisms. These excess of free radicals will attack cellular macromolecules leading to cell damage, function impairment or death. Because of that, antioxidant substances have been largely used in products to offer complementary protection. In this study a new mixture of three known antioxidants (cocoa, green tea and alpha-tocopherol) was evaluated and its antioxidant protection was assessed focusing on its capacity to protect main cell macromolecules. Results have shown that it has a high antioxidant capacity by protecting lipids, DNA and proteins against oxidative damage. The antioxidant effect of the mixture on cells was also investigated and it was able to reduce oxidative stress generated by lipopolisacharide in human fibroblasts. Finally, as the mixture has proved to be highly antioxidant, its effect on cell senescence was evaluated, and it was demonstrated that fibroblasts in culture had delayed senescence when treated with these actives on a mixture. All results together provide important data about a new antioxidant mixture that uses a small amount of actives and is able to protect cell against oxidative damages in a global way.

  10. Intermediate rough Brucella abortus S19Δper mutant is DIVA enable, safe to pregnant guinea pigs and confers protection to mice.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Gogia, Neha; Goswami, Tapas K; Singh, R K; Chaudhuri, Pallab

    2015-05-21

    Brucella abortus S19 is a smooth strain used as live vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for its residual virulence and serological interference. Rough mutants defective of LPS are more attenuated but confers lower level of protection. We describe a modified B. abortus S19 strain, named as S19Δper, which exhibits intermediate rough phenotype with residual O-polysaccharide (OPS). Deletion of perosamine synthetase gene resulted in substantial attenuation of S19Δper mutant without affecting immunogenic properties. It mounted strong immune response in Swiss albino mice and conferred protection similar to S19 vaccine. Immunized mice produced higher levels of IFN-γ, IgG2a and thus has immune response inclined towards Th1 cell mediated immunity. Sera from immunized animals did not show agglutination reaction with RBPT antigen and thus could serve as DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine. S19Δper mutant displayed more susceptibility to serum complement mediated killing and sensitivity to polymyxin B. Pregnant guinea pigs injected with S19Δper mutant completed full term of pregnancy and did not cause abortion, still birth or birth of weak offspring. S19Δper mutant with intermediate rough phenotype displayed remarkable resemblance to S19 vaccine strain with improved properties of safety, immunogenicity and DIVA capability for control of bovine brucellosis.

  11. Protection of weanling hamsters from experimental infection with wild-type parainfluenza virus type 3 (para 3) by cold-adapted mutants of para 3.

    PubMed

    Crookshanks-Newman, F K; Belshe, R B

    1986-02-01

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (para 3) was adapted to replicate at 20 degrees C, a nonpermissive temperature for wild-type (wt) para 3. Serial passage at 20 degrees C resulted in the generation of cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. These mutant viruses have been characterized both in vitro and in vivo [Belshe and Hissom (1982): Journal of Medical Virology 10:235-242; Crookshanks and Belshe (1984): Journal of Medical Virology 13:243-249]. We now report the evaluation of three mutants (clone 1150, passaged 12 times in the cold [cp12], clone 1146, passaged 18 times in the cold [cp18], and clone 1328, passaged 45 times in the cold [cp45]) for their ability to protect hamsters from infection by wild-type para 3. Ether-anesthetized male syrian hamsters were intranasally vaccinated with either wt para 3 (clone 127) or one of the ca para 3 mutants and on day 28 post-vaccination; each animal was intranasally challenged with 10(5.0) pfu of wt para 3. On days 1, 2, 3, and 4 post-challenge, 4 to 13 hamsters from each group were sacrificed, and the quantity of para 3 in the nasal turbinates and lungs was determined. Wt virus induced protection from challenge. cp12, cp18, and cp45 reduced the peak titer of wt replication in the lungs by greater than 100-fold, tenfold, and tenfold, respectively. The duration of virus replication was shortened also by intranasal vaccination with the mutants. These data give evidence of an inverse relationship between the degree of protection induced by vaccination with cold-adapted mutants and the number of passages of the virus in the cold.

  12. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with a Live-Attenuated Triple Mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 Induces Robust Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity To Completely Protect Animals against Pneumonic Plague.

    PubMed

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Fitts, Eric C; Popov, Vsevolod L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-12-01

    Earlier, we showed that the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 with deleted genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acyltransferase (MsbB), and the attachment invasion locus (Ail), respectively, was avirulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. In this study, we further evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant and its derivative by different routes of vaccination. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous (s.c.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) route with two doses (2 × 10(6) CFU/dose) of the above-mentioned triple mutant with 100% survivability of the animals. Upon subsequent pneumonic challenge with 70 to 92 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of wild-type (WT) strain CO92, all of the mice survived when immunization occurred by the i.m. route. Since Ail has virulence and immunogenic potential, a mutated version of Ail devoid of its virulence properties was created, and the genetically modified ail replaced the native ail gene on the chromosome of the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, creating a Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 vaccine strain. This newly generated mutant was attenuated similarly to the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant when administered by the i.m. route and provided 100% protection to animals against subsequent pneumonic challenge. Not only were the two above-mentioned mutants cleared rapidly from the initial i.m. site of injection in animals with no histopathological lesions, the immunized mice did not exhibit any disease symptoms during immunization or after subsequent exposure to WT CO92. These two mutants triggered balanced Th1- and Th2-based antibody responses and cell-mediated immunity. A substantial increase in interleukin-17 (IL-17) from the T cells of vaccinated mice, a cytokine of the Th17 cells, further augmented their vaccine potential. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants represent excellent vaccine candidates for plague, with the latter mutant still retaining Ail immunogenicity but

  13. Foundations and self-tanning products: Do they provide any protection from the sun?

    PubMed

    Choquenet, Benjamin; Couteau, Céline; Paparis, Eva; Coiffard, Laurence J M

    2009-11-01

    As soon as the weather turns sunny, everyone wants a tan. People with skin phototypes III and IV, called melanocompetent, have no problem meeting this fashion requirement. But things are quite different for people with phototypes I and II and so these individuals look for alternative solutions. In essence, light skin burns easily when exposed to the sun. Therefore, light-skinned people are offered a cosmetic solution through self-tanning products or foundations. It seemed interesting to us to evaluate the sun protection power of this type of product. To do this, we used an in vitro method to determine the typical indicators related to sunscreen products, such as sun protection factor (SPF), ultraviolet (UV)-A protection factor (PF-UVA), UV-B/UV-A ratio as well as the critical wavelength because these artificial tanning products could be considered sunscreen products by users. It is important to know whether a self-tanning product and/or a foundation provide sun protection and whether they meet the standards set for other sunscreen products. Protection which is imbalanced for either UV-B or UV-A radiation is potentially harmful for users believing themselves adequately protected. To do this, we assembled the requisite conditions for forming melanoidins in the cosmetic itself. We tested seven amino acids found in the corneal cells of the epidermis. Regardless of the amino acid used, the corresponding SPF was essentially zero (approximately SPF 2). Foundations, on the other hand, proved to be much more interesting because they possess a non-negligible SPF as well as good photostability making these products safe in terms of their mode of application (applied once daily).

  14. Brucella abortus mutants lacking ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are highly attenuated in virulence and confer protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is an attenuated vaccine strain that has been most frequently used for bovine brucellosis. Although it is known to provide good protection in cattle, it still has some drawbacks including resistance to rifampicin, residual virulence and pathogenicity in humans. Thus, there has been a continuous interest on new safe and effective bovine vaccine candidates. In the present study, we have constructed unmarked mutants by deleting singly cydD and cydC genes, which encode ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, from the chromosome of the virulent Brucella abortus isolate from Korean cow (referred to as IVK15). Both IVK15ΔcydD and ΔcydC mutants showed increased sensitivity to metal ions, hydrogen peroxide and acidic pH, which are mimic to intracellular environment during host infection. Additionally, the mutants exhibited a significant growth defect in RAW264.7 cells and greatly attenuated in mice. Vaccination of mice with either IVK15ΔcydC or IVK15ΔcydD mutant could elicit an anti-Brucella specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass responses as well as enhance the secretion of interferon-gamma, and provided better protection against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308 than with the commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. Collectively, these results suggest that both IVK15ΔcydC and IVK15ΔcydD mutants could be an attenuated vaccine candidate against B. abortus.

  15. Designated "no smoking" areas provide from partial to no protection from environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Cains, T; Cannata, S; Poulos, R; Ferson, M J; Stewart, B W

    2004-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of designated "no smoking" areas in the hospitality industry as a means of providing protection from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and whether certain design features assist in achieving this end. In the greater metropolitan region of Sydney, a representative group of 17 social and gaming clubs, licensed to serve alcoholic beverages and in which, apart from designated areas, smoking occurs, agreed to participate. In each establishment, simultaneous single measurements of atmospheric nicotine, particulate matter (10 microm; PM10) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were measured in a general use area and in a designated "no smoking" area during times of normal operation, together with the levels in outdoor air (PM10 and CO2 only). Analyses were made of these data to assess the extent to which persons using the "no smoking" areas were protected from exposure to ETS. By comparison with levels in general use areas, nicotine and particulate matter levels were significantly less in the "no smoking" areas, but were still readily detectable at higher than ambient levels. For nicotine, mean (SD) levels were 100.5 (45.3) microg/m3 in the areas where smoking occurred and 41.3 (16.1) microg/m3 in the "no smoking" areas. Corresponding PM10 levels were 460 (196) microg/m3 and 210 (210) microg/m3, while outdoor levels were 61 (23) microg/m3. The reduction in pollutants achieved through a separate room being designated "no smoking" was only marginally better than the reduction achieved when a "no smoking" area was contiguous with a smoking area. CO2 levels were relatively uninformative. Provision of designated "no smoking" areas in licensed (gaming) clubs in New South Wales, Australia, provides, at best, partial protection from ETS-typically about a 50% reduction in exposure. The protection afforded is less than users might reasonably have understood and is not comparable with protection afforded by prohibiting smoking on the premises.

  16. Bullying in medically fragile youth: a review of risks, protective factors, and recommendations for medical providers.

    PubMed

    Faith, Melissa A; Reed, Gabriela; Heppner, Celia E; Hamill, Lillian C; Tarkenton, Tahnae R; Donewar, Crista W

    2015-05-01

    Bullying is a common child and adolescent phenomenon that has concurrent and long-term implications for victims' psychological, psychosomatic, social, and academic functioning. Youth with chronic illnesses are at increased risk for being bullied, but few studies have evaluated specific risk and protective factors for medically fragile youth. Despite recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Society for Adolescent Medicine that pediatric health care providers should contribute to bullying prevention and intervention efforts, researchers also have yet to identify the best ways for providers to intervene with medically fragile youth. In this article, the authors review risk and protective factors for bullying among healthy samples. Then, the authors specifically address the ways in which these risk and protective factors are likely to apply to children with fragile medical conditions, and they provide summaries of extant bullying research for selected examples of medically fragile pediatric populations. Finally, the authors present recommendations for intervening with medically fragile youth and suggest several areas in which additional research is needed.

  17. Anesthesia Providers Adherence to the Use of Gloves and Eye Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    removing nasogastric /orogastric tubes , nine providers (32.1%) stated that they use gloves 60-79% of the time. Only one provider indicated a use of...eye protection when performing venipuncture, removing an nasogastric /orogastric tube , or when placing a spinal (see Table 9). Less than 15% of...How often do you wear gloves when inserting or removing a nasogastric /orogastric tube ? a. 100% c. 60-79% e. 20-39% b. 80-99% d. 40-59% f. < 20

  18. Valuing blue carbon: carbon sequestration benefits provided by the marine protected areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Barrera, Tatiana G; Maldonado, Jorge H

    2015-01-01

    Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation.

  19. Valuing Blue Carbon: Carbon Sequestration Benefits Provided by the Marine Protected Areas in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit’s demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation. PMID:26018814

  20. A Burkholderia pseudomallei outer membrane vesicle vaccine provides protection against lethal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Petersen, Hailey; Judy, Barbara M; Blumentritt, Carla A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J; Torres, Alfredo G; Morici, Lisa A

    2014-05-01

    The environmental Gram-negative encapsulated bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in areas of Southeast Asia and northern Australia in which the disease is endemic. B. pseudomallei is also classified as a tier I select agent due to the high level of lethality of the bacterium and its innate resistance to antibiotics, as well as the lack of an effective vaccine. Gram-negative bacteria, including B. pseudomallei, secrete outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) which are enriched with multiple protein, lipid, and polysaccharide antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that immunization with multivalent B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs protects highly susceptible BALB/c mice against an otherwise lethal aerosol challenge. In this work, we evaluated the protective efficacy of OMV immunization against intraperitoneal challenge with a heterologous strain because systemic infection with phenotypically diverse environmental B. pseudomallei strains poses another hazard and a challenge to vaccine development. We demonstrated that B. pseudomallei OMVs derived from strain 1026b afforded significant protection against septicemic infection with B. pseudomallei strain K96243. OMV immunization induced robust OMV-, lipopolysaccharide-, and capsular polysaccharide-specific serum IgG (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG3) and IgM antibody responses. OMV-immune serum promoted bacterial killing in vitro, and passive transfer of B. pseudomallei OMV immune sera protected naive mice against a subsequent challenge. These results indicate that OMV immunization provides antibody-mediated protection against acute, rapidly lethal sepsis in mice. B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs may represent an efficacious multivalent vaccine strategy against melioidosis.

  1. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Provides Protection against Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Nieves, Wildaliz; Petersen, Hailey; Judy, Barbara M.; Blumentritt, Carla A.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Roy, Chad J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    The environmental Gram-negative encapsulated bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in areas of Southeast Asia and northern Australia in which the disease is endemic. B. pseudomallei is also classified as a tier I select agent due to the high level of lethality of the bacterium and its innate resistance to antibiotics, as well as the lack of an effective vaccine. Gram-negative bacteria, including B. pseudomallei, secrete outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) which are enriched with multiple protein, lipid, and polysaccharide antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that immunization with multivalent B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs protects highly susceptible BALB/c mice against an otherwise lethal aerosol challenge. In this work, we evaluated the protective efficacy of OMV immunization against intraperitoneal challenge with a heterologous strain because systemic infection with phenotypically diverse environmental B. pseudomallei strains poses another hazard and a challenge to vaccine development. We demonstrated that B. pseudomallei OMVs derived from strain 1026b afforded significant protection against septicemic infection with B. pseudomallei strain K96243. OMV immunization induced robust OMV-, lipopolysaccharide-, and capsular polysaccharide-specific serum IgG (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG3) and IgM antibody responses. OMV-immune serum promoted bacterial killing in vitro, and passive transfer of B. pseudomallei OMV immune sera protected naive mice against a subsequent challenge. These results indicate that OMV immunization provides antibody-mediated protection against acute, rapidly lethal sepsis in mice. B. pseudomallei-derived OMVs may represent an efficacious multivalent vaccine strategy against melioidosis. PMID:24671550

  2. Vaccination with a defined Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida pathogenicity island mutant (DeltaiglB) induces protective immunity against homotypic and heterotypic challenge.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M Neal; Berton, Michael T; Seshu, Janakiram; Klose, Karl E; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2009-09-18

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia and a potential bioweapon. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against this organism. We have characterized the efficacy of a defined F. tularensis subsp. novicida mutant (DeltaiglB) as a live attenuated vaccine against pneumonic tularemia. Replication of the iglB mutant (KKF235) in murine macrophages was significantly lower than the wild type novicida strain U112, and exhibited an LD(50) greater than 10(6)-fold (>10(7)CFU vs <10CFU) in an intranasal challenge model. Mice immunized with KKF235 intranasally or orally induced robust antigen-specific splenic IFN-gamma recall responses, as well as the production of systemic and mucosal antibodies. Intranasal vaccination with KKF235 protected mice from subsequent homotypic challenge with U112 as well as heterotypic challenge with F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (LVS). Moreover, protected animals also exhibited minimal pathological changes compared with mock-vaccinated and challenged animals. The protection conferred by KKF235 vaccination was shown to be highly dependent on endogenous IFN-gamma production. Most significantly, oral immunization with KKF235 protected mice from a highly lethal subsp. tularensis (SCHU S4) pulmonary challenge. Collectively, these results further suggest the feasibility of using defined pathogenicity island mutants as live vaccine candidates against pneumonic tularemia.

  3. Providing the full DDF link protection for bus-connected SIEPON based system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, I.-Shyan; Pakpahan, Andrew Fernando; Liem, Andrew Tanny; Nikoukar, AliAkbar

    2016-09-01

    Currently a massive amount of traffic per second is delivered through EPON systems, one of the prominent access network technologies for delivering the next generation network. Therefore, it is vital to keep the EPON optical distribution network (ODN) working by providing the necessity protection mechanism in the deployed devices; otherwise, when failures occur it will cause a great loss for both network operators and business customers. In this paper, we propose a bus-connected architecture to protect and recover distribution drop fiber (DDF) link faults or transceiver failures at ONU(s) in SIEPON system. The proposed architecture provides a cost-effective architecture, which delivers the high fault-tolerance in handling multiple DDF faults, while also providing flexibility in choosing the backup ONU assignments. Simulation results show that the proposed architecture provides the reliability and maintains quality of service (QoS) performance in terms of mean packet delay, system throughput, packet loss and EF jitter when DDF link failures occur.

  4. Intranasal Immunization with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccines with Nontoxic Mutants of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxins as Adjuvants Protects Mice against Invasive Pneumococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Håvard; Schulz, Dominique; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Jónsdóttir, Ingileif

    1999-01-01

    Host defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae depend largely on phagocytosis following opsonization by polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and complement. Since colonization of the respiratory mucosa is the first step in pneumococcal pathogenesis, mucosal immune responses may play a significant role. In addition to inducing systemic immune responses, mucosal vaccination with an effective adjuvant has the advantage of inducing mucosal IgA antibodies. The heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli is a well-studied mucosal adjuvant, and adjuvant activity of nontoxic LT mutants has been demonstrated for several protein antigens. We investigated the immunogenicity of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PNC) of serotypes 1 and 3 in mice after intranasal (i.n.) immunization by using as an adjuvant the nontoxic LT mutant LT-K63 or LT-R72, which has minimal residual toxicity. Pneumococcal serotype-specific antibodies were measured in serum (IgM, IgG, and IgA) and saliva (IgA), and vaccine-induced protection was evaluated by i.n. challenge with virulent pneumococci of the homologous serotype. When administered with LT mutants, i.n. immunization with both conjugates induced systemic and mucosal immune responses, and serum IgG antibody levels were significantly higher than after subcutaneous immunization. All mice immunized i.n. with PNC-1 and LT mutants were protected against bacteremia and cleared the pneumococci from the lung 24 h after i.n. challenge; pneumococcal density correlated significantly with serum IgG antibody levels. Similarly, the survival of mice immunized i.n. with PNC-3 and LT mutants was significantly prolonged. These results demonstrate that i.n. vaccination with PNC and potent adjuvants can protect mice against invasive and lethal pneumococcal infections, indicating that mucosal vaccination with PNC may be an alternative vaccination strategy for humans. PMID:10531245

  5. Studies of the aggregation of mutant proteins in vitro provide insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chiti, Fabrizio; Calamai, Martino; Taddei, Niccolò; Stefani, Massimo; Ramponi, Giampietro; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2002-01-01

    Protein aggregation and the formation of highly insoluble amyloid structures is associated with a range of debilitating human conditions, which include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and the Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Muscle acylphosphatase (AcP) has already provided significant insights into mutational changes that modulate amyloid formation. In the present paper, we have used this system to investigate the effects of mutations that modify the charge state of a protein without affecting significantly the hydrophobicity or secondary structural propensities of the polypeptide chain. A highly significant inverse correlation was found to exist between the rates of aggregation of the protein variants under denaturing conditions and their overall net charge. This result indicates that aggregation is generally favored by mutations that bring the net charge of the protein closer to neutrality. In light of this finding, we have analyzed natural mutations associated with familial forms of amyloid diseases that involve alteration of the net charge of the proteins or protein fragments associated with the diseases. Sixteen mutations have been identified for which the mechanism of action that causes the pathological condition is not yet known or fully understood. Remarkably, 14 of these 16 mutations cause the net charge of the corresponding peptide or protein that converts into amyloid deposits to be reduced. This result suggests that charge has been a key parameter in molecular evolution to ensure the avoidance of protein aggregation and identifies reduction of the net charge as an important determinant in at least some forms of protein deposition diseases. PMID:12374855

  6. Studies of the aggregation of mutant proteins in vitro provide insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Chiti, Fabrizio; Calamai, Martino; Taddei, Niccolo; Stefani, Massimo; Ramponi, Giampietro; Dobson, Christopher M

    2002-12-10

    Protein aggregation and the formation of highly insoluble amyloid structures is associated with a range of debilitating human conditions, which include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Muscle acylphosphatase (AcP) has already provided significant insights into mutational changes that modulate amyloid formation. In the present paper, we have used this system to investigate the effects of mutations that modify the charge state of a protein without affecting significantly the hydrophobicity or secondary structural propensities of the polypeptide chain. A highly significant inverse correlation was found to exist between the rates of aggregation of the protein variants under denaturing conditions and their overall net charge. This result indicates that aggregation is generally favored by mutations that bring the net charge of the protein closer to neutrality. In light of this finding, we have analyzed natural mutations associated with familial forms of amyloid diseases that involve alteration of the net charge of the proteins or protein fragments associated with the diseases. Sixteen mutations have been identified for which the mechanism of action that causes the pathological condition is not yet known or fully understood. Remarkably, 14 of these 16 mutations cause the net charge of the corresponding peptide or protein that converts into amyloid deposits to be reduced. This result suggests that charge has been a key parameter in molecular evolution to ensure the avoidance of protein aggregation and identifies reduction of the net charge as an important determinant in at least some forms of protein deposition diseases.

  7. Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae double-deletion mutant S-8∆clpP/apxIIC confers protection against homologous or heterologous strain challenge.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Gang; Zhou, Long; Zhang, Yanhe; Cui, Ning; Liu, Siguo; Wang, Chunlai

    2017-01-06

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which leads to large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, S-8△clpP△apxIIC, a double-deletion mutant of A. pleuropneumoniae was constructed, and its safety and protective efficacy were evaluated in pigs. The S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in a murine (BALB/c) model, and caused no detrimental effects on pigs even at a dose of up to 1.0 × 10(9) CFU. Furthermore, the S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant was able to induce a strong immune response in pigs, which included high levels of IgG1 and IgG2, stimulated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) production, and conferred effective protection against the lethal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae serovars 7 or 5a. The pigs in the S-8△clpP△apxIIC immunized groups have no lesions and reduced bacterial loads in the lung tissue after challenge. The data obtained in this study suggest that the S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant can serve as a highly immunogenic and potential live attenuated vaccine candidate against A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  8. Combination of ACE inhibitor with nicorandil provides further protection in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Taniguchi, Kei; Higaki, Masato; Ueda, Shuko; Shima, Tomoko; Nagura, Michito; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J; Uchida, Shunya

    2014-12-15

    An inhibition in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the most widely used therapies to treat chronic kidney disease. However, its effect is occasionally not sufficient and additional treatments may be required. Recently, we reported that nicorandil exhibited renoprotective effects in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy. Here we examined if nicorandil can provide an additive protection on enalapril in chronic kidney disease. Single treatment with either enalapril or nicorandil significantly ameliorated glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in the rat remnant kidney while the combination of these two compounds provided additive effects. In addition, an increase in oxidative stress in remnant kidney was also blocked by either enalapril or nicorandil while the combination of the drugs was more potent. A mechanism was likely due for nicorandil to preventing manganase superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and sirtuin (Sirt)3 from being reduced in injured kidneys. A study with cultured podocytes indicated that the antioxidative effect could be mediated through sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) in the mitochondrial KATP channel since blocking SUR with glibenclamide reduced MnSOD and Sirt3 expression in podocytes. In conclusion, nicorandil may synergize with enalapril to provide superior protection in chronic kidney disease.

  9. Activation of the Farnesoid X Receptor Provides Protection against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Florence Ying; de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Quad; Chong, Hansook Kim; Zhang, Yanqiao; Liu, Yaping; Jones, Stacey A.; Osborne, Timothy F.; Edwards, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4), is known to regulate cholesterol, bile acid, lipoprotein, and glucose metabolism. In the current study, we provide evidence to support a role for FXR in hepatoprotection from acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Pharmacological activation of FXR induces the expression of several genes involved in phase II and phase III xenobiotic metabolism in wild-type, but not Fxr−/− mice. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-based genome-wide response element analyses coupled with luciferase reporter assays to identify functional FXR response elements within promoters, introns, or intragenic regions of these genes. Consistent with the observed transcriptional changes, FXR gene dosage is positively correlated with the degree of protection from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that pretreatment of wild-type mice with an FXR-specific agonist provides significant protection from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Based on these findings, we propose that FXR plays a role in hepatic xenobiotic metabolism and, when activated, provides hepatoprotection against toxins such as APAP. PMID:20573685

  10. Transferring Xenogenic Mitochondria Provides Neural Protection Against Ischemic Stress in Ischemic Rat Brains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Shen, Ching-I; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Wu, Shih-Fang; Chang, Jui-Chih; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Liu, Chin-San; Su, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Transferring exogenous mitochondria has therapeutic effects on damaged heart, liver, and lung tissues. Whether this protective effect requires the symbiosis of exogenous mitochondria in host cells remains unknown. Here xenogenic mitochondria derived from a hamster cell line were applied to ischemic rat brains and rat primary cortical neurons. Isolated hamster mitochondria, either through local intracerebral or systemic intra-arterial injection, significantly restored the motor performance of brain-ischemic rats. The brain infarct area and neuronal cell death were both attenuated by the exogenous mitochondria. Although internalized mitochondria could be observed in neurons and astrocytes, the low efficacy of mitochondrial internalization could not completely account for the high rate of rescue of the treated neural cells. We further illustrated that disrupting electron transport or ATPase synthase in mitochondria significantly attenuated the protective effect, suggesting that intact respiratory activity is essential for the mitochondrial potency on neural protection. These results emphasize that nonsymbiotic extracellular mitochondria can provide an effective cell defense against acute injurious ischemic stress in the central nervous system.

  11. Multifunctional PEG Retinylamine Conjugate Provides Prolonged Protection against Retinal Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) retinylamine (Ret-NH2) conjugate PEG-GFL-NH-Ret with a glycine-phenylalanine-leucine (GFL) spacer was synthesized for controlled oral delivery of Ret-NH2 to treat retinal degenerative diseases, including Stargardt disease (STGD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The peptide spacer was introduced for sustained release of the drug by digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract. The pharmacokinetics experiments showed that the PEG conjugate could control the sustained drug release after oral administration and had much lower nonspecific liver drug accumulation than the free drug in wild-type female C57BL mice. In the mean time, the conjugate maintained the same concentration of Ret-NH2 in the eye as the free drug. Also, PEG-GFL-NH-Ret at a Ret-NH2 equivalent dose of 25 mg/kg produced complete protection of Abca4–/–Rdh8–/– mouse retinas against light-induced retinal degeneration for 3 days after oral administration, as revealed by OCT retina imaging, whereas free Ret-NH2 did not provide any protection under identical conditions. The polymer conjugate PEG-GFL-NH-Ret has great potential for controlled delivery of Ret-NH2 to the eye for effective protection against retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25390360

  12. Immunisation with proteins expressed during chronic murine melioidosis provides enhanced protection against disease.

    PubMed

    Champion, Olivia L; Gourlay, Louise J; Scott, Andrew E; Lassaux, Patricia; Conejero, Laura; Perletti, Lucia; Hemsley, Claudia; Prior, Joann; Bancroft, Gregory; Bolognesi, Martino; Titball, Richard W

    2016-03-29

    There is an urgent need for an effective vaccine against human disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, and although a wide range of candidates have been tested in mice none provide high level protection. We considered this might reflect the inability of these vaccine candidates to protect against chronic disease. Using Q-RT PCR we have identified 6 genes which are expressed in bacteria colonising spleens and lungs of chronically infected mice. Three of the genes (BPSL1897, BPSL3369 and BPSL2287) have been expressed in Escherichia coli and the encoded proteins purified. We have also included BPSL2765, a protein known to induce immune responses associated with a reduced incidence of chronic/recurrent disease in humans. Immunisation of mice with a combination of these antigens resulted in the induction of antibody responses against all of the proteins. Compared with mice immunised with capsular polysaccharide or LolC protein, mice immunised with the combination of chronic stage antigens showed enhanced protection against experimental disease in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The solar ultraviolet B radiation protection provided by shading devices with regard to its diffuse component.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-10-01

    The composition of the incident solar global ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation with regard to its beam and diffuse radiation fractions is highly relevant with regard to outdoor sun protection. This is especially true with respect to sun protection during leisure-time outdoor sun exposure at the shore and pools, where people tend to escape the sun under shade trees or different types of shading devices, e.g., umbrellas, overhangs, etc., believing they offer protection from the erythemal solar radiation. The degree of sun protection offered by such devices is directly related to the composition of the solar global UVB radiation, i.e., its beam and diffuse fractions. The composition of the incident solar global UVB radiation can be determined by measuring the global UVB (using Solar Light Co. Inc., Model 501A UV-Biometer) and either of its components. The beam component of the UVB radiation was determined by measuring the normal incidence beam radiation using a prototype, tracking instrument consisting of a Solar Light Co. Inc. Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The horizontal beam component of the global UVB radiation was calculated from the measured normal incidence using a simple geometric correlation and the diffuse component is determined as the difference between global and horizontal beam radiations. Horizontal and vertical surfaces positioned under a horizontal overhang/sunshade or an umbrella are not fully protected from exposure to solar global UVB radiation. They can receive a significant fraction of the UVB radiation, depending on their location beneath the shading device, the umbrella radius and the albedo (reflectance) of the surrounding ground surface in the case of a vertical surface. Shading devices such as an umbrella or horizontal overhang/shade provide relief from the solar global radiation and do block the solar global UVB radiation to some extent; nevertheless, a significant fraction of the solar global UVB

  14. Designated "no smoking" areas provide from partial to no protection from environmental tobacco smoke

    PubMed Central

    Cains, T; Cannata, S; Poulos, R; Ferson, M; Stewart, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of designated "no smoking" areas in the hospitality industry as a means of providing protection from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and whether certain design features assist in achieving this end. Methodology: In the greater metropolitan region of Sydney, a representative group of 17 social and gaming clubs, licensed to serve alcoholic beverages and in which, apart from designated areas, smoking occurs, agreed to participate. In each establishment, simultaneous single measurements of atmospheric nicotine, particulate matter (10 µm; PM10) and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were measured in a general use area and in a designated "no smoking" area during times of normal operation, together with the levels in outdoor air (PM10 and CO2 only). Analyses were made of these data to assess the extent to which persons using the "no smoking" areas were protected from exposure to ETS. Results: By comparison with levels in general use areas, nicotine and particulate matter levels were significantly less in the "no smoking" areas, but were still readily detectable at higher than ambient levels. For nicotine, mean (SD) levels were 100.5 (45.3) µg/m3 in the areas where smoking occurred and 41.3 (16.1) µg/m3 in the "no smoking" areas. Corresponding PM10 levels were 460 (196) µg/m3 and 210 (210) µg/m3, while outdoor levels were 61 (23) µg/m3. The reduction in pollutants achieved through a separate room being designated "no smoking" was only marginally better than the reduction achieved when a "no smoking" area was contiguous with a smoking area. CO2 levels were relatively uninformative. Conclusion: Provision of designated "no smoking" areas in licensed (gaming) clubs in New South Wales, Australia, provides, at best, partial protection from ETS—typically about a 50% reduction in exposure. The protection afforded is less than users might reasonably have understood and is not comparable with protection afforded by prohibiting smoking on the

  15. Passive immunization does not provide protection against experimental infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Sarah; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Novacco, Marilisa; Oestmann, Angelina; de Miranda, Luisa H Monteiro; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Willi, Barbara

    2016-08-05

    Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) is the most pathogenic feline hemotropic mycoplasma. Cats infected with Mhf that clear bacteremia are protected from Mhf reinfection, but the mechanisms of protective immunity are unresolved. In the present study we investigated whether the passive transfer of antibodies from Mhf-recovered cats to naïve recipient cats provided protection against bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf; moreover, we characterized the immune response in the recipient cats. Ten specified pathogen-free (SPF) cats were transfused with pooled plasma from cats that had cleared Mhf bacteremia; five control cats received plasma from naïve SPF cats. After homologous challenge with Mhf, cats were monitored for 100 days using quantitative PCR, hematology, blood biochemistry, Coombs testing, flow cytometry, DnaK ELISA, and red blood cell (RBC) osmotic fragility (OF) measurement. Passively immunized cats were not protected against Mhf infection but, compared to control cats, showed significantly higher RBC OF and B lymphocyte (CD45R/B220(+)) counts and occasionally higher lymphocyte, monocyte and activated CD4(+) T lymphocyte (CD4(+)CD25(+)) counts; they also showed higher bilirubin, total protein and globulin levels compared to those of control cats. At times of peak bacteremia, a decrease in eosinophils and lymphocytes, as well as subsets thereof (B lymphocytes and CD5(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes), and an increase in monocytes were particularly significant in the passively immunized cats. In conclusion, passive immunization does not prevent bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf, but enhances RBC osmotic fragility and induces a pronounced immune response.

  16. PreImplantation factor (PIF) therapy provides comprehensive protection against radiation induced pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Shainer, Reut; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Berger, Arye; Hinden, Liad; Mueller, Martin; Brodie, Chaya; Simillion, Cedric; Paidas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) may lead to cancer and death and has few effective countermeasures. Efficacy of synthetic PIF treatment was demonstrated in preclinical autoimmune and transplantation models. PIF protected against inflammation and mortality following lethal irradiation in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) model. Herein, we demonstrate that PIF imparts comprehensive local and systemic protection against lethal and sub-lethal ARS in murine models. PIF treatment 2 h after lethal irradiation led to 100% survival and global hematopoietic recovery at 2 weeks after therapy. At 24 h after irradiation PIF restored hematopoiesis in a semi-allogeneic BMT model. PIF-preconditioning provided improved long-term engraftment. The direct effect of PIF on bone marrow cells was also demonstrated in vitro: PIF promoted pre-B cell differentiation and increased immunoregulatory properties of BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. PIF treatment also improved hematopoietic recovery and reduced systemic inflammatory cytokine production after sub-lethal radiation exposure. Here, PIF also prevented colonic crypt and basal membrane damage coupled with reduced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and increased (B7h1) expression. Global upper GI gene pathway analysis revealed PIF's involvement in protein-RNA interactions, mitochondrial oxidative pathways, and responses to cellular stress. Some effects may be attributed to PIF's influence on macrophage differentiation and function. PIF demonstrated a regulatory effect on irradiated macrophages and on classically activated M1 macrophages, reducing inflammatory gene expression (iNOS, Cox2), promoting protective (Arg1) gene expression and inducing pro-tolerance cytokine secretion. Notably, synthetic PIF is stable for long-term field use. Overall, clinical investigation of PIF for comprehensive ARS protection is warranted. PMID:27449294

  17. Neutron structure of the T26H mutant of T4 phage lysozyme provides insight into the catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme and how it differs from that of wild type

    PubMed Central

    Meilleur, Flora; Shimizu, Rumi; Shibazaki, Chie; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota

    2017-01-01

    Abstract T4 phage lysozyme is an inverting glycoside hydrolase that degrades the murein of bacterial cell walls by cleaving the β‐1,4‐glycosidic bond. The substitution of the catalytic Thr26 residue to a histidine converts the wild type from an inverting to a retaining enzyme, which implies that the original general acid Glu11 can also act as an acid/base catalyst in the hydrolysis. Here, we have determined the neutron structure of the perdeuterated T26H mutant to clarify the protonation states of Glu11 and the substituted His26, which are key in the retaining reaction. The 2.09‐Å resolution structure shows that the imidazole group of His26 is in its singly protonated form in the active site, suggesting that the deprotonated Nɛ2 atom of His26 can attack the anomeric carbon of bound substrate as a nucleophile. The carboxyl group of Glu11 is partially protonated and interacts with the unusual neutral state of the guanidine moiety of Arg145, as well as two heavy water molecules. Considering that one of the water‐binding sites has the potential to be occupied by a hydronium ion, the bulk solvent could be the source for the protonation of Glu11. The respective protonation states of Glu11 and His26 are consistent with the bond lengths determined by an unrestrained refinement of the high‐resolution X‐ray structure of T26H at 1.04‐Å resolution. The detail structural information, including the coordinates of the deuterium atoms in the active site, provides insight into the distinctively different catalytic activities of the mutant and wild type enzymes. PMID:28707339

  18. Neutron structure of the T26H mutant of T4 phage lysozyme provides insight into the catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme and how it differs from that of wild type.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Meilleur, Flora; Shimizu, Rumi; Shibazaki, Chie; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota

    2017-07-13

    T4 phage lysozyme is an inverting glycoside hydrolase that degrades the murein of bacterial cell walls by cleaving the β-1,4-glycosidic bond. The substitution of the catalytic Thr26 residue to a histidine converts the wild type from an inverting to a retaining enzyme, which implies that the original general acid Glu11 can also act as an acid/base catalyst in the hydrolysis. Here, we have determined the neutron structure of the perdeuterated T26H mutant to clarify the protonation states of Glu11 and the substituted His26, which are key in the retaining reaction. The 2.09-Å resolution structure shows that the imidazole group of His26 is in its singly protonated form in the active site, suggesting that the deprotonated Nɛ2 atom of His26 can attack the anomeric carbon of bound substrate as a nucleophile. The carboxyl group of Glu11 is partially protonated and interacts with the unusual neutral state of the guanidine moiety of Arg145, as well as two heavy water molecules. Considering that one of the water-binding sites has the potential to be occupied by a hydronium ion, the bulk solvent could be the source for the protonation of Glu11. The respective protonation states of Glu11 and His26 are consistent with the bond lengths determined by an unrestrained refinement of the high-resolution X-ray structure of T26H at 1.04-Å resolution. The detail structural information, including the coordinates of the deuterium atoms in the active site, provides insight into the distinctively different catalytic activities of the mutant and wild type enzymes. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  19. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington’s disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results. PMID:27110099

  20. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington's disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington's disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington's disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington's disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results.

  1. Live Attenuated Mutants of Francisella tularensis Protect Rabbits against Aerosol Challenge with a Virulent Type A Strain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection. PMID:24614653

  2. Design of Provider-Provisioned Website Protection Scheme against Malware Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Takeshi; Tanimoto, Naoto; Hariu, Takeo; Itoh, Mitsutaka

    Vulnerabilities in web applications expose computer networks to security threats, and many websites are used by attackers as hopping sites to attack other websites and user terminals. These incidents prevent service providers from constructing secure networking environments. To protect websites from attacks exploiting vulnerabilities in web applications, service providers use web application firewalls (WAFs). WAFs filter accesses from attackers by using signatures, which are generated based on the exploit codes of previous attacks. However, WAFs cannot filter unknown attacks because the signatures cannot reflect new types of attacks. In service provider environments, the number of exploit codes has recently increased rapidly because of the spread of vulnerable web applications that have been developed through cloud computing. Thus, generating signatures for all exploit codes is difficult. To solve these problems, our proposed scheme detects and filters malware downloads that are sent from websites which have already received exploit codes. In addition, to collect information for detecting malware downloads, web honeypots, which automatically extract the communication records of exploit codes, are used. According to the results of experiments using a prototype, our scheme can filter attacks automatically so that service providers can provide secure and cost-effective network environments.

  3. Dasatinib Targets B-Lineage Cells but Does Not Provide an Effective Therapy for Myeloproliferative Disease in c-Cbl RING Finger Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duyvestyn, Johanna M.; Taylor, Samuel J.; Dagger, Samantha A.; Orandle, Marlene; Morse, Herbert C.; Thien, Christine B. F.; Langdon, Wallace Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor dasatinib would provide an effective therapy for myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs) involving c-Cbl mutations. These mutations, which occur in the RING finger and linker domains, abolish the ability of c-Cbl to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and downregulate activated protein tyrosine kinases. Here we analyzed the effects of dasatinib in a c-Cbl RING finger mutant mouse that develops an MPD with a phenotype similar to the human MPDs. The mice are characterized by enhanced tyrosine kinase signaling resulting in an expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors and cells within the myeloid lineage. Since c-Cbl is a negative regulator of c-Kit and Src signaling we reasoned that dasatinib, which targets these kinases, would be an effective therapy. Furthermore, two recent studies showed dasatinib to be effective in inhibiting the in vitro growth of cells from leukemia patients with c-Cbl RING finger and linker domain mutations. Surprisingly we found that dasatinib did not provide an effective therapy for c-Cbl RING finger mutant mice since it did not suppress any of the hematopoietic lineages that promote MPD development. Thus we conclude that dasatinib may not be an appropriate therapy for leukemia patients with c-Cbl mutations. We did however find that dasatinib caused a marked reduction of pre-B cells and immature B cells which correlated with a loss of Src activity. This study is therefore the first to provide a detailed characterization of in vivo effects of dasatinib in a hematopoietic disorder that is driven by protein tyrosine kinases other than BCR-ABL. PMID:24718698

  4. Vitamin E provides protection for bone in mature hindlimb unloaded male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. J.; Lucas, E. A.; Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Lerner, M. R.; Brackett, D. J.; Stoecker, B. J.; Arjmandi, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    The deleterious effects of skeletal unloading on bone mass and strength may, in part, result from increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), a free-radical scavenger with antiinflammatory properties, to protect against bone loss caused by skeletal unloading in mature male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 2 x 3 factorial design was used with either hindlimb unloading (HU) or normal loading (ambulatory; AMB), and low-dose (LD; 15 IU/kg diet), adequate-dose (AD; 75 IU/kg diet), or high-dose (HD; 500 IU/kg diet) vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate). To optimize the effects of vitamin E on bone, dietary treatments were initiated 9 weeks prior to unloading and continued during the 4-week unloading period, at which time animals were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum vitamin E was dose-dependently increased, confirming the vitamin E status of animals. The HD treatment improved oxidation parameters, as indicated by elevated serum ferric-reducing ability and a trend toward reducing tissue lipid peroxidation. Histomorphometric analysis of the distal femur revealed significant reductions in trabecular thickness (TbTh), double-labeled surface (dLS/BS), and rate of bone formation to bone volume (BFR/BV) due by HU. AMB animals on the HD diet and HU animals on the LD diet had reduced bone surface normalized to tissue volume (BS/TV) and trabecular number (TbN); however, the HD vitamin E protected against these changes in the HU animals. Our findings suggest that vitamin E supplementation provides modest bone protective effects during skeletal unloading.

  5. Experimental and numerical analysis of coastal protection provided by natural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, M.; Lara, J. L.; Losada, I. J.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    The risk of flooding and erosion is increasing for many coastal areas owing to global and regional changes in climate conditions together with increasing exposure and vulnerability. After hurricane Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012) and the tsunami in Indonesia (2004), coastal managers have become interested in low environmental impact alternatives, or nature-based solutions, to protect the coast. Although capacity for coastal ecosystems to damp flow energy has been widely recognized, they have not been firmly considered in the portfolio of coastal protection options. This is mainly due to the complexity of flow-vegetation interaction and of quantifying the value of coastal protection provided by these ecosystems. This complex problem involves different temporal and spatial scales and disciplines, such as engineering, ecology and economics. This work aims to make a step forward in better understanding the physics involved in flow-vegetation interaction leading to new formulations and parameterizations to address some unsolved questions in literature: the representation of plants and field properties; the influence of wave parameters on the relevant processes; the role of the combined effect of waves and currents and the effect of extreme events on vegetation elements. The three main coastal vegetated ecosystems (seagrasses, saltmarshes and mangroves) are studied with an experimental and numerical approach. Experimental analysis is carried out using mimics and real vegetation, considering different flow and vegetation parameters and characterizing flow energy attenuation for the different scenarios. Numerical simulations are performed using 2-D and 3-D Navier-Stokes models in which the effect of vegetation is implemented and validated. These models are used to extend experimental results by simulating different vegetation distributions and analyzing variables such as high-spatial-resolution free surface and velocity data and forces exerted on vegetation elements.

  6. Vitamin E provides protection for bone in mature hindlimb unloaded male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. J.; Lucas, E. A.; Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Lerner, M. R.; Brackett, D. J.; Stoecker, B. J.; Arjmandi, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    The deleterious effects of skeletal unloading on bone mass and strength may, in part, result from increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), a free-radical scavenger with antiinflammatory properties, to protect against bone loss caused by skeletal unloading in mature male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 2 x 3 factorial design was used with either hindlimb unloading (HU) or normal loading (ambulatory; AMB), and low-dose (LD; 15 IU/kg diet), adequate-dose (AD; 75 IU/kg diet), or high-dose (HD; 500 IU/kg diet) vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate). To optimize the effects of vitamin E on bone, dietary treatments were initiated 9 weeks prior to unloading and continued during the 4-week unloading period, at which time animals were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum vitamin E was dose-dependently increased, confirming the vitamin E status of animals. The HD treatment improved oxidation parameters, as indicated by elevated serum ferric-reducing ability and a trend toward reducing tissue lipid peroxidation. Histomorphometric analysis of the distal femur revealed significant reductions in trabecular thickness (TbTh), double-labeled surface (dLS/BS), and rate of bone formation to bone volume (BFR/BV) due by HU. AMB animals on the HD diet and HU animals on the LD diet had reduced bone surface normalized to tissue volume (BS/TV) and trabecular number (TbN); however, the HD vitamin E protected against these changes in the HU animals. Our findings suggest that vitamin E supplementation provides modest bone protective effects during skeletal unloading.

  7. Influence of different yeast cell-wall mutants on performance and protection against pathogenic bacteria (Vibrio campbellii) in gnotobiotically-grown Artemia.

    PubMed

    Soltanian, Siyavash; Dhont, Jean; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2007-07-01

    A selection of isogenic yeast strains (with deletion for genes involved in cell-wall synthesis) was used to evaluate their nutritional and immunostimulatory characteristics for gnotobiotically-grown Artemia. In the first set of experiments the nutritional value of isogenic yeast strains (effected in mannoproteins, glucan, chitin and cell-wall bound protein synthesis) for gnotobiotically-grown Artemia was studied. Yeast cell-wall mutants were always better feed for Artemia than the isogenic wild type mainly because they supported a higher survival but not a stronger individual growth. The difference in Artemia performance between WT and mutants feeding was reduced when stationary-phase grown cells were used. These results suggest that any mutation affecting the yeast cell-wall make-up is sufficient to improve the digestibility in Artemia. The second set of experiments, investigates the use of a small amount of yeast cells in gnotobiotic Artemia to overcome pathogenicity of Vibrio campbellii (VC). Among all yeast cell strains used in this study, only mnn9 yeast (less cell-wall bound mannoproteins and more glucan and chitin) seems to completely protect Artemia against the pathogen. Incomplete protection against the pathogen was obtained by the gas1 and chs3 mutants, which are lacking the gene for a particular cell-wall protein and chitin synthesis, respectively, resulting in more glucan. The result with the chs3 mutant is of particular interest, as its nutritional value for Artemia is comparable to the wild type. Hence, only with the chs3 strain, in contrast to the gas1 or mnn9 strains, the temporary protection to VC is not concomitant with a better growth performance under non-challenged conditions, suggesting non-interference of general nutritional effects.

  8. Provide context when reporting on the use of protected and endangered wildlife in ethnopharmacological surveys.

    PubMed

    Nijman, Vincent; Nekaris, K A I

    2016-12-24

    The value of reports on the use of wildlife in ethnopharmacological surveys increases when context is provided on the legality of its use and on the species' conservation status. To evaluate if context is provided when protected and threatened animals are reported as being used in traditional medicine, and to provide recommendations for future reporting. Review of recent papers in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. Rarely is information provided on (1) the conservation status of the animals that are used in traditional medicine, (2) whether the parts can be obtained non-invasively or if the animals have to be killed, or (3) whether or not it is legal to use the animals, their parts or derivatives according to national law. When presenting the results of ethnopharmalogical surveys include (1) the conservation status of the species affected, (2) whether or not parts could be harvested non-invasively and (3) the legality of harvesting and / or trading these animals, their parts or their derivatives. Our focus here is on animals, given that more so than in plants or fungi, many of their parts used in natural medicine cannot be obtained non-invasively, but a similar set of guidelines could be developed for other taxa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sun-care product advertising in parenting magazines: what information does it provide about sun protection?

    PubMed

    Kang, Hannah; Walsh-Childers, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the content of sun-care product advertisements in five major U.S. parenting magazines with high circulation: Family Circle, Parents, Family Fun, Parenting (Early Years), and Parenting (School Years). The study examined what information sun-care product advertisements tell parents about skin cancer prevention and about sunscreen use for themselves or for their children based on the Health Belief Model concepts of perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Results showed that the most commonly mentioned benefit of the product was that it blocks ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. One-third of the ads promoted the product's effectiveness in overcoming four of the barriers that prevent people from using sunscreens: eye irritation, skin irritation, an unpleasant smell, and the need to reapply sunscreen too often or after physical activity. However, only a few of the ads provided information about the consequences of unprotected sun exposure or mentioned methods of sun protection or skin cancer prevention other than sunscreen use. We discuss the implications of these messages for parents' ability to understand correctly how to protect their children from damaging sun exposure.

  10. Dehydration protection provided by a maternal cuticle improves offspring fitness in the moss Funaria hygrometrica

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Jessica M.; Goffinet, Bernard; Jones, Cynthia S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In bryophytes the sporophyte offspring are in contact with, nourished from, and partially surrounded by the maternal gametophyte throughout their lifespan. During early development, the moss sporophyte is covered by the calyptra, a cap of maternal gametophyte tissue that has a multilayered cuticle. In this study the effects on sporophyte offspring fitness of removing the maternal calyptra cuticle, in combination with dehydration stress, is experimentally determined. Methods Using the moss Funaria hygrometrica, calyptra cuticle waxes were removed by chemical extraction and individuals were exposed to a short-term dehydration event. Sporophytes were returned to high humidity to complete development and then aspects of sporophyte survival, development, functional morphology, and reproductive output were measured. Key Results It was found that removal of calyptra cuticle under low humidity results in significant negative impacts to moss sporophyte fitness, resulting in decreased survival, increased tissue damage, incomplete sporophyte development, more peristome malformations, and decreased reproductive output. Conclusions This study represents the strongest evidence to date that the structure of the calyptra cuticle functions in dehydration protection of the immature moss sporophyte. The investment in a maternal calyptra with a multilayered cuticle increases offspring fitness and provides a functional explanation for calyptra retention across mosses. The moss calyptra may represent the earliest occurance of maternal protection via structural provisioning of a cuticle in green plants. PMID:23471009

  11. Resveratrol fails to provide prophylactic protection in a rat model of organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Yossi; Ravfogel, Shaul; Shiyovich, Arthur; Shrot, Shai; Milk, Nadav; Ophir, Nimrod; Aviram, Michael; Nir, Ishai; Kassirer, Michael; Eisenkraft, Arik

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxonase-1, an organophosphorous-hydrolyzing enzyme, was shown to provide protection against organophosphates poisoning in vivo. In vitro findings suggest that the phytoalexin resveratrol can elevate paraoxonase-1 levels and thus may provide protection against organophosphate poisoning. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of prolonged resveratrol intake on paraoxonase-1 levels in rats, and its role as a potential prophylactic treatment in organophosphate poisoning. 30 adult male albino Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: rats receiving no resveratrol (Control group, n = 10), rats treated once daily with oral gavage of ethanol only (Sham group, n = 6), and rats treated once daily with oral gavage of resveratrol (50 mg/kg) (Study group, n = 14). Following 2 weeks of feeding, all rats were exposed to 1.4LD50 paraoxon (450 mg/kg, intramuscular; 0.5 ml/kg) and monitored for severity of clinical signs and mortality. Paraoxonase-1 activity level was recorded in the beginning of the study and 2 weeks later, just before exposure to paraoxon. We found a significant decrease in paraoxonase-1 activity levels in all groups compared to baseline levels (p = 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the study group and the controls (p = 0.7). Following exposure to paraoxon, all animals suffered from severe convulsions and died within minutes. Following resveratrol intake in rats, paraoxonase-1 activity levels decreased. We found no beneficial effects in using resveratrol as a prophylactic medical countermeasure.

  12. EPA Provides $8.5 Million to Protect Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $8.5 million in research funding to 12 universities to protect air quality from the current and future challenges associated with the impacts of climate change.

  13. Deed Restrictions/Conservation Easements and Appropriate Considerations When Perpetual Protection Is Not Provided

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Basic requirements for mitigation site protection “…mitigation project must be providedlong-term protection through real estate instruments or other available instruments or other available mechanisms, as appropriate.” 33 CFR 332.7(a)(1)

  14. Indian community health insurance schemes provide partial protection against catastrophic health expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, Narayanan; Criel, Bart; Van Damme, Wim; Ranson, Kent; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Background More than 72% of health expenditure in India is financed by individual households at the time of illness through out-of-pocket payments. This is a highly regressive way of financing health care and sometimes leads to impoverishment. Health insurance is recommended as a measure to protect households from such catastrophic health expenditure (CHE). We studied two Indian community health insurance (CHI) schemes, ACCORD and SEWA, to determine whether insured households are protected from CHE. Methods ACCORD provides health insurance cover for the indigenous population, living in Gudalur, Tamil Nadu. SEWA provides insurance cover for self employed women in the state of Gujarat. Both cover hospitalisation expenses, but only upto a maximum limit of US$23 and US$45, respectively. We reviewed the insurance claims registers in both schemes and identified patients who were hospitalised during the period 01/04/2003 to 31/03/2004. Details of their diagnoses, places and costs of treatment and self-reported annual incomes were obtained. There is no single definition of CHE and none of these have been validated. For this research, we used the following definition; "annual hospital expenditure greater than 10% of annual income," to identify those who experienced CHE. Results There were a total of 683 and 3152 hospital admissions at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. In the absence of the CHI scheme, all of the patients at ACCORD and SEWA would have had to pay OOP for their hospitalisation. With the CHI scheme, 67% and 34% of patients did not have to make any out-of-pocket (OOP) payment for their hospital expenses at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. Both CHI schemes halved the number of households that would have experienced CHE by covering hospital costs. However, despite this, 4% and 23% of households with admissions still experienced CHE at ACCORD and SEWA, respectively. This was related to the following conditions: low annual income, benefit packages with low maximum limits

  15. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs.

  16. A Brucella melitensis high-temperature-requirement A (htrA) deletion mutant is attenuated in goats and protects against abortion.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R W; Elzer, P H; Robertson, G T; Hagius, S D; Walker, J V; Fatemi, M B; Enright, F M; Roop, R M

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that a Brucella melitensis high-temperature-requirement A (htrA) deletion mutant is more susceptible to oxidative killing in vitro than the parental strain and is attenuated in mice. To evaluate the contribution of the B melitensis HtrA protease to virulence in ruminants, the capacity of the B melitensis htrA mutant RWP5 to produce abortion in goats was compared to that of the virulent parental strain 16M. Experimental infection with strain 16M caused abortion in eight of 12 pregnant nannies, while none of the 12 nannies inoculated with RWP5 aborted. Furthermore, intramuscular injection of fetuses in utero with RWP5 led to colonisation of the fetus with subsequent colonisation of the nanny, but no abortion was observed. Nannies vaccinated with RWP5 showed complete protection against abortion when challenged with 16M during the third trimester of pregnancy. However, these animals were not protected from colonisation by 16M. The results presented here clearly indicate that the B melitensis htrA gene product contributes to pathogenesis in goats, but the utility of B melitensis htrA mutants as vaccines in this host appears to be limited.

  17. Mutant versions of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) can protect HIF1α from SART1-mediated degradation in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez-Navadijo, Á; Fuertes-Yebra, E; Acosta-Iborra, B; Balsa, E; Elorza, A; Aragonés, J; Landazuri, M O

    2016-02-04

    Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor drives the development of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Although ccRCC cells exhibit constitutive normoxic HIF signaling, the potential role of hypoxia in this setting is not fully understood. We show here that the ccRCC cell lines RCC4 and RCC10, which express mutant versions of VHL, have reduced HIF1α expression in hypoxia, whereas HIF2α expression is increased or not affected. Similar findings were observed in normoxia after abrogation of prolyl hydroxylase activity by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition, and by siRNA inhibition of mutant VHL. This reduction of HIF1α protein is due to proteasome-dependent degradation and is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SART1. HIF1α degradation favors ccRCC proliferation, in line with the previously recognized tumor suppressor capability of HIF1α. Our data indicate that mutant VHL can protect HIF1α from SART1-dependent degradation in normoxic conditions, but this protection is lost in hypoxic settings, favoring hypoxia-dependent ccRCC proliferation. This mechanism of HIF1α degradation might operate in some VHL-related clear-cell renal carcinomas in which the deletion of HIF1α locus does not occur.

  18. Novel filter providing human eye and optical sensors protection from the visible into the IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, A.; Fisher, T.; Nemet, B.; Oron, R.; Oron, M.; Shvartzer, R.; Eberle, B.; Ritt, G.; Ebert, R.

    2008-04-01

    We introduce into optical systems, susceptible to be interrupted or damaged from laser, novel passive solid-state threshold-triggered Wideband Protection Filter (WPF) that blocks the transmission only if the power exceeds a certain threshold. We present new protection capabilities of our latest filter composed of improved technology. The WPF can be readily used for protection of detectors, cameras, or eye safety.

  19. Vaccination with Brucella abortus rough mutant RB51 protects BALB/c mice against virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Jones, S M; Blasco, J M; Enright, F M; Schurig, G G; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with live Brucella abortus RB51, a stable rough mutant, produced protection against challenge with virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis. Passive-transfer experiments indicated that vaccinated mice were protected against B. abortus 2308 through cell-mediated immunity, against B. ovis PA through humoral immunity, and against B. melitensis 16M through both forms of immunity. Live bacteria were required for the induction of protective cell-mediated immunity; vaccination with whole killed cells of strain RB51 failed to protect mice against B. abortus 2308 despite development of good delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Protective antibodies against the heterologous species were generated in vaccinated mice primarily through anamnestic responses following challenge infections. Growth of the antigenically unrelated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in the spleens of vaccinated mice indicated that nonspecific killing by residual activated macrophages contributed minimally to protection. These results encourage the continued investigation of strain RB51 as an alternative vaccine against heterologous Brucella species. However, its usefulness against B. ovis would be limited if, as suggested here, epitopes critical for protective cell-mediated immunity are not shared between B. abortus and B. ovis. Images PMID:7927779

  20. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal

  1. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jennifer A A; Felder, Mildred; Horibata, Sachi; Belisle, Jennifer A; Kapur, Arvinder; Holden, Helen; Petrie, Sarah; Migneault, Martine; Rancourt, Claudine; Connor, Joseph P; Patankar, Manish S

    2010-01-20

    Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16(low) targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal cavity and also at overcoming

  2. Simultaneous immunization of mice with Omp31 and TF provides protection against Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Amir; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Mautner, Josef; Salari, Mohammad Hossein; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2015-10-13

    Brucella vaccines consisting of live attenuated Brucella strains are currently used in livestock, but safety concerns preclude their application in humans. Subunit vaccines have recently emerged as safe and efficacious alternatives in both humans and animals. In this study, subunit vaccines were developed that consisted of a recombinant outer membrane protein (rOmp31) and the trigger factor chaperone protein (rTF) of Brucella melitensis, either alone or in combination. BALB/c mice that were immunized with rOmp31+rTF showed comparable but slightly higher TF-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies as compared to mice with rTF alone. Indeed, mice given this combination had titers of rOmp31-specific antibodies similar to those immunized with rOmp31 alone. In lymphocyte reactivation experiments, the splenocytes of immunized mice, whether given either of these antigens alone or as a cocktail, exhibited a strong antigen-specific recall proliferative response and expressed high amounts of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-10 and IL-6. Both rTF and rTF+rOmp31 vaccinated mice exhibited significantly higher CD4 and CD8 levels compared to the PBS group. The combination of rOmp31 and rTF provided protection against B. melitensis infection comparable to that of vaccine strain Rev.1. In comparison to rTF alone, combination of rTF and rOmp31 caused only a slight increase in protection level. Although combination of rTF and rOmp31 caused a non-significant increase in IFN-γ induction, antibody level, proliferation index and CD4 and CD8 frequencies compared to rTF alone, its cumulative effects on aforesaid parameters may be viewed as a better efficacy.

  3. Monotreme lactation protein is highly expressed in monotreme milk and provides antimicrobial protection.

    PubMed

    Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar; Grant, Tom R; Nicol, Stewart C; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Nicholas, Kevin R; Sharp, Julie A

    2014-09-22

    Monotremes (platypus and echidna) are the descendants of the oldest ancestor of all extant mammals distinguished from other mammals by mode of reproduction. Monotremes lay eggs following a short gestation period and after an even briefer incubation period, altricial hatchlings are nourished over a long lactation period with milk secreted by nipple-less mammary patches located on the female's abdomen. Milk is the sole source of nutrition and immune protection for the developing young until weaning. Using transcriptome and mass spectrometry analysis of milk cells and milk proteins, respectively, a novel Monotreme Lactation Protein (MLP) was identified as a major secreted protein in milk. We show that platypus and short-beaked echidna MLP genes show significant homology and are unique to monotremes. The MLP transcript was shown to be expressed in a variety of tissues; however, highest expression was observed in milk cells and was expressed constitutively from early to late lactation. Analysis of recombinant MLP showed that it is an N-linked glycosylated protein and biophysical studies predicted that MLP is an amphipathic, α-helical protein, a typical feature of antimicrobial proteins. Functional analysis revealed MLP antibacterial activity against both opportunistic pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus and commensal Enterococcus faecalis bacteria but showed no effect on Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Salmonella enterica. Our data suggest that MLP is an evolutionarily ancient component of milk-mediated innate immunity absent in other mammals. We propose that MLP evolved specifically in the monotreme lineage supporting the evolution of lactation in these species to provide bacterial protection, at a time when mammals lacked nipples. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Monotreme Lactation Protein Is Highly Expressed in Monotreme Milk and Provides Antimicrobial Protection

    PubMed Central

    Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar; Grant, Tom R.; Nicol, Stewart C.; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Sharp, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Monotremes (platypus and echidna) are the descendants of the oldest ancestor of all extant mammals distinguished from other mammals by mode of reproduction. Monotremes lay eggs following a short gestation period and after an even briefer incubation period, altricial hatchlings are nourished over a long lactation period with milk secreted by nipple-less mammary patches located on the female’s abdomen. Milk is the sole source of nutrition and immune protection for the developing young until weaning. Using transcriptome and mass spectrometry analysis of milk cells and milk proteins, respectively, a novel Monotreme Lactation Protein (MLP) was identified as a major secreted protein in milk. We show that platypus and short-beaked echidna MLP genes show significant homology and are unique to monotremes. The MLP transcript was shown to be expressed in a variety of tissues; however, highest expression was observed in milk cells and was expressed constitutively from early to late lactation. Analysis of recombinant MLP showed that it is an N-linked glycosylated protein and biophysical studies predicted that MLP is an amphipathic, α-helical protein, a typical feature of antimicrobial proteins. Functional analysis revealed MLP antibacterial activity against both opportunistic pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus and commensal Enterococcus faecalis bacteria but showed no effect on Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Salmonella enterica. Our data suggest that MLP is an evolutionarily ancient component of milk-mediated innate immunity absent in other mammals. We propose that MLP evolved specifically in the monotreme lineage supporting the evolution of lactation in these species to provide bacterial protection, at a time when mammals lacked nipples. PMID:25245409

  5. Generation of temperature-sensitive human metapneumovirus strains that provide protective immunity in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Herfst, Sander; de Graaf, Miranda; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Sprong, Leo; Hussain, Karim; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2008-07-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes acute respiratory tract illness primarily in young children, immunocompromised individuals and the elderly. Vaccines would be desirable to prevent severe illnesses in these risk groups. Here, we describe the generation and evaluation of cold-passage (cp) temperature-sensitive (ts) HMPV strains as vaccine candidates. Repeated passage of HMPV at low temperatures in Vero cells resulted in the accumulation of mutations in the viral genome. Introduction of these mutations in a recombinant HMPV by reverse genetics resulted in a ts-phenotype, judged on the decreased shut-off temperature for virus replication in vitro. As an alternative approach, three previously described cp-respiratory syncytial virus (cp-HRSV) mutations were introduced in a recombinant HMPV, which also resulted in a low shut-off temperature in vitro. Replication of these ts-viruses containing either the cp-HMPV or cp-HRSV mutations was reduced in the upper respiratory tract (URT) and undetectable in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) of hamsters. Nevertheless, high titres of HMPV-specific antibodies were induced by both ts-viruses. Upon immunization with the ts-viruses, the LRT of hamsters were completely protected against challenge infection with a heterologous HMPV strain, and URT viral titres were reduced by 10 000-fold. In conclusion, we provide proof-of-principle for two candidate live-attenuated HMPV vaccines that induce cross-protective immunity to prevent infection of the LRT in Syrian golden hamsters. Further mapping of the molecular determinants of attenuation of HMPV should be the subject of future studies.

  6. Collateral blood flow in different cerebrovascular hierarchy provides endogenous protection in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chuanming; Liang, Fengyin; Ren, Huixia; Yao, Xiaoli; Liu, Qiang; Li, Mingyue; Qin, Dajiang; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Pei, Zhong; Su, Huanxing

    2016-11-15

    Collateral blood flow as vascular adaptions to focal cerebral ischemia is well recognized. However, few studies directly investigate the dynamics of collateral vessel recruitment in vivo and little is known about the effect of collateral blood flow in different cerebrovascular hierarchy on the neuropathology after focal ischemic stroke. Here, we report that collateral blood flow is critically involved in blood vessel compensations following regional ischemia. We occluded a pial arteriole using femtosecond laser ablating under the intact thinned skull and documented the changes of collateral flow around the surface communication network and between the surface communication network and subsurface microcirculation network using in vivo two photon microscopy imaging. Occlusion of the pial arteriole apparently increased the diameter and collateral blood flow of its leptomeningeal anastomoses, which significantly reduced the cortical infarction size. This result suggests that the collateral flow via surface communicating network connected with leptomeningeal anastomoses could greatly impact on the extent of infarction. We then further occluded the target pial arteriole and all of its leptomeningeal anastomoses. Notably, this type of occlusion led to reversals of blood flow in the penetrating arterioles mainly proximal to the occluded pial arteriole in a direction from the subsurface microcirculation network to surface arterioles. Interesting, the cell death in the area of ischemic penumbra was accelerated when we performed occlusion to cease the reversed blood flow in those penetrating arterioles, suggesting that the collateral blood flow from subsurface microcirculation network exerts protective roles in delaying cell death in the ischemic penumbra. In conclusion, we provide the first experimental evidence that collateral blood vessels at different cerebrovascular hierarchy are endogenously compensatory mechanisms in brain ischemia. This article is protected by

  7. Phosphodiesterase inhibition with tadalafil provides longer and sustained protection of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haider, Husnain Kh; Lee, Yun-Jung; Jiang, Shujia; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Ryon, Mok; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-11-01

    We hypothesized that inhibition of the cGMP-specific enzyme phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) promoted cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) activity to condition stem cells for enhanced survival and proliferation. One-time tadalafil treatment (1 μM for 30 min) of mesenchymal stem cells ((Tada)MSCs) provided sustained protection of cells for 36 h. Higher cGMP activity with concomitantly increased PKG1 activity was observed in (Tada)MSCs, which peaked within 12 h after tadalafil treatment. Pretreatment with PKG1 blockers (1 μM KT-5823 or 20 nM K-252a) or transduction with adenoviral PKG1-short-hairpin RNA abolished tadalafil-induced cytoprotection of the cells. A higher proliferation rate was observed in (Tada)MSCs compared with nontreated MSCs ((Cont)MSCs). In a rat model of acute myocardial infarction, (Tada)MSCs transplanted 0 and 24 h after tadalafil treatment showed higher survival compared with (Cont)MSCs on day 2 and day 4 after engraftment. (Tada)MSCs transplanted 48 h after tadalafil treatment lost their protection on both day 2 and day 4 after engraftment, and their rate of survival was similar to (Cont)MSCs. Reduced terminal dUTP nick end-labeling positivity (P < 0.01 vs. (Cont)MSCs) and higher proliferation of (Tada)MSCs (P < 0.01 vs. (Cont)MSCs) was observed in the infarcted heart. Fluorescence immunostaining revealed neomyogenesis in both the infarct and peri-infarct areas. Blood vessel density was significantly increased in group 2 compared with group 1. Transthoracic echocardiographic heart function revealed significant preservation of the indexes of left ventricle contractility and attenuation of remodeling in (Tada)MSC-engrafted animal hearts (group 2) compared with (Cont)MSCs (group 1). PDE5A inhibition using long-acting tadalafil is an innovative approach to promote stem cell survival and proliferation in the infarcted heart.

  8. Phosphodiesterase inhibition with tadalafil provides longer and sustained protection of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Husnain Kh; Lee, Yun-Jung; Jiang, Shujia; Ahmed, Rafeeq P. H.; Ryon, Mok

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that inhibition of the cGMP-specific enzyme phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) promoted cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) activity to condition stem cells for enhanced survival and proliferation. One-time tadalafil treatment (1 μM for 30 min) of mesenchymal stem cells (TadaMSCs) provided sustained protection of cells for 36 h. Higher cGMP activity with concomitantly increased PKG1 activity was observed in TadaMSCs, which peaked within 12 h after tadalafil treatment. Pretreatment with PKG1 blockers (1 μM KT-5823 or 20 nM K-252a) or transduction with adenoviral PKG1-short-hairpin RNA abolished tadalafil-induced cytoprotection of the cells. A higher proliferation rate was observed in TadaMSCs compared with nontreated MSCs (ContMSCs). In a rat model of acute myocardial infarction, TadaMSCs transplanted 0 and 24 h after tadalafil treatment showed higher survival compared with ContMSCs on day 2 and day 4 after engraftment. TadaMSCs transplanted 48 h after tadalafil treatment lost their protection on both day 2 and day 4 after engraftment, and their rate of survival was similar to ContMSCs. Reduced terminal dUTP nick end-labeling positivity (P < 0.01 vs. ContMSCs) and higher proliferation of TadaMSCs (P < 0.01 vs. ContMSCs) was observed in the infarcted heart. Fluorescence immunostaining revealed neomyogenesis in both the infarct and peri-infarct areas. Blood vessel density was significantly increased in group 2 compared with group 1. Transthoracic echocardiographic heart function revealed significant preservation of the indexes of left ventricle contractility and attenuation of remodeling in TadaMSC-engrafted animal hearts (group 2) compared with ContMSCs (group 1). PDE5A inhibition using long-acting tadalafil is an innovative approach to promote stem cell survival and proliferation in the infarcted heart. PMID:20833962

  9. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: impact on mental health services demand and provider availability.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Shoshannah A

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) will greatly increase the demand for mental health (MH) services, as 62.5 million Americans from relatively high-need populations will be newly eligible for MH benefits. Consequently, the supply of MH care provider services is expected to proportionately decrease by 18% to 21% in 2014. ACA funding does not demonstrate the ability to increase turnout of psychiatrists sufficiently to meet the need. Available data indicate that the numbers of advanced practice psychiatric nurses (APPNs) continue to increase at a much greater rate, but information from either a clinical perspective or a market perspective is complicated by the weak distinctions that are made between nurse practitioners (NPs) and other nonphysician care professionals. The following recommendations are made: (a) some of the ACA funding for research into efficient and effective care delivery systems should be allocated to acquiring data on APPNs in leadership roles or clinical settings in which they are ultimately responsible for management of MH care, as differentiated from settings in which they provide support for psychiatrists; and (b) since the available data indicate nurse practitioners achieve good outcomes and are more economically viable than psychiatrists, placement of psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners in community settings should be recognized as a realistic solution to the shortfall of MH services.

  10. Experimental shielding evaluation of the radiation protection provided by the structurally significant components of residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-03-01

    The human health and environmental effects following a postulated accidental release of radioactive material to the environment have been a public and regulatory concern since the early development of nuclear technology. These postulated releases have been researched extensively to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency planning purposes. The objective of this investigation is to provide an updated technical basis for contemporary building shielding factors for the US housing stock. Building shielding factors quantify the protection from ionising radiation provided by a certain building type. Much of the current data used to determine the quality of shielding around nuclear facilities and urban environments is based on simplistic point-kernel calculations for 1950s era suburbia and is no longer applicable to the densely populated urban environments realised today. To analyse a building's radiation shielding properties, the ideal approach would be to subject a variety of building types to various radioactive sources and measure the radiation levels in and around the building. While this is not entirely practicable, this research analyses the shielding effectiveness of ten structurally significant US housing-stock models (walls and roofs) important for shielding against ionising radiation. The experimental data are used to benchmark computational models to calculate the shielding effectiveness of various building configurations under investigation from two types of realistic environmental source terms. Various combinations of these ten shielding models can be used to develop full-scale computational housing-unit models for building shielding factor calculations representing 69.6 million housing units (61.3%) in the United States. Results produced in this investigation provide a comparison between theory and experiment behind building shielding factor methodology.

  11. Providing earplugs to young adults at risk encourages protective behaviour in music venues.

    PubMed

    Beach, Elizabeth Francis; Nielsen, Lillian; Gilliver, Megan

    2016-06-01

    For some young people, nightclubs and other music venues are a major source of noise exposure, arising from a combination of very high noise levels; relatively long attendance duration; and frequent, sustained participation over several years. Responsibility for hearing protection is largely left to individuals, many of whom choose not to wear earplugs. In order to encourage earplug use in these settings, a new approach is needed. The aim of the study was to examine whether presentation of hearing health information would result in increased use of earplugs, or whether provision of earplugs alone would be sufficient to change behaviour. A total of 51 regular patrons of music venues were allocated to either a low-information (lo-info) or high-information (hi-info) group. Both groups completed a survey about their current noise exposure, earplug usage and perceived risk of hearing damage. Both groups were also provided with one-size-fits-all filtered music earplugs. The hi-info group was also provided with audio-visual and written information about the risks of excessive noise exposure. After 4 weeks, and again after an additional 12 weeks, participants were asked about their recent earplug usage, intention to use earplugs in the future, and perceived risk of hearing damage. The results showed that after 4 weeks, the hi-info group's perceived personal risk of hearing damage was significantly higher than that of the lo-info group. After 16 weeks, these differences were no longer evident; however, at both 4 and 16 weeks, both the lo- and hi-info groups were using the earplugs equally often; and both groups intended to use earplugs significantly more often in the future. This suggests that the information was unnecessary to motivate behavioural change. Rather, the simple act of providing access to earplugs appears to have effectively encouraged young at-risk adults to increase their earplug use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Differential ability of novel attenuated targeted deletion mutants of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis strain SCHU S4 to protect mice against aerosol challenge with virulent bacteria: effects of host background and route of immunization

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, J. Wayne; Shen, Hua; Golovliov, Igor; Zingmark, Carl; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Chen, Wangxue; House, Robert V.; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen of humans and a potential biological weapon. A live vaccine strain, F. tularensis LVS, was developed more than 50 years ago by pragmatic attenuation of a strain of the less virulent holarctica subspecies. LVS was demonstrated to be highly effective in human volunteers who were exposed to intradermal challenge with fully virulent subsp. tularensis, but was less effective against aerosol exposure. LVS faces regulatory hurdles that to date have prevented its licensure for general use. Therefore, a better defined and more effective vaccine is being sought. To this end we have created gene deletion mutants in the virulent subsp. tularensis strain and tested them for their ability to elicit a protective immune response against systemic or aerosol challenge with the highly virulent wild-type subsp. tularensis strain, SCHU S4. Both oral and Intradermal (ID) primary vaccination routes were assessed in BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice as was oral boosting. One SCHU S4 mutant missing the heat shock gene, clpB, was significantly more attenuated than LVS whereas a double deletion mutant missing genes FTT0918 and capB was as attenuated as LVS. In general mice immunized with SCHU S4ΔclpB were significantly better protected against aerosol challenge than mice immunized with LVS. A single ID immunization of BALB/c mice with SCHU S4ΔclpB was at least as effective as any other regimen examined. Mice immunized with SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB were generally protected to a similar degree as mice immunized with LVS. A preliminary examination of immune responses to vaccination with LVS, SCHU S4ΔclpB, or SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB provided no obvious correlate to their relative efficacies. PMID:20018266

  13. Silymarin-loaded solid nanoparticles provide excellent hepatic protection: physicochemical characterization and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kwan Yeol; Hwang, Du Hyeong; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Dong Wuk; Shin, Young-Jun; Bae, Ok-Nam; Kim, Yong-II; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to develop a novel silymarin-loaded solid nanoparticle system with enhanced oral bioavailability and an ability to provide excellent hepatic protection for poorly water-soluble drugs using Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane emulsification and a spray-drying technique. Methods A silymarin-loaded liquid nanoemulsion was formulated by applying the SPG membrane emulsification technique. This was further converted into solid state nanosized particles by the spray-drying technique. The physicochemical characteristics of these nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction. Their dissolution, bioavailability, and hepatoprotective activity in rats were assessed by comparison with a commercially available silymarin-loaded product. Results Formulation of a silymarin-loaded nanoemulsion, comprising silymarin, castor oil, polyvinylpyrrolidone, Transcutol HP, Tween 80, and water at a weight ratio of 5/3/3/1.25/1.25/100 was accomplished using an SPG membrane emulsification technique at an agitator speed of 700 rpm, a feed pressure of 15 kPa, and a continuous phase temperature of 25°C. This resulted in generation of comparatively uniform emulsion globules with a narrow size distribution. Moreover, the silymarin-loaded solid nanoparticles, containing silymarin/castor oil/polyvinylpyrrolidone/Transcutol HP/Tween 80 at a weight ratio of 5/3/3/1.25/1.25, improved about 1,300-fold drug solubility and retained a mean size of about 210 nm. Silymarin was located in unaltered crystalline form in the nanoparticles. The drug dissolved rapidly from the nanoparticles, reaching nearly 80% within 15 minutes, indicating three-fold better dissolution than that of the commercial product. Further, the nanoparticles showed a considerably shorter time to peak concentration, a greater area under the concentration-time curve, and a higher maximum concentration of silymarin compared

  14. Immunization with a highly attenuated replication-competent herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant, HF10, protects mice from genital disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chenhong; Goshima, Fumi; Kamakura, Maki; Mutoh, Yoshifumi; Iwata, Seiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    Genital herpes is an intractable disease caused mainly by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 (HSV-2), and is a major concern in public health. A previous infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) enhances protection against primary HSV-2 infection to some extent. In this study, we evaluated the ability of HF10, a naturally occurring replication-competent HSV-1 mutant, to protect against genital infection in mice caused by HSV-2. Subcutaneous inoculation of HF10-immunized mice against lethal infection by HSV-2, and attenuated the development of genital ulcer diseases. Immunization with HF10 inhibited HSV-2 replication in the mouse vagina, reduced local inflammation, controlled emergence of neurological dysfunctions of HSV-2 infection, and increased survival. In HF10-immunized mice, we observed rapid and increased production of interferon-γ in the vagina in response to HSV-2 infection, and numerous CD4(+) and a few CD8(+) T cells localized to the infective focus. CD4(+) T cells invaded the mucosal subepithelial lamina propria. Thus, the protective effect of HF10 was related to induction of cellular immunity, mediated primarily by Th1 CD4(+) cells. These data indicate that the live attenuated HSV-1 mutant strain HF10 is a promising candidate antigen for a vaccine against genital herpes caused by HSV-2.

  15. An Adenovirus Type 5 Mutant with the Preterminal Protein Gene Deleted Efficiently Provides Helper Functions for the Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Ian H.; Maxwell, Francoise; Schaack, Jerome

    1998-01-01

    Production of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) requires helper functions that have routinely been provided by infection of the producer cells with adenovirus. Complete removal and/or inactivation of progeny adenovirus, present in such rAAV preparations, presents significant difficulty. Here, we report that an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) mutant with the preterminal protein (pTP) gene deleted can provide helper function for the growth of rAAV. At high multiplicity, Ad5dl308ΔpTP was as efficient as the phenotypically wild-type Ad5dl309 in permitting growth of rAAV. Use of Ad5dl308ΔpTP, which is incapable of replication in the absence of complementation for pTP, as a helper avoids the need to remove contaminating adenovirus infectious activity by heat inactivation or by purification. Comparison of the transducing ability of rAAV generated with either Ad5dl308ΔpTP or Ad5dl309 as a helper demonstrated that the heat inactivation protocol generally used does not remove all of the helper Ad5dl309 function. PMID:9733887

  16. Acetone Extract of Almond Hulls Provides Protection against Oxidative Damage and Membrane Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Meshkini, Azadeh

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have revealed that among foods, the consumption of edible nuts has beneficial effects on health which are attributed to their high content of potent antioxidants. Among nuts, the whole seed of the almond (Prunus dulcis) has been demonstrated to possess potent free radical scavenging activity, which is related to the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the polyphenol content and the antioxidant ability of almond hull, which is an agriculture solid waste. The present results revealed that among different extraction methods, the acetone extract of almond hulls has a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and a high antioxidant ability, which were determined by using the phosphomolybdenum method and by measuring the potency of the antioxidant, respectively. Moreover, the experimental data disclosed that the acetone extract of almond hulls provides protection against the oxidative damage and the membrane protein degradation that are caused in human erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide. These phenomena may likely be due to the recruitment of antioxidants by cell membranes and/or translocation to cytosol. Overall, almond hull extract could be considered as a natural source of antioxidants, and its consumption could have a positive effect on human health. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Imidapril provides a protective effect on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Shou-Yan; Li, Meng; Yang, Zhen; Niu, Ming-Fu; Sun, Tong-Wen; Yang, Dan-Li; Kong, Tao; Li, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this article is to explore the role of imidapril on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. Ninety chickens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 30): a control group, a low-temperature group and an imidapril group. Chickens in the low-temperature group and imidapril group were exposed to low ambient temperature from 14 days of age until 45 days of age; chickens in the imidapril group were gavaged with imidapril 3 mg/kg once daily for 30 days. The pulmonary arterial pressure, main pulmonary arterial diameter and pulmonary arterial wall thickness were measured, and lung tissue ACE, ACE2 mRNA expression, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells and Ang II, Ang (1-7) concentration were evaluated. The pulmonary arterial pressure was higher, the main pulmonary arterial diameter was wider and the pulmonary arterial wall was thicker in the low-temperature group than those in the control group and the imidapril group. ACE mRNA and PCNA-positive cells increased significantly in the low-temperature group compared with the control group and imidapril group; lung tissue Ang II concentration in the low-temperature group was higher, but Ang (1-7) content was lower than that in the control group and imidapril group. Imidapril provides a protective effect on pulmonary hypertension induced by low ambient temperature in broiler chickens. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. [Protective action of reactivating factor of Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei toward cells of Escherichia coli reparation mutants inactivated with UV-light].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Fedotova, A V; Khodzhaev, E Iu

    2010-01-01

    Reactivating factor (RF) from Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei had a protective action on UV-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli AB1157 with a native reparation system and on cells of isogenic reparation mutants of E. coli UvrA-, RecA-, and PolA-: the effect resulted in multifold increase of survivability. Defense action of L. casei exometabolite is not connected with stimulating reparation systems in E. coli, and, probably, it is mediated by involvement of the exometabolite in the mechanism of cell division. RF did not provoke the reactivation of E. coli cells inactivated by UV-light.

  19. Soft Tissue Conduction as a Possible Contributor to the Limited Attenuation Provided by Hearing Protection Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chordekar, Shai; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim; Kishon-Rabin, Liat

    2016-01-01

    Context: Damage to the auditory system by loud sounds can be avoided by hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earmuffs, earplugs, or both for maximum attenuation. However, the attenuation can be limited by air conduction (AC) leakage around the earplugs and earmuffs by the occlusion effect (OE) and by skull vibrations initiating bone conduction (BC). Aims: To assess maximum attenuation by HPDs and possible flanking pathways to the inner ear. Subjects and Methods: AC attenuation and resulting thresholds were assessed using the real ear attenuation at threshold (REAT) procedure on 15 normal-hearing participants in four free-field conditions: (a) unprotected ears, (b) ears covered with earmuffs, (c) ears blocked with deeply inserted customized earplugs, and (d) ears blocked with both earplugs and earmuffs. BC thresholds were assessed with and without earplugs to assess the OE. Results: Addition of earmuffs to earplugs did not cause significantly greater attenuation than earplugs alone, confirming minimal AC leakage through the external meatus and the absence of the OE. Maximum REATs ranged between 40 and 46 dB, leading to thresholds of 46–54 dB HL. Furthermore, calculation of the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and bone predicted at least 60 dB attenuation of BC. Conclusion: Results do not support the notion that skull vibrations (BC) contributed to the limited attenuation provided by traditional HPDs. An alternative explanation, supported by experimental evidence, suggests transmission of sound to inner ear via non-osseous pathways such as skin, soft tissues, and fluid. Because the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and soft tissues is smaller than that between air and bone, air-borne sounds would be transmitted to soft tissues more effectively than to bone, and therefore less attenuation is expected through soft tissue sound conduction. This can contribute to the limited attenuation provided by traditional HPDs. The present study has practical

  20. Desiccation provides photosynthetic protection for crust cyanobacteria Microcoleus vaginatus from high temperature.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shubin; Wu, Li; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-10-01

    As the dominant cyanobacterial species in biological soil crusts (BSCs), Microcoleus vaginatus often suffer from many stress conditions, such as desiccation and high temperature. In this study, the activities of light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) and reaction centers of photosystem II (PS II) in crust cyanobacteria M. vaginatus were monitored under high temperature and desiccation conditions using chlorophyll fluorescence technology. The results showed that all the fluorescence signals were significantly inhibited by high temperature or desiccation treatments. Under high temperature conditions, it was further demonstrated that PS II reaction centers were first destructed within the first hour, then the LHCs gradually dissociated and free phycocyanin formed within 1-5 h, and the activities of all the light harvesting and reaction center pigment proteins were fully suppressed after 24 h of high temperature treatment. Furthermore, the high temperature treated M. vaginatus lost its ability to recover photosynthetic activity. On the contrary, although desiccation also led to the loss of photosynthetic activity in M. vaginatus, after rehydration in the light the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm could be well recovered within 12 h. It was concluded that desiccation could provide crust cyanobacteria M. vaginatus some protection from other stresses, such as high temperature demonstrated in this experiment. The combine of temperature change and precipitation pattern in the field provide a guarantee for the alternate metabolism and inactivity in crust cyanobacteria. That may be a very important strategy for the survival of crust cyanobacteria in high temperature regions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. EPA Provides $691,000 to Protect Wetlands throughout New York State

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $690,940 to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Research Foundation of SUNY, to better protect wetlands throughout New York.

  2. Evaluation of genetic melanoma vaccines in cdk4-mutant mice provides evidence for immunological tolerance against authochthonous melanomas in the skin.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Julia; Büchs, Stefanie; Tormo, Damia; Ferrer, Aleix; Wenzel, Jörg; Huber, Christoph; Wölfel, Thomas; Barbacid, Mariano; Malumbres, Marcos; Tüting, Thomas

    2006-01-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of a candidate melanoma vaccine approach in mice genetically prone to develop melanoma due to the introduction of an oncogenic mutation (R24C) in the germline sequence of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), a protein critically involved in cell cycle regulation. Melanomas were induced in cdk4-mutant mice by chemical carcinogenesis and UVB irradiation. A genetic prime-boost strategy targeting the clinically relevant differentiation antigen tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) was performed which was able to stimulate a melanocyte-specific cellular immune response associated with localized autoimmune vitiligo-like depigmentation. However, significant destruction of carcinogen-induced autochthonous melanocytic neoplasms in the skin was not observed following immunization. We provide evidence that autochthonous melanomas expressed TRP2 but not the MHC molecule H2-Kb and are immunologically tolerated in the skin. Our results highlight the importance of assessing melanoma vaccines in genetic mouse models that more adequately represent the expected clinical situation in order to identify strategies, which eventually may be of benefit for melanoma patients.

  3. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance cerebral angiogenesis and provide long-term protection after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayin; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wengting; Leak, Rehana K.; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Ling; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurological disorder and one of the leading causes of death and serious disability. After cerebral ischemia, revascularization in the ischemic boundary zone provides nutritive blood flow as well as various growth factors to promote the survival and activity of neurons and neural progenitor cells. Enhancement of angiogenesis and the resulting improvement of cerebral microcirculation are key restorative mechanisms and represent an important therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that post-stroke angiogenesis would be enhanced by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), a major component of dietary fish oil. To this end, we found that transgenic fat-1 mice that overproduce n-3 PUFAs exhibited long-term behavioral and histological protection against transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI). Importantly, fat-1 transgenic mice also exhibited robust improvements in revascularization and angiogenesis compared to wild type littermates, suggesting a potential role for n-3 fatty acids in post-stroke cerebrovascular remodeling. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs induced upregulation of angiopoietin 2 (Ang 2) in astrocytes after tFCI and stimulated extracellular Ang 2 release from cultured astrocytes after oxygen and glucose deprivation. Ang 2 facilitated endothelial proliferation and barrier formation in vitro by potentiating the effects of VEGF on phospholipase Cγ1 and Src signaling. Consistent with these findings, blockade of Src activity in post-stroke fat-1 mice impaired n-3 PUFA-induced angiogenesis and exacerbated long-term neurological outcomes. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that n-3 PUFA supplementation is a potential angiogenic treatment capable of augmenting brain repair and improving long-term functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. PMID:24794156

  4. Motorcycle helmet fixation status is more crucial than helmet type in providing protection to the head.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Roszalina; Oxley, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    In Malaysia, motorcyclists continue to outnumber other road users in injuries and deaths. The objective of this study was to determine the association between helmet fixation and helmet type with head injury and severity of head injury among Malaysian motorcyclists. The study design was a prospective cross-sectional study. The participants involved injured motorcyclists who were admitted in five selected hospitals in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Participants who sustained head injury were selected as the cases while those with injury below the neck (IBN) were selected as the controls. Questionnaire comprising motorcyclist, vehicle, helmet and crash factors was examined. Diagnoses of injuries were obtained from the participants' medical records. The total subjects with head injuries were 404 while those with IBN were 235. Majority of the cases (76.2%) and controls (80.4%) wore the half-head and open-face helmets, followed by the tropical helmets (5.4% and 6.0% of the cases and controls, respectively). Full-face helmets were used by 1.2% of the cases and 4.7% of the controls. 5.7% of the cases and 6.0% of the controls did not wear a helmet. 32.7% of the cases and 77.4% of the controls had their helmets fixed. Motorcyclists with ejected helmets were five times as likely to sustain head injury [adjusted odds ratio, AOR 5.73 (95% CI 3.38-9.73)] and four times as likely to sustain severe head injury [AOR of 4.83 (95% CI 2.76-8.45)]. The half head and open face helmets had AOR of 0.24 (95% CI 0.10-0.56) for severe head injury when compared to motorcyclists who did not wear a helmet. Helmet fixation is more effective than helmet type in providing protection to the motorcyclists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  6. Identification of a mutant bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) in post-arrival outbreaks of IBR in feedlot calves and protection with conventional vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S; Myers, D; Doig, P A; Karvonen, B; Habermehl, M; Babiuk, L A; Jelinski, M; Van Donkersgoed, J; Schlesinger, K; Rinehart, C

    2001-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) have recently been observed in vaccinated feedlot calves in Alberta a few months post-arrival. To investigate the cause of these outbreaks, lung and tracheal tissues were collected from calves that died of IBR during a post-arrival outbreak of disease. Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), the causative agent of IBR, was isolated from 6 out of 15 tissues. Of these 6 isolates, 5 failed to react with a monoclonal antibody specific for one of the epitopes on glycoprotein D, one of the most important antigens of BHV-1. The ability of one of these mutant BHV-1 isolates to cause disease in calves vaccinated with a modified-live IBR vaccine was assessed in an experimental challenge study. After one vaccination, the majority of the calves developed humoral and cellular immune responses. Secondary vaccination resulted in a substantially enhanced level of immunity in all animals. Three months after the second vaccination, calves were either challenged with one of the mutant isolates or with a conventional challenge strain of BHV-1. Regardless of the type of virus used for challenge, vaccinated calves experienced significantly (P < 0.05) less weight loss and temperature rises, had lower nasal scores, and shed less virus than non-vaccinated animals. The only statistically significant (P < 0.05) difference between the 2 challenge viruses was the amount of virus shed, which was higher in non-vaccinated calves challenged with the mutant virus than in those challenged with the conventional virus. These data show that calves vaccinated with a modified-live IBR vaccine are protected from challenge with either the mutant or the conventional virus. Images Figure 1. PMID:11346260

  7. Loss of Slc4a1b Chloride/Bicarbonate Exchanger Function Protects Mechanosensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Damage in the Zebrafish Mutant persephone

    PubMed Central

    Hailey, Dale W.; Roberts, Brock; Owens, Kelly N.; Stewart, Andrew K.; Linbo, Tor; Pujol, Remy; Alper, Seth L.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cell death is a leading cause of hearing and balance disorders in the human population. Hair cells are remarkably sensitive to environmental insults such as excessive noise and exposure to some otherwise therapeutic drugs. However, individual responses to damaging agents can vary, in part due to genetic differences. We previously carried out a forward genetic screen using the zebrafish lateral line system to identify mutations that alter the response of larval hair cells to the antibiotic neomycin, one of a class of aminoglycoside compounds that cause hair cell death in humans. The persephone mutation confers resistance to aminoglycosides. 5 dpf homozygous persephone mutants are indistinguishable from wild-type siblings, but differ in their retention of lateral line hair cells upon exposure to neomycin. The mutation in persephone maps to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger slc4a1b and introduces a single Ser-to-Phe substitution in zSlc4a1b. This mutation prevents delivery of the exchanger to the cell surface and abolishes the ability of the protein to import chloride across the plasma membrane. Loss of function of zSlc4a1b reduces hair cell death caused by exposure to the aminoglycosides neomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin, and the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Pharmacological block of anion transport with the disulfonic stilbene derivatives DIDS and SITS, or exposure to exogenous bicarbonate, also protects hair cells against damage. Both persephone mutant and DIDS-treated wild-type larvae show reduced uptake of labeled aminoglycosides. persephone mutants also show reduced FM1-43 uptake, indicating a potential impact on mechanotransduction-coupled activity in the mutant. We propose that tight regulation of the ionic environment of sensory hair cells, mediated by zSlc4a1b activity, is critical for their sensitivity to aminoglcyoside antibiotics. PMID:23071446

  8. Experimental Shielding Evaluation of the Radiation Protection Provided by Residential Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Elijah D.

    The human health and environmental effects following a postulated accidental release of radioactive material to the environment has been a public and regulatory concern since the early development of nuclear technology and researched extensively to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency planning purposes. The objective of this investigation is to research and develop the technical basis for contemporary building shielding factors for the U.S. housing stock. Building shielding factors quantify the protection a certain building-type provides from ionizing radiation. Much of the current data used to determine the quality of shielding around nuclear facilities and urban environments is based on simplistic point-kernel calculations for 1950's era suburbia and is no longer applicable to the densely populated urban environments seen today. To analyze a building's radiation shielding properties, the ideal approach would be to subject a variety of building-types to various radioactive materials and measure the radiation levels in and around the building. While this is not entirely practicable, this research uniquely analyzes the shielding effectiveness of a variety of likely U.S. residential buildings from a realistic source term in a laboratory setting. Results produced in the investigation provide a comparison between theory and experiment behind building shielding factor methodology by applying laboratory measurements to detailed computational models. These models are used to develop a series of validated building shielding factors for generic residential housing units using the computational code MCNP5. For these building shielding factors to be useful in radiologic consequence assessments and emergency response planning, two types of shielding factors have been developed for; (1) the shielding effectiveness of each structure within a semi-infinite cloud of radioactive material, and (2) the shielding effectiveness of each structure

  9. How do migratory species add ecosystem service value to wilderness? Calculating the spatial subsidies provided by protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez-Hoffman, Laura; Semmens, Darius J.; Diffendorfer, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Species that migrate through protected and wilderness areas and utilize their resources, deliver ecosystem services to people in faraway locations. The mismatch between the areas that most support a species and those areas where the species provides most benefits to society can lead to underestimation of the true value of protected areas such as wilderness. We present a method to communicate the “off-site” value of wilderness and protected areas in providing habitat to migratory species that, in turn, provide benefits to people in distant locations. Using northern pintail ducks (Anas acuta) as an example, the article provides a method to estimate the amount of subsidy – the value of the ecosystem services provided by a migratory species in one area versus the cost to support the species and its habitat elsewhere.

  10. Dental Care Risk Management Provided by Social Protection Institutions of Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Cheikh Mouhamadou Mbacké; Diop, Mbathio; Kanouté, Aida; Diouf, Massamba; Cissé, Daouda; Faye, Daouda; Baldé, Yandé

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays in Senegal, located in West Africa, social protection institutions are confronted with a substantially increased healthcare expenditure in general, and oral care in particular. The ability of the leadership to use techniques to contain the impact of risks they are facing determine their viability. The aim of our study was to analyze the risk management of dental care coverage by those institutions. The study was descriptive, extensive and focused on all active social protection Institutions in Senegal since 2005, at least. Our results showed that, in spite of the implementation of risk management mechanisms such as patient co-payment (97% of institutions), coverage ceiling (26%) and dentist council (15%), healthcare expenditure still growing. For the containment of oral care expenditure increase, it is important to raise awareness among social protection institutions for a greater use of existing risk management mechanisms. PMID:28299147

  11. Does selective beta-1 blockade provide bone marrow protection after trauma/hemorrhagic shock?

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Latha V; Cook, Kristin M; Sifri, Ziad C; Kotamarti, Srinath; Calderon, Gabriel M; Alzate, Walter D; Livingston, David H; Mohr, Alicia M

    2012-09-01

    Previously, nonselective beta-blockade (BB) with propranolol demonstrated protection of the bone marrow (BM) after trauma and hemorrhagic shock (HS). Because selective beta-1 blockers are used commonly for their cardiac protection, the aim of this study was to more clearly define the role of specific beta adrenergic receptors in BM protection after trauma and HS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral lung contusion (LC) followed by HS for 45 minutes. After resuscitation, animals were injected with a selective beta-blocker, atenolol (B1B), butoxamine (B2B), or SR59230A (B3B). Animals were killed at 3 hours or 7 days. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured throughout the study period. BM cellularity, growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in BM, and hemoglobin levels (Hb) were assessed. Treatment with a B2B or B3B after LCHS restored both BM cellularity and BM HPC colony growth at 3 hours and 7 days. In contrast, treatment with a B1B had no effect on BM cellularity or HPC growth but did decrease heart effectively rate throughout the study. Treatment with a B3B after LCHS increased Hb as compared with LCHS alone. After trauma and HS, protection of BM for 7 days was seen with use of either a selective beta-2 or beta-3 blocker. Use of a selective beta-1 blocker was ineffective in protecting the BM despite a physiologic decrease in heart rate. Therefore, the protection of BM is via the beta-2 and beta-3 receptors and it is not via a direct cardiovascular effect. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. YopE specific CD8+ T cells provide protection against systemic and mucosal Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Molly A.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies indicated that CD8+ T cells responding to a surrogate single antigen expressed by Y. pseudotuberculosis, ovalbumin, were insufficient to protect against yersiniosis. Herein we tested the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells reactive to the natural Yersinia antigen YopE would be more effective at providing mucosal protection. We first confirmed that immunization with the attenuated ksgA- strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis generated YopE-specific CD8+ T cells. These T cells were protective against challenge with virulent Listeria monocytogenes expressing secreted YopE. Mice immunized with an attenuated L. monocytogenes YopE+ strain generated large numbers of functional YopE-specific CD8+ T cells, and initially controlled a systemic challenge with virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis, yet eventually succumbed to yersiniosis. Mice vaccinated with a YopE peptide and cholera toxin vaccine generated robust T cell responses, providing protection to 60% of the mice challenged mucosally but failed to show complete protection against systemic infection with virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis. These studies demonstrate that vaccination with recombinant YopE vaccines can generate YopE-specific CD8+ T cells, that can provide significant mucosal protection but these cells are insufficient to provide sterilizing immunity against systemic Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Our studies have implications for Yersinia vaccine development studies. PMID:28207901

  13. YopE specific CD8+ T cells provide protection against systemic and mucosal Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Shen, Haiqian; Bergman, Molly A; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies indicated that CD8+ T cells responding to a surrogate single antigen expressed by Y. pseudotuberculosis, ovalbumin, were insufficient to protect against yersiniosis. Herein we tested the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells reactive to the natural Yersinia antigen YopE would be more effective at providing mucosal protection. We first confirmed that immunization with the attenuated ksgA- strain of Y. pseudotuberculosis generated YopE-specific CD8+ T cells. These T cells were protective against challenge with virulent Listeria monocytogenes expressing secreted YopE. Mice immunized with an attenuated L. monocytogenes YopE+ strain generated large numbers of functional YopE-specific CD8+ T cells, and initially controlled a systemic challenge with virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis, yet eventually succumbed to yersiniosis. Mice vaccinated with a YopE peptide and cholera toxin vaccine generated robust T cell responses, providing protection to 60% of the mice challenged mucosally but failed to show complete protection against systemic infection with virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis. These studies demonstrate that vaccination with recombinant YopE vaccines can generate YopE-specific CD8+ T cells, that can provide significant mucosal protection but these cells are insufficient to provide sterilizing immunity against systemic Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Our studies have implications for Yersinia vaccine development studies.

  14. Real time enzyme inhibition assays provide insights into differences in binding of neuraminidase inhibitors to wild type and mutant influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Susan; Mohr, Peter G; Schmidt, Peter M; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir were all designed based on the knowledge that the transition state analogue of the cleaved sialic acid, 2-deoxy,2,3-dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (DANA) was a weak inhibitor of NA. While DANA bound rapidly to the NA, modifications leading to the improved potency of these new inhibitors also conferred a time dependent or slow binding phenotype. Many mutations in the NA leading to decreased susceptibility result in loss of slow binding, hence this is a phenotypic marker of many but not all resistant NAs. We present here a simplified approach to determine whether an inhibitor is fast or slow binding by extending the endpoint fluorescent enzyme inhibition assay to a real time assay and monitoring the changes in IC(50)s with time. We carried out two reactions, one with a 30 min preincubation with inhibitor and the second without. The enzymatic reaction was started via addition of substrate and IC(50)s were calculated after each 10 min interval up to 60 min. Results showed that without preincubation IC(50)s for the wild type viruses started high and although they decreased continuously over the 60 min reaction time the final IC(50)s remained higher than for pre-incubated samples. These results indicate a slow equilibrium of association and dissociation and are consistent with slow binding of the inhibitors. In contrast, for viruses with decreased susceptibility, preincubation had minimal effect on the IC(50)s, consistent with fast binding. Therefore this modified assay provides additional phenotypic information about the rate of inhibitor binding in addition to the IC(50), and critically demonstrates the differential effect of incubation times on the IC(50) and K(i) values of wild type and mutant viruses for each of the inhibitors.

  15. Polyphenol Extract from Phellinus igniarius Protects against Acrolein Toxicity In Vitro and Provides Protection in a Mouse Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Suabjakyong, Papawee; Saiki, Ryotaro; Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.; Higashi, Kyohei; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Kazuei; Toida, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycetous mushroom Phellinus igniarius (L.) Quel. has been used as traditional medicine in various Asian countries for many years. Although many reports exist on its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and therapeutic effects against various diseases, our current knowledge of its effect on stroke is very limited. Stroke is a neurodegenerative disorder in which oxidative stress is a key hallmark. Following the 2005 discovery by Igarashi’s group that acrolein produced from polyamines in vivo is a major cause of cell damage by oxidative stress, we now describe the effects of anti-oxidative extracts from P. igniarius on symptoms of experimentally induced stroke in mice. The toxicity of acrolein was compared with that of hydrogen peroxide in a mouse mammary carcinoma cell line (FM3A). We found that the complete inhibition of FM3A cell growth by 5 μM acrolein could be prevented by crude ethanol extract of P. igniarius at 0.5 μg/ml. Seven polyphenol compounds named 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-3-buten-2one, inonoblin C, phelligridin D, inoscavin C, phelligridin C and interfungin B were identified from this ethanolic extract by LCMS and 1H NMR. Polyphenol-containing extracts of P. igniarius were then used to prevent acrolein toxicity in a mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a) cell line. The results suggested that Neuro-2a cells were protected from acrolein toxicity at 2 and 5 μM by this polyphenol extract at 0.5 and 2 μg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, in mice with experimentally induced stroke, intraperitoneal treatment with P. igniarius polyphenol extract at 20 μg/kg caused a reduction of the infarction volume by 62.2% compared to untreated mice. These observations suggest that the polyphenol extract of P. igniarius could serve to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:25811373

  16. Polyphenol extract from Phellinus igniarius protects against acrolein toxicity in vitro and provides protection in a mouse stroke model.

    PubMed

    Suabjakyong, Papawee; Saiki, Ryotaro; Van Griensven, Leo J L D; Higashi, Kyohei; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Kazuei; Toida, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycetous mushroom Phellinus igniarius (L.) Quel. has been used as traditional medicine in various Asian countries for many years. Although many reports exist on its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities and therapeutic effects against various diseases, our current knowledge of its effect on stroke is very limited. Stroke is a neurodegenerative disorder in which oxidative stress is a key hallmark. Following the 2005 discovery by Igarashi's group that acrolein produced from polyamines in vivo is a major cause of cell damage by oxidative stress, we now describe the effects of anti-oxidative extracts from P. igniarius on symptoms of experimentally induced stroke in mice. The toxicity of acrolein was compared with that of hydrogen peroxide in a mouse mammary carcinoma cell line (FM3A). We found that the complete inhibition of FM3A cell growth by 5 μM acrolein could be prevented by crude ethanol extract of P. igniarius at 0.5 μg/ml. Seven polyphenol compounds named 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-3-buten-2one, inonoblin C, phelligridin D, inoscavin C, phelligridin C and interfungin B were identified from this ethanolic extract by LCMS and 1H NMR. Polyphenol-containing extracts of P. igniarius were then used to prevent acrolein toxicity in a mouse neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a) cell line. The results suggested that Neuro-2a cells were protected from acrolein toxicity at 2 and 5 μM by this polyphenol extract at 0.5 and 2 μg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, in mice with experimentally induced stroke, intraperitoneal treatment with P. igniarius polyphenol extract at 20 μg/kg caused a reduction of the infarction volume by 62.2% compared to untreated mice. These observations suggest that the polyphenol extract of P. igniarius could serve to prevent ischemic stroke.

  17. t-BHQ Provides Protection against Lead Neurotoxicity via Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Li, Xiaoyi; Li, Lili; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of lead has been well established, and oxidative stress is strongly associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity. Nrf2 is important for protection against oxidative stress in many disease models. We applied t-BHQ, which is an Nrf2 activator, to investigate the possible role of Nrf2 in the protection against lead neurotoxicity. t-BHQ significantly attenuated the oxidative stress in developmental rats by decreasing MDA level, as well as by increasing SOD activity and GSH content, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was detected by Nissl staining, and Bax expression was inhibited in the t-BHQ-treated group. Results showed that t-BHQ suppressed ROS production and caspase 3/7 activity but increased intracellular GSH content, in SH-SY5Y cells under lead exposure. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro, t-BHQ enhanced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and binding to ARE areas but did not induce Nrf2 transcription. These phenomena were confirmed using RT-PCR, EMSA, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. Subsequent upregulation of the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and GCLC was observed. However, knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 adversely affected the protective effects of t-BHQ against lead toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Thus, t-BHQ can protect against lead neurotoxicity, depending on the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26798413

  18. Efficient initial attacks: analysis of capacity and funding provides insights to wildfire protection planning

    Treesearch

    Jeremy Fried; Paul. Meznarich

    2014-01-01

    Large wildfires in the United States pose significant challenges to fire management agencies charged with protecting lives, property, and natural resources. A vigorous initial response to a wildfire, a process referred to as "initial attack," can greatly reduce the likelihood of the fire becoming larger and causing substantial damage. Successful...

  19. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  20. Commercial PCV2a-based vaccines are effective in protecting naturally PCV2b-infected finisher pigs against experimental challenge with a 2012 mutant PCV2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Halbur, Patrick G; Matzinger, Shannon R; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-07-23

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are all based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and disease. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in vaccinated herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of three commercial PCV2a-based vaccines administered in the presence of an ongoing PCV2b infection and passively-acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 11 weeks of age. Fifty naturally PCV2b-infected 2-week-old pigs were divided into five treatment groups with 10 pigs each. Pigs were unvaccinated (positive and negative controls) or vaccinated at 3 (VAC-A, VAC-B, VAC-C) and at 5 weeks of age (VAC-C). At 11 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative controls were challenged with a 2012 U.S. strain of mPCV2. The experiment was terminated 21 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas non-vaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2 infection was demonstrated in all positive controls and 3/10 had microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative controls infected with PCV2b alone did not develop PCVAD. The results indicate that concurrent PCV2b/mPCV2 infection can trigger PCVAD development and that commercial vaccines are effective in protecting conventional pigs against emerging mPCV2 strains.

  1. Operator dermal exposure and protection provided by personal protective equipment and working coveralls during mixing/loading, application and sprayer cleaning in vineyards.

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, Isabelle; Bouneb, Françoise; Mercier, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    The efficiency of a working coverall combined with personal protective equipment to protect operators against dermal exposure to plant protection products under field conditions was studied. Operators wore a non-certified water-repellent finish polyester/cotton coverall plus a certified gown during the mixing/loading and the cleaning phases. Insecticide foliar application to a vineyard was selected as the exposure scenario. The overall dermal residue levels measured in this study were in the range of data recently collected in Europe. The water-repellent finish working coverall reduced body exposure by a factor of approximately 95%. Wearing a Category III Type 3 partial body gown during mixing/loading and cleaning of the application equipment led to a further protective effect of 98.7%. The combination of a water-repellent finish working coverall and partial body protection during specific tasks provided satisfactory levels of protection and can be considered as suitable protection for the conditions of use studied.

  2. Recombinant BCG prime and PPE protein boost provides potent protection against acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Gu, Jin; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Honghai; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-04-01

    Since BCG, the only vaccine widely used against tuberculosis (TB) in the world, provides varied protective efficacy and may not be effective for inducing long-term cellular immunity, it is in an urgent need to develop more effective vaccines and more potent immune strategies against TB. Prime-boost is proven to be a good strategy by inducing long-term protection. In this study, we tested the protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) challenge of prime-boost strategy by recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing PPE protein Rv3425 fused with Ag85B and Rv3425. Results showed that the prime-boost strategy could significantly increase the protective efficiency against Mtb infection, characterized by reduction of bacterial load in lung and spleen, attenuation of tuberculosis lesions in lung tissues. Importantly, we found that Rv3425 boost, superior to Ag85B boost, provided better protection against Mtb infection. Further research proved that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost could obviously increase the expansion of lymphocytes, significantly induce IL-2 production by lymphocytes upon PPD stimulation, and inhibit IL-6 production at an early stage. It implied that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost opted to induce Th1 immune response and provided a long-term protection against TB. These results implicated that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost is a potent and promising strategy to prevent acute Mtb infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How Much Financial Protection Do Marketplace Plans Provide in States Not Expanding Medicaid?

    PubMed

    Beutel, Sophie; Gunja, Munira; Collins, Sara R

    2016-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act's premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions have helped to reduce out-of-pocket costs for low-income people enrolled in marketplace plans. This financial protection has been particularly important for people with incomes above 100 percent of poverty who live in states that have not expanded Medicaid. However, a key question for policymakers is how this protection compares to Medicaid. This brief analyzes a sample of silver plans offered in the largest markets in 18 states that use the federal website for marketplace enrollment and have not expanded Medicaid eligibility. It finds that marketplace enrollees at this income level in most plans analyzed are at risk of incurring premium and out-of-pocket costs that are higher than what they would pay under Medicaid. For people with significant health needs, costs are estimated to be much higher in marketplace plans than what they would be under Medicaid.

  4. Survival of lethal poxvirus infection in mice depends on TLR9, and therapeutic vaccination provides protection

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Christofer; Hausmann, Jürgen; Lauterbach, Henning; Schmidt, Michaela; Akira, Shizuo; Wagner, Hermann; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; O’Keeffe, Meredith; Hochrein, Hubertus

    2008-01-01

    Poxviruses such as the causative agent of smallpox have developed multiple strategies to suppress immune responses, including the suppression of DC activation. Since poxviruses are large DNA viruses, we hypothesized that their detection by DCs may involve the endosomal DNA recognition receptor TLR9. Indeed, we have shown here that DC recognition of ectromelia virus (ECTV), the causative agent of mousepox, completely depended on TLR9. The importance of TLR9 was highlighted by the fact that mice lacking TLR9 showed drastically increased susceptibility to infection with ECTV. In contrast, we found that the strongly attenuated poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) activated DCs by both TLR9-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore tested whether we could use the broader induction of immune responses by MVA to protect mice from a lethal infection with ECTV. Indeed, MVA given at the same time as a lethal dose of ECTV protected mice from death. Importantly, MVA also rescued TLR9-deficient mice if administered 2 full days after an otherwise lethal infection with ECTV. Therefore, these data suggest an essential role for TLR9 in the defense against poxviruses. In addition, postexposure application of MVA may protect against lethal poxvirus infection. PMID:18398511

  5. Hemoglobin C Trait Provides Protection From Clinical Falciparum Malaria in Malian Children

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Laurens, Matthew B.; Dembélé, Ahmadou; Tolo, Youssouf; Koné, Abdoulaye K.; Traoré, Karim; Niangaly, Amadou; Guindo, Aldiouma; Wu, Yukun; Berry, Andrea A.; Jacob, Christopher G.; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Adams, Matthew; Shrestha, Biraj; Mu, Amy Z.; Kouriba, Bourema; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Diallo, Dapa A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.; Thera, Mahamadou A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hemoglobin C trait, like hemoglobin S trait, protects against severe malaria in children, but it is unclear whether hemoglobin C trait also protects against uncomplicated malaria. We hypothesized that Malian children with hemoglobin C trait would have a lower risk of clinical malaria than children with hemoglobin AA. Methods. Three hundred children aged 0–6 years were enrolled in a cohort study of malaria incidence in Bandiagara, Mali, with continuous passive and monthly active follow-up from June 2009 to June 2010. Results. Compared to hemoglobin AA children (n = 242), hemoglobin AC children (n = 39) had a longer time to first clinical malaria episode (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; P = .001; 364 median malaria-free days vs 181 days), fewer episodes of clinical malaria, and a lower cumulative parasite burden. Similarly, hemoglobin AS children (n = 14) had a longer time to first clinical malaria episode than hemoglobin AA children (HR, 0.15; P = .015; 364 median malaria-free days vs 181 days), but experienced the most asymptomatic malaria infections of any group. Conclusions. Both hemoglobin C and S traits exerted a protective effect against clinical malaria episodes, but appeared to do so by mechanisms that differentially affect the response to infecting malaria parasites. PMID:26019283

  6. Sevoflurane at 1 MAC provides optimal myocardial protection during off-pump CABG.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Chun-Ling; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Qiang

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the myocardial protective effect of sevoflurane in patients receiving off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) and the role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Forty-eight patients receiving elective OPCABG were randomly assigned to a control group, and to 0.75 MAC, 1.0 MAC and 1.5 MAC sevoflurane groups. Blood samples were collected and levels of BNP and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were measured before anesthesia, and immediately, 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. Dopamine was necessary to maintain blood pressure in the sevoflurane groups, but not in the control group (p < 0.002). 1.0 MAC sevoflurane significantly decreased post-surgical cTnI levels (p < 0.001). 0.75 MAC had no significant effect, and increasing sevoflurane concentrations to 1.5 MAC caused no further decrease in cTnI concentrations. There was no significant difference in BNP level among the groups (p = 0.227) or between any two groups, although values of BNP showed a significant correlation with cTnI values in control subjects immediately after (r = 0.847) and 24 h after (r = 0.661) surgery. Our results demonstrated that 1.0 MAC and 1.5 MAC sevoflurane can exert a significant myocardial protective effect. BNP cannot be used to predict the myocardial protective effect of sevoflurane in OPCABG.

  7. Ultraviolet absorbing compounds provide a rapid response mechanism for UV protection in some reef fish.

    PubMed

    Braun, C; Reef, R; Siebeck, U E

    2016-07-01

    The external mucus surface of reef fish contains ultraviolet absorbing compounds (UVAC), most prominently Mycosporine-like Amino Acids (MAAs). MAAs in the external mucus of reef fish are thought to act as sunscreens by preventing the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), however, direct evidence for their protective role has been missing. We tested the protective function of UVAC's by exposing fish with naturally low, Pomacentrus amboinensis, and high, Thalassoma lunare, mucus absorption properties to a high dose of UVR (UVB: 13.4W∗m(-2), UVA: 6.1W∗m(-2)) and measuring the resulting DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). For both species, the amount of UV induced DNA damage sustained following the exposure to a 1h pulse of high UVR was negatively correlated with mucus absorbance, a proxy for MAA concentration. Furthermore, a rapid and significant increase in UVAC concentration was observed in P. amboinensis following UV exposure, directly after capture and after ten days in captivity. No such increase was observed in T. lunare, which maintained relatively high levels of UV absorbance at all times. P. amboinensis, in contrast to T. lunare, uses UV communication and thus must maintain UV transparent mucus to be able to display its UV patterns. The ability to rapidly alter the transparency of mucus could be an important adaptation in the trade off between protection from harmful UVR and UV communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Respiratory Protection Toolkit: Providing Guidance Without Changing Requirements-Can We Make an Impact?

    PubMed

    Bien, Elizabeth Ann; Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Betcher, Cynthia Ann; Thrasher, Terri L; Mingerink, Donna R

    2016-12-01

    International travel and infectious respiratory illnesses worldwide place health care workers (HCWs) at increasing risk of respiratory exposures. To ensure the highest quality safety initiatives, one health care system used a quality improvement model of Plan-Do-Study-Act and guidance from Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) May 2015 Hospital Respiratory Protection Program (RPP) Toolkit to assess a current program. The toolkit aided in identification of opportunities for improvement within their well-designed RPP. One opportunity was requiring respirator use during aerosol-generating procedures for specific infectious illnesses. Observation data demonstrated opportunities to mitigate controllable risks including strap placement, user seal check, and reuse of disposable N95 filtering facepiece respirators. Subsequent interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in other ideas to decrease risks and increase protection from potentially infectious respiratory illnesses. The toolkit's comprehensive document to evaluate the program showed that while the OSHA standards have not changed, the addition of the toolkit can better protect HCWs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. A population based estimation of the driver protection provided by passenger cars: France 1996-2005.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Lenguerrand, Erik

    2008-11-01

    The technology used in cars to protect occupants is constantly developing. Demonstrating the beneficial effects in the field is complex as the most recent vehicles are generally used by drivers who differ from other drivers and who drive in different traffic conditions. This paper presents an overall estimation of the consequences of changes in the secondary safety of cars, taking account of most of these factors. The data come from information collected about injury road traffic crashes by the police in France between 1996 and 2005. The risk of the driver being killed has been evaluated for the 144,034 drivers involved in two-car crashes and for the 63,621 drivers involved in single-car crashes. The study shows that when a recent car is in collision with an older car the driver of the former is better protected than the driver of the latter. These improvements in secondary safety are not observed in the case of single-car crashes, very probably because of higher impact speeds. Our findings also confirm the need for protection systems to be better adapted to the specific characteristics of users and for an improvement in the crash compatibility of vehicles, in particular to overcome the consequences of differences between the masses of vehicles.

  10. Genome-wide annotation of mutations in a phenotyped mutant library provides an efficient platform for discovery of casual gene mutations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) efficiently generates high-density mutations in genomes. Conventionally, these mutations are identified by techniques that can detect single-nucleotide mismatches in heteroduplexes of individual PCR amplicons. We applied whole-genome sequencing to 256-phenotyped mutant l...

  11. Does the National Health Insurance Scheme provide financial protection to households in Ghana?

    PubMed

    Kusi, Anthony; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Asante, Felix A; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-08-15

    Excessive healthcare payments can impede access to health services and also disrupt the welfare of households with no financial protection. Health insurance is expected to offer financial protection against health shocks. Ghana began the implementation of its National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in 2004. The NHIS is aimed at removing the financial barrier to healthcare by limiting direct out-of-pocket health expenditures (OOPHE). The study examines the effect of the NHIS on OOPHE and how it protects households against catastrophic health expenditures. Data was obtained from a cross-sectional representative household survey involving 2,430 households from three districts across Ghana. All OOPHE associated with treatment seeking for reported illness in the household in the last 4 weeks preceding the survey were analysed and compared between insured and uninsured persons. The incidence and intensity of catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) among households were measured by the catastrophic health payment method. The relative effect of NHIS on the incidence of CHE in the household was estimated by multiple logistic regression analysis. About 36% of households reported at least one illness during the 4 weeks period. Insured patients had significantly lower direct OOPHE for out-patient and in-patient care compared to the uninsured. On financial protection, the incidence of CHE was lower among insured households (2.9%) compared to the partially insured (3.7%) and the uninsured (4.0%) at the 40% threshold. The incidence of CHE was however significantly lower among fully insured households (6.0%) which sought healthcare from NHIS accredited health facilities compared to the partially insured (10.1%) and the uninsured households (23.2%). The likelihood of a household incurring CHE was 4.2 times less likely for fully insured and 2.9 times less likely for partially insured households relative to being uninsured. The NHIS has however not completely eliminated OOPHE for the

  12. Induction of Unconventional T Cells by a Mutant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strain Formulated in Cationic Liposomes Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections of Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Idalia; Morris, Sheldon; Cowley, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies aimed at defining protective immunity induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG immunization have largely focused on the induction of antituberculosis CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Here we describe a vaccine consisting of a BCGΔmmaA4 deletion mutant formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDA) with d-(+)-trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant (A4/Adj) that protected TCRδ−/− mice depleted of CD4+, CD8+, and NK1.1+ T cells against an aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis. These mice were significantly protected relative to mice immunized with a nonadjuvanted BCGΔmmaA4 (BCG-A4) mutant and nonvaccinated controls at 2 months and 9 months postvaccination. In the absence of all T cells following treatment with anti-Thy1.2 antibody, the immunized mice lost the ability to control the infection. These results indicate that an unconventional T cell population was mediating protection in the absence of CD4+, CD8+, NK1.1+, and TCRγδ T cells and could exhibit memory. Focusing on CD4− CD8− double-negative (DN) T cells, we found that these cells accumulated in the lungs postchallenge significantly more in A4/Adj-immunized mice and induced significantly greater frequencies of pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells than were seen in the nonvaccinated or nonadjuvanted BCG control groups. Moreover, pulmonary DN T cells from the A4/Adj group exhibited significantly higher IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) values than were seen in the control groups. We also showed that enriched DN T cells from mice immunized with A4/Adj could control mycobacterial growth in vitro significantly better than naive whole-spleen cells. These results suggest that formulating BCG in DDA/TDB adjuvant confers superior protection in immunocompromised mice and likely involves the induction of long-lived memory DN T cells. PMID:27226281

  13. Cytotoxic T cells are the predominant players providing cross-protective immunity induced by {gamma}-irradiated influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoichi; Chan, Jennifer; Regner, Matthias; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Kok, Tuckweng; Manavis, Jim; Li, Peng; Müllbacher, Arno; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2010-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that a single dose of nonadjuvanted intranasal gamma-irradiated influenza A virus can provide robust protection in mice against both homologous and heterosubtypic challenges, including challenge with an H5N1 avian virus strain. We investigated the mechanism behind the observed cross-protection to define which arms of the adaptive immune response are involved in mediating this protection. Studies with gene knockout mice showed the cross-protective immunity to be mediated mainly by T cells and to be dependent on the cytolytic effector molecule perforin. Adoptive transfer of memory T cells from immunized mice, but not of memory B cells, protected naïve recipients against lethal heterosubtypic influenza virus challenge. Furthermore, gamma-irradiated influenza viruses induced cross-reactive Tc-cell responses but not cross-neutralizing or cross-protective antibodies. In addition, histological analysis showed reduced lung inflammation in vaccinated mice compared to that in unvaccinated controls following heterosubtypic challenge. This reduced inflammation was associated with enhanced early recruitment of T cells, both CD4(+) and CD8(+), and with early influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. Therefore, cross-protective immunity induced by vaccination with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus is mediated mainly by Tc-cell responses.

  14. Identification of a Mycobacterium bovis BCG Auxotrophic Mutant That Protects Guinea Pigs against M. bovis and Hematogenous Spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis without Sensitization to Tuberculin

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Mark A.; Williams, Ann; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Whelan, Adam; Hall, Graham; Marsh, Philip D.; Bloom, Barry R.; Jacobs, William R.; Hewinson, R. Glyn

    2000-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the most significant diseases of humans and animals. The only currently available vaccine against this disease is a live, attenuated vaccine, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which was originally derived from Mycobacterium bovis and despite its variable efficacy is the most widely administered vaccine in the world. With the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus-AIDS pandemic concern has been raised over the safety of BCG. Moreover, since BCG sensitizes vaccinated individuals to the tuberculin test, vaccination with BCG prevents diagnosis of infection in vaccinated individuals. Recently, auxotrophic strains of BCG have been generated by insertional mutagenesis which have been shown to be safer than the parent BCG strain following administration to mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease. These strains have also been shown to give comparable protection against intravenous and intratracheal challenge of BALB/c mice with M. tuberculosis relative to conventional BCG. Here we report that one of these mutants, a leucine auxotroph of BCG, conferred significant protection of the lungs and spleens of guinea pigs infected with M. bovis and protection of the spleens of guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis in the absence of a cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction to tuberculin. Therefore, protective immunity to tuberculosis may, at least in part, be achieved without sensitization to the tuberculin skin test. These results indicate that it may be possible to develop a new generation of vaccines based on BCG that are protective, are safe for use in the immunocompromised, and do not preclude the use of the tuberculin skin test in both humans and animals. PMID:11083835

  15. Development of Protective Inflammation and Cell-Mediated Immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans after Exposure to Hyphal Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Bing; Wozniak, Karen L.; Masso-Silva, Jorge; Upadhyay, Srijana; Hole, Camaron; Rivera, Amariliz; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morphological switch is tightly coupled with the pathogenesis of many dimorphic fungal pathogens. Cryptococcus neoformans, the major causative agent of cryptococcal meningitis, mostly presents as the yeast form but is capable of switching to the hyphal form. The filamentous form has long been associated with attenuated virulence, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously identified the master regulator Znf2 that controls the yeast-to-hypha transition in Cryptococcus. Activation of Znf2 promotes hyphal formation and abolishes fungal virulence in vivo. Here we demonstrated that the cryptococcal strain overexpressing ZNF2 elicited strong and yet temporally confined proinflammatory responses in the early stage of infection. In contrast, exacerbated inflammation in mice infected with the wild-type (WT) strain showed that they were unable to control the infection. Animals inoculated with this filamentous Cryptococcus strain had fewer pulmonary eosinophils and CD11c+ CD11b+ cells than animals inoculated with WT yeast. Moreover, mice infected with this strain developed protective Th1- or Th17-type T cell responses. These findings suggest that the virulence attenuation of the filamentous form is likely due to its elicitation of protective host responses. The antivirulence effect of Znf2 was independent of two previously identified factors downstream of Znf2. Interestingly, mucosal immunizations with high doses of ZNF2-overexpressing cells, either in the live or heat-killed form, offered 100% protection to the host from a subsequent challenge with the otherwise lethal clinical strain H99. Our results demonstrate that heat-resistant cellular components presented in cryptococcal cells with activated ZNF2 elicit protective host immune responses. These findings could facilitate future research on novel immunological therapies. PMID:26443458

  16. Sigma-1 receptor agonist PRE084 is protective against mutant huntingtin-induced cell degeneration: involvement of calpastatin and the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hyrskyluoto, A; Pulli, I; Törnqvist, K; Huu Ho, T; Korhonen, L; Lindholm, D

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondria and increased oxidative stress are associated with the disease progression in Huntington's disease (HD). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative damage are linked through the close communication between the ER and mitochondria. Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a chaperone protein in the ER that is involved in ER stress regulation, but little is known about its role in HD or the mechanisms for cell protection. Here we show that the Sig-1R agonist, PRE084 increases cell survival and counteracts the deleterious effects caused by N-terminal mutant huntingtin proteins in neuronal PC6.3 cells. Particularly, PRE084 increased the levels of cellular antioxidants by activating the NF-κB pathway that is compromised by the expression of mutant huntingtin proteins. These results show that the Sig-1R agonist has beneficial effects in models of HD and that compounds affecting the Sig-1R may be promising targets for future drug development in HD. PMID:23703391

  17. Influence of fouling on the efficiency of sacrificial anodes in providing cathodic protection in Southeast Asian tropical seawater.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, D J; Lim, C S; Teo, S L M

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum and zinc based sacrificial anodes are routinely used to provide corrosion protection to metals (typically steel) exposed to seawater, for example in steel pipelines and storage tanks. However, the high fouling rates experienced in South East Asia means that both the anodes and the metals to be protected rapidly become coated with macrofoulers, which could potentially prevent the anodes from being effective. The present study, involving exposure tests of up to 18 months, indicates that both aluminum and zinc sacrificial anodes remain effective even after being completely coated with biofouling. Furthermore, it was easier to remove the biofouling on the cathodically protected samples than on their unprotected counterparts, possibly due to the higher local pH produced by cathodic protection at the metal and seawater interface.

  18. Low-Canopy Seagrass Beds Still Provide Important Coastal Protection Services

    PubMed Central

    Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; van Belzen, Jim; Herman, Peter M. J.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.; Lamers, Leon P. M.; van Leent, Peter J. M.; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most frequently quoted ecosystem services of seagrass meadows is their value for coastal protection. Many studies emphasize the role of above-ground shoots in attenuating waves, enhancing sedimentation and preventing erosion. This raises the question if short-leaved, low density (grazed) seagrass meadows with most of their biomass in belowground tissues can also stabilize sediments. We examined this by combining manipulative field experiments and wave measurements along a typical tropical reef flat where green turtles intensively graze upon the seagrass canopy. We experimentally manipulated wave energy and grazing intensity along a transect perpendicular to the beach, and compared sediment bed level change between vegetated and experimentally created bare plots at three distances from the beach. Our experiments showed that i) even the short-leaved, low-biomass and heavily-grazed seagrass vegetation reduced wave-induced sediment erosion up to threefold, and ii) that erosion was a function of location along the vegetated reef flat. Where other studies stress the importance of the seagrass canopy for shoreline protection, our study on open, low-biomass and heavily grazed seagrass beds strongly suggests that belowground biomass also has a major effect on the immobilization of sediment. These results imply that, compared to shallow unvegetated nearshore reef flats, the presence of a short, low-biomass seagrass meadow maintains a higher bed level, attenuating waves before reaching the beach and hence lowering beach erosion rates. We propose that the sole use of aboveground biomass as a proxy for valuing coastal protection services should be reconsidered. PMID:23723969

  19. Low-canopy seagrass beds still provide important coastal protection services.

    PubMed

    Christianen, Marjolijn J A; van Belzen, Jim; Herman, Peter M J; van Katwijk, Marieke M; Lamers, Leon P M; van Leent, Peter J M; Bouma, Tjeerd J

    2013-01-01

    One of the most frequently quoted ecosystem services of seagrass meadows is their value for coastal protection. Many studies emphasize the role of above-ground shoots in attenuating waves, enhancing sedimentation and preventing erosion. This raises the question if short-leaved, low density (grazed) seagrass meadows with most of their biomass in belowground tissues can also stabilize sediments. We examined this by combining manipulative field experiments and wave measurements along a typical tropical reef flat where green turtles intensively graze upon the seagrass canopy. We experimentally manipulated wave energy and grazing intensity along a transect perpendicular to the beach, and compared sediment bed level change between vegetated and experimentally created bare plots at three distances from the beach. Our experiments showed that i) even the short-leaved, low-biomass and heavily-grazed seagrass vegetation reduced wave-induced sediment erosion up to threefold, and ii) that erosion was a function of location along the vegetated reef flat. Where other studies stress the importance of the seagrass canopy for shoreline protection, our study on open, low-biomass and heavily grazed seagrass beds strongly suggests that belowground biomass also has a major effect on the immobilization of sediment. These results imply that, compared to shallow unvegetated nearshore reef flats, the presence of a short, low-biomass seagrass meadow maintains a higher bed level, attenuating waves before reaching the beach and hence lowering beach erosion rates. We propose that the sole use of aboveground biomass as a proxy for valuing coastal protection services should be reconsidered.

  20. Providing accurate near real-time fire alerts for Protected Areas through NASA FIRMS: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilavajhala, S.; Davies, D.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Wong, M.; Murphy, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) is at the forefront of providing global near real-time (NRT) MODIS thermal anomalies / hotspot location data to end-users . FIRMS serves the data via an interactive Web GIS named Web Fire Mapper, downloads of NRT active fire, archive data downloads for MODIS hotspots dating back to 1999 and a hotspot email alert system The FIRMS Email Alerts system has been successfully alerting users of fires in their area of interest in near real-time and/or via daily and weekly email summaries, with an option to receive MODIS hotspot data as a text file (CSV) attachment. Currently, there are more than 7000 email alert subscriptions from more than 100 countries. Specifically, the email alerts system is designed to generate and send an email alert for any region or area on the globe, with a special focus on providing alerts for protected areas worldwide. For many protected areas, email alerts are particularly useful for early fire detection, monitoring on going fires, as well as allocating resources to protect wildlife and natural resources of particular value. For protected areas, FIRMS uses the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) supplied by United Nations Environment Program - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). Maintaining the most up-to-date, accurate boundary geometry for the protected areas for the email alerts is a challenge as the WDPA is continuously updated due to changing boundaries, merging or delisting of certain protected areas. Because of this dynamic nature of the protected areas database, the FIRMS protected areas database is frequently out-of-date with the most current version of WDPA database. To maintain the most up-to-date boundary information for protected areas and to be in compliance with the WDPA terms and conditions, FIRMS needs to constantly update its database of protected areas. Currently, FIRMS strives to keep its database up to date by downloading the most recent

  1. Differential protection of neuromuscular sensory and motor axons and their endings in Wld(S) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Oyebode, O R O; Hartley, R; Singhota, J; Thomson, D; Ribchester, R R

    2012-01-03

    Orthograde Wallerian degeneration normally brings about fragmentation of peripheral nerve axons and their sensory or motor endings within 24-48 h in mice. However, neuronal expression of the chimaeric, Wld(S) gene mutation extends survival of functioning axons and their distal endings for up to 3 weeks after nerve section. Here we studied the pattern and rate of degeneration of sensory axons and their annulospiral endings in deep lumbrical muscles of Wld(S) mice, and compared these with motor axons and their terminals, using neurone-specific transgenic expression of the fluorescent proteins yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) as morphological reporters. Surprisingly, sensory endings were preserved for up to 20 days, at least twice as long as the most resilient motor nerve terminals. Protection of sensory endings and axons was also much less sensitive to Wld(S) gene-copy number or age than motor axons and their endings. Protection of γ-motor axons and their terminals innervating the juxtaequatorial and polar regions of the spindles was less than sensory axons but greater than α-motor axons. The differences between sensory and motor axon protection persisted in electrically silent, organotypic nerve-explant cultures suggesting that residual axonal activity does not contribute to the sensory-motor axon differences in vivo. Quantitative, Wld(S)-specific immunostaining of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and motor neurones in homozygous Wld(S) mice suggested that the nuclei of large DRG neurones contain about 2.4 times as much Wld(S) protein as motor neurones. By contrast, nuclear fluorescence of DRG neurones in homozygotes was only 1.5 times brighter than in heterozygotes stained under identical conditions. Thus, differences in axonal or synaptic protection within the same Wld(S) mouse may most simply be explained by differences in expression level of Wld(S) protein between neurones. Mimicry of Wld(S)-induced protection may also have

  2. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseolinone; levamisole gives protection.

    PubMed

    Sett, S; Mishra, S K; Siddiqui, K A

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the role of phaseolinone, a phytotoxin produced by Macrophomina phaseolina, in disease initiation, three nontoxigenic avirulent mutants of the fungus were generated by UV-mutagenesis. Two of them were able to initiate infection in germinating Phaseolus mungo seeds only in the presence of phaseolinone. The minimum dose of phaseoli-none required for infection in 30% seedlings was 2 5 mg/ml. A human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus was also able to infect germinating seeds of P. mungo in the presence of 5 mg/ml concentration of phaseolinone. Phaseolinone seemed to facilitate infection by A. fumigatus, which is not normally phytopathogenic, by reducing the immunity of germinating seedlings in a nonspecific way. Levamisole, a non-specific immunopotentiator gave protection against infection induced by A. fumigatus at an optimum dose of 50 mg/ml. Sodium malonate prevented the effects of levamisole.

  3. The effect of T and B lymphocyte depletion on the protection of mice vaccinated with a Gal E mutant of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. A.; Wray, C.; Sojka, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents were used to determine the relative importance of T and B lymphocytes in conferring protection to mice vaccinated with a live gal E mutant of Salmonella typhimurium, strain G30D. Lymphocyte transformation and serum agglutination tests showed that while cyclophosphamide (CPA) suppressed B lymphocytes, antilymphocyte sea (ALS) suppressed both T and B cells. The humoral response of vaccinated animals treated with ALS was therefore supplemented by the i.v. injection of serum from untreated vaccinated mice. CPA-treated mice could not control multiplication of the vaccinal strain which eventually killed them. There was little multiplication of the vaccinal strain in the controls and ALS-treated mice, all of which survived to challenge. The vaccinated controls and vaccinated ALS treated groups each survived infection with the challenge strain which was gradually eliminated. It was concluded that humoral immunity was of greater importance than cellular immunity in mice vaccinated i.p. with strain G30D. PMID:782501

  4. Mucosal Immunization with Vibrio cholerae Outer Membrane Vesicles Provides Maternal Protection Mediated by Antilipopolysaccharide Antibodies That Inhibit Bacterial Motility▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Anne L.; Schild, Stefan; Patimalla, Bharathi; Klein, Brian; Camilli, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of cholera, a severe diarrheal disease that remains endemic in many parts of the world and can cause outbreaks wherever sanitation and clean water systems break down. Prevention of disease could be achieved through improved sanitation and clean water provision supported by vaccination. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is the major cause of cholera; O1 serotypes Inaba and Ogawa have similar disease burdens, while O139 is the only non-O1 serogroup to cause epidemics. We showed previously that immunization of adult female mice with purified V. cholerae outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) elicits an antibody response that protect neonates from oral V. cholerae challenge and that suckling from an immunized dam accounts for the majority of protection from V. cholerae colonization. Here we report that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major OMV protective antigen. Mucosal immunization with OMVs from Inaba or Ogawa provides significant cross-serotype protection from V. cholerae colonization, although serotype-specific antigens are dominant. OMVs from O1 or O139 do not provide cross-serogroup protection, but by immunization with a mixture of O1 and O139 OMVs, cross-serogroup protection was achieved. Neonatal protection is not associated with significant bacterial death but may involve inhibition of motility, as antibodies from OMV-immunized mice inhibit V. cholerae motility in vitro, with trends that parallel in vivo protection. Motility assays also reveal that a higher antibody titer is required to immobilize O139 compared to O1, a phenotype that is O139 capsule dependent. PMID:20679439

  5. The impact of state laws protecting abortion clinics and reproductive rights on crimes against abortion providers: deterrence, backlash, or neither?

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex; Freilich, Joshua D

    2007-12-01

    Since Roe v. Wade, most states have passed laws either restricting or further protecting reproductive rights. During a wave of anti-abortion violence in the early 1990s, several states also enacted legislation protecting abortion clinics, staff, and patients. One hypothesis drawn from the theoretical literature predicts that these laws provide a deterrent effect and thus fewer anti-abortion crimes in states that protect clinics and reproductive rights. An alternative hypothesis drawn from the literature expects a backlash effect from radical members of the movement and thus more crimes in states with protective legislation. We tested these competing hypotheses by taking advantage of unique data sets that gauge the strength of laws protecting clinics and reproductive rights and that provide self-report victimization data from clinics. Employing logistic regression and controlling for several potential covariates, we found null effects and thus no support for either hypothesis. The null findings were consistent across a number of different types of victimization. Our discussion contextualizes these results in terms of previous research on crimes against abortion providers, discusses alternative explanations for the null findings, and considers the implications for future policy development and research.

  6. Perioperative Lung Protection Provided by High-Dose Ambroxol in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Huayong; Zhang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    The purpose is to observe the clinical effect of large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride in lung protection during the perioperative period of lung cancer operation. Fifty-six lung cancer patients who have undergone open-thoracic pulmonary lobectomy were divided randomly into two groups, and were given normal and large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride, respectively, during their perioperative period. Statistics based on post-operation clinical observations were analyzed in terms of ease of expectoration and expectoration properties, duration of antibiotics dependence, occurrence of lung complications, and adverse reactions related to ambroxol hydrochloride. On the third and the seventh day, the experimental group showed signs of improvement in terms of ease of expectoration and expectoration properties, compared with the controlled group. In terms of occurrence of post-operation lung complications and duration of antibiotics dependence, the experimental group also performed better. Using large doses of ambroxol hydrochloride would result in better clinical effects than using normal doses in preventing post-operation complications, and its clinical value in lung protection during lung cancer perioperative period calls for further research and promotion.

  7. ATP-sensitive K+ channel activation provides transient protection to the anoxic turtle brain.

    PubMed

    Pék-Scott, M; Lutz, P L

    1998-12-01

    There is wide speculation that ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels serve a protective function in the mammalian brain, being activated during periods of energy failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if KATP channels also have a protective role in the anoxia-tolerant turtle brain. After ouabain administration, rates of change in extracellular K+ were measured in the telencephalon of normoxic and anoxic turtles (Trachemys scripta). The rate of K+ efflux was reduced by 50% within 1 h of anoxia and by 70% at 2 h of anoxia, and no further decrease was seen at 4 h of anoxia. The addition of the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide or 2,3-butanedione monoxime prevented the anoxia-induced decrease in K+ efflux during the first hour of anoxia, but the effect of these blockers was diminished at 2 h of anoxia and was not seen after 4 h of anoxia. This pattern of change in KATP channel blocker sensitivity can be related to a previously established temporary fall and subsequent recovery of tissue ATP during early anoxia. We suggest that activated KATP channels are involved in the downregulation of membrane ion permeability (channel arrest) during the initial energy crisis period but are switched off when the full anoxic state is established and tissue ATP levels have been restored. We also found that, in contrast to those in mammals, KATP channels are not a major route for K+ efflux in the energy-depleted turtle brain.

  8. Ischemic postconditioning provides protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Weiwei; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shanwei; Yan, Aili; Nie, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ischemic postconditioning (IPOST) against intestine ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation group (S), I/R group (I/R), ischemic preconditioning group (IPC), ischemic postconditioning group (IPOST). After reperfusion, small intestines were resected for histopathologic evaluations. To evaluate DNA fragmentation, resolving agarose gel electrophoresis was performed. To measure cellular apoptotic rates in intestine tissues, we performed TUNEL staining. To examine lipid peroxidation, production of superoxide radicals and tissue neutrophil infiltration, we tested the content of malondialdehyde and activities of superoxidase dismutase and myeloperoxidase in intestine tissues, respectively. Under light microscope, intestinal mucosal impairment in IPOST and IPC groups was found milder than that in I/R group (P < 0.05). The number of apoptosis cells in I/R group was significantly higher than that in IPOST and IPC groups (P < 0.05). The content of malondialdehyde and activity of myeloperoxidase were significantly reduced in IPOST group and IPC group compared with I/R group, but the activity of superoxidase dismutase in IPOST group and IPC group was enhanced compared with I/R group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that IPOST results in protection against intestine I/R injury, which may be related to reduced production of reactive oxygen species, enhanced activities of antioxidant systems and inhibited apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells.

  9. Striatal grafts provide sustained protection from kainic and quinolinic acid-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N; Luo, S Q; Allen, G S; Whetsell, W O

    1988-12-01

    Grafts of neonatal striatal tissue were placed into the striata of adult rats. When challenged immediately with intrastriatal injections of either kainic or quinolinic acid, excitotoxic damage was prevented. Thirty days later these same graft recipients received another injection of excitotoxin. The intrastriatal grafts continued to mitigate toxin-induced damage. It is hypothesized that the grafted cells not only survive, but that they may continue to elaborate some substance or substances that prevent excitotoxin-induced injury for at least 30 days. Previous investigations indicated that grafts of neonatal striatal tissue can protect the recipient striatum from kainic acid toxicity. In the following study it is demonstrated that such grafts also protect the striatum from quinolinic acid, an endogenous excitotoxin which induces kainate-like neuronal degeneration and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. It is postulated that the salutary effect of striatal grafting may be sufficiently long lasting to mitigate a chronic toxic insult. Such grafting may therefore represent a therapy for Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in which an endogenous or exogenous toxin has been implicated as the pathogenetic agent.

  10. Vaccination with self-adjuvanted protein nanoparticles provides protection against lethal influenza challenge.

    PubMed

    Karch, Christopher P; Li, Jianping; Kulangara, Caroline; Paulillo, Sara M; Raman, Senthil K; Emadi, Sharareh; Tan, Anmin; Helal, Zeinab H; Fan, Qing; Khan, Mazhar I; Burkhard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines should be improved by the addition of universal influenza vaccine antigens in order to protect against multiple virus strains. We used our self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs) to display the two conserved influenza antigens M2e and Helix C in their native oligomerization states. To further improve the immunogenicity of the SAPNs, we designed and incorporated the TLR5 agonist flagellin into the SAPNs to generate self-adjuvanted SAPNs. We demonstrate that addition of flagellin does not affect the ability of SAPNs to self-assemble and that they are able to stimulate TLR5 in a dose-dependent manner. Chickens vaccinated with the self-adjuvanted SAPNs induce significantly higher levels of antibodies than those with unadjuvanted SAPNs and show higher cross-neutralizing activity compared to a commercial inactivated virus vaccine. Upon immunization with self-adjuvanted SAPNs, mice were completely protected against a lethal challenge. Thus, we have generated a self-adjuvanted SAPN with a great potential as a universal influenza vaccine.

  11. Microencapsulation of aspartame by double emulsion followed by complex coacervation to provide protection and prolong sweetness.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Selmi, Glaucia A; Bozza, Fernanda T; Thomazini, Marcelo; Bolini, Helena M A; Fávaro-Trindade, Carmen S

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this work was to microencapsulate aspartame by double emulsion followed by complex coacervation, aiming to protect it and control its release. Six treatments were prepared using sunflower oil to prepare the primary emulsion and gelatin and gum Arabic as the wall materials. The microcapsules were evaluated structurally with respect to their sorption isotherms and release into water (36°C and 80°C). The microcapsules were multinucleated, not very water-soluble or hygroscopic and showed reduced rates of equilibrium moisture content and release at both temperatures. FTIR confirmed complexation between the wall materials and the intact nature of aspartame. The results indicated it was possible to encapsulate aspartame with the techniques employed and that these protected the sweetener even at 80°C. The reduced solubility and low release rates indicated the enormous potential of the vehicle developed in controlling the release of the aspartame into the food, thus prolonging its sweetness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HACE1-dependent protein degradation provides cardiac protection in response to haemodynamic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liyong; Chen, Xin; Sharma, Parveen; Moon, Mark; Sheftel, Alex D.; Dawood, Fayez; Nghiem, Mai P.; Wu, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Penninger, Josef M.; Brumell, John H.; Liu, Peter P.

    2014-03-01

    The HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is a tumour suppressor known to regulate Rac1 activity under stress conditions. HACE1 is increased in the serum of patients with heart failure. Here we show that HACE1 protects the heart under pressure stress by controlling protein degradation. Hace1 deficiency in mice results in accelerated heart failure and increased mortality under haemodynamic stress. Hearts from Hace1-/- mice display abnormal cardiac hypertrophy, left ventricular dysfunction, accumulation of LC3, p62 and ubiquitinated proteins enriched for cytoskeletal species, indicating impaired autophagy. Our data suggest that HACE1 mediates p62-dependent selective autophagic turnover of ubiquitinated proteins by its ankyrin repeat domain through protein-protein interaction, which is independent of its E3 ligase activity. This would classify HACE1 as a dual-function E3 ligase. Our finding that HACE1 has a protective function in the heart in response to haemodynamic stress suggests that HACE1 may be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease.

  13. Protective effects of recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin type C mutant vaccine against experimental bovine infection by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Byoung Sun; Moon, Jin San; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Young-In; Lee, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Jong-Duk; Lee, Byung-Saeng; Koo, Hye Cheong; Park, Yong Ho

    2008-04-16

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiological agents of bovine mastitis; however, antibiotics that are effective against bovine strains of S. aureus are not currently available. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type C (SEC), a superantigen, is the enterotoxin most frequently expressed by bovine strains of S. aureus and one of immunogenic determinants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protective effectiveness of recombinant SEC mutant vaccine (MastaVactrade mark) against experimentally induced bovine infection. Three representative SEC secreting strains were selected from 9 candidate isolates that showed various intensities of pathogenicity on mice and inoculated into 5 lactating dairy cattle at a concentration of 50-5.0x10(8) CFU per quarter. The optimal experimental bovine subclinical mastitis model was produced by inoculation with 50 CFU of S. aureus 409 per quarter, a level which was not lethal to mice. After the experimental model was determined, other 3 cattle were intramuscularly administered three doses of vaccine at day 0, at 2 wks and at 6 wks. Nine quarters of 3 vaccinated cattle and 8 quarters of 3 control cattle were then challenged with S. aureus 409. An SEC-specific ELISA test conducted at 4 wks post-immunization confirmed the presence of a high antibody titer against SEC in all vaccinated cattle. The somatic cell counts from the vaccinated group remained relatively low, whereas those of control group increased significantly after challenge with S. aureus. After challenge, S. aureus was not isolated from any cattle in the vaccinated group, whereas it was isolated from 75% of the cattle in the control group. These results indicate that recombinant SEC mutant vaccine had a protective effect against S. aureus intramammary infection in lactating cattle.

  14. Oil and water? Lessons from Maryland's effort to protect safety net providers in moving to Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Gold, M; Mittler, J; Lyons, B

    2000-12-01

    Studies have highlighted the tensions that can arise between Medicaid managed care organizations and safety net providers. This article seeks to identify what other states can learn from Maryland's effort to include protections for safety net providers in its Medicaid managed care program--HealthChoice. Under HealthChoice, traditional provider systems can sponsor managed care organizations, historical providers are assured of having a role, patients can self-refer and have open access to certain public health providers, and capitation rates are risk adjusted through the use of adjusted clinical groups and claims data. The article is based on a week-long site visit to Maryland in fall 1998 that was one part of a seven-state study. Maryland's experience suggests that states have much to gain in the way of "good" public policy by considering the impact of their Medicaid managed care programs on the safety net, but states should not underestimate the challenges involved in balancing the need to protect the safety net with the need to contain costs and minimize the administrative burden on providers. No amount of protection can compensate for a poorly designed or implemented program. As the health care environment continues to change, so may the need for and the types of protections change. It also may be most difficult to guarantee adequate protections to those who need it most--among relatively financially insecure providers that have a limited management infrastructure and that depend heavily on Medicaid and the state for funds to care for the uninsured.

  15. Spermatogenesis-defective (spe) Mutants of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans Provide Clues to Solve the Puzzle of Male Germline Functions during Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; L’Hernault, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    In most species, each sex produces gametes, usually either sperm or oocytes, from its germline during gametogenesis. The sperm and oocyte subsequently fuse together during fertilization to create the next generation. This review focuses on spermatogenesis and the roles of sperm during fertilization in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where suitable mutants are readily obtained. So far 186 mutants defective in the C. elegans male germline functions have been isolated, and many of these mutations are alleles for one of the ~60 spermatogenesis-defective (spe) genes. Many cloned spe genes are expressed specifically in the male germline, where they play roles during spermatogenesis (spermatid production), spermiogenesis (spermatid activation into spermatozoa), and/or fertilization. Moreover, several spe genes are orthologs of mammalian genes, suggesting that the reproductive processes of the C. elegans and the mammalian male germlines might share common pathways at the molecular level. PMID:20419782

  16. Formulation of a mmaA4 Gene Deletion Mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in Cationic Liposomes Significantly Enhances Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, Steven C.; Dao, Dee; Yang, Amy; Kolibab, Kris; Jacobs, William R.; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2012-01-01

    A new vaccination strategy is urgently needed for improved control of the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. Using a mouse aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge model, we investigated the protective efficacy of a mmaA4 gene deletion mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (ΔmmaA4BCG) formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA) – D(+) trehalose 6,6 dibenenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant. In previous studies, deletion of the mmaA4 gene was shown to reduce the suppression of IL-12 production often seen after mycobacterial infections. While the non-adjuvanted ΔmmaA4BCG strain did not protect mice substantially better than conventional BCG against a tuberculous challenge in four protection experiments, the protective responses induced by the ΔmmaA4BCG vaccine formulated in DDA/TDB adjuvant was consistently increased relative to nonadjuvanted BCG controls. Furthermore, the ΔmmaA4BCG-DDA/TDB vaccine induced significantly higher frequencies of multifunctional (MFT) CD4 T cells expressing both IFNγ and TNFα (double positive) or IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 (triple positive) than CD4 T cells derived from mice vaccinated with BCG. These MFT cells were characterized by having higher IFNγ and TNFα median fluorescence intensity (MFI) values than monofunctional CD4 T cells. Interestingly, both BCG/adjuvant and ΔmmaA4BCG/adjuvant formulations induced significantly higher frequencies of CD4 T cells expressing TNFα and IL-2 than nonadjuvanted BCG or ΔmmaA4BCG vaccines indicating that BCG/adjuvant mixtures may be more effective at inducing central memory T cells. Importantly, when either conventional BCG or the mutant were formulated in adjuvant and administered to SCID mice or immunocompromised mice depleted of IFNγ, significantly lower vaccine-derived mycobacterial CFU were detected relative to immunodeficient mice injected with non-adjuvanted BCG. Overall, these data suggest that immunization with the ΔmmaA4BCG/adjuvant formulation may be an effective, safe

  17. ATG5-knockout mutants of Physcomitrella provide a platform for analyzing the involvement of autophagy in senescence processes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Mukae, Kyosuke; Inoue, Yuko; Moriyasu, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a pathway in which a cell degrades part of its cytoplasm in vacuoles or lysosomes. To identify the physiological functions of autophagy in plants, we disrupted ATG5, an autophagy-related gene, in Physcomitrella, and confirmed that atg5 mutants are deficient in the process of autophagy. On carbon or nitrogen starvation medium, atg5 colonies turned yellow earlier than the wild-type (WT) colonies, showing that Physcomitrella atg5 mutants, like yeast and Arabidopsis, are sensitive to nutrient starvation. In the dark, even under nutrient-sufficient conditions, colonies turned yellow and the net degradation of chlorophyll and Rubisco protein occurred together with the upregulation of several senescence-associated genes. Yellowing reactions were inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, suggesting that protonemal colonies undergo dark-induced senescence like the green leaves of higher plants. Such senescence responses in the dark occurred earlier in atg5 colonies than WT colonies. The sugar content was almost the same between WT and atg5 colonies, indicating that the early-senescence phenotype of atg5 is not explained by sugar deficiency. However, the levels of 7 amino acids showed significantly different alteration between atg5 and WT in the dark: 6 amino acids, particularly arginine and alanine, were much more deficient in the atg5 mutants, irrespective of the early degradation of Rubisco protein. On nutrient-sufficient medium supplemented with casamino acids, the early-senescence phenotype was slightly moderated. We propose that the early-senescence phenotype in atg5 mutants is partly explained by amino acid imbalance because of the lack of cytoplasmic degradation by autophagy in Physcomitrella.

  18. High-resolution structures of Neotermes koshunensis β-glucosidase mutants provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and the synthesis of glucoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Wen-Yih; Wang, Nai-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Tse; Chang, Wei-Jung; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-07-01

    NkBgl, a β-glucosidase from Neotermes koshunensis, is a β-retaining glycosyl hydrolase family 1 enzyme that cleaves β-glucosidic linkages in disaccharide or glucose-substituted molecules. β-Glucosidases have been widely used in several applications. For example, mutagenesis of the attacking nucleophile in β-glucosidase has been conducted to convert it into a glycosynthase for the synthesis of oligosaccharides. Here, several high-resolution structures of wild-type or mutated NkBgl in complex with different ligand molecules are reported. In the wild-type NkBgl structures it was found that glucose-like glucosidase inhibitors bind to the glycone-binding pocket, allowing the buffer molecule HEPES to remain in the aglycone-binding pocket. In the crystal structures of NkBgl E193A, E193S and E193D mutants Glu193 not only acts as the catalytic acid/base but also plays an important role in controlling substrate entry and product release. Furthermore, in crystal structures of the NkBgl E193D mutant it was found that new glucoconjugates were generated by the conjugation of glucose (hydrolyzed product) and HEPES/EPPS/opipramol (buffer components). Based on the wild-type and E193D-mutant structures of NkBgl, the glucosidic bond of cellobiose or salicin was hydrolyzed and a new bond was subsequently formed between glucose and HEPES/EPPS/opipramol to generate new glucopyranosidic products through the transglycosylation reaction in the NkBgl E193D mutant. This finding highlights an innovative way to further improve β-glucosidases for the enzymatic synthesis of oligosaccharides.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2–4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (<10x), cell surface expression (20x) and chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD–exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27935997

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Targeted Subunit Toxins Provide a New Approach to Rescue Misfolded Mutant Proteins and Revert Cell Models of Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Humaira; Zhang, Zhenbo; Park, Hyun-Joo; Tailor, Chetankumar; Che, Clare; Kamani, Mustafa; Spitalny, George; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Many germ line diseases stem from a relatively minor disturbance in mutant protein endoplasmic reticulum (ER) 3D assembly. Chaperones are recruited which, on failure to correct folding, sort the mutant for retrotranslocation and cytosolic proteasomal degradation (ER-associated degradation-ERAD), to initiate/exacerbate deficiency-disease symptoms. Several bacterial (and plant) subunit toxins, retrograde transport to the ER after initial cell surface receptor binding/internalization. The A subunit has evolved to mimic a misfolded protein and hijack the ERAD membrane translocon (dislocon), to effect cytosolic access and cytopathology. We show such toxins compete for ERAD to rescue endogenous misfolded proteins. Cholera toxin or verotoxin (Shiga toxin) containing genetically inactivated (± an N-terminal polyleucine tail) A subunit can, within 2-4 hrs, temporarily increase F508delCFTR protein, the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutant (5-10x), F508delCFTR Golgi maturation (<10x), cell surface expression (20x) and chloride transport (2x) in F508del CFTR transfected cells and patient-derived F508delCFTR bronchiolar epithelia, without apparent cytopathology. These toxoids also increase glucocerobrosidase (GCC) in N370SGCC Gaucher Disease fibroblasts (3x), another ERAD-exacerbated misfiling disease. We identify a new, potentially benign approach to the treatment of certain genetic protein misfolding diseases.

  1. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Matthew R; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Kondur, Hema R; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J; Haworth, Kevin G; Decker, Julie M; Alpert, Michael D; Bailey, Charles C; Neale, Ernest S; Fellinger, Christoph H; Joshi, Vinita R; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Martinez-Navio, Jose M; Quinlan, Brian D; Yao, Annie Y; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Burton, Dennis R; Kwong, Peter D; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Evans, David T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M; Seaman, Michael S; Farzan, Michael

    2015-03-05

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). However, even the best bNAbs neutralize 10-50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (80% inhibitory concentration (IC80) > 5 μg ml(-1)), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) < 0.05 μg ml(-1)). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46 and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17-77 μg ml(-1) of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for more than 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from several infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well-characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  2. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Matthew R.; Kattenhorn, Lisa M.; Kondur, Hema R.; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Decker, Julie M.; Alpert, Michael D.; Bailey, Charles C.; Neale, Ernest S.; Fellinger, Christoph H.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, Jose M.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Yao, Annie Y.; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Burton, Dennis R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Evans, David T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs)1,2. However even the best bNAbs neutralize 10–50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (IC80 > 5 μg/ml), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection3–6. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean IC50 < 0.05 μg/ml). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46, and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17 to 77 μg/ml of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from multiple infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25707797

  3. Would protecting tropical forest fragments provide carbon and biodiversity cobenefits under REDD+?

    PubMed

    Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, William F; Martins, Sebastião V; Meira-Neto, João Augusto A; Simonelli, Marcelo; Edwards, David P

    2015-09-01

    Tropical forests store vast amounts of carbon and are the most biodiverse terrestrial habitats, yet they are being converted and degraded at alarming rates. Given global shortfalls in the budgets required to prevent carbon and biodiversity loss, we need to seek solutions that simultaneously address both issues. Of particular interest are carbon-based payments under the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism to also conserve biodiversity at no additional cost. One potential is for REDD+ to protect forest fragments, especially within biomes where contiguous forest cover has diminished dramatically, but we require empirical tests of the strength of any carbon and biodiversity cobenefits in such fragmented systems. Using the globally threatened Atlantic Forest landscape, we measured above-ground carbon stocks within forest fragments spanning 13 to 23 442 ha in area and with different degrees of isolation. We related these stocks to tree community structure and to the richness and abundance of endemic and IUCN Red-listed species. We found that increasing fragment size has a positive relationship with above-ground carbon stock and with abundance of IUCN Red-listed species and tree community structure. We also found negative relationships between distance from large forest block and tree community structure, endemic species richness and abundance, and IUCN Red-listed species abundance. These resulted in positive congruence between carbon stocks and Red-listed species, and the abundance and richness of endemic species, demonstrating vital cobenefits. As such, protecting forest fragments in hotspots of biodiversity, particularly larger fragments and those closest to sources, offers important carbon and biodiversity cobenefits. More generally, our results suggest that macroscale models of cobenefits under REDD+ have likely overlooked key benefits at small scales, indicating the necessity to apply models that include finer

  4. Small Marine Protected Areas in Fiji Provide Refuge for Reef Fish Assemblages, Feeding Groups, and Corals

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mathias M.; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hay, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs is a common management strategy for conserving the diversity, abundance, and biomass of reef organisms. Generally, well-managed and enforced MPAs can increase or maintain the diversity and function of the enclosed coral reef, with some of the benefits extending to adjacent non-protected reefs. A fundamental question in coral reef conservation is whether these benefits arise within small MPAs (<1 km2), because larval input of reef organisms is largely decoupled from local adult reproduction. We examined the structure of fish assemblages, composition of fish feeding groups, benthic cover, and key ecosystem processes (grazing, macroalgal browsing, and coral replenishment) in three small (0.5–0.8 km2) no-take MPAs and adjacent areas where fisheries are allowed (non-MPAs) on coral reefs in Fiji. The MPAs exhibited greater species richness, density, and biomass of fishes than non-MPAs. Furthermore, MPAs contained a greater abundance and biomass of grazing herbivores and piscivores as well as a greater abundance of cleaners than fished areas. We also found differences in fish associations when foraging, with feeding groups being generally more diverse and having greater biomass within MPAs than adjacent non-MPAs. Grazing by parrotfishes was 3–6 times greater, and macroalgal browsing was 3–5 times greater in MPAs than in non-MPAs. On average, MPAs had 260–280% as much coral cover and only 5–25% as much macroalgal cover as their paired non-MPA sites. Finally, two of the three MPAs had three-fold more coral recruits than adjacent non-MPAs. The results of this study indicate that small MPAs benefit not only populations of reef fishes, but also enhance ecosystem processes that are critical to reef resilience within the MPAs. PMID:28122006

  5. Does User Fee Removal Policy Provide Financial Protection from Catastrophic Health Care Payments? Evidence from Zambia.

    PubMed

    Masiye, Felix; Kaonga, Oliver; Kirigia, Joses M

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-pocket payments in health care have been shown to impose significant burden on households in Sub-Saharan Africa, leading to constrained access to health care and impoverishment. In an effort to reduce the financial burden imposed on households by user fees, some countries in Sub-Saharan Africa have abolished user fees in the health sector. Zambia is one of few countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to abolish user fees in primary health care facilities with a view to alleviating financial burden of out-of-pocket payments among the poor. The main aim of this paper was to examine the extent and patterns of financial protection from fees following the decision to abolish user fees in public primary health facilities. Our analysis is based on a nationally representative health expenditure and utilization survey conducted in 2014. We calculated the incidence and intensity of catastrophic health expenditure based on households' out-of-pocket payments during a visit as a percentage of total household consumption expenditure. We further show the intensity of the problem of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) experienced by households. Our analysis show that following the removal of user fees, a majority of patients who visited public health facilities benefitted from free care at the point of use. Further, seeking care at public primary health facilities is associated with a reduced likelihood of incurring CHE after controlling for economic wellbeing and other covariates. However, 10% of households are shown to suffer financial catastrophe as a result of out-of-pocket payments. Further, there is considerable inequality in the incidence of CHE whereby the poorest expenditure quintile experienced a much higher incidence. Despite the removal of user fees at primary health care level, CHE is high among the poorest sections of the population. This study also shows that cost of transportation is mainly responsible for limiting the protective effectiveness of user fee removal

  6. Small Marine Protected Areas in Fiji Provide Refuge for Reef Fish Assemblages, Feeding Groups, and Corals.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, Roberta M; Pires, Mathias M; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Hoey, Andrew S; Hay, Mark E

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs is a common management strategy for conserving the diversity, abundance, and biomass of reef organisms. Generally, well-managed and enforced MPAs can increase or maintain the diversity and function of the enclosed coral reef, with some of the benefits extending to adjacent non-protected reefs. A fundamental question in coral reef conservation is whether these benefits arise within small MPAs (<1 km2), because larval input of reef organisms is largely decoupled from local adult reproduction. We examined the structure of fish assemblages, composition of fish feeding groups, benthic cover, and key ecosystem processes (grazing, macroalgal browsing, and coral replenishment) in three small (0.5-0.8 km2) no-take MPAs and adjacent areas where fisheries are allowed (non-MPAs) on coral reefs in Fiji. The MPAs exhibited greater species richness, density, and biomass of fishes than non-MPAs. Furthermore, MPAs contained a greater abundance and biomass of grazing herbivores and piscivores as well as a greater abundance of cleaners than fished areas. We also found differences in fish associations when foraging, with feeding groups being generally more diverse and having greater biomass within MPAs than adjacent non-MPAs. Grazing by parrotfishes was 3-6 times greater, and macroalgal browsing was 3-5 times greater in MPAs than in non-MPAs. On average, MPAs had 260-280% as much coral cover and only 5-25% as much macroalgal cover as their paired non-MPA sites. Finally, two of the three MPAs had three-fold more coral recruits than adjacent non-MPAs. The results of this study indicate that small MPAs benefit not only populations of reef fishes, but also enhance ecosystem processes that are critical to reef resilience within the MPAs.

  7. Carbon based secondary compounds do not provide protection against heavy metal road pollutants in epiphytic macrolichens.

    PubMed

    Gauslaa, Yngvar; Yemets, Olena A; Asplund, Johan; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2016-01-15

    Lichens are useful monitoring organisms for heavy metal pollution. They are high in carbon based secondary compounds (CBSCs) among which some may chelate heavy metals and thus increase metal accumulation. This study quantifies CBSCs in four epiphytic lichens transplanted for 6months on stands along transects from a highway in southern Norway to search for relationships between concentrations of heavy metals and CBSCs along a gradient in heavy metal pollutants. Viability parameters and concentrations of 21 elements including nutrients and heavy metals in these lichen samples were reported in a separate paper. Medullary CBSCs in fruticose lichens (Ramalina farinacea, Usnea dasypoga) were reduced in the most polluted sites, but not in foliose ones (Parmelia sulcata, Lobaria pulmonaria), whereas cortical CBSC did not change with distance from the road in any species. Strong positive correlations only occurred between the major medullary compound stictic acid present in L. pulmonaria and most heavy metals, consistent with a chelating role of stictic acid, but not of other studied CBSCs or in other species. However, heavy metal chelating did not protect L. pulmonaria against damage because this species experienced the strongest reduction in viability in the polluted sites. CBSCs with an accumulation potential for heavy metals should be quantified in lichen biomonitoring studies of heavy metals because they, like stictic acid, could overshadow pollutant inputs in some species rendering biomonitoring data less useful. In the two fruticose lichen species, CBSCs decreased with increasing heavy metal concentration, probably because heavy metal exposure impaired secondary metabolism. Thus, we found no support for a heavy metal protection role of any CBSCs in studied epiphytic lichens. No intraspecific relationships occurred between CBSCs versus N or C/N-ratio. Interspecifically, medullary CBSCs decreased and cortical CBSCs increased with increasing C/N-ratio. Copyright © 2015

  8. Does User Fee Removal Policy Provide Financial Protection from Catastrophic Health Care Payments? Evidence from Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Masiye, Felix; Kaonga, Oliver; Kirigia, Joses M

    2016-01-01

    Background Out-of-pocket payments in health care have been shown to impose significant burden on households in Sub-Saharan Africa, leading to constrained access to health care and impoverishment. In an effort to reduce the financial burden imposed on households by user fees, some countries in Sub-Saharan Africa have abolished user fees in the health sector. Zambia is one of few countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to abolish user fees in primary health care facilities with a view to alleviating financial burden of out-of-pocket payments among the poor. The main aim of this paper was to examine the extent and patterns of financial protection from fees following the decision to abolish user fees in public primary health facilities. Methods Our analysis is based on a nationally representative health expenditure and utilization survey conducted in 2014. We calculated the incidence and intensity of catastrophic health expenditure based on households’ out-of-pocket payments during a visit as a percentage of total household consumption expenditure. We further show the intensity of the problem of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) experienced by households. Results Our analysis show that following the removal of user fees, a majority of patients who visited public health facilities benefitted from free care at the point of use. Further, seeking care at public primary health facilities is associated with a reduced likelihood of incurring CHE after controlling for economic wellbeing and other covariates. However, 10% of households are shown to suffer financial catastrophe as a result of out-of-pocket payments. Further, there is considerable inequality in the incidence of CHE whereby the poorest expenditure quintile experienced a much higher incidence. Conclusion Despite the removal of user fees at primary health care level, CHE is high among the poorest sections of the population. This study also shows that cost of transportation is mainly responsible for limiting the

  9. Fish oil provides protection against the oxidative stress in pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nejm, Mariana B; Haidar, André A; Marques, Márcia J G; Hirata, Aparecida E; Nogueira, Fernando N; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Scorza, Fulvio A; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo

    2015-08-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of epilepsy is often resistant to pharmacological treatment. Neuronal loss observed in epileptic brain may be result of an overproduction of free radicals (oxidative stress). Oxidative stress is characterized by an imbalance between antioxidant defenses and oxidizing agents (free radicals), which can lead to tissue injury. The n-3 PUFAs are important for the development and maintenance of central nervous system functions. Research by our group has shown that chronic treatment with fish oil, immediately after status epilepticus (SE), exhibits both neuroprotective effects and effects on neuroplasticity. The main purpose of this research was to evaluate if fish oil exhibits a protective effect against oxidative stress. Animals were subjected to TLE model by pilocarpine administration. After 3 h of SE they were randomly divided into the following groups: control animals treated daily with vehicle or with 85 mg/kg of fish oil and animals with epilepsy treated daily with vehicle or with 85 mg/kg of fish oil. After 90 days, superoxide anion production, enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and protein expression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits (p47(PHOX) and gp91(PHOX)) were analyzed. Our results showed evidences that reactive oxygen species are increased in animals with epilepsy and that fish oil supplementation could counteract it. Fish oil supplementation promoted protection against oxidative stress by multiple ways, which involved the reduction of activity and expression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits and increased the activity and expression of antioxidants enzymes, contributing to well-known neuroprotective effect in epilepsy.

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid provides cerebrovascular protection from oxidant damage in salt-loaded stroke-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Niwa, Atsuko; Tabuchi, Masaki; Ooshima, Kana; Higashino, Hideaki

    2008-03-26

    Inflammatory processes may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular injury in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Recent reports revealed that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) has anti-oxidative properties and elicits nitric oxide release by a direct activation of the endothelial NO synthase. The present study was designed to determine whether low-dose aspirin might prevent cerebrovascular injury in salt-loaded SHRSP by protecting oxidative damage. Nine-week-old SHRSP were fed a 0.4% NaCl or a 4% NaCl diet with or without treatment by naproxen (20 mg/kg/day), salicylic acid (5 mg/kg/day), or aspirin (5 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks. Blood pressure, blood brain barrier impairment, mortality, and the parameters of cerebrovascular inflammation and damage were compared among them. High salt intake in SHRSP significantly increased blood brain barrier impairment and early mortality, which were suppressed by treatment with aspirin independent of changes in blood pressure. Salt loading significantly increased superoxide production in basilar arteries of SHRSP, which were significantly suppressed by treatment with aspirin. Salt loading also significantly decreased NOS activity in the basilar arteries of SHRSP, which were significantly improved by treatment with aspirin. At 5 weeks after salt loading, macrophage accumulation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity at the stroke-negative area in cerebral cortex of SHRSP were significantly reduced by treatment with aspirin. These results suggest that low-dose aspirin may exert protective effects against cerebrovascular inflammation and damage by salt loading through down-regulation of superoxide production and induction of nitric oxide synthesis.

  11. TELMISARATAN PROVIDES BETTER RENAL PROTECTION THAN VALSARTAN IN A RAT MODEL OF METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Hye; Imig, John D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotension receptor blockers (ARB), telmisartan and valsartan were compared for renal protection in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) fed high fat diet. We hypothesized that in cardiometabolic syndrome, telmisartan an ARB with PPAR-γ activity will offer better renal protection. METHODS SHR were fed either normal (SHR-NF, 7% fat) or high fat (SHR-HF, 36% fat) diet and treated with an ARB for 10 weeks. RESULTS Blood pressure was similar between SHR-NF (190±3 mmHg) and SHR-HF (192±4 mmHg) at the end of the 10 week period. Telmisartan and valsartan decreased blood pressure to similar extents in SHR-NF and SHR-HF groups. Body weight was significantly higher in SHR-HF (368±5g) compared to SHR-NF (328±7g). Telmisartan but not valsartan significantly reduced the body weight gain in SHR-HF. Telmisartan was also more effective than valsartan in improving glycemic and lipid status in SHR-HF. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), an inflammatory marker, was higher in SHR-HF (24±2 ng/d) compared to SHR-NF (14±5 ng/d). Telmisartan reduced MCP-1 excretion in both SHR-HF and SHR-NF to a greater extent than valsartan. An indicator of renal injury, urinary albumin excretion increased to 85±8 mg/d in SHR-HF compared to 54±9 mg/d in SHR-NF. Telmisartan (23±5 mg/d) was more effective than valsartan (45±3 mg/d) in lowering urinary albumin excretion in SHR-HF. Moreover, telmisartan reduced glomerular damage to a greater extent than valsartan in the SHR-HF. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our data demonstrate that telmisartan was more effective than valsartan in reducing body weight gain, renal inflammation, and renal injury in a rat model of cardiometabolic syndrome. PMID:21415842

  12. Validation of protection provided by one brand of filtering facepiece respirator

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, John Rose

    1995-05-01

    A previous laboratory study of a widely used disposable dust / mist (D/M) respirator (3M™8710) utilized a challenge agent that had high penetration values for D/M filter media. Therefore, measured protection factors (PFs) reflected both filter and faceseal penetration, and would be lower than that expected for faceseal penetration only. The purpose of this study was to determine a PF for this brand of disposable D/M respirator using a challenge agent that has low filter penetration for this type of filter. Methodology involved qualitatively (QLFT) and quantitatively (QNFT) fit testing 15 males and 15 females while wearing the respirator. One QLFT was done per subject using the saccharin method. Three QNFTs were performed on each subject utilizing a 2.5 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) monodisperse challenge aerosol. Measured PF`s were corrected for lung deposition of this size aerosol. The average fit for each subject was the arithmetic mean of the three PFs. The PFs were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, so logs of PFs were used in the statistical analysis. The exponent of the 95% lower tolerance level (LTL) of the fifth percentile of the log PFs was 50. This compares to an exponent of the 95% LTL of the fifth percentile of the log PFs of two determined in a previous study and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of ten. No significant difference of average fit between males and females was found. The sensitivity of the saccharin QLFT was 42.9%, and specificity could not be evaluated.

  13. CD8 knockout mice are protected from challenge by vaccination with WR201, a live attenuated mutant of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Yingst, Samuel L; Izadjoo, Mina; Hoover, David L

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have been reported to play an important role in defense against B. abortus infection in mouse models. In the present report, we use CD8 knockout mice to further elucidate the role of these cells in protection from B. melitensis infection. Mice were immunized orally by administration of B. melitensis WR201, a purine auxotrophic attenuated vaccine strain, then challenged intranasally with B. melitensis 16M. In some experiments, persistence of WR201 in the spleens of CD8 knockout mice was slightly longer than that in the spleens of normal mice. However, development of anti-LPS serum antibody, antigen-induced production of γ-interferon (IFN-γ) by immune splenic lymphocytes, protection against intranasal challenge, and recovery of nonimmunized animals from intranasal challenge were similar between normal and knockout animals. Further, primary Brucella infection was not exacerbated in perforin knockout and Fas-deficient mice and these animals' anti-Brucella immune responses were indistinguishable from those of normal mice. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells do not play an essential role as either cytotoxic cells or IFN-γ producers, yet they do participate in a specific immune response to immunization and challenge in this murine model of B. melitensis infection.

  14. Adenovirus-Mediated Human Paraoxonase 1 Gene Transfer to Provide Protection Against the Toxicity of the Organophosphorus Pesticide Toxicant Diazoxon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    tested whether PON1 gene transfer using adenovirus provides protection against the toxicity of the OP diazoxon. Using an adenovirus construct...expressed PON1 at 600-3480 U ml(-1) on day 5 post-treatment, which is 8-50 fold above endogenous. Six mice expressing hPON1 survived 2LD(50) doses of diazoxon

  15. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae.

    PubMed

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Bachelerie, Françoise; Martin, Coralie

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4(+/1013)). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis.

  16. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4+/1013). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4+/1013 mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4+/1013 mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis. PMID:27111140

  17. Overexpression of CYP2J2 provides protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunfang; El-Sikhry, Haitham; Chaudhary, Ketul R.; Batchu, Sri Nagarjun; Shayeganpour, Anooshirvan; Jukar, Taibeh Orujy; Bradbury, J. Alyce; Graves, Joan P.; DeGraff, Laura M.; Myers, Page; Rouse, Douglas C.; Foley, Julie; Nyska, Abraham; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Seubert, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Human cytochrome P-450 (CYP)2J2 is abundant in heart and active in biosynthesis of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Recently, we demonstrated that these eicosanoid products protect myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion injury. The present study utilized transgenic (Tr) mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of human CYP2J2 to investigate protection toward toxicity resulting from acute (0, 5, or 15 mg/kg daily for 3 days, followed by 24-h recovery) or chronic (0, 1.5, or 3.0 mg/kg biweekly for 5 wk, followed by 2-wk recovery) doxorubicin (Dox) administration. Acute treatment resulted in marked elevations of serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase levels that were significantly greater in wild-type (WT) than CYP2J2 Tr mice. Acute treatment also resulted in less activation of stress response enzymes in CYP2J2 Tr mice (catalase 750% vs. 300% of baseline, caspase-3 235% vs. 165% of baseline in WT vs. CYP2J2 Tr mice). Moreover, CYP2J2 Tr hearts exhibited less Dox-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis (measured by TUNEL) compared with WT hearts. After chronic treatment, comparable decreases in body weight were observed in WT and CYP2J2 Tr mice. However, cardiac function, assessed by measurement of fractional shortening with M-mode transthoracic echocardiography, was significantly higher in CYP2J2 Tr than WT hearts after chronic Dox treatment (WT 37 ± 2%, CYP2J2 Tr 47 ± 1%). WT mice also had larger increases in β-myosin heavy chain and cardiac ankryin repeat protein compared with CYP2J2 Tr mice. CYP2J2 Tr hearts had a significantly higher rate of Dox metabolism than WT hearts (2.2 ± 0.25 vs. 1.6 ± 0.50 ng·min−1·100 μg protein−1). In vitro data from H9c2 cells demonstrated that EETs attenuated Dox-induced mitochondrial damage. Together, these data suggest that cardiac-specific overexpression of CYP2J2 limited Dox-induced toxicity. PMID:19429816

  18. Measles Vaccination of Nonhuman Primates Provides Partial Protection against Infection with Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Ludlow, Martin; Verburgh, R. Joyce; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Nguyen, D. Tien; McQuaid, Stephen; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) is being considered for global eradication, which would likely reduce compliance with MV vaccination. As a result, children will grow up without MV-specific immunity, creating a potential niche for closely related animal morbilliviruses such as canine distemper virus (CDV). Natural CDV infection causing clinical signs has never been reported in humans, but recent outbreaks in captive macaques have shown that CDV can cause disease in primates. We studied the virulence and tropism of recombinant CDV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in naive and measles-vaccinated cynomolgus macaques. In naive animals CDV caused viremia and fever and predominantly infected CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Virus was reisolated from the upper and lower respiratory tracts, but infection of epithelial or neuronal cells was not detectable at the time points examined, and the infections were self-limiting. This demonstrates that CDV readily infects nonhuman primates but suggests that additional mutations are necessary to achieve full virulence in nonnatural hosts. Partial protection against CDV was observed in measles-vaccinated macaques, as demonstrated by accelerated control of virus replication and limited shedding from the upper respiratory tract. While neither CDV infection nor MV vaccination induced detectable cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, MV-specific neutralizing antibody levels of MV-vaccinated macaques were boosted by CDV challenge infection, suggesting that cross-reactive VN epitopes exist. Rapid increases in white blood cell counts in MV-vaccinated macaques following CDV challenge suggested that cross-reactive cellular immune responses were also present. This study demonstrates that zoonotic morbillivirus infections can be controlled by measles vaccination. IMPORTANCE Throughout history viral zoonoses have had a substantial impact on human health. Given the drive toward global eradication of measles, it is essential to

  19. Xanthone biosynthesis in Hypericum perforatum cells provides antioxidant and antimicrobial protection upon biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Gregory; Conceição, Luis F R; Kombrink, Erich; Dias, Alberto C P

    2009-01-01

    Xanthone production in Hypericum perforatum (HP) suspension cultures in response to elicitation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens co-cultivation has been studied. RNA blot analyses of HP cells co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens have shown a rapid up-regulation of genes encoding important enzymes of the general phenylpropanoid pathway (PAL, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4CL, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase) and xanthone biosynthesis (BPS, benzophenone synthase). Analyses of HPLC chromatograms of methanolic extracts of control and elicited cells (HP cells that were co-cultivated for 24h with A. tumefaciens) have revealed a 12-fold increase in total xanthone concentration and also the emergence of many xanthones after elicitation. Methanolic extract of elicited cells exhibited significantly higher antioxidant and antimicrobial competence than the equivalent extract of control HP cells indicating that these properties have been significantly increased in HP cells after elicitation. Four major de novo synthesized xanthones have been identified as 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxy-8-prenyl xanthone, 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxy-2-prenyl xanthone, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-6-methoxy-8-prenyl xanthone and paxanthone. Antioxidant and antimicrobial characterization of these de novo xanthones have revealed that xanthones play dual function in plant cells during biotic stress: (1) as antioxidants to protect the cells from oxidative damage and (2) as phytoalexins to impair the pathogen growth.

  20. Architecture and material properties of diatom shells provide effective mechanical protection.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christian E; Merkel, Rudolf; Springer, Olaf; Jurkojc, Piotr; Maier, Christian; Prechtel, Kathrin; Smetacek, Victor

    2003-02-20

    Diatoms are the major contributors to phytoplankton blooms in lakes and in the sea and hence are central in aquatic ecosystems and the global carbon cycle. All free-living diatoms differ from other phytoplankton groups in having silicified cell walls in the form of two 'shells' (the frustule) of manifold shape and intricate architecture whose function and role, if any, in contributing to the evolutionary success of diatoms is under debate. We explored the defence potential of the frustules as armour against predators by measuring their strength. Real and virtual loading tests (using calibrated glass microneedles and finite element analysis) were performed on centric and pennate diatom cells. Here we show that the frustules are remarkably strong by virtue of their architecture and the material properties of the diatom silica. We conclude that diatom frustules have evolved as mechanical protection for the cells because exceptional force is required to break them. The evolutionary arms race between diatoms and their specialized predators will have had considerable influence in structuring pelagic food webs and biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Anti-predator meshing may provide greater protection for sea turtle nests than predator removal

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Julie M.; Limpus, Colin J.; Hofmeister, Kate M.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Burnett, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of how to protect sea turtle nests from terrestrial predators is of worldwide concern. On Queensland’s southern Sunshine Coast, depredation of turtle nests by the introduced European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) has been recorded as the primary terrestrial cause of egg and hatchling mortality. We investigated the impact of foxes on the nests of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) and occasional green turtle (Chelonia mydas) over ten nesting seasons. Meshing of nests with fox exclusion devices (FEDs) was undertaken in all years accompanied by lethal fox control in the first five-year period, but not in the second five-year period. Lethal fox control was undertaken in the study area from 2005 to February 2010, but foxes still breached 27% (range19–52%) of turtle nests. In the second five-year period, despite the absence of lethal fox control, the average percentage of nests breached was less than 3% (range 0–4%). Comparison of clutch depredation rates in the two five-year periods demonstrated that continuous nest meshing may be more effective than lethal fox control in mitigating the impact of foxes on turtle nests. In the absence of unlimited resources available for the eradication of exotic predators, the use of FEDs and the support and resourcing of a dedicated volunteer base can be considered an effective turtle conservation tool on some beaches. PMID:28187181

  2. Ablation of Cbl-b provides protection against transplanted and spontaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jeffrey Y.; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Hodes, Richard; Gu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    A significant challenge to efforts aimed at inducing effective antitumor immune responses is that CD8+ T cells, which play a prominent role in these responses, may be unable to respond to tumors that lack costimulatory signals and that are protected by an immune suppressive environment such as that mediated by TGF-β produced by tumor cells themselves or by infiltrating Tregs, often resulting in tolerance or anergy of tumor-specific T cells. Here we show that the in vitro activation of Cblb–/– CD8+ T cells does not depend on CD28 costimulation and is resistant to TGF-β suppression. In vivo studies further demonstrated that Cblb–/– mice, but not WT controls, efficiently rejected inoculated E.G7 and EL4 lymphomas that did not express B7 ligands and that introduction of the Cblb–/– mutation into tumor-prone ataxia telangiectasia mutated–deficient mice markedly reduced the incidence of spontaneous thymic lymphomas. Immunohistological study showed that E.G7 tumors from Cblb–/– mice contained massively infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Adoptive transfer of purified Cblb–/– CD8+ T cells into E.G7 tumor-bearing mice led to efficient eradication of established tumors. Thus, our data indicate that ablation of Cbl-b can be an efficient strategy for eliciting immune responses against both inoculated and spontaneous tumors. PMID:17364027

  3. Combined Preconditioning and Postconditioning Provides Synergistic Protection against Liver Ischemic Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; XU, Hongde; Cao, Liu; Zhang, Haipeng

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury (IRI) is a major cause of liver damage during liver surgery and transplantation. Ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning are strategies that can reduce IRI. In this study, different combined types of pre- and postconditioning procedures were tested in a murine warm hepatic IRI model to evaluate their protective effects. Proanthocyanidins derived from grape seed was used before ischemia process as pharmacological preconditioning to combine with technical preconditioning and postconditioning. Three pathways related to IRI, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, pro-inflammatory cytokines release and hypoxia responses were examined in hepatic IRI model. Individual and combined pre- and postconditioning protocols significantly reduce liver injury by decreasing the liver ROS and cytokine levels, as well as enhancing the hypoxia tolerance response. Our data also suggested that in addition to individual preconditioning or postconditioning, the combination of these two treatments could reduce liver ischemia/reperfusion injury more effectively by increasing the activity of ROS scavengers and antioxidants. The utilization of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) could improve the oxidation resistance in combined pre- and postconditioning groups. The combined protocol also further increased the liver HIF-1 alpha protein level, but had no effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines release compared to solo treatment. PMID:22701341

  4. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tipper, Donald J.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%. PMID:27213160

  5. Architecture and material properties of diatom shells provide effective mechanical protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Christian E.; Merkel, Rudolf; Springer, Olaf; Jurkojc, Piotr; Maier, Christian; Prechtel, Kathrin; Smetacek, Victor

    2003-02-01

    Diatoms are the major contributors to phytoplankton blooms in lakes and in the sea and hence are central in aquatic ecosystems and the global carbon cycle. All free-living diatoms differ from other phytoplankton groups in having silicified cell walls in the form of two `shells' (the frustule) of manifold shape and intricate architecture whose function and role, if any, in contributing to the evolutionary success of diatoms is under debate. We explored the defence potential of the frustules as armour against predators by measuring their strength. Real and virtual loading tests (using calibrated glass microneedles and finite element analysis) were performed on centric and pennate diatom cells. Here we show that the frustules are remarkably strong by virtue of their architecture and the material properties of the diatom silica. We conclude that diatom frustules have evolved as mechanical protection for the cells because exceptional force is required to break them. The evolutionary arms race between diatoms and their specialized predators will have had considerable influence in structuring pelagic food webs and biogeochemical cycles.

  6. Anti-predator meshing may provide greater protection for sea turtle nests than predator removal.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Julie M; Limpus, Colin J; Hofmeister, Kate M; Allen, Benjamin L; Burnett, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    The problem of how to protect sea turtle nests from terrestrial predators is of worldwide concern. On Queensland's southern Sunshine Coast, depredation of turtle nests by the introduced European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) has been recorded as the primary terrestrial cause of egg and hatchling mortality. We investigated the impact of foxes on the nests of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) and occasional green turtle (Chelonia mydas) over ten nesting seasons. Meshing of nests with fox exclusion devices (FEDs) was undertaken in all years accompanied by lethal fox control in the first five-year period, but not in the second five-year period. Lethal fox control was undertaken in the study area from 2005 to February 2010, but foxes still breached 27% (range19-52%) of turtle nests. In the second five-year period, despite the absence of lethal fox control, the average percentage of nests breached was less than 3% (range 0-4%). Comparison of clutch depredation rates in the two five-year periods demonstrated that continuous nest meshing may be more effective than lethal fox control in mitigating the impact of foxes on turtle nests. In the absence of unlimited resources available for the eradication of exotic predators, the use of FEDs and the support and resourcing of a dedicated volunteer base can be considered an effective turtle conservation tool on some beaches.

  7. SDF-1 provides morphological and functional protection against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stokman, Geurt; Stroo, Ingrid; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J D; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2010-12-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is thought to be involved in mediating tissue repair by promoting migration of bone marrow stem or progenitor cells to the site of injury. Increased levels of renal SDF-1 are found after kidney injury. However, recently, we showed that SDF-1 does not play an important role in the migration of haematopoietic stem cells to the post-ischaemic kidney. The function of increased post-ischaemic renal SDF-1 expression in modulating renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury remains, therefore, unknown. We studied the role of SDF-1 in renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury by locally decreasing SDF-1 expression and subsequent SDF-1 signalling in the corticomedullary region of the kidney using antisense oligonucleotide treatment in mice. Renal SDF-1 protein increased significantly in the early phase of ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Antisense treatment resulted in a reduction of corticomedullary SDF-1 expression which was accompanied by severely increased tubular injury and decreased renal function. We did not observe any difference in mobilization or retention of CXCR4-positive haematopoietic stem or progenitor cells after induction of renal ischaemia. Rather, antisense-treated animals showed markedly increased apoptosis of the tubular epithelium accompanied by an increased renal inflammatory response. Conclusions. These data indicate a new role for SDF-1 in renal pathogenesis by mediating tubular epithelial protection against ischaemic injury and suggest that SDF-1 by itself is not crucial for the influx of haematopoietic stem or progenitor cells towards the ischaemic injured kidney.

  8. Oral intake of beet extract provides protection against skin barrier impairment in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Ken-Ichi; Umemura, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    The epidermis acts as a functional barrier against the external environment. Disturbances in the function of this barrier cause water loss and increase the chances of penetration by various irritable stimuli, leading to skin diseases such as dry skin, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Ceramides are a critical natural element of the protective epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral intake of beet (Beta vulgaris) extract, a natural product rich in glucosylceramide (GlcCer), may prevent disturbance in skin barrier function. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a special diet (HR-AD), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the dorsal skin increased, with a compensatory increase in water intake after 5 weeks. Mice fed with HR-AD had dry skin with erythema and showed increased scratching behaviour. Histological examinations revealed a remarkable increase in the thickness of the skin at 8 weeks. Supplemental addition of beet extract, which contained GlcCer at a final concentration of 0.1%, significantly prevented an increase TEWL, water intake, cumulative scratching time, and epidermal thickness at 8 weeks. These results indicate that oral intake of beet extract shows potential for preventing skin diseases associated with impaired skin barrier function.

  9. Anti-Staphylococcus aureus single-chain variable region fragments provide protection against mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading causative agent of bovine mastitis, which can result in significant economic losses to the dairy industry. However, available vaccines against bovine mastitis do not confer adequate protection, although passive immunization with antibodies may be useful to prevent disease. Hence, we constructed a bovine single-chain variable region fragment (scFv) phage display library using cDNAs from peripheral blood lymphocytes of cows with S. aureus-induced mastitis. After four rounds of selection, eight scFvs that bound S. aureus antigens with high affinity were obtained. The framework regions of the variable domains (VH and VL) of the eight scFvs were highly conserved, and the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) displayed significant diversity, especially CDR3 of the VH domain. All eight scFvs inhibited S. aureus growth in culture medium. Lactating mice were challenged by injecting S. aureus into the fourth mammary gland. Histopathological analysis showed that treatment with these scFvs prior to bacterial challenge maintained the structure of the mammary acini, decreased infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, increased levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels in mammary tissues, as compared with mice treatment with physiological saline (P < 0.05). These novel bovine scFvs may be suitable candidates for therapeutic agents for the prevention of S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis.

  10. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Providing Password Protection and Limited Access to Models and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-09

    One of the most important concerns for regulatory agencies is the concept of reproducibility (i.e., reproducibility means credibility) of an assessment. One aspect of reproducibility deals with tampering of the assessment. In other words, when multiple groups are engaged in an assessment, it is important to lock down the problem that is to be solved and/or to restrict the models that are to be used to solve the problem. The objective of this effort is to provide the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with a means to limit user access to models and to provide a mechanism to constrain the conceptual site models (CSMs) when appropriate. The purpose is to provide the user (i.e., NRC) with the ability to “lock down” the CSM (i.e., picture containing linked icons), restrict access to certain models, or both.

  11. Financial protection of patients through compensation of providers: the impact of Health Equity Funds in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gabriela; Ir, Por; Men, Chean R; O'Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2013-12-01

    Public providers have no financial incentive to respect their legal obligation to exempt the poor from user fees. Health Equity Funds (HEFs) aim to make exemptions effective by giving NGOs responsibility for assessing eligibility and compensating providers for lost revenue. We use the geographic spread of HEFs over time in Cambodia to identify their impact on out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. Among households with some OOP payment, HEFs reduce the amount paid by 35%, on average. The effect is larger for households that are poorer and mainly use public health care. Reimbursement of providers through a government operated scheme also reduces household OOP payments but the effect is not as well targeted on the poor. Both compensation models raise household non-medical consumption but have no impact on health-related debt. HEFs reduce the probability of primarily seeking care in the private sector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative proteomic profiling of the choline transporter-like1 (CHER1) mutant provides insights into plasmodesmata composition of fully developed Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Kraner, Max E; Müller, Carmen; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2017-09-02

    In plants, intercellular communication and exchange are highly dependent on cell wall bridging structures between adhering cells, so-called plasmodesmata (PD). In our previous genetic screen for PD-deficient Arabidopsis mutants, we described choline transporter-like 1 (CHER1) being important for PD genesis and maturation. Leaves of cher1 mutant plants have up to 10 times less PD, which do not develop to complex structures. Here we utilize the T-DNA insertion mutant cher1-4 and report a deep comparative proteomic workflow for the identification of cell-wall-embedded PD-associated proteins. Analyzing triplicates of cell-wall-enriched fractions in depth by fractionation and quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry, we compared > 5000 proteins obtained from fully developed leaves. Comparative data analysis and subsequent filtering generated a list of 61 proteins being significantly more abundant in Col-0. This list was enriched for previously described PD-associated proteins. To validate PD association of so far uncharacterized proteins, subcellular localization analyses were carried out by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This study confirmed the association of PD for three out of four selected candidates, indicating that the comparative approach indeed allowed identification of so far undescribed PD-associated proteins. Performing comparative cell wall proteomics of Nicotiana benthamiana tissue, we observed an increase in abundance of these three selected candidates during sink to source transition. Taken together, our comparative proteomic approach revealed a valuable data set of potential PD-associated proteins, which can be used as a resource to unravel the molecular composition of complex PD and to investigate their function in cell-to-cell communication. © 2017 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Aminosyn PF or trophamine: which provides more protection from cholestasis associated with total parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed

    Forchielli, M L; Gura, K M; Sandler, R; Lo, C

    1995-11-01

    Cholestasis often occurs in infants on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for long periods. Amino acid formulations developed specifically for infants, namely Aminosyn PF and Trophamine, may protect against cholestasis associated with total parenteral nutrition (CATPN). The development of cholestasis may also be caused by other risk factors such as prematurity, surgery, sepsis, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). To evaluate the relative effectiveness of the pediatric amino acid formulations in reducing CATPN, the courses of 70 infants < 1 year of age who received TPN for at least 14 days were reviewed. Cholestasis was defined as a conjugated serum bilirubin > or = 2 mg/dl subsequent to the initiation of TPN; CATPN was considered present when other factors related to cholestasis were ruled out. Liver function tests were recorded 24 h before starting TPN and at day 7, 15, and 21 during TPN infusion. Thirty infants (42.8%) developed cholestasis. CATPN was judged to have occurred in 15 (21.4%) of 70 infants, while 15 (21.4%) developed cholestasis secondary to other factors. Of the 15 CATPN patients, 7 had received Trophamine, 6 had received Aminosyn PF, and 2 had received both solutions. Aminosyn PF and Trophamine, along with other potential risk factors for CATPN such as antecedent surgery, sepsis, ECMO, prematurity, and nitrogen/calorie intake were analyzed by regression-analysis methods. None was statistically significant except the length of TPN (p = 0.0063). In conclusion, we cannot support the view that Trophamine is more effective than Aminosyn PF in the prevention of CATPN.

  14. Preconditioning Triggered by Carbon Monoxide (CO) Provides Neuronal Protection Following Perinatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Widerøe, Marius; Alves, Paula M.; Vercelli, Alessandro; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a major cause of acute mortality in newborns and cognitive and motor impairments in children. Cerebral hypoxia-ischemia leads to excitotoxicity and necrotic and apoptotic cell death, in which mitochondria play a major role. Increased resistance against major damage can be achieved by preconditioning triggered by subtle insults. CO, a toxic molecule that is also generated endogenously, may have a role in preconditioning as low doses can protect against inflammation and apoptosis. In this study, the role of CO-induced preconditioning on neurons was addressed in vitro and in vivo. The effect of 1 h of CO treatment on neuronal death (plasmatic membrane permeabilization and chromatin condensation) and bcl-2 expression was studied in cerebellar granule cells undergoing to glutamate-induced apoptosis. CO's role was studied in vivo in the Rice-Vannucci model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (common carotid artery ligature +75 min at 8% oxygen). Apoptotic cells, assessed by Nissl staining were counted with a stereological approach and cleaved caspase 3-positive profiles in the hippocampus were assessed. Apoptotic hallmarks were analyzed in hippocampal extracts by Western Blot. CO inhibited excitotoxicity-induced cell death and increased Bcl-2 mRNA in primary cultures of neurons. In vivo, CO prevented hypoxia-ischemia induced apoptosis in the hippocampus, limited cytochrome c released from mitochondria and reduced activation of caspase-3. Still, Bcl-2 protein levels were higher in hippocampus of CO pre-treated rat pups. Our results show that CO preconditioning elicits a molecular cascade that limits neuronal apoptosis. This could represent an innovative therapeutic strategy for high-risk cerebral hypoxia-ischemia patients, in particular neonates. PMID:22952602

  15. Small-molecule quinolinol inhibitor identified provides protection against BoNT/A in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC(50) values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A).

  16. Small-Molecule Quinolinol Inhibitor Identified Provides Protection against BoNT/A in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). PMID:23071727

  17. 76 FR 9968 - Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... performing abortions. While Federal health care provider conscience statutes have been in effect for decades... receipt of Federal funds did not require the recipients of such funds to perform abortions or... or an abortion, if it would be contrary to the individual's religious beliefs or moral convictions; 2...

  18. Increase in use of protective earplugs by Rock and Roll concert attendees when provided for free at concert venues.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jieun; Smukler, Simon R; Chung, Yuan; House, Ron; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of hearing protection use among attendees of Rock and Roll concerts at baseline and in concerts where earplugs are provided for free at concert venue entrances. Six concerts performed at two music venues in Toronto, Canada were evaluated. Study personnel observed and recorded the use of hearing protection at three concerts where no earplugs were distributed, and three concerts where earplugs were provided for free at the concert venue entrance. A total of 955 individuals over the age of 18 were observed at six concerts. Six hundred and thirty-seven individuals (64% male) were observed at concerts where no earplugs were provided, and 318 individuals (68% male) were observed at concerts where free earplugs were provided. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in hearing protection usage at concerts where earplugs were provided for free at the concert venue entrance, odds ratio 7.27 (95% CI: 3.24-16.30). The provision of free earplugs at concert venues may be a simple and inexpensive intervention that could be a component of a larger public health campaign to prevent non-occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

  19. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain’s protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuated by subcutaneous route, elicits an F1-specific antibody titer similar to the EV and provides a protective efficacy similar to the EV against bubonic plague in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques. The Microtus strain 201 could induce elevated secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6), as well as chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8. However, the protected animals developed skin ulcer at challenge site with different severity in most of the immunized and some of the EV-immunized monkeys. Generally, the Microtus strain 201 represented a good plague vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as its good protection against high dose of subcutaneous virulent Y. pestis challenge. PMID:24225642

  20. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain's protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuated by subcutaneous route, elicits an F1-specific antibody titer similar to the EV and provides a protective efficacy similar to the EV against bubonic plague in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques. The Microtus strain 201 could induce elevated secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6), as well as chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8. However, the protected animals developed skin ulcer at challenge site with different severity in most of the immunized and some of the EV-immunized monkeys. Generally, the Microtus strain 201 represented a good plague vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as its good protection against high dose of subcutaneous virulent Y. pestis challenge.

  1. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  2. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOEpatents

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  3. Treatment with bexarotene, a compound that increases apolipoprotein-E, provides no cognitive benefit in mutant APP/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though the precise cause(s) of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remain unknown, there is strong evidence that decreased clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain can contribute to the disease. Therapeutic strategies to promote natural Aβ clearance mechanisms, such as the protein apolipoprotein-E (APOE), hold promise for the treatment of AD. The amount of APOE in the brain is regulated by nuclear receptors including retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Drugs that activate RXRs, including bexarotene, can increase APOE and ABCA1 production, and have been shown to decrease the Aβ burden and improve cognition in mouse models of Aβ amyloidosis. Although recent bexarotene studies failed to replicate the rapid clearance of Aβ from brains, behavioral and cognitive effects of this compound remain controversial. Findings In efforts to clarify these behavioral findings, mutant APP/PS1 mice were acutely dosed with bexarotene. While ABCA1 was upregulated in mutant APP/PS1 mice treated with bexarotene, this drug failed to attenuate Aβ plaques or cognitive deficits in these mice. Conclusions We recommend rigorous preclinical study to evaluate the mechanism and utility of such a compound for AD therapy. PMID:23764200

  4. Immunization with a novel Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant rETXY196E-C confers strong protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenwu; Kang, Jingjing; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bin; Li, Ping; Liu, Jing; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by toxinotypes B and D of Clostridium perfringens. It can induce lethal enterotoxemia in domestic animals, mainly in sheep, goats and cattle, causing serious economic losses to global animal husbandry. In this study, a novel and stable epsilon toxin mutant rETXY196E-C, obtained by substituting the 196th tyrosine (Y196) with glutamic acid (E) and introducing of 23 amino acids long C-terminal peptide, was determined as a promising recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia. After the third vaccination, the antibody titers against recombinant wild type (rETX) could reach 1:105 in each immunized group, and the mice were completely protected from 100 × LD50 (50% lethal dose) of rETX challenge. The mice in 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group fully survived at the dose of 500 × LD50 of rETX challenge and 80% of mice survived at 180 μg (1000 × LD50) of rETX administration. In vitro, immune sera from 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group could completely protect MDCK cells from 16 × CT50 (50% lethal dose of cells) of rETX challenge and protect against 10 × LD50 dose (1.8 μg) of rETX challenge in mice. These data suggest that recombinant protein rETXY196E-C is a potential vaccine candidate for future applied researches. PMID:27048879

  5. Immunization with a novel Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant rETX(Y196E)-C confers strong protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenwu; Kang, Jingjing; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bin; Li, Ping; Liu, Jing; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-04-06

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by toxinotypes B and D of Clostridium perfringens. It can induce lethal enterotoxemia in domestic animals, mainly in sheep, goats and cattle, causing serious economic losses to global animal husbandry. In this study, a novel and stable epsilon toxin mutant rETX(Y196E)-C, obtained by substituting the 196th tyrosine (Y196) with glutamic acid (E) and introducing of 23 amino acids long C-terminal peptide, was determined as a promising recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia. After the third vaccination, the antibody titers against recombinant wild type (rETX) could reach 1:10(5) in each immunized group, and the mice were completely protected from 100 × LD50 (50% lethal dose) of rETX challenge. The mice in 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group fully survived at the dose of 500 × LD50 of rETX challenge and 80% of mice survived at 180 μg (1000 × LD50) of rETX administration. In vitro, immune sera from 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group could completely protect MDCK cells from 16 × CT50 (50% lethal dose of cells) of rETX challenge and protect against 10 × LD50 dose (1.8 μg) of rETX challenge in mice. These data suggest that recombinant protein rETX(Y196E)-C is a potential vaccine candidate for future applied researches.

  6. Light and transmission electron microscopy of Vibrio campbellii infection in gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana and protection offered by a yeast mutant with elevated cell wall glucan.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, R A Y S Asanka; Defoirdt, Tom; Rekecki, Anamaria; Decostere, Annemie; Cornelissen, Maria; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Van den Broeck, Wim

    2012-08-17

    Luminescent vibrios are amongst the most important pathogens in aquaculture, affecting almost all types of cultured organisms. Vibrio campbellii is one of these most important pathogens. In this study, the effects of feeding mnn9 yeast cell wall mutant and wild type yeast strain were investigated in the digestive tract of brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia franciscana, after experimental infection with V. campbellii (LMG 21363). Gnotobiotic A. franciscana nauplii were fed daily with dead Aeromonas hydrophila LVS3, and with either wild type strain of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or mutant strain mnn9, of which the cell wall contains elevated chitin and glucan and lower mannose levels. After three days of feeding, some nauplii were challenged with V. campbellii. Mean survival (%), individual length (mm) and total length (mm) at one day and two days after challenge were significantly higher in the group fed mnn9 than in the group fed wild type yeast (81 ± 1.50 and 63 ± 0.49, 1.56 ± 0.07 and 1.13 ± 0.02, 38.21 ± 3.11 and 21.26 ± 0.81 respectively for one day and 50 ± 2.37 and 20 ± 1.41, 2.33 ± 0.01 and 1.24 ± 0.04, 34.97 ± 5.56 and 7.45 ± 1.63 for two days after challenge). Histological examination revealed that the luminal diameter and enterocyte height of both mid- and hindgut were larger in the mnn9-fed group. Colonization of the gut lumen by V. campbellii could be observed by transmission electron microscopy for the group of nauplii fed with wild type yeast. Furthermore, it was observed that V. campbellii caused damage to the gut epithelium including shortening and disappearance of the microvilli, destruction of the apical cell membrane and cell lysis in the nauplii fed wild type yeast. The gut epithelium remained intact in challenged nauplii fed mnn9 yeast. The morphological findings of the present study further substantiate previous studies reporting a protective effect of this yeast cell wall mutant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Poloxamer-188 and citicoline provide neuronal membrane integrity and protect membrane stability in cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Timur; Eylen, Alpaslan; Lule, Sevda; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Vural, Atay; Karatas, Hulya; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Dalkara, Turgay; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Under pathological conditions such as brain trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and stroke, cortical spreading depression (CSD) or peri-infarct depolarizations contribute to brain damage in animal models of neurological disorders as well as in human neurological diseases. CSD causes transient megachannel opening on the neuronal membrane, which may compromise neuronal survival under pathological conditions. Poloxamer-188 (P-188) and citicoline are neuroprotectants with membrane sealing properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of P-188 and citicoline on the neuronal megachannel opening induced by CSD in the mouse brain. We have monitored megachannel opening with propidium iodide, a membrane impermeable fluorescent dye and, demonstrate that P-188 and citicoline strikingly decreased CSD-induced neuronal PI influx in cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Therefore, these agents may be providing neuroprotection by blocking megachannel opening, which may be related to their membrane sealing action and warrant further investigation for treatment of traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke.

  8. Delayed argon administration provides robust protection against cardiac arrest-induced neurological damage.

    PubMed

    Brücken, Anne; Kurnaz, Pinar; Bleilevens, Christian; Derwall, Matthias; Weis, Joachim; Nolte, Kay; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Argon at a dosage of 70 % is neuroprotective, when given 1 h after cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. We investigated if a neuroprotective effect of argon would also be observed, when administration was delayed. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing between 400 and 500 g were subjected to 7 min of CA and 3 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Animals were randomized to receive either 1 h of 70 % argon ventilation 1 h (n = 8) or 3 h (n = 8) after return of spontaneous circulation or no argon treatment (n = 8). For all animals, a neurological deficit score (NDS) was calculated daily for 7 days following the experiment. On day 8, rats were re-anesthetized and transcardially perfused before brains were harvested for histopathological analyses. All animals survived. Control animals exhibited severe neurologic dysfunction at all time points as measured with the NDS. Argon-treated animals showed significant improvements in the NDS through all postoperative days, even when argon administration was delayed for 3 h. This was paralleled by a significant reduction in the neuronal damage index in the neocortex and the hippocampal CA 3/4 region in argon-treated animals, regardless of the timing of argon administration. However, animals of the delayed argon administration group additionally showed significant reductions in the basal ganglia in comparison with control animals. Our study demonstrates that a 1-h application of argon provided a significant reduction in histopathological damage, associated with a marked improvement in functional neurologic recovery even when treatment was delayed for 3 h. This is highly significant with regard to clinical situations, where argon treatment cannot be provided timely.

  9. Inactivated Influenza Vaccine That Provides Rapid, Innate-Immune-System-Mediated Protection and Subsequent Long-Term Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chinn Yi; Mifsud, Edin J.; Edenborough, Kathryn M.; Sekiya, Toshiki; Tan, Amabel C. L.; Mercuri, Francesca; Rockman, Steve; Chen, Weisan; Turner, Stephen J.; Doherty, Peter C.; Kelso, Anne; Brown, Lorena E.; Jackson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The continual threat to global health posed by influenza has led to increased efforts to improve the effectiveness of influenza vaccines for use in epidemics and pandemics. We show in this study that formulation of a low dose of inactivated detergent-split influenza vaccine with a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-based lipopeptide adjuvant (R4Pam2Cys) provides (i) immediate, antigen-independent immunity mediated by the innate immune system and (ii) significant enhancement of antigen-dependent immunity which exhibits an increased breadth of effector function. Intranasal administration of mice with vaccine formulated with R4Pam2Cys but not vaccine alone provides protection against both homologous and serologically distinct (heterologous) viral strains within a day of administration. Vaccination in the presence of R4Pam2Cys subsequently also induces high levels of systemic IgM, IgG1, and IgG2b antibodies and pulmonary IgA antibodies that inhibit hemagglutination (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) activities of homologous but not heterologous virus. Improved primary virus nucleoprotein (NP)-specific CD8+ T cell responses are also induced by the use of R4Pam2Cys and are associated with robust recall responses to provide heterologous protection. These protective effects are demonstrated in wild-type and antibody-deficient animals but not in those depleted of CD8+ T cells. Using a contact-dependent virus transmission model, we also found that heterologous virus transmission from vaccinated mice to naive mice is significantly reduced. These results demonstrate the potential of adding a TLR2 agonist to an existing seasonal influenza vaccine to improve its utility by inducing immediate short-term nonspecific antiviral protection and also antigen-specific responses to provide homologous and heterologous immunity. PMID:26507227

  10. The protein PprI provides protection against radiation injury in human and mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Huiping; Yue, Ling; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute radiation injuries are both very lethal and exceptionally difficult to treat. Though the radioresistant bacterium D. radiodurans was first characterized in 1956, genes and proteins key to its radioprotection have not yet to be applied in radiation injury therapy for humans. In this work, we express the D. radiodurans protein PprI in Pichia pastoris yeast cells transfected with the designed vector plasmid pHBM905A-pprI. We then treat human umbilical endothelial vein cells and BALB/c mouse cells with the yeast-derived PprI and elucidate the radioprotective effects the protein provides upon gamma irradiation. We see that PprI significantly increases the survival rate, antioxidant viability, and DNA-repair capacity in irradiated cells and decreases concomitant apoptosis rates and counts of damage-indicative γH2AX foci. Furthermore, we find that PprI reduces mortality and enhances bone marrow cell clone formation and white blood cell and platelet counts in irradiated mice. PprI also seems to alleviate pathological injuries to multiple organs and improve antioxidant viability in some tissues. Our results thus suggest that PprI has crucial radioprotective effects on irradiated human and mouse cells. PMID:27222438

  11. Synchrotron Radiation Provides a Plausible Explanation for the Generation of a Free Radical Adduct of Thioxolone in Mutant Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Katherine H; Genis, Caroli; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Kiddle, James J; Tripp, Brian C; McKenna, Robert

    2010-10-07

    Thioxolone acts as a prodrug in the presence of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), whereby the molecule is cleaved by thioester hydrolysis to the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, 4-mercaptobenzene-1,3-diol (TH0). Thioxolone was soaked into the proton transfer mutant H64A of CA II in an effort to capture a reaction intermediate via X-ray crystallography. Structure determination of the 1.2 Å resolution data revealed the TH0 had been modified to a 4,4'-disulfanediyldibenzene-1,3-diol, a product of crystallization conditions, and a zinc ligated 2,4-dihydroxybenzenesulfenic acid, most likely induced by radiation damage. Neither ligand was likely a result of an enzymatic mechanism.

  12. Characterization of the UVA protection provided by avobenzone, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide in broad-spectrum sunscreen products.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Donathan G; Meyer, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Solar UV radiation (UVR) is composed of UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) wavelengths. Only two sunscreen active ingredients approved in the US, avobenzone (butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane) and zinc oxide (ZnO), provide true broad-spectrum protection against UVA wavelengths >360 nm. Although effective against shorter UVR wavelengths <360 nm, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is also often believed to confer broad-spectrum protection and is substituted for ZnO or avobenzone. To sustain its absorption capacity within a sunscreen film during UVR exposure, avobenzone needs to be formulated into sunscreen products using sound formulation strategies. To characterize the efficacy of avobenzone, ZnO, and TiO(2) in terms of their abilities to provide broad UVA protection and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the different formulation strategies used today to maintain the efficacy of avobenzone even during prolonged exposures to UVR. UVA efficacy was assessed by measuring absorbance profiles in vitro using Vitro Skin® (IMS Inc., Orange, CT, USA) as an inert substrate and by determining UVA protection factors (PFA) on human skin. The impact of avobenzone loss on sun protection factor (SPF) and PFA values was evaluated by serially reducing avobenzone concentrations in an otherwise photostable product. The photostabilizing influence of specific formulation ingredients was monitored by measuring the extent to which they prevented UVR-induced degradation of avobenzone, whereas photostability of commercial sunscreen products was quantified by measuring the percentage change in absorbance within the UVB and UVA spectral regions following irradiation of thin product films on inert substrates. Model formulations containing 3% avobenzone or 5% ZnO provided superior attenuation of UVA wavelengths >360 nm compared with formulas containing 5% TiO(2). Additionally, sunscreen products of similar SPF containing avobenzone or ZnO exhibited significantly higher PFA values than those

  13. Crystal structures of the F88Y obelin mutant before and after bioluminescence provide molecular insight into spectral tuning among hydromedusan photoproteins.

    PubMed

    Natashin, Pavel V; Markova, Svetlana V; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2014-03-01

    Ca(2+) -regulated photoproteins are responsible for the bioluminescence of a variety of marine coelenterates. All hydromedusan photoproteins are a single-chain polypeptide to which 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine is tightly but non-covalently bound. Bioluminescence results from oxidative decarboxylation of 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, generating protein-bound coelenteramide in an excited state. The bioluminescence spectral maxima of recombinant photoproteins vary in the range 462-495 nm, despite a high degree of identity of amino acid sequences and spatial structures of these photoproteins. Based on studies of obelin and aequorin mutants with substitution of Phe to Tyr and Tyr to Phe, respectively [Stepanyuk GA et al. (2005) FEBS Lett 579, 1008-1014], it was suggested that the spectral differences may be accounted for by an additional hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of a Tyr residue and an oxygen atom of the 6-(p-hydroxyphenyl) substituent of coelenterazine. Here, we report the crystal structures of two conformation states of the F88Y obelin mutant that has bioluminescence and product fluorescence spectra resembling those of aequorin. Comparison of spatial structures of the F88Y obelin conformation states with those of wild-type obelin clearly shows that substitution of Phe to Tyr does not affect the overall structures of either F88Y obelin or its product following Ca(2+) discharge, compared to the conformation states of wild-type obelin. The hydrogen bond network in F88Y obelin being due to the Tyr substitution clearly supports the suggestion that different hydrogen bond patterns near the oxygen of the 6-(p-hydroxyphenyl) substituent are the basis for spectral modifications between hydromedusan photoproteins.

  14. Deciphering the Physalis floridana double-layered-lantern1 mutant provides insights into functional divergence of the GLOBOSA duplicates within the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; Quan, Hui; Zhao, Man; He, Chaoying

    2014-02-01

    Physalis spp. develop the "Chinese lantern" trait, also known as inflated calyx syndrome, that is a morphological novelty. Here, we identified the double-layered-lantern1 (doll1) mutant, a recessive and monofactorial mutation, in Physalis floridana; its corolla and androecium were transformed into the calyx and gynoecium, respectively. Two GLOBOSA-like MADS-box paralogous genes PFGLO1 and PFGLO2 were found in Physalis floridana, while the mutated phenotype was cosegregated with a large deletion harboring PFGLO1 and was complemented by the PFGLO1 genomic locus in transgenic plants, and severe PFGLO1 knockdowns phenocopied doll1. Thus, DOLL1 encodes the PFGLO1 protein and plays a primary role in determining corolla and androecium identity. However, specific PFGLO2 silencing showed no homeotic variation but rather affected pollen maturation. The two genes featured identical floral expression domains, but the encoding proteins shared 67% identity in sequences. PFGLO1 was localized in the nucleus when expressed in combination with a DEFICIENS homolog from Physalis floridana, whereas PFGLO2 was imported to the nucleus on its own. The two proteins were further found to have evolved different interacting partners and regulatory patterns, supporting the hypothesis that PFGLO2 is functionally separated from organ identity. Such a divergent pattern of duplicated GLO genes is unusual within the Solanaceae. Moreover, the phenotypes of the PFGLO1PFGLO2 double silencing mutants suggested that PFGLO2, through genetically interacting with PFGLO1, also exerts a role in the control of organ number and tip development of the second floral whorl. Our results, therefore, shed new light on the functional evolution of the duplicated GLO genes.

  15. Deciphering the Physalis floridana Double-Layered-Lantern1 Mutant Provides Insights into Functional Divergence of the GLOBOSA Duplicates within the Solanaceae1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; Quan, Hui; Zhao, Man; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    Physalis spp. develop the “Chinese lantern” trait, also known as inflated calyx syndrome, that is a morphological novelty. Here, we identified the double-layered-lantern1 (doll1) mutant, a recessive and monofactorial mutation, in Physalis floridana; its corolla and androecium were transformed into the calyx and gynoecium, respectively. Two GLOBOSA-like MADS-box paralogous genes PFGLO1 and PFGLO2 were found in Physalis floridana, while the mutated phenotype was cosegregated with a large deletion harboring PFGLO1 and was complemented by the PFGLO1 genomic locus in transgenic plants, and severe PFGLO1 knockdowns phenocopied doll1. Thus, DOLL1 encodes the PFGLO1 protein and plays a primary role in determining corolla and androecium identity. However, specific PFGLO2 silencing showed no homeotic variation but rather affected pollen maturation. The two genes featured identical floral expression domains, but the encoding proteins shared 67% identity in sequences. PFGLO1 was localized in the nucleus when expressed in combination with a DEFICIENS homolog from Physalis floridana, whereas PFGLO2 was imported to the nucleus on its own. The two proteins were further found to have evolved different interacting partners and regulatory patterns, supporting the hypothesis that PFGLO2 is functionally separated from organ identity. Such a divergent pattern of duplicated GLO genes is unusual within the Solanaceae. Moreover, the phenotypes of the PFGLO1PFGLO2 double silencing mutants suggested that PFGLO2, through genetically interacting with PFGLO1, also exerts a role in the control of organ number and tip development of the second floral whorl. Our results, therefore, shed new light on the functional evolution of the duplicated GLO genes. PMID:24390390

  16. Bioactive glass combined with bisphosphonates provides protection against biofilms formed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Anna K; Skogman, Malena E; Rosenqvist, Kirsi; Juvonen, Helka; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Juppo, Anne; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-03-30

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in the progression of periodontitis and they can be treated with antiseptics (i.e. chlorhexidine) or antibiotics, but these therapeutic alternatives are unable of ameliorating periodontal alveolar bone loss, which has been, on the other hand, successfully treated with bone-preserving agents. The improved bone formation achieved in animal models by the combination of two such agents: bioactive glass (BAG) and bisphosphonates has attracted the interest for further exploring dental applications. However, the antimicrobial effects that may result from combining them have not been yet investigated. Here, our aim was to explore the anti-biofilm effects that could result from combining BAG with bisphosphonates, particularly in a dental biofilm model. The experiments were performed with an oral cavity single-specie (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) biofilm assay, which was optimized in this contribution. Risedronate displayed an intrinsic anti-biofilm effect, and all bisphosphonates, except clodronate, reduced biofilm formation when combined with BAG. In particular, the anti-biofilm activity of risedronate was significantly increased by the combination with BAG. Since it has been proposed that some of the antimicrobial effects of BAG are caused by local pH changes, studies of pH variations were performed to gain a mechanistic understanding. However, the observed anti-biofilm effects could not be explained with lowered pHs. Overall, these results do provide further support for the promising use of bisphosphonate-BAG combinations in dental applications. These findings are particularly relevant for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, or osteoporotic patients, which are known to be more vulnerable to periodontitis. In such cases, bisphosphonate treatment could play a double positive effect: local treatment of periodontitis (in combination with BAG) and systemic treatment of osteoporosis, prevention of hypercalcemia and metastases

  17. Vaccine adjuvants aluminum and monophosphoryl lipid A provide distinct signals to generate protective cytotoxic memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Megan K. L.; McKee, Amy S.; David, Alexandria; Wang, Jieru; Mason, Robert; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines can greatly reduce the spread of and deaths from many infectious diseases. However, many infections have no successful vaccines. Better understanding of the generation of protective CD8 memory T cells by vaccination is essential for the rational design of new vaccines that aim to prime cellular immune responses. Here we demonstrate that the combination of two adjuvants that are currently licensed for use in humans can be used to prime long-lived memory CD8 T cells that protect mice from viral challenge. The universally used adjuvant, aluminum salts, primed long-lived memory CD8 T cells; however, effective cytotoxic T-cell differentiation occurred only in the presence of an additional adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). MPL-induced IL-6 was required for cytotoxic differentiation. The IL-6 acted by inducing granzyme B production and reducing expression of inhibitory molecule PD1 on the surface of the primed CD8 T cells. CD8 memory T cells generated by antigen delivered with both aluminum salts and MPL provided significant protection from influenza A challenge. These adjuvants could be used in human vaccines to prime protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:21518876

  18. Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Bryan, Ruth A; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

  19. Compton Scattering by Internal Shields Based on Melanin-Containing Mushrooms Provides Protection of Gastrointestinal Tract from Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C.; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Bryan, Ruth A.; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors. PMID:23113595

  20. Humoral immune response in breeding hens and protective immunity provided by administration of purified Salmonella Gallinarum porins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Verduzco, G; Téllez, G; Quintana, A L; Isibasi, A; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    2010-03-01

    The current studies were undertaken to assess the ability of humoral immune response in breeding hens to provide protective maternal antibody in the progeny. A highly purified outer membrane protein, 34 kDa, was isolated from a virulent strain of Salmonella Gallinarum. Cross-reactivity was observed between this protein and Salmonella Typhi porins; thus we consider this outer membrane protein as a Salmonella Gallinarum porin. To evaluate passive immunity against Salmonella Gallinarum, 200 broiler breeder hens were immunized with either 10 microg of Salmonella Gallinarum porins, 30 microg of Salmonella Gallinarum porins, or PBS without porins as a control group. Anti-Salmonella Gallinarum porin antibodies were detected in broiler breeder serum and in fertile eggs (P < 0.05). Consequently, chickens from immunized broiler breeder hens were protected between 53 to 70% against challenges of 20 to 500 half-maximal lethal dose of Salmonella Gallinarum (P < 0.001) when compared with control hens that were injected with PBS. These results suggest that Salmonella Gallinarum porins, as those of other Salmonella species, participate in the induction of the passive protective immunity, and the humoral immune response may be one of the mechanisms involved in the establishment of this protection.

  1. [Coordination of governmental and public control in providing sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population and consumers' rights protection].

    PubMed

    Rakitin, I A; Zel'din, A L

    2015-01-01

    The article covers features of govenmental and public control in providing sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population and consumers' rights protection. Based on analysis of contemporary legislation, the authors evaluated terms "control" and "supervision", having different legal nature. The authors determined specific traits and define subjects and objects for public control in relationships aimed to provide sanitary epidemiologic well-being of population, evaluated legislative basis of citizens' claims to Rospotrebnadzor, pointed at difficulties in implementation of public control in connection with necessity to create new organizational and legal mechanisms widening control possibilities.

  2. Trehalose protects from aggravation of amyloid pathology induced by isoflurane anesthesia in APP(swe) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Perucho, Juan; Casarejos, Maria J; Gomez, Ana; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Mena, Maria A

    2012-03-01

    There is an open controversy about the role of surgery and anesthesia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies have shown a high prevalence of these procedures in subjects with AD but the interpretation of these studies is difficult because of the co-existence of multiple variables. Experimental studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that small molecular weight volatile anesthetics enhance amyloidogenesis in vitro and produce behavioral deficits and brain lesions similar to those found in patients with AD. We examined the effect of co-treatment with trehalose on isoflurane-induced amyloidogenesis in mice. WT and APP(swe) mice, of 11 months of age, were exposed to 1% isoflurane, 3 times, for 1.5 hours each time and sacrificed 24 hours after their last exposure to isoflurane. The right hemi-brain was used for histological analysis and the contra-lateral hemi-brain used for biochemical studies. In this study, we have shown that repetitive exposure to isoflurane in pre-symptomatic mature APP(swe) mice increases apoptosis in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, enhances astrogliosis and the expression of GFAP and that these effects are prevented by co-treatment with trehalose, a disaccharide with known effects as enhancer of autophagy. We have also confirmed that in our model the co-treatment with trehalose increases the expression of autophagic markers as well as the expression of chaperones. Cotreatment with trehalose reduces the levels of β amyloid peptide aggregates, tau plaques and levels of phospho-tau. Our study, therefore, provides new therapeutic avenues that could help to prevent the putative pro-amyloidogenic properties of small volatile anesthetics.

  3. Chitosan-Alginate Microcapsules Provide Gastric Protection and Intestinal Release of ICAM-1-Targeting Nanocarriers, Enabling GI Targeting In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ghaffarian, Rasa; Herrero, Edgar Pérez; Oh, Hyuntaek; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Muro, Silvia

    2016-05-24

    When administered intravenously, active targeting of drug nanocarriers (NCs) improves biodistribution and endocytosis. Targeting may also improve oral delivery of NCs to treat gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies or for systemic absoption. However, GI instability of targeting moieties compromises this strategy. We explored whether encapsulation of antibody-coated NCs in microcapsules would protect against gastric degradation, providing NCs release and targeting in intestinal conditions. We used nanoparticles coated with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (anti-ICAM) or non-specific IgG. NCs (~160-nm) were encapsulated in ~180-μm microcapsules with an alginate core, in the absence or presence of a chitosan shell. We found >95% NC encapsulation within microcapsules and <10% NC release from microcapsules in storage. There was minimal NC release at gastric pH (<10%) and burst release at intestinal pH (75-85%), slightly attenuated by chitosan. Encapsulated NCs afforded increased protection against degradation (3-4 fold) and increased cell targeting (8-20 fold) after release vs. non-encapsulated NCs. Mouse oral gavage showed that microencapsulation provided 38-65% greater protection of anti-ICAM NCs in the GI tract, 40% lower gastric retention, and 4-9-fold enhanced intestinal biodistribution vs. non-encapsulated NCs. Therefore, microencapsulation of antibody-targeted NCs may enable active targeting strategies to be effective in the context of oral drug delivery.

  4. Human Exposure to Early Morning Anopheles funestus Biting Behavior and Personal Protection Provided by Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Moiroux, Nicolas; Damien, Georgia B.; Egrot, Marc; Djenontin, Armel; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Killeen, Gerry F.; Pennetier, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    A shift towards early morning biting behavior of the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus have been observed in two villages in south Benin following distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), but the impact of these changes on the personal protection efficacy of LLINs was not evaluated. Data from human and An. funestus behavioral surveys were used to measure the human exposure to An. funestus bites through previously described mathematical models. We estimated the personal protection efficacy provided by LLINs and the proportions of exposure to bite occurring indoors and/or in the early morning. Average personal protection provided by using of LLIN was high (≥80% of the total exposure to bite), but for LLIN users, a large part of remaining exposure occurred outdoors (45.1% in Tokoli-V and 68.7% in Lokohoué) and/or in the early morning (38.5% in Tokoli-V and 69.4% in Lokohoué). This study highlights the crucial role of LLIN use and the possible need to develop new vector control strategies targeting malaria vectors with outdoor and early morning biting behavior. This multidisciplinary approach that supplements entomology with social science and mathematical modeling illustrates just how important it is to assess where and when humans are actually exposed to malaria vectors before vector control program managers, policy-makers and funders conclude what entomological observations imply. PMID:25115830

  5. The Brucella melitensis M5-90 phosphoglucomutase (PGM) mutant is attenuated and confers protection against wild-type challenge in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Tiansen; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhen; Feng, Hanping; Wang, Yuanzhi; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Brucellae are Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogens that infect humans and animals, bringing great economic burdens to developing countries. Live attenuated Brucella vaccines (strain M5-90 or others) are the most efficient means for prevention and control of animal brucellosis. However, these vaccines have several drawbacks, including residual virulence in animals, and difficulties in differentiating natural infection from vaccine immunization, which limit their application. A vaccine that can differentiate infection from immunization will have extensive applications. A Brucella melitensis (B. melitensis) strain M5-90 pgm mutant (M5-90Δpgm) was constructed to overcome these drawbacks. M5-90Δpgm showed significantly reduced survival in embryonic trophoblast cells and in mice, and induced high protective immunity in BALB/c mice. Moreover, M5-90Δpgm elicited an anti-Brucella-specific immunoglobulin G response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). In addition, M5-90Δpgm induced the secretion of IFN-γ in immunized sheep. Serum samples from sheep inoculated with M5-90Δpgm were negative by the Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) and Standard Tube Agglutination Test (STAT). Furthermore, the PGM antigen allowed serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. These results suggest that M5-90Δpgm is an ideal live attenuated vaccine candidate against B. melitensis 16 M and deserves further evaluation for vaccine development.

  6. Safety and protective efficacy of a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum as a live attenuated vaccine for fowl typhoid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhao; Yin, Junlei; Kang, Xilong; Geng, Shizhong; Hu, Maozhi; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-08-01

    With an aim to develop a safe, immunogenic fowl typhoid (FT) vaccine, the safety and efficacy of 1009ΔspiCΔcrp, a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum, were evaluated in chickens. Three-day-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized with 1009ΔspiCΔcrp (1×10(7)CFU) and boosted 7days later (at 10-days old) with the same dose and via the same route (vaccinated group). The vaccinated group showed no clinical symptoms and no differences in body weight compared to the unvaccinated control group. 1009ΔspiCΔcrp bacteria colonized and persisted in the liver and spleen of vaccinated chickens for >14days, and significant specific humoral and cellular immune responses were induced. Vaccinated chickens were challenged with S. gallinarum strain SG9 at 21days post-immunization (24-day-old chickens), and efficient protection was observed based on the mortality and clinical symptoms, as compared to those in the control group. These results demonstrate that 1009ΔspiCΔcrp can be used as a live attenuated vaccine.

  7. Mentha piperita (Linn) leaf extract provides protection against radiation induced alterations in intestinal mucosa of Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Samarth, R M; Saini, M R; Maharwal, J; Dhaka, A; Kumar, Ashok

    2002-11-01

    Intestinal protection in mice against radiation injury by M. piperita (1 g/kg body weight/day) was studied from day 1 to day 20 after whole body gamma irradiation (8 Gy). Villus height, goblet cells/villus section, total cells, mitotic cells and dead cells/crypt section in the jejunum are good parameters for the assessment of radiation damage. There was significant decrease in the villus height, number of total cells and mitotic cells/crypt section, whereas goblet cells and dead cells showed significant increase after irradiation. Mentha pretreatment resulted in a significant increase in villus height, total cells and mitotic cells, whereas goblet cells and dead cells showed a significant decrease from respective irradiated controls at each autopsy day. The results suggest that Mentha pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced alterations in intestinal mucosa of Swiss albino mice.

  8. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-01-06

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Curiel, David T.; Leppla, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  10. Burkholderia terrae BS001 migrates proficiently with diverse fungal hosts through soil and provides protection from antifungal agents

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Rashid; Tazetdinova, Diana I.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Soil bacteria can benefit from co-occurring soil fungi in respect of the acquisition of carbonaceous nutrients released by fungal hyphae and the access to novel territories in soil. Here, we investigated the capacity of the mycosphere-isolated bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 to comigrate through soil along with hyphae of the soil fungi Trichoderma asperellum, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum, F. oxysporum pv lini, Coniochaeta ligniaria, Phanerochaete velutina, and Phallus impudicus. We used Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten as the reference migration-inciting fungus. Bacterial migration through presterilized soil on the extending fungal hyphae was detected with six of the seven test fungi, with only Phallus impudicus not showing any bacterial transport. Much like with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten, intermediate (106–108 CFU g-1 dry soil) to high (>108 CFU g-1 dry soil) strain BS001 cell population sizes were found at the hyphal migration fronts of four fungi, i.e., T. asperellum, Rhizoctonia solani, F. oxysporum and F. oxysporum pv lini, whereas for two fungi, Coniochaeta ligniaria and Phanerochaete velutina, the migration responses were retarded and population sizes were lower (103–106 CFU g-1 dry soil). Consistent with previous data obtained with the reference fungus, migration with the migration-inciting fungi occurred only in the direction of the hyphal growth front. Remarkably, Burkholderia terrae BS001 provided protection from several antifungal agents to the canonical host Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. Specifically, this host was protected from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0 metabolites, as well as from the anti-fungal agent cycloheximide. Similar protection by strain BS001was observed for T. asperellum, and, to a lower extent, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. The protective effect may be related to the consistent occurrence of biofilm-like cell layers or agglomerates at the surfaces of the protected fungi. The current study represents

  11. Does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Fallouh, Hazem B; Young, Christopher P; Chambers, David J

    2009-11-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation? Altogether, 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 13 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We identified 13 studies, of which eight were randomised prospective trials. None of these studies found increased mortality, seven analyzed serum cardiac enzymes and showed that intermittent ischemic arrest provides equal or better protection compared to cardioplegic techniques. Two studies found an increased usage of inotropes and intra aortic balloon pump (IABP) in the intermittent ischemic arrest group. We conclude that intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is a versatile and cost-effective method of myocardial protection, with the immediate postoperative outcome comparable to cardioplegic arrest in first-time coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The ischaemic duration associated with intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is invariably shorter than that associated with cardioplegic arrest, and this may be one explanation for the comparable outcomes. There may also be an element of preconditioning protection during the intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation method, as has been shown experimentally. During elective CABG in patients with no clinical evidence of aortic or cerebro-vascular disease, the incidence of peri-operative microemboli (ME) and postoperative neuropsychological disturbances are shown to be comparable with both techniques of myocardial preservation.

  12. Co-Activation of Th17 and Antibody Responses Provides Efficient Protection against Mucosal Infection by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianyang; Li, Ning; Bi, Shuai; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Beinan

    2016-01-01

    Conserved protein antigens among serotypes of group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) have been focused for vaccine development because of the diversity of GAS serotypes and risks of autoimmunity post-GAS infection. Precise delineation of protective immune response to each of GAS antigens is critical for vaccine efficacy and safety. We recently reported that immunization with SrtA of GAS provides Th17-dependent clearance of heterologous serotypes of GAS in NALT. SCPA is a surface virulence molecule of GAS and known to induce antibody-mediated protection against GAS. We hypothesized that co-immunization with SrtA and SCPA would provide more efficient protection by eliciting combined Th17 and antibody responses. The present study showed that mice that were intranasally co-immunized with SrtA/SCPA cleared GAS more efficiently than the mice that were immunized with either SrtA or SCPA individually, and as efficient as the mice that experienced repeated GAS infections. The co-immunization induced Th17 and robust SCPA antibody responses, accompanied by a rapid influx of neutrophils and high myeloperoxidase activity in NALT, suggesting that simultaneous induction of mucosal Th17 and neutralizing antibody responses offers more effective GAS elimination through rapid infiltration and activation of neutrophils. Moreover, Th17 response was strongly induced in mice that experienced repeated GAS-infection and maintained at a high level even after the bacteria were cleared; whereas, it was moderately induced and promptly returned to baseline following bacterial elimination in SrtA/SCPA co-immunized mice. Additional results showed that the survival rate of systemic challenge was significantly higher in infection experienced than in co-immunized mice, indicating that more immune elements are required for protection against systemic than mucosal GAS infection. PMID:28030629

  13. Salt shield: intracellular salts provide cellular protection against ionizing radiation in the halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Kish, A; Kirkali, G; Robinson, C; Rosenblatt, R; Jaruga, P; Dizdaroglu, M; DiRuggiero, J

    2009-05-01

    The halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 was used as a model system to investigate cellular damage induced by exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Oxidative damages are the main lesions from IR and result from free radicals production via radiolysis of water. This is the first study to quantify DNA base modification in a prokaryote, revealing a direct relationship between yield of DNA lesions and IR dose. Most importantly, our data demonstrate the significance of DNA radiation damage other than strand breaks on cell survival. We also report the first in vivo evidence of reactive oxygen species scavenging by intracellular halides in H. salinarum NRC-1, resulting in increased protection against nucleotide modification and carbonylation of protein residues. Bromide ions, which are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals, provided the greatest protection to cellular macromolecules. Modified DNA bases were repaired in 2 h post irradiation, indicating effective DNA repair systems. In addition, measurements of H. salinarum NRC-1 cell interior revealed a high Mn/Fe ratio similar to that of Deinococcus radiodurans and other radiation-resistant microorganisms, which has been shown to provide a measure of protection for proteins against oxidative damage. The work presented here supports previous studies showing that radiation resistance is the product of mechanisms for cellular protection and detoxification, as well as for the repair of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules. The finding that not only Mn/Fe but also the presence of halides can decrease the oxidative damage to DNA and proteins emphasizes the significance of the intracellular milieu in determining microbial radiation resistance.

  14. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  15. A signature of the oxygenase intermediate in catalysis by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase as provided by a site-directed mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Hartman, F C

    1995-05-19

    An uncharacterized minor transient product, observed in our earlier studies of substrate turnover by the E48Q mutant of Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Lee, E. H., Harpel, M. R., Chen, Y.-R., and Hartman, F. C. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 26583-26591), becomes a major product when it is trapped and stabilized with borate as an additive to the reaction mixture. Chemical characterization establishes this novel product as D-glycero-2,3-pentodiulose 1,5-bisphosphate, thereby demonstrating oxidation of the C-3 hydroxyl of D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate to a carbonyl. As the formation of the novel oxidation product is oxygen-dependent and generates hydrogen peroxide, its precursor must be a peroxy derivative of ribulose bisphosphate. Thus, discovery of the dicarbonyl bisphosphate lends direct support to the long standing, but heretofore unproven, postulate that the normal pathway for oxidative cleavage of ribulose bisphosphate by the wild-type enzyme entails a peroxy intermediate. Our results also suggest that stabilization of the peroxy intermediate by the wild-type enzyme promotes carbon-carbon scission as opposed to elimination of hydrogen peroxide.

  16. The never ripe mutant provides evidence that tumor-induced ethylene controls the morphogenesis of agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced crown galls on tomato stems

    PubMed

    Aloni; Wolf; Feigenbaum; Avni; Klee

    1998-07-01

    We confirm the hypothesis that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced galls produce ethylene that controls vessel differentiation in the host stem of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Using an ethylene-insensitive mutant, Never ripe (Nr), and its isogenic wild-type parent we show that infection by A. tumefaciens results in high rates of ethylene evolution from the developing crown galls. Ethylene evolution from isolated internodes carrying galls was up to 50-fold greater than from isolated internodes of control plants when measured 21 and 28 d after infection. Tumor-induced ethylene substantially decreased vessel diameter in the host tissues beside the tumor in wild-type stems but had a very limited effect in the Nr stems. Ethylene promoted the typical unorganized callus shape of the gall, which maximized the tumor surface in wild-type stems, whereas the galls on the Nr stems had a smooth surface. The combination of decreased vessel diameter in the host and increased tumor surface ensured water-supply priority to the growing gall over the host shoot. These results indicate that in addition to the well-defined roles of auxin and cytokinin, there is a critical role for ethylene in determining crown-gall morphogenesis.

  17. Paternity protection can provide a kick-start for the evolution of male-only parental care.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Andrew T; Schwanz, Lisa E; Kokko, Hanna

    2013-08-01

    Sperm competition and uncertainty of paternity hamper the evolution of male parental care. Thus, maternal care predominates in most taxa. What if males can, however, limit cuckoldry by guarding the eggs postmating? Here, we show that this provides a reason to reconsider an old and nowadays rather discredited hypothesis: that external fertilization is associated with male care because the parent who releases its gametes first can depart leaving the other in a "cruel bind," having to care for the offspring. In our model, protection of paternity provides an additional incentive for the male to stay associated with its young. When we then assume that offspring survive better if guarded, paternity protection proves enough to kick-start the evolution of male-only parental care from a scenario with no care. This fits with data from fishes, where male-only care is associated with external fertilization, whereas female-only care almost always evolves after an initial transition to internal fertilization. Our model unifies disparate hypotheses regarding parental care roles and provides support for the idea that care roles can be influenced by sex differences in selection to be physically close to the offspring, including selection that is initially not based on offspring survival.

  18. Long-Term Endothelin-A Receptor Antagonism Provides Robust Renal Protection in Humanized Sickle Cell Disease Mice.

    PubMed

    Kasztan, Malgorzata; Fox, Brandon M; Speed, Joshua S; De Miguel, Carmen; Gohar, Eman Y; Townes, Tim M; Kutlar, Abdullah; Pollock, Jennifer S; Pollock, David M

    2017-03-27

    Sickle cell disease (SCD)-associated nephropathy is a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients because of the lack of efficacious treatments targeting renal manifestations of the disease. Here, we describe a long-term treatment strategy with the selective endothelin-A receptor (ETA) antagonist, ambrisentan, designed to interfere with the development of nephropathy in a humanized mouse model of SCD. Ambrisentan preserved GFR at the level of nondisease controls and prevented the development of proteinuria, albuminuria, and nephrinuria. Microscopy studies demonstrated prevention of podocyte loss and structural alterations, the absence of vascular congestion, and attenuation of glomerulosclerosis in treated mice. Studies in isolated glomeruli showed that treatment reduced inflammation and oxidative stress. At the level of renal tubules, ambrisentan treatment prevented the increased excretion of urinary tubular injury biomarkers. Additionally, the treatment strategy prevented tubular brush border loss, diminished tubular iron deposition, blocked the development of interstitial fibrosis, and prevented immune cell infiltration. Furthermore, the prevention of albuminuria in treated mice was associated with preservation of cortical megalin expression. In a separate series of identical experiments, combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonism provided only some of the protection observed with ambrisentan, highlighting the importance of exclusively targeting the ETA receptor in SCD. Our results demonstrate that ambrisentan treatment provides robust protection from diverse renal pathologies in SCD mice, and suggest that long-term ETA receptor antagonism may provide a strategy for the prevention of renal complications of SCD.

  19. Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium delivery of a novel DNA vaccine induces immune responses and provides protection against duck enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueyan; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Kangpeng; Li, Pei; Liu, Qiong; Zhao, Xinxin; Kong, Qingke

    2016-04-15

    DNA vaccines are widely used to prevent and treat infectious diseases, cancer and autoimmune diseases; however, their relatively low immunogenicity is an obstacle to their use. In this study, we constructed a novel and universal DNA vaccine vector (pSS898) that can be used to build DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV) and other viruses that require DNA vaccines to provide protection. This vaccine vector has many advantages, including innate immunogenicity, efficient nuclear trafficking and resistance to attack from nucleases. UL24 and tgB from DEV were chosen as the antigens, and the heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) from Escherichia coli and the IL-2 gene (DuIL-2) from duck were used as adjuvants for the construction of DNA vaccine plasmids. Ducklings that were orally immunized with S739 (Salmonella Typhimurium Δasd-66 Δcrp-24 Δcya-25) and harboring these DEV DNA vaccines produced strong mucosal and systemic immune responses, and they resisted an otherwise lethal DEV challenge. More importantly, S739 (UL24-LTB) provided 90% protection after a priming-boost immunization. This study shows that our novel and universal DNA vaccine vector can be used efficiently in practical applications and may provide a promising method of orally inoculating ducks with a DEV DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium for prevention of DVE.

  20. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  1. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-04-27

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades.

  2. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine provides early protective antibody responses in children after related and unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Roland; Kuypers, Lisa; Dirksen, Uta; Schubert, Ralf; Gruhn, Bernd; Strauss, Gabriele; Beutel, Karin; Groll, Andreas H; Duffner, Ulrich; Blütters-Sawatzki, Renate; Holter, Wolfgang; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Grüttner, Hans-Peter; Schroten, Horst; Zielen, Stefan; Ohmann, Christian; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Dilloo, Dagmar

    2007-03-15

    Following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), children are at risk of life-threatening pneumococcal infections. Whereas vaccination with polysaccharide vaccines fails to elicit protective immunity in most alloHSC transplant recipients, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines may effectively prevent invasive disease by eliciting T-cell-dependent antibody responses. Here, we report safety and immunogenicity in 53 children immunized with a regimen of 3 consecutive doses of a heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) in monthly intervals starting 6 to 9 months after alloHSCT. Immunization was well tolerated with no vaccine-related serious adverse events. Serologic response rates evaluable in 43 patients ranged from 41.9% to 86.0% and 58.1% to 93.0% after 2 and 3 vaccinations, respectively, with 55.8% and 74.4% of patients achieving protective antibody levels to all 7 vaccine serotypes. Our study provides the first evidence that vaccination with 7vPCV is safe and elicits protective antipneumococcal antibody responses in pediatric recipients of related or unrelated donor alloHSC transplants within the first year following transplantation. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00169728.

  3. Adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific effector CD4+ T cells provides antiviral protection from murine CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Jeitziner, Sanja Mandaric; Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the human population and establishes a life-long persistence. CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but the virus carries pathogenic potential and causes severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. T-cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role in control of CMV infection and adoptive transfer of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells restores viral immunity in immunosuppressed patients but a role for CD4(+) T cells remains elusive. Here, we analyzed in adoptive transfer studies the features and antiviral functions of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells during primary murine CMV (MCMV) infection. MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells expanded upon MCMV infection and displayed an effector phenotype and function. Adoptive transfer of in vivo activated MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells to immune-compromised mice was protective during pathogenic MCMV infection and IFN-γ was a crucial mediator of this protective capacity. Moreover, co-transfer of low doses of both MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells synergized in control of lytic viral replication in immune-compromised mice. Our data reveal a pivotal antiviral role for virus-specific CD4(+) T cells in protection from pathogenic CMV infection and provide evidence for their antiviral therapeutic potential.

  4. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine provides long-lasting protection against lethal Ebola virus challenge after a single dose.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yoshimi; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Feldmann, Friederike; Botto, Sara; Ball, Susan; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2015-05-05

    Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus; EBOV) is a highly lethal hemorrhagic disease virus that most recently was responsible for two independent 2014 outbreaks in multiple countries in Western Africa, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, respectively. Herein, we show that a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides durable protective immunity from Ebola virus following a single vaccine dose. This study has implications for human vaccination against ebolaviruses, as well as for development of a 'disseminating' vaccine to target these viruses in wild African great apes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Delayed Treatment of Ebola Virus Infection with Plant-Derived Monoclonal Antibodies Provides Protection in Rhesus Macaques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-15

    Delayed treatment of Ebola virus infection with plant -derived monoclonal antibodies provides protection in rhesus macaques Gene Garrard Olinger, Jr.a...Michael Paulyb, Kevin J. Whaleyb, Calli M. Leara, Julia E. Bigginsa, Corinne Scullya, Lisa Hensleya,3, and Larry Zeitlinb,2 aDivision of Virology , United...three anti-Ebola virus mouse/human chimeric mAbs (c13C6, h-13F6, and c6D8) were produced in Chinese hamster ovary and in whole plant

  6. Abortive Intrabronchial Infection of Rhesus Macaques with Varicella-Zoster Virus Provides Partial Protection against Simian Varicella Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christine; Engelmann, Flora; Arnold, Nicole; Krah, David L.; ter Meulen, Jan; Haberthur, Kristen; Dewane, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus and the etiological agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (HZ, shingles). Previously, inoculation of monkeys via the subcutaneous, intratracheal, intravenous, or oral-nasal-conjunctival routes did not recapitulate all the hallmarks of VZV infection, including varicella, immunity, latency, and reactivation. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques (RMs) with simian varicella virus (SVV), a homolog of VZV, recapitulates virologic and immunologic hallmarks of VZV infection in humans. Given that VZV is acquired primarily via the respiratory route, we investigated whether intrabronchial inoculation of RMs with VZV would result in a robust model. Despite the lack of varicella and viral replication in either the lungs or whole blood, all four RMs generated an immune response characterized by the generation of VZV-specific antibodies and T cells. Two of 4 VZV-inoculated RMs were challenged with SVV to determine cross-protection. VZV-immune RMs displayed no varicella rash and had lower SVV viral loads and earlier and stronger humoral and cellular immune responses than controls. In contrast to the results for SVV DNA, no VZV DNA was detected in sensory ganglia at necropsy. In summary, following an abortive VZV infection, RMs developed an adaptive immune response that conferred partial protection against SVV challenge. These data suggest that a replication-incompetent VZV vaccine that does not establish latency may provide sufficient protection against VZV disease and that VZV vaccination of RMs followed by SVV challenge provides a model to evaluate new vaccines and therapeutics against VZV. IMPORTANCE Although VZV vaccine strain Oka is attenuated, it can cause mild varicella, establish latency, and in rare cases, reactivate to cause herpes zoster (HZ). Moreover, studies suggest that the HZ vaccine (Zostavax) only confers short-lived immunity. The development of more efficacious

  7. Novel protective antigens expressed by Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes provide immunity to mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Eduardo L V; Claser, Carla; Haolla, Filipe A B; Zanella, Luiz G; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2008-08-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated in A/Sn mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease protective immunity against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection elicited by vaccination with an open reading frame (ORF) expressed by amastigotes. In our experiments, we used this mouse model to search for other amastigote-expressed ORFs with a similar property. Fourteen ORFs previously determined to be expressed in this developmental stage were individually inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector containing a nucleotide sequence that encoded a mammalian secretory signal peptide. Immunization with 13 of the 14 ORFs induced specific antibodies which recognized the amastigotes. Three of those immune sera also reacted with trypomastigotes and epimastigotes. After a lethal challenge with Y strain trypomastigotes, the vast majority of plasmid-injected mice succumbed to infection. In some cases, a significant delay in mortality was observed. Only two of these ORFs provided protective immunity against the otherwise lethal infection caused by trypomastigotes of the Y or Colombia strain. These ORFs encode members of the trans-sialidase family of surface antigens related to the previously described protective antigen amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2). Nevertheless, at the level of antibody recognition, no cross-reactivity was observed between the ORFs and the previously described ASP-2 from the Y strain. In immunofluorescence analyses, we observed the presence of epitopes related to both proteins expressed by amastigotes of seven different strains. In conclusion, our approach allowed us to successfully identify two novel protective ORFs which we consider interesting for future studies on the immune response to Chagas' disease.

  8. Novel Protective Antigens Expressed by Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigotes Provide Immunity to Mice Highly Susceptible to Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Claser, Carla; Haolla, Filipe A. B.; Zanella, Luiz G.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2008-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated in A/Sn mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease protective immunity against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection elicited by vaccination with an open reading frame (ORF) expressed by amastigotes. In our experiments, we used this mouse model to search for other amastigote-expressed ORFs with a similar property. Fourteen ORFs previously determined to be expressed in this developmental stage were individually inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector containing a nucleotide sequence that encoded a mammalian secretory signal peptide. Immunization with 13 of the 14 ORFs induced specific antibodies which recognized the amastigotes. Three of those immune sera also reacted with trypomastigotes and epimastigotes. After a lethal challenge with Y strain trypomastigotes, the vast majority of plasmid-injected mice succumbed to infection. In some cases, a significant delay in mortality was observed. Only two of these ORFs provided protective immunity against the otherwise lethal infection caused by trypomastigotes of the Y or Colombia strain. These ORFs encode members of the trans-sialidase family of surface antigens related to the previously described protective antigen amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2). Nevertheless, at the level of antibody recognition, no cross-reactivity was observed between the ORFs and the previously described ASP-2 from the Y strain. In immunofluorescence analyses, we observed the presence of epitopes related to both proteins expressed by amastigotes of seven different strains. In conclusion, our approach allowed us to successfully identify two novel protective ORFs which we consider interesting for future studies on the immune response to Chagas' disease. PMID:18579696

  9. Combined morphine and limb remote ischemic perconditioning provides an enhanced protection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury by antiapoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Yu; Cui, Xin-Long; Xue, Fu-Shan; Duan, Ran; Li, Rui-Ping; Liu, Gao-Pu; Yang, Gui-Zhen; Sun, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Both morphine and limb remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPer) can protect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). This experiment was designed to assess whether combined morphine and limb RIPer could provide and enhanced protection against myocardial IRI in an in vivo rat model. One hundred male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to six groups: sham, ischemia/reperfusion (IR), ischemic preconditioning, RIPer, morphine (M), and combined morphine and remote ischemic perconditioning (M + RIPer). Ventricular arrhythmias that occurred during ischemia and early reperfusion were scored, and serum creatine kinase isoenzyme and cardiac troponin I levels were assayed. The infarct size was determined by Evans blue and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. The apoptosis in the myocardial ischemic core, ischemic border, and nonischemic areas was assessed through real-time polymerase chain reaction for Bax and Bcl-2 and with the transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling assay. The infarct size, serum cardiac troponin I level, incidence, and score of the arrhythmias during the initial reperfusion were significantly reduced in the M + RIPer group compared with the IR group but did not differ significantly between the ischemic preconditioning and M + RIPer groups. Transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling-positive cells were significantly decreased, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly increased in the M + RIPer group compared with the IR group. This experiment demonstrates that combined morphine and limb RIPer provides an enhanced protection against myocardial IRI by the Bcl-2-linked apoptotic signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of micro health insurance in providing financial risk protection in developing countries--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Habib, Shifa Salman; Perveen, Shagufta; Khuwaja, Hussain Maqbool Ahmed

    2016-03-22

    Out of pocket payments are the predominant method of financing healthcare in many developing countries, which can result in impoverishment and financial catastrophe for those affected. In 2010, WHO estimated that approximately 100 million people are pushed below the poverty line each year by payments for healthcare. Micro health insurance (MHI) has been used in some countries as means of risk pooling and reducing out of pocket health expenditure. A systematic review was conducted to assess the extent to which MHI has contributed to providing financial risk protection to low-income households in developing countries, and suggest how the findings can be applied in the Pakistani setting. We conducted a systematic search for published literature using the search terms "Community based health insurance AND developing countries", "Micro health insurance AND developing countries", "Mutual health insurance AND developing countries", "mutual OR micro OR community based health insurance" "Health insurance AND impact AND poor" "Health insurance AND financial protection" and "mutual health organizations" on three databases, Pubmed, Google Scholar and Science Direct (Elsevier). Only those records that were published in the last ten years, in English language with their full texts available free of cost, were considered for inclusion in this review. Hand searching was carried out on the reference lists of the retrieved articles and webpages of international organizations like World Bank, World Health Organization and International Labour Organization. Twenty-three articles were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review (14 from Asia and 9 from Africa). Our analysis shows that MHI, in the majority of cases, has been found to contribute to the financial protection of its beneficiaries, by reducing out of pocket health expenditure, catastrophic health expenditure, total health expenditure, household borrowings and poverty. MHI also had a positive safeguarding effect on

  11. Radical scavenging activity of a sunscreen enriched by antioxidants providing protection in the whole solar spectral range.

    PubMed

    Souza, Carla; Campos, Patrícia Maia; Schanzer, Sabine; Albrecht, Stephanie; Lohan, Silke B; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E; Meinke, Martina C

    2017-03-21

    The literature claims that incorporation of antioxidants into sunscreens provides additional skin photoprotection by scavenging free radicals formed due to sun radiation, but there are limited in vivo studies that support this hypothesis. This study aims to examine whether addition of antioxidants to a broad-spectrum sunscreen increases its photoprotective effect in real-use conditions. Sunscreen formulations composed of stable UV filters (Tinosorb® S, Tinosorb® M, Uvinul® APlus, and Uvinul® T150) alone or in combination with antioxidants (Spirulina and dimethylmethoxy chromanol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles) were developed and their appearance, odor, rheological behavior, Sun Protection Factor (SPF), and UVA protection were analyzed. Next, it was conducted a 3-month, single-blind clinical study with 44 healthy subjects (30-50years). Before and 28, 54, and 84days after twice-daily self application of the sunscreens on the face, the stratum corneum water content, transepidermal water loss, dermis echogenicity, and skin elasticity and pigmentation were measured. At the end of the study period, the volunteers answered a questionnaire containing terms related to sensory characteristics of the formulations. All formulations were stable and exhibited non-Newtonian and pseudoplastic behavior, in vivo SPF 30, and good UVA protection. Antioxidant supplementation to the sunscreen formulation significantly improved the skin pigmentation, the collagen degradation on the dermis and thereby the skin net elasticity after 84days of treatment compared to the sunscreen alone. Concerning safety, all formulations were considered non-irritant according to the sensorial analyses, whose results agreed with the clinical study findings.

  12. Novel method for screening of radioprotective agents providing protection to DNA ligase against gamma radiation induced damage.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Saurabh; Malhotra, Poonam; Gupta, Ashutosh K; Singh, Praveen K; Mishra, Anil K; Javed, Saleem; Kumar, Raj

    2014-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and novel method was developed to screen out potential agents able to protect functional activity of DNA ligase against gamma irradiation-induced damage. Repeatability, authenticity and sensitivity of the method was verified by analyzing DNA ligase protecting activities of well-known radioprotectors such as amifostine, trolox, melatonin, semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) and an antioxidant gallic acid in extremely low concentration (1 μg/reaction). Two different sets (Set A and B) of T4 DNA ligase (1 unit/set) were prepared. Set 'A' (negative control) was exposed to different doses (3-5 kGy) of gamma radiation in the absence of radioprotective compounds. Set B (test) was exposed to similar doses of gamma radiation in the presence of radioprotective compounds. Following irradiation, DNA ligase was mixed with λ DNA (250 ng) pre-digested with Hind III restriction endonuclease. Ligation reaction was performed in both sets simultaneously at 22°C for 20 min and reaction product was analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Complete DNA ligation was observed in samples where DNA ligase was irradiated in the presence of radioprotectective compounds, i.e., amifostine, trolox, melatonin and a natural radioprotector semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) individually, while, functional impairment in ligation activity of DNA ligase was evident in samples in which DNA ligase was irradiated in the absence of a radioprotective compound. The current method was able to provide significant input to screen out radioprotective compounds able to protect DNA ligase functional activity against gamma radiation-induced functional impairment.

  13. Helium breathing provides modest antiinflammatory, but no endothelial protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in humans in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lucchinetti, Eliana; Wacker, Johannes; Maurer, Christian; Keel, Marius; Härter, Luc; Zaugg, Kathrin; Zaugg, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The noble gas helium is devoid of anesthetic effects, and it elicits cardiac preconditioning. We hypothesized that inhalation of helium provides protection against postocclusive endothelial dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion of the forearm in humans. Eight healthy male subjects were enrolled in this study with a crossover design. Each volunteer was randomly exposed to 15 min of forearm ischemia in the presence or absence of helium inhalation. Helium was inhaled at an end-tidal concentration of 50 vol% from 15 min before ischemia until 5 min after the onset of reperfusion ("helium conditioning"). Hyperemic reaction, a marker of nitric oxide bioavailability and endothelial function, was determined at 15 and 30 min of reperfusion on the forearm using venous occlusion plethysmography. Expression of the proinflammatory markers CD11b, ICAM-1, PSGL-1, and L-selectin (CD62L) on leukocytes and P-selectin (CD62P), PSGL-1, and CD42b on platelets were measured by flow cytometry during reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion consistently reduced the postocclusive endothelium-dependent hyperemic reaction at 15 and 30 min of reperfusion. Periischemic inhalation of helium at 50 vol% did not improve postocclusive hyperemic reaction. Helium decreased expression of the proinflammatory marker CD11b and ICAM-1 on leukocytes and attenuated the expression of the procoagulant markers CD42b and PSGL-1 on platelets. Although inhalation of helium diminished the postischemic inflammatory reaction, our data indicate that human endothelium, which is a component of all vital organs, is not amenable to protection by helium at 50 vol% in vivo. This is in contrast to sevoflurane, which protects human endothelium at low subanesthetic concentrations.

  14. Regulated expression of virulence gene mviN provides protective immunity and colonization control of Salmonella in poultry.

    PubMed

    Rubinelli, Peter M; Lee, Sang In; Roto, Stephanie M; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2015-10-05

    Current live attenuated vaccines for control of Salmonella in poultry persist in the ceca and may persist in the environment. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of the vaccine efficacy of a Salmonella mutant strain with inducible mviN expression and rapid clearance from the host. The mutant was effective in oral immunization of the broiler chicken host against a virulent Salmonella oral challenge strain, having a mean 7×10(6)CFU/g in the ceca of unvaccinated controls compared to a mean 2×10(3)CFU/g in the ceca of vaccinated chickens at 4 weeks post-challenge (6 weeks of age). The mutant strain also demonstrated immunogenicity, reduced organ colonization, and rapid clearance in broiler chickens within 3 weeks of inoculation.

  15. Hepatitis B virus vaccination booster does not provide additional protection in adolescents: a cross-sectional school-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Jun-Song; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-09-23

    Current consensus does not support the use of a universal booster of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine because there is an anamnestic response in almost all children 15 years after universal infant HBV vaccination. We aimed to provide a booster strategy among adolescents as a result of their changes in lifestyle and sexual activity. This study comprised a series of cross-sectional serological surveys of HBV markers in four age groups between 2004 and 2012. The seropositivity rates of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its reciprocal antibody (anti-HBs) for each age group were collected. There were two parts to this study; age-specific HBV seroepidemiology and subgroup analysis, including effects of different vaccine types, booster response for immunogenicity at 15 years of age, and longitudinal follow-up to identify possible additional protection by HBV booster. Within the study period, data on serum anti-HBs and HBsAg in a total of 6950 students from four age groups were collected. The overall anti-HBs and HBsAg seropositivity rates were 44.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate in the plasma-derived subgroup was significantly higher in both 15- and 18-year age groups. Overall response rate in the double-seronegative recipients at 15 years of age was 92.5% at 6 weeks following one recombinant HBV booster dose. Among the 24 recipients showing anti-HBs seroconversion at 6 weeks after booster, seven subjects (29.2%) had lost their anti-HBs seropositivity again within 3 years. Increased seropositivity rates and titers of anti-HBs did not provide additional protective effects among subjects comprehensively vaccinated against HBV in infancy. HBV booster strategy at 15 years of age was the main contributor to the unique age-related phenomenon of anti-HBs seropositivity rate and titer. No increase in HBsAg seropositivity rates within different age groups was observed. Vaccination with plasma-derived HBV vaccines in infancy provided higher

  16. Oral administration of Euglena gracilis Z and its carbohydrate storage substance provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ayaka; Suzuki, Kengo; Asayama, Yuta; Konno, Makoto; Saito, Keita; Yamazaki, Noriyuki; Takimoto, Hiroaki

    2017-09-30

    Euglena gracilis Z is a micro-algae that is used as a food or nutritional supplement. Paramylon, the carbohydrate storage substance of Euglena gracilis Z has β-1, 3-glucan structure. Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon are reported to affect the immune system. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon against influenza virus infection in mice. Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon were administered to mice as a 2% dietary mixture ad libitum. At 2 weeks after initiation of dietary administration, mice were infected intranasally with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Survival rate was monitored 10 days after infection. In adition, we performed virus titer and cytokine profiles in the lung. High survival rates were observed for Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon-treated groups compared to the control group. Significantly lower virus titer in the lung was observed in the Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon-treated groups compared to the control group from day 1 after infection. Higher amount of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, and IL-10 was observed in the paramylon groups compared to the control group. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the Euglena gracilis Z and paramylon which provides protection against influenza virus infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Protection Provided by a Gabexate Mesylate Thermo-Sensitive In Situ Gel for Rats with Grade III Pancreatic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hanjing; Song, Qing; Lv, Faqin; Wang, Shan; Wang, Yiru; Li, Xiaoyan; Luo, Yukun; Mei, Xingguo; Tang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims This study investigated the protection provided by gabexate mesylate thermo-sensitive in-situ gel (GMTI) against grade III pancreatic trauma in rats. Methods A grade III pancreatic trauma model with main pancreatic duct dividing was established, and the pancreas anatomical diagram, ascites, and serum biochemical indices, including amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were examined. The pancreas was sliced and stained with hematoxylin eosin and subjected to terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results Ascites, serum amylase, lipase, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were significantly increased in the pancreas trauma (PT) groups with prolonged trauma time and were significantly decreased after GMTI treatment. The morphological structure of the pancreas was loose, the acinus was significantly damaged, the nuclei were irregular and hyperchromatic, and there was inflammatory cell invasion in the PT group compared to the control. After GMTI treatment, the morphological structure of the pancreas was restored, and the damaged acinus and inflammatory cell invasion were decreased compared to the PT group. Moreover, the cell apoptosis index was significantly increased in the PT group and restored to the same levels as the control group after GMTI treatment. Conclusions GMTI, a novel formulation and drug delivery method, exhibited specific effective protection against PT with acute pancreatitis therapy and has potential value as a minimally invasive adjuvant therapy for PT with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27646597

  18. Skin effector memory T cells do not recirculate and provide immune protection in alemtuzumab-treated CTCL patients

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.; Watanabe, Rei; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Tawa, Marianne C.; Adams, Natalie; Dorosario, Andrew A.; Chaney, Keri S.; Cutler, Corey S.; LeBoeuf, Nicole R.; Carter, Joi B.; Fisher, David C.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    CTCL is a cancer of skin homing T cells with variants that include leukemic CTCL (L-CTCL), a malignancy of central memory T cells (TCM), and mycosis fungoides (MF), a malignancy of skin resident effector memory T cells (TEM). We report that low-dose alemtuzumab (αCD52) effectively treated patients with refractory L-CTCL but not MF. Alemtuzumab depleted all T cells in blood and depleted both benign and malignant TCM from skin, but a diverse population of skin resident TEM remained in skin after therapy. T-cell depletion with alemtuzumab required the presence of neutrophils, a cell type frequent in blood but rare in normal skin. These data suggest that TCM were depleted because they recirculate between the blood and skin whereas skin resident TEM were spared because they are sessile and non-recirculating. After alemtuzumab treatment, skin T cells produced lower amounts of IL-4 and higher amounts of IFNγ. Moreover, there was a marked lack of infections in alemtuzumab-treated L-CTCL patients despite the complete absence of T cells in blood, suggesting that skin resident TEM can protect the skin from pathogens even in the absence of T cell recruitment from the circulation. Together, these data suggest that alemtuzumab may treat refractory L-CTCL without severely compromising the immune response to infection by depleting circulating TCM but sparing the skin resident TEM that provide local immune protection of the skin. PMID:22261031

  19. EPA Provides $2.3 Million to Two Universities in Atlanta to Protect Air Quality in a Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $8.5 million in research funding to 12 universities to protect air quality from the current and future challenges associated with the impacts of climate change.

  20. Enhanced herbicide metabolism induced by 2,4-D in herbicide susceptible Lolium rigidum provides protection against diclofop-methyl.

    PubMed

    Han, Heping; Yu, Qin; Cawthray, Gregory R; Powles, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    The auxinic herbicide 2,4-D amine is known, in vitro, as a cytochrome P450 inducer. The current study uses 2,4-D pre-treatment, at the whole plant level, to study mechanism(s) of non-target site based herbicide resistance to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide diclofop-methyl in Lolium rigidum. The 2,4-D pre-treatment caused up to 10-fold shift in LD50 and GR50 in dose-response to subsequently applied diclofop-methyl in a herbicide susceptible L. rigidum population. Foliar uptake and translocation of (14) C-diclofop-methyl did not differ in 2,4-D pre-treated versus untreated plants. HPLC analysis revealed that de-esterification of diclofop-methyl to toxic diclofop acid was similar, but further metabolism of diclofop acid to non-toxic metabolites was significantly (1.8-fold) faster in 2,4-D pre-treated than untreated plants. HPLC profile of major polar metabolites was similar when L. rigidum and diclofop-methyl tolerant wheat were compared, but wheat metabolised diclofop acid three-fold faster than L. rigidum. In addition, 2,4-D pre-treatment also induced cross-protection against the ALS-inhibiting herbicide chlorsulfuron, and the known P450 inhibitor malathion can reverse this effect. Protection against diclofop-methyl provided by 2,4-D pre-treatment in susceptible L. rigidum is associated with higher rates of herbicide metabolism, mirroring that identified in field-evolved, non-target site-based diclofop-methyl resistant populations. 2,4-D may induce higher level expression of herbicide-metabolising genes hence providing protection, and therefore, this 2,4-D induction system can be used, in combination with other genomic approaches, to assist isolating cytochrome P450 and other genes that are involved in herbicide metabolism and endow herbicide resistance in L. rigidum. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Towards a vaccine for attaching/effacing Escherichia coli: a LEE encoded regulator (ler) mutant of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is attenuated, immunogenic, and protects rabbits from lethal challenge with the wild-type virulent strain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengru; Feng, Shuzhang; Thate, Timothy E; Kaper, James B; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2006-05-01

    The ler (LEE encoded regulator) gene product is a central regulator for the genes encoded on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island of attaching/effacing (A/E) pathogens, including human enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) as well as animal isolates. Although an in vivo role for Ler in bacterial virulence has not been documented, we hypothesized that a Ler deletion mutant should be attenuated for virulence but might retain immunogenicity. The goals of this study were to genetically characterize ler of a rabbit EPEC (rEPEC) strain (O103:H2), to examine the effect of ler on in vivo virulence, and to determine if intragastric inoculation of an attenuated rEPEC ler mutant was immunogenic and could protect rabbits against subsequent challenge with the wild-type virulent parent strain. The predicted ler gene product of rEPEC strain O103:H2 shares high homology (over 95% amino acid identity) with the Lers of another rEPEC strain RDEC-1 (O15:H-) and human EPEC and EHEC. A defined internal ler deletion mutant of rEPEC O103:H2 showed reduced production of secreted proteins. Although orogastric inoculation of rabbits with the virulent parent O103:H2 strain induced severe diarrhea, significant weight loss and early mortality with adherent mucosal bacteria found at sacrifice, the isogeneic ler mutant strain was well tolerated. Animals gained weight and showed no clinical signs of disease. Examination of histological sections of intestinal segments revealed the absence of mucosal bacterial adherence. This result demonstrates an essential role for Ler in in vivo pathogenicity of A/E E. coli. Single dose orogastric immunization with the rEPEC ler mutant induced serum IgG antibody to whole bacteria (but not to intimin). Immunized animals were protected against enteric infection with the WT virulent parent strain exhibiting normal weight gain, absence of diarrhea and absence of mucosally adherent bacteria at sacrifice. Such

  2. Salmonella Typhimurium TTSS-2 deficient mig-14 mutant shows attenuation in immunocompromised mice and offers protection against wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Pati, Niladri Bhusan; Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Selvaraj, Sathish Kumar; Dash, Sabyasachi; Saha, Bhaskar; Singh, Neera; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2013-10-22

    Development of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) live attenuated vaccine carrier strain to prevent enteric infections has been a subject of intensive study. Several mutants of S. Typhimurium have been proposed as an effective live attenuated vaccine strain. Unfortunately, many such mutant strains failed to successfully complete the clinical trials as they were suboptimal in delivering effective safety and immunogenicity. However, it remained unclear, whether the existing live attenuated S. Typhimurium strains can further be attenuated with improved safety and immune efficacy or not. We deleted a specific non-SPI (Salmonella Pathogenicity Island) encoded virulence factor mig-14 (an antimicrobial peptide resistant protein) in ssaV deficient S. Typhimurium strain. The ssaV is an important SPI-II gene involved in Salmonella replication in macrophages and its mutant strain is considered as a potential live attenuated strain. However, fatal systemic infection was previously reported in immunocompromised mice like Nos2-/- and Il-10-/- when infected with ssaV deficient S. Typhimurium. Here we reported that attenuation of S. Typhimurium ssaV mutant in immunocompromised mice can further be improved by introducing additional deletion of gene mig-14. The ssaV, mig-14 double mutant was as efficient as ssaV mutant, with respect to host colonization and eliciting Salmonella-specific mucosal sIgA and serum IgG response in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, this double mutant did not show any systemic infection in immunocompromised mice. This study suggests that ssaV, mig-14 double mutant strain can be effectively used as a potential vaccine candidate even in immunocompromised mice. Such attenuated vaccine strain could possibly used for expression of heterologous antigens and thus for development of a polyvalent vaccine strain.

  3. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  4. Three Candida albicans potassium uptake systems differ in their ability to provide Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1trk2 mutants with necessary potassium.

    PubMed

    Elicharová, Hana; Hušeková, Barbora; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-06-01

    Yeasts usually have one or two high-affinity potassium transporters. Two complete and one interrupted gene encoding three types of putative potassium uptake system exist in Candida albicans SC5314. As high intracellular potassium is essential for many yeast cell functions, the existence of three transporters with differing transport mechanisms (Trk uniporter, Hak cation-proton symporter, Acu ATPase) may help pathogenic C. albicans cells to acquire the necessary potassium in various organs and tissues of the host. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking their own potassium uptake systems, all three putative transporters were able to provide cells with the ability to grow with low amounts of potassium over a broad range of external pH. Only CaTrk1 was properly recognized and secreted to the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, even the small number of CaHak1 and mainly CaAcu1 molecules which reached the plasma membrane resulted in an improved growth of cells in low potassium concentrations, suggesting a high affinity and capacity of the transporters. A single-point mutation restored the complete CaACU1 gene, and the resulting protein not only provided cells with the necessary potassium but also improved their tolerance to toxic lithium. In contrast to its known homologues, CaAcu1 did not seem to transport sodium. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Oral immunization with cholera toxin provides protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an adult mouse intestinal colonization model.

    PubMed

    Albert, M John; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Islam, Anjum; Haridas, Shilpa

    2013-05-07

    a common protective antigen(s) present in all C. jejuni serotypes is expected to provide broad protection. In our previous study, we showed that antibody to cholera toxin (CT) reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) from different strains of C. jejuni. We assumed that the B subunit of the toxin (CT-B), which is nontoxic and a component of licensed oral cholera vaccines, might be the component that cross-reacts with MOMP. In the current study, we showed that orally immunizing mice with CT protected them against colonization upon challenge with different serotypes of C. jejuni. We also showed that CT-B is the component mediating cross-reaction. Therefore, it might be possible to use cholera vaccines to prevent C. jejuni diarrhea. This could result in significant savings in vaccine development and treatment of the disease.

  6. The hepatitis B vaccine protects re-exposed health care workers, but does not provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jens M; Abdalla, Adil; Gara, Naveen; Ghany, Marc G; Rehermann, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be prevented by vaccination with HB surface (HBs) antigen, which induces HBs-specific antibodies and T cells. However, the duration of vaccine-induced protective immunity is poorly defined for health care workers who were vaccinated as adults. We investigated the immune mechanisms (antibody and T-cell responses) of long-term protection by the HBV vaccine in 90 health care workers with or without occupational exposure to HBV, 10-28 years after vaccination. Fifty-nine of 90 health care workers (65%) had levels of antibodies to HBs antigen above the cut-off (>12 mIU/mL) and 30 of 90 (33%) had HBs-specific T cells that produced interferon-gamma. Titers of antibodies to HBs antigen correlated with numbers of HBs-specific interferon-gamma-producing T cells, but not with time after vaccination. Although occupational exposure to HBV after vaccination did not induce antibodies to the HBV core protein (HBcore), the standard biomarker for HBV infection, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against HBcore and polymerase antigens were detected. Similar numbers of HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV and in patients who acquired immunity via HBV infection. Most of the HBcore- and polymerase-specific T cells were CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD127(-) effector memory cells in exposed health care workers and in patients with acquired immunity. In contrast, most of the vaccine-induced HBs-specific T cells were CD45RO(-)CCR7(-)CD127(-) terminally differentiated cells. HBs antigen vaccine-induced immunity protects against future infection but does not provide sterilizing immunity, as evidenced by HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccinated health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV. The presence of HBcore- and HBV polymerase-specific T-cell responses is a more sensitive indicator of HBV exposure than detection of HBcore-specific antibodies

  7. Vaccination of ferrets with a recombinant G glycoprotein subunit vaccine provides protection against Nipah virus disease for over 12 months.

    PubMed

    Pallister, Jackie A; Klein, Reuben; Arkinstall, Rachel; Haining, Jessica; Long, Fenella; White, John R; Payne, Jean; Feng, Yan-Ru; Wang, Lin-Fa; Broder, Christopher C; Middleton, Deborah

    2013-07-16

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic virus belonging to the henipavirus genus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Since NiV was first identified in 1999, outbreaks have continued to occur in humans in Bangladesh and India on an almost annual basis with case fatality rates reported between 40% and 100%. Ferrets were vaccinated with 4, 20 or 100 μg HeVsG formulated with the human use approved adjuvant, CpG, in a prime-boost regime. One half of the ferrets were exposed to NiV at 20 days post boost vaccination and the other at 434 days post vaccination. The presence of virus or viral genome was assessed in ferret fluids and tissues using real-time PCR, virus isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry; serology was also carried out. Non-immunised ferrets were also exposed to virus to confirm the pathogenicity of the inoculum. Ferrets exposed to Nipah virus 20 days post vaccination remained clinically healthy. Virus or viral genome was not detected in any tissues or fluids of the vaccinated ferrets; lesions and antigen were not identified on immunohistological examination of tissues; and there was no increase in antibody titre during the observation period, consistent with failure of virus replication. Of the ferrets challenged 434 days post vaccination, all five remained well throughout the study period; viral genome - but not virus - was recovered from nasal secretions of one ferret given 20 μg HeVsG and bronchial lymph nodes of the other. There was no increase in antibody titre during the observation period, consistent with lack of stimulation of a humoral memory response. We have previously shown that ferrets vaccinated with 4, 20 or 100 μg HeVsG formulated with CpG adjuvant, which is currently in several human clinical trials, were protected from HeV disease. Here we show, under similar conditions of use, that the vaccine also provides protection against NiV-induced disease. Such protection persists for at least 12 months post-vaccination, with data supporting

  8. Targeting the HA2 subunit of influenza A virus hemagglutinin via CD40L provides universal protection against diverse subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, X; Hashem, A M; Chen, Z; Li, C; Doyle, T; Zhang, Y; Yi, Y; Farnsworth, A; Xu, K; Li, Z; He, R; Li, X; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin (HA) is comprised of two subunits. Current influenza vaccine predominantly induces neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against the HA1 subunit, which is constantly evolving in unpredictable fashion. The other subunit, HA2, however, is highly conserved but largely shielded by the HA head domain. Thus, enhancing immune response against HA2 could potentially elicit broadly inhibitory Abs. We generated a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding secreted fusion protein, consisting of codon-optimized HA2 subunit of influenza A/California/7/2009(H1N1) virus fused to a trimerized form of murine CD40L, and determined its ability of inducing protective immunity upon intranasal administration. We found that mice immunized with this recombinant viral vaccine were completely protected against lethal challenge with divergent influenza A virus subtypes including H1N1, H3N2, and H9N2. Codon-optimization of HA2 as well as the use of CD40L as a targeting ligand/molecular adjuvant were indispensable to enhance HA2-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG levels. Moreover, induction of HA2-specific T-cell responses was dependent on CD40L, as rAd secreting HA2 subunit without CD40L failed to induce any significant levels of T-cell cytokines. Finally, sera obtained from immunized mice were capable of inhibiting 13 subtypes of influenza A viruses in vitro. These results provide proof of concept for a prototype HA2-based universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25052763

  9. A copper-induced quinone degradation pathway provides protection against combined copper/quinone stress in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Abicht, Helge K; Gonskikh, Yulia; Solioz, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Quinones are ubiquitous in the environment. They occur naturally but are also in widespread use in human and industrial activities. Quinones alone are relatively benign to bacteria, but in combination with copper, they become toxic by a mechanism that leads to intracellular thiol depletion. Here, it was shown that the yahCD-yaiAB operon of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 provides resistance to combined copper/quinone stress. The operon is under the control of CopR, which also regulates expression of the copRZA copper resistance operon as well as other L. lactis genes. Expression of the yahCD-yaiAB operon is induced by copper but not by quinones. Two of the proteins encoded by the operon appear to play key roles in alleviating quinone/copper stress: YaiB is a flavoprotein that converts p-benzoquinones to less toxic hydroquinones, using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as reductant; YaiA is a hydroquinone dioxygenase that converts hydroquinone putatively to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde in an oxygen-consuming reaction. Hydroquinone and methylhydroquinone are both substrates of YaiA. Deletion of yaiB causes increased sensitivity of L. lactis to quinones and complete growth arrest under combined quinone and copper stress. Copper induction of the yahCD-yaiAB operon offers protection to copper/quinone toxicity and could provide a growth advantage to L. lactis in some environments.

  10. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Vienna R.; Adney, Danielle R.; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Bowen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia) in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A) and holarctica (type B) which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50–100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp). Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism. PMID:26474413

  11. Incorporation of natural uncultivable Legionella pneumophila into potable water biofilms provides a protective niche against chlorination stress.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Wilks, S; Azevedo, N F; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that has been isolated sporadically from drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Resistance to disinfectants is mainly attributed to the association of cells with amoebae, but biofilms are also thought to provide some degree of protection. In the present work, a two-stage chemostat was used to form heterotrophic biofilms from drinking water to study the influence of chlorine on the presence of naturally occurring L. pneumophila. The pathogen was tracked in planktonic and sessile biofilm phases using standard culture recovery techniques for cultivable cells and a peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridisation assay for total cells. The results showed that the total number of L. pneumophila cells in biofilms was not affected by the concentrations of chlorine tested, and the presence of L. pneumophila could not be detected by culturing. To restrict the outbreaks of disease caused by this bacterium, efforts need to be concentrated on preventing L. pneumophila from re-entering an infectious state by maintaining residual disinfectant levels through the entire DWDS network so that the resuscitation of cells via contact with amoebae is prevented.

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide an Antibiotic-Protective Niche for Persistent Viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis that Survive Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian; Major, Samuel; Das, Bikul; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    During tuberculosis (TB), some Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli persist in the presence of an active immunity and antibiotics that are used to treat the disease. Herein, by using the Cornell model of TB persistence, we further explored our recent finding that suggested that M. tuberculosis can escape therapy by residing in the bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells. We initially showed that M. tuberculosis rapidly disseminates to the mouse BM after aerosol exposure and maintained a stable burden for at least 220 days. In contrast, in the lungs, the M. tuberculosis burden peaked at 28 days and subsequently declined approximately 10-fold. More important, treatment of the mice with the antibiotics rifampicin and isoniazid, as expected, resulted in effective clearance of M. tuberculosis from the lungs and spleen. In contrast, M. tuberculosis persisted, albeit at low numbers, in the BM of antibiotic-treated mice. Moreover, most viable M. tuberculosis was recovered from the bone marrow CD271+CD45−-enriched cell fraction, and only few viable bacteria could be isolated from the CD271−CD45+ cell fraction. These results clearly show that BM mesenchymal stem cells provide an antibiotic-protective niche for M. tuberculosis and suggest that unraveling the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon will enhance our understanding of M. tuberculosis persistence in treated TB patients. PMID:25451154

  13. Health Gains and Financial Protection Provided by the Ethiopian Mental Health Strategy: an Extended Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Kjell Arne; Strand, Kirsten Bjerkreim; Fekadu, Abebaw; Chisholm, Dan

    2017-04-01

    Mental and neurological (MN) health care has long been neglected in low-income settings. This paper estimates health and non-health impacts of fully publicly financed care for selected key interventions in the National Mental Health Strategy in Ethiopia for depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and epilepsy. A methodology of extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) is applied to MN health care in Ethiopia. The impact of providing a package of selected MN interventions free of charge in Ethiopia is estimated for: epilepsy (75% coverage, phenobarbital), depression (30% coverage, fluoxetine, cognitive therapy and proactive case management), bipolar affective disorder (50% coverage, valproate and psychosocial therapy) and schizophrenia (75% coverage, haloperidol plus psychosocial treatment). Multiple outcomes are estimated and disaggregated across wealth quintiles: (1) healthy-life-years (HALYs) gained; (2) household out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures averted; (3) expected financial risk protection (FRP); and (4) productivity impact. The MN package is expected to cost US$177 million and gain 155,000 HALYs (epilepsy US$37m and 64,500 HALYs; depression US$65m and 61,300 HALYs; bipolar disorder US$44m and 20,300 HALYs; and schizophrenia US$31m and 8,900 HALYs) annually. The health benefits would be concentrated among the poorest groups for all interventions. Universal public finance averts little household OOP expenditures and provides minimal FRP because of the low current utilization of these MN services in Ethiopia. In addition, economic benefits of US$ 51 million annually are expected from depression treatment in Ethiopia as a result of productivity gains, equivalent to 78% of the investment cost. The total MN package in Ethiopia is estimated to cost equivalent to US$1.8 per capita and yields large progressive health benefits. The expected productivity gain is substantially higher than the expected FRP. The ECEA approach seems to fit well with the current

  14. Heat shock factor 1 over-expression protects against exposure of hydrophobic residues on mutant SOD1 and early mortality in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) are responsible for 20% of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and mutant SOD1 has been shown to have increased surface hydrophobicity in vitro. Mutant SOD1 may adopt a complex array of conformations with varying toxicity in vivo. We have used a novel florescence-based proteomic assay using 4,4’-bis-1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (bisANS) to assess the surface hydrophobicity, and thereby distinguish between different conformations, of SOD1and other proteins in situ. Results Covalent bisANS labeling of spinal cord extracts revealed that alterations in surface hydrophobicity of H46R/H48Q mutations in SOD1 provoke formation of high molecular weight SOD1 species with lowered solubility, likely due to increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. BisANS was docked on the H46R/H48Q SOD1 structure at the disordered copper binding and electrostatic loops of mutant SOD1, but not non-mutant WT SOD1. 16 non-SOD1 proteins were also identified that exhibited altered surface hydrophobicity in the H46R/H48Q mutant mouse model of ALS, including proteins involved in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, signaling, and protein quality control. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were also enriched in the detergent-insoluble fractions with SOD1. Given that chaperones recognize proteins with exposed hydrophobic surfaces as substrates and the importance of protein homeostasis in ALS, we crossed SOD1 H46R/H48Q mutant mice with mice over-expressing the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. Here we showed that HSF1 over-expression in H46R/H48Q ALS mice enhanced proteostasis as evidenced by increased expression of HSPs in motor neurons and astrocytes and increased solubility of mutant SOD1. HSF1 over-expression significantly reduced body weight loss, delayed ALS disease onset, decreases cases of early disease, and increased survival for the 25th percentile in an H46R/H48Q SOD1 background. HSF1

  15. Heat shock factor 1 over-expression protects against exposure of hydrophobic residues on mutant SOD1 and early mortality in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Simon, Sharotka M; Koh, Won Kyun; Folorunso, Oluwarotimi; Umbaugh, C Samuel; Pierce, Anson

    2013-11-21

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) are responsible for 20% of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and mutant SOD1 has been shown to have increased surface hydrophobicity in vitro. Mutant SOD1 may adopt a complex array of conformations with varying toxicity in vivo. We have used a novel fluorescence-based proteomic assay using 4,4'-bis-1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (bisANS) to assess the surface hydrophobicity, and thereby distinguish between different conformations, of SOD1 and other proteins in situ. Covalent bisANS labeling of spinal cord extracts revealed that alterations in surface hydrophobicity of H46R/H48Q mutations in SOD1 provoke formation of high molecular weight SOD1 species with lowered solubility, likely due to increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. BisANS was docked on the H46R/H48Q SOD1 structure at the disordered copper binding and electrostatic loops of mutant SOD1, but not non-mutant WT SOD1. 16 non-SOD1 proteins were also identified that exhibited altered surface hydrophobicity in the H46R/H48Q mutant mouse model of ALS, including proteins involved in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, signaling, and protein quality control. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were also enriched in the detergent-insoluble fractions with SOD1. Given that chaperones recognize proteins with exposed hydrophobic surfaces as substrates and the importance of protein homeostasis in ALS, we crossed SOD1 H46R/H48Q mutant mice with mice over-expressing the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. Here we showed that HSF1 over-expression in H46R/H48Q ALS mice enhanced proteostasis as evidenced by increased expression of HSPs in motor neurons and astrocytes and increased solubility of mutant SOD1. HSF1 over-expression significantly reduced body weight loss, delayed ALS disease onset, decreases cases of early disease, and increased survival for the 25th percentile in an H46R/H48Q SOD1 background. HSF1 overexpression did not affect

  16. A further attenuated derivative of a cold-passaged temperature-sensitive mutant of human respiratory syncytial virus retains immunogenicity and protective efficacy against wild-type challenge in seronegative chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Crowe, J E; Bui, P T; Davis, A R; Chanock, R M; Murphy, B R

    1994-07-01

    A cold-passage (cp), temperature-sensitive (ts) RSV mutant designated RSV cpts-248 (shut-off temperature 38 degrees C), which possesses host-range mutations acquired during 52 passages at low temperature in bovine tissue culture and a ts phenotype introduced by subsequent chemical mutagenesis, was found previously to be attenuated, immunogenic, and protective against wild-type challenge in seronegative chimpanzees. We sought to introduce additional attenuating mutations such as small-plaque (sp) and ts mutations into RSV cpts-248 by chemical mutagenesis with 5-fluorouracil with the intent of obtaining cpts-248 derivatives that are more attenuated in mice or chimpanzees and that are more genetically stable following replication in vivo. Ten mutants of RSV cpts-248 which had acquired a sp phenotype or a second ts mutation were generated by chemical mutagenesis. Five cpts-248 derivatives which had acquired mutations that specified a 36 degrees C shut-off temperature for plaque formation and one which had acquired only a sp phenotype were more restricted in replication in Balb/c mice than the cpts-248 parental strain. One mutant, designated RSV cpts-248/404 (shut-off temperature 36 degrees C), was 100 times more restricted in replication in the nasal turbinates of mice and 100 times more restricted in the nasopharynx of seronegative chimpanzees than its cpts-248 parent. The cpts-248/404 mutant was completely restricted in replication in the lower respiratory tract of chimpanzees even following direct intratracheal administration. The ts phenotype of the cpts-248/404 mutant was stable during replication in vivo in mice and chimpanzees.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Endothelial VWF promotes blood-brain barrier flexibility and provides protection from hypoxia and seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Brill, Alexander; De Meyer, Simon F.; Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Cabral, Jessica E.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Aberrant blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is a hallmark pathology of many central nervous system diseases. von Willebrand factor (VWF) is stored in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies from where it is released upon activation into plasma and basement membrane. VWF’s role in endothelial homeostasis is unclear. The goal of this study was to assess the role of VWF in disease models associated with increased BBB permeability. Approach and Results We did not find any differences in BBB permeability to Evan’s blue dye at baseline between wild-type (WT) and VWF−/− animals. We next utilized two models presenting with increased BBB permeability, hypoxia/reoxygenation and pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, to assess the response of VWF−/− animals. In both models, VWF−/− mice maintained a tighter BBB than WT. VWF−/− mice fared worse in both conditions with nearly 100% of VWF−/− mice dying within 120 minutes after pilocarpine administration while more than 80% of WT animals survived. Investigation into the status of tight junction proteins revealed that VWF−/− mice expressed more claudin-5 at baseline. In vitro work confirmed that the presence of subendothelial VWF is inhibitory to claudin-5 expression. Conclusions VWF-deficiency confers partial preservation of BBB integrity after hypoxia/reoxygenation and seizures. Surprisingly, this decrease in BBB permeability did not result in protection of the animals as they demonstrated more severe pathology in both models when compared to WT animals. These data suggest that a rigid BBB is detrimental (to the organism) during certain disease states and that VWF release may provide desired flexibility under stress. PMID:23825365

  18. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  19. Chilling acclimation provides immunity to stress by altering regulatory networks and inducing genes with protective functions in cassava.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Changying; Chen, Zheng; Xia, Jing; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Yufei; Bo, Weiping; Song, Shun; Deng, Deli; Guo, Xin; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Junfei; Peng, Hai; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Zhang, Weixiong

    2014-08-05

    Stress acclimation is an effective mechanism that plants acquired for adaption to dynamic environment. Even though generally considered to be sensitive to low temperature, Cassava, a major tropical crop, can be tolerant to much lower temperature after chilling acclimation. Improvement to chilling resistance could be beneficial to breeding. However, the underlying mechanism and the effects of chilling acclimation on chilling tolerance remain largely unexplored. In order to understand the mechanism of chilling acclimation, we profiled and analyzed the transcriptome and microRNAome of Cassava, using high-throughput deep sequencing, across the normal condition, a moderate chilling stress (14°C), a harsh stress (4°C) after chilling acclimation (14°C), and a chilling shock from 24°C to 4°C. The results revealed that moderate stress and chilling shock triggered comparable degrees of transcriptional perturbation, and more importantly, about two thirds of differentially expressed genes reversed their expression from up-regulation to down-regulation or vice versa in response to hash stress after experiencing moderate stress. In addition, microRNAs played important roles in the process of this massive genetic circuitry rewiring. Furthermore, function analysis revealed that chilling acclimation helped the plant develop immunity to further harsh stress by exclusively inducing genes with function for nutrient reservation therefore providing protection, whereas chilling shock induced genes with function for viral reproduction therefore causing damage. Our study revealed, for the first time, the molecular basis of chilling acclimation, and showed potential regulation role of microRNA in chilling response and acclimation in Euphorbia.

  20. Moderate exercise training provides modest protection against adipose tissue inflammatory gene expression in response to high‐fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Melissa A.; Pincu, Yair; Martin, Stephen A.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Baynard, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract As white adipose tissue (WAT) expands under obesogenic conditions, local WAT hypoxia may contribute to the chronic low‐grade inflammation observed in obesity. Aerobic exercise training is beneficial in treating WAT inflammation after obesity is established, but it remains unknown whether exercise training, while on a concomitant high‐fat (HF) diet, influences WAT inflammation during the development of obesity. We sought to determine the effects of 4, 8, and 12 weeks of HF feeding and/or moderate intensity treadmill exercise training (EX) on the relationship between inflammatory and hypoxic gene expression within mouse WAT. Male C57Bl6/J mice (n = 113) were randomized into low‐fat (LF)/sedentary (SED), LF/EX, HF/SED, or HF/EX groups. The low‐fat and high‐fat diets contained 10% and 60% energy from fat, respectively. Exercise training consisted of treadmill running 5 days/week at 12 m/min, 8% incline, 40 min/day. Quantitative real‐time PCR was used to assess gene expression. HF diet impaired glucose regulation, and upregulated WAT gene expression of inflammation (IL‐1β, IL‐1ra, TNFα), macrophage recruitment and infiltration (F4/80 and monocyte chemoattractant protein), and M1 (CD11c) and M2 (CD206 and Arginase‐1) macrophage polarization markers. Treadmill training resulted in a modest reduction of WAT macrophage and inflammatory gene expression. HF diet had little effect on hypoxia‐inducible factor‐1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, suggesting that WAT inflammatory gene expression may not be driven by hypoxia within the adipocytes. Treadmill training may provide protection by preventing WAT expansion and macrophage recruitment. PMID:25347855

  1. Chilling acclimation provides immunity to stress by altering regulatory networks and inducing genes with protective functions in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress acclimation is an effective mechanism that plants acquired for adaption to dynamic environment. Even though generally considered to be sensitive to low temperature, Cassava, a major tropical crop, can be tolerant to much lower temperature after chilling acclimation. Improvement to chilling resistance could be beneficial to breeding. However, the underlying mechanism and the effects of chilling acclimation on chilling tolerance remain largely unexplored. Results In order to understand the mechanism of chilling acclimation, we profiled and analyzed the transcriptome and microRNAome of Cassava, using high-throughput deep sequencing, across the normal condition, a moderate chilling stress (14°C), a harsh stress (4°C) after chilling acclimation (14°C), and a chilling shock from 24°C to 4°C. The results revealed that moderate stress and chilling shock triggered comparable degrees of transcriptional perturbation, and more importantly, about two thirds of differentially expressed genes reversed their expression from up-regulation to down-regulation or vice versa in response to hash stress after experiencing moderate stress. In addition, microRNAs played important roles in the process of this massive genetic circuitry rewiring. Furthermore, function analysis revealed that chilling acclimation helped the plant develop immunity to further harsh stress by exclusively inducing genes with function for nutrient reservation therefore providing protection, whereas chilling shock induced genes with function for viral reproduction therefore causing damage. Conclusions Our study revealed, for the first time, the molecular basis of chilling acclimation, and showed potential regulation role of microRNA in chilling response and acclimation in Euphorbia. PMID:25090992

  2. Brassinosteroid Mutants of Crops.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gerard J.

    2003-12-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), were originally isolated from extracts of pollen because of their growth-promoting properties and their potential use for enhancing crop production. Mutants in the biosynthesis, metabolism, and signaling of brassinolide (BL), the most bioactive BR, are important resources in helping to establish BRs' essential role in plant growth and development. The dark green and distinctive dwarf phenotype of BR-related mutants identified in pea, tomato, and rice highlights the importance of BRs in crops. These mutants are helping to elucidate both the conserved and the unique features of BR biosynthesis and signaling. Such insights are providing the key knowledge and understanding that will enable the development of strategies towards the production of crops with enhanced qualities.

  3. Recombinant Isfahan Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vaccine Vectors Provide Durable, Multivalent, Single-Dose Protection against Lethal Alphavirus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Matassov, Demetrius; Seymour, Robert L.; Latham, Theresa; Gorchakov, Rodion V.; Nowak, Rebecca M.; Leal, Grace; Hamm, Stefan; Eldridge, John H.; Tesh, Robert B.; Clarke, David K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The demonstrated clinical efficacy of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vaccine vector has stimulated the investigation of additional serologically distinct Vesiculovirus vectors as therapeutic and/or prophylactic vaccine vectors to combat emerging viral diseases. Among these viral threats are the encephalitic alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), which have demonstrated potential for natural disease outbreaks, yet no licensed vaccines are available in the event of an epidemic. Here we report the rescue of recombinant Isfahan virus (rISFV) from genomic cDNA as a potential new vaccine vector platform. The rISFV genome was modified to attenuate virulence and express the VEEV and EEEV E2/E1 surface glycoproteins as vaccine antigens. A single dose of the rISFV vaccine vectors elicited neutralizing antibody responses and protected mice from lethal VEEV and EEEV challenges at 1 month postvaccination as well as lethal VEEV challenge at 8 months postvaccination. A mixture of rISFV vectors expressing the VEEV and EEEV E2/E1 glycoproteins also provided durable, single-dose protection from lethal VEEV and EEEV challenges, demonstrating the potential for a multivalent vaccine formulation. These findings were paralleled in studies with an attenuated form of rVSV expressing the VEEV E2/E1 glycoproteins. Both the rVSV and rISFV vectors were attenuated by using an approach that has demonstrated safety in human trials of an rVSV/HIV-1 vaccine. Vaccines based on either of these vaccine vector platforms may present a safe and effective approach to prevent alphavirus-induced disease in humans. IMPORTANCE This work introduces rISFV as a novel vaccine vector platform that is serologically distinct and phylogenetically distant from VSV. The rISFV vector has been attenuated by an approach used for an rVSV vector that has demonstrated safety in clinical studies. The vaccine potential of the rISFV vector

  4. Alpha-beta T cells provide protection against lethal encephalitis in the murine model of VEEV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Paessler, Slobodan Yun, Nadezhda E.; Judy, Barbara M.; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A.; Grund, Anna H.; Frolov, Ilya; Campbell, Gerald A.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estes, D. Mark

    2007-10-25

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a chimeric alphavirus vaccine candidate in mice with selective immunodeficiencies. This vaccine candidate was highly attenuated in mice with deficiencies in the B and T cell compartments, as well as in mice with deficient gamma-interferon responsiveness. However, the level of protection varied among the strains tested. Wild type mice were protected against lethal VEEV challenge. In contrast, alpha/beta ({alpha}{beta}) TCR-deficient mice developed lethal encephalitis following VEEV challenge, while mice deficient in gamma/delta ({gamma}{delta}) T cells were protected. Surprisingly, the vaccine potency was diminished by 50% in animals lacking interferon-gamma receptor alpha chain (R1)-chain and a minority of vaccinated immunoglobulin heavy chain-deficient ({mu}MT) mice survived challenge, which suggests that neutralizing antibody may not be absolutely required for protection. Prolonged replication of encephalitic VEEV in the brain of pre-immunized mice is not lethal and adoptive transfer experiments indicate that CD3{sup +} T cells are required for protection.

  5. Artocarpin-enriched (Artocarpus altilis) Heartwood Extract Provides Protection Against UVB-induced Mechanical Damage in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tiraravesit, Narisara; Humbert, Philippe; Robin, Sophie; Tissot, Marion; Viennet, Céline; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of artocarpin-enriched (Artocarpus altilis) heartwood extract on the mechanical properties of UVB-irradiated fibroblasts. Human skin fibroblasts were pretreated with 50 μg/mL(-1) extract and later irradiated with UVB (200 mJ/cm(-2) ). They were then cultured within three-dimensional of free-floating and tense collagen lattices. The pretreatment of fibroblasts with the extract prior to UVB radiation showed cells protection against UVB-induced suppression of α-SMA expression, fibroblast migration and contraction. These results reveal that the extract prevents mechanical damages induced by UVB irradiation in fibroblast-embedded collagen lattices, and therefore, has a potential as a natural photo-protectant. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. First peptide vaccine providing protection against viral infection in the target animal: studies of canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Langeveld, J P; Casal, J I; Osterhaus, A D; Cortés, E; de Swart, R; Vela, C; Dalsgaard, K; Puijk, W C; Schaaper, W M; Meloen, R H

    1994-01-01

    A synthetic peptide vaccine which protects dogs against challenge with virulent canine parvovirus is described. The amino acid sequence used was discovered in previous studies on the immunogenic properties of previously mapped antigenic sites and represents the amino-terminal region of viral protein VP2. As with marker vaccines, it is possible to discriminate between vaccinated dogs that have not been exposed to the virus and dogs that have been infected with the virus. The protective mechanism can be explained by a humoral response against the peptide aided by T-cell epitopes contained in the carrier protein used for peptide coupling. This is the first example of a synthetic peptide vaccine that induces protection in target animals. PMID:8207825

  7. Melanin nanoparticles (MNPs) provide protection against whole-body ɣ-irradiation in mice via restoration of hematopoietic tissues.

    PubMed

    Rageh, Monira M; El-Gebaly, Reem H; Abou-Shady, H; Amin, Doaa G

    2015-01-01

    During radiotherapy, ionizing irradiation interacts with biological systems to produce free radicals, which attack various cellular components. The hematopoietic system is easily recognized to be radiosensitive and its damage may be severe. Melanin nanoparticles (MNPs) act as free radical scavengers prepared by polymerization of dopamine. In this study, a total of 110 male BALB/C mice were divided into five equal groups. Each group contained 22 mice. Mice of group A did not receive MNPs or irradiation (control group), group B was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 50 mg/kg MNPs. Mice of group C and D were exposed to a dose of 7 Gy ɣ-irradiation and injected with the same dose of MNPs as in group B either 30 min pre- or post-irradiation, and group E was exposed to a dose of 7 Gy ɣ-irradiation only. The impact of MNPs on peripheral blood, spleen, and DNA damage induced by irradiation was evaluated by blood count, histopathology of the spleen, and comet assay for the DNA in the bone marrow at 1, 4, 8, and 12 days post-irradiation. Results of group E compared with control group (A) showed a significant depression in complete blood count. Additionally, histopathological observation showed the absence of megakaryocytes with delayed time post-irradiation, deposition of eosinophilic protein of their spleen appeared, as well as a remarkable decrease in spleen size was observed. Moreover, ɣ-irradiation-induced DNA damage as can be inferred from a significant increase by about 5-10 folds in all comet parameters (% of DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive moment) in the DNA of the bone marrow. In contrast, pre-post treatment with MNPs protected hematopoietic tissues against radiation damage, and therefore, enhanced the survival of mice with 40 % in groups (C&D) compared with 10 % to group (E) till 30 days post-irradiation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that synthetic MNPs provide significant radioprotection to the hematopoietic tissues.

  8. A Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) gD Mutant Impaired for Neural Tropism Is Superior to an HSV-2 gD Subunit Vaccine To Protect Animals from Challenge with HSV-2

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kyle N.; Li, Daniel Y.; Raffeld, Mark; Chavez, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recent phase 3 trial with soluble herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2t) in adjuvant failed to show protection against genital herpes. We postulated that live attenuated HSV-2 would provide more HSV antigens for induction of virus-specific antibodies and cellular immunity than would gD2t. We previously reported an HSV-2 mutant, HSV2-gD27, in which the nectin-1 binding domain of gD2 is altered so that the virus is impaired for infecting neural cells, but not epithelial cells, in vitro and is impaired for infecting dorsal root ganglia in mice (K. Wang, J. D. Kappel, C. Canders, W. F. Davila, D. Sayre, M. Chavez, L. Pesnicak, and J. I. Cohen, J Virol 86:12891–12902, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.01055-12). Here we report that the mutations in HSV2-gD27 were stable when the virus was passaged in cell culture and during acute infection of mice. HSV2-gD27 was attenuated in mice when it was inoculated onto the cornea, intramuscularly (i.m.), intravaginally, and intracranially. Vaccination of mice i.m. with HSV2-gD27 provided better inhibition of challenge virus replication in the vagina than when the virus was used to vaccinate mice intranasally or subcutaneously. Comparison of i.m. vaccinations with HSV2-gD27 versus gD2t in adjuvant showed that HSV2-gD27 induced larger reductions of challenge virus replication in the vagina and reduced latent viral loads in dorsal root ganglia but induced lower serum neutralizing antibody titers than those obtained with gD2t in adjuvant. Taken together, our data indicate that a live attenuated HSV-2 vaccine impaired for infection of neurons provides better protection from vaginal challenge with HSV-2 than that obtained with a subunit vaccine, despite inducing lower titers of HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies in the serum. IMPORTANCE Genital herpes simplex is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases. Though HSV-2 disease is usually mild, it can be life threatening in neonates and immunocompromised persons. In

  9. A Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) gD Mutant Impaired for Neural Tropism Is Superior to an HSV-2 gD Subunit Vaccine To Protect Animals from Challenge with HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kening; Goodman, Kyle N; Li, Daniel Y; Raffeld, Mark; Chavez, Mayra; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2015-11-11

    A recent phase 3 trial with soluble herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2t) in adjuvant failed to show protection against genital herpes. We postulated that live attenuated HSV-2 would provide more HSV antigens for induction of virus-specific antibodies and cellular immunity than would gD2t. We previously reported an HSV-2 mutant, HSV2-gD27, in which the nectin-1 binding domain of gD2 is altered so that the virus is impaired for infecting neural cells, but not epithelial cells, in vitro and is impaired for infecting dorsal root ganglia in mice (K. Wang, J. D. Kappel, C. Canders, W. F. Davila, D. Sayre, M. Chavez, L. Pesnicak, and J. I. Cohen, J Virol 86:12891-12902, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.01055-12). Here we report that the mutations in HSV2-gD27 were stable when the virus was passaged in cell culture and during acute infection of mice. HSV2-gD27 was attenuated in mice when it was inoculated onto the cornea, intramuscularly (i.m.), intravaginally, and intracranially. Vaccination of mice i.m. with HSV2-gD27 provided better inhibition of challenge virus replication in the vagina than when the virus was used to vaccinate mice intranasally or subcutaneously. Comparison of i.m. vaccinations with HSV2-gD27 versus gD2t in adjuvant showed that HSV2-gD27 induced larger reductions of challenge virus replication in the vagina and reduced latent viral loads in dorsal root ganglia but induced lower serum neutralizing antibody titers than those obtained with gD2t in adjuvant. Taken together, our data indicate that a live attenuated HSV-2 vaccine impaired for infection of neurons provides better protection from vaginal challenge with HSV-2 than that obtained with a subunit vaccine, despite inducing lower titers of HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies in the serum. Genital herpes simplex is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases. Though HSV-2 disease is usually mild, it can be life threatening in neonates and immunocompromised persons. In addition, genital

  10. Attenuated temperature-sensitive respiratory syncytial virus mutants generated by cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Randolph, V B; Kandis, M; Stemler-Higgins, P; Kennelly, M S; McMullen, Y M; Speelman, D J; Weeks-Levy, C

    1994-09-01

    Two strains of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), RSV 2B and RSV 3A (representing subgroup B and A virus respectively) were cold-adapted by passaging in Vero cells for up to 42 weeks at successively lower temperatures down to 20 degrees C. Successful cold adaptation of the virus population was dependent on the amount of time the cultures were maintained at the various low temperatures, as well as on the strain of virus used. Temperature-sensitive (TS) mutants appeared in the cold passaged virus populations; however, the majority of the virus variants remained predominantly non-TS. Four RSV 2B and three RSV 3A TS mutants were selected for further characterization. These seven TS mutants retained their fusion phenotype and two major neutralizing antibody epitopes, and displayed varying levels of temperature sensitivity. Six of the seven mutants had a cold-adapted (CA) phenotype. All of the RSV 2B mutants were highly attenuated in cotton rats and two of the mutants elicited relatively high levels of neutralizing antibody and were able to protect rats against virus challenge. The RSV 3A TS mutants grew well in the nose but poorly in the cotton rat lungs, as did the parental 3A virus. All 3A mutants elicited high titers of neutralizing antibody and provided complete protection against virus challenge. These mutants showed varying levels of temperature sensitivity in vitro and attenuation in vivo and represent potential vaccine candidates.

  11. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Dina A.; Scarff, Jennifer M.; Garcia, Preston P.; Cassidy, Sara K. B.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:26148026

  12. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid.

  13. A Computationally Designed Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Protein Provides In Vivo Protection from Influenza Independent of a Host Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Koday, Merika Treants; Nelson, Jorgen; Chevalier, Aaron; Koday, Michael; Kalinoski, Hannah; Stewart, Lance; Carter, Lauren; Nieusma, Travis; Lee, Peter S.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Dagley, Ashley; Smee, Donald F.; Baker, David; Fuller, Deborah Heydenburg

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting a highly conserved region in the hemagglutinin (HA) stem protect against influenza infection. Here, we investigate the protective efficacy of a protein (HB36.6) computationally designed to bind with high affinity to the same region in the HA stem. We show that intranasal delivery of HB36.6 affords protection in mice lethally challenged with diverse strains of influenza independent of Fc-mediated effector functions or a host antiviral immune response. This designed protein prevents infection when given as a single dose of 6.0 mg/kg up to 48 hours before viral challenge and significantly reduces disease when administered as a daily therapeutic after challenge. A single dose of 10.0 mg/kg HB36.6 administered 1-day post-challenge resulted in substantially better protection than 10 doses of oseltamivir administered twice daily for 5 days. Thus, binding of HB36.6 to the influenza HA stem region alone, independent of a host response, is sufficient to reduce viral infection and replication in vivo. These studies demonstrate the potential of computationally designed binding proteins as a new class of antivirals for influenza. PMID:26845438

  14. Passive transfer of serum from tilapia vaccinated with a Vibrio vulnificus vaccine provides protection from specific pathogen challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vibrio vulnificus is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with disease losses in some aquaculture reared fish species. Vaccination has proven effective for reducing the impact of this disease and research has suggested that specific antibodies are important for protective immunity. The...

  15. Synthetic cationic peptide IDR-1002 provides protection against bacterial infections through chemokine induction and enhanced leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua; Waldbrook, Matthew; Elliott, Melissa R; Easton, Donna M; Mayer, Matthew L; Mullaly, Sarah C; Kindrachuk, Jason; Jenssen, Håvard; Hancock, Robert E W

    2010-03-01

    With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the PI3K, NF-kappaB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity.

  16. [The results of a trial in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam of clothing providing mechanical protection against the bites of blood-sucking Diptera].

    PubMed

    Gornostaeva, R M; Zhukova, L I

    1993-01-01

    The tested overalls for protection in hot climate may be recommended only for the protection of people engaged in work involving little movement (fishermen, watchmen, etc.). For wider use of such overalls in hot regions the design should be changed, the alterations are described in the paper. Further trials of the overalls should be carried out with its modified design; this costume provides adequate mechanical protection from the bites of mosquitoes and other blood-sucking Diptera and it will be widely used in the tropics, where blood-sucking Diptera contribute much to infection transmission.

  17. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Kachura, Melissa A.; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A.; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L.; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs (CpG-ODN) linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50 nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing over 100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using a recombinant form of protective antigen (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 weeks compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially co-localized with rPA in key antigen-presenting cell populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important. PMID:26608924

  19. A mutant in one of two exbD loci of a TonB system in Flavobacterium psychrophilum shows attenuated virulence and confers protection against cold water disease.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Beatriz; Alvarez, Javier; Menéndez, Aurora; Guijarro, José A

    2008-04-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a psychrotrophic fish-pathogenic bacterium that causes cold water disease (CWD) in salmonids. By means of Tn4351 mutagenesis a mutant named FP1033, deficient in growth on iron-depleted medium, was previously isolated. FP1033 recovered the parental phenotype in the presence of iron. The gene disrupted by the transposon in this mutant encoded a protein with similarity to ExbD proteins, which are members of the TonB complex system involved in iron uptake mediated by siderophores. Analysis of the DNA surrounding the transposon insertion showed the presence of a tonB cluster of genes composed of exbB, two exbD (exbD1 and exbD2) and tonB loci. RT-PCR analysis and complementation studies indicated that these genes are transcribed as an operon and that the exbD2 : : Tn4351 phenotype was caused by the lack of ExbD2. FP1033 showed decreased virulence and conferred a high level of protection in rainbow trout fry after vaccination. This is believed to be the first report of a F. psychrophilum attenuated strain that induces a protective immune response in rainbow trout against CWD. These results suggest that the exbD2 locus from this particular TonB system is a suitable target to generate a live attenuated vaccine.

  20. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Devendra K.; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San; Schafer, Elizabeth; Burrage, Thomas G.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Santos, Teresa de los; Hoeprich, Paul D.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2016-08-15

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co{sup 2+} affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni{sup 2+}-chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. - Highlights: • 6xHis-tags in A{sub 24} FMDV enable purification and biding to adjuvants via metal ions. • 6xHis A{sub 24} FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine enhanced protective immunity against FMDV. • Surface exposed capsid tags allow distinction of infected from vaccinated animals.

  1. Nasal IgA Provides Protection against Human Influenza Challenge in Volunteers with Low Serum Influenza Antibody Titre

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Victoria M. W.; Francis, James N.; Anderson, Katie J.; Georges, Bertrand; Cope, Alethea V.; Tregoning, John S.

    2017-01-01

    In spite of there being a number of vaccines, influenza remains a significant global cause of morbidity and mortality. Understanding more about natural and vaccine induced immune protection against influenza infection would help to develop better vaccines. Virus specific IgG is a known correlate of protection, but other factors may help to reduce viral load or disease severity, for example IgA. In the current study we measured influenza specific responses in a controlled human infection model using influenza A/California/2009 (H1N1) as the challenge agent. Volunteers were pre-selected with low haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titres in order to ensure a higher proportion of infection; this allowed us to explore the role of other immune correlates. In spite of HAI being uniformly low, there were variable levels of H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection. There was also a range of disease severity in volunteers allowing us to compare whether differences in systemic and local H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection affected disease outcome. H1N1 specific IgG level before challenge did not correlate with protection, probably due to the pre-screening for individuals with low HAI. However, the length of time infectious virus was recovered from the nose was reduced in patients with higher pre-existing H1N1 influenza specific nasal IgA or serum IgA. Therefore, IgA contributes to protection against influenza and should be targeted in vaccines. PMID:28567036

  2. Nasal IgA Provides Protection against Human Influenza Challenge in Volunteers with Low Serum Influenza Antibody Titre.

    PubMed

    Gould, Victoria M W; Francis, James N; Anderson, Katie J; Georges, Bertrand; Cope, Alethea V; Tregoning, John S

    2017-01-01

    In spite of there being a number of vaccines, influenza remains a significant global cause of morbidity and mortality. Understanding more about natural and vaccine induced immune protection against influenza infection would help to develop better vaccines. Virus specific IgG is a known correlate of protection, but other factors may help to reduce viral load or disease severity, for example IgA. In the current study we measured influenza specific responses in a controlled human infection model using influenza A/California/2009 (H1N1) as the challenge agent. Volunteers were pre-selected with low haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titres in order to ensure a higher proportion of infection; this allowed us to explore the role of other immune correlates. In spite of HAI being uniformly low, there were variable levels of H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection. There was also a range of disease severity in volunteers allowing us to compare whether differences in systemic and local H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection affected disease outcome. H1N1 specific IgG level before challenge did not correlate with protection, probably due to the pre-screening for individuals with low HAI. However, the length of time infectious virus was recovered from the nose was reduced in patients with higher pre-existing H1N1 influenza specific nasal IgA or serum IgA. Therefore, IgA contributes to protection against influenza and should be targeted in vaccines.

  3. Transcription-coupled repair and apoptosis provide specific protection against transcription-associated mutagenesis by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Giel; Jansen, Jacob G; Mullenders, Leon H F; de Wind, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Recent data reveal that gene transcription affects genome stability in mammalian cells. For example, transcription of DNA that is damaged by the most prevalent exogenous genotoxin, UV light, induces nucleotide substitutions and chromosomal instability, collectively called UV-induced transcription-associated mutations (UV-TAM). An important class of UV-TAM consists of nucleotide transitions that are caused by deamination of cytosine-containing photolesions to uracil, presumably occurring at stalled transcription complexes. Transcription-associated deletions and recombinational events after UV exposure may be triggered by collisions of replication forks with stalled transcription complexes. In this Point-of-View we propose that mammalian cells possess two tailored mechanisms to prevent UV-TAM in dermal stem cells. First, the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) pathway removes lesions at transcribed DNA strands, forming the primary barrier against the mutagenic consequences of transcription at a damaged template. Second, when TCR is absent or when the capacity of TCR is exceeded, persistently stalled transcription complexes induce apoptosis, averting the generation of mutant cells following replication. We hypothesize that TCR and the apoptotic response in conjunction reduce the risk of skin carcinogenesis.

  4. Genome-Wide Screen for Oxalate-Sensitive Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Stotz, H. U.; Hippchen, K.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor produced by phytopathogenic filamentous fungi. In order to discover yeast genes whose orthologs in the pathogen may confer self-tolerance and whose plant orthologs may protect the host, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library consisting of 4,827 haploid mutants harboring deletions in nonessential genes was screened for growth inhibition and survival in a rich medium containing 30 mM oxalic acid at pH 3.