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Sample records for mutation causing recessive

  1. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly.

  2. Mutations of ESPN cause autosomal recessive deafness and vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Naz, S; Griffith, A; Riazuddin, S; Hampton, L; Battey, J; Khan, S; Riazuddin, S; Wilcox, E; Friedman, T

    2004-01-01

    We mapped a human deafness locus DFNB36 to chromosome 1p36.3 in two consanguineous families segregating recessively inherited deafness and vestibular areflexia. This phenotype co-segregates with either of two frameshift mutations, 1988delAGAG and 2469delGTCA, in ESPN, which encodes a calcium-insensitive actin-bundling protein called espin. A recessive mutation of ESPN is known to cause hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in the jerker mouse. Our results establish espin as an essential protein for hearing and vestibular function in humans. The abnormal vestibular phenotype associated with ESPN mutations will be a useful clinical marker for refining the differential diagnosis of non-syndromic deafness. PMID:15286153

  3. Recessively Inherited LRBA Mutations Cause Autoimmunity Presenting as Neonatal Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Al Senani, Aisha; Elbarbary, Nancy; Siklar, Zeynep; Berberoglu, Merih; Imane, Zineb; Haghighi, Alireza; Razavi, Zahra; Ullah, Irfan; Alyaarubi, Saif; Gardner, Daphne; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2017-08-01

    Young-onset autoimmune diabetes associated with additional autoimmunity usually reflects a polygenic predisposition, but rare cases result from monogenic autoimmunity. Diagnosing monogenic autoimmunity is crucial for patients' prognosis and clinical management. We sought to identify novel genetic causes of autoimmunity presenting with neonatal diabetes (NDM) (diagnosis <6 months). We performed exome sequencing in a patient with NDM and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and his unrelated, unaffected parents and identified compound heterozygous null mutations in LRBA Biallelic LRBA mutations cause common variable immunodeficiency-8; however, NDM has not been confirmed in this disorder. We sequenced LRBA in 169 additional patients with diabetes diagnosed <1 year without mutations in the 24 known NDM genes. We identified recessive null mutations in 8 additional probands, of which, 3 had NDM (<6 months). Diabetes was the presenting feature in 6 of 9 probands. Six of 17 (35%) patients born to consanguineous parents and with additional early-onset autoimmunity had recessive LRBA mutations. LRBA testing should be considered in patients with diabetes diagnosed <12 months, particularly if they have additional autoimmunity or are born to consanguineous parents. A genetic diagnosis is important as it can enable personalized therapy with abatacept, a CTLA-4 mimetic, and inform genetic counseling. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Mutations in NSUN2 Cause Autosomal- Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Mertel, Sara; Gonsior, Melanie; Nouri-Vahid, Leyla; Kahrizi, Kimia; Cirak, Sebahattin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Motazacker, M. Mahdi; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Cremer, Kirsten; Weißmann, Robert; Tzschach, Andreas; Garshasbi, Masoud; Abedini, Seyedeh S.; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H. Hilger; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Kuss, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    With a prevalence between 1 and 3%, hereditary forms of intellectual disability (ID) are among the most important problems in health care. Particularly, autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have a very heterogeneous molecular basis, and genes with an increased number of disease-causing mutations are not common. Here, we report on three different mutations (two nonsense mutations, c.679C>T [p.Gln227∗] and c.1114C>T [p.Gln372∗], as well as one splicing mutation, g.6622224A>C [p.Ile179Argfs∗192]) that cause a loss of the tRNA-methyltransferase-encoding NSUN2 main transcript in homozygotes. We identified the mutations by sequencing exons and exon-intron boundaries within the genomic region where the linkage intervals of three independent consanguineous families of Iranian and Kurdish origin overlapped with the previously described MRT5 locus. In order to gain further evidence concerning the effect of a loss of NSUN2 on memory and learning, we constructed a Drosophila model by deleting the NSUN2 ortholog, CG6133, and investigated the mutants by using molecular and behavioral approaches. When the Drosophila melanogaster NSUN2 ortholog was deleted, severe short-term-memory (STM) deficits were observed; STM could be rescued by re-expression of the wild-type protein in the nervous system. The humans homozygous for NSUN2 mutations showed an overlapping phenotype consisting of moderate to severe ID and facial dysmorphism (which includes a long face, characteristic eyebrows, a long nose, and a small chin), suggesting that mutations in this gene might even induce a syndromic form of ID. Moreover, our observations from the Drosophila model point toward an evolutionarily conserved role of RNA methylation in normal cognitive development. PMID:22541559

  5. Mutations in KDSR Cause Recessive Progressive Symmetric Erythrokeratoderma.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Lynn M; Vincent, Nicholas G; Zhou, Jing; Hu, Ronghua; Craiglow, Brittany G; Bayliss, Susan J; Rosman, Ilana S; Lucky, Anne W; Diaz, Luis A; Goldsmith, Lowell A; Paller, Amy S; Lifton, Richard P; Baserga, Susan J; Choate, Keith A

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of new genetic determinants of inherited skin disorders has been instrumental to the understanding of epidermal function, differentiation, and renewal. Here, we show that mutations in KDSR (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase), encoding an enzyme in the ceramide synthesis pathway, lead to a previously undescribed recessive Mendelian disorder in the progressive symmetric erythrokeratoderma spectrum. This disorder is characterized by severe lesions of thick scaly skin on the face and genitals and thickened, red, and scaly skin on the hands and feet. Although exome sequencing revealed several of the KDSR mutations, we employed genome sequencing to discover a pathogenic 346 kb inversion in multiple probands, and cDNA sequencing and a splicing assay established that two mutations, including a recurrent silent third base change, cause exon skipping. Immunohistochemistry and yeast complementation studies demonstrated that the mutations cause defects in KDSR function. Systemic isotretinoin therapy has achieved nearly complete resolution in the two probands in whom it has been applied, consistent with the effects of retinoic acid on alternative pathways for ceramide generation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recessive mutations in DGKE cause atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Schaefer, Franz; Choi, Murim; Tang, Wai Ho; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Taque, Sophie; Nobili, François; Martinez, Frank; Ji, Weizhen; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Morin, Denis; Deschenes, Georges; Baudouin, Véronique; Llanas, Brigitte; Collard, Laure; Majid, Mohammed A.; Simkova, Eva; Nürnberg, Peter; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Gubler, Marie Claire; Hwa, John; Loirat, Chantal; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic thrombosis is a major cause of mortality. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features episodes of small vessel thrombosis resulting in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure1. Atypical HUS (aHUS) can result from genetic or autoimmune factors2 that lead to pathologic complement cascade activation3. By exome sequencing we identify recessive mutations in DGKE (diacylglycerol kinase epsilon) that co-segregate with aHUS in 9 unrelated kindreds, defining a distinctive Mendelian disease. Affected patients present with aHUS before age 1, have persistent hypertension, hematuria and proteinuria (sometimes nephrotic range), and develop chronic kidney disease with age. DGKE is found in endothelium, platelets, and podocytes. Arachidonic acid-containing diacylglycerols (DAG) activate protein kinase C, which promotes thrombosis. DGKE normally inactivates DAG signaling. We infer that loss of DGKE function results in a pro-thrombotic state. These findings identify a new mechanism of pathologic thrombosis and kidney failure and have immediate implications for treatment of aHUS patients. PMID:23542698

  7. Mutations in FYCO1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Ma, Zhiwei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Fariss, Robert; Kantorow, Wanda Lee; Kantorow, Marc; Pras, Eran; Frydman, Moshe; Pras, Elon; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2011-01-01

    Congenital cataracts (CCs), responsible for about one-third of blindness in infants, are a major cause of vision loss in children worldwide. Autosomal-recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) form a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of the crystalline lens. To identify the genetic cause of arCC in consanguineous Pakistani families, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis and fine mapping and identified linkage to 3p21-p22 with a summed LOD score of 33.42. Mutations in the gene encoding FYVE and coiled-coil domain containing 1 (FYCO1), a PI(3)P-binding protein family member that is associated with the exterior of autophagosomes and mediates microtubule plus-end-directed vesicle transport, were identified in 12 Pakistani families and one Arab Israeli family in which arCC had previously been mapped to the overlapping CATC2 region. Nine different mutations were identified, including c.3755 delC (p.Ala1252AspfsX71), c.3858_3862dupGGAAT (p.Leu1288TrpfsX37), c.1045 C>T (p.Gln349X), c.2206C>T (p.Gln736X), c.2761C>T (p.Arg921X), c.2830C>T (p.Arg944X), c.3150+1 G>T, c.4127T>C (p.Leu1376Pro), and c.1546C>T (p.Gln516X). Fyco1 is expressed in the mouse embryonic and adult lens and peaks at P12d. Expressed mutant proteins p.Leu1288TrpfsX37 and p.Gln736X are truncated on immunoblots. Wild-type and p.L1376P FYCO1, the only missense mutant identified, migrate at the expected molecular mass. Both wild-type and p. Leu1376Pro FYCO1 proteins expressed in human lens epithelial cells partially colocalize to microtubules and are found adjacent to Golgi, but they primarily colocalize to autophagosomes. Thus, FYCO1 is involved in lens development and transparency in humans, and mutations in this gene are one of the most common causes of arCC in the Pakistani population. PMID:21636066

  8. Homozygous mutation in MERTK causes severe autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ksantini, Mohamed; Lafont, Estèle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Gene identification in retinitis pigmentosa is a prerequisite to future therapies. Accordingly, autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families were genotyped to search for causative mutations. Members of a consanguineous Moroccan family had standard ophthalmologic examination, optical coherence tomography-3 scan, autofluorescence testing, and electroretinogram. Their DNA was genotyped with the 250K SNP microchip (Affymetrix) and homozygosity mapping was done. MERTK exons were polymerase chain reaction amplified and sequenced. Two sisters and one brother out of 6 siblings had rod cone dystrophy type of retinitis pigmentosa. Salient features were night blindness starting in early infancy, dot-like whitish deposits in fovea and macula with corresponding autofluorescent dots in youngest patients, decreased visual acuity, and cone responses higher than rod responses at electroretinogram. The patients were homozygous in regions from chromosomes 2 and 8, but only that of chromosome 2 was inherited from a common ancestor. Sequencing of the MERTK gene belonging to the chromosome 2 region showed that the 3 affected patients carried a novel homozygous mutation in exon 17, c.2323C>T, leading to p.Arg775X, while their unaffected brothers and sister, parents, and paternal grandfather were heterozygous. MERTK mutations lead to severe retinitis pigmentosa with discrete dot-like autofluorescent deposits at early stages, which are a hallmark of this MERTK-specific dystrophy.

  9. Mutation of TBCK causes a rare recessive developmental disorder

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Rita J.; Brown, Rachel; Dian, Donnai; de Goede, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the underlying genetic defect in a family with 3 siblings affected by a severe, yet viable, congenital disorder. Methods: Extensive genetic and metabolic investigations were performed, and the affected children were imaged at different ages. Whole-genome genotyping and whole-exome sequencing were undertaken. A single large region (>8 Mb) of homozygosity in chromosome 4 (chr4:100,268,553–108,609,628) was identified that was shared only in affected siblings. Inspection of genetic variability within this region led to the identification of a novel mutation. Sanger sequencing confirmed segregation of the mutation with disease. Results: All affected siblings share homozygosity for a novel 4-bp deletion in the gene TBCK (NM_033115:c.614_617del:p.205_206del). Conclusions: This finding provides the genetic cause of a severe inherited disease in a family and extends the number of mutations and phenotypes associated with this recently identified disease gene. PMID:27275012

  10. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  11. ALDH1A3 Mutations Cause Recessive Anophthalmia and Microphthalmia

    PubMed Central

    Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Serey, Margaux; Serre, Valérie; Gérard, Xavier; Baumann, Clarisse; Plessis, Ghislaine; Demeer, Bénédicte; Brétillon, Lionel; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Calvas, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Ragge, Nicola; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are early-eye-development anomalies resulting in absent or small ocular globes, respectively. A/M anomalies occur in syndromic or nonsyndromic forms. They are genetically heterogeneous, some mutations in some genes being responsible for both anophthalmia and microphthalmia. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygosity for one splice-site and two missense mutations in the gene encoding the A3 isoform of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3) in three consanguineous families segregating A/M with occasional orbital cystic, neurological, and cardiac anomalies. ALDH1A3 is a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic acid gradient along the dorso-ventral axis during early eye development. Transitory expression of mutant ALDH1A3 open reading frames showed that both missense mutations reduce the accumulation of the enzyme, potentially leading to altered retinoic acid synthesis. Although the role of retinoic acid signaling in eye development is well established, our findings provide genetic evidence of a direct link between retinoic-acid-synthesis dysfunction and early-eye-development anomalies in humans. PMID:23312594

  12. Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Missense Mutations in SPARC

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Tétreault, Martine; Nadaf, Javad; Kannu, Peter; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew; Stimec, Jennifer; Dupuis, Lucie; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Palomo, Telma; Ouellet, Jean; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Mort, John S.; Moffatt, Pierre; Boudko, Sergei; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Rauch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) is a glycoprotein that binds to collagen type I and other proteins in the extracellular matrix. Using whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular defect in two unrelated girls with severe bone fragility and a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV, we identified two homozygous variants in SPARC (GenBank: NM_003118.3; c.497G>A [p.Arg166His] in individual 1; c.787G>A [p.Glu263Lys] in individual 2). Published modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies had previously shown that the residues substituted by these mutations form an intramolecular salt bridge in SPARC and are essential for the binding of SPARC to collagen type I. The amount of SPARC secreted by skin fibroblasts was reduced in individual 1 but appeared normal in individual 2. The migration of collagen type I alpha chains produced by these fibroblasts was mildly delayed on SDS-PAGE gel, suggesting some overmodification of collagen during triple helical formation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that collagen type I secretion was mildly delayed in skin fibroblasts from both individuals. Analysis of an iliac bone sample from individual 2 showed that trabecular bone was hypermineralized on the material level. In conclusion, these observations show that homozygous mutations in SPARC can give rise to severe bone fragility in humans. PMID:26027498

  13. Mutation of ATF6 causes autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Ullah, Ehsan; Wang, Xin; Sajid, Sundus; Khan, Falak Sher; Amin-ud-Din, Muhammad; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hameed, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an early-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by photophobia, nystagmus, color blindness and severely reduced visual acuity. Currently mutations in five genes CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C and PDE6H have been implicated in ACHM. We performed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis in a consanguineous Pakistani ACHM family and mapped the locus to a 15.12-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.1-q24.3 with a maximum LOD score of 3.6. A DNA sample from an affected family member underwent exome sequencing. Within the ATF6 gene, a single-base insertion variant c.355_356dupG (p.Glu119Glyfs*8) was identified, which completely segregates with the ACHM phenotype within the family. The frameshift variant was absent in public variant databases, in 130 exomes from unrelated Pakistani individuals, and in 235 ethnically matched controls. The variant is predicted to result in a truncated protein that lacks the DNA binding and transmembrane domains and therefore affects the function of ATF6 as a transcription factor that initiates the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Immunolabeling with anti-ATF6 antibodies showed localization throughout the mouse neuronal retina, including retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor cells, inner nuclear layer, inner and outer plexiform layers, with a more prominent signal in retinal ganglion cells. In contrast to cytoplasmic expression of wild-type protein, in heterologous cells ATF6 protein with the p.Glu119Glyfs*8 variant is mainly confined to the nucleus. Our results imply that response to ER stress as mediated by the ATF6 pathway is essential for color vision in humans.

  14. Mutations in FKBP10 Cause Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Bruck Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brian P; Malfait, Fransiska; Bonafe, Luisa; Baldridge, Dustin; Homan, Erica; Symoens, Sofie; Willaert, Andy; Elcioglu, Nursel; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Gillerot, Yves; Napierala, Dobrawa; Krakow, Deborah; Beighton, Peter; Superti-Furga, Andrea; De Paepe, Anne; Lee, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and posttranslational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring congenital contractures in addition to bone fragility; Bruck syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in PLOD2 encoding collagen lysyl hydroxylase, whereas Bruck syndrome type 1 has been mapped to chromosome 17, with evidence suggesting region 17p12, but the gene has remained elusive so far. Recently, the molecular spectrum of OI has been expanded with the description of the basis of a unique posttranslational modification of type I procollagen, that is, 3-prolyl-hydroxylation. Three proteins, cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene), and the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (PPIB), form a complex that is required for fibrillar collagen 3-prolyl-hydroxylation, and mutations in each gene have been shown to cause recessive forms of OI. Since then, an additional putative collagen chaperone complex, composed of FKBP10 (also known as FKBP65) and SERPINH1 (also known as HSP47), also has been shown to be mutated in recessive OI. Here we describe five families with OI-like bone fragility in association with congenital contractures who all had FKBP10 mutations. Therefore, we conclude that FKBP10 mutations are a cause of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and Bruck syndrome, possibly Bruck syndrome Type 1 since the location on chromosome 17 has not been definitely localized. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20839288

  15. Mutations in PNKP cause recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-03-05

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms.

  16. Mutations in MME cause an autosomal‐recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yuan, Junhui; Yoshimura, Akiko; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Masaki; Ishihara, Satoshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Nozuma, Satoshi; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Ohkubo, Ryuichi; Inamizu, Saeko; Shiraishi, Wataru; Yamasaki, Ryo; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun‐ichi; Oya, Yasushi; Yabe, Hayato; Nishikawa, Noriko; Tobisawa, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Nozomu; Masuda, Masayuki; Kugimoto, Chiharu; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yano, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jun; Doi, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Morishita, Shinichi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify new causes of Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease in patients with autosomal‐recessive (AR) CMT. Methods To efficiently identify novel causative genes for AR‐CMT, we analyzed 303 unrelated Japanese patients with CMT using whole‐exome sequencing and extracted recessive variants/genes shared among multiple patients. We performed mutation screening of the newly identified membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME) gene in 354 additional patients with CMT. We clinically, genetically, pathologically, and radiologically examined 10 patients with the MME mutation. Results We identified recessive mutations in MME in 10 patients. The MME gene encodes neprilysin (NEP), which is well known to be one of the most prominent beta‐amyloid (Aβ)‐degrading enzymes. All patients had a similar phenotype consistent with late‐onset axonal neuropathy. They showed muscle weakness, atrophy, and sensory disturbance in the lower extremities. All the MME mutations could be loss‐of‐function mutations, and we confirmed a lack/decrease of NEP protein expression in a peripheral nerve. No patients showed symptoms of dementia, and 1 patient showed no excess Aβ in Pittsburgh compound‐B positron emission tomography imaging. Interpretation Our results indicate that loss‐of‐function MME mutations are the most frequent cause of adult‐onset AR‐CMT2 in Japan, and we propose that this new disease should be termed AR‐CMT2T. A loss‐of‐function MME mutation did not cause early‐onset Alzheimer's disease. Identifying the MME mutation responsible for AR‐CMT could improve the rate of molecular diagnosis and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of CMT. Ann Neurol 2016;79:659–672 PMID:26991897

  17. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Michael N; Cebola, Ines; Patch, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H; Allen, Hana Lango; Houghton, Jayne Al; Roth, Christian L; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole-genome sequencing can identify all noncoding variants, yet the discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole-genome sequences from individuals with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This analysis uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400-bp sequence located 25 kb downstream of PTF1A (encoding pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can thus uncover new noncoding elements underlying human development and disease.

  18. A deleterious mutation in the LOXHD1 gene causes autosomal recessive hearing loss in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, S; Jalas, C; Shaag, A; Zenvirt, S; Landau, C; Lerer, I; Elpeleg, O

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (ARNSHL) in Ashkenazi Jews, is mainly caused by mutations in the GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Here we describe a novel homozygous mutation of the LOXHD1 gene resulting in a premature stop codon (R1572X) in nine patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin who had severe-profound congenital non-progressive ARNSHL and benefited from cochlear implants. Upon screening for the mutation among 719 anonymous Ashkenazi-Jews we detected four carriers, indicating a carrier rate of 1:180 Ashkenazi Jews. This is the second reported mutation in the LOXHD1 gene, and its homozygous presence in two of 39 Ashkenazi Jewish families with congenital ARNSHL suggest that it could account for some 5% of the familial cases in this community. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Mutations in GBA2 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia with Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Monia B.; Eleuch-Fayache, Ghada; Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Nehdi, Houda; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Arepalli, Sampath K.; Chong, Sean B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sailer, Anna; Liu, Guoxiang; Mistry, Pramod K.; Cai, Huaibin; Shrader, Ginamarie; Sassi, Celeste; Bouhlal, Yosr; Houlden, Henry; Hentati, Fayçal; Amouri, Rim; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with more than 20 different forms currently recognized, many of which are also associated with increased tone and some of which have limb spasticity. Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a defect in the enzyme acid β-glucosidase 1. β-glucosidase 2 is an enzyme with similar glucosylceramidase activity but to date has not been associated with a monogenic disorder. We studied four unrelated consanguineous families of Tunisian decent diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia of unknown origin. We performed homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an attempt to identify the genetic origin of their disorder. We were able to identify mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive ataxia in these families within the gene encoding β-glucosidase 2, GBA2. Two nonsense mutations (c.363C>A [p.Tyr121∗] and c.1018C>T [p.Arg340∗]) and a substitution (c.2618G>A [p.Arg873His]) were identified, probably resulting in nonfunctional enzyme. This study suggests GBA2 mutations are a cause of recessive spastic ataxia and responsible for a form of glucosylceramide storage disease in humans. PMID:23332917

  20. Mutations in the interleukin receptor IL11RA cause autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Katharina; Li, Yun; Vargel, Ibrahim; Hoischen, Alexander; Richardson, Rebecca; Neveling, Kornelia; Alanay, Yasemin; Uz, Elif; Elcioğlu, Nursel; Rachwalski, Martin; Kamaci, Soner; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Akin, Burcu; Grötzinger, Joachim; Konas, Ersoy; Mavili, Emin; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Collmann, Hartmut; Roscioli, Tony; Buckley, Michael F; Yigit, Gökhan; Gilissen, Christian; Kress, Wolfram; Veltman, Joris; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Akarsu, Nurten A; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We have characterized a novel autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis syndrome in a 12-affected member family from Antakya, Turkey, the presenting features of which include: multiple suture synostosis, midface hypoplasia, variable degree of exophthalmos, relative prognathism, a beaked nose, and conductive hearing loss. Homozygosity mapping followed by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a c.479+6T>G mutation in the interleukin 11 receptor alpha gene (IL11RA) on chromosome 9p21. This donor splice-site mutation leads to a high percentage of aberrant IL11RA mRNA transcripts in an affected individual and altered mRNA splicing determined by in vitro exon trapping. An extended IL11RA mutation screen was performed in a cohort of 79 patients with an initial clinical diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome, pansynostosis, or unclassified syndromic craniosynostosis. We identified mutations segregating with the disease in five families: a German patient of Turkish origin and a Turkish family with three affected sibs all of whom were homozygous for the previously identified IL11RA c.479+6T>G mutation; a family with pansynostosis with compound heterozygous missense mutations, p.Pro200Thr and p.Arg237Pro; and two further Turkish families with Crouzon-like syndrome carrying the homozygous nonsense mutations p.Tyr232* and p.Arg292*. Using transient coexpression in HEK293T and COS7 cells, we demonstrated dramatically reduced IL11-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation for all mutations. Immunofluorescence analysis of mouse Il11ra demonstrated specific protein expression in cranial mesenchyme which was localized around the coronal suture tips and in the lambdoidal suture. In situ hybridization analysis of adult zebrafish also detected zfil11ra expression in the coronal suture between the overlapping frontal and parietal plates. This study demonstrates that mutations in the IL11RA gene cause an autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis. PMID:24498618

  1. Mutations in the interleukin receptor IL11RA cause autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Keupp, Katharina; Li, Yun; Vargel, Ibrahim; Hoischen, Alexander; Richardson, Rebecca; Neveling, Kornelia; Alanay, Yasemin; Uz, Elif; Elcioğlu, Nursel; Rachwalski, Martin; Kamaci, Soner; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Akin, Burcu; Grötzinger, Joachim; Konas, Ersoy; Mavili, Emin; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Collmann, Hartmut; Roscioli, Tony; Buckley, Michael F; Yigit, Gökhan; Gilissen, Christian; Kress, Wolfram; Veltman, Joris; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Akarsu, Nurten A; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    We have characterized a novel autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis syndrome in a 12-affected member family from Antakya, Turkey, the presenting features of which include: multiple suture synostosis, midface hypoplasia, variable degree of exophthalmos, relative prognathism, a beaked nose, and conductive hearing loss. Homozygosity mapping followed by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a c.479+6T>G mutation in the interleukin 11 receptor alpha gene (IL11RA) on chromosome 9p21. This donor splice-site mutation leads to a high percentage of aberrant IL11RA mRNA transcripts in an affected individual and altered mRNA splicing determined by in vitro exon trapping. An extended IL11RA mutation screen was performed in a cohort of 79 patients with an initial clinical diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome, pansynostosis, or unclassified syndromic craniosynostosis. We identified mutations segregating with the disease in five families: a German patient of Turkish origin and a Turkish family with three affected sibs all of whom were homozygous for the previously identified IL11RA c.479+6T>G mutation; a family with pansynostosis with compound heterozygous missense mutations, p.Pro200Thr and p.Arg237Pro; and two further Turkish families with Crouzon-like syndrome carrying the homozygous nonsense mutations p.Tyr232* and p.Arg292*. Using transient coexpression in HEK293T and COS7 cells, we demonstrated dramatically reduced IL11-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation for all mutations. Immunofluorescence analysis of mouse Il11ra demonstrated specific protein expression in cranial mesenchyme which was localized around the coronal suture tips and in the lambdoidal suture. In situ hybridization analysis of adult zebrafish also detected zfil11ra expression in the coronal suture between the overlapping frontal and parietal plates. This study demonstrates that mutations in the IL11RA gene cause an autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis.

  2. Recessive HYDIN Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia without Randomization of Left-Right Body Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Heike; Schmidts, Miriam; Werner, Claudius; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Loges, Niki T.; Raidt, Johanna; Banki, Nora Fanni; Shoemark, Amelia; Burgoyne, Tom; Al Turki, Saeed; Hurles, Matthew E.; Köhler, Gabriele; Schroeder, Josef; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Reinhardt, Richard; Marthin, June K.; Nielsen, Kim G.; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Omran, Heymut

    2012-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder characterized by defective cilia and flagella motility. Chronic destructive-airway disease is caused by abnormal respiratory-tract mucociliary clearance. Abnormal propulsion of sperm flagella contributes to male infertility. Genetic defects in most individuals affected by PCD cause randomization of left-right body asymmetry; approximately half show situs inversus or situs ambiguous. Almost 70 years after the hy3 mouse possessing Hydin mutations was described as a recessive hydrocephalus model, we report HYDIN mutations in PCD-affected persons without hydrocephalus. By homozygosity mapping, we identified a PCD-associated locus, chromosomal region 16q21-q23, which contains HYDIN. However, a nearly identical 360 kb paralogous segment (HYDIN2) in chromosomal region 1q21.1 complicated mutational analysis. In three affected German siblings linked to HYDIN, we identified homozygous c.3985G>T mutations that affect an evolutionary conserved splice acceptor site and that subsequently cause aberrantly spliced transcripts predicting premature protein termination in respiratory cells. Parallel whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense HYDIN mutation, c.922A>T (p.Lys307∗), in six individuals from three Faroe Island PCD-affected families that all carried an 8.8 Mb shared haplotype across HYDIN, indicating an ancestral founder mutation in this isolated population. We demonstrate by electron microscopy tomography that, consistent with the effects of loss-of-function mutations, HYDIN mutant respiratory cilia lack the C2b projection of the central pair (CP) apparatus; similar findings were reported in Hydin-deficient Chlamydomonas and mice. High-speed videomicroscopy demonstrated markedly reduced beating amplitudes of respiratory cilia and stiff sperm flagella. Like the hy3 mouse model, all nine PCD-affected persons had normal body composition because nodal cilia function is apparently

  3. Ullrich scleroatonic muscular dystrophy is caused by recessive mutations in collagen type VI.

    PubMed

    Camacho Vanegas, O; Bertini, E; Zhang, R Z; Petrini, S; Minosse, C; Sabatelli, P; Giusti, B; Chu, M L; Pepe, G

    2001-06-19

    Ullrich syndrome is a recessive congenital muscular dystrophy affecting connective tissue and muscle. The molecular basis is unknown. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification performed on RNA extracted from fibroblasts or muscle of three Ullrich patients followed by heteroduplex analysis displayed heteroduplexes in one of the three genes coding for collagen type VI (COL6). In patient A, we detected a homozygous insertion of a C leading to a premature termination codon in the triple-helical domain of COL6A2 mRNA. Both healthy consanguineous parents were carriers. In patient B, we found a deletion of 28 nucleotides because of an A --> G substitution at nucleotide -2 of intron 17 causing the activation of a cryptic acceptor site inside exon 18. The second mutation was an exon skipping because of a G --> A substitution at nucleotide -1 of intron 23. Both mutations are present in an affected brother. The first mutation is also present in the healthy mother, whereas the second mutation is carried by their healthy father. In patient C, we found only one mutation so far-the same deletion of 28 nucleotides found in patient B. In this case, it was a de novo mutation, as it is absent in her parents. mRNA and protein analysis of patient B showed very low amounts of COL6A2 mRNA and of COL6. A near total absence of COL6 was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in fibroblasts and muscle. Our results demonstrate that Ullrich syndrome is caused by recessive mutations leading to a severe reduction of COL6.

  4. A novel nonsense mutation in keratin 10 causes a familial case of recessive epidermolytic ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jeydith A; Hannoush, Zeina C; Vargas, Luis G; Momany, Allison; Garcia, Carmen C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Dunnwald, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a rare skin disorder characterized by generalized erythroderma and cutaneous blistering at birth, which is substituted by hyperkeratosis later in life. It is caused by autosomal dominant mutations in highly conserved regions of KRT1 and KRT10. To date, only four mutations with autosomal recessive inheritance of EI have been described in consanguineous families. All of them affect the 2B domain of KRT10. In the present study, we describe four patients with EI (including one lethal case) born from unaffected parents in a consanguineous family of a native Venezuelan community. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical, genetic, and morphological aspects of the disease in this family, as well as understand its functional implications. Genomic DNA was sequenced for KRT10 and KRT1. Immunofluoresence for keratin expression was performed on cutaneous biopsies. After examination of cutaneous biopsies histology, our results showed hyperkeratosis and acantholysis with an expanded granular layer. Sequencing of KRT10 demonstrated a nonsense mutation (p.Tyr282Ter.) corresponding to the 1B domain of the protein in patients and a heterozygous pattern in other family members, resulting in complete absence of K10. The loss of K10 was compensated by upregulation of K14 and K17. In conclusion, this novel mutation in KRT10 is the first recessive genetic variation that is not located in the so called “hot spot” for recessive EI, suggesting that other areas of the gene are also susceptible for such mutations. PMID:23957016

  5. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism.

    PubMed

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-03-07

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations in C10orf11, a Melanocyte-Differentiation Gene, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N.; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L.; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2–q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. PMID:23395477

  7. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  8. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  9. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  10. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Moyer, J H; Lee-Tischler, M J; Kwon, H Y; Schrick, J J; Avner, E D; Sweeney, W E; Godfrey, V L; Cacheiro, N L; Wilkinson, J E; Woychik, R P

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  11. Mutations in MYO1H cause a recessive form of central hypoventilation with autonomic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Malte; Hernandez-Miranda, Luis R; Ceccherini, Isabella; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Kragesteen, Bjørt K; Harabula, Izabela; Krawitz, Peter; Birchmeier, Carmen; Leonard, Norma; Mundlos, Stefan

    2017-08-04

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare life-threatening disorder of respiratory and autonomic regulation. It is classically caused by dominant mutations in the transcription factor PHOX2B. The objective of the present study was to identify the molecular cause of a recessive form of central hypoventilation with autonomic dysfunction. Here, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-genome sequencing in a consanguineous family with CCHS in combination with functional analyses in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered mice. We report on a consanguineous family with three affected children, all tested PHOX2B mutation negative, presenting with alveolar hypoventilation and symptoms of autonomic dysregulation. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 25 of the MYO1H gene (c.2524_2524delA) segregating with the phenotype in the family. MYO1H encodes for the unconventional myosin IH, which is thought to function as a motor protein in intracellular transport and vesicle trafficking. We show that Myo1h is broadly expressed in the mouse lower medulla, including the CO2-sensitive Phox2b+ retrotrapezoid neurons. To test the pathogenicity of the variant, we engineered two Myo1h mutant mouse strains: the first strain (Myo1h*) resembling the human mutation and the second being a full knock-out (Myo1h(FS) ). Whole-body plethysmography studies in Myo1h* newborns with the re-engineered human mutation revealed hypoventilation and a blunted response to CO2, recapitulating the breathing phenotype observed in the kindred. Our results identify MYO1H as an important gene in CO2 sensitivity and respiratory control and as the cause of a rare recessive form of congenital central hypoventilation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Mutations in KLHL40 are a frequent cause of severe autosomal-recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Miyatake, Satoko; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Todd, Emily J; Vornanen, Pauliina; Yau, Kyle S; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Ohya, Takashi; Sakamoto, Yuko; Koshimizu, Eriko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J; Vaz, Raquel; Ceyhan, Ozge; Brownstein, Catherine A; Swanson, Lindsay C; Monnot, Sophie; Romero, Norma B; Amthor, Helge; Kresoje, Nina; Sivadorai, Padma; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Haliloglu, Goknur; Talim, Beril; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gulsev; Charles, Adrian K; Fabian, Victoria A; Davis, Mark R; Lammens, Martin; Sewry, Caroline A; Manzur, Adnan; Muntoni, Francesco; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Bertini, Enrico; Nevo, Yoram; Willichowski, Ekkhard; Silberg, Inger E; Topaloglu, Haluk; Beggs, Alan H; Allcock, Richard J N; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Laing, Nigel G

    2013-07-11

    Nemaline myopathy (NEM) is a common congenital myopathy. At the very severe end of the NEM clinical spectrum are genetically unresolved cases of autosomal-recessive fetal akinesia sequence. We studied a multinational cohort of 143 severe-NEM-affected families lacking genetic diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of six families and targeted gene sequencing of additional families. We identified 19 mutations in KLHL40 (kelch-like family member 40) in 28 apparently unrelated NEM kindreds of various ethnicities. Accounting for up to 28% of the tested individuals in the Japanese cohort, KLHL40 mutations were found to be the most common cause of this severe form of NEM. Clinical features of affected individuals were severe and distinctive and included fetal akinesia or hypokinesia and contractures, fractures, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Molecular modeling suggested that the missense substitutions would destabilize the protein. Protein studies showed that KLHL40 is a striated-muscle-specific protein that is absent in KLHL40-associated NEM skeletal muscle. In zebrafish, klhl40a and klhl40b expression is largely confined to the myotome and skeletal muscle, and knockdown of these isoforms results in disruption of muscle structure and loss of movement. We identified KLHL40 mutations as a frequent cause of severe autosomal-recessive NEM and showed that it plays a key role in muscle development and function. Screening of KLHL40 should be a priority in individuals who are affected by autosomal-recessive NEM and who present with prenatal symptoms and/or contractures and in all Japanese individuals with severe NEM. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations in KLHL40 Are a Frequent Cause of Severe Autosomal-Recessive Nemaline Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Miyatake, Satoko; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Todd, Emily J.; Vornanen, Pauliina; Yau, Kyle S.; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Ohya, Takashi; Sakamoto, Yuko; Koshimizu, Eriko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.; Vaz, Raquel; Ceyhan, Ozge; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Monnot, Sophie; Romero, Norma B.; Amthor, Helge; Kresoje, Nina; Sivadorai, Padma; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Haliloglu, Goknur; Talim, Beril; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gulsev; Charles, Adrian K.; Fabian, Victoria A.; Davis, Mark R.; Lammens, Martin; Sewry, Caroline A.; Manzur, Adnan; Muntoni, Francesco; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Bertini, Enrico; Nevo, Yoram; Willichowski, Ekkhard; Silberg, Inger E.; Topaloglu, Haluk; Beggs, Alan H.; Allcock, Richard J.N.; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Laing, Nigel G.

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NEM) is a common congenital myopathy. At the very severe end of the NEM clinical spectrum are genetically unresolved cases of autosomal-recessive fetal akinesia sequence. We studied a multinational cohort of 143 severe-NEM-affected families lacking genetic diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of six families and targeted gene sequencing of additional families. We identified 19 mutations in KLHL40 (kelch-like family member 40) in 28 apparently unrelated NEM kindreds of various ethnicities. Accounting for up to 28% of the tested individuals in the Japanese cohort, KLHL40 mutations were found to be the most common cause of this severe form of NEM. Clinical features of affected individuals were severe and distinctive and included fetal akinesia or hypokinesia and contractures, fractures, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Molecular modeling suggested that the missense substitutions would destabilize the protein. Protein studies showed that KLHL40 is a striated-muscle-specific protein that is absent in KLHL40-associated NEM skeletal muscle. In zebrafish, klhl40a and klhl40b expression is largely confined to the myotome and skeletal muscle, and knockdown of these isoforms results in disruption of muscle structure and loss of movement. We identified KLHL40 mutations as a frequent cause of severe autosomal-recessive NEM and showed that it plays a key role in muscle development and function. Screening of KLHL40 should be a priority in individuals who are affected by autosomal-recessive NEM and who present with prenatal symptoms and/or contractures and in all Japanese individuals with severe NEM. PMID:23746549

  14. Null mutations in LEPRE1 and CRTAP cause severe recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Marini, Joan C; Cabral, Wayne A; Barnes, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Classical osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a dominant genetic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in either of the two genes encoding type I collagen, COL1A1 and COL1A2. Recent investigations, however, have generated a new paradigm for OI incorporating many of the prototypical features that distinguish dominant and recessive conditions, within a type I collagen framework. We and others have shown that the long-sought cause of the recessive form of OI, first postulated in the Sillence classification, lies in defects in the genes encoding cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) or prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1/LEPRE1). Together with cyclophilin B (PPIB), CRTAP and P3H1 comprise the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex, which catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of types I, II, and V collagen, and may act as a general chaperone. Patients with mutations in CRTAP or LEPRE1 have a lethal to severe osteochondrodystrophy that overlaps with Sillence types II and III OI but has distinctive features. Infants with recessive OI have white sclerae, undertubulation of the long bones, gracile ribs without beading, and a small to normal head circumference. Those who survive to childhood or the teen years have severe growth deficiency and extreme bone fragility. Most causative mutations result in null alleles, with the absence or severe reduction of gene transcripts and proteins. As expected, 3-hydroxylation of the Pro986 residue is absent or severly reduced, but bone severity and survival length do not correlate with the extent of residual hydroxylation. Surprisingly, the collagen produced by cells with an absence of Pro986 hydroxylation has helical overmodification by lysyl hydroxylase and prolyl 4-hydroxylase, indicating that the folding of the collagen helix has been substantially delayed.

  15. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  17. Recessive Mutations in ACPT, Encoding Testicular Acid Phosphatase, Cause Hypoplastic Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Seymen, Figen; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Ye Ji; Kang, Jenny; Kim, Tak-Heun; Choi, Hwajung; Koruyucu, Mine; Kasimoglu, Yelda; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Zang Hee; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2016-11-03

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting tooth enamel. The affected enamel can be hypoplastic and/or hypomineralized. In this study, we identified ACPT (testicular acid phosphatase) biallelic mutations causing non-syndromic, generalized hypoplastic autosomal-recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in individuals from six apparently unrelated Turkish families. Families 1, 4, and 5 were affected by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.713C>T (p.Ser238Leu), family 2 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111Cys), family 3 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.226C>T (p.Arg76Cys), and family 6 by the compound heterozygous ACPT mutations c.382G>C (p.Ala128Pro) and 397G>A (p.Glu133Lys). Analysis of the ACPT crystal structure suggests that these mutations damaged the activity of ACPT by altering the sizes and charges of key amino acid side chains, limiting accessibility of the catalytic core, and interfering with homodimerization. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed localization of ACPT in secretory-stage ameloblasts. The study results provide evidence for the crucial function of ACPT during amelogenesis.

  18. An autosomal recessive mutation of DSG4 causes monilethrix through the ER stress response.

    PubMed

    Kato, Madoka; Shimizu, Akira; Yokoyama, Yoko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Shimomura, Yutaka; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    Monilethrix is a hair shaft anomaly characterized by beaded hair with periodic changes in hair thickness. Mutations in the desmoglein 4 (DSG4) gene reportedly underlie the autosomal recessive form of the disease. However, the pathogenesis and cellular basis for the DSG4 mutation-induced monilethrix remained largely unknown. We report a Japanese female patient with monilethrix. Observation of her hair shaft by means of transmission electron microscopy showed fewer desmosomes and abnormal keratinization. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous mutation, c.2119delG (p.Asp707Ilefs*109), in the DSG4 gene, which was predicted to cause a frameshift and premature termination in the intracellular region of the DSG4 protein. The mutation has not been reported previously. In the patient's hair shaft, we detected reduced but partial expression of the mutant DSG4 protein. Cellular analyses demonstrated that the mutant DSG4 lost its affinity to plakoglobin and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The amounts of mutant DSG4 were increased by proteasome inhibitor treatment, and the expression of an ER chaperone, GRP78/BiP, was elevated in the patient's skin. Collectively, these results suggest that the dysfunctional mutated DSG4, tethered in the ER, undergoes ER-associated degradation, leading to unfolded protein response induction, and thus ER stress may have a role in the pathogenesis of monilethrix.

  19. Mutations in CAPN1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Bouslam, Naima; Birouk, Nazha; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chambers, Daniel B.; Vérièpe, Julie; Androschuck, Alaura; Laurent, Sandra B.; Rochefort, Daniel; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Szuto, Anna; Liao, Meijiang; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Benomar, Ali; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Ouazzani, Reda; Yoon, Grace; Dupré, Nicolas; Suchowersky, Oksana; Bolduc, Francois V.; Parker, J. Alex; Dion, Patrick A.; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A.; Bencheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs with or without additional neurological symptoms. Although more than 70 genes and genetic loci have been implicated in HSP, many families remain genetically undiagnosed, suggesting that other genetic causes of HSP are still to be identified. HSP can be inherited in an autosomal-dominant, autosomal-recessive, or X-linked manner. In the current study, we performed whole-exome sequencing to analyze a total of nine affected individuals in three families with autosomal-recessive HSP. Rare homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense, missense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations in CAPN1 were identified in all affected individuals, and sequencing in additional family members confirmed the segregation of these mutations with the disease (spastic paraplegia 76 [SPG76]). CAPN1 encodes calpain 1, a protease that is widely present in the CNS. Calpain 1 is involved in synaptic plasticity, synaptic restructuring, and axon maturation and maintenance. Three models of calpain 1 deficiency were further studied. In Caenorhabditis elegans, loss of calpain 1 function resulted in neuronal and axonal dysfunction and degeneration. Similarly, loss-of-function of the Drosophila melanogaster ortholog calpain B caused locomotor defects and axonal anomalies. Knockdown of calpain 1a, a CAPN1 ortholog in Danio rerio, resulted in abnormal branchiomotor neuron migration and disorganized acetylated-tubulin axonal networks in the brain. The identification of mutations in CAPN1 in HSP expands our understanding of the disease causes and potential mechanisms. PMID:27153400

  20. A homozygous mutation in TRIM36 causes autosomal recessive anencephaly in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nivedita; Kumble Bhat, Vishwanath; Tiwari, Ankana; Kodaganur, Srinivas G; Tontanahal, Sagar J; Sarda, Astha; Malini, K V; Kumar, Arun

    2017-01-13

    Anencephaly is characterized by the absence of brain tissues and cranium. During primary neurulation stage of the embryo, the rostral part of the neural pore fails to close, leading to anencephaly. Anencephaly shows a heterogeneous etiology, ranging from environmental to genetic causes. The autosomal recessive inheritance of anencephaly has been reported in several populations. In this study, we employed whole-exome sequencing and identified a homozygous missense mutation c.1522C>A (p.Pro508Thr) in the TRIM36 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive anencephaly (APH) in an Indian family. The TRIM36 gene is expressed in the developing brain, suggesting a role in neurogenesis. In silco analysis showed that proline at codon position 508 is highly conserved in 26 vertebrate species, and the mutation is predicted to affect the conformation of the B30.2/SPRY domain of TRIM36. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the mutation renders the TRIM36 protein less stable. TRIM36 is known to associate with microtubules. Transient expression of the mutant TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells resulted in microtubule disruption, disorganized spindles, loosely arranged chromosomes, multiple spindles, abnormal cytokinesis, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis as compared to cells transfected with its wild-type counterpart. The siRNA knock down of TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells also led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We suggest that microtubule disruption and disorganized spindles mediated by mutant TRIM36 affect neural cell proliferation during neural tube formation, leading to anencephaly.

  1. Mutation of CERKL, a Novel Human Ceramide Kinase Gene, Causes Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP26)

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the main cause of adult blindness, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors through apoptosis. Up to now, 39 genes and loci have been implicated in nonsyndromic RP, yet the genetic bases of >50% of the cases, particularly of the recessive forms, remain unknown. Previous linkage analysis in a Spanish consanguineous family allowed us to define a novel autosomal recessive RP (arRP) locus, RP26, within an 11-cM interval (17.4 Mb) on 2q31.2-q32.3. In the present study, we further refine the RP26 locus down to 2.5 Mb, by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping. After unsuccessful mutational analysis of the nine genes initially reported in this region, a detailed gene search based on expressed-sequence-tag data was undertaken. We finally identified a novel gene encoding a ceramide kinase (CERKL), which encompassed 13 exons. All of the patients from the RP26 family bear a homozygous mutation in exon 5, which generates a premature termination codon. The same mutation was also characterized in another, unrelated, Spanish pedigree with arRP. Human CERKL is expressed in the retina, among other adult and fetal tissues. A more detailed analysis by in situ hybridization on adult murine retina sections shows expression of Cerkl in the ganglion cell layer. Ceramide kinases convert the sphingolipid metabolite ceramide into ceramide-1-phosphate, both key mediators of cellular apoptosis and survival. Ceramide metabolism plays an essential role in the viability of neuronal cells, the membranes of which are particularly rich in sphingolipids. Therefore, CERKL deficiency could shift the relative levels of the signaling sphingolipid metabolites and increase sensitivity of photoreceptor and other retinal cells to apoptotic stimuli. This is the first genetic report suggesting a direct link between retinal neurodegeneration in RP and sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis. PMID

  2. A novel recessive GUCY2D mutation causing cone-rod dystrophy and not Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Ugur Iseri, Sibel A; Durlu, Yusuf K; Tolun, Aslihan

    2010-10-01

    Cone-rod dystrophies are inherited retinal dystrophies that are characterized by progressive degeneration of cones and rods, causing an early decrease in central visual acuity and colour vision defects, followed by loss of peripheral vision in adolescence or early adult life. Both genetic and clinical heterogeneity are well known. In a family with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy, genetic analyses comprising genome scan with microsatellite markers, fine mapping and candidate gene approach resulted in the identification of a homozygous missense GUCY2D mutation. This is the first GUCY2D mutation associated with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy rather than Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe disease leading to childhood blindness. This study hence establishes GUCY2D, which is a common cause for both recessive LCA and dominant cone-rod dystrophy, as a good candidate for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

  3. Recessive MYL2 mutations cause infantile type I muscle fibre disease and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weterman, Marian A J; Barth, Peter G; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Aronica, Eleonora; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Tintelen, J Peter; Qahar, Zohal; Bradley, Edward J; de Wissel, Marit; Salviati, Leonardo; Angelini, Corrado; van den Heuvel, Lambertus; Thomasse, Yolande E M; Backx, Ad P; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Baas, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A cardioskeletal myopathy with onset and death in infancy, morphological features of muscle type I hypotrophy with myofibrillar disorganization and dilated cardiomyopathy was previously reported in three Dutch families. Here we report the genetic cause of this disorder. Multipoint parametric linkage analysis of six Dutch patients identified a homozygous region of 2.1 Mb on chromosome 12, which was shared between all Dutch patients, with a log of odds score of 10.82. Sequence analysis of the entire linkage region resulted in the identification of a homozygous mutation in the last acceptor splice site of the myosin regulatory light chain 2 gene (MYL2) as the genetic cause. MYL2 encodes a myosin regulatory light chain (MLC-2V). The myosin regulatory light chains bind, together with the essential light chains, to the flexible neck region of the myosin heavy chain in the hexameric myosin complex and have a structural and regulatory role in muscle contraction. The MYL2 mutation results in use of a cryptic splice site upstream of the last exon causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 20 different codons. Whole exome sequencing of an Italian patient with similar clinical features showed compound heterozygosity for two other mutations affecting the same exon of MYL2, also resulting in mutant proteins with altered C-terminal tails. As a consequence of these mutations, the second EF-hand domain is disrupted. EF-hands, assumed to function as calcium sensors, can undergo a conformational change upon binding of calcium that is critical for interactions with downstream targets. Immunohistochemical staining of skeletal muscle tissue of the Dutch patients showed a diffuse and weak expression of the mutant protein without clear fibre specificity, while normal protein was absent. Heterozygous missense mutations in MYL2 are known to cause dominant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, none of the parents showed signs of cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, the mutations

  4. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Adam; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E.; Liao, Jun; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Boles, Richard G.; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A.; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway. PMID:27120463

  5. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinglan; Lachance, Véronik; Schaffner, Adam; Li, Xianting; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E; Liao, Jun; Rosenfeld, Jill; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Mitchell, Wendy G; Boles, Richard G; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Bagley, Kaytee; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway.

  6. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, David B.; Heon, Elise; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Lu, Monica; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Garafalo, Alexandra V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog) gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar) retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit), some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK. PMID:28704921

  7. Mutations in the HSP27 (HSPB1) gene cause dominant, recessive, and sporadic distal HMN/CMT type 2.

    PubMed

    Houlden, H; Laura, M; Wavrant-De Vrièze, F; Blake, J; Wood, N; Reilly, M M

    2008-11-18

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder and is characterized by significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in both the small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 or HSPB1) and 22 (HSP22 or HSPB8) genes have been reported to cause autosomal dominant CMT with minimal sensory involvement (CMT 2F/CMT2L) and autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy type II (dHMN II). We analyzed the HSPB1 and HSPB8 genes in a large clinically well-characterized series of dHMN and CMT type 2 (CMT2) cases and families using linkage analysis and direct sequencing of these genes. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the alpha-crystallin domain of HSPB1 segregating in an autosomal recessive fashion in a family with distal HMN/CMT2. A further four heterozygous HSPB1 mutations were identified in four autosomal dominant families dHMN/CMT2, and two sporadic cases were identified with probable de novo mutations. In the autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive families, there were no clinical sensory findings, but reduced sural nerve action potential amplitudes were found in some affected individuals, indicating that long sensory axons are mildly affected in this predominantly motor disorder. This extends the clinical and electrophysiologic spectrum of HSPB1 mutations and identifies four unreported dominant HSPB1 mutations and the first family where the HSPB1 mutation acts in a recessive way to cause distal HMN.

  8. UBA5 Mutations Cause a New Form of Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Gehan; Li, Jia; Lin, Yunting; Guo, Jifeng; Wang, Junling; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Beisha

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. For many affected patients, the genetic cause remains undetermined. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 5 gene (UBA5) in two Chinese siblings presenting with ARCA. Moreover, copy number variations in UBA5 or ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 gene (UFM1) were documented with the phenotypes of global developmental delays and gait disturbances in the ClinVar database. UBA5 encodes UBA5, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of UFM1. However, a crucial role for UBA5 in human neurological disease remains to be reported. Our molecular study of UBA5-R246X revealed a dramatically decreased half-life and loss of UFM1 activation due to the absence of the catalytic cysteine Cys250. UBA5-K310E maintained its interaction with UFM1, although with less stability, which may affect the ability of this UBA5 mutant to activate UFM1. Drosophila modeling revealed that UBA5 knockdown induced locomotive defects and a shortened lifespan accompanied by aberrant neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Strikingly, we found that UFM1 and E2 cofactor knockdown induced markedly similar phenotypes. Wild-type UBA5, but not mutant UBA5, significantly restored neural lesions caused by the absence of UBA5. The finding of a UBA5 mutation in cerebellar ataxia suggests that impairment of the UFM1 pathway may contribute to the neurological phenotypes of ARCA. PMID:26872069

  9. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-04

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis.

  10. Monogenic Recessive Mutations Causing Both Late Floral Initiation and Excess Starch Accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Eimert, K.; Wang, S. M.; Lue, W. I.; Chen, J.

    1995-01-01

    A recessive Arabidopsis mutation, carbohydrate accumulation mutant1 (cam1), which maps to position 22.8 on chromosome 3, was identified by screening leaves of ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized M2 plants stained with iodine for altered starch content. Increased starch content in leaves of the cam1 mutant was observed at the onset of flowering. This mutant also had a delayed floral initiation phenotype with more rosette leaves than the parental line. In addition, activities of several enzymes associated with starch metabolism were altered in the cam1 mutant. The late-flowering mutant gigantea (gi) also manifested an elevated starch level in leaves. However, not all late-flowering mutants had increased leaf starch content. Double mutants cam1 adg1 (for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase), cam1 pgm (for phosphoglucomutase), and gi pgm had no observable starch in leaves but showed the late-flowering phenotype, demonstrating that the elevated starch content is not the cause of late floral initiation. The pleiotropic effects of cam1 and gi suggest that they may play regulatory roles in starch metabolism and floral initiation. These data suggest that starch accumulation and floral initiation may share a common regulatory pathway. PMID:12242359

  11. Mutations in RIPK4 Cause the Autosomal-Recessive Form of Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalay, Ersan; Sezgin, Orhan; Chellappa, Vasant; Mutlu, Mehmet; Morsy, Heba; Kayserili, Hulya; Kreiger, Elmar; Cansu, Aysegul; Toraman, Bayram; Abdalla, Ebtesam Mohammed; Aslan, Yakup; Pillai, Shiv; Akarsu, Nurten A.

    2012-01-01

    The autosomal-recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome, also known as Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, is a rare, but frequently lethal disorder characterized by marked popliteal pterygium associated with multiple congenital malformations. Using Affymetrix 250K SNP array genotyping and homozygosity mapping, we mapped this malformation syndrome to chromosomal region 21q22.3. Direct sequencing of RIPK4 (receptor-interacting serine/threonine kinase protein 4) showed a homozygous transversion (c.362T>A) that causes substitution of a conserved isoleucine with asparagine at amino acid position 121 (p.Ile121Asn) in the serine/threonine kinase domain of the protein. Additional pathogenic mutations—a homozygous transition (c.551C>T) that leads to a missense substitution (p.Thr184Ile) at a conserved position and a homozygous one base-pair insertion mutation (c.777_778insA) predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (p.Arg260ThrfsX14) within the kinase domain—were observed in two families. Molecular modeling of the kinase domain showed that both the Ile121 and Thr184 positions are critical for the protein's stability and kinase activity. Luciferase reporter assays also demonstrated that these mutations are critical for the catalytic activity of RIPK4. RIPK4 mediates activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and is required for keratinocyte differentiation and craniofacial and limb development. The phenotype of Ripk4−/− mice is consistent with the human phenotype presented herein. Additionally, the spectrum of malformations observed in the presented families is similar, but less severe than the conserved helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase (CHUK)-deficient human fetus phenotype; known as Cocoon syndrome; this similarity indicates that RIPK4 and CHUK might function via closely related pathways to promote keratinocyte differentiation and epithelial growth. PMID:22197489

  12. Compound heterozygosity of two novel truncation mutations in RP1 causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Jia; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Tam, Pancy O S; Chiang, Sylvia W Y; Zhang, Xin; Lam, Shi; Lai, Ricky Y K; Lam, Dennis S C; Pang, Chi Pui

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the phenotypic effects of two novel frameshift mutations in the RP1 gene in a Chinese pedigree of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). Methods. Family members of a proband with ARRP were screened for RP1, RHO, NR2E3, and NRL mutations by direct sequencing. Detected RP1 mutations were genotyped in 225 control subjects. Since one family member with the RP1 deletion mutation in exon 2 was found to have age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but not RP, exons 2 and 3 of RP1 were screened in 120 patients with exudative AMD. Major AMD-associated SNPs in the HTRA1 and CFH genes were also investigated. Results. Two novel frameshift mutations in RP1, c.5_6delGT and c.4941_4942insT, were identified in the pedigree. They were absent in 225 control subjects. Family members who were compound heterozygous for the nonsense mutations had early-onset and severe RP, whereas those with only one mutation did not have RP. No mutations in RHO, NR2E3, and NRL were identified in the pedigree. Subject I:2 with AMD carried both at-risk genotypes at HTRA1 rs11200638 and CFH rs800292. No mutation in RP1 exons 2 and 3 was identified in 120 AMD patients. Conclusions. This report is the first to associate ARRP with compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in RP1. Identification of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD)-sensitive mutation c.5_6delGT provided further genetic evidence that haploinsufficiency of RP1 is not responsible for RP. The authors propose four classes of truncation mutations in the RP1 gene with different effects on the etiology of RP.

  13. A homozygous mutation in ADAMTSL4 causes autosomal-recessive isolated ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Dina; Sato, T Shawn; Kohilan, Abdulghani; Tayeh, Marwan; Chen, Shan; Leal, Suzanne; Al-Salem, Mahmoud; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2009-02-01

    Ectopia lentis is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is characterized by the subluxation of the lens resulting from the disruption of the zonular fibers. Patients with ectopia lentis commonly present with a marked loss in visual acuity in addition to a number of possibly accompanying ocular complications including cataract, myopia, and retinal detachment. We here describe an isolated form of ectopia lentis in a large inbred family that shows autosomal-recessive inheritance. We map the ectopia lentis locus in this family to the pericentromeric region on chromosome 1 (1p13.2-q21.1). The linkage region contains well more than 60 genes. Mutation screening of four candidate genes revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 11 of ADAMTSL4 (p.Y595X; c.1785T-->G) in all affected individuals that is absent in 380 control chromosomes. The mutation would result in a truncated protein of half the original length, if the mRNA escapes nonsense-mediated decay. We conclude that mutations in ADAMTSL4 are responsible for autosomal-recessive simple ectopia lentis and that ADAMTS-like4 plays a role in the development and/or integrity of the zonular fibers.

  14. Recessive mutations in EPG5 cause Vici syndrome, a multisystem disorder with defective autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Cullup, Thomas; Kho, Ay L.; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brandmeier, Birgit; Smith, Frances; Urry, Zoe; Simpson, Michael A.; Yau, Shu; Bertini, Enrico; McClelland, Verity; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Koelker, Stefan; Koerner, Christian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Wijburg, Frits A.; Hoedt, Amber E. ten; Rogers, Curtis; Manchester, David; Miyata, Rie; Hayashi, Masaharu; Said, Elizabeth; Soler, Doriette; Kroisel, Peter M.; Windpassinger, Christian; Filloux, Francis M.; Al-Kaabi, Salwa; Hertecant, Jozef; Del Campo, Miguel; Buk, Stefan; Bodi, Istvan; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Sewry, Caroline A.; Abbs, Stephen; Mohammed, Shehla; Josifova, Dragana; Gautel, Mathias; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Vici syndrome is a recessively inherited multisystem disorder characterized by callosal agenesis, cataracts, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency and hypopigmentation. To investigate the molecular basis of Vici syndrome, we carried out exome and Sanger sequence analysis in a cohort of 18 patients. We identified recessive mutations in EPG5 (previously KIAA1632), indicating a causative role in Vici syndrome. EPG5 is the human homologue of the metazoan-specific autophagy gene epg-5, encoding a key autophagy regulator (ectopic P-granules autophagy protein 5) implicated in the formation of autolysosomes. Further studies demonstrated a severe block of autophagosomal clearance in muscle and fibroblasts from EPG5 mutant patients, resulting in autophagic cargo accumulation in autophagosomes. These findings indicate Vici syndrome as a paradigm of a human multisystem disorder associated with defective autophagy, and suggest a fundamental role of the autophagy pathway in the anatomical and functional formation of organs such as the brain, the heart and the immune system. PMID:23222957

  15. Recessive Mutations in RTN4IP1 Cause Isolated and Syndromic Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Angebault, Claire; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Charif, Majida; Gerber, Sylvie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gueguen, Naig; Halloy, François; Moore, David; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Manes, Gael; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Quiles, Mélanie; Piro-Mégy, Camille; Teigell, Marisa; Delettre, Cécile; Rossel, Mireille; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit; Carelli, Valerio; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Roubertie, Agathe; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Bomont, Pascale; Hamel, Christian P.; Lenaers, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare blinding conditions related to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic-nerve degeneration, for which only mutations in TMEM126A and ACO2 are known. In four families with early-onset recessive optic neuropathy, we identified mutations in RTN4IP1, which encodes a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxydo-reductase. RTN4IP1 is a partner of RTN4 (also known as NOGO), and its ortholog Rad8 in C. elegans is involved in UV light response. Analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals with a RTN4IP1 mutation showed loss of the altered protein, a deficit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV activities, and increased susceptibility to UV light. Silencing of RTN4IP1 altered the number and morphogenesis of mouse RGC dendrites in vitro and the eye size, neuro-retinal development, and swimming behavior in zebrafish in vivo. Altogether, these data point to a pathophysiological mechanism responsible for RGC early degeneration and optic neuropathy and linking RTN4IP1 functions to mitochondrial physiology, response to UV light, and dendrite growth during eye maturation. PMID:26593267

  16. Recessive PIEZO2 stop mutation causes distal arthrogryposis with distal muscle weakness, scoliosis and proprioception defects.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Goknur; Becker, Kerstin; Temucin, Cagri; Talim, Beril; Küçükşahin, Nalan; Pergande, Matthias; Motameny, Susanne; Nürnberg, Peter; Aydingoz, Ustun; Topaloglu, Haluk; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2017-04-01

    The genetic work-up of arthrogryposis is challenging due to the diverse clinical and molecular etiologies. We report a-18(3/12)-year-old boy, from a 2nd degree consanguineous family, who presented at 3(6/12) years with hypotonia, distal laxity, contractures, feeding difficulties at birth. He required surgery for progressive scoliosis at 16 years of age, and walked independently since then with an unstable gait and coordination defects. His latest examination at 18 years of age revealed a proprioceptive defect and loss-of-joint position sense in the upper limbs. Somatosensory evoked potentials supported bilateral involvement of dorsal column-medial lemniscal sensory pathways and nerve conduction studies revealed a mild axonal neuropathy. Muscle biopsy showed myopathic changes with neonatal myosin expression. Mendeliome sequencing led to the discovery of a recessive stop mutation in piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2, NM_022068, c.1384C>T, p.R462*). PIEZO2 is a nonselective cation channel, expressed in sensory endings of proprioceptors innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. Dominant PIEZO2 mutations were described in patients with distal arthrogryposis type 5 and Marden-Walker syndrome. Sensory ataxia and proprioception defect with dorsal column involvement together with arthrogryposis, myopathy, scoliosis and progressive respiratory failure may represent a distinct clinical phenotype, and indicate recessive mutations in PIEZO2.

  17. Recessive mutations in POLR1C cause a leukodystrophy by impairing biogenesis of RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Thiffault, Isabelle; Wolf, Nicole I.; Forget, Diane; Guerrero, Kether; Tran, Luan T.; Choquet, Karine; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Poitras, Christian; Brais, Bernard; Yoon, Grace; Sztriha, Laszlo; Webster, Richard I.; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Seeger, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Alíz; Máté, Adrienn; Goizet, Cyril; Fung, Eva; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fribourg, Sébastien; Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Taft, Ryan J.; Yates III, John R.; Coulombe, Benoit; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    A small proportion of 4H (Hypomyelination, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism) or RNA polymerase III (POLR3)-related leukodystrophy cases are negative for mutations in the previously identified causative genes POLR3A and POLR3B. Here we report eight of these cases carrying recessive mutations in POLR1C, a gene encoding a shared POLR1 and POLR3 subunit, also mutated in some Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) cases. Using shotgun proteomics and ChIP sequencing, we demonstrate that leukodystrophy-causative mutations, but not TCS mutations, in POLR1C impair assembly and nuclear import of POLR3, but not POLR1, leading to decreased binding to POLR3 target genes. This study is the first to show that distinct mutations in a gene coding for a shared subunit of two RNA polymerases lead to selective modification of the enzymes' availability leading to two different clinical conditions and to shed some light on the pathophysiological mechanism of one of the most common hypomyelinating leukodystrophies, POLR3-related leukodystrophy. PMID:26151409

  18. Pathognomonic oral profile of Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS) caused by recessive FAM20A mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. Commonly described as an isolated trait, it may be observed concomitantly with other orodental and/or systemic features such as nephrocalcinosis in Enamel Renal Syndrome (ERS, MIM#204690), or gingival hyperplasia in Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome (AIGFS, MIM#614253). Patients affected by ERS/AIGFS present a distinctive orodental phenotype consisting of generalized hypoplastic AI affecting both the primary and permanent dentition, delayed tooth eruption, pulp stones, hyperplastic dental follicles, and gingival hyperplasia with variable severity and calcified nodules. Renal exam reveals a nephrocalcinosis which is asymptomatic in children affected by ERS. FAM20A recessive mutations are responsible for both syndromes. We suggest that AIGFS and ERS are in fact descriptions of the same syndrome, but that the kidney phenotype has not always been investigated fully in AIGFS. The aim of this review is to highlight the distinctive and specific orodental features of patients with recessive mutations in FAM20A. We propose ERS to be the preferred term for all the phenotypes arising from recessive FAM20A mutations. A differential diagnosis has to be made with other forms of AI, isolated or syndromic, where only a subset of the clinical signs may be shared. When ERS is suspected, the patient should be assessed by a dentist, nephrologist and clinical geneticist. Confirmed cases require long-term follow-up. Management of the orodental aspects can be extremely challenging and requires the input of multi-disciplinary specialized dental team, especially when there are multiple unerupted teeth. PMID:24927635

  19. Suppression of a -1 frameshift mutation by a recessive tRNA suppressor which causes doublet decoding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D J; Hughes, D; Thompson, S; Atkins, J F

    1989-01-01

    sufS was found to suppress the only known suppressible-1 frameshift mutation, trpE91, at a site identified as GGA and mapped within the single gene of the only tRNA that can decode GGA in Escherichia coli. It mapped to the same gene in Salmonella typhimurium. sufS alleles were recessive, and dominant alleles could not be isolated. This is in contrast to all other tRNA structural gene mutations identified thus far that cause frameshift suppression. The recessiveness implies that all sufS alleles are poor competitors against their wild-type tRNA(Gly2) counterparts. The base G immediately 5' of the GGA suppression site influenced the level but was not critical for suppression by sufS601. From this result, it is inferred that sufS601 causes frameshifting by doublet decoding. PMID:2472379

  20. Recessive mutations in SLC38A8 cause foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting without albinism.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M; Parry, David A; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-12-05

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism in people with recessive mutations in the putative glutamine transporter gene SLC38A8. Nine different mutations were identified in seven Asian and European families. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of Slc38a8 in medaka fish, we confirmed that pigmentation is unaffected by loss of SLC38A8. Furthermore, by undertaking an association study with SNPs at the SLC38A8 locus, we showed that common variants within this gene modestly affect foveal thickness in the general population. This study reveals a melanin-independent component underpinning the development of the visual pathway that requires a functional role for SLC38A8.

  1. Recessive Mutations in SLC38A8 Cause Foveal Hypoplasia and Optic Nerve Misrouting without Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A.; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M.; Parry, David A.; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D.; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism in people with recessive mutations in the putative glutamine transporter gene SLC38A8. Nine different mutations were identified in seven Asian and European families. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of Slc38a8 in medaka fish, we confirmed that pigmentation is unaffected by loss of SLC38A8. Furthermore, by undertaking an association study with SNPs at the SLC38A8 locus, we showed that common variants within this gene modestly affect foveal thickness in the general population. This study reveals a melanin-independent component underpinning the development of the visual pathway that requires a functional role for SLC38A8. PMID:24290379

  2. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Dominant, Recessive, or Compound Heterozygous SUR1 Mutations with Opposite Functional Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Sian ; Flanagan, Sarah E. ; Girard, Christophe A. ; Patch, Ann-Marie ; Harries, Lorna W. ; Parrish, Andrew ; Edghill, Emma L. ; Mackay, Deborah J. G. ; Proks, Peter ; Shimomura, Kenju ; Haberland, Holger ; Carson, Dennis J. ; Shield, Julian P. H. ; Hattersley, Andrew T. ; Ashcroft, Frances M. 

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygous activating mutations in the KCNJ11 gene encoding the pore-forming Kir6.2 subunit of the pancreatic beta cell KATP channel are the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM). Patients with PNDM due to a heterozygous activating mutation in the ABCC8 gene encoding the SUR1 regulatory subunit of the KATP channel have recently been reported. We studied a cohort of 59 patients with permanent diabetes who received a diagnosis before 6 mo of age and who did not have a KCNJ11 mutation. ABCC8 gene mutations were identified in 16 of 59 patients and included 8 patients with heterozygous de novo mutations. A recessive mode of inheritance was observed in eight patients with homozygous, mosaic, or compound heterozygous mutations. Functional studies of selected mutations showed a reduced response to ATP consistent with an activating mutation that results in reduced insulin secretion. A novel mutational mechanism was observed in which a heterozygous activating mutation resulted in PNDM only when a second, loss-of-function mutation was also present. PMID:17668386

  3. A newly described mutation of the CLCN7 gene causes neuropathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in an Arab family.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Dabbagh, Amal A; Edrees, Alaa Y

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic manifestations in osteopetrosis are usually secondary to sclerosis of the skull bones. However, a rare neuropathic subtype of osteopetrosis exists that resembles neurodegenerative storage disorders. Unlike other forms of osteopetrosis, this latter form does not respond to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Preliminary studies suggest that this neuropathic form is more likely to be caused by mutations in the CLCN7 gene in an autosomal recessive manner. This study provides further evidence for this phenotype-genotype correlation by presenting a previously unreported mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a Yemeni family with the neuropathic form. This is also the first study of any mutation in patients with osteopetrosis of Arabic ethnicity. As literature review suggests that this type may be more common in Arabs, cascade genetic screening of early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis in patients of Arabic ancestry may preferably start with the CLCN7 gene rather than the TCIRG gene as is routinely done in clinical laboratories. Identifying a mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a patient with early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis may also guide therapeutic decisions including the option of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  4. Mutations in SNX14 cause a distinctive autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna C; Williams, Hywel; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Bacchelli, Chiara; Jenkins, Dagan; O'Sullivan, Mary; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Ishida, Miho; Ocaka, Louise; Chanudet, Estelle; James, Chela; Lescai, Francesco; Anderson, Glenn; Morrogh, Deborah; Ryten, Mina; Duncan, Andrew J; Pai, Yun Jin; Saraiva, Jorge M; Ramos, Fabiana; Farren, Bernadette; Saunders, Dawn; Vernay, Bertrand; Gissen, Paul; Straatmaan-Iwanowska, Anna; Baas, Frank; Wood, Nicholas W; Hersheson, Joshua; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane; Scott, Richard; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Moore, Gudrun E; Sousa, Sérgio B; Stanier, Philip

    2014-11-06

    Intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy occur together in a large number of genetic conditions and are frequently associated with microcephaly and/or epilepsy. Here we report the identification of causal mutations in Sorting Nexin 14 (SNX14) found in seven affected individuals from three unrelated consanguineous families who presented with recessively inherited moderate-severe intellectual disability, cerebellar ataxia, early-onset cerebellar atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and the distinctive association of progressively coarsening facial features, relative macrocephaly, and the absence of seizures. We used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a homozygous nonsense mutation and an in-frame multiexon deletion in two families. A homozygous splice site mutation was identified by Sanger sequencing of SNX14 in a third family, selected purely by phenotypic similarity. This discovery confirms that these characteristic features represent a distinct and recognizable syndrome. SNX14 encodes a cellular protein containing Phox (PX) and regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domains. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis predicts that SNX14 is highly coexpressed with genes involved in cellular protein metabolism and vesicle-mediated transport. All three mutations either directly affected the PX domain or diminished SNX14 levels, implicating a loss of normal cellular function. This manifested as increased cytoplasmic vacuolation as observed in cultured fibroblasts. Our findings indicate an essential role for SNX14 in neural development and function, particularly in development and maturation of the cerebellum.

  5. Mutations in SCAPER cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Tatour, Yasmin; Sanchez-Navarro, Iker; Chervinsky, Elana; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gawi, Haithum; Tahsin-Swafiri, Saoud; Leibu, Rina; Lopez-Molina, Maria Isabel; Fernandez-Sanz, Guillermo; Ayuso, Carmen; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2017-08-09

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy, with a worldwide prevalence of 1 in 4000 persons. While in most cases of RP, the disease is limited to the eye (non-syndromic), over 40 forms of syndromic RP have been described. To identify the genetic basis for syndromic RP in three unrelated families from Israel and Spain. Whole exome sequencing was conducted in one Israeli and two Spanish families segregating autosomal recessive RP with intellectual disability. Complete ophthalmic examination included best-corrected visual acuity, funduscopy, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, flash visual evoked potentials, and electroretinography. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunostaining were used to examine the spatial and temporal expression pattern of SCAPER. In all patients, biallelic SCAPER mutations were observed. Clinically, patients with SCAPER mutations show signs of typical RP. In addition, they have mild to moderate intellectual disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. SCAPER was found to be ubiquitously expressed in a wide range of human tissues, including retina and brain. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that in both mouse eye and brain, Scaper is expressed as early as embryonic day 14. In the mouse retina, SCAPER is located in multiple layers, including the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor outer and inner segments, the inner plexiform layer and the ganglion cell layer. Deleterious SCAPER mutations were identified in four patients from three unrelated families of different ethnic backgrounds, thereby confirming the involvement of this gene in the aetiology of autosomal recessive syndromic RP. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Is Caused by Mutations in Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Guergueltcheva, Velina; Azmanov, Dimitar N.; Angelicheva, Dora; Smith, Katherine R.; Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Bynevelt, Michael; Nguyen, Thai; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Bojinova, Veneta; Kaprelyan, Ara; Angelova, Lyudmila; Morar, Bharti; Chandler, David; Kaneva, Radka; Bahlo, Melanie; Tournev, Ivailo; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital cerebellar ataxia was identified in Roma patients originating from a small subisolate with a known strong founder effect. Patients presented with global developmental delay, moderate to severe stance and gait ataxia, dysarthria, mild dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria and tremors, intellectual deficit, and mild pyramidal signs. Brain imaging revealed progressive generalized cerebellar atrophy, and inferior vermian hypoplasia and/or a constitutionally small brain were observed in some patients. Exome sequencing, used for linkage analysis on extracted SNP genotypes and for mutation detection, identified two novel (i.e., not found in any database) variants located 7 bp apart within a unique 6q24 linkage region. Both mutations cosegregated with the disease in five affected families, in which all ten patients were homozygous. The mutated gene, GRM1, encodes metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, which is highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays an important role in cerebellar development and synaptic plasticity. The two mutations affect a gene region critical for alternative splicing and the generation of receptor isoforms; they are a 3 bp exon 8 deletion and an intron 8 splicing mutation (c.2652_2654del and c.2660+2T>G, respectively [RefSeq accession number NM_000838.3]). The functional impact of the deletion is unclear and is overshadowed by the splicing defect. Although ataxia lymphoblastoid cell lines expressed GRM1 at levels comparable to those of control cells, the aberrant transcripts skipped exon 8 or ended in intron 8 and encoded various species of nonfunctional receptors either lacking the transmembrane domain and containing abnormal intracellular tails or completely missing the tail. The study implicates mGluR1 in human hereditary ataxia. It also illustrates the potential of the Roma founder populations for mutation identification by exome sequencing. PMID:22901947

  7. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes.

  8. Characterization of six novel mutations in CYBA: the gene causing autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Teimourian, Shahram; Zomorodian, Elham; Badalzadeh, Mohsen; Pouya, Alireza; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Mansouri, Davood; Cheraghi, Taher; Parvaneh, Nima

    2008-06-01

    One of the rarest forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is caused by mutations in CYBA, which encodes the p22-phox subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, leading to defective intracellular killing. This study investigated eight patients (six males and two females) from seven consanguineous, unrelated families with clinical CGD, positive family history and p22-phox deficiency. Mutation analysis of CYBA showed six different novel mutations: deletion of exons 3, 4 and 5; a missense mutation in exon 6 (c.373G>A); a splice site mutation in intron 5 (c.369+1G>A); a frameshift in exon 6 (c.385delGAGC); a frameshift in exon 3 (c.174delG); and a frameshift in exon 4 (c.223delC).

  9. Mutations in the beta propeller WDR72 cause autosomal-recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Walid; Parry, David A; Shore, Roger C; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2009-11-01

    Healthy dental enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized human tissue. Though acellular, nonvital, and without capacity for turnover or repair, it can nevertheless last a lifetime. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term for failure of normal enamel development, covering diverse clinical phenotypes that typically show Mendelian inheritance patterns. One subset, known as hypomaturation AI, is characterised by near-normal volumes of organic enamel matrix but with weak, creamy-brown opaque enamel that fails prematurely after tooth eruption. Mutations in genes critical to enamel matrix formation have been documented, but current understanding of other key events in enamel biomineralization is limited. We investigated autosomal-recessive hypomaturation AI in a consanguineous Pakistani family. A whole-genome SNP autozygosity screen identified a locus on chromosome 15q21.3. Sequencing candidate genes revealed a point mutation in the poorly characterized WDR72 gene. Screening of WDR72 in a panel of nine additional hypomaturation AI families revealed the same mutation in a second, apparently unrelated, Pakistani family and two further nonsense mutations in Omani families. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intracellular localization in maturation-stage ameloblasts. WDR72 function is unknown, but as a putative beta propeller is expected to be a scaffold for protein-protein interactions. The nearest homolog, WDR7, is involved in vesicle mobilization and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis at synapses. Vesicle trafficking is important in maturation-stage ameloblasts with respect to secretion into immature enamel and removal of cleaved enamel matrix proteins via endocytosis. This raises the intriguing possibility that WDR72 is critical to ameloblast vesicle turnover during enamel maturation.

  10. Mutations in IMPG2, Encoding Interphotoreceptor Matrix Proteoglycan 2, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Collin, Rob W.J.; Banin, Eyal; Ingeborgh van den Born, L.; Coene, Karlien L.M.; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Zelinger, Lina; Khan, Muhammad I.; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Erdinest, Inbar; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Voesenek, Krysta; Blokland, Ellen A.W.; Strom, Tim M.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Qamar, Raheel; Banfi, Sandro; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases caused by progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified two families, each with three affected siblings sharing large overlapping homozygous regions that harbored the IMPG2 gene on chromosome 3. Sequence analysis of IMPG2 in the two index cases revealed homozygous mutations cosegregating with the disease in the respective families: three affected siblings of Iraqi Jewish ancestry displayed a nonsense mutation, and a Dutch family displayed a 1.8 kb genomic deletion that removes exon 9 and results in the absence of seven amino acids in a conserved SEA domain of the IMPG2 protein. Transient transfection of COS-1 cells showed that a construct expressing the wild-type SEA domain is properly targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas the mutant lacking the seven amino acids appears to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutation analysis in ten additional index cases that were of Dutch, Israeli, Italian, and Pakistani origin and had homozygous regions encompassing IMPG2 revealed five additional mutations; four nonsense mutations and one missense mutation affecting a highly conserved phenylalanine residue. Most patients with IMPG2 mutations showed an early-onset form of RP with progressive visual-field loss and deterioration of visual acuity. The patient with the missense mutation, however, was diagnosed with maculopathy. The IMPG2 gene encodes the interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan IMPG2, which is a constituent of the interphotoreceptor matrix. Our data therefore show that mutations in a structural component of the interphotoreceptor matrix can cause arRP. PMID:20673862

  11. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Kana; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Kono, Michihiro; Takama, Hiromichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH), and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser) and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn) are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016), and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024). In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  12. Frontorhiny, a Distinctive Presentation of Frontonasal Dysplasia Caused by Recessive Mutations in the ALX3 Homeobox Gene

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Versnel, Sarah L.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Lees, Melissa M.; Bhat, Meenakshi; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Hoogeboom, A. Jeannette M.; Hurst, Jane A.; Johnson, David; Robinson, Alexis A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Gerrelli, Dianne; Nürnberg, Peter; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a recessively inherited frontonasal malformation characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, with hypertelorism, wide nasal bridge, short nasal ridge, bifid nasal tip, broad columella, widely separated slit-like nares, long philtrum with prominent bilateral swellings, and midline notch in the upper lip and alveolus. Additional recurrent features present in a minority of individuals have been upper eyelid ptosis and midline dermoid cysts of craniofacial structures. Assuming recessive inheritance, we mapped the locus in three families to chromosome 1 and identified mutations in ALX3, which is located at band 1p13.3 and encodes the aristaless-related ALX homeobox 3 transcription factor. In total, we identified seven different homozygous pathogenic mutations in seven families. These mutations comprise missense substitutions at critical positions within the conserved homeodomain as well as nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations, all predicting severe or complete loss of function. Our findings contrast with previous studies of the orthologous murine gene, which showed no phenotype in Alx3−/− homozygotes, apparently as a result of functional redundancy with the paralogous Alx4 gene. We conclude that ALX3 is essential for normal facial development in humans and that deficiency causes a clinically recognizable phenotype, which we term frontorhiny. PMID:19409524

  13. Nonsense mutation in TMEM126A causing autosomal recessive optic atrophy and auditory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Esther; Michaelides, Michel; Tee, Louise J.; Robson, Anthony G.; Rahman, Fatimah; Pasha, Shanaz; Luxon, Linda M.; Moore, Anthony T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To define the phenotype and elucidate the molecular basis for an autosomal recessively inherited optic atrophy and auditory neuropathy in a consanguineous family with two affected children. Methods Family members underwent detailed ophthalmologic, electrophysiological, and audiological assessments. An autozygosity mapping strategy using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and microsatellite markers was used to detect regions of genome homozygosity that might contain the disease gene. Candidate genes were then screened for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Both affected subjects had poor vision from birth and complained of progressive visual loss over time. Current visual acuity ranged from 6/60 to 6/120. Fundus examination revealed bilateral temporal optic nerve pallor in both patients with otherwise normal retinal findings. International-standard full-field electroretinograms were normal in both individuals, with no evidence of generalized retinal dysfunction. Pattern cortical visual evoked potentials were grossly abnormal bilaterally in both cases. The pattern electroretinogram N95:P50 ratio was subnormal, and the P50 was of shortened peak time bilaterally in both patients. The electrophysiological findings were consistent with bilateral retinal ganglion cell/optic nerve dysfunction. Audiological investigation in both siblings revealed abnormalities falling within the auditory neuropathy/dysynchrony spectrum. There were no auditory symptoms and good outer hair cell function (as demonstrated by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions) but impaired inner hair cell/neural function with abnormal stapedial reflex thresholds and abnormal or absent auditory brainstem-evoked responses. The single nucleotide polymorphism microarray data demonstrated a 24.17 Mb region of homozygosity at 11q14.1–11q22.3, which was confirmed by microsatellite marker analysis. The candidate target region contained the transmembrane protein 126A (TMEM126A

  14. Autosomal Recessive Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia in a Korean Girl Caused by Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutations in the DTDST (SLC26A2) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hwa; Lee, Hye-Ran; Shin, Sung Jin; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Woong Yang; Park, Sung Sup; Cho, Sung Im; Choi, In Ho

    2010-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia is caused by heterogenous genotypes involving more than six genes. Recessive mutations in the DTDST gene cause a phenotype of recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). The authors report a 9-yr old Korean girl with the rMED phenotype having novel compound heterozygous mutations in the DTDST gene, which were inherited from both parents. This is the first Korean rMED case attributed to DTDST mutations, and expands the spectrum of diseases caused by DTDST mutations. PMID:20592910

  15. A case report of novel mutation in PRF1 gene, which causes familial autosomal recessive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Dastsooz, Hassan; Shakib Azad, Nader; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-05-03

    Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening immunodeficiency and multi-organ disease that affects people of all ages and ethnic groups. Common symptoms and signs of this disease are high fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and cytopenias. Familial form of HLH disease, which is an autosomal recessive hematological disorder is due to disease-causing mutations in several genes essential for NK and T-cell granule-mediated cytotoxic function. For an effective cytotoxic response from cytotoxic T lymphocyte or NK cell encountering an infected cell or tumor cell, different processes are required, including trafficking, docking, priming, membrane fusion, and entry of cytotoxic granules into the target cell leading to apoptosis. Therefore, genes involved in these steps play important roles in the pathogenesis of HLH disease which include PRF1, UNC13D (MUNC13-4), STX11, and STXBP2 (MUNC18-2). Here, we report a novel missense mutation in an 8-year-old boy suffered from hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, epilepsy and pancytopenia. The patient was born to a first-cousin parents with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify mutated gene in the proband, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was used on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform on DNA sample from the patient. Results showed a novel deleterious homozygous missense mutation in PRF1 gene (NM_001083116: exon3: c. 1120 T > G, p.W374G) in the patient and then using Sanger sequencing it was confirmed in the proband and his parents. Since his parents were heterozygous for the identified mutation, autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance was confirmed in the family. Our study identified a rare new pathogenic missense mutation in PRF1 gene in patient with HLH disease and it is the first report of mutation in PRF1 in Iranian patients with this disease.

  16. OPTN 691_692insAG is a founder mutation causing recessive ALS and increased risk in heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Nayshool, Omri; Nefussy, Beatrice; Traynor, Bryan J.; Renton, Alan E.; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Drory, Vivian E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To detect genetic variants underlying familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: We analyzed 2 founder Jewish populations of Moroccan and Ashkenazi origins and ethnic matched controls. Exome sequencing of 2 sisters with ALS from Morocco was followed by genotyping the identified causative null mutation in 379 unrelated patients with ALS and 1,000 controls. The shared risk haplotype was characterized using whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array. Results: We identified 5 unrelated patients with ALS homozygous for the null 691_692insAG mutation in the optineurin gene (OPTN), accounting for 5.8% of ALS of Moroccan origin and 0.3% of Ashkenazi. We also identified a high frequency of heterozygous carriers among patients with ALS, 8.7% and 2.9%, respectively, compared to 0.75% and 1.0% in controls. The risk of carriers for ALS was significantly increased, with odds ratio of 13.46 and 2.97 in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews, respectively. We determined that 691_692insAG is a founder mutation in the tested populations with a minimal risk haplotype of 58.5 Kb, encompassing the entire OPTN gene. Conclusions: Our data show that OPTN 691_692insAG mutation is a founder mutation in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews. This mutation causes autosomal recessive ALS and significantly increases the risk to develop the disease in heterozygous carriers, suggesting both a recessive mode of inheritance and a dominant with incomplete penetrance. These data emphasize the important role of OPTN in ALS pathogenesis, and demonstrate the complex genetics of ALS, as the same mutation leads to different phenotypes and appears in 2 patterns of inheritance. PMID:26740678

  17. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  18. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S.; Reid, Bryan M.; Lin, Brent P.; Wang, Susan J.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell–ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance–Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell–matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects. PMID:24305999

  19. Loss-of-Function Mutations of ILDR1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment DFNB42

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Guntram; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Kakar, Naseebullah; von Ameln, Simon; Grillet, Nicolas; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Ansar, Muhammad; Basit, Sulman; Javed, Qamar; Morell, Robert J.; Nasreen, Nabilah; Shearer, A. Eliot; Ahmad, Adeel; Kahrizi, Kimia; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Ali, Rana A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Goebel, Ingrid; Meyer, Nicole C.; Kimberling, William J.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Schiller, Martin R.; Bahlo, Melanie; Najmabadi, Hossein; Gillespie, Peter G.; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Richard J.H.; Ahmad, Wasim; Müller, Ulrich; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By analyzing additional consanguineous families with homozygosity at this locus, we detected ILDR1 mutations in the affected individuals of 10 more families from Pakistan and Iran. The identified ILDR1 variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations as well as a start codon mutation in the family that originally defined the DFNB42 locus. ILDR1 encodes the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1, a putative transmembrane receptor of unknown function. In situ hybridization detected expression of Ildr1, the murine ortholog, early in development in the vestibule and in hair cells and supporting cells of the cochlea. Expression in hair cell- and supporting cell-containing neurosensory organs is conserved in the zebrafish, in which the ildr1 ortholog is prominently expressed in the developing ear and neuromasts of the lateral line. These data identify loss-of-function mutations of ILDR1, a gene with a conserved expression pattern pointing to a conserved function in hearing in vertebrates, as underlying nonsyndromic prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:21255762

  20. A Mutation in CABP2, Expressed in Cochlear Hair Cells, Causes Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Helfmann, Sarah; Inagaki, Akira; Predoehl, Friederike; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Sommen, Manou; Seco, Celia Zazo; Oostrik, Jaap; Kremer, Hannie; Dheedene, Annelies; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh; Coucke, Paul; Lee, Amy; Moser, Tobias; Van Camp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    CaBPs are a family of Ca2+-binding proteins related to calmodulin and are localized in the brain and sensory organs, including the retina and cochlea. Although their physiological roles are not yet fully elucidated, CaBPs modulate Ca2+ signaling through effectors such as voltage-gated Cav Ca2+ channels. In this study, we identified a splice-site mutation (c.637+1G>T) in Ca2+-binding protein 2 (CABP2) in three consanguineous Iranian families affected by moderate-to-severe hearing loss. This mutation, most likely a founder mutation, probably leads to skipping of exon 6 and premature truncation of the protein (p.Phe164Serfs∗4). Compared with wild-type CaBP2, the truncated CaBP2 showed altered Ca2+ binding in isothermal titration calorimetry and less potent regulation of Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels. We show that genetic defects in CABP2 cause moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment. The mutation might cause a hypofunctional CaBP2 defective in Ca2+ sensing and effector regulation in the inner ear. PMID:22981119

  1. Mutations in the lipoma HMGIC fusion partner-like 5 (LHFPL5) gene cause autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Ersan; Li, Yun; Uzumcu, Abdullah; Uyguner, Oya; Collin, Rob W; Caylan, Refik; Ulubil-Emiroglu, Melike; Kersten, Ferry F J; Hafiz, Gunter; van Wijk, Erwin; Kayserili, Hulya; Rohmann, Edyta; Wagenstaller, Janine; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Strom, Tim M; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baserer, Nermin; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Becker, Christian; Brunner, Han G; Nürnberg, Peter; Karaguzel, Ahmet; Basaran, Seher; Kubisch, Christian; Kremer, Hannie; Wollnik, Bernd

    2006-07-01

    In two large Turkish consanguineous families, a locus for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) was mapped to chromosome 6p21.3 by genome-wide linkage analysis in an interval overlapping with the loci DFNB53 (COL11A2), DFNB66, and DFNB67. Fine mapping excluded DFNB53 and subsequently homozygous mutations were identified in the lipoma HMGIC fusion partner-like 5 (LHFPL5) gene, also named tetraspan membrane protein of hair cell stereocilia (TMHS) gene, which was recently shown to be mutated in the "hurry scurry" mouse and in two DFNB67-linked families from Pakistan. In one family, we found a homozygous one-base pair deletion, c.649delG (p.Glu216ArgfsX26) and in the other family we identified a homozygous transition c.494C>T (p.Thr165Met). Further screening of index patients from 96 Turkish ARNSHL families and 90 Dutch ARNSHL patients identified one additional Turkish family carrying the c.649delG mutation. Haplotype analysis revealed that the c.649delG mutation was located on a common haplotype in both families. Mutation screening of the LHFPL5 homologs LHFPL3 and LHFPL4 did not reveal any disease causing mutation. Our findings indicate that LHFPL5 is essential for normal function of the human cochlea.

  2. Two specific mutations are prevalent causes of recessive retinitis pigmentosa in North American patients of Jewish ancestry.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Giulia; Koskiniemi-Kuendig, Hanna; Harper, Shyana; Berson, Eliot L; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a Mendelian disease with a very elevated genetic heterogeneity. Most mutations are responsible for less than 1% of cases, making molecular diagnosis a multigene screening procedure. In this study, we assessed whether direct testing of specific alleles could be a valuable screening approach in cases characterized by prevalent founder mutations. We screened 275 North American patients with recessive/isolate retinitis pigmentosa for two mutations: an Alu insertion in the MAK gene and the p.Lys42Glu missense in the DHDDS gene. All patients were unrelated; 35 reported Jewish ancestry and the remainder reported mixed ethnicity. We identified the MAK and DHDDS mutations homozygously in only 2.1% and 0.8%, respectively, of patients of mixed ethnicity, but in 25.7% and 8.6%, respectively, of cases reporting Jewish ancestry. Haplotype analyses revealed that inheritance of the MAK mutation was attributable to a founder effect. In contrast to most mutations associated with retinitis pigmentosa-which are, in general, extremely rare-the two alleles investigated here cause disease in approximately one-third of North American patients reporting Jewish ancestry. Therefore, their screening constitutes an alternative procedure to large-scale tests for patients belonging to this ethnic group, especially in time-sensitive situations.

  3. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families.

  4. Mutations of the gene encoding otogelin are a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic moderate hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Ruiz-Palmero, Laura; Kalay, Ersan; Oostrik, Jaap; del Castillo, Francisco J; Sezgin, Orhan; Beynon, Andy J; Strom, Tim M; Pennings, Ronald J E; Zazo Seco, Celia; Oonk, Anne M M; Kunst, Henricus P M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; García-Arumi, Ana M; del Campo, Miguel; Villamar, Manuela; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Moreno, Felipe; Admiraal, Ronald J C; del Castillo, Ignacio; Kremer, Hannie

    2012-11-02

    Already 40 genes have been identified for autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI); however, many more genes are still to be identified. In a Dutch family segregating arNSHI, homozygosity mapping revealed a 2.4 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 11 in p15.1-15.2, which partially overlapped with the previously described DFNB18 locus. However, no putative pathogenic variants were found in USH1C, the gene mutated in DFNB18 hearing impairment. The homozygous region contained 12 additional annotated genes including OTOG, the gene encoding otogelin, a component of the tectorial membrane. It is thought that otogelin contributes to the stability and strength of this membrane through interaction or stabilization of its constituent fibers. The murine orthologous gene was already known to cause hearing loss when defective. Analysis of OTOG in the Dutch family revealed a homozygous 1 bp deletion, c.5508delC, which leads to a shift in the reading frame and a premature stop codon, p.Ala1838ProfsX31. Further screening of 60 unrelated probands from Spanish arNSHI families detected compound heterozygous OTOG mutations in one family, c.6347C>T (p.Pro2116Leu) and c. 6559C>T (p.Arg2187X). The missense mutation p.Pro2116Leu affects a highly conserved residue in the fourth von Willebrand factor type D domain of otogelin. The subjects with OTOG mutations have a moderate hearing impairment, which can be associated with vestibular dysfunction. The flat to shallow "U" or slightly downsloping shaped audiograms closely resembled audiograms of individuals with recessive mutations in the gene encoding α-tectorin, another component of the tectorial membrane. This distinctive phenotype may represent a clue to orientate the molecular diagnosis.

  5. Autosomal Recessive Hypotrichosis with Woolly Hair Caused by a Mutation in the Keratin 25 Gene Expressed in Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zernov, Nikolay V; Skoblov, Mikhail Y; Marakhonov, Andrey V; Shimomura, Yutaka; Vasilyeva, Tatyana A; Konovalov, Fedor A; Abrukova, Anna V; Zinchenko, Rena A

    2016-06-01

    Hypotrichosis is an abnormal condition characterized by decreased hair density and various defects in hair structure and growth patterns. In particular, in woolly hair, hypotrichosis is characterized by a tightly curled structure and abnormal growth. In this study, we present a detailed comparative examination of individuals affected by autosomal-recessive hypotrichosis (ARH), which distinguishes two types of ARH. Earlier, we demonstrated that exon 4 deletion in the lipase H gene caused an ARH (hypotrichosis 7; MIM: 604379) in populations of the Volga-Ural region of Russia. Screening for this mutation in all affected individuals revealed its presence only in the group with the hypotrichosis 7 phenotype. Other patients formed a separate group of woolly hair-associated ARH, with a homozygous missense mutation c.712G>T (p.Val238Leu) in a highly conserved position of type I keratin KRT25 (K25). Haplotype analysis indicated a founder effect. An expression study in the HaCaT cell line demonstrated a deleterious effect of the p.Val238Leu mutation on the formation of keratin intermediate filaments. Hence, we have identified a previously unreported missense mutation in the KRT25 gene causing ARH with woolly hair. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-07

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development.

  7. Mutations in apoptosis-inducing factor cause X-linked recessive auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Liang; Guan, Jing; Ealy, Megan; Zhang, Qiujing; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Hongyang; Zhao, Yali; Shen, Zhirong; Campbell, Colleen A; Wang, Fengchao; Yang, Ju; Sun, Wei; Lan, Lan; Ding, Dalian; Xie, Linyi; Qi, Yue; Lou, Xin; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Qiang; Chang, Suhua; Xiong, Wenping; Yin, Zifang; Yu, Ning; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jing; Salvi, Richard J; Petit, Christine; Smith, Richard J H; Wang, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Background Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) is a form of hearing loss in which auditory signal transmission from the inner ear to the auditory nerve and brain stem is distorted, giving rise to speech perception difficulties beyond that expected for the observed degree of hearing loss. For many cases of ANSD, the underlying molecular pathology and the site of lesion remain unclear. The X-linked form of the condition, AUNX1, has been mapped to Xq23-q27.3, although the causative gene has yet to be identified. Methods We performed whole-exome sequencing on DNA samples from the AUNX1 family and another small phenotypically similar but unrelated ANSD family. Results We identified two missense mutations in AIFM1 in these families: c.1352G>A (p.R451Q) in the AUNX1 family and c.1030C>T (p.L344F) in the second ANSD family. Mutation screening in a large cohort of 3 additional unrelated families and 93 sporadic cases with ANSD identified 9 more missense mutations in AIFM1. Bioinformatics analysis and expression studies support this gene as being causative of ANSD. Conclusions Variants in AIFM1 gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic ANSD and provide insight into the expanded spectrum of AIFM1-associated diseases. The finding of cochlear nerve hypoplasia in some patients was AIFM1-related ANSD implies that MRI may be of value in localising the site of lesion and suggests that cochlea implantation in these patients may have limited success. PMID:25986071

  8. Identification of a Mutation Causing Deficient BMP1/mTLD Proteolytic Activity in Autosomal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Valencia, Maria; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Aglan, Mona; Temtamy, Samia; Tenorio, Jair; Pulido, Veronica; Lindert, Uschi; Rohrbach, Marianne; Eyre, David; Giunta, Cecilia; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we have studied a consanguineous Egyptian family with two children diagnosed with severe autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (AR-OI) and a large umbilical hernia. Homozygosity mapping in this family showed lack of linkage to any of the previously known AR-OI genes, but revealed a 10.27 MB homozygous region on chromosome 8p in the two affected sibs, which comprised the procollagen I C-terminal propeptide (PICP) endopeptidase gene BMP1. Mutation analysis identified both patients with a Phe249Leu homozygous missense change within the BMP1 protease domain involving a residue, which is conserved in all members of the astacin group of metalloproteases. Type I procollagen analysis in supernatants from cultured fibroblasts demonstrated abnormal PICP processing in patient-derived cells consistent with the mutation causing decreased BMP1 function. This was further confirmed by overexpressing wild type and mutant BMP1 longer isoform (mammalian Tolloid protein [mTLD]) in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and human primary fibroblasts. While overproduction of normal mTLD resulted in a large proportion of proα1(I) in the culture media being C-terminally processed, proα1(I) cleavage was not enhanced by an excess of the mutant protein, proving that the Phe249Leu mutation leads to a BMP1/mTLD protein with deficient PICP proteolytic activity. We conclude that BMP1 is an additional gene mutated in AR-OI. PMID:22052668

  9. Mutation of SALL2 causes recessive ocular coloboma in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelberman, Daniel; Islam, Lily; Lakowski, Jörn; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chanudet, Estelle; Lescai, Francesco; Patel, Aara; Stupka, Elia; Buck, Anja; Wolf, Stephan; Beales, Philip L.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Liasis, Alki; Lehmann, Ordan J.; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Nischal, Ken K.; Sowden, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular coloboma is a congenital defect resulting from failure of normal closure of the optic fissure during embryonic eye development. This birth defect causes childhood blindness worldwide, yet the genetic etiology is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel homozygous mutation in the SALL2 gene in members of a consanguineous family affected with non-syndromic ocular coloboma variably affecting the iris and retina. This mutation, c.85G>T, introduces a premature termination codon (p.Glu29*) predicted to truncate the SALL2 protein so that it lacks three clusters of zinc-finger motifs that are essential for DNA-binding activity. This discovery identifies SALL2 as the third member of the Drosophila homeotic Spalt-like family of developmental transcription factor genes implicated in human disease. SALL2 is expressed in the developing human retina at the time of, and subsequent to, optic fissure closure. Analysis of Sall2-deficient mouse embryos revealed delayed apposition of the optic fissure margins and the persistence of an anterior retinal coloboma phenotype after birth. Sall2-deficient embryos displayed correct posterior closure toward the optic nerve head, and upon contact of the fissure margins, dissolution of the basal lamina occurred and PAX2, known to be critical for this process, was expressed normally. Anterior closure was disrupted with the fissure margins failing to meet, or in some cases misaligning leading to a retinal lesion. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, a role for SALL2 in eye morphogenesis and that loss of function of the gene causes ocular coloboma in humans and mice. PMID:24412933

  10. Autosomal recessive posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa caused by novel mutations in the FLVCR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz; Wong, Lee-Jun; Wei Zhang, Victor; Lewis, Richard Alan; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Posterior column ataxia with retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe sensory ataxia, muscle weakness and atrophy, and progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Recently, mutations in the FLVCR1 gene were described in four families with this condition. We investigated the molecular basis and studied the phenotype of PCARP in a new family. The proband is a 33-year-old woman presented with sensory polyneuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The constellation of clinical findings with normal metabolic and genetic evaluation, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis and normal levels of phytanic acid and vitamin E, prompted us to seek other causes of our patient's condition. Sequencing of FLVCR1 in the proband and targeted mutation testing in her two affected siblings revealed two novel variants, c.1547G > A (p.R516Q) and c.1593+5_+8delGTAA predicted, respectively, to be highly conserved throughout evolution and affecting the normal splicing, therefore, deleterious. This study supports the pathogenic role of FLVCR1 in PCARP and expands the molecular and clinical spectra of PCARP. We show for the first time that nontransmembrane domain (TMD) mutations in the FLVCR1 can cause PCARP, suggesting different mechanisms for pathogenicity. Our clinical data reveal that impaired sensation can be part of the phenotypic spectrum of PCARP. This study along with previously reported cases suggests that targeted sequencing of the FLVCR1 gene should be considered in patients with severe sensory ataxia, RP, and peripheral sensory neuropathy.

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in the PRCD gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Turkish family

    PubMed Central

    Pach, Johanna; Kohl, Susanne; Gekeler, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a canine form of autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration and serves as an animal model for human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To date, only two RP-causing mutations of the PRCD gene have been reported in humans. We found a novel mutation in PRCD (c.52C>T, p.R18X) in three siblings affected by RP and present detailed morphologic and functional parameters. Methods A complete ophthalmological examination was performed including psychophysical tests (best-corrected visual acuity, Lanthony Panel D-15 color vision test, and visual field) and electrophysiology (ganzfeld and multifocal electroretinogram). Additionally, color and infrared fundus photography, autofluorescence, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography recordings were performed. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with high-throughput sequencing for all RP-related genes in a diagnostic set-up. Results We identified a novel homozygous mutation in PRCD (c.52C>T, p.R18X) with diagnostic high-throughput panel sequencing. All three patients showed an advanced stage of retinitis pigmentosa with reduced visual acuity (mean: 20/80), small residual visual fields (mean for target III4e: 1134.35 deg2), and non-detectable electrophysiological responses. Myopia, posterior subcapsular cataract, bone spicule-like pigmentation, and attenuated arterioles were typical findings. Interestingly, bull’s eye maculopathy due to patchy retinal pigment epithelium atrophy was also present in all patients. The mean central retinal thickness observed in optical coherence tomography was 148 µm. Conclusions The identification of a third mutation in PRCD confirms its role in the pathogenesis of RP. Clinical findings were in line with the morphological changes observed in previous studies. Bull’s eye maculopathy seems to be a hallmark of RP due to mutations in the PRCD gene. PMID:23805042

  12. Mutation-induced loss of APP function causes GABAergic depletion in recessive familial Alzheimer's disease: analysis of Osaka mutation-knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Kayo; Takao, Keizo; Fujita, Yuki; Matsuyama, Shogo; Sakai, Ayumi; Yamashita, Minato; Yamashita, Yuki; Ohnishi, Kiyouhisa; Suzuki, Mamiko; Takuma, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takashima, Akihiko; Morita, Takashi; Mori, Hiroshi; Tomiyama, Takami

    2017-07-31

    The E693Δ (Osaka) mutation in APP is linked to familial Alzheimer's disease. While this mutation accelerates amyloid β (Aβ) oligomerization, only patient homozygotes suffer from dementia, implying that this mutation is recessive and causes loss-of-function of amyloid precursor protein (APP). To investigate the recessive trait, we generated a new mouse model by knocking-in the Osaka mutation into endogenous mouse APP. The produced homozygous, heterozygous, and non-knockin littermates were compared for memory, neuropathology, and synaptic plasticity. Homozygotes showed memory impairment at 4 months, whereas heterozygotes did not, even at 8 months. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that only homozygotes displayed intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ oligomers at 8 months, followed by abnormal tau phosphorylation, synapse loss, glial activation, and neuron loss. These pathologies were not observed at younger ages, suggesting that a certain mechanism other than Aβ accumulation underlies the memory disturbance at 4 months. For the electrophysiology studies at 4 months, high-frequency stimulation evoked long-term potentiation in all mice in the presence of picrotoxin, but in the absence of picrotoxin, such potentiation was observed only in homozygotes, suggesting their GABAergic deficit. In support of this, the levels of GABA-related proteins and the number of dentate GABAergic interneurons were decreased in 4-month-old homozygotes. Since APP has been shown to play a role in dentate GABAergic synapse formation, the observed GABAergic depletion is likely associated with an impairment of the APP function presumably caused by the Osaka mutation. Oral administration of diazepam to homozygotes from 6 months improved memory at 8 months, and furthermore, prevented Aβ oligomer accumulation, indicating that GABAergic deficiency is a cause of memory impairment and also a driving force of Aβ accumulation. Our findings suggest that the Osaka mutation

  13. Mutations in ARL2BP, Encoding ADP-Ribosylation-Factor-Like 2 Binding Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Schwarz, Nele; Zelinger, Lina; Stern-Schneider, Gabriele; Shoemark, Amelia; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Gross, Menachem; Laxer, Uri; Sosna, Jacob; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Wilson, Robert; Kahn, Richard A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Wolfrum, Uwe; Banin, Eyal; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Sharon, Dror; Webster, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor death, which results in visual failure. Here, we used a combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify mutations in ARL2BP, which encodes an effector protein of the small GTPases ARL2 and ARL3, as causative for autosomal-recessive RP (RP66). In a family affected by RP and situs inversus, a homozygous, splice-acceptor mutation, c.101−1G>C, which alters pre-mRNA splicing of ARLBP2 in blood RNA, was identified. In another family, a homozygous c.134T>G (p.Met45Arg) mutation was identified. In the mouse retina, ARL2BP localized to the basal body and cilium-associated centriole of photoreceptors and the periciliary extension of the inner segment. Depletion of ARL2BP caused cilia shortening. Moreover, depletion of ARL2, but not ARL3, caused displacement of ARL2BP from the basal body, suggesting that ARL2 is vital for recruiting or anchoring ARL2BP at the base of the cilium. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the p.Met45Arg amino acid substitution reduced binding to ARL2 and caused the loss of ARL2BP localization at the basal body in ciliated nasal epithelial cells. These data demonstrate a role for ARL2BP and ARL2 in primary cilia function and that this role is essential for normal photoreceptor maintenance and function. PMID:23849777

  14. Long-Term Clinical Outcome and Carrier Phenotype in Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemia Caused by a Novel DMP1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mäkitie, Outi; Pereira, Renata C; Kaitila, Ilkka; Turan, Serap; Bastepe, Murat; Laine, Tero; Kröger, Heikki; Cole, William G; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous inactivating mutations in DMP1 (dentin matrix protein 1), the gene encoding a noncollagenous bone matrix protein expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, cause autosomal recessive hypophosphatemia (ARHP). Herein we describe a family with ARHP owing to a novel homozygous DMP1 mutation and provide a detailed description of the associated skeletal dysplasia and carrier phenotype. The two adult patients with ARHP, a 78-year-old man and his 66-year-old sister, have suffered from bone pain and lower extremity varus deformities since early childhood. With increasing age, both patients developed severe joint pain, contractures, and complete immobilization of the spine. Radiographs showed short and deformed long bones, significant cranial hyperostosis, enthesopathies, and calcifications of the paraspinal ligaments. Biochemistries were consistent with hypophosphatemia owing to renal phosphate wasting; markers of bone turnover and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) levels were increased significantly. Nucleotide sequence analysis of DMP1 revealed a novel homozygous mutation at the splice acceptor junction of exon 6 (IVS5-1G > A). Two heterozygous carriers of the mutation also showed mild hypophosphatemia, and bone biopsy in one of these individuals showed focal areas of osteomalacia. In bone, DMP1 expression was absent in the homozygote but normal in the heterozygote, whereas FGF-23 expression was increased in both subjects but higher in the ARHP patient. The clinical and laboratory observations in this family confirm that DMP1 has an important role in normal skeletal development and mineral homeostasis. The skeletal phenotype in ARHP may be significantly more severe than in other forms of hypophosphatemic rickets. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20499351

  15. A POU3F4 Mutation Causes Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in a Chinese X-linked Recessive Family

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wan; Han, Ming-Kun; Wang, Da-Yong; Han, Bing; Zong, Liang; Lan, Lan; Yang, Ju; Shen, Qi; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Guan, Jing; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: The molecular genetic research showed the association between X-linked hearing loss and mutations in POU3F4. This research aimed to identify a POU3F4 mutation in a nonsyndromic X-linked recessive hearing loss family. Methods: A series of clinical evaluations including medical history, otologic examinations, family history, audiologic testing, and a high-resolution computed tomography scan were performed for each patient. Bidirectional sequencing was carried out for all polymerase chain reaction products of the samples. Moreover, 834 controls with normal hearing were also tested. Results: The pedigree showed X-linkage recessive inheritance pattern, and pathogenic mutation (c.499C>T) was identified in the proband and his family member, which led to a premature termination prior to the entire POU domains. This mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in this family. No mutation of POU3F4 gene was found in 834 controls. Conclusions: A nonsense mutation is identified in a family displaying the pedigree consistent with X-linked recessive pattern in POU3F4 gene. In addition, we may provide molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling for this family. PMID:28051029

  16. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na+- and HCO3−-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that causes

  17. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-09-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na(+)- and HCO(3)(-)-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that

  18. Mutations in CNNM4 cause recessive cone-rod dystrophy with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Polok, Bozena; Escher, Pascal; Ambresin, Aude; Chouery, Eliane; Bolay, Sylvain; Meunier, Isabelle; Nan, Francis; Hamel, Christian; Munier, Francis L; Thilo, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2009-02-01

    Cone-rod dystrophies are inherited dystrophies of the retina characterized by the accumulation of deposits mainly localized to the cone-rich macular region of the eye. Dystrophy can be limited to the retina or be part of a syndrome. Unlike nonsyndromic cone-rod dystrophies, syndromic cone-rod dystrophies are genetically heterogeneous with mutations in genes encoding structural, cell-adhesion, and transporter proteins. Using a genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype analysis to fine map the locus and a gene-candidate approach, we identified homozygous mutations in the ancient conserved domain protein 4 gene (CNNM4) that either generate a truncated protein or occur in highly conserved regions of the protein. Given that CNNM4 is implicated in metal ion transport, cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta may originate from abnormal ion homeostasis.

  19. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with recessive trait caused by mutation in KLC4 gene.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Yuksel, Sirin; Yakicier, Cengiz; Erguner, Bekir; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Yuceturk, Betul; Ozer, Bugra; Doganay, Selim; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Seker, Askin; Akbulut, Fatih; Ozen, Ali; Per, Huseyin; Kumandas, Sefer; Altuner Torun, Yasemin; Bayri, Yasar; Sakar, Mustafa; Dagcinar, Adnan; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    We report an association between a new causative gene and spastic paraplegia, which is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical phenotyping of one consanguineous family followed by combined homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing analysis. Three patients from the same family shared common features of progressive complicated spastic paraplegia. They shared a single homozygous stretch area on chromosome 6. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.853_871del19) in the gene coding the kinesin light chain 4 protein (KLC4). Meanwhile, the unaffected parents and two siblings were heterozygous and one sibling was homozygous wild type. The 19 bp deletion in exon 6 generates a stop codon and thus a truncated messenger RNA and protein. The association of a KLC4 mutation with spastic paraplegia identifies a new locus for the disease.

  20. Recessive and Dominant De Novo ITPR1 Mutations Cause Gillespie Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sylvie; Alzayady, Kamil J.; Burglen, Lydie; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Marchesin, Valentina; Roche, Olivier; Rio, Marlène; Funalot, Benoit; Calmon, Raphaël; Durr, Alexandra; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lucia; Ribeiro Bittar, Maria Fernanda; Orssaud, Christophe; Héron, Bénédicte; Ayoub, Edward; Berquin, Patrick; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bole, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Munnich, Arnold; Simons, Matias; Delous, Marion; Dollfus, Helene; Boddaert, Nathalie; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Kaplan, Josseline; Calvas, Patrick; Yule, David I.; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Fares Taie, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Gillespie syndrome (GS) is a rare variant form of aniridia characterized by non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, and iris hypoplasia. Unlike the more common dominant and sporadic forms of aniridia, there has been no significant association with PAX6 mutations in individuals with GS and the mode of inheritance of the disease had long been regarded as uncertain. Using a combination of trio-based whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five simplex GS-affected families, we found homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations (c.4672C>T [p.Gln1558∗], c.2182C>T [p.Arg728∗], c.6366+3A>T [p.Gly2102Valfs5∗], and c.6664+5G>T [p.Ala2221Valfs23∗]) and de novo heterozygous mutations (c.7687_7689del [p.Lys2563del] and c.7659T>G [p.Phe2553Leu]) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1). ITPR1 encodes one of the three members of the IP3-receptors family that form Ca2+ release channels localized predominantly in membranes of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. The truncation mutants, which encompass the IP3-binding domain and varying lengths of the modulatory domain, did not form functional channels when produced in a heterologous cell system. Furthermore, ITPR1 p.Lys2563del mutant did not form IP3-induced Ca2+ channels but exerted a negative effect when co-produced with wild-type ITPR1 channel activity. In total, these results demonstrate biallelic and monoallelic ITPR1 mutations as the underlying genetic defects for Gillespie syndrome, further extending the spectrum of ITPR1-related diseases. PMID:27108797

  1. A Population-Based Study of Autosomal-Recessive Disease-Causing Mutations in a Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Ouwenga, Rebecca; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Waggoner, Darrel J.; Ober, Carole

    2012-01-01

    The decreasing cost of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing has resulted in a renaissance for identifying Mendelian disease mutations, and for the first time it is possible to survey the distribution and characteristics of these mutations in large population samples. We conducted carrier screening for all autosomal-recessive (AR) mutations known to be present in members of a founder population and revealed surprisingly high carrier frequencies for many of these mutations. By utilizing the rich demographic, genetic, and phenotypic data available on these subjects and simulations in the exact pedigree that these individuals belong to, we show that the majority of mutations were most likely introduced into the population by a single founder and then drifted to the high carrier frequencies observed. We further show that although there is an increased incidence of AR diseases overall, the mean carrier burden is likely to be lower in the Hutterites than in the general population. Finally, on the basis of simulations, we predict the presence of 30 or more undiscovered recessive mutations among these subjects, and this would at least double the number of AR diseases that have been reported in this isolated population. PMID:22981120

  2. A Founder Mutation in LEPRE1 Carried by 1.5% of West Africans and 0.4% of African Americans Causes Lethal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Cushing, Kelly; Chitayat, David; Porter, Forbes D.; Panny, Susan R.; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Marini, Joan C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Deficiency of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1, encoded by LEPRE1, causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. We previously identified a LEPRE1 mutation, exclusively in African Americans and contemporary West Africans. We hypothesized that this allele originated in West Africa and was introduced to the Americas with the Atlantic slave trade. We aimed to determine the frequency of carriers for this mutation among African Americans and West Africans, and the mutation origin and age. Methods Genomic DNA was screened for the mutation using PCR and restriction digestion, and a custom TaqMan genomic SNP assay. The mutation age was estimated using microsatellites and short tandem repeats spanning 4.2 Mb surrounding LEPRE1 in probands and carriers. Results Approximately 0.4% of Mid-Atlantic African Americans carry this mutation, estimating recessive OI in 1/260,000 births in this population. In Nigeria and Ghana, 1.48% of unrelated individuals are heterozygous carriers, predicting 1/18,260 births will be affected with recessive OI, equal to the incidence of de novo dominant OI. The mutation was not detected in Africans from surrounding countries. All carriers shared a haplotype of 63-770 Kb, consistent with a single founder for this mutation. Using linkage disequilibrium analysis, the mutation was estimated to have originated between 650 and 900 years before present (1100-1350 C.E.). Conclusions We identified a West African founder mutation for recessive OI in LEPRE1. Nearly 1.5% of Ghanians and Nigerians are carriers. The age of this allele is consistent with introduction to North America via the Atlantic slave trade (1501 – 1867 C.E). PMID:22281939

  3. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in RP1 that causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in an Indonesian family

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Astuti, Galuh D.N.; Arimadyo, Kentar; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; Cremers, Frans P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying molecular genetic defect in an Indonesian family with three affected individuals who had received a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical evaluation of the family members included measuring visual acuity and fundoscopy, and assessing visual field and color vision. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with Illumina 700k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, and homozygous regions were identified using PLINK software. Mutation analysis was performed with sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene that resided in one of the homozygous regions. The frequency of the identified mutation in the Indonesian population was determined with TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results A novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 4 of the RP1 gene, c.1012C>T (p.R338*), was identified in the proband and her two affected sisters. Unaffected family members either carried two wild-type alleles or were heterozygous carriers of the mutation. The mutation was not present in 184 Indonesian control samples. Conclusions Most of the previously reported RP1 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, and appear to cluster in exon 4. Here, we identified a novel homozygous p.R338* mutation in exon 4 of RP1, and speculate on the mutational mechanisms of different RP1 mutations underlying dominant and recessive RP. PMID:23077400

  4. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in KIF14 as a novel cause of an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Filges, I; Nosova, E; Bruder, E; Tercanli, S; Townsend, K; Gibson, W T; Röthlisberger, B; Heinimann, K; Hall, J G; Gregory-Evans, C Y; Wasserman, W W; Miny, P; Friedman, J M

    2014-09-01

    Gene discovery using massively parallel sequencing has focused on phenotypes diagnosed postnatally such as well-characterized syndromes or intellectual disability, but is rarely reported for fetal disorders. We used family-based whole-exome sequencing in order to identify causal variants for a recurrent pattern of an undescribed lethal fetal congenital anomaly syndrome. The clinical signs included intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), severe microcephaly, renal cystic dysplasia/agenesis and complex brain and genitourinary malformations. The phenotype was compatible with a ciliopathy, but not diagnostic of any known condition. We hypothesized biallelic disruption of a gene leading to a defect related to the primary cilium. We identified novel autosomal recessive truncating mutations in KIF14 that segregated with the phenotype. Mice with autosomal recessive mutations in the same gene have recently been shown to have a strikingly similar phenotype. Genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that the function of KIF14 in cell division and cytokinesis can be linked to a role in primary cilia, supported by previous cellular and model organism studies of proteins that interact with KIF14. We describe the first human phenotype, a novel lethal ciliary disorder, associated with biallelic inactivating mutations in KIF14. KIF14 may also be considered a candidate gene for allelic viable ciliary and/or microcephaly phenotypes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Recessive mutations in SLC13A5 result in a loss of citrate transport and cause neonatal epilepsy, developmental delay and teeth hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Asselbergh, Bob; Geuens, Thomas; Deconinck, Tine; Azmi, Abdelkrim; May, Patrick; Brilstra, Eva; Becker, Felicitas; Barisic, Nina; Craiu, Dana; Braun, Kees P J; Lal, Dennis; Thiele, Holger; Schubert, Julian; Weber, Yvonne; van 't Slot, Ruben; Nürnberg, Peter; Balling, Rudi; Timmerman, Vincent; Lerche, Holger; Maudsley, Stuart; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Koeleman, Bobby P C; De Jonghe, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The epileptic encephalopathies are a clinically and aetiologically heterogeneous subgroup of epilepsy syndromes. Most epileptic encephalopathies have a genetic cause and patients are often found to carry a heterozygous de novo mutation in one of the genes associated with the disease entity. Occasionally recessive mutations are identified: a recent publication described a distinct neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (MIM 615905) caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC13A5 gene. Here, we report eight additional patients belonging to four different families with autosomal recessive mutations in SLC13A5. SLC13A5 encodes a high affinity sodium-dependent citrate transporter, which is expressed in the brain. Neurons are considered incapable of de novo synthesis of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates; therefore they rely on the uptake of intermediates, such as citrate, to maintain their energy status and neurotransmitter production. The effect of all seven identified mutations (two premature stops and five amino acid substitutions) was studied in vitro, using immunocytochemistry, selective western blot and mass spectrometry. We hereby demonstrate that cells expressing mutant sodium-dependent citrate transporter have a complete loss of citrate uptake due to various cellular loss-of-function mechanisms. In addition, we provide independent proof of the involvement of autosomal recessive SLC13A5 mutations in the development of neonatal epileptic encephalopathies, and highlight teeth hypoplasia as a possible indicator for SLC13A5 screening. All three patients who tried the ketogenic diet responded well to this treatment, and future studies will allow us to ascertain whether this is a recurrent feature in this severe disorder.

  6. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Saikia, Bibhuti B; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhu, Xiong; Liu, Yuqing; Huang, Lulin; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Yin; Qu, Chao; Hao, Fang; Gong, Bo; Tai, Zhengfu; Niu, Lihong; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun

    2015-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. To identify genetic mutations underlying autosomal recessive RP (arRP), we performed whole-exome sequencing study on two consanguineous marriage Indian families (RP-252 and RP-182) and 100 sporadic RP patients. Here we reported novel mutation in FAM161A in RP-252 and RP-182 with two patients affected with RP in each family. The FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. By whole-exome sequencing we identified several homozygous genomic regions, one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked arRP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 in both patients of family RP-252 and family RP-182. In 100 sporadic Indian RP patients, this novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 was identified in one sporadic patient ARRP-S-I-46 by whole-exome sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, this homozygous frameshift mutation was absent in 1000 ethnicity-matched control samples screened by direct Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutations of RP28-linked RP gene FAM161A in Indian population.

  7. A novel missense mutation p.L76P in the GJB2 gene causing nonsyndromic recessive deafness in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Batissoco, A C; Auricchio, M T B M; Kimura, L; Tabith-Junior, A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene, encoding connexin 26 (Cx26), are a major cause of nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss in many countries. We report here on a novel point mutation in GJB2, p.L76P (c.227C>T), in compound heterozygosity with a c.35delG mutation, in two Brazilian sibs, one presenting mild and the other profound nonsyndromic neurosensorial hearing impairment. Their father, who carried a wild-type allele and a p.L76P mutation, had normal hearing. The mutation leads to the substitution of leucine (L) by proline (P) at residue 76, an evolutionarily conserved position in Cx26 as well as in other connexins. This mutation is predicted to affect the first extracellular domain (EC1) or the second transmembrane domain (TM2). EC1 is important for connexon-connexon interaction and for the control of channel voltage gating. The segregation of the c.227C>T (p.L76P) mutation together with c.35delG in this family indicates a recessive mode of inheritance. The association between the p.L76P mutation and hearing impairment is further supported by its absence in a normal hearing control group of 100 individuals, 50 European-Brazilians and 50 African-Brazilians.

  8. ANO10 c.1150_1151del is a founder mutation causing autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia in Roma/Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Raycheva, Margarita; Kaneva, Radka; Lochmüller, Hanns; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2012-05-01

    A recent report (Vermeer et al. in Am J Hum Genet 87:813-819, 2010) implicated for the first time the ANO10 gene in the genetic basis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias. One of the three described families were Roma/Gypsies from Serbia, where the affected individuals were homozygous for the truncating p.Leu384fs mutation and displayed distinct phenotypic features (Vermeer et al. in Am J Hum Genet 87:813-819, 2010). Based on the history and population genetics of the Roma/Gypsies, we hypothesised that p.Leu384fs could be another founder mutation in this population, whose identification in a larger number of genetically homogeneous patients will contribute to defining the phenotypic spectrum of the disorder. Here, we describe additional patients from neighbouring Bulgaria, outlining invariable ANO10-ataxia features and confirming global intellectual decline as part of the phenotype resulting from complete Anactomin 10 deficit.

  9. Novel mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal recessive generalized lymphatic dysplasia with non-immune hydrops fetalis.

    PubMed

    Fotiou, Elisavet; Martin-Almedina, Silvia; Simpson, Michael A; Lin, Shin; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Atton, Giles; Jeffery, Iona; Rees, David C; Mignot, Cyril; Vogt, Julie; Homfray, Tessa; Snyder, Michael P; Rockson, Stanley G; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S; Mansour, Sahar; Ostergaard, Pia

    2015-09-03

    Generalized lymphatic dysplasia (GLD) is a rare form of primary lymphoedema characterized by a uniform, widespread lymphoedema affecting all segments of the body, with systemic involvement such as intestinal and/or pulmonary lymphangiectasia, pleural effusions, chylothoraces and/or pericardial effusions. This may present prenatally as non-immune hydrops. Here we report homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in PIEZO1, resulting in an autosomal recessive form of GLD with a high incidence of non-immune hydrops fetalis and childhood onset of facial and four limb lymphoedema. Mutations in PIEZO1, which encodes a mechanically activated ion channel, have been reported with autosomal dominant dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis and non-immune hydrops of unknown aetiology. Besides its role in red blood cells, our findings indicate that PIEZO1 is also involved in the development of lymphatic structures.

  10. Mutations in the genes for thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase cause thyroid dyshormonogenesis and autosomal-recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Kirti; Rafiq, Muhammad A; Rafiullah, Rafiullah; Harripaul, Ricardo; Ali, Hazrat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Amin-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Waqas, Ahmed; So, Joyce; Rappold, Gudrun A; Vincent, John B; Ayub, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    We have used single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray genotyping and homozygosity-by-descent (HBD) mapping followed by Sanger sequencing or whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify causative mutations in three consanguineous families with intellectual disability (ID) related to thyroid dyshormonogenesis (TDH). One family was found to have a shared HBD region of 12.1 Mb on 8q24.21-q24.23 containing 36 coding genes, including the thyroglobulin gene, TG. Sanger sequencing of TG identified a homozygous nonsense mutation Arg2336*, which segregated with the phenotype in the family. A second family showed several HBD regions, including 6.0 Mb on 2p25.3-p25.2. WES identified a homozygous nonsense mutation, Glu596*, in the thyroid peroxidase gene, TPO. WES of a mother/father/proband trio from a third family revealed a homozygous missense mutation, Arg412His, in TPO. Mutations in TG and TPO are very rarely associated with ID, mainly because TDH is generally detectable and treatable. However, in populations where resources for screening and detection are limited, and especially where consanguineous marriages are common, mutations in genes involved in thyroid function may also be causes of ID, and as TPO and TG mutations are the most common genetic causes of TDH, these are also likely to be relatively common causes of ID.

  11. Whole-exome sequencing identifies LRIT3 mutations as a cause of autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G; Hamel, Christian P; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-10

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440(∗)]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384(∗)]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs(∗)59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated.

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies LRIT3 Mutations as a Cause of Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Hamel, Christian P.; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D.; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440∗]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384∗]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs∗59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated. PMID:23246293

  13. Mutations in CNNM4 Cause Jalili Syndrome, Consisting of Autosomal-Recessive Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Mighell, Alan J.; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C.; Jalili, Ismail K.; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnes; Carlos, Roman; Carr, Ian M.; Downey, Louise M.; Blain, Katharine M.; Mansfield, David C.; Shahrabi, Mehdi; Heidari, Mansour; Aref, Parissa; Abbasi, Mohsen; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of recessively inherited cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) was first reported by Jalili and Smith in 1988 in a family subsequently linked to a locus on chromosome 2q11, and it has since been reported in a second small family. We have identified five further ethnically diverse families cosegregating CRD and AI. Phenotypic characterization of teeth and visual function in the published and new families reveals a consistent syndrome in all seven families, and all link or are consistent with linkage to 2q11, confirming the existence of a genetically homogenous condition that we now propose to call Jalili syndrome. Using a positional-candidate approach, we have identified mutations in the CNNM4 gene, encoding a putative metal transporter, accounting for the condition in all seven families. Nine mutations are described in all, three missense, three terminations, two large deletions, and a single base insertion. We confirmed expression of Cnnm4 in the neural retina and in ameloblasts in the developing tooth, suggesting a hitherto unknown connection between tooth biomineralization and retinal function. The identification of CNNM4 as the causative gene for Jalili syndrome, characterized by syndromic CRD with AI, has the potential to provide new insights into the roles of metal transport in visual function and biomineralization. PMID:19200525

  14. An unusual clinical severity of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome caused by unmasked recessive mutation of CLN3.

    PubMed

    Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Greze, Victoria; Kemeny, Stéphan; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetitia; Tchirkov, Andreï; Vago, Philippe; Goumy, Carole; Francannet, Christine

    2014-03-01

    With the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) techniques in the diagnostic setting of patients with developmental delay and congenital malformations, many new microdeletion syndromes have been recognized. One of these recently recognized microdeletion syndromes is the 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, associated with variable clinical outcomes including developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and obesity, but also apparently normal phenotype. We report on a 16-year-old patient with developmental delay, exhibiting retinis pigmentosa with progressive visual failure from the age of 9 years, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a 1.7-Mb 16p11.2 deletion encompassing the 593-kb common deletion (∼29.5 to ∼30.1 Mb; Hg18) and the 220-kb distal deletion (∼28.74 to ∼28.95 Mb; Hg18) that partially included the CLN3 gene. As the patient's clinical findings were different from usual 16p11.2 microdeletion phenotypes and showed some features reminiscent of juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (JNCL, Batten disease, OMIM 204200), we suspected and confirmed a mutation of the remaining CLN3 allele. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletion represents one explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders.

  15. An unusual clinical severity of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome caused by unmasked recessive mutation of CLN3

    PubMed Central

    Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Greze, Victoria; Kemeny, Stéphan; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetitia; Tchirkov, Andreï; Vago, Philippe; Goumy, Carole; Francannet, Christine

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) techniques in the diagnostic setting of patients with developmental delay and congenital malformations, many new microdeletion syndromes have been recognized. One of these recently recognized microdeletion syndromes is the 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, associated with variable clinical outcomes including developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and obesity, but also apparently normal phenotype. We report on a 16-year-old patient with developmental delay, exhibiting retinis pigmentosa with progressive visual failure from the age of 9 years, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a 1.7-Mb 16p11.2 deletion encompassing the 593-kb common deletion (∼29.5 to ∼30.1 Mb; Hg18) and the 220-kb distal deletion (∼28.74 to ∼28.95 Mb; Hg18) that partially included the CLN3 gene. As the patient's clinical findings were different from usual 16p11.2 microdeletion phenotypes and showed some features reminiscent of juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (JNCL, Batten disease, OMIM 204200), we suspected and confirmed a mutation of the remaining CLN3 allele. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletion represents one explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders. PMID:23860047

  16. GJB2 and GJB6 mutations are an infrequent cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss in residents of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Juárez, Aideé Alejandra; Lugo-Trampe, José de Jesús; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Lugo-Trampe, Angel; Treviño-González, José Luis; de-la-Cruz-Ávila, Israel; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura Elia

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in the DFNB1 locus are the most common cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent mutations in patients with ARNSHL who reside in Northeastern Mexico. We determined the nucleotide sequence the coding region of GJB2 of 78 patients with ARNSHL. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect the GJB2 IVS1+1G>A mutation and deletions within GJB6. GJB2 mutations were detected in 9.6% of the alleles, and c.35delG was the most frequent. Six other less-frequent mutations were detected, including an extremely rare variant (c.645_648delTAGA), a novel mutation (c.35G>A), and one of possible Mexican origin (c.34G>T). GJB6 deletions and GJB2 IVS1+1G>A were not detected. These data suggest that mutations in the DFNB1 locus are a rare cause of ARNSHL among the population of Northeastern Mexico. This confirms the genetic heterogeneity of this condition and indicates that further research is required to determine the other mechanisms of pathogenesis of ARNSHL in Mexicans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Homozygous SLC6A17 mutations cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability with progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Musante, Luciana; Benevento, Marco; Hu, Hao; Venselaar, Hanka; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Marouillat, Sylviane; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Najmabadi, Hossein; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-03-05

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed homozygous mutations c.484G>A (p.Gly162Arg) and c.1898C>G (p.Pro633Arg) in SLC6A17. SLC6A17 is predominantly expressed in the brain, encodes a synaptic vesicular transporter of neutral amino acids and glutamate, and plays an important role in the regulation of glutamatergic synapses. Prediction programs and 3D modeling suggest that the identified mutations are deleterious to protein function. To directly test the functional consequences, we investigated the neuronal subcellular localization of overexpressed wild-type and mutant variants in mouse primary hippocampal neuronal cells. Wild-type protein was present in soma, axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines. p.Pro633Arg altered SLC6A17 was found in soma and proximal dendrites but did not reach spines. p.Gly162Arg altered SLC6A17 showed a normal subcellular distribution but was associated with an abnormal neuronal morphology mainly characterized by the loss of dendritic spines. In summary, our genetic findings implicate homozygous SLC6A17 mutations in autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, and their pathogenic role is strengthened by genetic evidence and in silico and in vitro functional analyses. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Buried in the Middle but Guilty: Intronic Mutations in the TCIRG1 Gene Cause Human Autosomal Recessive Osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Palagano, Eleonora; Blair, Harry C; Pangrazio, Alessandra; Tourkova, Irina; Strina, Dario; Angius, Andrea; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Oppo, Manuela; Uva, Paolo; Van Hul, Wim; Boudin, Eveline; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Faletra, Flavio; Nocerino, Agostino; Ferrari, Matteo C; Grappiolo, Guido; Monari, Marta; Montanelli, Alessandro; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a rare genetic bone disease with genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, sometimes translating into delayed diagnosis and treatment. In particular, cases of intermediate severity often constitute a diagnostic challenge and represent good candidates for exome sequencing. Here, we describe the tortuous path to identification of the molecular defect in two siblings, in which osteopetrosis diagnosed in early childhood followed a milder course, allowing them to reach the adult age in relatively good conditions with no specific therapy. No clearly pathogenic mutation was identified either with standard amplification and resequencing protocols or with exome sequencing analysis. While evaluating the possible impact of a 3'UTR variant on the TCIRG1 expression, we found a novel single nucleotide change buried in the middle of intron 15 of the TCIRG1 gene, about 150 nucleotides away from the closest canonical splice site. By sequencing a number of independent cDNA clones covering exons 14 to 17, we demonstrated that this mutation reduced splicing efficiency but did not completely abrogate the production of the normal transcript. Prompted by this finding, we sequenced the same genomic region in 33 patients from our unresolved ARO cohort and found three additional novel single nucleotide changes in a similar location and with a predicted disruptive effect on splicing, further confirmed in one of them at the transcript level. Overall, we identified an intronic region in TCIRG1 that seems to be particularly prone to splicing mutations, allowing the production of a small amount of protein sufficient to reduce the severity of the phenotype usually associated with TCIRG1 defects. On this basis, we would recommend including TCIRG1 not only in the molecular work-up of severe infantile osteopetrosis but also in intermediate cases and carefully evaluating the possible effects of intronic changes.

  19. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  20. Mutation in the Scyl1 gene encoding amino-terminal kinase-like protein causes a recessive form of spinocerebellar neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Kraus, Cornelia; Höger, Harald; Hochmeister, Sonja; Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Branka, Manuela; Bingemann, Sonja; Lassmann, Hans; Müller, Markus; Macedo-Souza, Lúcia Inês; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana; Reis, André; Bittner, Reginald E

    2007-01-01

    Here, we show that the murine neurodegenerative disease mdf (autosomal recessive mouse mutant ‘muscle deficient') is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in Scyl1, disrupting the expression of N-terminal kinase-like protein, an evolutionarily conserved putative component of the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery. Scyl1 is prominently expressed in neurons, and enriched at central nervous system synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We show that the pathology of mdf comprises cerebellar atrophy, Purkinje cell loss and optic nerve atrophy, and therefore defines a new animal model for neurodegenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement in humans. PMID:17571074

  1. A new autosomal recessive syndrome consisting of posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa, foveoschisis, and optic disc drusen is caused by a MFRP gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Graue-Wiechers, Federico; Robredo, Violeta; Amato-Almanza, Monica; Horta-Diez, Iliana; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2006-12-04

    To describe the clinical and genetic characteristics of a new ophthalmic syndrome, which consists of posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa, foveoschisis, and optic disc drusen, that segregates as an autosomal recessive trait in a family with four affected siblings. The membrane-type frizzled-related protein (MFRP) and CEH10 homeodomain-containing homolog (CHX10) genes, previously implicated in autosomal recessive forms of nanophthalmos/microphthalmos, were analyzed as candidate genes for this novel disease. Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed in four affected siblings and their parents. Ophthalmologic manifestations, fundus photographs, ultrasonographic (US) assessment, electroretinography (ERG), fluorescein retinal angiography (FA), Goldmann kinetic perimetry (GKP), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), as well as mutational status of MFRP and CHX10 genes in genomic DNA. In all affected siblings, ophthalmologic examination demonstrated normal horizontal corneal diameters and high hyperopia; funduscopy, ERG, and FA evidenced a progressive retinal dystrophy compatible with retinitis pigmentosa; A- and B-mode ultrasonography revealed decreased axial eye length and optic disc drusen; OCT showed localized macular retinoschisis. MFRP molecular analysis disclosed a one base pair insertion in exon 5 (c.498_499insC) in all affected individuals, a mutation that predicts a truncated protein (P165fsX198). Both parents were heterozygous for this mutation. A distinct autosomal recessive ophthalmic syndrome characterized by microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa, foveoschisis, and optic disc drusen is described. We demonstrated that this clinical association is caused by a mutation in MFRP, a gene previously implicated in isolated nanophthalmos. Our data indicate that defects in MFRP could be responsible for syndromic forms of microphthalmos/retinal degeneration and that this gene is necessary for photoreceptor maintenance.

  2. Usher Syndrome 1D and Nonsyndromic Autosomal Recessive Deafness DFNB12 Are Caused by Allelic Mutations of the Novel Cadherin-Like Gene CDH23

    PubMed Central

    Bork, Julie M.; Peters, Linda M.; Riazuddin, Saima; Bernstein, Steve L.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Ness, Seth L.; Polomeno, Robert; Ramesh, Arabandi; Schloss, Melvin; Srisailpathy, C. R. Srikumari; Wayne, Sigrid; Bellman, Susan; Desmukh, Dilip; Ahmed, Zahoor; Khan, Shaheen N.; Kaloustian, Vazken M. Der; Li, X. Cindy; Lalwani, Anil; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Nance, Walter E.; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Wistow, Graeme; Smith, Richard J. H.; Griffith, Andrew J.; Wilcox, Edward R.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Morell, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Genes causing nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness (DFNB12) and deafness associated with retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction (USH1D) were previously mapped to overlapping regions of chromosome 10q21-q22. Seven highly consanguineous families segregating nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness were analyzed to refine the DFNB12 locus. In a single family, a critical region was defined between D10S1694 and D10S1737, ∼0.55 cM apart. Eighteen candidate genes in the region were sequenced. Mutations in a novel cadherin-like gene, CDH23, were found both in families with DFNB12 and in families with USH1D. Six missense mutations were found in five families with DFNB12, and two nonsense and two frameshift mutations were found in four families with USH1D. A northern blot analysis of CDH23 showed a 9.5-kb transcript expressed primarily in the retina. CDH23 is also expressed in the cochlea, as is demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification from cochlear cDNA. PMID:11090341

  3. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features.

  4. Mutations in the delta-sarcoglycan gene are a rare cause of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2).

    PubMed

    Duggan, D J; Manchester, D; Stears, K P; Mathews, D J; Hart, C; Hoffman, E P

    1997-05-01

    The dystrophin-based membrane cytoskeleton of muscle fibers has emerged as a critical multi-protein complex which seems to impart structural integrity on the muscle fiber plasma membrane. Deficiency of dystrophin causes the most common types of muscular dystrophy, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. Muscular dystrophy patients showing normal dystrophin protein and gene analysis are generally isolated cases with a presumed autosomal recessive inheritance pattern (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy). Recently, linkage and candidate gene analyses have shown that some cases of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy can be caused by deficiency of other components of the dystrophin membrane cytoskeleton. The most recently identified component, delta-sarcoglycan, has been found to show mutations in a series of Brazilian muscular dystrophy patients. All patients were homozygous for a protein-truncating carboxy-terminal mutation, and showed a deficiency of the four sarcoglycan proteins. To determine if delta-sarcoglycan deficiency occurred in other world populations, to identify the range of mutations and clinical phenotypes, and to test for the biochemical consequences of delta-sarcoglycan gene mutations, we studied Duchenne-like and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy patients who we had previously shown not to exhibit gene mutations of dystrophin, alpha-, beta-, or gamma-sarcoglycan for delta-sarcoglycan mutations (n = 54). We identified two American patients with novel nonsense mutations of delta-sarcoglycan (W30X, R165X). One was apparently homozygous, and we show likely consanguinity through homozygosity for 13 microsatellite loci covering a 38 cM region of chromosome 5. The second was heterozygous. Both were girls who showed clinical symptoms consistent with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in males. Our data shows that delta-sarcoglycan deficiency occurs in other world populations, and that most or all patients show a deficiency of the entire sarcoglycan complex, adding support to

  5. Recessive Mutations in the Putative Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Anoctamin 5 Cause Proximal LGMD2L and Distal MMD3 Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Véronique; Marlow, Gareth; Boycott, Kym M.; Saleki, Khalil; Inoue, Hiroshi; Kroon, Johan; Itakura, Mitsuo; Robitaille, Yves; Parent, Lucie; Baas, Frank; Mizuta, Kuniko; Kamata, Nobuyuki; Richard, Isabelle; Linssen, Wim H.J.P.; Mahjneh, Ibrahim; de Visser, Marianne; Bashir, Rumaisa; Brais, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The recently described human anion channel Anoctamin (ANO) protein family comprises at least ten members, many of which have been shown to correspond to calcium-activated chloride channels. To date, the only reported human mutations in this family of genes are dominant mutations in ANO5 (TMEM16E, GDD1) in the rare skeletal disorder gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia. We have identified recessive mutations in ANO5 that result in a proximal limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L) in three French Canadian families and in a distal non-dysferlin Miyoshi myopathy (MMD3) in Dutch and Finnish families. These mutations consist of a splice site, one base pair duplication shared by French Canadian and Dutch cases, and two missense mutations. The splice site and the duplication mutations introduce premature-termination codons and consequently trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, suggesting an underlining loss-of-function mechanism. The LGMD2L phenotype is characterized by proximal weakness, with prominent asymmetrical quadriceps femoris and biceps brachii atrophy. The MMD3 phenotype is associated with distal weakness, of calf muscles in particular. With the use of electron microscopy, multifocal sarcolemmal lesions were observed in both phenotypes. The phenotypic heterogeneity associated with ANO5 mutations is reminiscent of that observed with Dysferlin (DYSF) mutations that can cause both LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy (MMD1). In one MMD3-affected individual, defective membrane repair was documented on fibroblasts by membrane-resealing ability assays, as observed in dysferlinopathies. Though the function of the ANO5 protein is still unknown, its putative calcium-activated chloride channel function may lead to important insights into the role of deficient skeletal muscle membrane repair in muscular dystrophies. PMID:20096397

  6. Recessive Mutations in TRMT10C Cause Defects in Mitochondrial RNA Processing and Multiple Respiratory Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Metodiev, Metodi D; Thompson, Kyle; Alston, Charlotte L; Morris, Andrew A M; He, Langping; Assouline, Zarah; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Siira, Stefan; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Munnich, Arnold; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Rötig, Agnès; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-05-05

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically diverse, with mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes able to cause defects in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, mutations in several genes encoding factors involved in mt-tRNA processing have been identified to cause mitochondrial disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified mutations in TRMT10C (encoding the mitochondrial RNase P protein 1 [MRPP1]) in two unrelated individuals who presented at birth with lactic acidosis, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and deafness. Both individuals died at 5 months after respiratory failure. MRPP1, along with MRPP2 and MRPP3, form the mitochondrial ribonuclease P (mt-RNase P) complex that cleaves the 5' ends of mt-tRNAs from polycistronic precursor transcripts. Additionally, a stable complex of MRPP1 and MRPP2 has m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, which methylates mt-tRNAs at position 9 and is vital for folding mt-tRNAs into their correct tertiary structures. Analyses of fibroblasts from affected individuals harboring TRMT10C missense variants revealed decreased protein levels of MRPP1 and an increase in mt-RNA precursors indicative of impaired mt-RNA processing and defective mitochondrial protein synthesis. The pathogenicity of the detected variants-compound heterozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) and c.814A>G (p.Thr272Ala) changes in subject 1 and a homozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) variant in subject 2-was validated by the functional rescue of mt-RNA processing and mitochondrial protein synthesis defects after lentiviral transduction of wild-type TRMT10C. Our study suggests that these variants affect MRPP1 protein stability and mt-tRNA processing without affecting m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, identifying mutations in TRMT10C as a cause of mitochondrial disease and highlighting the importance of RNA processing for correct mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T; Ishak, Gisele E; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-04-07

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126(∗)] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455(∗)]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G.; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126∗] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455∗]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  9. Recessive NEK9 mutation causes a lethal skeletal dysplasia with evidence of cell cycle and ciliary defects.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian P; Brennan, Kieran; Scheidel, Noemie; McGettigan, Paul; Lavin, Paul T; Carter, Stephen; Ennis, Sean; Dorkins, Huw; Ghali, Neeti; Blacque, Oliver E; Mc Gee, Margaret M; Murphy, Helen; Lynch, Sally Ann

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of bone and cartilage disorders. Whilst >450 skeletal dysplasias have been reported, 30% are genetically uncharacterized. We report two Irish Traveller families with a previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by fetal akinesia, shortening of all long bones, multiple contractures, rib anomalies, thoracic dysplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia and protruding abdomen. Single nucleotide polymorphism homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous stop-gain mutation in NEK9 (c.1489C>T; p.Arg497*) as the cause of this disorder. NEK9 encodes a never in mitosis gene A-related kinase involved in regulating spindle organization, chromosome alignment, cytokinesis and cell cycle progression. This is the first disorder to be associated with NEK9 in humans. Analysis of NEK9 protein expression and localization in patient fibroblasts showed complete loss of full-length NEK9 (107 kDa). Functional characterization of patient fibroblasts showed a significant reduction in cell proliferation and a delay in cell cycle progression. We also provide evidence to support possible ciliary associations for NEK9. Firstly, patient fibroblasts displayed a significant reduction in cilia number and length. Secondly, we show that the NEK9 orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, nekl-1, is almost exclusively expressed in a subset of ciliated cells, a strong indicator of cilia-related functions. In summary, we report the clinical and molecular characterization of a lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by NEK9 mutation and suggest that this disorder may represent a novel ciliopathy.

  10. Mutations in CDC14A, Encoding a Protein Phosphatase Involved in Hair Cell Ciliogenesis, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe to Profound Deafness.

    PubMed

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Aghaie, Asadollah; Bouyacoub, Yosra; El Hachmi, Hala; Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chardenoux, Sebastien; Perfettini, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Houmeida, Ahmed; Herbomel, Philippe; Petit, Christine

    2016-06-02

    By genetic linkage analysis in a large consanguineous Iranian family with eleven individuals affected by severe to profound congenital deafness, we were able to define a 2.8 Mb critical interval (at chromosome 1p21.2-1p21.1) for an autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic deafness locus (DFNB). Whole-exome sequencing allowed us to identify a CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1126C>T (p.Arg376(∗)), which was present in the eight clinically affected individuals still alive. Subsequent screening of 115 unrelated individuals affected by severe or profound congenital deafness of unknown genetic cause led us to identify another CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1015C>T (p.Arg339(∗)), in an individual originating from Mauritania. CDC14A encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence analysis of the protein distribution in the mouse inner ear showed a strong labeling of the hair cells' kinocilia. By using a morpholino strategy to knockdown cdc14a in zebrafish larvae, we found that the length of the kinocilia was reduced in inner-ear hair cells. Therefore, deafness caused by loss-of-function mutations in CDC14A probably arises from a morphogenetic defect of the auditory sensory cells' hair bundles, whose differentiation critically depends on the proper growth of their kinocilium.

  11. Homozygosity mapping reveals new nonsense mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Palestinian family.

    PubMed

    Zobor, Ditta; Balousha, Ghassan; Baumann, Britta; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 45 genes. Recently, the FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. We performed a clinical and molecular genetic study of a consanguineous Palestinian family with two three siblings affected with retinitis pigmentosa. DNA samples were collected from the index patient, his father, his affected sister, and two non-affected brothers. DNA sample from the index was subjected to high resolution genome-wide SNP array. Assuming identity-by-descent in this consanguineous family we applied homozygosity mapping to identify disease causing genes. The index patient reported night blindness since the age of 20 years, followed by moderate disease progression with decrease of peripheral vision, the development of photophobia and later on reduced central vision. At the age of 40 his visual acuity was counting fingers (CF) for both eyes, color discrimination was not possible and his visual fields were severely constricted. Funduscopic examination revealed a typical appearance of advanced RP with optic disc pallor, narrowed retinal vessels, bone-spicule like pigmentary changes in the mid-periphery and atrophic changes in the macula. His younger affected brother (37 years) was reported with overall milder symptoms, while the youngest sister (21 years) reported problems only with night vision. Applying high-density SNP arrays we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked autosomal recessive RP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.1003C>T/p.R335X in the index patient and the affected sister. We identified an RP28-linked RP family in the Palestinian population caused by a novel nonsense mutation in FAM161A. RP in this family shows a typical disease onset with moderate to rapid progression

  12. Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by a novel ADCK3 mutation that elongates the protein: clinical, genetic and biochemical characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Hersheson, Joshua; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Duberley, Kate E C; Preza, Elisavet; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chalasani, Annapurna; Laurá, Matilde; Wood, Nick W; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background The autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The large number of ARCA genes leads to delay and difficulties obtaining an exact diagnosis in many patients and families. Ubiquinone (CoQ10) deficiency is one of the potentially treatable causes of ARCAs as some patients respond to CoQ10 supplementation. The AarF domain containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3) is one of several genes associated with CoQ10 deficiency. ADCK3 encodes a mitochondrial protein which functions as an electron-transfer membrane protein complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Methods We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family who presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe myoclonus from adolescence. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical assessment of fibroblasts were performed in the index patient. Results A novel homozygous frameshift mutation in ADCK3 (p.Ser616Leufs*114), was identified in both siblings. This frameshift mutation results in the loss of the stop codon, extending the coding protein by 81 amino acids. Significant CoQ10 deficiency and reduced MRC enzyme activities in the index patient's fibroblasts suggested that the mutant protein may reduce the efficiency of mitochondrial electron transfer. CoQ10 supplementation was initiated following these genetic and biochemical analyses. She gained substantial improvement in myoclonic movements, ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after treatment. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of diagnosing ADCK3 mutations and the potential benefit of treatment for patients. The identification of this new mutation broadens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ADCK3 mutations and provides further understanding of their pathogenic mechanism. PMID:24218524

  13. A recessive X-linked mutation causes a threefold reduction of total body zinc accumulation in Drosophila melanogaster laboratory strains☆

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Negar; Argunhan, Bilge; Bettedi, Lucia; Szular, Joanna; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    A newly identified human locus on chromosome 15 was recently associated with zinc accumulation. Based on a prior report of a threefold difference in zinc accumulation between fumble1 heterozygous mutants and control fly strains, it was suggested that phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase might affect zinc status through its effects on vitamin B5 (pantothenate) metabolism. We report here that outcrossed fumble1 heterozygous mutant flies with low zinc content have been recovered, suggesting that pantothenate metabolism did not alter zinc homeostasis in fumble1 heterozygous flies. We show instead that the Drosophila condition of low body zinc accumulation is an X-chromosome-linked recessive trait. PMID:23951551

  14. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-05-05

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339(∗)]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling.

  15. Biallelic Mutations in GNB3 Cause a Unique Form of Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Ajoy; Audo, Isabelle; Tavares, Erika; Maynes, Jason T.; Tumber, Anupreet; Wright, Thomas; Li, Shuning; Michiels, Christelle; Banin, Eyal; Bocquet, Beatrice; De Baere, Elfride; Casteels, Ingele; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Drumare, Isabelle; Friedburg, Christoph; Gottlob, Irene; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Kellner, Ulrich; Koenekoop, Robert; Kohl, Susanne; Leroy, Bart P.; Lorenz, Birgit; McLean, Rebecca; Meire, Francoise; Meunier, Isabelle; Munier, Francis; de Ravel, Thomy; Reiff, Charlotte M.; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sharon, Dror; Schorderet, Daniel; Schwartz, Sharon; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Condroyer, Christel; MacDonald, Heather; Verdet, Robert; Sahel, José-Alain; Hamel, Christian P.; Zeitz, Christina; Héon, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous group of non-progressive inherited retinal disorders with characteristic electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Riggs and Schubert-Bornschein are subtypes of CSNB and demonstrate distinct ERG features. Riggs CSNB demonstrates selective rod photoreceptor dysfunction and occurs due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction cascade; night blindness is the only symptom and eye examination is otherwise normal. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is a consequence of impaired signal transmission between the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. Schubert-Bornschein CSNB is subdivided into complete CSNB with an ON bipolar signaling defect and incomplete CSNB with both ON and OFF pathway involvement. Both subtypes are associated with variable degrees of night blindness or photophobia, reduced visual acuity, high myopia, and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing of a family screened negative for mutations in genes associated with CSNB identified biallelic mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-3 gene (GNB3). Two siblings were compound heterozygous for a deletion (c.170_172delAGA [p.Lys57del]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339∗]). The maternal aunt was homozygous for the nonsense mutation (c.1017G>A [p.Trp339∗]). Mutational analysis of GNB3 in a cohort of 58 subjects with CSNB identified a sporadic case individual with a homozygous GNB3 mutation (c.200C>T [p.Ser67Phe]). GNB3 encodes the β subunit of G protein heterotrimer (Gαβγ) and is known to modulate ON bipolar cell signaling and cone transducin function in mice. Affected human subjects showed an unusual CSNB phenotype with variable degrees of ON bipolar dysfunction and reduced cone sensitivity. This unique retinal disorder with dual anomaly in visual processing expands our knowledge about retinal signaling. PMID:27063057

  16. A Novel Splicesite Mutation in the EDAR Gene Causes Severe Autosomal Recessive Hypohydrotic (Anhidrotic) Ectodermal Dysplasia in an Iranian Family

    PubMed Central

    Torkamandi, Shahram; Gholami, Milad; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Rezaie, Somaye; Zaimy, Mohammad Ali; Omrani, Mir Davood

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a rare congenital disorder arising from deficient development of ectoderm-derived structures including skin, nails, glands and teeth. The phenotype of HED is associated with mutation in EDA, EDAR, EDARADD and NEMO genes, all of them disruptingNF-κB signaling cascade necessary for initiation, formation and differentiation in the embryo and adult. Here we describe a novel acceptor splice site mutation c.730-2 A>G(IVS 8-2 A>G) in EDAR gene in homozygous form in all affected members of a family,and in heterozygous form in carriers. Bioinformatics analysis showed that this mutation can create a new broken splicing site and lead to aberrant splicing. PMID:28357203

  17. Adenylate cyclase 1 (ADCY1) mutations cause recessive hearing impairment in humans and defects in hair cell function and hearing in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Giese, Arnaud P.; Ansar, Muhammad; Amin-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Rehn, Kira; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Chiu, Ilene; Hussain Ali, Raja; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Ahmad, Wasim; Riazuddin, Saima; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) production, which is important for mechanotransduction within the inner ear, is catalyzed by adenylate cyclases (AC). However, knowledge of the role of ACs in hearing is limited. Previously, a novel autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment locus DFNB44 was mapped to chromosome 7p14.1-q11.22 in a consanguineous family from Pakistan. Through whole-exome sequencing of DNA samples from hearing-impaired family members, a nonsense mutation c.3112C>T (p.Arg1038*) within adenylate cyclase 1 (ADCY1) was identified. This stop-gained mutation segregated with hearing impairment within the family and was not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. This mutation is predicted to cause the loss of 82 amino acids from the carboxyl tail, including highly conserved residues within the catalytic domain, plus a calmodulin-stimulation defect, both of which are expected to decrease enzymatic efficiency. Individuals who are homozygous for this mutation had symmetric, mild-to-moderate mixed hearing impairment. Zebrafish adcy1b morphants had no FM1-43 dye uptake and lacked startle response, indicating hair cell dysfunction and gross hearing impairment. In the mouse, Adcy1 expression was observed throughout inner ear development and maturation. ADCY1 was localized to the cytoplasm of supporting cells and hair cells of the cochlea and vestibule and also to cochlear hair cell nuclei and stereocilia. Ex vivo studies in COS-7 cells suggest that the carboxyl tail of ADCY1 is essential for localization to actin-based microvilli. These results demonstrate that ADCY1 has an evolutionarily conserved role in hearing and that cAMP signaling is important to hair cell function within the inner ear. PMID:24482543

  18. Mutations in the MGAT2 gene controlling complex N-glycan synthesis cause carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type II, an autosomal recessive disease with defective brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, J.; Schachter, H.; Dunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome (CDGS) type II is a multisystemic congenital disease with severe involvement of the nervous system. Two unrelated CDGS type II patients are shown to have point mutations (one patient having Ser{r_arrow}Phe and the other having His{r_arrow}Arg) in the catalytic domain of the gene MGAT2, encoding UDP-GlcNAc:{alpha}-6-D-mannoside {Beta}-1,2-N-ace-tylglucosaminyltransferase II (GnT II), an enzyme essential for biosynthesis of complex Asn-linked glycans. Both mutations caused both decreased expression of enzyme protein in a baculovirus/insect cell system and inactivation of enzyme activity. Restriction-endonuclease analysis of DNA from 23 blood relatives of one of these patients showed that 13 donors were heterozygotes; the other relatives and 21 unrelated donors were normal homozygotes. All heterozygotes showed a significant reduction (33%-68%) in mononuclear-cell GnT II activity. The data indicate that CDGS type II is an autosomal recessive disease and that complex Asn-linked glycans are essential for normal neurological development. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Matchmaking facilitates the diagnosis of an autosomal-recessive mitochondrial disease caused by biallelic mutation of the tRNA isopentenyltransferase (TRIT1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kernohan, Kristin D; Dyment, David A; Pupavac, Mihaela; Cramer, Zvi; McBride, Arran; Bernard, Genevieve; Straub, Isabella; Tetreault, Martine; Hartley, Taila; Huang, Lijia; Sell, Erick; Majewski, Jacek; Rosenblatt, David S; Shoubridge, Eric; Mhanni, Aziz; Myers, Tara; Proud, Virginia; Vergano, Samanta; Spangler, Brooke; Farrow, Emily; Kussman, Jennifer; Safina, Nicole; Saunders, Carol; Boycott, Kym M; Thiffault, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Deleterious variants in the same gene present in two or more families with overlapping clinical features provide convincing evidence of a disease-gene association; this can be a challenge in the study of ultrarare diseases. To facilitate the identification of additional families, several groups have created "matching" platforms. We describe four individuals from three unrelated families "matched" by GeneMatcher and MatchMakerExchange. Individuals had microcephaly, developmental delay, epilepsy, and recessive mutations in TRIT1. A single homozygous mutation in TRIT1 associated with similar features had previously been reported in one family. The identification of these individuals provides additional evidence to support TRIT1 as the disease-causing gene and interprets the variants as "pathogenic." TRIT1 functions to modify mitochondrial tRNAs and is necessary for protein translation. We show that dysfunctional TRIT1 results in decreased levels of select mitochondrial proteins. Our findings confirm the TRIT1 disease association and advance the phenotypic and molecular understanding of this disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A Homozygous Mutation in Human PRICKLE1 Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy-Ataxia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Wallace, Robyn H.; Buhr, Aimee; Buller, Andrew R.; Afawi, Zaid; Shimojo, Masahito; Miyata, Shingo; Chen, Shan; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Griesbach, Hilary L.; Wu, Shu; Nashelsky, Marcus; Vladar, Eszter K.; Antic, Dragana; Ferguson, Polly J.; Cirak, Sebahattin; Voit, Thomas; Scott, Matthew P.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Gurnett, Christina; Daoud, Azhar S.; Kivity, Sara; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Mazarib, Aziz; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Korczyn, Amos D.; Slusarski, Diane C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; El-Shanti, Hatem I.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a syndrome characterized by myoclonic seizures (lightning-like jerks), generalized convulsive seizures, and varying degrees of neurological decline, especially ataxia and dementia. Previously, we characterized three pedigrees of individuals with PME and ataxia, where either clinical features or linkage mapping excluded known PME loci. This report identifies a mutation in PRICKLE1 (also known as RILP for REST/NRSF interacting LIM domain protein) in all three of these pedigrees. The identified PRICKLE1 mutation blocks the PRICKLE1 and REST interaction in vitro and disrupts the normal function of PRICKLE1 in an in vivo zebrafish overexpression system. PRICKLE1 is expressed in brain regions implicated in epilepsy and ataxia in mice and humans, and, to our knowledge, is the first molecule in the noncanonical WNT signaling pathway to be directly implicated in human epilepsy. PMID:18976727

  1. New autosomal recessive mutations in aquaporin-2 causing nephrogenic diabetes insipidus through deficient targeting display normal expression in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Nadeau, Alexandre; Lussier, Yoann; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; Lonergan, Michèle; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Riveira-Munoz, Eva; Devuyst, Olivier; Bissonnette, Pierre; Bichet, Daniel G

    2010-06-15

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2), located at the luminal side of the collecting duct principal cells, is a water channel responsible for the final concentration of urine. Lack of function, often occurring through mistargeting of mutated proteins, induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a condition characterized by large urinary volumes. In the present study, two new mutations (K228E and V24A) identified in NDI-affected individuals from distinct families along with the already reported R187C were analysed in comparison to the wild-type protein (AQP2-wt) using Xenopus laevis oocytes and a mouse collecting duct cell-line (mIMCD-3). Initial data in oocytes showed that all mutations were adequately expressed at reduced levels when compared to AQP2-wt. K228E and V24A were found to be properly targeted at the plasma membrane and exhibited adequate functionality similar to AQP2-wt, as opposed to R187C which was retained in internal stores and was thus inactive. In coexpression studies using oocytes, R187C impeded the functionality of all other AQP2 variants while combinations with K228E, V24A and AQP2-wt only showed additive functionalities. When expressed in mIMCD-3 cells, forskolin treatment efficiently promoted the targeting of AQP2-wt at the plasma membrane (>90%) while K228E only weakly responded to the same treatment (approximately 20%) and both V24A and R187C remained completely insensitive to the treatment. We concluded that both V24A and K228E are intrinsically functional water channels that lack a proper response to vasopressin, which leads to NDI as found in both compound mutations studied (K228E + R187C and V24A + R187C). The discrepancies in plasma membrane targeting response found in both expression systems stress the need to evaluate such data using mammalian cell systems.

  2. Recessive SLC19A2 mutations are a cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus in thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Smith, Charles; Flanagan, Sarah E; Patch, Ann-Marie; Grulich-Henn, Juergen; Habeb, Abdelhadi M; Hussain, Khalid; Pomahacova, Renata; Matyka, Krystyna; Abdullah, Mohamed; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian

    2012-06-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is diagnosed within the first 6 months of life, and is usually monogenic in origin. Heterozygous mutations in ABCC8, KCNJ11, and INS genes account for around half of cases of PNDM; mutations in 10 further genes account for a further 10%, and the remaining 40% of cases are currently without a molecular genetic diagnosis. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anaemia (TRMA), due to mutations in the thiamine transporter SLC19A2, is associated with the classical clinical triad of diabetes, deafness, and megaloblastic anaemia. Diabetes in this condition is well described in infancy but has only very rarely been reported in association with neonatal diabetes. We used a combination of homozygosity mapping and evaluation of clinical information to identify cases of TRMA from our cohort of patients with PNDM. Homozygous mutations in SLC19A2 were identified in three cases in which diabetes presented in the first 6 months of life, and a further two cases in which diabetes presented between 6 and 12 months of age. We noted the presence of a significant neurological disorder in four of the five cases in our series, prompting us to examine the incidence of these and other non-classical clinical features in TRMA. From 30 cases reported in the literature, we found significant neurological deficit (stroke, focal, or generalized epilepsy) in 27%, visual system disturbance in 43%, and cardiac abnormalities in 27% of cases. TRMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diabetes presenting in the neonatal period. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 genes cause recessive distal renal tubular acidosis in Mexican families.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Laura I; Simian, Christopher; Treard, Cyrielle; Hayek, Donia; Salvador, Carolina; Guerra, Norma; Matos, Mario; Medeiros, Mara; Enciso, Sandra; Camargo, María Dolores; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is a rare disease characterized by a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap, hypokalemia, hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, nephrocalcinosis, and conserved glomerular filtration rate. In some cases, neurosensorial deafness is associated. dRTA is developed during the first months of life and the main manifestations are failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and anorexia. Nine unrelated families were studied: seven children, a teenager, and an adult with dRTA. Hearing was preserved in four children. Coding regions of the genes responsible for recessive dRTA were analysed by Sanger sequencing. Molecular defects were found in the genes ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4. We identified three homozygous variants in ATP6V1B: a frameshift mutation (p.Ile386Hisfs*56), a nucleotide substitution in exon 10 (p.Pro346Arg), and a new splicing mutation in intron 5. Three patients were homozygous for one novel (p.Arg743Trp) and one known (p.Asp411Tyr) missense mutations in the ATP6V0A4 gene. Three patients were compound heterozygous: one proband displayed two novel mutations, the frameshift mutation p.Val52Metfs*25, and a large deletion of exons 18-21; two probands showed the missense mutation p.Asp411Tyr and as a second mutation, p.Arg194Ter and c.1691+2dup, respectively. ATP6V0A4 and ATP6V1B1 genes were involved in recessive dRTA of Mexican families. All ATP6V1B1 mutations detected were homozygous and all patients developed sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) early in infancy. ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in one infant and three children without SNHL, and in one teenager and one adult with SNHL confirming the phenotypic variability in this trait. The mutation p.Asp411Tyr detected in four Mexican families was due to a founder effect. Screening of these mutations could provide a rapid and valuable tool for diagnosis of dRTA in this population.

  4. Mutations in SLC13A5 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Epileptic Encephalopathy with Seizure Onset in the First Days of Life

    PubMed Central

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy. PMID:24995870

  5. Mutations in SLC13A5 cause autosomal-recessive epileptic encephalopathy with seizure onset in the first days of life.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-03

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy.

  6. Recessive mutations in the cancer gene Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), at a locus previously associated with metformin response, cause dysglycaemia and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Connelly, P J; Smith, N; Chadwick, R; Exley, A R; Shneerson, J M; Pearson, E R

    2016-03-01

    To investigate glucose and insulin metabolism in participants with ataxia telangiectasia in the absence of a diagnosis of diabetes. A standard oral glucose tolerance test was performed in participants with ataxia telangiectasia (n = 10) and in a control cohort (n = 10). Serial glucose and insulin measurements were taken to permit cohort comparisons of glucose-insulin homeostasis and indices of insulin secretion and sensitivity. During the oral glucose tolerance test, the 2-h glucose (6.75 vs 4.93 mmol/l; P = 0.029), insulin concentrations (285.6 vs 148.5 pmol/l; P = 0.043), incremental area under the curve for glucose (314 vs 161 mmol/l/min; P = 0.036) and incremental area under the curve for insulin (37,720 vs 18,080 pmol/l/min; P = 0.03) were higher in participants with ataxia telangiectasia than in the controls. There were no significant differences between groups in fasting glucose, insulin concentrations or insulinogenic index measurement (0.94 vs 0.95; P = 0.95). The Matsuda index, reflecting whole-body insulin sensitivity, was lower in participants with ataxia telangiectasia (5.96 vs 11.03; P = 0.019) than in control subjects. Mutations in Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) that cause ataxia telangiectasia are associated with elevated glycaemia and low insulin sensitivity in participants without diabetes. This indicates a role of ATM in glucose and insulin metabolic pathways. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  7. Recessive and dominant mutations in COL12A1 cause a novel EDS/myopathy overlap syndrome in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yaqun; Zwolanek, Daniela; Izu, Yayoi; Gandhy, Shreya; Schreiber, Gudrun; Brockmann, Knut; Devoto, Marcella; Tian, Zuozhen; Hu, Ying; Veit, Guido; Meier, Markus; Stetefeld, Jörg; Hicks, Debbie; Straub, Volker; Voermans, Nicol C.; Birk, David E.; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are disorders of connective tissue presenting with an overlap phenotype combining clinical involvement from the muscle and from the connective tissue. Not all patients displaying related overlap phenotypes between muscle and connective tissue have mutations in collagen VI. Here, we report a homozygous recessive loss of function mutation and a de novo dominant mutation in collagen XII (COL12A1) as underlying a novel overlap syndrome involving muscle and connective tissue. Two siblings homozygous for a loss of function mutation showed widespread joint hyperlaxity combined with weakness precluding independent ambulation, while the patient with the de novo missense mutation was more mildly affected, showing improvement including the acquisition of walking. A mouse model with inactivation of the Col12a1 gene showed decreased grip strength, a delay in fiber-type transition and a deficiency in passive force generation while the muscle seems more resistant to eccentric contraction induced force drop, indicating a role for a matrix-based passive force-transducing elastic element in the generation of the weakness. This new muscle connective tissue overlap syndrome expands on the emerging importance of the muscle extracellular matrix in the pathogenesis of muscle disease. PMID:24334604

  8. A novel compound heterozygous mutation (35delG, 363delC) in the Connexin 26 gene causes non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Onsori, Habib; Rahmati, Mohammad; Fazli, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Connexin 26 (Cx26) gene are a common cause of hereditary hearing loss in different populations. In the present study, an Iranian patient with bilateral hearing loss underwent molecular analysis for the causative mutation. DNA studies were performed for the Cx26 gene by PCR and sequencing methods. We describe a novel compound heterozygous mutation (35delG, 363delC) in the Cx26 gene that is strongly associated with congenital non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL).

  9. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course.

  10. Mutations in UNC80, Encoding Part of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN Channel Complex, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe Infantile Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Faqeih, Eissa; Alasmari, Ali; Zaki, Maha S.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Brain channelopathies represent a growing class of brain disorders that usually result in paroxysmal disorders, although their role in other neurological phenotypes, including the recently described NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, is increasingly recognized. In three Saudi Arabian families and one Egyptian family all affected by a remarkably similar phenotype (infantile encephalopathy and largely normal brain MRI) to that of NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, we identified a locus on 2q34 in which whole-exome sequencing revealed three, including two apparently loss-of-function, recessive mutations in UNC80. UNC80 encodes a large protein that is necessary for the stability and function of NALCN and for bridging NALCN to UNC79 to form a functional complex. Our results expand the clinical relevance of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN channel complex. PMID:26708753

  11. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  12. Mutations in FGD4 Encoding the Rho GDP/GTP Exchange Factor FRABIN Cause Autosomal Recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4H

    PubMed Central

    Delague, Valérie ; Jacquier, Arnaud ; Hamadouche, Tarik ; Poitelon, Yannick ; Baudot, Cécile ; Boccaccio, Irène ; Chouery, Eliane ; Chaouch, Malika ; Kassouri, Nora ; Jabbour, Rosette ; Grid, Djamel ; Mégarbané, André ; Haase, Georg ; Lévy, Nicolas 

    2007-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT. PMID:17564959

  13. Mutations in FGD4 encoding the Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor FRABIN cause autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4H.

    PubMed

    Delague, Valérie; Jacquier, Arnaud; Hamadouche, Tarik; Poitelon, Yannick; Baudot, Cécile; Boccaccio, Iréne; Chouery, Eliane; Chaouch, Malika; Kassouri, Nora; Jabbour, Rosette; Grid, Djamel; Mégarbané, Andre; Haase, Georg; Lévy, Nicolas

    2007-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, foot and hand deformities, and electrophysiological changes. The CMT4H subtype is an autosomal recessive demyelinating form of CMT that was recently mapped to a 15.8-Mb region at chromosome 12p11.21-q13.11, in two consanguineous families of Mediterranean origin, by homozygosity mapping. We report here the identification of mutations in FGD4, encoding FGD4 or FRABIN (FGD1-related F-actin binding protein), in both families. FRABIN is a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), specific to Cdc42, a member of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins (Rho GTPases). Rho GTPases play a key role in regulating signal-transduction pathways in eukaryotes. In particular, they have a pivotal role in mediating actin cytoskeleton changes during cell migration, morphogenesis, polarization, and division. Consistent with these reported functions, expression of truncated FRABIN mutants in rat primary motoneurons and rat Schwann cells induced significantly fewer microspikes than expression of wild-type FRABIN. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations in a Rho GEF protein being involved in CMT.

  14. Biallelic Truncating Mutations in FMN2, Encoding the Actin-Regulatory Protein Formin 2, Cause Nonsyndromic Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Law, Rosalind; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Jerber, Julie; Cai, Na; Abbasi, Ansar A.; Zaki, Maha S.; Mittal, Kirti; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Khan, Valeed; Nguyen, Maria; Ali, Ghazanfar; Copeland, Brett; Scott, Eric; Vasli, Nasim; Mikhailov, Anna; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Andrade, Danielle M.; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major site of neuronal activity in the brain; they serve as the receiving point for neurotransmitters and undergo rapid activity-dependent morphological changes that correlate with learning and memory. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and next-generation sequencing in two consanguineous families affected by nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we identified truncating mutations in formin 2 (FMN2), encoding a protein that belongs to the formin family of actin cytoskeleton nucleation factors and is highly expressed in the maturing brain. We found that FMN2 localizes to punctae along dendrites and that germline inactivation of mouse Fmn2 resulted in animals with decreased spine density; such mice were previously demonstrated to have a conditioned fear-learning defect. Furthermore, patient neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells showed correlated decreased synaptic density. Thus, FMN2 mutations link intellectual disability either directly or indirectly to the regulation of actin-mediated synaptic spine density. PMID:25480035

  15. Functional analysis of a novel I71N mutation in the GJB2 gene among Southern Egyptians causing autosomal recessive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mostafa R; Alesutan, Ioana; Föller, Michael; Sopjani, Mentor; Bress, Andreas; Baur, Manuela; Salama, Ragaa H M; Bakr, Mohamed S; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Blin, Nikolaus; Lang, Florian; Pfister, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, a gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26 (Cx26), are a major cause for inherited and sporadic non-syndromic hearing loss, albeit with highly variable clinical effects. To determine new mutations and their frequencies in a Southern Egyptian population restriction fragment length polymorphism, gene sequencing, and single strand conformational polymorphism revealed only 2 mutations for GJB2: c.35delG and p.I71N. The allelic frequency of the c.35delG mutation was 8.7% (found in 27 out of 310 investigated alleles) resulting in a relatively low carrier frequency (1.6%) in Upper Egypt. The new mutation, a substitution of isoleucin (I) (a non-polar amino acid) by the polar amino acid asparagin (N), was localized within the conserved Cx26 structure. The functional significance of p.I71N was tested by injection of cRNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes. Cx26 hemi-channel activity was measured by depolarization activated conductance in non-coupled oocytes. As a result, the p.I71N mutated channel was non-functional. The study discloses a novel, functionally relevant GJB2 mutation and defines the contribution of Cx26 alterations to the hearing loss in the Southern Egyptian population.

  16. Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability with Cerebellar Atrophy Syndrome Caused by Mutation of the Manganese and Zinc Transporter Gene SLC39A8.

    PubMed

    Boycott, Kym M; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Kernohan, Kristin D; Gebril, Ola H; Mhanni, Aziz; Chudley, Albert E; Redl, David; Qin, Wen; Hampson, Sarah; Küry, Sébastien; Tetreault, Martine; Puffenberger, Erik G; Scott, James N; Bezieau, Stéphane; Reis, André; Uebe, Steffen; Schumacher, Johannes; Hegele, Robert A; McLeod, D Ross; Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Majewski, Jacek; Ramaekers, Vincent T; Nebert, Daniel W; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2015-12-03

    Manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) are essential divalent cations used by cells as protein cofactors; various human studies and animal models have demonstrated the importance of Mn and Zn for development. Here we describe an autosomal-recessive disorder in six individuals from the Hutterite community and in an unrelated Egyptian sibpair; the disorder is characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, hypotonia, strabismus, cerebellar atrophy, and variable short stature. Exome sequencing in one affected Hutterite individual and the Egyptian family identified the same homozygous variant, c.112G>C (p.Gly38Arg), affecting a conserved residue of SLC39A8. The affected Hutterite and Egyptian individuals did not share an extended common haplotype, suggesting that the mutation arose independently. SLC39A8 is a member of the solute carrier gene family known to import Mn, Zn, and other divalent cations across the plasma membrane. Evaluation of these two metal ions in the affected individuals revealed variably low levels of Mn and Zn in blood and elevated levels in urine, indicating renal wasting. Our findings identify a human Mn and Zn transporter deficiency syndrome linked to SLC39A8, providing insight into the roles of Mn and Zn homeostasis in human health and development.

  17. Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability with Cerebellar Atrophy Syndrome Caused by Mutation of the Manganese and Zinc Transporter Gene SLC39A8

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Beaulieu, Chandree L.; Kernohan, Kristin D.; Gebril, Ola H.; Mhanni, Aziz; Chudley, Albert E.; Redl, David; Qin, Wen; Hampson, Sarah; Küry, Sébastien; Tetreault, Martine; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Scott, James N.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Reis, André; Uebe, Steffen; Schumacher, Johannes; Hegele, Robert A.; McLeod, D. Ross; Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Majewski, Jacek; Ramaekers, Vincent T.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Innes, A. Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) are essential divalent cations used by cells as protein cofactors; various human studies and animal models have demonstrated the importance of Mn and Zn for development. Here we describe an autosomal-recessive disorder in six individuals from the Hutterite community and in an unrelated Egyptian sibpair; the disorder is characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, hypotonia, strabismus, cerebellar atrophy, and variable short stature. Exome sequencing in one affected Hutterite individual and the Egyptian family identified the same homozygous variant, c.112G>C (p.Gly38Arg), affecting a conserved residue of SLC39A8. The affected Hutterite and Egyptian individuals did not share an extended common haplotype, suggesting that the mutation arose independently. SLC39A8 is a member of the solute carrier gene family known to import Mn, Zn, and other divalent cations across the plasma membrane. Evaluation of these two metal ions in the affected individuals revealed variably low levels of Mn and Zn in blood and elevated levels in urine, indicating renal wasting. Our findings identify a human Mn and Zn transporter deficiency syndrome linked to SLC39A8, providing insight into the roles of Mn and Zn homeostasis in human health and development. PMID:26637978

  18. Recessive mutations in the INS gene result in neonatal diabetes through reduced insulin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Intza; Edghill, Emma L.; Akerman, Ildem; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Rica, Itxaso; Locke, Jonathan M.; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Alshaikh, Adnan; Bundak, Ruveyde; del Castillo, Gabriel; Deeb, Asma; Deiss, Dorothee; Fernandez, Juan M.; Godbole, Koumudi; Hussain, Khalid; O’Connell, Michele; Klupa, Thomasz; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Mohsin, Fauzia; Perlman, Kusiel; Sumnik, Zdenek; Rial, Jose M.; Ugarte, Estibaliz; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Johnstone, Karen; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Martínez, Rosa; Castaño, Carlos; Patch, Ann-Marie; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Raile, Klemens; Morgan, Noel; Harries, Lorna W.; Castaño, Luis; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; de Nanclares, Guiomar Perez; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous coding mutations in the INS gene that encodes preproinsulin were recently shown to be an important cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. These dominantly acting mutations prevent normal folding of proinsulin, which leads to beta-cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. We now report 10 different recessive INS mutations in 15 probands with neonatal diabetes. Functional studies showed that recessive mutations resulted in diabetes because of decreased insulin biosynthesis through distinct mechanisms, including gene deletion, lack of the translation initiation signal, and altered mRNA stability because of the disruption of a polyadenylation signal. A subset of recessive mutations caused abnormal INS transcription, including the deletion of the C1 and E1 cis regulatory elements, or three different single base-pair substitutions in a CC dinucleotide sequence located between E1 and A1 elements. In keeping with an earlier and more severe beta-cell defect, patients with recessive INS mutations had a lower birth weight (−3.2 SD score vs. −2.0 SD score) and were diagnosed earlier (median 1 week vs. 10 weeks) compared to those with dominant INS mutations. Mutations in the insulin gene can therefore result in neonatal diabetes as a result of two contrasting pathogenic mechanisms. Moreover, the recessively inherited mutations provide a genetic demonstration of the essential role of multiple sequence elements that regulate the biosynthesis of insulin in man. PMID:20133622

  19. Transglutaminase 1 mutations in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: private and recurrent mutations in an isolated population.

    PubMed Central

    Laiho, E; Ignatius, J; Mikkola, H; Yee, V C; Teller, D C; Niemi, K M; Saarialho-Kere, U; Kere, J; Palotie, A

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a rare, heterogenous keratinization disorder of the skin, classically divided into two clinical subtypes, lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiformis erythroderma (CIE). Recently, strong evidence for the involvement of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) in LI has evolved. We have studied ARCI in the isolated Finnish population, in which recessive disorders are often caused by single mutations enriched by a founder effect. Surprisingly, five different mutations of TGM1 (Arg141His, Arg142Cys, Gly217Ser, Val378Leu, and Arg395Leu) were found in Finnish ARCI patients. In addition to affected LI patients, we also identified TGM1 mutations in CIE patients. Moreover, haplotype analysis of the chromosomes carrying the most common mutation, a C-->T transition changing Arg142 to Cys, revealed that the same mutation has been introduced twice in the Finnish population. In addition to this Arg142Cys mutation, three other mutations, in Arg141 and Arg142, have been described elsewhere, in other populations. These findings suggest that this region of TGM1 is more susceptible to mutation. The corresponding amino acid sequence is conserved in other transglutaminases, but, for example, coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) mutations do not cluster in this region. Protein modeling of the Arg142Cys mutation suggested disruption or destabilization of the protein. In transfection studies, the closely related transglutaminase FXIII protein with the corresponding mutation was shown to be susceptible to degradation in COS cells, further supporting evidence of the destabilizing effect of the Arg142Cys mutation in TGM1. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9326318

  20. Congenital ptosis, scoliosis, and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility in siblings with recessive RYR1 mutations.

    PubMed

    AlBakri, Amani; Karaoui, Mohammad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Khan, Arif O

    2015-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility is a rare pharmacogenic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor 1 gene (RYR1). It is important to identify children who are candidates for ophthalmic surgery who might harbor RYR1 mutations because intraoperative malignant hyperthermia is potentially lethal. We report 2 siblings with congenital ptosis and scoliosis who were considered for ptosis surgery but were found to harbor underlying recessive RYR1 mutations.

  1. Unstable minisatellite expansion causing recessively inherited myoclonus epilepsy, EPM1.

    PubMed

    Virtaneva, K; D'Amato, E; Miao, J; Koskiniemi, M; Norio, R; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S; Michelucci, R; Tassinari, C A; Omer, S; Pennacchio, L A; Myers, R M; Dieguez-Lucena, J L; Krahe, R; de la Chapelle, A; Lehesjoki, A E

    1997-04-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1; MIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs with a low frequency in many populations but is more common in Finland and the Mediterranean region. It is characterized by stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures with onset at age 6-15 years, typical electroencephalographic abnormalities and a variable rate of progression between and within families. Following the initial mapping of the EPM1 gene to chromosome 21 (ref. 6) and the refinement of the critical region to a small interval, positional cloning identified the gene encoding cystatin B (CST6), a cysteine protease inhibitor, as the gene underlying EPM1 (ref. 10). Levels of messenger RNA encoded by CST6 were dramatically decreased in patients. A 3' splice site and a stop codon mutation were identified in three families, leaving most mutations uncharacterized. In this study, we report a novel type of disease-causing mutation, an unstable 15- to 18-mer minisatellite repeat expansion in the putative promoter region of the CST6 gene. The mutation accounts for the majority of EPM1 patients worldwide. Haplotype data are compatible with a single ancestral founder mutation. The length of the repeat array differs between chromosomes and families, but changes in repeat number seem to be comparatively rare events.

  2. Mutations in WDR62 gene in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Kousar, Rizwana; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Khan, Bushra; Basit, Sulman; Mahmood, Saqib; Mir, Asif; Ahmad, Wasim; Ansar, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a disorder of neurogenic mitosis that causes reduction in brain size. It is a rare heterogeneous condition with seven causative genes reported to date. Mutations in WD repeat protein 62 are associated with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly with cortical malformations. This study was initiated to screen WDR62 mutations in four consanguineous Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. As part of a large study to detect the genetic basis of primary microcephaly in Pakistan, homozygosity mapping and DNA sequencing was used to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in four families. Four out of 100 families recruited in the study revealed linkage to the MCPH2 locus on chromosome 19, which harbor WDR62 gene. DNA sequencing in these MCPH2 linked families result in the identification of a novel nonsense mutation (p.Q648X) and three previously known mutations. Our data indicate that WDR62 mutations cause about 4% of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in Pakistan.

  3. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Campbell, Ian M; Baggett, Brett C; Soens, Zachry T; Rao, Mitchell M; Hixson, Patricia M; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R

    2013-09-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles.

  4. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  5. Fryns Syndrome Associated with Recessive Mutations in PIGN in two Separate Families.

    PubMed

    McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Harris, Jessica E; Gattas, Michael; Peach, Elizabeth E; Sinnott, Stephen; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Barnett, Christopher P; Anderson, Lisa K; Wheeler, Lawrie; Brown, Matthew A; Leo, Paul J; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-07-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), dysmorphic facial features, distal digital hypoplasia, and other associated malformations, and is the most common syndromic form of CDH. No gene has been associated with this condition. Whole-exome sequence data from two siblings and three unrelated individuals with Fryns syndrome were filtered for rare, good quality, coding mutations fitting a recessive inheritance model. Compound heterozygous mutations in PIGN were identified in the siblings, with appropriate parental segregation: a novel STOP mutation (c.1966C>T: p.Glu656X) and a rare (minor allele frequency <0.001) donor splice site mutation (c.1674+1G>C) causing skipping of exon 18 and utilization of a cryptic acceptor site in exon 19. A further novel homozygous STOP mutation in PIGN (c.694A>T: p.Lys232X) was detected in one unrelated case. All three variants affected highly conserved bases. The two remaining cases were negative for PIGN mutations. Mutations in PIGN have been reported in cases with multiple congenital anomalies, including one case with syndromic CDH. Fryns syndrome can be caused by recessive mutations in PIGN. Whether PIGN affects other syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CDH warrants investigation.

  6. Recessive TRAPPC11 Mutations Cause a Disease Spectrum of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy and Myopathy with Movement Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Bögershausen, Nina; Shahrzad, Nassim; Chong, Jessica X.; von Kleist-Retzow, Jürgen-Christoph; Stanga, Daniela; Li, Yun; Bernier, Francois P.; Loucks, Catrina M.; Wirth, Radu; Puffenberger, Eric G.; Hegele, Robert A.; Schreml, Julia; Lapointe, Gabriel; Keupp, Katharina; Brett, Christopher L.; Anderson, Rebecca; Hahn, Andreas; Innes, A. Micheil; Suchowersky, Oksana; Mets, Marilyn B.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; McLeod, D. Ross; Thiele, Holger; Waggoner, Darrel; Altmüller, Janine; Boycott, Kym M.; Schoser, Benedikt; Nürnberg, Peter; Ober, Carole; Heller, Raoul; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Wollnik, Bernd; Sacher, Michael; Lamont, Ryan E.

    2013-01-01

    Myopathies are a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous group of disorders that can range from limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) to syndromic forms with associated features including intellectual disability. Here, we report the identification of mutations in transport protein particle complex 11 (TRAPPC11) in three individuals of a consanguineous Syrian family presenting with LGMD and in five individuals of Hutterite descent presenting with myopathy, infantile hyperkinetic movements, ataxia, and intellectual disability. By using a combination of whole-exome or genome sequencing with homozygosity mapping, we identified the homozygous c.2938G>A (p.Gly980Arg) missense mutation within the gryzun domain of TRAPPC11 in the Syrian LGMD family and the homozygous c.1287+5G>A splice-site mutation resulting in a 58 amino acid in-frame deletion (p.Ala372_Ser429del) in the foie gras domain of TRAPPC11 in the Hutterite families. TRAPPC11 encodes a component of the multiprotein TRAPP complex involved in membrane trafficking. We demonstrate that both mutations impair the binding ability of TRAPPC11 to other TRAPP complex components and disrupt the Golgi apparatus architecture. Marker trafficking experiments for the p.Ala372_Ser429del deletion indicated normal ER-to-Golgi trafficking but dramatically delayed exit from the Golgi to the cell surface. Moreover, we observed alterations of the lysosomal membrane glycoproteins lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) and LAMP2 as a consequence of TRAPPC11 dysfunction supporting a defect in the transport of secretory proteins as the underlying pathomechanism. PMID:23830518

  7. Structure of the human sulfhydryl oxidase augmenter of liver regeneration and characterization of a human mutation causing an autosomal recessive myopathy†, ‡

    PubMed Central

    Daithankar, Vidyadhar N.; Schaefer, Stephanie A.; Dong, Ming; Bahnson, Brian J.; Thorpe, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The sulfhydryl oxidase augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) binds FAD in a helix-rich domain that presents a CxxC disulfide proximal to the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin. Head-to-tail interchain disulfide bonds link subunits within the homodimer of both the short, cytokine-like, form of ALR (sfALR), and a longer form (lfALR) which resides in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). lfALR has an 80-residue N-terminal extension with an additional CxxC motif required for the reoxidation of reduced Mia40 during oxidative protein folding within the IMS. Recently Di Fonzo et al. (Di Fonzo, A., Ronchi, D., Lodi, T., Fassone, E., Tigano, M., Lamperti, C., Corti, S., Bordoni, A., Fortunato, F., Nizzardo, M., Napoli, L., Donadoni, C., Salani, S., Saladino, F., Moggio, M., Bresolin, N., Ferrero, I., and Comi, G. P. (2009) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 84, 594–604) described an R194H mutation of human ALR that led to cataract, progressive muscle hypotonia, and hearing loss in three children. The current work presents a structural and enzymological characterization of the human R194H mutant in lf- and sfALR. A crystal structure of human sfALR was determined by molecular replacement using the rat sfALR structure. R194 is located at the subunit interface of sfALR, close to the intersubunit disulfide bridges. The R194 guanidino moiety participates in three H-bonds: two main-chain carbonyl oxygen atoms (from R194 itself, and from C95 of the intersubunit disulfide of the other protomer) and with the 2' OH of the FAD ribose. The R194H mutation has minimal effect on the enzyme activity using model and physiological substrates of short and long ALR forms. However the mutation adversely affects the stability of both ALR forms: e.g. by decreasing the melting temperature by about 10 °C, by increasing the rate of dissociation of FAD from the holoenzyme by about 45-fold, and by strongly enhancing the susceptibility of sfALR to partial proteolysis and to reduction of its intersubunit

  8. Mutational founder effect in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa families from Southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Brick, Ahlem Sabrine; Laroussi, Nadia; Mesrati, Hela; Kefi, Rym; Bchetnia, Mbarka; Lasram, Khaled; Ben Halim, Nizar; Romdhane, Lilia; Ouragini, Houyem; Marrakchi, Salaheddine; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Meddeb Cherif, Mounira; Castiglia, Daniele; Hovnanian, Alain; Abdelhak, Sonia; Turki, Hamida

    2014-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a group of heritable bullous skin disorders caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. One of the most severe forms of DEB is the severe generalized [recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB-SG)] subtype, which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This subtype is most often due to COL7A1 mutations resulting in a premature termination codon on both alleles. We report here, the molecular investigation of 15 patients belonging to 14 nuclear families from the city of Sfax in Southern Tunisia, with clinical features of RDEB-SG complicated by squamous cell carcinoma in 3 patients. We identified two novel mutations, p.Val769LeufsX1 and p.Ala2297SerfsX91, in addition to one previously reported mutation (p.Arg2063Trp). The p.Val769LeufsX1 mutation was shared by 11 families and haplotype analysis indicated that it is a founder mutation. The p.Ala2297SerfsX91 mutation was a private mutation found in only one family. Together with the previously described recurrent mutations in Tunisia, screening for the founder p.Val769LeufsX1 mutation should provide a rapid molecular diagnosis tool for mutation screening in RDEB patients from Southern Tunisia and possibly from other Mediterranean populations sharing the same genetic background.

  9. An autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) with mild mental retardation is allelic to Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) caused by a mutation in the POMT1 gene.

    PubMed

    Balci, Burcu; Uyanik, Gökhan; Dincer, Pervin; Gross, Claudia; Willer, Tobias; Talim, Beril; Haliloglu, Göknur; Kale, Gülsev; Hehr, Ute; Winkler, Jürgen; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2005-04-01

    Mutations of the protein O-mannosyltransferase (POMT1) gene affect glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan, leading to Walker-Warburg syndrome, a lethal disorder in early life with severe congenital muscular dystrophy, and brain and eye malformations. Recently, we described a novel form of recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy with mild mental retardation, associated with an abnormal alpha-dystroglycan pattern in the muscle, suggesting a glycosylation defect. Here, we present evidence that this distinct phenotype results from a common mutation (A200P) in the POMT1 gene. Our findings further expand the phenotype of glycosylation disorders linked to POMT1 mutations. Furthermore, the A200P mutation is part of a conserved core haplotype, indicating an ancestral founder mutation.

  10. Spondylocheiro Dysplastic Form of the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome—An Autosomal-Recessive Entity Caused by Mutations in the Zinc Transporter Gene SLC39A13

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Cecilia; Elçioglu, Nursel H.; Albrecht, Beate; Eich, Georg; Chambaz, Céline; Janecke, Andreas R.; Yeowell, Heather; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David R.; Kraenzlin, Marius; Steinmann, Beat

    2008-01-01

    We present clinical, radiological, biochemical, and genetic findings on six patients from two consanguineous families that show EDS-like features and radiological findings of a mild skeletal dysplasia. The EDS-like findings comprise hyperelastic, thin, and bruisable skin, hypermobility of the small joints with a tendency to contractures, protuberant eyes with bluish sclerae, hands with finely wrinkled palms, atrophy of the thenar muscles, and tapering fingers. The skeletal dysplasia comprises platyspondyly with moderate short stature, osteopenia, and widened metaphyses. Patients have an increased ratio of total urinary pyridinolines, lysyl pyridinoline/hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (LP/HP), of ∼1 as opposed to ∼6 in EDS VI or ∼0.2 in controls. Lysyl and prolyl residues of collagens were underhydroxylated despite normal lysyl hydroxylase and prolyl 4-hydroxylase activities; underhydroxylation was a generalized process as shown by mass spectrometry of the α1(I)- and α2(I)-chain-derived peptides of collagen type I and involved at least collagen types I and II. A genome-wide SNP scan and sequence analyses identified in all patients a homozygous c.483_491 del9 SLC39A13 mutation that encodes for a membrane-bound zinc transporter SLC39A13. We hypothesize that an increased Zn2+ content inside the endoplasmic reticulum competes with Fe2+, a cofactor that is necessary for hydroxylation of lysyl and prolyl residues, and thus explains the biochemical findings. These data suggest an entity that we have designated “spondylocheiro dysplastic form of EDS (SCD-EDS)” to indicate a generalized skeletal dysplasia involving mainly the spine (spondylo) and striking clinical abnormalities of the hands (cheiro) in addition to the EDS-like features. PMID:18513683

  11. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  12. Recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to compound heterozygous mitofusin 2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Polke, J.M.; Laurá, M.; Pareyson, D.; Taroni, F.; Milani, M.; Bergamin, G.; Gibbons, V.S.; Houlden, H.; Chamley, S.C.; Blake, J.; DeVile, C.; Sandford, R.; Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) are the most common cause of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2). Over 50 mutations have been reported, mainly causing autosomal dominant disease, though families with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations have been described. We present 3 families with early-onset CMT2 associated with compound heterozygous MFN2 mutations. Transcriptional analysis was performed to investigate the effects of the mutations. Methods: Patients were examined clinically and electrophysiologically; parents were also examined where available. Genetic investigations included MFN2 DNA sequencing and dosage analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. MFN2 mRNA transcripts from blood lymphocytes were analyzed in 2 families. Results: Compound heterozygosity for MFN2 mutations was associated with early-onset CMT2 of varying severity between pedigrees. Parents, where examined, were unaffected and were heterozygous for the expected mutations. Four novel mutations were detected (one missense, one nonsense, an intragenic deletion of exons 7 + 8, and a 3–base pair deletion), as well as 2 previously reported missense mutations. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated aberrant splicing of the exonic deletion and indicated nonsense-mediated decay of mutant alleles with premature truncating mutations. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that MFN2 mutations can cause early-onset CMT2 with apparent recessive inheritance. Novel genetic findings include an intragenic MFN2 deletion and nonsense-mediated decay. Carrier parents were asymptomatic, suggesting that MFN2 null alleles can be nonpathogenic unless coinherited with another mutation. PMID:21715711

  13. Missense Mutations in CRYAB Are Liable for Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Kabir, Firoz; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was initiated to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination, and slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals who have not yet been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. Blood samples were obtained, and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. A genome-wide scan was completed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers, and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Protein coding exons of CRYAB were sequenced, bi-directionally. Evolutionary conservation was investigated by aligning CRYAB orthologues, and the expression of Cryab in embryonic and postnatal mice lens was investigated with TaqMan probe. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis suggested a potential region on chromosome 11q23 harboring CRYAB. DNA sequencing identified a missense variation: c.34C>T (p.R12C) in CRYAB that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequent interrogation of our entire cohort of familial cases identified a second familial case localized to chromosome 11q23 harboring a c.31C>T (p.R11C) mutation. In silico analyses suggested that the mutations identified in familial cases, p.R11C and p.R12C will not be tolerated by the three-dimensional structure of CRYAB. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of Cryab in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15) that increased significantly until postnatal day 6 (P6) with steady level of expression thereafter. Conclusion Here, we report two novel missense mutations, p.R11C and p.R12C, in CRYAB associated with autosomal recessive congenital nuclear cataracts. PMID:26402864

  14. Novel CLCN7 compound heterozygous mutations in intermediate autosomal recessive osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Nana; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Komori, Takahide; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable disorder of the skeleton that is characterized by increased bone density on radiographs caused by defects in osteoclast formation and function. Mutations in >10 genes are identified as causative for this clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease in humans. We report two novel missense variations in a compound heterozygous state in the CLCN7 gene, detected through targeted exome sequencing, in a 15-year-old Japanese female with intermediate autosomal recessive osteopetrosis. PMID:28819563

  15. The fate of 12 recessive mutations in a single village.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Hujerat, Y; Barges, S; Shalev, S A; Chakravarti, A

    2007-03-01

    In a Muslim Arab village, relatively isolated because of the preference of consanguineous marriages, we studied the fate of 12 mutations in 5 different genes. The study was based on carriers detected among relatives of affected patients and of carriers discovered in a random sample of 424 adults. Most of the mutations have been introduced by a carrier(s) originating from another village, but a few have been de novo events. Mutations that are very frequent in the entire village were introduced soon after the foundation of the village. Examples of such mutations are [GBJ2, 35Gdel] and [MEFV, M680I], with a carrier frequency of 7.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Many of the other mutations that are rare were introduced recently into the village and are frequent only among the descendants of the first couple carrying the mutation. For instance all the carriers of [ARSA, Q190H], responsible for metachromatic leukodystrophy, were found among the 218 descendants of a couple who were living in the village 4 generations ago. Since the village is typical for the region this study allows for some general conclusions to be drawn. In a population with a high degree of inbreeding the diagnosis of a single family with a patient(s) affected with a recessive disorder points to a recent event, while the finding of a rare disease in several families from an inbred population points to an older mutation. Mutations are often "exported" from one population to another by marriage. In the new inbred population this novel mutation will either be lost or will become frequent as the result of a founder effect. These observations are important for genetic counselling in the case of a recent mutation, since only the descendants of the founder couple are at risk, while in the case of older mutations the risk may be for the entire village. In the case of those frequent ancient mutations, the risk for a relative of an affected individual will be similar whether he marries a close relative or any random

  16. Screening for MYO15A Gene Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic, GJB2 Negative Iranian Deaf Population

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Shearer, A. Eliot; Babanejad, Mojgan; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Almadani, Seyed Navid; Nikzat, Nooshin; Jalalvand, Khadijeh; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Abtahi, Rezvan; Azadeh, Batool; Smith, Richard J.H.; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    MYO15A is located at the DFNB3 locus on chromosome 17p11.2, and encodes myosin-XV, an unconventional myosin critical for the formation of stereocilia in hair cells of cochlea. Recessive mutations in this gene lead to profound autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in humans and the shaker2 (sh2) phenotype in mice. Here, we performed a study on 140 Iranian families in order to determine mutations causing ARNSHL. The families, who were negative for mutations in GJB2, were subjected to linkage analysis. Eight of these families showed linkage to the DFNB3 locus, suggesting a MYO15A mutation frequency of 5.71% in our cohort of Iranian population. Subsequent sequencing of the MYO15A gene led to identification of 7 previously unreported mutations, including 4 missense mutations, 1 nonsense mutation, and 2 deletions in different regions of the myosin-XV protein. PMID:22736430

  17. Confirmation of ADAMTSL4 mutations for autosomal recessive isolated bilateral ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Greene, V Bennouna; Stoetzel, C; Pelletier, V; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y; Liebermann, L; Marion, V; De Korvin, H; Boileau, C; Dufier, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is a zonular disease where alteration of the zonular fibers leads progressively to lens dislocation. It is most often associated with systemic diseases such as Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchesani syndrome or homocystinuria. Isolated non syndromic ectopia lentis (IEL) is reported in families with autosomal inheritance, with dominant forms being more common than recessive. LTBP2 truncating mutations have been described as a cause of autosomal recessive ectopia lentis as a primary or secondary feature in patients showing ocular (eg, glaucoma) or extraocular manifestations (eg, Marfanoid habitus). Recently, ADAMTSL4 has been shown to be responsible for isolated autosomal recessive ectopia lentis in an inbred family. Herein we show a consanguineous family that carries a novel homozygous splice mutation IVS4-1G>A/IVS4-1G>A in ADAMTSL4 responsible for isolated autosomal recessive EL, thus confirming the involvement of this gene in this condition and underlining the major role of ADAMTS proteases in zonular fibers homeostasis.

  18. Kuskokwim syndrome, a recessive congenital contracture disorder, extends the phenotype of FKBP10 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Aileen M.; Duncan, Geraldine; Weis, MaryAnn; Paton, William; Cabral, Wayne A.; Mertz, Edward L.; Makareeva, Elena; Gambello, Michael J.; Lacbawan, Felicitas L.; Leikin, Sergey; Fertala, Andrzej; Eyre, David R.; Bale, Sherri J.; Marini, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Recessive mutations in FKBP10 at 17q21.2, encoding FKBP65, cause both osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Bruck syndrome (OI plus congenital contractures). Contractures are a variable manifestation of null/missense FKBP10 mutations. Kuskokwim syndrome (KS) is an autosomal recessive congenital contracture disorder found among Yup’ik Eskimos. Linkage mapping of KS to chromosome 17q21, together with contractures as a feature of FKBP10 mutations, made FKBP10 a candidate gene. We identified a homozygous 3-nucleotide deletion in FKBP10 (c.877_879delTAC) in multiple Kuskokwim pedigrees; 3% of regional controls are carriers. The mutation deletes the highly conserved p.Tyr293 residue in FKBP65’s 3rd PPIase domain. FKBP10 transcripts are normal, but mutant FKBP65 is destabilized to a residual 5%. Collagen synthesized by KS fibroblasts has substantially decreased hydroxylation of the telopeptide lysine crucial for collagen cross-linking, with 2–10% hydroxylation in probands vs 60% in controls. Matrix deposited by KS fibroblasts has marked reduction in maturely cross-linked collagen. KS collagen is disorganized in matrix, and fibrils formed in vitro had subtle loosening of monomer packing. Our results imply that FKBP10 mutations affect collagen indirectly, by ablating FKBP65 support for collagen telopeptide hydroxylation by LH2, thus decreasing collagen crosslinks in tendon and bone matrix. FKBP10 mutations may also underlie other arthrogryposis syndromes. PMID:23712425

  19. A novel frameshift mutation of DDHD1 in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Kosaka, Kengo; Yamada, Kohei; Hattori, Gohsuke; Motomura, Manabu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 28 is an autosomal recessive SPG caused by mutations in the DDHD1 gene. We examined a Japanese 54-years-old male patient with autosomal recessive SPG. His parents were consanguineous. He needed a wheelchair for transfer due to spastic paraplegia. There was a history of operations for bilateral hallux valgus, thoracic ossification of the yellow ligament, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ankle contracture, and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. He noticed gait disturbance at age 14. He used a cane for walking in his 40s. On neurological examination, he showed hyperreflexia, spasticity, and weakness in the lower extremities and bilateral Babinski reflexes. Urinary dysfunctions and impaired vibration sense in the lower limbs were observed. By exome sequencing analysis using Agilent SureSelect and Illumina MiSeq, we identified 17,248 homozygous nucleotide variants in the patient. Through the examination of 48 candidate genes known to be responsible for autosomal recessive SPG, we identified a novel homozygous 4-bp deletion, c.914_917delGTAA, p.Ser305Ilefs*2 in exon2 of the DDHD1 gene encoding phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PLA1). The mutation is expected to cause a frameshift generating a premature stop codon 3-bp downstream from the deletion. In consequence, the DDHD domain that is known to be critical for PLA1 activity is completely depleted in the mutated DDHD1 protein, predicted to be a functionally null mutation of the DDHD1 gene. By Sanger sequencing, we confirmed that both parents are heterozygous for the mutation. This variation was not detected in 474 Japanese control subjects as well as the data of the 1,000G Project. We conclude that the novel mutation in DDHD1 is the causative variant for the SPG28 patient that is the first record of the disease in Japanese population.

  20. A novel Thr56Met mutation of the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia gene associated with hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Morisaki, Hiroko; Ohta, Naotaka; Yamanaka, Itaru; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Makino, Hisashi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Okayama, Akira; Tomoike, Hitonobu; Okamura, Tomonori; Tomonori, Okamura; Saito, Yoshihiko; Yoshimasa, Yasunao; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2010-02-26

    The autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) gene is located on chromosome 1p35 and encodes a 308-amino acid protein containing a phosphotyrosine-binding domain. Several researchers have identified mutations of ARH that cause autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia; however, it remains unknown whether this gene is involved in common hypercholesterolemia. We searched for polymorphisms of the ARH gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. We identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms of the gene, including 9 novel polymorphisms, and determined 2 haplotype blocks. No association was observed between common hypercholesterolemia and any polymorphisms or haplotypes of the ARH gene; however, we newly identified a rare Thr56Met missense mutation located in the phosphotyrosine-binding domain, which is the functional domain responsible for cholesterol metabolism. Among 1,800 Japanese individuals enrolled in the Suita study, only 4 were heterozygous for Thr56Met and all had hypercholesterolemia. The total cholesterol level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of diabetic patients with the Thr56Met missense mutation was 276.3+/-13.8 mg/dL and 185.3+/-7.37 mg/dL, respectively. Because the Thr56Met missense mutation occurs in an orthologously conserved functional domain and all subjects with the mutation had hypercholesterolemia resembling familiar hypercholesterolemia, it may be a cause of familial hypercholesterolemia.

  1. 'Immobile' (im), a recessive lethal mutation of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Droin, A; Beauchemin, M L

    1975-10-01

    'Immobile' (im) is a recessive lethal mutation discovered in the F3 of a Xenopus (Xenopus laevis laevis) originating from a mesodermal nucleus of a neurula transplanted into an enucleated egg. The im embryos do not contract after mechanical stimulation nor do they present any spontaneous contraction from the neurula stage onwards. Development proceeds normally during the first days after which deformation of the lower jaw and tail are observed. The im tadpoles die when normal controls are at the feeding stage. Nevous and muscular tissues are histologically normal in the mutant tadpoles; at advanced stages, however, an irregularity in the path of the myofibrils is observed which is especially conspicuous in the electron microscope. Cholinesterases and ATPase are present in the mutant muscles. Parabiosis and chimerae experiments have shown that parabionts and grafts behave according to their own genotype. Cultures of presumptive axial systems with or without ectoderm lead to the conclusion that, first of all, the abnormality is situated in the mesodermal cells and secondly that the first muscular contractions in normal Xenopus laevis are of myogenic origin. The banding pattern of the myofibrils is normal as was shown by obtaining contractions of glycerol extracted in myoblasts with ATP. It seems therefore that in this mutation, the abnormality is situated in the membraneous system of the muscular cell, sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or tubular system as is probably the case in the mdg mutation of the mouse.

  2. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5.

    PubMed

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-09-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation.

  3. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-01-01

    Background/aims Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. Methods All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Conclusion Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation. PMID:16929062

  4. Recessive and Dominant Mutations in Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta in Cases with Microphthalmia and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Myriam; Chitayat, David; Caron, Véronique; Chassaing, Nicolas; Bitoun, Pierre; Patry, Lysanne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Francannet, Christine; Calvas, Patrick; Ragge, Nicola; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Tremblay, André; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2013-01-01

    Anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac defects are the main features of PDAC syndrome. Recessive mutations in STRA6, encoding a membrane receptor for the retinol-binding protein, have been identified in some cases with PDAC syndrome, although many cases have remained unexplained. Using whole-exome sequencing, we found that two PDAC-syndrome-affected siblings, but not their unaffected sibling, were compound heterozygous for nonsense (c.355C>T [p.Arg119∗]) and frameshift (c.1201_1202insCT [p.Ile403Serfs∗15]) mutations in retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB). Transfection studies showed that p.Arg119∗ and p.Ile403Serfs∗15 altered RARB had no transcriptional activity in response to ligands, confirming that the mutations induced a loss of function. We then sequenced RARB in 15 subjects with anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and at least one other feature of PDAC syndrome. Surprisingly, three unrelated subjects with microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia showed de novo missense mutations affecting the same codon; two of the subjects had the c.1159C>T (Arg387Cys) mutation, whereas the other one carried the c.1159C>A (p.Arg387Ser) mutation. We found that compared to the wild-type receptor, p.Arg387Ser and p.Arg387Cys altered RARB induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in transcriptional activity in response to retinoic acid ligands, suggesting a gain-of-function mechanism. Our study thus suggests that both recessive and dominant mutations in RARB cause anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia, providing further evidence of the crucial role of the retinoic acid pathway during eye development and organogenesis. PMID:24075189

  5. Homozygosity mapping in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families detects novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Marzouka, Nour al Dain; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gaël; Sénéchal, Audrey; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease resulting in progressive loss of photoreceptors that leads to blindness. To date, 36 genes are known to cause arRP, rendering the molecular diagnosis a challenge. The aim of this study was to use homozygosity mapping to identify the causative mutation in a series of inbred families with arRP. Methods arRP patients underwent standard ophthalmic examination, Goldman perimetry, fundus examination, retinal OCT, autofluorescence measurement, and full-field electroretinogram. Fifteen consanguineous families with arRP excluded for USH2A and EYS were genotyped on 250 K SNP arrays. Homozygous regions were listed, and known genes within these regions were PCR sequenced. Familial segregation and mutation analyzes were performed. Results We found ten mutations, seven of which were novel mutations in eight known genes, including RP1, IMPG2, NR2E3, PDE6A, PDE6B, RLBP1, CNGB1, and C2ORF71, in ten out of 15 families. The patients carrying RP1, C2ORF71, and IMPG2 mutations presented with severe RP, while those with PDE6A, PDE6B, and CNGB1 mutations were less severely affected. The five families without mutations in known genes could be a source of identification of novel genes. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping combined with systematic screening of known genes results in a positive molecular diagnosis in 66.7% of families. PMID:24339724

  6. Complete association between a retroviral insertion in the tyrosinase gene and the recessive white mutation in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Ming; Coville, Jean-Luc; Coquerelle, Gérard; Gourichon, David; Oulmouden, Ahmad; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    Background In chickens, three mutant alleles have been reported at the C locus, including the albino mutation, and the recessive white mutation, which is characterized by white plumage and pigmented eyes. The albino mutation was found to be a 6 bp deletion in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. The present work describes an approach to identify the structural rearrangement in the TYR gene associated with the recessive white mutation. Results Molecular analysis of the chicken TYR gene has revealed a major structural difference (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, RFLP) in the genomic DNA of the recessive white chicken. A major size difference of 7.7 kb was found in intron 4 of the TYR gene by long-range PCR. Molecular cloning and sequencing results showed the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence of the Avian Leukosis Virus (ALV) family. Several aberrant transcripts of the tyrosinase gene were found in 10 week old recessive white chickens but not in the homozygous wild type colored chicken. We established a rapid genotyping diagnostic test based on the discovery of this retroviral insertion. It shows that all homozygous carriers of this insertion had a white plumage in various chicken strains. Furthermore, it was possible to distinguish heterozygous carriers from homozygous normal chickens in a segregating line. Conclusion In this study, we conclude that the insertion of a complete avian retroviral sequence in intron 4 of the tyrosinase gene is diagnostic of the recessive white mutation in chickens. This insertion causes aberrant transcripts lacking exon 5, and we propose that this insertion is the causal mutation for the recessive white allele in the chicken. PMID:16457736

  7. Novel STXBP2 mutation causing familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakhi; Puliyel, Mammen; Moses, Prabhakar D; Sieni, Elena

    2012-06-01

    Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Diagnosis is established in presence of genetic mutation or positive family history in one of the siblings. Common genetic mutations associated with FHL are mutations in gene PRF1 (also known as FHL 2), UNC13D (FHL 3) and STX11 (FHL 4). Recently mutation in STXBP2 encoding syntaxin binding protein 2 (Munc 18 -2) has been found to be associated with FHL type 5. Here we describe the first reported Indian patient with homozygous mutation in STX BP2 gene (c1697 G > A resulting in amino acid change p.G566D) causing FHL 5.

  8. Proof-of-principle rapid noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, David A; Altarescu, Gheona; Weinberg-Shukron, Ariella; Zahdeh, Fouad; Dinur, Tama; Chicco, Gaya; Herskovitz, Yair; Renbaum, Paul; Elstein, Deborah; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Rolfs, Arndt; Zimran, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing can be used to accurately detect chromosomal aneuploidies in circulating fetal DNA; however, the necessity of parental haplotype construction is a primary drawback to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of monogenic disease. Family-specific haplotype assembly is essential for accurate diagnosis of minuscule amounts of circulating cell-free fetal DNA; however, current haplotyping techniques are too time-consuming and laborious to be carried out within the limited time constraints of prenatal testing, hampering practical application of NIPD in the clinic. Here, we have addressed this pitfall and devised a universal strategy for rapid NIPD of a prevalent mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population. Pregnant AJ couples, carrying mutation(s) in GBA, which encodes acid β-glucosidase, were recruited at the SZMC Gaucher Clinic. Targeted next-generation sequencing of GBA-flanking SNPs was performed on peripheral blood samples from each couple, relevant mutation carrier family members, and unrelated individuals who are homozygotes for an AJ founder mutation. Allele-specific haplotypes were constructed based on linkage, and a consensus Gaucher disease-associated founder mutation-flanking haplotype was fine mapped. Together, these haplotypes were used for NIPD. All test results were validated by conventional prenatal or postnatal diagnostic methods. Ten parental alleles in eight unrelated fetuses were diagnosed successfully based on the noninvasive method developed in this study. The consensus mutation-flanking haplotype aided diagnosis for 6 of 9 founder mutation alleles. The founder NIPD method developed and described here is rapid, economical, and readily adaptable for prenatal testing of prevalent autosomal recessive disease-causing mutations in an assortment of worldwide populations. SZMC, Protalix Biotherapeutics Inc., and Centogene AG.

  9. Molecular analysis of the genes causing recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makiko; Abe, Akiko; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Yamao, Satoshi; Arai, Hidee; Hattori, Hideji; Iai, Mizue; Watanabe, Kyoko; Oka, Nobuyuki; Chida, Keiji; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common hereditary neuropathy, has been classified into two types, demyelinating and axonal types. We previously analyzed the genes causing dominant demyelinating CMT in 227 Japanese patients to identify the genetic background, but could not find any mutations in 110 patients. To investigate the frequency of patients with autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT (CMT4) mutations, we analyzed the coding sequence of known causative genes of CMT4 in 103 demyelinating CMT patients, excluding seven patients owing to lack of specimens. We found one patient with a GDAP1 mutation, one patient with an MTMR2 mutation, two patients with SH3TC2/KIAA1985 mutations and three patients with FGD4 mutations. Twelve patients, including five previously detected patients with PRX mutations, were diagnosed as CMT4, accounting for 5.5% of demyelinating CMT. In the patient with GDAP1 mutation, only one mutation inherited from his mother was detected by genomic sequencing. Analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using messenger RNA (mRNA) from the patient's leukocytes revealed the absence of transcription from the allele inherited from his father, suggesting the existence of one more mutation leading to a lack or destabilization of mRNA. Most patients carrying CMT4 gene mutations present with early-onset and slowly progressive symptoms, which may be associated with the function of mutants. We could not identify the disease-causing gene in 96 patients (about 45%). Further studies including studies with next-generation sequencers will be required to identify the causative gene in Japanese CMT.

  10. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO7A gene associated with autosomal recessive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yalin; Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Fengguo; Han, Yuechen; Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in MYO7A gene have been reported to be associated with Usher Syndrome type 1B (USH1B) and nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB2, DFNA11). Most mutations in MYO7A gene caused USH1B, whereas only a few reported mutations led to DFNB2 and DFNA11. The current study was designed to investigate the mutations among a Chinese family with autosomal recessive hearing loss. In this study, we present the clinical, genetic and molecular characteristics of a Chinese family. Targeted capture of 127 known deafness genes and next-generation sequencing were employed to study the genetic causes of two siblings in the Chinese family. Sanger sequencing was employed to examine those variant mutations in the members of this family and other ethnicity-matched controls. We identified the novel compound heterozygous mutant alleles of MYO7A gene: a novel missense mutation c.3671C>A (p.A1224D) and a reported insert mutation c.390_391insC (p.P131PfsX9). Variants were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. These two compound heterozygous variants were co-segregated with autosomal recessive hearing loss phenotype. The gene mutation analysis and protein sequence alignment further supported that the novel compound heterozygous mutations were pathogenic. The novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.3671C>A and c.390_391insC) in MYO7A gene identified in this study were responsible for the autosomal recessive sensorineural hearing loss of this Chinese family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recessive mutations of TMC1 associated with moderate to severe hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Maqsood, Azra; Rehman, Atteeq U; Morell, Robert J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Thomas B; Naz, Sadaf

    2016-04-01

    TMC1 encodes a protein required for the normal function of mechanically activated channels that enable sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells. TMC1 protein is localized at the tips of the hair cell stereocilia, the site of conventional mechanotransduction. In many populations, loss-of-function recessive mutations of TMC1 are associated with profound deafness across all frequencies tested. In six families reported here, variable moderate-to-severe or moderate-to-profound hearing loss co-segregated with STR (short tandem repeats) markers at the TMC1 locus DFNB7/11. Massively parallel and Sanger sequencing of genomic DNA revealed each family co-segregating hearing loss with a homozygous TMC1 mutation: two reported mutations (p.R34X and p.R389Q) and three novel mutations (p.S596R, p.N199I, and c.1404 + 1G > T). TMC1 cDNA sequence from affected subjects homozygous for the donor splice site transversion c.1404 + 1G > T revealed skipping of exon 16, deleting 60 amino acids from the TMC1 protein. Since the mutations in our study cause less than profound hearing loss, we speculate that there is hypo-functional TMC1 mechanotransduction channel activity and that other even less damaging variants of TMC1 may be associated with more common mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss.

  12. Compound heterozygosity for dominant and recessive GJB2 mutations in a Tunisian family and association with successful cochlear implant outcome.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Zied; Zainine, Rim; Mellouli, Yosra; Hannachi, Raja; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Laroussi, Nadia; Beltaief, Najeh; Kefi, Rym; Romdhane, Lilia; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdelhak, Sonia; Besbes, Ghazi

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of GJB2 encoding connexin 26 are the most common cause of hearing loss. They are responsible for up to 50% of ARNSHL. The pathogenic mutations in this gene are generally inherited recessively. Dominant mutations in GJB2 also cause hearing loss, either in isolated non-syndromic form or as part of a syndrome associated with various skin disorders. We screened a Tunisian child affected by congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural hearing loss for mutations in GJB2 gene using PCR and direct sequencing. The proband was found to be compound heterozygous for recessive and dominant GJB2 mutations respectively p.V37I (c.109G > A) and p.R143Q (c.428G > A). Surprisingly the hearing mother is a carrier for this dominant GJB2 mutation. This proband underwent a cochlear implant at four years old. The evaluation using APCEI and IT-MAIS tests at six months post implantation indicates a successful cochlear implant outcome since the deaf child began to acquire language abilities and auditory sensation. The p.R143Q mutation was described for the first time in Tunisia. We confirm the low penetrance of this mutation since the proband mother is a carrier despite her normal hearing. We show the effectiveness of cochlear implant to restore the communication abilities and auditory sensation for our patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropathology of the recessive A673V APP mutation: Alzheimer disease with distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Giaccone, Giorgio; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Botta, Mario; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Uggetti, Andrea; Catania, Marcella; Moro, Maria Luisa; Redaelli, Veronica; Spagnoli, Alberto; Rossi, Roberta Simona; Salmona, Mario; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2010-12-01

    Mutations of three different genes, encoding β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, the APP mutation A673V has been identified that stands out from all the genetic defects previously reported in these three genes, since it causes the disease only in the homozygous state (Di Fede et al. in Science 323:1473-1477, 2009). We here provide the detailed neuropathological picture of the proband of this family, who was homozygous for the APP A673V mutation and recently came to death. The brain has been studied by histological and immunohistochemical techniques, at the optical and ultrastructural levels. Cerebral Aβ accumulation and tau pathology were severe and extensive. Peculiar features were the configuration of the Aβ deposits that were of large size, mostly perivascular and exhibited a close correspondence between the pattern elicited by amyloid stainings and the labeling obtained with immunoreagents specific for Aβ40 or Aβ42. Moreover, Aβ deposition spared the neostriatum while deeply affecting the cerebellum, and therefore was not in compliance with the hierarchical topographical sequence of involvement documented in sporadic AD. Therefore, the neuropathological picture of familial AD caused by the APP recessive mutation A673V presents distinctive characteristics compared to sporadic AD or familial AD inherited as a dominant trait. Main peculiar features are the morphology, structural properties and composition of the Aβ deposits as well as their topographic distribution in the brain.

  14. Autosomal Recessive Dilated Cardiomyopathy due to DOLK Mutations Results from Abnormal Dystroglycan O-Mannosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morava, Eva; Riemersma, Moniek; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H. M.; Absmanner, Birgit; Verrijp, Kiek; van den Akker, Willem M. R.; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Jozwiak, Adam; Zucker, Nili; Lorber, Avraham; Lammens, Martin; Knopf, Carlos; van Bokhoven, Hans; Grünewald, Stephanie; Lehle, Ludwig; Kapusta, Livia; Mandel, Hanna; Wevers, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5–13 years) with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations. PMID:22242004

  15. A novel splice-site mutation in the ASPM gene underlies autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Jamil A; Al-Harbi, Khalid M; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Albalawi, Alia M; Mehmood, Amir; Samman, Mohammed I; Basit, Sulman

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Patients with MCPH exhibit reduced occipito-frontal head circumference and non-progressive intellectual disability. To date, 17 genes have been known as an underlying cause of MCPH in humans. ASPM (abnormal spindle-like, microcephaly associated) is the most commonly mutated MCPH gene. Identify the genetic defect underlying MCPH in a Saudi family. A cross-sectional clinical genetic study of a Saudi family. Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital and Centre for Genetics and Inherited Diseases, Taibah University. A molecular analysis was carried out on DNA samples from 10 individuals of a Saudi family segregating MCPH. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 10 individuals, including 2 patients, and whole exome sequencing was performed using the Nextera Rapid Capture kit and NextSeq500 instrument. VariantStudio was used to filter and prioritize variants. Detection of mutation in the ASPM gene in a family segregating autoso- mal recessive primary microcephaly. A novel homozygous splice-site variant (c.3742-1G > C) in the ASPM gene was identified. The variant is predicted to have an effect on splicing. Human Splice Finder, an in silico tool, predicted skipping of exon 16 due to this variant. Skipping of exon 16 may change the order and number of IQ motifs in the ASPM protein leading to typical MCPH phenotype. Single family study.

  16. Mutation in LIM2 Is Responsible for Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Muhammad; Kaul, Haiba; Kabir, Firoz; Rauf, Bushra; Fatima, Fareeha; Nadeem, Raheela; Khan, Arif O.; Al Obaisi, Saif; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Nasir, Idrees A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Eghrari, Allen O.; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecular basis of non-syndromic autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a consanguineous family. Methods All family members participating in the study received a comprehensive ophthalmic examination to determine their ocular phenotype and contributed a blood sample, from which genomic DNA was extracted. Available medical records and interviews with the family were used to compile the medical history of the family. The symptomatic history of the individuals exhibiting cataracts was confirmed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. A genome-wide linkage analysis was performed to localize the disease interval. The candidate gene, LIM2 (lens intrinsic membrane protein 2), was sequenced bi-directionally to identify the disease-causing mutation. The physical changes caused by the mutation were analyzed in silico through homology modeling, mutation and bioinformatic algorithms, and evolutionary conservation databases. The physiological importance of LIM2 to ocular development was assessed in vivo by real-time expression analysis of Lim2 in a mouse model. Results Ophthalmic examination confirmed the diagnosis of nuclear cataracts in the affected members of the family; the inheritance pattern and cataract development in early infancy indicated arCC. Genome-wide linkage analysis localized the critical interval to chromosome 19q with a two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 3.25. Bidirectional sequencing identified a novel missense mutation, c.233G>A (p.G78D) in LIM2. This mutation segregated with the disease phenotype and was absent in 192 ethnically matched control chromosomes. In silico analysis predicted lower hydropathicity and hydrophobicity but higher polarity of the mutant LIM2-encoded protein (MP19) compared to the wild-type. Moreover, these analyses predicted that the mutation would disrupt the secondary structure of a transmembrane domain of MP19. The expression of Lim2, which was detected in the mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15

  17. Autosomal recessive PGM3 mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S.; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A.; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F.; Kranick, Sarah M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Holland, Steven M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Hughes, Jason D.; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Su, Helen C.; Milner, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. Objective To define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, elevated serum IgE, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Methods Eight patients from two families who had similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain MRI and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T cell cytokine production were measured. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar and sugar phosphate analyses along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of glycans were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Results Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased TH2 and TH17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8+ T cells, and reduced memory B cells. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurological abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced UDP-GlcNAc, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients’ cells. These results define a new Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation. Conclusions Autosomal recessive, hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability and hypomyelination. PMID:24589341

  18. Proof-of-principle rapid noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive founder mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, David A.; Altarescu, Gheona; Weinberg-Shukron, Ariella; Zahdeh, Fouad; Dinur, Tama; Chicco, Gaya; Herskovitz, Yair; Renbaum, Paul; Elstein, Deborah; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Rolfs, Arndt; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Noninvasive prenatal testing can be used to accurately detect chromosomal aneuploidies in circulating fetal DNA; however, the necessity of parental haplotype construction is a primary drawback to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of monogenic disease. Family-specific haplotype assembly is essential for accurate diagnosis of minuscule amounts of circulating cell-free fetal DNA; however, current haplotyping techniques are too time-consuming and laborious to be carried out within the limited time constraints of prenatal testing, hampering practical application of NIPD in the clinic. Here, we have addressed this pitfall and devised a universal strategy for rapid NIPD of a prevalent mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population. METHODS. Pregnant AJ couples, carrying mutation(s) in GBA, which encodes acid β-glucosidase, were recruited at the SZMC Gaucher Clinic. Targeted next-generation sequencing of GBA-flanking SNPs was performed on peripheral blood samples from each couple, relevant mutation carrier family members, and unrelated individuals who are homozygotes for an AJ founder mutation. Allele-specific haplotypes were constructed based on linkage, and a consensus Gaucher disease–associated founder mutation–flanking haplotype was fine mapped. Together, these haplotypes were used for NIPD. All test results were validated by conventional prenatal or postnatal diagnostic methods. RESULTS. Ten parental alleles in eight unrelated fetuses were diagnosed successfully based on the noninvasive method developed in this study. The consensus mutation–flanking haplotype aided diagnosis for 6 of 9 founder mutation alleles. CONCLUSIONS. The founder NIPD method developed and described here is rapid, economical, and readily adaptable for prenatal testing of prevalent autosomal recessive disease-causing mutations in an assortment of worldwide populations. FUNDING. SZMC, Protalix Biotherapeutics Inc., and Centogene AG. PMID:26426075

  19. Whole exome sequencing identified novel CRB1 mutations in Chinese and Indian populations with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin; Yang, Yeming; Huang, Lulin; Zhai, Yaru; Li, Jie; Jiang, Zhilin; Gong, Bo; Fang, Hao; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun; Zhou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a leading cause of inherited blindness characterized by progressive degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells. This study aims to identify genetic mutations in a Chinese family RP-2236, an Indian family RP-IC-90 and 100 sporadic Indian individuals with autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Whole exome sequencing was performed on the index patients of RP-2236, RP-IC-90 and all of the 100 sporadic Indian patients. Direct Sanger sequencing was used to validate the mutations identified. Four novel mutations and one reported mutation in the crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene, which has been known to cause severe retinal dystrophies, were identified. A novel homozygous splicing mutation c.2129-1G>C was found in the three patients In family RP-2236. A homozygous point mutation p.R664C was found in RP-IC-90. A novel homozygous mutation p.G1310C was identified in patient I-44, while novel compound heterozygous mutations p.N629D and p.A593T were found in patient I-7. All mutations described above were not present in the 1000 normal controls. In conclusion, we identified four novel mutations in CRB1 in a cohort of RP patients from the Chinese and Indian populations. Our data enlarges the CRB1 mutation spectrums and may provide new target loci for RP diagnose and treatment. PMID:27670293

  20. Mutational characterization of the P3H1/CRTAP/CypB complex in recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Barbirato, C; Trancozo, M; Almeida, M G; Almeida, L S; Santos, T O; Duarte, J C G; Rebouças, M R G O; Sipolatti, V; Nunes, V R R; Paula, F

    2015-12-03

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease characterized by bone deformities and fractures. Most cases are caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the type I collagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2; however, an increasing number of recessive mutations in other genes have been reported. The LEPRE1, CRTAP, and PPIB genes encode proteins that form the P3H1/CRTAP/CypB complex, which is responsible for posttranslational modifications of type I collagen. In general, mutations in these genes lead to severe and lethal phenotypes of recessive OI. Here, we describe sixteen genetic variations detected in LEPRE1, CRTAP, and PPIB from 25 Brazilian patients with OI. Samples were screened for mutations on single-strand conformation polymorphism gels and variants were determined by automated sequencing. Seven variants were detected in patients but were absent in control samples. LEPRE1 contained the highest number of variants, including the previously described West African allele (c.1080+1G>T) found in one patient with severe OI as well as a previously undescribed p.Trp675Leu change that is predicted to be disease causing. In CRTAP, one patient carried the c.558A>G homozygous mutation, predicted as disease causing through alteration of a splice site. Genetic variations detected in the PPIB gene are probably not pathogenic due to their localization or because of their synonymous effect. This study enhances our knowledge about the mutational pattern of the LEPRE1, CRTAP, and PPIB genes. In addition, the results strengthen the proposition that LEPRE1 should be the first gene analyzed in mutation detection studies in patients with recessive OI.

  1. Prostaglandin transporter mutations cause pachydermoperiostosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Laissue, Paul; Rivera, Carolina; Restrepo, Carlos Martín; Fonseca, Dora J; Morgan, Joanne E; Allanore, Yannick; Fontenay, Michaela; Wipff, Julien; Varret, Mathilde; Gibault, Laure; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Korbonits, Márta; Zhou, Bowen; Yuan, Gang; Harifi, Ghita; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Akoglu, Hadim; Zwijnenburg, Petra J; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Accadia, Maria; Brancati, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M; Johnson, Colin A; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2012-08-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis, or primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO), is an inherited multisystem disorder, whose features closely mimic the reactive osteoarthropathy that commonly accompanies neoplastic and inflammatory pathologies. We previously described deficiency of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) as a cause of this condition, implicating elevated circulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) as causative of PHO, and perhaps also as the principal mediator of secondary HO. However, PHO is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we use whole-exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations of the prostaglandin transporter SLCO2A1, in individuals lacking HPGD mutations. We performed exome sequencing of four probands with severe PHO, followed by conventional mutation analysis of SLCO2A1 in nine others. Biallelic SLCO2A1 mutations were identified in 12 of the 13 families. Affected individuals had elevated urinary PGE(2), but unlike HPGD-deficient patients, also excreted considerable quantities of the PGE(2) metabolite, PGE-M. Clinical differences between the two groups were also identified, notably that SLCO2A1-deficient individuals have a high frequency of severe anemia due to myelofibrosis. These findings reinforce the key role of systemic or local prostaglandin excess as the stimulus to HO. They also suggest that the induction or maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by prostaglandin may depend upon transporter activity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Recessive Mutations in SPTBN2 Implicate β-III Spectrin in Both Cognitive and Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwasniewska, Alexandra; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Suminaite, Daumante; Hope, Jilly; Baker, Ian; Gregory, Lorna; Green, Angie; Allan, Chris; Lamble, Sarah; Jayawant, Sandeep; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cader, M. Zameel; Hughes, Sarah; Armstrong, Richard J. E.; Kanapin, Alexander; Rimmer, Andrew; Lunter, Gerton; Mathieson, Iain; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Buck, David; Taylor, Jenny C.; Bentley, David; McVean, Gilean; Donnelly, Peter; Knight, Samantha J. L.; Jackson, Mandy; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Németh, Andrea H.

    2012-01-01

    β-III spectrin is present in the brain and is known to be important in the function of the cerebellum. Heterozygous mutations in SPTBN2, the gene encoding β-III spectrin, cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5 (SCA5), an adult-onset, slowly progressive, autosomal-dominant pure cerebellar ataxia. SCA5 is sometimes known as “Lincoln ataxia,” because the largest known family is descended from relatives of the United States President Abraham Lincoln. Using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a homozygous stop codon in SPTBN2 in a consanguineous family in which childhood developmental ataxia co-segregates with cognitive impairment. The cognitive impairment could result from mutations in a second gene, but further analysis using whole-genome sequencing combined with SNP array analysis did not reveal any evidence of other mutations. We also examined a mouse knockout of β-III spectrin in which ataxia and progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells has been previously reported and found morphological abnormalities in neurons from prefrontal cortex and deficits in object recognition tasks, consistent with the human cognitive phenotype. These data provide the first evidence that β-III spectrin plays an important role in cortical brain development and cognition, in addition to its function in the cerebellum; and we conclude that cognitive impairment is an integral part of this novel recessive ataxic syndrome, Spectrin-associated Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 (SPARCA1). In addition, the identification of SPARCA1 and normal heterozygous carriers of the stop codon in SPTBN2 provides insights into the mechanism of molecular dominance in SCA5 and demonstrates that the cell-specific repertoire of spectrin subunits underlies a novel group of disorders, the neuronal spectrinopathies, which includes SCA5, SPARCA1, and a form of West syndrome. PMID:23236289

  3. Novel AE1 mutations in recessive distal renal tubular acidosis. Loss-of-function is rescued by glycophorin A.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, V S; Sumboonnanonda, A; Ideguchi, H; Shayakul, C; Brugnara, C; Takao, M; Veerakul, G; Alper, S L

    1998-12-15

    The AE1 gene encodes band 3 Cl-/HCO3- exchangers that are expressed both in the erythrocyte and in the acid-secreting, type A intercalated cells of the kidney. Kidney AE1 contributes to urinary acidification by providing the major exit route for HCO3- across the basolateral membrane. Several AE1 mutations cosegregate with dominantly transmitted nonsyndromic renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). However, the modest degree of in vitro hypofunction exhibited by these dRTA-associated mutations fails to explain the disease phenotype in light of the normal urinary acidification associated with the complete loss-of-function exhibited by AE1 mutations linked to dominant spherocytosis. We report here novel AE1 mutations linked to a recessive syndrome of dRTA and hemolytic anemia in which red cell anion transport is normal. Both affected individuals were triply homozygous for two benign mutations M31T and K56E and for the loss-of-function mutation, G701D. AE1 G701D loss-of-function was accompanied by impaired trafficking to the Xenopus oocyte surface. Coexpression with AE1 G701D of the erythroid AE1 chaperonin, glycophorin A, rescued both AE1-mediated Cl- transport and AE1 surface expression in oocytes. The genetic and functional data both suggest that the homozygous AE1 G701D mutation causes recessively transmitted dRTA in this kindred with apparently normal erythroid anion transport.

  4. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome due to a loss of function mutation in the COL9A3 gene.

    PubMed

    Faletra, Flavio; D'Adamo, Adamo P; Bruno, Irene; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Biskup, Saskia; Esposito, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (STL) is a clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by ophthalmic, articular, orofacial, and auditory manifestations. STL has been described with both autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance. The dominant form is caused by mutations of COL2A1 (STL 1, OMIM 108300), COL11A1 (STL 2, OMIM 604841), and COL11A2 (STL 3, OMIM 184840) genes, while recessive forms have been associated with mutations of COL9A1 (OMIM 120210) and COL9A2 (OMIM 120260) genes. Type IX collagen is a heterotrimeric molecule formed by three genetically distinct chains: α1, α2, and α3 encoded by the COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3 genes. Up to this time, only heterozygous mutations of COL9A3 gene have been reported in human and related to: (1) multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 3, (2) susceptibility to an intervertebral disc disease, and (3) hearing loss. Here, we describe the first autosomal recessive Stickler family due to loss of function mutations (c.1176_1198del, p.Gln393Cysfs*25) of COL9A3 gene. These findings extend further the role of collagen genes family in the disease pathogenesis.

  5. Novel mutations in the genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Rahim; Ansar, Muhammad; Durrani, Zaka Ullah; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Mahboob; Zia, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Suliman; Smith, Josh D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Leal, Suzanne M; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-05-01

    Ichthyoses are clinically characterized by scaling or hyperkeratosis of the skin or both. It can be an isolated condition limited to the skin or appear secondarily with involvement of other cutaneous or systemic abnormalities. The present study investigated clinical and molecular characterization of three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). Linkage in three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of ARCI was searched by typing microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism marker analysis. Sequencing of the two genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 was performed by the dideoxy chain termination method. Genome-wide linkage analysis established linkage in family A to TGM1 gene on chromosome 14q11 and in families B and C to ALOXE3 gene on chromosome 17p13. Subsequently, sequencing of these genes using samples from affected family members led to the identification of three novel mutations: a missense variant p.Trp455Arg in TGM1 (family A); a nonsense variant p.Arg140* in ALOXE3 (family B); and a complex rearrangement in ALOXE3 (family C). The present study further extends the spectrum of mutations in the two genes involved in causing ARCI. Characterizing the clinical spectrum resulting from mutations in the TGM1 and ALOXE3 genes will improve diagnosis and may direct clinical care of the family members. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Novel mutations in the genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Rahim; Ansar, Muhammad; Durrani, Zaka Ullah; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Mahboob; Zia, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Suliman; Smith, Josh D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Background Ichthyoses are clinically characterized by scaling or hyperkeratosis of the skin or both. It can be an isolated condition limited to the skin or appear secondarily with involvement of other cutaneous or systemic abnormalities. Methods The present study investigated clinical and molecular characterization of three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). Linkage in three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of ARCI was searched by typing microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism marker analysis. Sequencing of the two genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 was performed by the dideoxy chain termination method. Results Genome-wide linkage analysis established linkage in family A to TGM1 gene on chromosome 14q11 and in families B and C to ALOXE3 gene on chromosome 17p13. Subsequently, sequencing of these genes using samples from affected family members led to the identification of three novel mutations: a missense variant p.Trp455Arg in TGM1 (family A); a nonsense variant p.Arg140* in ALOXE3 (family B); and a complex rearrangement in ALOXE3 (family C). Conclusion The present study further extends the spectrum of mutations in the two genes involved in causing ARCI. Characterizing the clinical spectrum resulting from mutations in the TGM1 and ALOXE3 genes will improve diagnosis and may direct clinical care of the family members. PMID:26578203

  7. Recessive mutations in the gene encoding the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, M E; Sandberg, M A; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1993-06-01

    We have found four mutations in the human gene encoding the beta-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE beta) that cosegregate with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative disease of photoreceptors. In one family two affected siblings both carry allelic nonsense mutations at codons 298 and 531. Affected individuals have abnormal rod and cone electroretinograms. PDE beta is the second member of the phototransduction cascade besides rhodopsin that is absent or altered as a cause of retinitis pigmentosa, suggesting that other members of this pathway may be defective in other forms of this disease.

  8. ATM gene mutations result in both recessive and dominant expression phenotypes of genes and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Denis A; Cheung, Vivian G

    2008-08-01

    The defining characteristic of recessive disorders is the absence of disease in heterozygous carriers of the mutant alleles. However, it has been recognized that recessive carriers may differ from noncarriers in some phenotypes. Here, we studied ataxia telangiectasia (AT), a classical recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene. We compared the gene and microRNA expression phenotypes of noncarriers, AT carriers who have one copy of the ATM mutations, and AT patients with two copies of ATM mutations. We found that some phenotypes are more similar between noncarriers and AT carriers compared to AT patients, as expected for a recessive disorder. However, for some expression phenotypes, AT carriers are more similar to the patients than to the noncarriers. Analysis of one of these expression phenotypes, TNFSF4 level, allowed us to uncover a regulatory pathway where ATM regulates TNFSF4 expression through MIRN125B (also known as miR-125b or miR125b) [corrected] In AT carriers and AT patients, this pathway is disrupted. As a result, the level of MIRN125B is lower and the level of its target gene, TNFSF4, is higher than in noncarriers. A decreased level of MIRN125B is associated with breast cancer, and an elevated level of TNFSF4 is associated with atherosclerosis. Thus, our findings provide a mechanistic suggestion for the increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease in AT carriers. By integrating molecular and computational analyses of gene and microRNA expression, we show the complex consequences of a human gene mutation.

  9. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) - A Polish family with novel SACS mutations.

    PubMed

    Krygier, Magdalena; Konkel, Agnieszka; Schinwelski, Michał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Sildatke-Bauer, Magdalena; Płoski, Rafał; Sławek, Jarosław

    2017-08-17

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a rare hereditary ataxia, characterized by the triad of early-onset cerebellar ataxia, peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and lower limb spasticity. Although ARSACS is increasingly reported worldwide, we present the first Polish family with a comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological assessment, harboring two novel mutations in the SACS gene. Our results demonstrate the variability in cognitive and behavioral profiles in ARSACS, which is in line with other heredodegenerative ataxias. One should be aware of ARSACS in cases of autosomally recessive inherited ataxias without common mutations. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Autosomal recessive POLR1D mutation with decrease of TCOF1 mRNA is responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Collet, Corinne; Genevieve, David; Vincent, Marie; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Sanchez, Elodie; Bolender, Chantal; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita; Wieczorek, Dagmar; van Maldergem, Lionel; Doray, Bérénice

    2014-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by mutations in genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and synthesis. TCOF1 mutations are observed in ~80% of the patients and are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, two other genes have been reported in <2% of patients--POLR1D in patients with autosomal dominant inheritance, and POLR1C in patients with autosomal recessive inheritance. We performed direct sequencing of TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D in two unrelated consanguineous families. The four affected children shared the same homozygous mutation in POLR1D (c.163C>G, p.Leu55Val). This mutation is localized in a region encoding the dimerization domain of the RNA polymerase. It is supposed that this mutation impairs RNA polymerase, resulting in a lower amount of mature dimeric ribosomes. A functional analysis of the transcripts of TCOF1 by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed in the first family, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the index case, compatible with this hypothesis. This is the first report of POLR1D mutation being responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited Treacher Collins syndrome. These results reinforce the concept of genetic heterogeneity of Treacher Collins syndrome and underline the importance of combining clinical expertise and familial molecular analyses for appropriate genetic counseling.

  11. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  12. An estimate of the average number of recessive lethal mutations carried by humans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-04-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes.

  13. An Estimate of the Average Number of Recessive Lethal Mutations Carried by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes. PMID:25697177

  14. Autosomal recessive causes likely in early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Thomas S; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Cutler, David J

    2012-01-01

    To determine the genetic contribution to non-autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) (onset age ≤60 years) cases and identify the likely mechanism of inheritance in those cases. A liability threshold model of disease was used to estimate heritability of EOAD and late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) using concordance for AD among parent-offspring pairs. The Uniform Data Set, whose participants were collected from 32 US Alzheimer's Disease Centers, maintained by the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Individuals with probable AD and detailed parental history (n = 5370). The concordance among relatives and heritability of EOAD and late-onset AD. For late-onset AD (n = 4302), we found sex-specific parent-offspring concordance that ranged from approximately 10% to 30%, resulting in a heritability of 69.8% (95% confidence interval, 64.6%-75.0%), and equal heritability for both sexes regardless of parental sex. For EOAD (n = 702), we found that the parent-offspring concordance was 10% or less and concordance among siblings was 21.6%. Early-onset AD heritability was 92% to 100% for all likely values of EOAD prevalence. We confirm late-onset AD is a highly polygenic disease. By contrast, the data for EOAD suggest it is an almost entirely genetically based disease, and the patterns of observed concordance for parent-offspring pairs and among siblings lead us to reject the hypotheses that EOAD is a purely dominant, mitochondrial, X-linked, or polygenic disorder. The most likely explanation of the data is that approximately 90% of EOAD cases are due to autosomal recessive causes.

  15. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  16. Recessive C10orf2 mutations in a family with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Woo, Hae-Mi; Hong, Young Bin; Park, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Bo Ram; Park, Jin-Mo; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Chae, Jong-Hee; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Koo, Soo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) are relevant in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA). In this study, we investigated the causative mutation in a Korean family with combined phenotypes of IOSCA, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and myopathy. We investigated recessive mutations in a Korean family with two individuals affected by IOSCA. Causative mutations were investigated using whole exome sequencing. Electrophysiological analyses and muscle and nerve biopsies were performed, along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and lower extremities. Compound heterozygous mutations c.1460C>T and c.1485-1G>A in C10orf2 were identified as causative of IOSCA. Skeletal muscle showed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Both patients showed a period of normal development until 12-15 months, followed by ataxia, athetosis, hearing loss, and intellectual disability. Electrophysiological findings indicated motor and sensory polyneuropathies. Muscle biopsy revealed variations in the size and shape of myofibers with scattered, small, and angulated degenerating myofibers containing abnormal mitochondria; these observations are consistent with myopathy and may be the result of mtDNA deletions. Sural nerve biopsy revealed an axonal neuropathy. High-signal-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles were correlated with clinical severity, and MRI of the lower legs was compatible with the hypothesis of length-dependent axonal degeneration. We identified novel compound heterozygous mutations of the C10orf2 gene as the cause of IOSCA with sensorimotor polyneuropathy and myopathy. Signs of motor neuropathy and myopathy were discovered for the first time in IOSCA patients with C10orf2 mutations. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of IOSCA caused by C10orf2 mutations may be more variable than previously reported.

  17. Gingival recession: its causes and types, and the importance of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jati, Ana Suzy; Furquim, Laurindo Zanco; Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    abstract Gingival recession has direct causes and predisposing factors. Orthodontic treatment is able to prevent recession and even contribute to its treatment, with or without periodontal approach, depending on the type and severity of gingival tissue damage. There is no evidence on the fact that orthodontic treatment alone might induce gingival recession, although it might lead the affected teeth (usually mandibular incisors or maxillary canines) to be involved in situations that act as predisposing factors, allowing direct causes to act and, therefore, trigger recession, especially when the buccal bone plate is very thin or presents with dehiscence. Several aspects regarding the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival recession have been addressed, and so has the importance of the periosteum to the mechanism of gingival recession formation. Clinical as well as experimental trials on the subject would help to clarify this matter, of which understanding is not very deep in the related literature. PMID:27409650

  18. Molecular analysis of DMP1 mutants causing autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Emily G; Davis, Siobhan I; Ward, Leanne M; Summers, Lelia J; Bubbear, Judith S; Keen, Richard; Stamp, Trevor C B; Baker, Laurence R I; Bonewald, Lynda F; White, Kenneth E

    2009-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that the mutations Met1Val (M1V) and the deletion of nucleotides 1484-1490 (1484-1490del) in Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1) cause the novel disorder autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR), which is associated with elevated fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). To further understand the role of DMP1 in ARHR, we undertook molecular genetic and in vitro expression studies. First, we examined a kindred with a severe hypophosphatemic rickets phenotype and recessive inheritance. Analyses of this family demonstrated that the affected members had elevated serum FGF23 and carried a large, biallelic deletion that removed the majority of DMP1. At a minimum, this deletion encompassed 49 kb between DMP1 exon 3 and an intergenic region 5' to the next telomeric gene, integrin-binding sialoprotein (IBSP). We next performed immunofluorescent studies in cells to understand the effects of the known ARHR mutations on DMP1 cellular processing. These analyses showed that the M1V DMP1 mutant was not sorted to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and secretory pathway, but filled the entire cytoplasm. In contrast, the 1484-1490del mutant localized to the TGN and was secreted, similar to wild type DMP1. The 1484-1490del mutation replaces the DMP1 18 C-terminal amino acids with 33 non-native residues. Truncation of wild type DMP1 by these native 18 residues followed by Western blot and confocal microscopic analyses demonstrated a wild type expression pattern when compared with the 1484-1490del mutant, indicating that the last 18 residues are not critical for cellular trafficking, but that the 33 additional residues arising from the 1484-1490del mutation likely compromise DMP1 processing. The relationship between DMP1 and FGF23 is unclear. To test endogenous DMP1 response to serum metabolites that also regulate FGF23, UMR-106 cells were treated with 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D (1x10(-7) M) and showed a 12-fold increase in DMP1 mRNA and protein at 24 h. In summary

  19. The induction of recessive mutations in mouse primordial germ cells with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, T; Murota, T; Horiya, N; Matsuda, H; Hara, T

    1993-12-01

    A specific-locus test was carried out to examine the mutagenic activity of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) on mouse primordial germ cells (PGC). Embryos of C3H/He mice were treated transplacentally with 30 or 50 mg ENU per kg of maternal body weight on day 8.5, 10.5, or 13.5 of gestation (G8.5 day, G10.5 day, or G13.5 day). Male and female mice that had been treated with ENU in embryonic stages were mated with female or male tester PW mice to detect recessive mutations induced in PGC. ENU induced recessive mutations at a relatively high rate in PGC at these developmental stages. The most sensitive stage was G10.5 day. On G8.5 day, the induced mutation rate in males and females was not significantly different. Cluster mutations, which originate from the limited number of PGC and cell killing, were more frequently induced at an earlier developmental stage. The induced mutation rate per unit dose of ENU (1 mg/kg) was higher in G8.5 and G10.5 day PGC than in stem-cell spermatogonia. It can be concluded that mouse PGC are more sensitive than stem-cell spermatogonia to the induction of recessive mutations by ENU.

  20. Genome wide identification of recessive cancer genes by combinatorial mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Volinia, Stefano; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Marchesini, Jlenia; Veronese, Angelo; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Alder, Hansjuerg; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M

    2008-01-01

    We devised a novel procedure to identify human cancer genes acting in a recessive manner. Our strategy was to combine the contributions of the different types of genetic alterations to loss of function: amino-acid substitutions, frame-shifts, gene deletions. We studied over 20,000 genes in 3 Gigabases of coding sequences and 700 array comparative genomic hybridizations. Recessive genes were scored according to nucleotide mismatches under positive selective pressure, frame-shifts and genomic deletions in cancer. Four different tests were combined together yielding a cancer recessive p-value for each studied gene. One hundred and fifty four candidate recessive cancer genes (p-value < 1.5 x 10(-7), FDR = 0.39) were identified. Strikingly, the prototypical cancer recessive genes TP53, PTEN and CDKN2A all ranked in the top 0.5% genes. The functions significantly affected by cancer mutations are exactly overlapping those of known cancer genes, with the critical exception for the absence of tyrosine kinases, as expected for a recessive gene-set.

  1. Autozygosity reveals recessive mutations and novel mechanisms in dominant genes: implications in variant interpretation.

    PubMed

    Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Kurdi, Wesam; Alanazy, Mohammed H; Alkhalidi, Hisham; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Sulaiman, Raashda A; Faqeih, Eissa; Goljan, Ewa; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Shaheen, Ranad; Arold, Stefan T; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe recessive alleles in strictly dominant genes. Identifying recessive mutations in genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported can expand our understanding of the medical relevance of these genes both phenotypically and mechanistically. The Saudi population is enriched for autozygosity, which enhances the homozygous occurrence of alleles, including pathogenic alleles in genes that have been associated only with a dominant inheritance pattern. Exome sequencing of patients from consanguineous families with likely recessive phenotypes was performed. In one family, the genotype of the deceased children was inferred from their parents due to lack of available samples. We describe the identification of 11 recessive variants (5 of which are reported here for the first time) in 11 genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported. The observed phenotypes for these recessive variants were novel (e.g., FBN2-related myopathy and CSF1R-related brain malformation and osteopetrosis), typical (e.g., ACTG2-related visceral myopathy), or an apparently healthy state (e.g., PDE11A), consistent with the corresponding mouse knockout phenotypes. Our results show that, in the era of genomic sequencing and "reverse phenotyping," recessive variants in dominant genes should not be dismissed based on perceived "incompatibility" with the patient's phenotype before careful consideration.Genet Med advance online publication 06 April 2017.

  2. Functional Recovery of AQP2 Recessive Mutations Through Hetero-Oligomerization with Wild-Type Counterpart

    PubMed Central

    El Tarazi, Abdulah; Lussier, Yoann; Da Cal, Sandra; Bissonnette, Pierre; Bichet, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is a homotetrameric water channel responsible for the final water reuptake in the kidney. Mutations in the protein induce nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which challenges the water balance by producing large urinary volumes. Although recessive AQP2 mutations are believed to generate non-functional and monomeric proteins, the literature identifies several mild mutations which suggest the existence of mixed wt/mut tetramers likely to carry function in heterozygotes. Using Xenopus oocytes, we tested this hypothesis and found that mild mutants (V24A, D150E) can associate with wt-AQP2 in mixed heteromers, providing clear functional gain in the process (62 ± 17% and 63 ± 17% increases, respectively), conversely to the strong monomeric R187C mutant which fails to associate with wt-AQP2. In kidney cells, both V24A and D150E display restored targeting while R187C remains in intracellular stores. Using a collection of mutations to expand recovery analyses, we demonstrate that inter-unit contacts are central to this recovery process. These results not only present the ground data for the functional recovery of recessive AQP2 mutants through heteromerization, which prompt to revisit the accepted NDI model, but more importantly describe a general recovery process that could impact on all multimeric systems where recessive mutations are found. PMID:27641679

  3. Recessive mutations in a common pathway block thymocyte apoptosis induced by multiple signals

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor that controls genes necessary to initiate glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte apoptosis. We have performed a genetic analysis of thymocyte cell death by isolating and characterizing a panel of GR+ dexamethasone- resistant mutants of the murine WEHI7.2 thymocyte cell line. These apoptosis-defective (Apt-) mutants were used to identify previously unknown early steps in the apoptotic pathway. The Apt- mutants contain nonglucocorticoid receptor, recessive mutations in genes that represent multiple complementation groups. These mutations block apoptosis induced by dexamethasone, gamma irradiation, and c-AMP treatment before the point where Bcl-2 exerts its protective effect. We propose that different signals share a common apoptotic pathway, and that the induction of apoptosis involves multiple precommitment steps that can be blocked by recessive mutations. PMID:7798323

  4. FAT1 mutations cause a glomerulotubular nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Aggarwal, Pardeep K.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Yakulov, Toma A.; Schueler, Markus; Lovric, Svjetlana; Ashraf, Shazia; Braun, Daniela A.; Halbritter, Jan; Fang, Humphrey; Airik, Rannar; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Cho, Kyeong Jee; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G. T.; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Allen, Nicholas; McNeill, Helen; Büscher, Rainer; Kyrieleis, Henriette; Wallot, Michael; Gaspert, Ariana; Kistler, Thomas; Milford, David V.; Saleem, Moin A.; Keng, Wee Teik; Alexander, Stephen I.; Valentini, Rudolph P.; Licht, Christoph; Teh, Jun C.; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Koziell, Ania; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Soliman, Neveen A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Lifton, Richard P.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Sibinga, Nicholas E. S.; Walz, Gerd; Tufro, Alda; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we show that recessive mutations in FAT1 cause a distinct renal disease entity in four families with a combination of SRNS, tubular ectasia, haematuria and facultative neurological involvement. Loss of FAT1 results in decreased cell adhesion and migration in fibroblasts and podocytes and the decreased migration is partially reversed by a RAC1/CDC42 activator. Podocyte-specific deletion of Fat1 in mice induces abnormal glomerular filtration barrier development, leading to podocyte foot process effacement. Knockdown of Fat1 in renal tubular cells reduces migration, decreases active RAC1 and CDC42, and induces defects in lumen formation. Knockdown of fat1 in zebrafish causes pronephric cysts, which is partially rescued by RAC1/CDC42 activators, confirming a role of the two small GTPases in the pathogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of SRNS and tubulopathy, linking FAT1 and RAC1/CDC42 to podocyte and tubular cell function. PMID:26905694

  5. FAT1 mutations cause a glomerulotubular nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gee, Heon Yung; Sadowski, Carolin E; Aggarwal, Pardeep K; Porath, Jonathan D; Yakulov, Toma A; Schueler, Markus; Lovric, Svjetlana; Ashraf, Shazia; Braun, Daniela A; Halbritter, Jan; Fang, Humphrey; Airik, Rannar; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Cho, Kyeong Jee; Chan, Timothy A; Morris, Luc G T; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Allen, Nicholas; McNeill, Helen; Büscher, Rainer; Kyrieleis, Henriette; Wallot, Michael; Gaspert, Ariana; Kistler, Thomas; Milford, David V; Saleem, Moin A; Keng, Wee Teik; Alexander, Stephen I; Valentini, Rudolph P; Licht, Christoph; Teh, Jun C; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Koziell, Ania; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Soliman, Neveen A; Otto, Edgar A; Lifton, Richard P; Holzman, Lawrence B; Sibinga, Nicholas E S; Walz, Gerd; Tufro, Alda; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-24

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we show that recessive mutations in FAT1 cause a distinct renal disease entity in four families with a combination of SRNS, tubular ectasia, haematuria and facultative neurological involvement. Loss of FAT1 results in decreased cell adhesion and migration in fibroblasts and podocytes and the decreased migration is partially reversed by a RAC1/CDC42 activator. Podocyte-specific deletion of Fat1 in mice induces abnormal glomerular filtration barrier development, leading to podocyte foot process effacement. Knockdown of Fat1 in renal tubular cells reduces migration, decreases active RAC1 and CDC42, and induces defects in lumen formation. Knockdown of fat1 in zebrafish causes pronephric cysts, which is partially rescued by RAC1/CDC42 activators, confirming a role of the two small GTPases in the pathogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of SRNS and tubulopathy, linking FAT1 and RAC1/CDC42 to podocyte and tubular cell function.

  6. Investigation of LRTOMT gene (locus DFNB63) mutations in Iranian patients with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, Seyyed Hossein; Kazeminezhad, Seyyed Reza; Sefidgar, Seyyed Ali Asghar; Yazdanpanahi, Nasrin; Tabatabaeifar, Mohammad Amin; Yousefi, Ahmad; Lesani, Seyyed Mohammad; Abolhasani, Marziyeh; Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is the most frequent sensory defect affecting 1 in 1000 neonates. This can occur due to genetic or environmental causes or both. The genetic causes are very heterogenous and over 100 loci have been identified to cause autosomal recessive non - syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of the LRTOMT gene mutations in causing ARNSHL. One hundred fifty seven pupils affected with ARNSHL from Azarbaijan Sharghi, Kordestan, Gilan and Golestan provinces, north and west of Iran, were ascertained. In this descriptive - laboratory study, the presence of LRTOMT mutations were initially checked using PCR – Single - strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) strategy. Samples with shifted bands on the gel were confirmed by DNA sequencing method. The PCR-SSCP/HA and the subsequent direct DNA sequencing showed no mutation in the population studied. We conclude that LRTOMT mutations have no role in causing sporadic deafness in the studied population. Further studies on other populations and samples could clarify the exact role of LRTOMT mutations. PMID:24551789

  7. Investigation of LRTOMT gene (locus DFNB63) mutations in Iranian patients with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Seyyed Hossein; Kazeminezhad, Seyyed Reza; Sefidgar, Seyyed Ali Asghar; Yazdanpanahi, Nasrin; Tabatabaeifar, Mohammad Amin; Yousefi, Ahmad; Lesani, Seyyed Mohammad; Abolhasani, Marziyeh; Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is the most frequent sensory defect affecting 1 in 1000 neonates. This can occur due to genetic or environmental causes or both. The genetic causes are very heterogenous and over 100 loci have been identified to cause autosomal recessive non - syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of the LRTOMT gene mutations in causing ARNSHL. One hundred fifty seven pupils affected with ARNSHL from Azarbaijan Sharghi, Kordestan, Gilan and Golestan provinces, north and west of Iran, were ascertained. In this descriptive - laboratory study, the presence of LRTOMT mutations were initially checked using PCR - Single - strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) strategy. Samples with shifted bands on the gel were confirmed by DNA sequencing method. The PCR-SSCP/HA and the subsequent direct DNA sequencing showed no mutation in the population studied. We conclude that LRTOMT mutations have no role in causing sporadic deafness in the studied population. Further studies on other populations and samples could clarify the exact role of LRTOMT mutations.

  8. Novel cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis mutation causes familial early dementia in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Chica, Margarita; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Urbano, Lorena; Velilla, Lina; Lopera, Francisco; Pineda, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is an infrequent cause of dementia. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with clinical and molecular heterogeneity. To identify the presence of a possible mutation in a Colombian family with several affected siblings and clinical characteristics compatible with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis associated to early dementia. We studied a series of cases with longitudinal follow-up and genetic analysis. These individuals had xanthomas, mental retardation, psychiatric disorders, behavioral changes, and multiple domains cognitive impairment with dysexecutive dominance that progressed to early dementia. CYP27A1 gene coding region sequencing revealed a novel mutation (c.1183_1184insT). The mutation found in this family is responsible for the described dementia features. Early identification of familial history with mental retardation, xanthomas and cognitive impairment might prevent the progression to this treatable type of dementia. Even though this mutation lies in the most frequently mutated codon of CYP27A1 gene, it has not been reported previously.

  9. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa Due To ABCA4 Mutations: Clinical, Pathologic, and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Radu, Roxana A.; Enriquez, G. Stephanie; East, Jade S.; Schindler, Emily I.; Travis, Gabriel H.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive loss of retinal photoreceptor cells. In order to gain new insights into the pathogenesis of ARRP, we evaluated the morphological, biochemical, and gene expression changes in eyes from a human donor with ARRP due to mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Methods. Eyes were obtained postmortem from a donor with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The coding sequences of the RDS, RHO, and ABCA4 genes were screened for disease-causing mutations. Morphological changes in different regions of the retina were examined histologically, and levels of lipofuscin-associated bisretinoids were measured. Gene expression was examined in retinal/choroidal tissue using microarray analysis, and all parameters were compared to those in unaffected control donors. Results. Genetic analysis of the donor's DNA identified two mutations in the ABCA4 gene, IVS14+1G > C and Phe1440del1 cT, each on a separate allele. Morphological evaluation revealed complete loss of the outer nuclear layer, remodeling of the inner retina, loss of retinal vasculature, and regional neovascularization. The retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris exhibited regional preservation. Microarray analysis revealed loss of photoreceptor cell-associated transcripts, with preservation of multiple genes expressed specifically in inner retinal neurons. Conclusions. The persistence of transcripts expressed by inner retinal neurons suggests that despite significant plasticity that occurs during retinal degeneration, bipolar cells and ganglion cells remain at least partially differentiated. Findings from this study suggest that some forms of therapy currently under investigation may have benefit even in advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:22395892

  10. Clinical and molecular characterization of seven Egyptian families with autosomal recessive robinow syndrome: Identification of four novel ROR2 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Aglan, Mona; Amr, Khalda; Ismail, Samira; Ashour, Adel; Otaify, Ghada A; Mehrez, Mennat Allah I; Aboul-Ezz, Eman H A; El-Ruby, Mona; Mazen, Inas; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Temtamy, Samia A

    2015-12-01

    Robinow syndrome (RS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and craniofacial/orodental abnormalities. The syndrome follows both autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance with similar phenotypic presentation and overlapping features. Autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome (ARRS) is caused by mutations in the ROR2 gene. Here, we present the clinical, radiological and molecular findings of 11 Egyptian patients from 7 unrelated consanguineous families with clinical features of ARRS. Mutation analyses of ROR2 gene identified five pathogenic mutations distributed all over the gene. The identified mutations included four novel (G326A, D166H, S677F, and R528Q) and one previously reported (Y192D). Our results extend the number of ROR2 mutations identified so far, suggest a founder effect in the Egyptian population, and emphasize the important role of genetic testing in proper counseling and patients' management.

  11. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E.

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  12. Mutation Screening of Multiple Genes in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa by Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    González-del Pozo, María; Borrego, Salud; Barragán, Isabel; Pieras, Juan I.; Santoyo, Javier; Matamala, Nerea; Naranjo, Belén; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. RP is the leading cause of visual loss in individuals younger than 60 years, with a prevalence of about 1 in 4000. The molecular genetic diagnosis of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) is challenging due to the large genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Traditional methods for sequencing arRP genes are often laborious and not easily available and a screening technique that enables the rapid detection of the genetic cause would be very helpful in the clinical practice. The goal of this study was to develop and apply microarray-based resequencing technology capable of detecting both known and novel mutations on a single high-throughput platform. Hence, the coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of 16 arRP genes were resequenced using microarrays in 102 Spanish patients with clinical diagnosis of arRP. All the detected variations were confirmed by direct sequencing and potential pathogenicity was assessed by functional predictions and frequency in controls. For validation purposes 4 positive controls for variants consisting of previously identified changes were hybridized on the array. As a result of the screening, we detected 44 variants, of which 15 are very likely pathogenic detected in 14 arRP families (14%). Finally, the design of this array can easily be transformed in an equivalent diagnostic system based on targeted enrichment followed by next generation sequencing. PMID:22164218

  13. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Deconinck, Tine; Craiu, Dana; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudy; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Hirst, Jennifer; Afawi, Zaid; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Depienne, Christel; De Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Dimova, Petia; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jahn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes; Lerche, Holger; Marini, Carla; Muhle, Hiltrud; Rosenow, Felix; Serratosa, Jose M.; Møller, Rikke S.; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; Talvik, Tiina; Von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Zara, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-function variants (p.Gln46Profs*9 and p.Arg97*) was further investigated in a patient's fibroblast cell line. We show that the premature stop mutations in AP4S1 result in a reduction of all AP-4 subunits and loss of AP-4 complex assembly. Recruitment of the AP-4 accessory protein tepsin, to the membrane was also abolished. In retrospect, the clinical phenotype in the family is consistent with previous reports of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. Our study reports the second family with mutations in AP4S1 and describes the first two patients with loss of AP4S1 and seizures. We further discuss seizure phenotypes in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies. PMID:25552650

  14. Omi, a recessive mutation on chromosome 10, is a novel allele of Ostm1.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Erika A; Estabel, Jeanne; Ismail, Ozama; Podrini, Christine; White, Jacqueline K; Steel, Karen P

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis has provided many rodent models for human disease. Here we describe the initial characterization and mapping of a recessive mutation that leads to degeneration of the incisors, failure of molars to erupt, a grey coat colour, and mild osteopetrosis. We mapped the omi mutation to chromosome 10 between D10Mit214 and D10Mit194. The Ostm1 gene is a likely candidate gene in this region and the grey-lethal allele, Ostm1 ( gl ), and omi mutations fail to complement each other. We show that om/om mice have reduced levels of Ostm1 protein. To date we have not been able to identify the causative mutation. We propose that omi is a novel hypomorphic mutation affecting Ostm1 expression, potentially in a regulatory element.

  15. The R402Q tyrosinase variant does not cause autosomal recessive ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Oetting, William S; Pietsch, Jacy; Brott, Marcia J; Savage, Sarah; Fryer, James P; Summers, C Gail; King, Richard A

    2009-03-01

    Mutations in the gene for tyrosinase, the key enzyme in melanin synthesis, are responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 1, and more than 100 mutations of this gene have been identified. The c.1205G > A variant of the tyrosinase gene (rs1126809) predicts p.R402Q and expression studies show thermolabile enzyme activity for the variant protein. The Q402 allele has been associated with autosomal recessive ocular albinism when it is in trans with a tyrosinase gene mutation associated with oculocutaneous albinism type 1. We have identified 12 families with oculocutaneous albinism type 1 that exhibit segregation of the c.1205G > A variant with a known pathologic mutation on the homologous chromosome, and demonstrate no genetic association between autosomal recessive oculocutaneous albinism and the Q402 variant. We conclude that the codon 402 variant of the tyrosinase gene is not associated with albinism.

  16. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive.

  17. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  18. A novel nonsense mutation in rhodopsin gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kartasasmita, Arief; Fujiki, Keiko; Iskandar, Erwin; Sovani, Iwan; Fujimaki, Takuro; Murakami, Akira

    2011-03-01

    To report a novel, identical nonsense mutation in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Mutation screening for the RHO gene was performed in 38 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) by direct sequencing. Clinical features were also characterized, through complete ophthalmologic examination. Family members of RP patients testing positive for the RHO gene were subjected to genetic and clinical examination. To assess the founder effect in the two families, haplotype analysis also was performed. A novel homozygous nonsense mutation was detected in two patients by a G to A transition at nucleotide position 482 in exon 2 of the RHO gene, resulting in substitution of a tryptophan-to-stop at codon 161 (c.482G>A, p.W161X). Examination of family members of these 2 patients showed that the affected members were homozygous and unaffected carriers were heterozygous for the p.W161X mutation. Haplotype analysis revealed that members of the two families carried the same disease-associated variants in markers (IVS1 RHO and D3S2322). No p.W161X mutations were detected in 45 normal Indonesian subjects, nor were any mutations detected in exons 1-5 of the RHO gene in the remaining 36 RP patients. We detected a novel, recessive nonsense mutation (p.W161X) in the RHO gene of two families through mutation screening of RHO in 38 Indonesian RP patients. Haplotype analysis suggested that p.W161X was the founder mutation.

  19. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-04-05

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction.

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments. PMID:28145517

  1. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  2. An analysis of ABCR mutations in British patients with recessive retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, M; Ocaka, L; Bessant, D; Lois, N; Bird, A; Payne, A; Bhattacharya, S

    2000-01-01

    Several reports have shown that mutations in the ABCR gene can lead to Stargardt disease (STGD)/fundus flavimaculatus (FFM), autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), and autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD). To assess the involvement of ABCR in these retinal dystrophies, the gene was screened in a panel of 70 patients of British origin. Fifty-six patients exhibiting the STGD/FFM phenotype, 6 with arRP, and 8 with arCRD, were screened for mutations in the 50 exons of the ABCR gene by heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. Microsatellite marker haplotyping was used to determine ancestry. In the 70 patients analyzed, 31 sequence changes were identified, of which 20 were considered to be novel mutations, in a variety of phenotypes. An identical haplotype was associated with the same pair of in-cis alterations in 5 seemingly unrelated patients and their affected siblings with STGD/FFM. Four of the aforementioned patients were found to carry three alterations in the coding sequence of the ABCR gene, with two of them being in-cis. These results suggest that ABCR is a relatively polymorphic gene. Because putative mutations have been identified thus far only in 25 of 70 patients, of whom only 8 are compound heterozygotes, a large number of mutations have yet to be ascertained. The disease haplotype seen in the 5 patients carrying the same "complex" allele is consistent with the presence of a common ancestor.

  3. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: CERS3 mutations identified by a next generation sequencing panel targeting ichthyosis genes.

    PubMed

    Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Adams, Rebecca; Ghanadan, Alireza; Zeinali, Sirous; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-09-06

    There are at least 38 mutant genes known to be associated with the ichthyosis phenotypes, and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a specific subgroup caused by mutations in 13 different genes. Mutations in some of these genes, such as CERS3 with only two previous reports, are rare. In this study, we identified mutations in candidate genes in consanguineous families with ARCI with a next generation sequencing (NGS) array that incorporates 38 ichthyosis associated genes. We applied this sequencing array to DNA from 140 ichthyosis families with high prevalence of consanguinity. Among these patients we identified six distinct, previously unreported mutations in CERS3 in six Iranian families. These mutations in each family co-segregated with the ichthyosis phenotype. The patients demonstrated collodion membrane at birth, acrogeria, generalized scaling, and hyperlinearity of the palms and soles. The presence of a significant percentage of CERS3 mutations in our cohort depicts a marked difference between the etiology of ichthyoses in genetically poorly characterized regions and well-characterized western populations. Also, it shows that rare alleles are more prevalent in the gene pool of consanguineous populations and emphasizes the importance of these population studies for better understanding of ichthyosis pathogenesis.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 6 September 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.137.

  4. Gene expression and genetic analysis reveal diverse causes of recessive self-compatibility in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wen; Zhang, Jianfeng; Yang, Yong; Ma, Chaozhi; Liu, Zhiquan; Gao, Changbin; Zhou, Guilong; Tu, Jinxing; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong

    2014-11-28

    Brassica napus (AACC) is self-compatible, although its ancestor species Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC) are self-incompatible. Most B.napus accessions have dominant self-compatibility (SC) resulting from an insertion of 3.6 kb in the promoter region of BnSCR-1 on the A genome, while recessive SC in B.napus has rarely been observed. Expression and cloning of SRK and SCR genes and genetic analysis were carried out to dissect bases of recessive SC in B.napus. Eleven accessions were screened to identify stable recessive SC and had the S genotype BnS-7 on the A genome and BnS-6 on the C genome similarly to BrS-29 and BoS-15, respectively. In eight SC accessions, BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 were nearly undetectable and harbored no structural mutations in the promoters, while SRK genes were expressed at normal levels and contained intact CDS, with the exception of BnSRK-7 in line C32. SRK and SCR genes were expressed normally but their CDSs had no mutations in three SC accessions. In self-incompatible S-1300 and 11 F1 hybrids, SRK genes and BnSCR-1300 transcripts were present at high levels, while expression of the BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 were absent. Plants of S genotype S1300S1300 were completely SI, while SI phenotypes of SBnS-7SBnS-7 and S1300SBnS-7 plants were segregated in BC1 and F2 populations. The recessive SC in eight accessions is caused by the loss of function of BnSCR-7 and BnSCR-6 in pollen. Translational repression contributes to the recessive SC in three accessions, whose SRK and SCR genes were expressed normally and had identical CDSs to BrS-29 or BoS-15. SI in 11 F1 hybrids relies on the expression of BnSCR-1300 rather than SRK genes. Other factor(s) independent of the S locus are involved in recessive SC. Therefore, diverse causes underlie recessive SC in B. napus, yielding insight into these complex mechanisms.

  5. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G; Meisler, Miriam H; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasises the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded.

  6. Telomerase reverse-transcriptase homozygous mutations in autosomal recessive dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Anna; Walne, Amanda; Tamary, Hannah; Masunari, Yuka; Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2010-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a multisystem bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a triad of mucocutaneous abnormalities and an increased predisposition to malignancy. X-linked DC is due to mutations in DKC1, while heterozygous mutations in TERC (telomerase RNA component) and TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) have been found in autosomal dominant DC. Many patients with DC remain uncharacterized, particularly families displaying autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance. We have now identified novel homozygous TERT mutations in 2 unrelated consanguineous families, where the index cases presented with classical DC or the more severe variant, Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome. These TERT mutations resulted in reduced telomerase activity and extremely short telomeres. As these mutations are homozygous, these patients are predicted to have significantly reduced telomerase activity in vivo. Interestingly, in contrast to patients with heterozygous TERT mutations or hemizygous DKC1 mutations, these 2 homozygous TERT patients were observed to have higher-than-expected TERC levels compared with controls. Collectively, the findings from this study demonstrate that homozygous TERT mutations, resulting in a pure but severe telomerase deficiency, produce a phenotype of classical AR-DC and its severe variant, the HH syndrome. PMID:17785587

  7. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Autosomal Recessive Carrier Screening Gene Mutation Detection System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-10-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified an autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system classification. The Agency has classified the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  8. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia.

  9. The recession of gastric cancer and its possible causes.

    PubMed

    Seely, S

    1978-01-01

    The paper re-examines the hypothesis that excessively hot drinks constitute an important risk factor in the causation of gastric cancer. The recession of gastric cancer mortality rates in the United States in recent decades is attributed to dietary changes tending to supplant the traditional hot beverages. One such change was the appearance of domestic refrigerators, promoting iced drinks, another the popularisation of soft drinks. The example of Okinawa is quoted where in 1972, after 27 years of American administration, gastric cancer mortality rate was 11.3 per 100,000, in contrast to Japan's 46.7, presumably due to the introduction of American dietary habits. While in most Western European countries gastric cancer risk decreased in the last decades, there was little change in Eastern Europe, and rates were rising in some countries, like Portugal, Mexico and Hong-Kong. This is attributed to the increasing pollution of water, promoting its boiling and flovouring. In some countries water is disinfected by chlorination in which case boiling and flavouring may be used to mask the unpleasant smell and taste of disinfectant.

  10. Cultural transmission of a sign language when deafness is caused by recessive alleles at two independent loci.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Feldman, M W

    1994-02-01

    Two unlinked autosomal loci are assumed to affect the ability to hear in such a way that homozygosity for the recessive allele at either locus causes deafness. The five deaf genotypes are subject to the same negative selection due to a lower likelihood of marriage, but unmarried deaf persons remain socially active and participate in the cultural transmission of sign languages. Marriages are assortative for deafness or for hearing, and mutation occurs irreversibly from the dominant to recessive allele at each locus at the same rate. At mutation-selection balance, the fully polymorphic equilibrium is symmetrical. Based on this genetic model, we consider the relative importance of various forms of cultural transmission as they affect the persistence of sign languages. Horizontal transmission is shown to be effective when deaf children are able to interact with many peers. This observation is especially pertinent if assortative meeting of deaf children occurs, for example, at schools for the deaf. Oblique transmission can also be effective, but the literature suggests that this kind of transmission plays only a minor role. It is necessary, however, that some form of cultural transmission occur between generations. Thus, vertical transmission is a critical factor, despite the fact that parent-child transmission is often interrupted due to the recessive inheritance of deafness. In particular, the contribution of vertical transmission is enhanced by assortative mating for deafness.

  11. Founder mutation in dystonin-e underlying autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Takeichi, T; Nanda, A; Liu, L; Aristodemou, S; McMillan, J R; Sugiura, K; Akiyama, M; Al-Ajmi, H; Simpson, M A; McGrath, J A

    2015-02-01

    Only two homozygous nonsense mutations in the epidermal isoform of the dystonin gene, DST-e, have been reported previously in autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS); the affected pedigrees were Kuwaiti and Iranian. This subtype of EBS is therefore considered to be a rare clinicopathological entity. In this study, we identified four seemingly unrelated Kuwaiti families in which a total of seven individuals had predominantly acral trauma-induced blistering since infancy. All affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation p.Gln1124* in DST-e, the same mutation that was identified in the originally reported family from Kuwait. Haplotype analysis in the five pedigrees (including the previous case) revealed a shared block of ~60 kb of genomic DNA across the site of the mutation, consistent with a founder effect. Most heterozygotes had no clinical abnormalities although one subject had mild transient skin fragility during childhood, an observation noted in the previously reported Iranian pedigree, suggesting that the condition may also be semidominant in some pedigrees rather than purely autosomal recessive. Our study reveals propagation of a mutant ancestral allele in DST-e throughout Kuwait, indicating that this subtype of EBS may be more common in Kuwait, and perhaps other Middle Eastern countries, than is currently appreciated.

  12. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia of adult onset due to STUB1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Simonis, Nicolas; Rai, Myriam; van Heurck, Roxane; Abramowicz, Marc; D'Hooghe, Marc; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Autosomal recessive ataxias affect about 1 person in 20,000. Friedreich ataxia accounts for one-third of the cases in Caucasians; the others are due to a growing list of very rare molecular defects, including mild forms of metabolic diseases. In nearly 50%, the genetic cause remains undetermined.

  13. Dominant GDAP1 mutations cause predominantly mild CMT phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimoń, M; Baets, J; Fabrizi, G M; Jaakkola, E; Kabzińska, D; Pilch, J; Schindler, A B; Cornblath, D R; Fischbeck, K H; Auer-Grumbach, M; Guelly, C; Huber, N; De Vriendt, E; Timmerman, V; Suter, U; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I; Niemann, A; Kochański, A; De Jonghe, P; Jordanova, A

    2011-08-09

    Ganglioside-induced differentiation associated-protein 1 (GDAP1) mutations are commonly associated with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (ARCMT) neuropathy; however, in rare instances, they also lead to autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (ADCMT). We aimed to investigate the frequency of disease-causing heterozygous GDAP1 mutations in ADCMT and their associated phenotype. We performed mutation analysis in a large cohort of ADCMT patients by means of bidirectional sequencing of coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of GDAP1. Intragenic GDAP1 deletions were excluded using an allele quantification assay. We confirmed the pathogenic character of one sequence variant by in vitro experiments assaying mitochondrial morphology and function. In 8 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) families we identified 4 pathogenic heterozygous GDAP1 mutations, 3 of which are novel. Three of the mutations displayed reduced disease penetrance. Disease onset in the affected individuals was variable, ranging from early childhood to adulthood. Disease progression was slow in most patients and overall severity milder than typically seen in autosomal recessive GDAP1 mutations. Electrophysiologic changes are heterogeneous but compatible with axonal neuropathy in the majority of patients. With this study, we broaden the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of autosomal dominant GDAP1-associated neuropathies. We show that patients with dominant GDAP1 mutations may display clear axonal CMT, but may also have only minimal clinical and electrophysiologic abnormalities. We demonstrate that cell-based functional assays can be reliably used to test the pathogenicity of unknown variants. We discuss the implications of phenotypic variability and the reduced penetrance of autosomal dominant GDAP1 mutations for CMT diagnostic testing and counseling.

  14. Mitochondrial Hsp60 Chaperonopathy Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Neurodegenerative Disorder Linked to Brain Hypomyelination and Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Daniella; Georgopoulos, Costa; Bross, Peter; Ang, Debbie; Segev, Yardena; Goldsher, Dorit; Nemirovski, Alexandra; Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Luder, Anthony; Heno, Bayan; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Skorecki, Karl; Mandel, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) are disorders involving aberrant myelin formation. The prototype of primary HMLs is the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by mutations in PLP1. Recently, homozygous mutations in GJA12 encoding connexin 47 were found in patients with autosomal-recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD). However, many patients of both genders with PMLD carry neither PLP1 nor GJA12 mutations. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD, in which linkage to PLP1 and GJA12 was excluded. Using homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation (D29G) not previously described in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in all affected individuals. The D29G mutation completely segregates with the disease-associated phenotype. The pathogenic effect of D29G on Hsp60-chaperonin activity was verified by an in vivo E. coli complementation assay, which demonstrated compromised ability of the D29G-Hsp60 mutant protein to support E. coli survival, especially at high temperatures. The disorder, which we have termed MitCHAP-60 disease, can be distinguished from spastic paraplegia 13 (SPG13), another Hsp60-associated autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, by its autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern, as well as by its early-onset, profound cerebral involvement and lethality. Our findings suggest that Hsp60 defects can cause neurodegenerative pathologies of varying severity, not previously suspected on the basis of the SPG13 phenotype. These findings should help to clarify the important role of Hsp60 in myelinogenesis and neurodegeneration. PMID:18571143

  15. Mutations in IMPG1 cause vitelliform macular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P M; Hollyfield, Joe G; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P

    2013-09-05

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507(∗)). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD.

  16. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  17. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-01-01

    To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs.

  18. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif O.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Methods: Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Results: Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. Conclusions: In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs. PMID:26622071

  19. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in CNGA1in a Chinese family affected with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa by targeted sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Gan, Dekang; Huang, Xin; Xu, Gezhi

    2016-07-08

    About 37 genes have been reported to be involved in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary retinal disease. However, causative genes remain unclear in a lot of cases. Two sibs of a Chinese family with ocular disease were diagnosed in Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University. Targeted sequencing performed on proband to screen pathogenic mutations. PCR combined Sanger sequencing then performed on eight family members including two affected and six unaffected individuals to determine whether mutations cosegregate with disease. Two affected members exhibited clinical features that fit the criteria of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Two heterozygous mutations (NM000087, p.Y82X and p.L89fs) in CNGA1 were revealed on proband. Affected members were compound heterozygotes for the two mutations whereas unaffected members either had no mutation or were heterozygote carriers for only one of the two mutations. That is, these mutations cosegregate with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Compound heterozygous mutations (NM000087, p.Y82X and p.L89fs) in exon 6 of CNGA1are pathogenic mutations in this Chinese family. Of which, p.Y82X is firstly reported in patient with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

  20. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  1. Mutation of SYNE-1, encoding an essential component of the nuclear lamina, is responsible for autosomal recessive arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Attali, Ruben; Warwar, Nasim; Israel, Ariel; Gurt, Irina; McNally, Elizabeth; Puckelwartz, Megan; Glick, Benjamin; Nevo, Yoram; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Melki, Judith

    2009-09-15

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a group of disorders characterized by congenital joint contractures caused by reduced fetal movements. AMC has an incidence of 1 in 3000 newborns and is genetically heterogeneous. We describe an autosomal recessive form of myogenic AMC in a large consanguineous family. The disease is characterized by bilateral clubfoot, decreased fetal movements, delay in motor milestones, then progressive motor decline after the first decade. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed a single locus on chromosome 6q25 with Z(max) = 3.55 at theta = 0.0 and homozygosity of the polymorphic markers at this locus in patients. Homozygous A to G nucleotide substitution of the conserved AG splice acceptor site at the junction of intron 136 and exon 137 of the SYNE-1 gene was found in patients. This mutation results in an aberrant retention of intron 136 of SYNE-1 RNA leading to premature stop codons and the lack of the C-terminal transmembrane domain KASH of nesprin-1, the SYNE-1 gene product. Mice lacking the KASH domain of nesprin-1 display a myopathic phenotype similar to that observed in patients. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that the splice site mutation of SYNE-1 gene found in the family is responsible for AMC. Recent reports have shown that mutations of the SYNE-1 gene might be responsible for autosomal recessive adult onset cerebellar ataxia. These data indicate that mutations of nesprin-1 which interacts with lamin A/C may lead to at least two distinct human disease phenotypes, myopathic or neurological, a feature similar to that found in laminopathies.

  2. Autosomal recessive phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) mutations link glycosylation defects to atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xiaomin; Ichikawa, Mie; Lyons, Jonathan J; Datta, Shrimati; Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Kim, Emily S; Biancalana, Matthew; Wolfe, Lynne A; DiMaggio, Thomas; Matthews, Helen F; Kranick, Sarah M; Stone, Kelly D; Holland, Steven M; Reich, Daniel S; Hughes, Jason D; Mehmet, Huseyin; McElwee, Joshua; Freeman, Alexandra F; Freeze, Hudson H; Su, Helen C; Milner, Joshua D

    2014-05-01

    Identifying genetic syndromes that lead to significant atopic disease can open new pathways for investigation and intervention in allergy. We sought to define a genetic syndrome of severe atopy, increased serum IgE levels, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, and motor and neurocognitive impairment. Eight patients from 2 families with similar syndromic features were studied. Thorough clinical evaluations, including brain magnetic resonance imaging and sensory evoked potentials, were performed. Peripheral lymphocyte flow cytometry, antibody responses, and T-cell cytokine production were measured. Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations. Immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR, enzymatic assays, nucleotide sugar, and sugar phosphate analyses, along with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of glycans, were used to determine the molecular consequences of the mutations. Marked atopy and autoimmunity were associated with increased T(H)2 and T(H)17 cytokine production by CD4(+) T cells. Bacterial and viral infection susceptibility were noted along with T-cell lymphopenia, particularly of CD8(+) T cells, and reduced memory B-cell numbers. Apparent brain hypomyelination resulted in markedly delayed evoked potentials and likely contributed to neurologic abnormalities. Disease segregated with novel autosomal recessive mutations in a single gene, phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3). Although PGM3 protein expression was variably diminished, impaired function was demonstrated by decreased enzyme activity and reduced uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, along with decreased O- and N-linked protein glycosylation in patients' cells. These results define a new congenital disorder of glycosylation. Autosomal recessive hypomorphic PGM3 mutations underlie a disorder of severe atopy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity, intellectual disability, and hypomyelination. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  3. Mutations in TNK2 in severe autosomal recessive infantile onset epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Yuki; Heinzen, Erin L; Donatello, Simona; Dahl, Hans-Henrik; Damiano, John A; McMahon, Jacinta M; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Legros, Benjamin; Rai, Myriam; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Pandolfo, Massimo; Goldstein, David B; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Depondt, Chantal

    2013-09-01

    We identified a small family with autosomal recessive, infantile onset epilepsy and intellectual disability. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant in the gene TNK2, encoding a brain-expressed tyrosine kinase. Sequencing of the coding region of TNK2 in 110 patients with a similar phenotype failed to detect further homozygote or compound heterozygote mutations. Pathogenicity of the variant is supported by the results of our functional studies, which demonstrated that the variant abolishes NEDD4 binding to TNK2, preventing its degradation after epidermal growth factor stimulation. Definitive proof of pathogenicity will require confirmation in unrelated patients.

  4. Mutations in TNK2 in severe autosomal recessive infantile-onset epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hitomi, Yuki; Heinzen, Erin L.; Donatello, Simona; Dahl, Hans-Henrik; Damiano, John A.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Legros, Benjamin; Rai, Myriam; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Suls, Arvid; De Jonghe, Peter; Pandolfo, Massimo; Goldstein, David B.; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Depondt, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    We identified a small family with autosomal recessive, infantile-onset epilepsy and intellectual disability. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant in the gene TNK2, encoding a brain-expressed tyrosine kinase. Sequencing of the coding region of TNK2 in 110 patients with a similar phenotype failed to detect further homozygote or compound heterozygote mutations. Pathogenicity of the variant is supported by the results of our functional studies, which demonstrated that the variant abolishes NEDD4 binding to TNK2, preventing its degradation after epidermal growth factor stimulation. Definitive proof of pathogenicity will require confirmation in unrelated patients. PMID:23686771

  5. Novel Deletion of SERPINF1 Causes Autosomal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Two Brazilian Families

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer Minillo, Renata; Sobreira, Nara; de Fatima de Faria Soares, Maria; Jurgens, Julie; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Valle, David; Brunoni, Decio; Alvarez Perez, Ana B.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) accounts for 10% of all OI cases, and, currently, mutations in 10 genes (CRTAP, LEPRE1, PPIB, SERPINH1, FKBP10, SERPINF1, SP7, BMP1, TMEM38B, and WNT1) are known to be responsible for this form of the disease. PEDF is a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily that maintains bone homeostasis and regulates osteoid mineralization, and it is encoded by SERPINF1, currently associated with OI type VI (MIM 172860). Here, we report a consanguineous Brazilian family in which multiple individuals from at least 4 generations are affected with a severe form of OI, and we also report an unrelated individual from the same small city in Brazil with a similar but more severe phenotype. In both families the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion was identified which is not known in the literature yet. We described intra- and interfamilial clinical and radiological phenotypic variability of OI type VI caused by the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion and suggest a founder effect. Furthermore, the SERPINF1 genotypes/phenotypes reported so far in the literature are reviewed. PMID:25565926

  6. Severe Gingival Recession Caused by Traumatic Occlusion and Mucogingival Stress: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Kemal; Sari, Zafer; Orucoglu, Hasan; Duran, Ismet; Hakki, Sema S.

    2008-01-01

    Gingival recession is displacement of the soft tissue margin apically leading to root surface exposure. Tooth malpositions, high muscle attachment, frenal pull have been associated with gingival tissue recession. Occlusal trauma is defined as injury resulting in tissue changes within the attachment apparatus as a result of occlusal forces. Trauma from occlusion may cause a shift in tooth position and the direction of the movement depends on the occlusal force. We present the clinical and radiological findings and the limitation of periodontal treatment of a severe gingival recession in a case with traumatic occlusion. A 16 years old male, systemically healthy and non-smoking patient presented to our clinic with severe gingival recession of mandibular canines and incisors. Clinical evaluation revealed extensive gingival recession on the vestibules of mandibular anterior segment. Patient has an Angle class III malocclusion and deep bite. To maintain the teeth until orthodontic therapy and maxillofacial surgery, mucogingival surgeries were performed to obtain attached gingiva to provide oral hygiene and reduce inflammation. After mucogingival surgeries, limited attached gingiva was gained in this case. Regular periodontal maintenance therapy was performed at 2 month intervals to preserve mandibular anterior teeth. Multidisciplinary approach should be performed in this kind of case for satisfactory results. Unless occlusal relationship was corrected, treatment of severe gingival recession will be problematic. For satisfactory periodontal treatment, early diagnosis of trauma from occlusion and its treatment is very important. PMID:19212523

  7. Severe gingival recession caused by traumatic occlusion and mucogingival stress: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Kemal; Sari, Zafer; Orucoglu, Hasan; Duran, Ismet; Hakki, Sema S

    2008-04-01

    Gingival recession is displacement of the soft tissue margin apically leading to root surface exposure. Tooth malpositions, high muscle attachment, frenal pull have been associated with gingival tissue recession. Occlusal trauma is defined as injury resulting in tissue changes within the attachment apparatus as a result of occlusal forces. Trauma from occlusion may cause a shift in tooth position and the direction of the movement depends on the occlusal force. We present the clinical and radiological findings and the limitation of periodontal treatment of a severe gingival recession in a case with traumatic occlusion. A 16 years old male, systemically healthy and non-smoking patient presented to our clinic with severe gingival recession of mandibular canines and incisors. Clinical evaluation revealed extensive gingival recession on the vestibules of mandibular anterior segment. Patient has an Angle class III malocclusion and deep bite. To maintain the teeth until orthodontic therapy and maxillofacial surgery, mucogingival surgeries were performed to obtain attached gingiva to provide oral hygiene and reduce inflammation. After mucogingival surgeries, limited attached gingiva was gained in this case. Regular periodontal maintenance therapy was performed at 2 month intervals to preserve mandibular anterior teeth. Multidisciplinary approach should be performed in this kind of case for satisfactory results. Unless occlusal relationship was corrected, treatment of severe gingival recession will be problematic. For satisfactory periodontal treatment, early diagnosis of trauma from occlusion and its treatment is very important.

  8. The tumour suppressor gene WWOX is mutated in autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Mallaret, Martial; Synofzik, Matthis; Lee, Jaeho; Sagum, Cari A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Drouot, Nathalie; Renaud, Mathilde; Klein, Fabrice A. C.; Anheim, Mathieu; Tranchant, Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Bedford, Mark; Bauer, Peter; Salih, Mustafa A.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We previously localized a new form of recessive ataxia with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 by homozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family. We now report the identification by whole exome sequencing of the missense mutation changing proline 47 into threonine in the first WW domain of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase gene, WWOX, located in the linkage interval. Proline 47 is a highly conserved residue that is part of the WW motif consensus sequence and is part of the hydrophobic core that stabilizes the WW fold. We demonstrate that proline 47 is a key amino acid essential for maintaining the WWOX protein fully functional, with its mutation into a threonine resulting in a loss of peptide interaction for the first WW domain. We also identified another highly conserved homozygous WWOX mutation changing glycine 372 to arginine in a second consanguineous family. The phenotype closely resembled the index family, presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, mental retardation and ataxia, but also included prominent upper motor neuron disease. Moreover, we observed that the short-lived Wwox knock-out mouse display spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, a phenotype previously observed in the spontaneous Wwox mutant rat presenting with ataxia and epilepsy, indicating that homozygous WWOX mutations in different species causes cerebellar ataxia associated with epilepsy. PMID:24369382

  9. Inbreeding depression maintained by recessive lethal mutations interacting with stabilizing selection on quantitative characters in a partially self-fertilizing population.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2017-03-21

    The bimodal distribution of fitness effects of new mutations and standing genetic variation, due to early-acting strongly deleterious recessive mutations and late-acting mildly deleterious mutations, is analyzed using the Kondrashov model for lethals (K), with either the infinitesimal model for selfing (IMS) or the Gaussian allele model (GAM) for quantitative genetic variance under stabilizing selection. In the combined models (KIMS and KGAM) high genomic mutation rates to lethals and weak stabilizing selection on many characters create strong interactions between early and late inbreeding depression, by changing the distribution of lineages selfed consecutively for different numbers of generations. Alternative stable equilibria can exist at intermediate selfing rates for a given set of parameters. Evolution of quantitative genetic variance under multivariate stabilizing selection can strongly influence the purging of nearly recessive lethals, and sometimes vice versa. If the selfing rate at the purging threshold for quantitative genetic variance in IMS or GAM alone exceeds that for nearly recessive lethals in K alone, then in KIMS and KGAM stabilizing selection causes selective interference with purging of lethals, increasing the mean number of lethals compared to K; otherwise, stabilizing selection causes selective facilitation in purging of lethals, decreasing the mean number of lethals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. [Obesity caused by melanocortin-4 receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Linda; Glorie-Docter, Miriam; van den Akker, Erica; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is usually the result of a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. In monogenic obesity, overweight is caused by a single gene mutation. The most frequent form of monogenic obesity is caused by mutations in the gene that codes for the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R gene). Approximately 2% of Dutch children with obesity have a mutation in the MC4R gene. Children with homozygous and 'compound' heterozygous MC4R mutations have a phenotype distinguished by extreme overweight at an early age and hyperphagia. Children with heterozygous MC4R mutations have a more subtle phenotype and are difficult to distinguish clinically from obese children without this mutation. MC4R mutations can be identified by DNA diagnostics.- Drug treatment is not yet available for this condition.

  11. Mutations in the PDE6B gene in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Danciger, M.; Blaney, J.; Gao, Y.Q.; Zhao, D.Y.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied 24 small families with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance of retinitis pigmentosa by a combination of haplotype analysis and exon screening. Initial analysis of the families was made with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism adjacent to the gene for rod cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6B). This was followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism electrophoresis (SSCPE) of the 22 exons and a portion of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the PDE6B gene in the probands of each family in which the PDE6B locus could not be ruled out from segregating with disease. Two probands were found with compound heterozygous mutations: Gly576Asp and His620(1-bp del) mutations were present in one proband, and a Lys706X null mutation and an AG to AT splice acceptor site mutation in intron 2 were present in the other. Only the affecteds of each of the two families carried both corresponding mutations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Riess, O.; Weber, B.; Hayden, M.R. ); Noerremoelle, A. ); Musarella, M.A. )

    1992-10-01

    The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons including 196 bp of the 5[prime] region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected individuals of seven different ancestries. However, a frequent intronic and two exonic polymorphisms (Leu[sup 489][yields]Gln and Gly[sup 842][yields]Gly) were identified. Segregation analysis using these polymorphic sites excludes linkage of ARRP to the PDEB gene in a family with two affected children. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related.

  14. Mutations in SERPINF1 cause osteogenesis imperfecta type VI.

    PubMed

    Homan, Erica P; Rauch, Frank; Grafe, Ingo; Lietman, Caressa; Doll, Jennifer A; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry; Napierala, Dobrawa; Morello, Roy; Gibbs, Richard; White, Lisa; Miki, Rika; Cohn, Daniel H; Crawford, Susan; Travers, Rose; Glorieux, Francis H; Lee, Brendan

    2011-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders characterized by bone fragility. It is caused by dominant mutations affecting the synthesis and/or structure of type I procollagen or by recessively inherited mutations in genes responsible for the posttranslational processing/trafficking of type I procollagen. Recessive OI type VI is unique among OI types in that it is characterized by an increased amount of unmineralized osteoid, thereby suggesting a distinct disease mechanism. In a large consanguineous family with OI type VI, we performed homozygosity mapping and next-generation sequencing of the candidate gene region to isolate and identify the causative gene. We describe loss of function mutations in serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade F, member 1 (SERPINF1) in two affected members of this family and in an additional unrelated patient with OI type VI. SERPINF1 encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor. Hence, loss of pigment epithelium-derived factor function constitutes a novel mechanism for OI and shows its involvement in bone mineralization.

  15. PLA2G6 mutations and other rare causes of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Alisdair

    2012-08-01

    There is a wide variety of genetic and sporadic causes for neurodegenerative disorders with apparent brain iron accumulation on magnetic resonance imaging. Rare recessive causes include PLA2G6 mutations (infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy), and mutations of ATP13A2 (Kufor Rakeb syndrome) and FA2H. A variety of sporadic neurological disorders can present brain iron accumulation on imaging, including multiple sclerosis and neurological manifestations of HIV infection. The relevant clinical and imaging features will be discussed.

  16. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  17. Mutations in WNT1 Cause Different Forms of Bone Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Katharina; Beleggia, Filippo; Kayserili, Hülya; Barnes, Aileen M.; Steiner, Magdalena; Semler, Oliver; Fischer, Björn; Yigit, Gökhan; Janda, Claudia Y.; Becker, Jutta; Breer, Stefan; Altunoglu, Umut; Grünhagen, Johannes; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Jochen; Schinke, Thorsten; Makareeva, Elena; Lausch, Ekkehart; Cankaya, Tufan; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Lapunzina, Pablo; Temtamy, Samia; Aglan, Mona; Zabel, Bernhard; Eysel, Peer; Koerber, Friederike; Leikin, Sergey; Garcia, K. Christopher; Netzer, Christian; Schönau, Eckhard; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.; Mundlos, Stefan; Amling, Michael; Kornak, Uwe; Marini, Joan; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We report that hypofunctional alleles of WNT1 cause autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, a congenital disorder characterized by reduced bone mass and recurrent fractures. In consanguineous families, we identified five homozygous mutations in WNT1: one frameshift mutation, two missense mutations, one splice-site mutation, and one nonsense mutation. In addition, in a family affected by dominantly inherited early-onset osteoporosis, a heterozygous WNT1 missense mutation was identified in affected individuals. Initial functional analysis revealed that altered WNT1 proteins fail to activate canonical LRP5-mediated WNT-regulated β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, osteoblasts cultured in vitro showed enhanced Wnt1 expression with advancing differentiation, indicating a role of WNT1 in osteoblast function and bone development. Our finding that homozygous and heterozygous variants in WNT1 predispose to low-bone-mass phenotypes might advance the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for congenital forms of bone fragility, as well as for common forms of age-related osteoporosis. PMID:23499309

  18. Two recessive mutations in FGF5 are associated with the long-hair phenotype in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Romain; Tiret, Laurent; Abitbol, Marie

    2014-09-25

    Seven donkey breeds are recognized by the French studbook. Individuals from the Pyrenean, Provence, Berry Black, Normand, Cotentin and Bourbonnais breeds are characterized by a short coat, while those from the Poitou breed (Baudet du Poitou) are characterized by a long-hair phenotype. We hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in the FGF5 (fibroblast growth factor 5) gene, which are associated with a long-hair phenotype in several mammalian species, may account for the special coat feature of Poitou donkeys. To the best of our knowledge, mutations in FGF5 have never been described in Equidae. We sequenced the FGF5 gene from 35 long-haired Poitou donkeys, as well as from a panel of 67 short-haired donkeys from the six other French breeds and 131 short-haired ponies and horses. We identified a recessive c.433_434delAT frameshift deletion in FGF5, present in Poitou and three other donkey breeds and a recessive nonsense c.245G > A substitution, present in Poitou and four other donkey breeds. The frameshift deletion was associated with the long-hair phenotype in Poitou donkeys when present in two copies (n = 31) or combined with the nonsense mutation (n = 4). The frameshift deletion led to a stop codon at position 159 whereas the nonsense mutation led to a stop codon at position 82 in the FGF5 protein. In silico, the two truncated FGF5 proteins were predicted to lack the critical β strands involved in the interaction between FGF5 and its receptor, a mandatory step to inhibit hair growth. Our results highlight the allelic heterogeneity of the long-hair phenotype in donkeys and enlarge the panel of recessive FGF5 loss-of-function alleles described in mammals. Thanks to the DNA test developed in this study, breeders of non-Poitou breeds will have the opportunity to identify long-hair carriers in their breeding stocks.

  19. Recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital nemaline myopathy with ophthalomoplegia identified through massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eri; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Inaba, Yuji; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ishida, Takefumi; Baba, Atsushi; Koike, Kenichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Furukawa, Toru; Saito, Kayoko

    2012-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a group of congenital myopathies, characterized by the presence of distinct rod-like inclusions "nemaline bodies" in the sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle fibers. To date, ACTA1, NEB, TPM3, TPM2, TNNT1, and CFL2 have been found to cause NM. We have identified recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital NM, through high-throughput screening of congenital myopathy/muscular dystrophy-related genes using massively parallel sequencing with target gene capture. The patient manifested fetal akinesia, neonatal severe hypotonia with muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, swallowing disturbance, and ophthalomoplegia. Skeletal muscle histology demonstrated nemaline bodies and small type 1 fibers, but without central cores or minicores. Congenital myopathies, a molecularly, histopathologically, and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders are considered to be a good candidate for massively parallel sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mutation Spectrum of EYS in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Isabel; Borrego, Salud; Pieras, Juan Ignacio; Pozo, María González-del; Santoyo, Javier; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Millan, José M; Mena, Marcela; El-Aziz, Mai M Abd; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina; Littink, Karin W; Dopazo, Joaquín; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. We have recently identified a new gene (EYS) encoding an ortholog of Drosophila spacemaker (spam) as a commonly mutated gene in autosomal recessive RP. In the present study, we report the identification of 73 sequence variations in EYS, of which 28 are novel. Of these, 42.9% (12/28) are very likely pathogenic, 17.9% (5/28) are possibly pathogenic, whereas 39.3% (11/28) are SNPs. In addition, we have detected 3 pathogenic changes previously reported in other populations. We are also presenting the characterisation of EYS homologues in different species, and a detailed analysis of the EYS domains, with the identification of an interesting novel feature: a putative coiled-coil domain. Majority of the mutations in the arRP patients have been found within the domain structures of EYS. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our group of patients is of 15.9% (15/94), confirming a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Spanish population. Along with the detection of three recurrent mutations in Caucasian population, our hypothesis of EYS being the first prevalent gene in arRP has been reinforced in the present study. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21069908

  1. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Methods Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36 or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. Results All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. Conclusion TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. PMID:24933710

  2. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  3. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, Sonia; Nyegaard, Mette; Hassan, Muhammad J.; Jackson, Stephen P.; Børglum, Anders D.

    2011-01-01

    Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5) but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2). Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8) gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder. PMID:21998596

  4. Recessive truncating NALCN mutation in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy with facial dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Köroğlu, Çiğdem; Seven, Mehmet; Tolun, Aslihan

    2013-08-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a recessive disease that results in total neurological degeneration and death in childhood. PLA2G6 mutation is the underlying genetic defect, but rare genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated. One of the five families we studied did not link to PLA2G6 locus, and in the family one of the two affected siblings additionally had atypical features including facial dysmorphism, pectus carinatum, scoliosis, pes varus, zygodactyly and bilateral cryptorchidism as well as cerebellar atrophy, as previously reported. Sural biopsy was investigated by electron microscopy. PLA2G6 was screened for mutations by Sanger sequencing. In the mutation-free family, candidate disease loci were found via linkage analysis using data from single nucleotide polymorphism genome scans. Exome sequencing was applied to find the variants at the loci. PLA2G6 mutations were identified in four families including the one with an unusually severe phenotype that led to death within the first 2 years of life. In the remaining family, seven candidate loci totalling 15.2 Mb were found and a homozygous truncating mutation p.Q642X was identified in NALCN at 13q32.3. The patients are around 20-years-old. NALCN is the gene responsible for INAD with facial dysmorphism. The patients have lived to adulthood despite severe growth and neuromotor retardation. NALCN forms a voltage-independent ion channel with a role in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Our findings broaden the spectrum of genes associated with neuroaxonal dystrophy. Testing infants with idiopathic severe growth retardation and neurodegeneration for NALCN mutations could benefit families.

  5. Relative high frequency of the c.255delA parkin gene mutation in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, E; Tolosa, E; Pastor, P; Marti, M; Valldeoriola, F; Campdelacreu, J; Oliva, R

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To search for the presence of parkin gene mutations in Spanish patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and characterise the phenotype associated with these mutations. Methods: Thirty seven PD patients with either early onset or autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance were selected for genetic study. Results: Mutations were identified in seven index patients (19%). Homozygous mutations were detected in six patients and a heterozygous mutation in one. The age at onset was lower in patients with mutations than in patients without mutations. Dystonia at onset was present in two patients with parkin gene mutations. The disease began in two patients with postural tremor in the upper limbs mimicking essential tremor. Four patients exhibited a long term response to dopamine agonists. The c.255delA mutation was identified in four unrelated families. This is a frameshift mutation leading to protein truncation. Conclusions: Parkin gene mutations are present in Spanish patients with early onset and/or an autosomal recessive parkinsonism. The c.255delA is the most frequent mutation found, suggesting a relative high prevalence in the Spanish population. PMID:12397156

  6. Respiratory chain complex I deficiency caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Swalwell, Helen; Kirby, Denise M; Blakely, Emma L; Mitchell, Anna; Salemi, Renato; Sugiana, Canny; Compton, Alison G; Tucker, Elena J; Ke, Bi-Xia; Lamont, Phillipa J; Turnbull, Douglass M; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Thorburn, David R

    2011-01-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain are associated with a diverse spectrum of clinical phenotypes, and may be caused by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)). Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzyme defect in mitochondrial disorders, particularly in children in whom family history is often consistent with sporadic or autosomal recessive inheritance, implicating a nuclear genetic cause. In contrast, although a number of recurrent, pathogenic mtDNA mutations have been described, historically, these have been perceived as rare causes of paediatric complex I deficiency. We reviewed the clinical and genetic findings in a large cohort of 109 paediatric patients with isolated complex I deficiency from 101 families. Pathogenic mtDNA mutations were found in 29 of 101 probands (29%), 21 in MTND subunit genes and 8 in mtDNA tRNA genes. Nuclear gene defects were inferred in 38 of 101 (38%) probands based on cell hybrid studies, mtDNA sequencing or mutation analysis (nuclear gene mutations were identified in 22 probands). Leigh or Leigh-like disease was the most common clinical presentation in both mtDNA and nuclear genetic defects. The median age at onset was higher in mtDNA patients (12 months) than in patients with a nuclear gene defect (3 months). However, considerable overlap existed, with onset varying from 0 to >60 months in both groups. Our findings confirm that pathogenic mtDNA mutations are a significant cause of complex I deficiency in children. In the absence of parental consanguinity, we recommend whole mitochondrial genome sequencing as a key approach to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality. PMID:21364701

  7. A novel compound heterozygous TACI mutation in an autosomal recessive common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) family.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, V; Gallizzi, R; Vitali, M; Baronio, M; Salpietro, A; Bergbreiter, A; Salzer, U; Badolato, R; Plebani, A

    2012-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immune disorder characterized by low immunoglobulin serum levels and increased susceptibility to infections. Underlying genetic causes are only known in less than 15% of patients and encompass mutations in the genes encoding for ICOS, TACI, BAFF-R, CD19, CD20, CD81 and MSH5. TACI is the most frequently mutated gene among CVID patients. We report on two pediatric Italian male siblings with hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in association with a novel compound heterozygous TACI mutation. Both patients carry the I87N/C104R mutation that has not been reported yet. This results in aberrant TACI expression and abrogates APRIL binding on EBV B cells. This study identifies a novel combined mutation in TNFRSF13B increasing the spectrum of TACI mutations associated with CVID. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional Basis of Three New Recessive Mutations of Slow Skeletal Muscle Troponin T Found in Non-Amish TNNT1 Nemaline Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, Chinthaka; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, J-P

    2016-08-16

    Troponin T (TnT) is the tropomyosin (Tm)-binding and thin filament-anchoring subunit of troponin and plays a central role in striated muscle contraction. A nonsense mutation in exon 11 of the TNNT1 gene encoding slow skeletal muscle troponin T (ssTnT) truncating the polypeptide chain at Glu(180) causes a lethal recessive nemaline myopathy (NM) in the Amish (ANM). More TNNT1 NM mutations have been reported recently with similar recessive phenotypes. A nonsense mutation in exon 9 causes truncation at Ser(108), and a splicing site mutation causes truncation at Leu(203). Another splicing site mutation causes an internal deletion of the 39 exon 8-encoded amino acids. We engineered and characterized these ssTnT mutants to demonstrate that the Ser(108) truncation exhibits a Tm binding affinity lower than that of the ANM Glu(180) truncation, indicating a partial loss of Tm-binding site 1. Despite the presence of Tm-binding sites 1 and 2, ssTnT truncated at Leu(203) binds Tm with decreased affinity, consistent with its recessive NM phenotype and the requirement of troponin complex formation for high-affinity binding of TnT to Tm. The exon 8-deleted ssTnT has a partial loss of Tm-binding site 1 but retains high-affinity Tm-binding site 2. However, exon 8-deleted ssTnT exhibits a dramatically diminished Tm binding affinity, indicating a long-range conformational effect of this middle region deletion. Predicted from the TnT structure-function relationship, removal of the N-terminal variable region partially rescued this negative impact. These novel findings lay a foundation for understanding the pathogenesis of TNNT1 myopathies and provide insights into the development of targeted treatment.

  9. Homozygous STIL mutation causes holoprosencephaly and microcephaly in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Mouden, Charlotte; de Tayrac, Marie; Dubourg, Christèle; Rose, Sophie; Carré, Wilfrid; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Babron, Marie-Claude; Akloul, Linda; Héron-Longe, Bénédicte; Odent, Sylvie; Dupé, Valérie; Giet, Régis; David, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu) in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis.

  10. Homozygous STIL Mutation Causes Holoprosencephaly and Microcephaly in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Mouden, Charlotte; de Tayrac, Marie; Dubourg, Christèle; Rose, Sophie; Carré, Wilfrid; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Babron, Marie-Claude; Akloul, Linda; Héron-Longe, Bénédicte; Odent, Sylvie; Dupé, Valérie; Giet, Régis; David, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu) in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis. PMID:25658757

  11. Mutations in BTD gene causing biotinidase deficiency: a regional report.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, Çiğdem Seher; Akar, Melek; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Tüzün, Heybet; Aldudak, Bedri; Baran, Rıza Taner; Tanyalçın, Tijen

    2015-03-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of biotin metabolism. Children with biotinidase deficiency cannot cleave biocytin and, therefore, cannot recycle biotin. Untreated individuals become secondarily biotin deficient, which in turn results in decreased activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and the subsequent accumulation of toxic metabolites causing clinical symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency is characterized by neurological, cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. The worldwide incidence of profound biotinidase deficiency has been estimated at 1:112,271. The human biotinidase gene is located on chromosome 3p25 and consists of four exons with a total length of 1629 base pairs. To date, more than 100 mutations in the biotinidase gene known to cause biotinidase deficiency have been reported. The vast majority of mutations are homozygous or compound heterozygous. Finding known mutations can be correlated with the biochemical enzymatic results. This report summarizes the demographic features of patients identified as biotinidase deficient from August of 2012 through August of 2013 and mutation analysis results for 20 cases in the southeast region of Turkey.

  12. ECEL1 mutation causes fetal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dohrn, N; Le, V Q; Petersen, A; Skovbo, P; Pedersen, I S; Ernst, A; Krarup, H; Petersen, M B

    2015-04-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a descriptor for the clinical finding of congenital fixation of multiple joints. We present a consanguineous healthy couple with two pregnancies described with AMC due to characteristic findings on ultrasonography of fixated knee extension and reduced fetal movement at the gestational age of 13 weeks + 2 days and 12 weeks + 4 days. Both pregnancies were terminated and postmortem examinations were performed. The postmortem examinations confirmed AMC and suggested a diagnosis of centronuclear myopathy (CNM) due to characteristic histological findings in muscle biopsies. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on all four individuals and the outcome was filtered by application of multiple filtration parameters satisfying a recessive inheritance pattern. Only one gene, ECEL1, was predicted damaging and had previously been associated with neuromuscular disease or AMC. The variant found ECEL1 is a missense mutation in a highly conserved residue and was predicted pathogenic by prediction software. The finding expands the molecular basis of congenital contractures and the phenotypic spectrum of ECEL1 mutations. The histological pattern suggestive of CNM in the fetuses can expand the spectrum of genes causing CNM, as we propose that mutations in ECEL1 can cause CNM or a condition similar to this. Further investigation of this is needed and we advocate that future patients with similar clinical presentation or proven ECEL1 mutations are examined with muscle biopsy. Secondly, this study illustrates the great potential of the clinical application of WES in couples with recurrent abortions or stillborn neonates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. COL9A2 and COL9A3 mutations in canine autosomal recessive oculoskeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Orly; Guyon, Richard; Kukekova, Anna; Kuznetsova, Tatyana N; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Johnson, Jennifer; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2010-08-01

    Oculoskeletal dysplasia segregates as an autosomal recessive trait in the Labrador retriever and Samoyed canine breeds, in which the causative loci have been termed drd1 and drd2, respectively. Affected dogs exhibit short-limbed dwarfism and severe ocular defects. The disease phenotype resembles human hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathies such as Stickler and Marshall syndromes, although these disorders are usually dominant. Linkage studies mapped drd1 to canine chromosome 24 and drd2 to canine chromosome 15. Positional candidate gene analysis then led to the identification of a 1-base insertional mutation in exon 1 of COL9A3 that cosegregates with drd1 and a 1,267-bp deletion mutation in the 5' end of COL9A2 that cosegregates with drd2. Both mutations affect the COL3 domain of the respective gene. Northern analysis showed that RNA expression of the respective genes was reduced in affected retinas. These models offer potential for studies such as protein-protein interactions between different members of the collagen gene family, regulation and expression of these genes in retina and cartilage, and even opportunities for gene therapy.

  14. Dominant and recessive central core disease associated with RYR1 mutations and fetal akinesia.

    PubMed

    Romero, Norma Beatriz; Monnier, Nicole; Viollet, Louis; Cortey, Anne; Chevallay, Martine; Leroy, Jean Paul; Lunardi, Joël; Fardeau, Michel

    2003-11-01

    We studied seven patients (fetuses/infants) from six unrelated families affected by central core disease (CCD) and presenting with a fetal akinesia syndrome. Two fetuses died before birth (at 31 and 32 weeks) and five infants presented severe symptoms at birth (multiple arthrogryposis, congenital dislocation of the hips, severe hypotonia and hypotrophy, skeletal and feet deformities, kyphoscoliosis, etc.). Histochemical and ultrastructural studies of muscle biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of CCD showing unique large eccentric cores. Molecular genetic investigations led to the identification of mutations in the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene in three families, two with autosomal recessive (AR) and one with autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance. RYR1 gene mutations were located in the C-terminal domain in two families (AR and AD) and in the N-terminal domain of the third one (AR). This is the first report of mutations in the RYR1 gene involved in a severe form of CCD presenting as a fetal akinesia syndrome with AD and AR inheritances.

  15. Homozygous Nonsense Mutations in TWIST2 Cause Setleis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tukel, Turgut; Šošić, Dražen; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Erazo, Mónica; Casasnovas, Jose; Franco, Hector L.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The focal facial dermal dysplasias (FFDDs) are a group of inherited developmental disorders in which the characteristic diagnostic feature is bitemporal scar-like lesions that resemble forceps marks. To date, the genetic defects underlying these ectodermal dysplasias have not been determined. To identify the gene defect causing autosomal-recessive Setleis syndrome (type III FFDD), homozygosity mapping was performed with genomic DNAs from five affected individuals and 26 members of the consanguineous Puerto Rican (PR) family originally described by Setleis and colleagues. Microsatellites D2S1397 and D2S2968 were homozygous in all affected individuals, mapping the disease locus to 2q37.3. Haplotype analyses of additional markers in the PR family and a consanguineous Arab family further limited the disease locus to ∼3 Mb between D2S2949 and D2S2253. Of the 29 candidate genes in this region, the bHLH transcription factor, TWIST2, was initially sequenced on the basis of its known involvement in murine facial development. Homozygous TWIST2 nonsense mutations, c.324C>T and c.486C>T, were identified in the affected members of the Arab and PR families, respectively. Characterization of the expressed mutant proteins, p.Q65X and p.Q119X, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses indicated that they were truncated and unstable. Notably, Setleis syndrome patients and Twist2 knockout mice have similar facial features, indicating the gene's conserved role in mammalian development. Although human TWIST2 and TWIST1 encode highly homologous bHLH transcription factors, the finding that TWIST2 recessive mutations cause an FFDD and dominant TWIST1 mutations cause Saethre-Chotzen craniocynostosis suggests that they function independently in skin and bone development. PMID:20691403

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in CCDC114 as a Cause of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Huang, Lu; Carson, Johnny L.; Hazucha, Milan J.; Yin, Weining; Berg, Jonathan S.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sagel, Scott D.; Milla, Carlos E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Turner, Emily H.; Lewis, Alexandra P.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal-recessive disorder, characterized by oto-sino-pulmonary disease and situs abnormalities. PCD-causing mutations have been identified in 14 genes, but they collectively account for only ∼60% of all PCD. To identify mutations that cause PCD, we performed exome sequencing on six unrelated probands with ciliary outer dynein arm (ODA) defects. Mutations in CCDC114, an ortholog of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii motility gene DCC2, were identified in a family with two affected siblings. Sanger sequencing of 67 additional individuals with PCD with ODA defects from 58 families revealed CCDC114 mutations in 4 individuals in 3 families. All 6 individuals with CCDC114 mutations had characteristic oto-sino-pulmonary disease, but none had situs abnormalities. In the remaining 5 individuals with PCD who underwent exome sequencing, we identified mutations in two genes (DNAI2, DNAH5) known to cause PCD, including an Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutation in DNAI2. These results revealed that mutations in CCDC114 are a cause of ciliary dysmotility and PCD and further demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing to identify genetic causes in heterogeneous recessive disorders. PMID:23261302

  17. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  18. Genes and mutations causing retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, SP; Sullivan, LS; Bowne, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of inherited retinopathies with many disease-causing genes, many known mutations, and highly varied clinical consequences. Progress in finding treatments is dependent on determining the genes and mutations causing these diseases, which includes both gene discovery and mutation screening in affected individuals and families. Despite the complexity, substantial progress has been made in finding RP genes and mutations. Depending on the type of RP, and the technology used, it is possible to detect mutations in 30–80% of cases. One of the most powerful approaches to genetic testing is high-throughput ‘deep sequencing’, that is, next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS has identified several novel RP genes but a substantial fraction of previously unsolved cases have mutations in genes that are known causes of retinal disease but not necessarily RP. Apparent discrepancy between the molecular defect and clinical findings may warrant reevaluation of patients and families. In this review, we summarize the current approaches to gene discovery and mutation detection for RP, and indicate pitfalls and unsolved problems. Similar considerations apply to other forms of inherited retinal disease. PMID:23701314

  19. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a 12.5 Mb homozygous region reveals ANO10 mutations in patients with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P P; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Schijvenaars, Mascha M V A P; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-12-10

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia.

  20. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F.; Haskins, Mark E.; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with ∼35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461–GQ850464. PMID:19934113

  1. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Haskins, Mark E; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-02-15

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with approximately 35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461-GQ850464.

  2. IARS mutation causes prenatal death in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Takeda, Kenji; Hara, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Kita, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Hanzawa, Kei

    2016-09-01

    Isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS) c.235G > C (p.V79L) is a causative mutation for a recessive disease called IARS disorder in Japanese black cattle. The disease is involved in weak calf syndrome and is characterized by low birth weight, weakness and poor suckling. The gestation period is often slightly extended, implying that intrauterine growth is retarded. In a previous analysis of 2597 artificial insemination (AI) procedures, we suggested that the IARS mutation might contribute toward an increase in the incidence of prenatal death. In this study, we extended this analysis to better clarify the association between the IARS mutation and prenatal death. The IARS genotypes of 92 animals resulting from crosses between carrier (G/C) × G/C were 27 normal (G/G), 55 G/C and 10 affected animals (C/C) (expected numbers: 23, 46 and 23, respectively). Compared to the expected numbers, there were significantly fewer affected animals in this population (P < 0.05), suggesting that more than half of the affected embryos died prenatally. When the number of AI procedures examined was increased to 11 580, the frequency of re-insemination after G/C × G/C insemination was significantly higher at 61-140 days (P < 0.001). The findings suggested that the homozygous IARS mutation not only causes calf death, but also embryonic or fetal death. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Mutations in EMP2 Cause Childhood-Onset Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Ashraf, Shazia; Wan, Xiaoyang; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Lovric, Svjetlana; Fang, Humphrey; Hurd, Toby W.; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Allen, Susan J.; Otto, Edgar A.; Korkmaz, Emine; Washburn, Joseph; Levy, Shawn; Williams, David S.; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan A.; Zolotnitskaya, Anna; Ozaltin, Fatih; Zhou, Weibin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are divided into steroid-sensitive NS (SSNS) and steroid-resistant NS (SRNS). SRNS inevitably leads to end-stage kidney disease, and no curative treatment is available. To date, mutations in more than 24 genes have been described in Mendelian forms of SRNS; however, no Mendelian form of SSNS has been described. To identify a genetic form of SSNS, we performed homozygosity mapping, whole-exome sequencing, and multiplex PCR followed by next-generation sequencing. We thereby detected biallelic mutations in EMP2 (epithelial membrane protein 2) in four individuals from three unrelated families affected by SRNS or SSNS. We showed that EMP2 exclusively localized to glomeruli in the kidney. Knockdown of emp2 in zebrafish resulted in pericardial effusion, supporting the pathogenic role of mutated EMP2 in human NS. At the cellular level, we showed that knockdown of EMP2 in podocytes and endothelial cells resulted in an increased amount of CAVEOLIN-1 and decreased cell proliferation. Our data therefore identify EMP2 mutations as causing a recessive Mendelian form of SSNS. PMID:24814193

  4. The Molecular Genetics of Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: a Mutational Continuum and Future Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Khan, Saadullah; Windpassinger, Christian; Badar, Muhammad; Nawaz, Zafar; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-11-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinical manifestation of the central nervous system without any major dysmorphologies of the brain. Biologically it affects learning capabilities, memory, and cognitive functioning. The basic defining features of ID are characterized by IQ<70, age of onset before 18 years, and impairment of at least two of the adaptive skills. Clinically it is classified in a syndromic (with additional abnormalities) and a nonsyndromic form (with only cognitive impairment). The study of nonsyndromic intellectual disability (NSID) can best explain the pathophysiology of cognition, intelligence and memory. Genetic analysis in autosomal recessive nonsyndrmic ID (ARNSID) has mapped 51 disease loci, 34 of which have revealed their defective genes. These genes play diverse physiological roles in various molecular processes, including methylation, proteolysis, glycosylation, signal transduction, transcription regulation, lipid metabolism, ion homeostasis, tRNA modification, ubiquitination and neuromorphogenesis. High-density SNP array and whole exome sequencing has increased the pace of gene discoveries and many new mutations are being published every month. The lack of uniform criteria has assigned multiple identifiers (or accession numbers) to the same MRT locus (e.g. MRT7 and MRT22). Here in this review we describe the molecular genetics of ARNSID, prioritize the candidate genes in uncharacterized loci, and propose a new nomenclature to reorganize the mutation data that will avoid the confusion of assigning duplicate accession numbers to the same ID locus and to make the data manageable in the future as well. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  5. Simple recessive mutation in ENAM is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta in Italian Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Liu, Hongwei; Griffioen, Layle; Pedersen, Niels C

    2013-08-01

    We report a familial enamel hypoplasia in Italian Greyhounds resembling non-syndromic autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) of humans. The condition uniformly affects deciduous and permanent teeth and is manifested by enamel roughening/thinning and brownish mottling. Affected teeth are often small and pointed with increased gaps. However, basic tooth structure is usually maintained throughout life, and fractures and dental cavities are not a serious problem as in humans. No tissues or organs other than teeth were affected by this mutation, and there was no relationship between enamel hypoplasia and either autoimmunity or periodontal disease, which also are prevalent in the breed. The enamel hypoplasia was associated with a 5-bp deletion in exon 10 of the enamelin (ENAM) gene. The prevalence of the enamel defect in Italian Greyhounds was 14%, and 30% of dogs with normal teeth were carriers. Genome analyses suggest that the trait is under inadvertent positive selection. Based on the deletion detected in the ENAM gene, a genetic test was developed for identifying mutation carriers, which would enable breeders to manage the trait.

  6. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howard, Malcolm F; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J L; Keays, David A; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C; Kini, Usha

    2015-07-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A novel GDAP1 mutation 439delA is associated with autosomal recessive CMT disease.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Domna-Maria; Nicolaou, Paschalis; Chitayat, David; Koutsou, Pantelitsa; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Vajsar, Jiri; Murphy, Jillian; Christodoulou, Kyproula

    2006-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common form of inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Based on neurophysiological and neuropathological criteria CMT has been sub-classified into two main types: demyelinating and axonal. Furthermore, it is genetically heterogeneous with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive (AR) and X-linked modes of inheritance. Thus far, seven genes have been identified in association with the demyelinating AR-CMT disease. We hereby report our clinical and molecular genetic findings in a consanguineous family with AR-CMT. Two young sisters with AR-CMT and other non-affected family members were clinically and electrophysiologically evaluated and then molecular genetic investigation was carried out in order to identify the pathogenic mutation. Following an initial indication for linkage of the family to the CMT4A locus on chromosome 8, we sequenced the Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1) gene and identified a single nucleotide deletion in exon 3 that is associated with AR-CMT in the family. We identified a novel GDAP1 439delA mutation that is associated with AR-CMT in a consanguineous family of Iranian descent with two affected young girls and a history in other members of the family.

  8. NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marni J; Zhang, Qi; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kannabiran, Chitra; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Chakarova, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Mackay, Donna S; Zeitz, Christina; Borman, Arundhati Dev; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Shukla, Rachna; Palavalli, Lakshmi; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Waseem, Naushin H; Jalali, Subhadra; Perin, Juan C; Place, Emily; Ostrovsky, Julian; Xiao, Rui; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Consugar, Mark; Webster, Andrew R; Sahel, José-Alain; Moore, Anthony T; Berson, Eliot L; Liu, Qin; Gai, Xiaowu; Pierce, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an infantile-onset form of inherited retinal degeneration characterized by severe vision loss1, 2. Two-thirds of LCA cases are caused by mutations in 17 known disease genes3 (RetNet Retinal Information Network). Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.25G>A, p.Val9Met) in NMNAT1 as likely disease-causing in two siblings of a consanguineous Pakistani kindred affected by LCA. This mutation segregated with disease in their kindred, including in three other children with LCA. NMNAT1 resides in the previously identified LCA9 locus and encodes the nuclear isoform of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis4, 5. Functional studies showed the p.Val9Met mutation decreased NMNAT1 enzyme activity. Sequencing NMNAT1 in 284 unrelated LCA families identified 14 rare mutations in 13 additional affected individuals. These results are the first to link an NMNAT isoform to disease and indicate that NMNAT1 mutations cause LCA. PMID:22842227

  9. Mutations in ECEL1 Cause Distal Arthrogryposis Type 5D

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Margaret J.; Below, Jennifer E.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Beck, Anita E.; Gildersleeve, Heidi I.; Pinner, Jason; Gogola, Gloria R.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Harris, David J.; Earl, Dawn L.; Jagadeesh, Sujatha; Mehta, Sarju G.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Mefford, Heather C.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndromes are the most common of the heritable congenital-contracture disorders, and ∼50% of cases are caused by mutations in genes that encode contractile proteins of skeletal myofibers. DA type 5D (DA5D) is a rare, autosomal-recessive DA previously defined by us and is characterized by congenital contractures of the hands and feet, along with distinctive facial features, including ptosis. We used linkage analysis and whole-genome sequencing of a multiplex consanguineous family to identify in endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 (ECEL1) mutations that result in DA5D. Evaluation of a total of seven families affected by DA5D revealed in five families ECEL1 mutations that explain ∼70% of cases overall. ECEL1 encodes a neuronal endopeptidase and is expressed in the brain and peripheral nerves. Mice deficient in Ecel1 exhibit perturbed terminal branching of motor neurons to the endplate of skeletal muscles, resulting in poor formation of the neuromuscular junction. Our results distinguish a second developmental pathway that causes congenital-contracture syndromes. PMID:23261301

  10. Identification and characterization of novel parathyroid-specific transcription factor Glial Cells Missing Homolog B (GCMB) mutations in eight families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bowl, Michael R; Mirczuk, Samantha M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Piret, Sian E; Cranston, Treena; Southam, Lorraine; Allgrove, Jeremy; Bahl, Shailini; Brain, Caroline; Loughlin, John; Mughal, Zulf; Ryan, Fiona; Shaw, Nick; Thakker, Yogini V; Tiosano, Dov; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2010-05-15

    GCMB is a member of the small transcription factor family GCM (glial cells missing), which are important regulators of development, present in vertebrates and some invertebrates. In man, GCMB encodes a 506 amino acid parathyroid gland-specific protein, mutations of which have been reported to cause both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism. We ascertained 18 affected individuals from 12 families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism and have investigated them for GCMB abnormalities. Four different homozygous germline mutations were identified in eight families that originate from the Indian Subcontinent. These consisted of a novel nonsense mutation R39X; a missense mutation, R47L in two families; a novel missense mutation, R110W; and a novel frameshifting deletion, I298fsX307 in four families. Haplotype analysis, using polymorphic microsatellites from chromosome 6p23-24, revealed that R47L and I298fsX307 mutations arose either as ancient founders, or recurrent de novo mutations. Functional studies including: subcellular localization studies, EMSAs and luciferase-reporter assays, were undertaken and these demonstrated that: the R39X mutant failed to localize to the nucleus; the R47L and R110W mutants both lost DNA-binding ability; and the I298fsX307 mutant had reduced transactivational ability. In order to gain further insights, we undertook 3D-modeling of the GCMB DNA-binding domain, which revealed that the R110 residue is likely important for the structural integrity of helix 2, which forms part of the GCMB/DNA binding interface. Thus, our results, which expand the spectrum of hypoparathyroidism-associated GCMB mutations, help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DNA-binding and transactivation that are required for this parathyroid-specific transcription factor.

  11. Dose-dependent induction of recessive mutations with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in primordial germ cells of male mice.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, T; Horiya, N; Matsuda, H; Sakamoto, K; Hara, T

    1996-10-25

    Using a specific locus test, we previously found that N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) induces recessive mutations at a relatively high rate in male mouse primordial germ cells (PGC) at 8.5, 10.5 and 13.5 days of development (G8.5, G10.5 and G13.5). A large difference was observed on the induced mutation rate between 30 and 50 mg/kg ENU in 10.5-day PGC. We therefore carried out specific locus tests to ascertain whether ENU induces recessive mutations in a dose-dependent manner in G8.5 and G10.5 PGC. We also gave multiple doses of 25 mg/kg ENU using an 18-h interval, the approximate doubling time of PGC at these developmental stages, to test for an additive effect on the induced mutations rate. A dose-dependent induction of recessive mutations by ENU was observed in both G8.5 and G10.5 PGC, and multiple dosing of 25 mg/kg ENU showed an additive effect. Comparing these results to data on spermatogonial stem cells, we conclude the capacity to repair ENU-induced premutagenic damages is less effective in male mouse PGC at these developmental stages than in spermatogonial stem cells.

  12. Localized gingival recession caused by a C-PAP mask: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mason, William E

    2002-10-01

    This case report describes a localized gingival recession on the labial of tooth # 6 caused by the nasal mask of a C-PAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure) machine. The patient was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment consisted of night-time use of a C-PAP machine. The patient noticed sudden exposure of the root surface on no. 6 and sought evaluation by his family dentist. He was referred to a periodontist for evaluation. A subepithelial connective tissue graft was performed to repair the defect. A maxillary bite splint with a buccal and apical extension to protect the grafted area was constructed. The patient is able to wear the C-PAP mask and protective splint concurrently for successful treatment of his OSA and maintenance of the newly grafted connective tissue. We as dental practitioners can use this information to evaluate the etiology of gingival recession, especially those occurring in patients with OSA.

  13. Adaptor protein complex 4 deficiency causes severe autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia, shy character, and short stature.

    PubMed

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Philippe, Orianne; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Eck, Sebastian H; Graf, Elisabeth; Buchert, Rebecca; Borck, Guntram; Ekici, Arif; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Nöthen, Markus M; Munnich, Arnold; Strom, Tim M; Reis, Andre; Colleaux, Laurence

    2011-06-10

    Intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion represents an important fraction of severe cognitive-dysfunction disorders. Yet, the extreme heterogeneity of these conditions markedly hampers gene identification. Here, we report on eight affected individuals who were from three consanguineous families and presented with severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly, foot deformity, decreased muscle mass of the lower limbs, inability to walk, and growth retardation. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and either Sanger sequencing of candidate genes or next-generation exome sequencing, we identified one mutation in each of three genes encoding adaptor protein complex 4 (AP4) subunits: a nonsense mutation in AP4S1 (NM_007077.3: c.124C>T, p.Arg42(∗)), a frameshift mutation in AP4B1 (NM_006594.2: c.487_488insTAT, p.Glu163_Ser739delinsVal), and a splice mutation in AP4E1 (NM_007347.3: c.542+1_542+4delGTAA, r.421_542del, p.Glu181Glyfs(∗)20). Adaptor protein complexes (AP1-4) are ubiquitously expressed, evolutionarily conserved heterotetrameric complexes that mediate different types of vesicle formation and the selection of cargo molecules for inclusion into these vesicles. Interestingly, two mutations affecting AP4M1 and AP4E1 have recently been found to cause cerebral palsy associated with severe intellectual disability. Combined with previous observations, these results support the hypothesis that AP4-complex-mediated trafficking plays a crucial role in brain development and functioning and demonstrate the existence of a clinically recognizable syndrome due to deficiency of the AP4 complex.

  14. Analysis of mutations causing biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pindolia, Kirit; Jordan, Megan; Wolf, Barry

    2010-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an inherited disorder in which the vitamin, biotin, is not recycled. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency can develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms if they are not treated with biotin. Biotinidase deficiency screening has been incorporated into essentially all newborn screening programs in the United States and in many countries. We now report 140 known mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) that cause biotinidase deficiency. All types of mutations have been found to cause biotinidase deficiency. Variants have been identified throughout the coding sequence. Essentially all the variants result in enzymatic activities with less than 10% of mean normal enzyme activity (profound biotinidase deficiency) with the exception of the c.1330G>C (p.D444H) mutation, which results in an enzyme having 50% of mean normal serum activity. The putative three-dimensional structure of biotinidase has been predicted by homology to that of nitrilases/amidases. The effect of the various missense mutations can be predicted to affect various important sites within the structure of the enzyme. This compilation of variants causing biotinidase deficiency will be useful to clinical laboratories that are performing mutation analysis for confirmational testing when the enzymatic results are equivocal for children identified through newborn screening. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Exome sequencing reveals a novel mutation for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation in the TECR gene on chromosome 19p13.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Minal; Chong, Jessica X; Uricchio, Lawrence; Anderson, Rebecca; Chen, Peixian; Sougnez, Carrie; Garimella, Kiran; Gabriel, Stacey B; dePristo, Mark A; Shakir, Khalid; Matern, Dietrich; Das, Soma; Waggoner, Darrel; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole

    2011-04-01

    Exome sequencing is a powerful tool for discovery of the Mendelian disease genes. Previously, we reported a novel locus for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation (NSMR) in a consanguineous family [Nolan, D.K., Chen, P., Das, S., Ober, C. and Waggoner, D. (2008) Fine mapping of a locus for nonsyndromic mental retardation on chromosome 19p13. Am. J. Med. Genet. A, 146A, 1414-1422]. Using linkage and homozygosity mapping, we previously localized the gene to chromosome 19p13. The parents of this sibship were recently included in an exome sequencing project. Using a series of filters, we narrowed the putative causal mutation to a single variant site that segregated with NSMR: the mutation was homozygous in five affected siblings but in none of eight unaffected siblings. This mutation causes a substitution of a leucine for a highly conserved proline at amino acid 182 in TECR (trans-2,3-enoyl-CoA reductase), a synaptic glycoprotein. Our results reveal the value of massively parallel sequencing for identification of novel disease genes that could not be found using traditional approaches and identifies only the seventh causal mutation for autosomal recessive NSMR.

  16. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  17. In Silico Analysis of SNPs in PARK2 and PINK1 Genes That Potentially Cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Osama Mirghani; Mirghani, Yousra Abdelazim; Hassan, Mohamed Ahmed Salih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations in PINK1 are the second most common agents causing autosomal recessive, early onset PD. We aimed to identify the pathogenic SNPs in PARK2 and PINK1 using in silico prediction software and their effect on the structure, function, and regulation of the proteins. Materials and Methods. We carried out in silico prediction of structural effect of each SNP using different bioinformatics tools to predict substitution influence on protein structure and function. Result. Twenty-one SNPs in PARK2 gene were found to affect transcription factor binding activity. 185 SNPs were found to affect splicing. Ten SNPs were found to affect the miRNA binding site. Two SNPs rs55961220 and rs56092260 affected the structure, function, and stability of Parkin protein. In PINK1 gene only one SNP (rs7349186) was found to affect the structure, function, and stability of the PINK1 protein. Ten SNPs were found to affect the microRNA binding site. Conclusion. Better understanding of Parkinson's disease caused by mutations in PARK2 and PINK1 genes was achieved using in silico prediction. Further studies should be conducted with a special consideration of the ethnic diversity of the different populations. PMID:28127307

  18. RTTN Mutations Cause Primary Microcephaly and Primordial Dwarfism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Hanan; Alazami, Anas M; Manning, Melanie; Hashem, Amal; Caluseiu, Oana; Tabarki, Brahim; Esplin, Edward; Schelley, Susan; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan; Majewski, Jacek; Bernier, Francois P; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-12-03

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental brain anomaly that results from defective proliferation of neuroprogenitors in the germinal periventricular zone. More than a dozen genes are known to be mutated in autosomal-recessive primary microcephaly in isolation or in association with a more generalized growth deficiency (microcephalic primordial dwarfism), but the genetic heterogeneity is probably more extensive. In a research protocol involving autozygome mapping and exome sequencing, we recruited a multiplex consanguineous family who is affected by severe microcephalic primordial dwarfism and tested negative on clinical exome sequencing. Two candidate autozygous intervals were identified, and the second round of exome sequencing revealed a single intronic variant therein (c.2885+8A>G [p.Ser963(∗)] in RTTN exon 23). RT-PCR confirmed that this change creates a cryptic splice donor and thus causes retention of the intervening 7 bp of the intron and leads to premature truncation. On the basis of this finding, we reanalyzed the exome file of a second consanguineous family affected by a similar phenotype and identified another homozygous change in RTTN as the likely causal mutation. Combined linkage analysis of the two families confirmed that RTTN maps to the only significant linkage peak. Finally, through international collaboration, a Canadian multiplex family affected by microcephalic primordial dwarfism and biallelic mutation of RTTN was identified. Our results expand the phenotype of RTTN-related disorders, hitherto limited to polymicrogyria, to include microcephalic primordial dwarfism with a complex brain phenotype involving simplified gyration.

  19. RTTN Mutations Cause Primary Microcephaly and Primordial Dwarfism in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Hanan; Alazami, Anas M.; Manning, Melanie; Hashem, Amal; Caluseiu, Oana; Tabarki, Brahim; Esplin, Edward; Schelley, Susan; Innes, A. Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Lamont, Ryan; Majewski, Jacek; Bernier, Francois P.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental brain anomaly that results from defective proliferation of neuroprogenitors in the germinal periventricular zone. More than a dozen genes are known to be mutated in autosomal-recessive primary microcephaly in isolation or in association with a more generalized growth deficiency (microcephalic primordial dwarfism), but the genetic heterogeneity is probably more extensive. In a research protocol involving autozygome mapping and exome sequencing, we recruited a multiplex consanguineous family who is affected by severe microcephalic primordial dwarfism and tested negative on clinical exome sequencing. Two candidate autozygous intervals were identified, and the second round of exome sequencing revealed a single intronic variant therein (c.2885+8A>G [p.Ser963∗] in RTTN exon 23). RT-PCR confirmed that this change creates a cryptic splice donor and thus causes retention of the intervening 7 bp of the intron and leads to premature truncation. On the basis of this finding, we reanalyzed the exome file of a second consanguineous family affected by a similar phenotype and identified another homozygous change in RTTN as the likely causal mutation. Combined linkage analysis of the two families confirmed that RTTN maps to the only significant linkage peak. Finally, through international collaboration, a Canadian multiplex family affected by microcephalic primordial dwarfism and biallelic mutation of RTTN was identified. Our results expand the phenotype of RTTN-related disorders, hitherto limited to polymicrogyria, to include microcephalic primordial dwarfism with a complex brain phenotype involving simplified gyration. PMID:26608784

  20. RAD21 mutations cause a human cohesinopathy.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, Matthew A; Wilde, Jonathan J; Albrecht, Melanie; Dickinson, Emma; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Braunholz, Diana; Mönnich, Maren; Yan, Yuqian; Xu, Weizhen; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Clark, Dinah; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halbach, Sara; Michelis, Laura Daniela; Rampuria, Abhinav; Rossier, Eva; Spranger, Stephanie; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lynch, Sally Ann; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Ramsay, Robert G; McKay, Michael J; Krantz, Ian D; Xu, Huiling; Horsfield, Julia A; Kaiser, Frank J

    2012-06-08

    The evolutionarily conserved cohesin complex was originally described for its role in regulating sister-chromatid cohesion during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesin and its regulatory proteins have been implicated in several human developmental disorders, including Cornelia de Lange (CdLS) and Roberts syndromes. Here we show that human mutations in the integral cohesin structural protein RAD21 result in a congenital phenotype consistent with a "cohesinopathy." Children with RAD21 mutations display growth retardation, minor skeletal anomalies, and facial features that overlap findings in individuals with CdLS. Notably, unlike children with mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A, or SMC3, these individuals have much milder cognitive impairment than those with classical CdLS. Mechanistically, these mutations act at the RAD21 interface with the other cohesin proteins STAG2 and SMC1A, impair cellular DNA damage response, and disrupt transcription in a zebrafish model. Our data suggest that, compared to loss-of-function mutations, dominant missense mutations result in more severe functional defects and cause worse structural and cognitive clinical findings. These results underscore the essential role of RAD21 in eukaryotes and emphasize the need for further understanding of the role of cohesin in human development.

  1. RAD21 Mutations Cause a Human Cohesinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Deardorff, Matthew A.; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Albrecht, Melanie; Dickinson, Emma; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Braunholz, Diana; Mönnich, Maren; Yan, Yuqian; Xu, Weizhen; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Clark, Dinah; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halbach, Sara; Michelis, Laura Daniela; Rampuria, Abhinav; Rossier, Eva; Spranger, Stephanie; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lynch, Sally Ann; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Ramsay, Robert G.; McKay, Michael J.; Krantz, Ian D.; Xu, Huiling; Horsfield, Julia A.; Kaiser, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved cohesin complex was originally described for its role in regulating sister-chromatid cohesion during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesin and its regulatory proteins have been implicated in several human developmental disorders, including Cornelia de Lange (CdLS) and Roberts syndromes. Here we show that human mutations in the integral cohesin structural protein RAD21 result in a congenital phenotype consistent with a “cohesinopathy.” Children with RAD21 mutations display growth retardation, minor skeletal anomalies, and facial features that overlap findings in individuals with CdLS. Notably, unlike children with mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A, or SMC3, these individuals have much milder cognitive impairment than those with classical CdLS. Mechanistically, these mutations act at the RAD21 interface with the other cohesin proteins STAG2 and SMC1A, impair cellular DNA damage response, and disrupt transcription in a zebrafish model. Our data suggest that, compared to loss-of-function mutations, dominant missense mutations result in more severe functional defects and cause worse structural and cognitive clinical findings. These results underscore the essential role of RAD21 in eukaryotes and emphasize the need for further understanding of the role of cohesin in human development. PMID:22633399

  2. Mutations in the LPAR6 and LIPH genes underlie autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair in 17 consanguineous families from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Habib, R; Mir, H; Umm-e-Kalsoom; Naz, G; Ayub, M; Shafique, S; Yamin, T; Ali, N; Basit, S; Wasif, N; Kamran-Ul-Hassan Naqvi, S; Ali, G; Wali, A; Ansar, M; Ahmad, W

    2011-08-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair is a rare genetic hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair/woolly hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, sparse axillary and body hair in affected individuals. This form of hair loss results from mutations in either LPAR6 or LIPH gene. To identify mutations in LPAR6 and LIPH genes in 17 consanguineous Pakistani families showing features of hypotrichosis/woolly hair. Genotyping in 17 families was carried out using polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to genes causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair phenotype. To screen for mutations in LPAR6 and LIPH genes, all of their exons and splice junction sites were amplified by PCR and sequenced using an automated DNA sequencer. Genotyping with polymorphic microsatellite markers showed linkage in eight families to LPAR6 and in nine families to LIPH gene. Sequence analysis revealed four recurrent mutations (p.Phe24HisfsX28; p.Asp63Val; p.Gly146Arg; p.Ile188Phe) in LPAR6 and two recurrent mutations (p.Trp108Arg; p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in LIPH gene. Comparison of the haplotypes generated by typing LPAR6 and LIPH genes linked microsatellite markers in different families suggested common founder natures of the two mutations (c.66_69insCATG and c.659_660delTA). Mutations identified in the present study extend the body of evidence implicating LPAR6 and LIPH genes in pathogenesis of human hereditary hair loss. © The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Obstruction of adaptation in diploids by recessive, strongly deleterious alleles.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Zoe June; Petrov, Dmitri A; Blundell, Jamie R

    2015-05-19

    Recessive deleterious mutations are common, causing many genetic disorders in humans and producing inbreeding depression in the majority of sexually reproducing diploids. The abundance of recessive deleterious mutations in natural populations suggests they are likely to be present on a chromosome when a new adaptive mutation occurs, yet the dynamics of recessive deleterious hitchhikers and their impact on adaptation remains poorly understood. Here we model how a recessive deleterious mutation impacts the fate of a genetically linked dominant beneficial mutation. The frequency trajectory of the adaptive mutation in this case is dramatically altered and results in what we have termed a "staggered sweep." It is named for its three-phased trajectory: (i) Initially, the two linked mutations have a selective advantage while rare and will increase in frequency together, then (ii), at higher frequencies, the recessive hitchhiker is exposed to selection and can cause a balanced state via heterozygote advantage (the staggered phase), and (iii) finally, if recombination unlinks the two mutations, then the beneficial mutation can complete the sweep to fixation. Using both analytics and simulations, we show that strongly deleterious recessive mutations can substantially decrease the probability of fixation for nearby beneficial mutations, thus creating zones in the genome where adaptation is suppressed. These mutations can also significantly prolong the number of generations a beneficial mutation takes to sweep to fixation, and cause the genomic signature of selection to resemble that of soft or partial sweeps. We show that recessive deleterious variation could impact adaptation in humans and Drosophila.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease caused by S399fsx410 mutation in the PRX gene.

    PubMed

    Kabzinska, D; Drac, H; Sherman, D L; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Brophy, P J; Kochanski, A; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I

    2006-03-14

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease (CMT4F) is an autosomal recessive neuropathy caused by mutations in the PRX gene. To date, only seven mutations have been identified in the PRX gene. In this study, the authors report a novel S399fsX410 mutation in the PRX gene and its effects at the protein level, which was identified in an 8-year-old patient with early-onset CMT disease.

  5. Two novel mutations on exon 8 and intron 65 of COL7A1 gene in two Chinese brothers result in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Chen, Xue-Jun; Liu, Wei; Gong, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xiong, Jun-Hao; Cheng, Jing; Duan, Xi-Ling; Lin, Zhao-Chun; Huang, Lu-Lin; Wan, Hui-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qi; Song, Lin-Hong; Yang, Zheng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation in autosomal dominant or recessive mode. COL7A1 gene encodes type VII collagen - the main component of the anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Besides the 730 mutations reported, we identified two novel COL7A1 gene mutations in a Chinese family, which caused recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). The diagnosis was established histopathologically and ultrastructurally. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (5 pedigree members and 136 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing of the whole coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in affected individuals revealed compound heterozygotes with identical novel mutations. The maternal mutation is a 2-bp deletion at exon 8 (c.1006_1007delCA), leading to a subsequent reading frame-shift and producing a premature termination codon located 48 amino acids downstream in exon 9 (p.Q336EfsX48), consequently resulting in the truncation of 2561 amino acids downstream. This was only present in two affected brothers, but not in the other unaffected family members. The paternal mutation is a 1-bp deletion occurring at the first base of intron 65 (c.IVS5568+1delG) that deductively changes the strongly conserved GT dinucleotide at the 5' donor splice site, results in subsequent reading-through into intron 65, and creates a stop codon immediately following the amino acids encoded by exon 65 (GTAA→TAA). This is predicted to produce a truncated protein lacking of 1089 C-terminal amino acids downstream. The latter mutation was found in all family members except one of the two unaffected sisters. Both mutations were observed concurrently only in the two affected brothers. Neither mutation was discovered in 136 unrelated Chinese control

  6. Highly variable recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutation rates during germ-line development of male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Jun; Pan, Xue-Rong; Hu, Jing; Ma, Li; Wu, Jian-Min; Shao, Ye-Lin; Barton, Sara A; Woodruff, Ronny C; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2011-09-20

    Each cell of higher organism adults is derived from a fertilized egg through a series of divisions, during which mutations can occur. Both the rate and timing of mutations can have profound impacts on both the individual and the population, because mutations that occur at early cell divisions will affect more tissues and are more likely to be transferred to the next generation. Using large-scale multigeneration screening experiments for recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutations of Drosophila melanogaster and recently developed statistical analysis, we show for male D. melanogaster that (i) mutation rates (for recessive lethal or nearly lethal) are highly variable during germ cell development; (ii) first cell cleavage has the highest mutation rate, which drops substantially in the second cleavage or the next few cleavages; (iii) the intermediate stages, after a few cleavages to right before spermatogenesis, have at least an order of magnitude smaller mutation rate; and (iv) spermatogenesis also harbors a fairly high mutation rate. Because germ-line lineage shares some (early) cell divisions with somatic cell lineage, the first conclusion is readily extended to a somatic cell lineage. It is conceivable that the first conclusion is true for most (if not all) higher organisms, whereas the other three conclusions are widely applicable, although the extent may differ from species to species. Therefore, conclusions or analyses that are based on equal mutation rates during development should be taken with caution. Furthermore, the statistical approach developed can be adopted for studying other organisms, including the human germ-line or somatic mutational patterns.

  7. Mutations in Twinkle primase-helicase cause Perrault syndrome with neurologic features

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yukiko; Walsh, Tom; Ohsawa, Ryosuke; Newby, Marta; Hiraki-Kamon, Keiko; Kuramochi, Masahito; Lee, Ming K.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Martin, Alan; Maruyama, Hirofumi; King, Mary-Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in 2 families of progressive ataxia, axonal neuropathy, hyporeflexia, and abnormal eye movements, accompanied by progressive hearing loss and ovarian dysgenesis, with a clinical diagnosis of Perrault syndrome. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify causative mutations in the 2 affected sisters in each family. Family 1 is of Japanese ancestry, and family 2 is of European ancestry. Results: In family 1, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) p.Arg391His and p.Asn585Ser. In family 2, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for C10orf2 p.Trp441Gly and p.Val507Ile. C10orf2 encodes Twinkle, a primase-helicase essential for replication of mitochondrial DNA. Conservation and structural modeling support the causality of the mutations. Twinkle is known also to harbor multiple mutations, nearly all missenses, leading to dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia type 3 and to recessive mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 7, also known as infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia. Conclusions: Our study identifies Twinkle mutations as a cause of Perrault syndrome accompanied by neurologic features and expands the phenotypic spectrum of recessive disease caused by mutations in Twinkle. The phenotypic heterogeneity of conditions caused by Twinkle mutations and the genetic heterogeneity of Perrault syndrome call for genomic definition of these disorders. PMID:25355836

  8. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-03

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression.

  10. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Viallet, François; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Dürr, Alexandra; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berg, Daniela; Bettella, Francesco; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Dong, Jing; Durif, Frank; Edkins, Sarah; Escott-Price, Valentina; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michèle; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Kilarski, Laura L.; Jansen, Iris E.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Lubbe, Steven; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez, María; Mätzler, Walter; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Owen, Michael J.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Shulman, Joshua; Sidransky, Ellen; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wurster, Isabel; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  11. Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis caused by a mutation in GALNT3 in a European kindred.

    PubMed

    Specktor, Polina; Cooper, John G; Indelman, Margarita; Sprecher, Eli

    2006-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. HFTC was shown recently to result from mutations in two genes: GALNT3, coding for a glycosyltransferase responsible for initiating O-glycosylation, and FGF23, coding for a potent phosphaturic protein. All GALNT3 mutations reported so far have been identified in patients of either Middle Eastern or African-American extraction, corroborating numerous historical reports of the disorder in Africa and in the Middle East. In the present study, we describe a patient of Northern European origin displaying typical features of HFTC. Mutation analysis revealed that this patient carries a homozygous novel nonsense mutation in GALNT3 predicted to result in the synthesis of a significantly truncated protein. The present results expand the spectrum of known mutations in GALNT3 and demonstrate the existence of HFTC-causing mutations in this gene outside the Middle Eastern and African-American populations.

  12. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stránecký, Viktor; Hoischen, Alexander; Hartmannová, Hana; Zaki, Maha S.; Chaudhary, Amit; Zudaire, Enrique; Nosková, Lenka; Barešová, Veronika; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Sovová, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Piherová, Lenka; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; de Silva, Deepthi; Senanayake, Manouri P.; Farrag, Sameh; Zeman, Jiří; Martásek, Pavel; Baxová, Alice; Afifi, Hanan H.; St. Croix, Brad; Brunner, Han G.; Temtamy, Samia; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [p.Arg88*] and c.505C>T [p.Arg169*]) or splicing mutations (c.1435–12A>G [p.Gly479Phefs*119]) in ANTXR1, which encodes anthrax toxin receptor 1. The nonsense mutations predictably trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, resulting in the loss of ANTXR1. The transcript with the splicing mutation theoretically encodes a truncated ANTXR1 containing a neopeptide composed of 118 unique amino acids in its C terminus. GAPO syndrome’s major phenotypic features, which include dental abnormalities and the accumulation of extracellular matrix, recapitulate those found in Antxr1-mutant mice and point toward an underlying defect in extracellular-matrix regulation. Thus, we propose that mutations affecting ANTXR1 function are responsible for this disease’s characteristic generalized defect in extracellular-matrix homeostasis. PMID:23602711

  13. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G.; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G.; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene. PMID:12651888

  14. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-03-15

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene.

  15. Mutations in phospholipase C epsilon 1 are not sufficient to cause diffuse mesangial sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Rodney D; Turner, Claire L S; Gibson, Jane; Bass, Paul S; Haq, Mushfequr R; Cross, Esta; Bunyan, David J; Collins, Andrew R; Tapper, William J; Needell, Juliet C; Dell, Beverley; Morton, Newton E; Temple, I Karen; Robinson, David O

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse mesangial sclerosis occurs as an isolated abnormality or as a part of a syndrome. Recently, mutations in phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) were found to cause a nonsyndromic, autosomal recessive form of this disease. Here we describe three children from one consanguineous kindred of Pakistani origin with diffuse mesangial sclerosis who presented with congenital or infantile nephrotic syndrome. Homozygous mutations in PLCE1 (also known as KIAA1516, PLCE, or NPHS3) were identified following genome-wide mapping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. All affected children were homozygous for a four-basepair deletion in exon 3, which created a premature translational stop codon. Analysis of the asymptomatic father of two of the children revealed that he was also homozygous for the same mutation. We conclude this nonpenetrance may be due to compensatory mutations at a second locus and that mutation within PLCE1 is not always sufficient to cause diffuse mesangial sclerosis.

  16. Mutations in argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA of Japanese patients, causing classical citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Terazono, Hiroki; Saheki, Takeyori

    1994-12-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. In order to characterize mutations in Japanese patients with classical citrullinemia, RNA isolated from 10 unrelated patients was reverse-transcribed, and cDNA amplified by PCR was cloned and sequenced. The 10 mutations identified included 6 missense mutations (A118T, A192V, R272C, G280R, R304W, and R363L), 2 mutations associated with an absence of an exon 7 or exon 13, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bp in exon 16 (which might be caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bp within exons 15 and 16 in cDNA. The insertion mutation and the five missense mutations (R304W being excluded) are new mutations described in the present paper. These are in addition to 14 mutations (9 missense mutations, 4 mutations associated with an absence of an exon in mRNA, and 1 splicing mutation) that we identified previously in mainly American patients with neonatal citrullinemia. Two of these 20 mutations, a deletion of exon 13 sequence and a 7-bp deletion in exon 16, were common to Japanese and American populations from different ethnic backgrounds; however, other mutations were unique to each population. Furthermore, the presence of a frequent mutation - the exon 7 deletion mutation in mRNA, which accounts for 10 of 23 affected alleles - was demonstrated in Japanese citrullinemia. This differs from the situation in the United States, where there was far greater heterogeneity of mutations.

  17. Deletion of eIF2beta suppresses testicular cancer incidence and causes recessive lethality in agouti-yellow mice.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Jason D; Michelson, Megan V; Youngren, Kirsten K; Lam, Man-Yee J; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2009-04-15

    The agouti-yellow (A(y)) deletion is the only genetic modifier known to suppress testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) susceptibility in mice or humans. The A(y) mutation deletes Raly and Eif2s2, and induces the ectopic expression of agouti, all of which are potential TGCT-modifying mutations. Here we report that the reduced TGCT incidence of heterozygous A(y) males and the recessive embryonic lethality of A(y) are caused by the deletion of Eif2s2, the beta subunit of translation initiation factor eIF2. We found that the incidence of affected males was reduced 2-fold in mice that were partially deficient for Eif2s2 and that embryonic lethality occurred near the time of implantation in mice that were fully deficient for Eif2s2. In contrast, neither reduced expression of Raly in gene-trap mice nor ectopic expression of agouti in transgenic or viable-yellow (A(vy)) mutants affected TGCT incidence or embryonic viability. In addition, we provide evidence that partial deficiency of Eif2s2 attenuated germ cell proliferation and differentiation, both of which are important to TGCT formation. These results show that germ cell development and TGCT pathogenesis are sensitive to the availability of the eIF2 translation initiation complex and to changes in the rate of translation.

  18. TNXB Mutations Can Cause Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Patrick D.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hall, Gentzon; Gupta, Indra R.; Hains, David; Bartkowiak, Bartlomeij; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Homstad, Alison; Westreich, Katherine; Wu, Guanghong; Liu, Yutao; Holanda, Danniele; Clarke, Jason; Lavin, Peter; Selim, Angelica; Miller, Sara; Wiener, John S.; Ross, Sherry S.; Foreman, John; Rotimi, Charles; Winn, Michelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the kidney and the urinary tract, and it is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and CKD in children. Although twin studies support the heritability of VUR, specific genetic causes remain elusive. We performed a sequential genome-wide linkage study and whole-exome sequencing in a family with hereditary VUR. We obtained a significant multipoint parametric logarithm of odds score of 3.3 on chromosome 6p, and whole-exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous mutation (T3257I) in the gene encoding tenascin XB (TNXB in 6p21.3). This mutation segregated with disease in the affected family as well as with a pathogenic G1331R change in another family. Fibroblast cell lines carrying the T3257I mutation exhibited a reduction in both cell motility and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression, suggesting a defect in the focal adhesions that link the cell cytoplasm to the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the human uroepithelial lining of the ureterovesical junction expresses TNXB, suggesting that TNXB may be important for generating tensile forces that close the ureterovesical junction during voiding. Taken together, these results suggest that mutations in TNXB can cause hereditary VUR. PMID:23620400

  19. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the other gene comes from the father. Recessive inheritance means both genes in a pair must be abnormal to cause ... born to parents who carry the same autosomal recessive change ... abnormal gene from both parents and developing the disease. You ...

  20. Mutations in TULP1, NR2E3, and MFRP genes in Indian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kannabiran, Chitra; Singh, Hardeep; Sahini, Nishika; Jalali, Subhadra; Mohan, Gayathri

    2012-01-01

    To identify genes underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) by homozygosity mapping. Families with ARRP were recruited after complete ophthalmic evaluation of all members and diagnosis of RP by predefined criteria. Genomic DNA from affected members of 26 families was genotyped on Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 6.0 K arrays with standard procedures. Genotypes were evaluated for homozygous regions that were common and concordant between affected members of each family. The genes mapping to homozygous intervals within these families were screened for pathogenic changes with PCR amplification and sequencing of coding regions. Co-segegration of sequence changes with disease was determined within each pedigree, and each variation was tested for presence in 100 unrelated normal controls. A genome-wide scan for homozygosity showed homozygous regions harboring the tubby like protein 1 gene (TULP1; chromosome 6) in one family, the nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group E, member 3 gene (NR2E3; chromosome 15) in three families, and the membrane frizzled-related protein gene (MFRP; chromosome 11) in one family. Screening of the three genes in the respective families revealed homozygous disease-causing mutations in three families. These included a missense mutation in TULP1, a deletion-cum-insertion in NR2E3, and a single base deletion in MFRP. Patients from all three families had a rod-cone type of dystrophy with night blindness initially. The NR2E3 and MFRP genes were associated with fundus features atypical of RP. This study shows involvement of the TULP1, NR2E3, and MFRP genes in ARRP in Indian cases. Genome-wide screening with SNP arrays followed by a prioritized candidate gene evaluation is useful in identifying genes in these patients.

  1. Dominant and recessive compound heterozygous mutations in epidermolysis bullosa simplex demonstrate the role of the stutter region in keratin intermediate filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kana; Sawamura, Daisuke; McMillan, James R; Nakamura, Hideki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2002-06-28

    Keratin intermediate filaments are important cytoskeletal structural proteins involved in maintaining cell shape and function. Mutations in the epidermal keratin genes, keratin 5 or keratin 14 lead to the disruption of keratin filament assembly, resulting in an autosomal dominant inherited blistering skin disease, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). We investigated a large EBS kindred who exhibited a markedly heterogeneous clinical presentation and detected two distinct keratin 5 mutations in the proband, the most severely affected. One missense mutation (E170K) in the highly conserved helix initiation peptide sequence of the 1A rod domain was found in all the affected family members. In contrast, the other missense mutation (E418K) was found only in the proband. The E418K mutation was located in the stutter region, an interruption in the heptad repeat regularity, whose function as yet remains unclear. We hypothesized that this mutated stutter allele was clinically silent when combined with the wild type allele but aggravates the clinical severity of EBS caused by the E170K mutation on the other allele. To confirm this in vitro, we transfected mutant keratin 5 cDNA into cultured cells. Although only 12.7% of the cells transfected with the E170K mutation alone showed disrupted keratin filament aggregations, significantly more cells (30.0%) cotransfected with both E170K and E418K mutations demonstrated keratin aggregation (p < 0.05). These transfection assay results corresponded to the heterogeneous clinical findings of the EBS patient in this kindred. We have identified the first case of both compound heterozygous dominant (E170K) and recessive (E418K) mutations in any keratin gene and confirmed the significant involvement of the stutter region in the assembly and organization of the keratin intermediate filament network in vitro.

  2. ABCA12 mutations and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: a review of genotype/phenotype correlations and of pathogenetic concepts.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masashi

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in ABCA12 have been described in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) including harlequin ichthyosis (HI), congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE), and lamellar ichthyosis (LI). HI shows the most severe phenotype. CIE and LI are clinically characterized by fine, whitish scales on a background of erythematous skin, and large, thick, dark scales over the entire body without serious background erythroderma, respectively. To date, a total of 56 ABCA12 mutations have been reported in 66 ARCI families including 48 HI, 10 LI, and 8 CIE families of African, European, Pakistani/Indian, and Japanese origin (online database: http://www.derm-hokudai.jp/ABCA12/). A total of 62.5% of reported ABCA12 mutations are expected to lead to truncated proteins. Most mutations in HI are truncation mutations and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncation mutations always results in HI phenotype. In CIE families, at least one mutation on each allele is typically a missense mutation. Combinations of missense mutations in the first ATP-binding cassette of ABCA12 underlie the LI phenotype. ABCA12 is a keratinocyte lipid transporter associated with lipid transport in lamellar granules, and loss of ABCA12 function leads to a defective lipid barrier in the stratum corneum, resulting in an ichthyotic phenotype. Recent work using mouse models confirmed ABCA12 roles in skin barrier formation.

  3. Novel G6B gene variant causes familial autosomal recessive thrombocytopenia and anemia.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Motasem; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Antony, Dinu; Madhoun, Ashraf Al; Bacchelli, Chiara; Alkayal, Fadi; AlKhairi, Irina; John, Sumi; Alomari, Mohamad; Beales, Phillip L; Alsmadi, Osama

    2017-03-01

    To characterize the underlying genetic and molecular defects in a consanguineous family with lifelong blood disorder manifested with thrombocytopenia (low platelets count) and anemia. Genetic linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and functional genomics were carried out to identify and characterize the defective gene. We identified a novel truncation mutation (p.C108*) in chromosome 6 open reading frame 25 (C6orf25) gene in this family. We also showed the p.C108* mutation was responsible for destabilizing the encoded truncated G6B protein. Unlike the truncated form, wild-type G6B expression resulted in enhanced K562 differentiation into megakaryocytes and erythrocytes. C6orf25, also known as G6B, is an effector protein for the key hematopoiesis regulators, Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. G6B seems to act through an autosomal recessive mode of disease transmission in this family and regarded as the gene responsible for the observed hematological disorder. This inference is well supported further by in vivo evidence where similar outcomes were reported from G6b(-/-) and SHP1/2 DKO mouse models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  5. Dominant and Recessive Forms of Fibrochondrogenesis Resulting from Mutations at a Second Locus, COL11A2

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Miki, Rika; Funari, Tara; Funari, Vincent A.; Nevarez, Lisette; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, recessively inherited skeletal dysplasia shown to result from mutations in the gene encoding the proα1(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A1. The first of two cases reported here was the affected offspring of first cousins and sequence analysis excluded mutations in COL11A1. Consequently, whole-genome SNP genotyping was performed to identify blocks of homozygosity, identical-by-descent, wherein the disease locus would reside. COL11A1 was not within a region of homozygosity, further excluding it as the disease locus, but the gene encoding the proα2(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A2, was located within a large region of homozygosity. Sequence analysis identified homozygosity for a splice donor mutation in intron 18. Exon trapping demonstrated that the mutation resulted in skipping of exon 18 and predicted deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the protein. In the second case, heterozygosity for a de novo 9 bp deletion in exon 40 of COL11A2 was identified, indicating that there are autosomal dominant forms of fibrochondrogenesis. These findings thus demonstrate that fibrochondrogenesis can result from either recessively- or dominantly-inherited mutations in COL11A2. PMID:22246659

  6. Rare compound heterozygosity involving dominant and recessive mutations of GJB2 gene in an assortative mating hearing impaired Indian family.

    PubMed

    Pavithra, Amritkumar; Chandru, Jayasankaran; Jeffrey, Justin Margret; Karthikeyen, N P; Srisailapathy, C R Srikumari

    2017-01-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx-26), a gap junction protein coded by GJB2 gene, plays a very important role in recycling of potassium ions, one of the vital steps in the mechanotransduction process of hearing. Mutations in the GJB2 gene have been associated with both autosomal recessive as well as dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. As Cx-26 is linked with skin homeostasis, mutations in this gene are sometimes associated with syndromic forms of hearing loss showing skin anomalies. We report here a non consanguineous assortatively mating hearing impaired family with one of the hearing impaired partners, their hearing impaired sibling and hearing impaired offspring showing compound heterozygosity in the GJB2 gene, involving a dominant mutation p.R184Q and two recessive mutations p.Q124X and c.IVS 1+1G>A in a unique triallelic combination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from India on p.R184Q mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with rare compound heterozygosity showing nonsyndromic presentation.

  7. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease.

  8. The E705K mutation in hPMS2 exerts recessive, not dominant, effects on mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Tomer, Guy; Nguyen, Megan; Erdeniz, Naz; Juba, Nicole C.; Sepúlveda, Natalia; Pisani, Jenna E.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The hPMS2 mutation E705K is associated with Turcot syndrome. To elucidate the pathogenesis of hPMS2-E705K, we modeled this mutation in yeast and characterized its expression and effects on mutation avoidance in mammalian cells. We found that while hPMS2-E705K (pms1-E738K in yeast) did not significantly affect hPMS2 (Pms1p in yeast) stability or interaction with MLH1, it could not complement the mutator phenotype in MMR-deficient mouse or yeast cells. Further-more, hPMS2-E705K/pms1-E738K inhibited MMR in wild-type (WT) mammalian cell extracts or yeast cells only when present in excess amounts relative to WT PMS2. Our results strongly suggest that hPMS2-E705K is a recessive loss-of-function allele. PMID:17029773

  9. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  10. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  11. Identification of an RP1 prevalent founder mutation and related phenotype in Spanish patients with early-onset autosomal recessive retinitis.

    PubMed

    Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Corton, Marta; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Muñoz-Sanz, Nelida; Benavides-Mori, Belen; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Garcia-Sandoval, Blanca; Rivolta, Carlo; Ayuso, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    To identify the genetic causes underlying early-onset autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in the Spanish population and describe the associated phenotype. Case series. A total of 244 unrelated families affected by early-onset arRP. Homozygosity mapping or exome sequencing analysis was performed in 3 families segregating arRP. A mutational screening was performed in 241 additional unrelated families for the p.Ser452Stop mutation. Haplotype analysis also was conducted. Individuals who were homozygotes, double heterozygotes, or carriers of mutations in RP1 underwent an ophthalmic evaluation to establish a genotype-phenotype correlation. DNA sequence variants, homozygous regions, haplotypes, best-corrected visual acuity, visual field assessments, electroretinogram responses, and optical coherence tomography images. Four novel mutations in RP1 were identified. The new mutation p.Ser542Stop was present in 11 of 244 (4.5%) of the studied families. All chromosomes harboring this mutation shared the same haplotype. All patients presented a common phenotype with an early age of onset and a prompt macular degeneration, whereas the heterozygote carriers did not show any signs of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). p.Ser542Stop is a single founder mutation and the most prevalent described mutation in the Spanish population. It causes early-onset RP with a rapid macular degeneration and is responsible for 4.5% of all cases. Our data suggest that the implication of RP1 in arRP may be underestimated. The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A 5-bp Insertion in Mip Causes Recessive Congenital Cataract in KFRS4/Kyo Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoko; Okubo, Saki; Takekuma, Kensuke; Hashizume, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We discovered a new cataract mutation, kfrs4, in the Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) background. Within 1 month of birth, all kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes developed cataracts, with severe opacity in the nuclei of the lens. In contrast, no opacity was observed in the kfrs4/+ heterozygotes. We continued to observe these rats until they reached 1 year of age and found that cataractogenesis did not occur in kfrs4/+ rats. To define the histological defects in the lenses of kfrs4 rats, sections of the eyes of these rats were prepared. Although the lenses of kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes showed severely disorganised fibres and vacuolation, the lenses of kfrs4/+ heterozygotes appeared normal and similar to those of wild-type rats. We used positional cloning to identify the kfrs4 mutation. The mutation was mapped to an approximately 9.7-Mb region on chromosome 7, which contains the Mip gene. This gene is responsible for a dominant form of cataract in humans and mice. Sequence analysis of the mutant-derived Mip gene identified a 5-bp insertion. This insertion is predicted to inactivate the MIP protein, as it produces a frameshift that results in the synthesis of 6 novel amino acid residues and a truncated protein that lacks 136 amino acids in the C-terminal region, and no MIP immunoreactivity was observed in the lens fibre cells of kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygous rats using an antibody that recognises the C- and N-terminus of MIP. In addition, the kfrs4/+ heterozygotes showed reduced expression of Mip mRNA and MIP protein and the kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes showed no expression in the lens. These results indicate that the kfrs4 mutation conveys a loss-of-function, which leads to functional inactivation though the degradation of Mip mRNA by an mRNA decay mechanism. Therefore, the kfrs4 rat represents the first characterised rat model with a recessive mutation in the Mip gene. PMID:23226368

  13. Seventeen novel mutations that cause profound biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Jensen, K; Hüner, G; Demirkol, M; Baykal, T; Divry, P; Rolland, M-O; Perez-Cerdá, C; Ugarte, M; Straussberg, R; Basel-Vanagaite, L; Baumgartner, E R; Suormala, T; Scholl, S; Das, A M; Schweitzer, S; Pronicka, E; Sykut-Cegielska, J

    2002-01-01

    We report 17 novel mutations that cause profound biotinidase deficiency. Six of the mutations are due to deletions, whereas the remaining 11 mutations are missense mutations located throughout the gene and encode amino acids that are conserved in mammals. Our results increase the total number of different mutations that cause biotinidase deficiency to 79. These additional mutations will undoubtedly be helpful in identifying structure/function relationships once the three-dimensional structure of biotinidase is determined.

  14. Does inferior oblique recession cause overcorrections in laterally incomitant small hypertropias due to superior oblique palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Karen; Pineles, Stacy L; Demer, Joseph L; Rosenbaum, Arthur L; Velez, Guillermo; Velez, Federico G

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of inferior oblique muscle recession (IOR) in cases of laterally incomitant hypertropia <10 prism dioptres (PD) in central gaze thact 2t are clinically consistent with superior oblique palsy (SOP). Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients with SOP and hypertropias <10 PD in central gaze who underwent graded IOR. Primary outcomes were reduction of lateral incomitance and number of overcorrections in central gaze. Results Twenty-five patients were included. Mean follow-up was 13.8 months (range 1.4–66). Mean central gaze hypertropia decreased from 5.6±2.1 to 0.2±1.6 PD (p<0.001). Contralateral gaze hypertropia decreased from 15.9±7.6 to 2.3±3.3 PD (p<0.001). Lateral incomitance (central vs contralateral gaze) was 10.3±6.9 PD preoperatively and 2.0±3.0 PD postoperatively (p<0.001). There were two patients overcorrected in central gaze, and one patient overcorrected in downgaze. One patient necessitated further surgery for overcorrection. Conclusions Although small hypertropias can be treated with prisms or small, adjustable inferior rectus recessions, IOR collapses incomitance without causing much overcorrection. IOR is a reasonable treatment for small, laterally incomitant hypertropia due to SOP. PMID:23143910

  15. Identities and frequencies of mutations of the otoferlin gene (OTOF) causing DFNB9 deafness in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Choi, BY; Ahmed, ZM; Riazuddin, S; Bhinder, MA; Shahzad, M; Husnain, T; Riazuddin, S; Griffith, AJ; Friedman, TB

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in OTOF, encoding otoferlin, cause non-syndromic recessive hearing loss. The goal of our study was to define the identities and frequencies of OTOF mutations in a model population. We screened a cohort of 557 large consanguineous Pakistani families segregating recessive, severe-to-profound, prelingual-onset deafness for linkage to DFNB9. There were 13 families segregating deafness consistent with linkage to markers for DFNB9. We analyzed the genomic nucleotide sequence of OTOF and detected probable pathogenic sequence variants among all 13 families. These include the previously reported nonsense mutation p.R708X and 10 novel variants: 3 nonsense mutations (p.R425X, p.W536X, and p.Y1603X), 1 frameshift (c.1103_1104delinsC), 1 single amino acid deletion (p.E766del) and 5 missense substitutions of conserved residues (p.L573R, p.A1090E, p.E1733K, p.R1856Q and p.R1939W). OTOF mutations thus account for deafness in 13 (2.3%) of 557 Pakistani families. This overall prevalence is similar, but the mutation spectrum is different from those for Western populations. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an alternative splice isoform of OTOF expressed in the human cochlea. This isoform must be required for human hearing because it encodes a unique alternative C-terminus affected by some DFNB9 mutations. PMID:19250381

  16. Identification of a Frameshift Mutation in Osterix in a Patient with Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lapunzina, Pablo; Aglan, Mona; Temtamy, Samia; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Valencia, Maria; Letón, Rocío; Martínez-Glez, Victor; Elhossini, Rasha; Amr, Khalda; Vilaboa, Nuria; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, or “brittle bone disease,” is a type I collagen-related condition associated with osteoporosis and increased risk of bone fractures. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and candidate gene approach, we have identified a homozygous single base pair deletion (c.1052delA) in SP7/Osterix (OSX) in an Egyptian child with recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. The clinical findings from this patient include recurrent fractures, mild bone deformities, delayed tooth eruption, normal hearing, and white sclera. OSX encodes a transcription factor containing three Cys2-His2 zinc-finger DNA-binding domains at its C terminus, which, in mice, has been shown to be essential for bone formation. The frameshift caused by the c.1052delA deletion removes the last 81 amino acids of the protein, including the third zinc-finger motif. This finding adds another locus to the spectrum of genes associated with osteogenesis imperfecta and reveals that SP7/OSX also plays a key role in human bone development. PMID:20579626

  17. Prevalence and range of GJB2 and SLC26A4 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Jia; Shan, Xin-Ji; Li, Ying; He, Jian-Guo; Yang, Bei-Bei

    2014-07-01

    The frequency and distribution of genetic mutations that cause deafness differ significantly according to ethnic group and region. Zhejiang is a province in the southeast of China, with an exceptional racial composition of the population caused by mass migration in ancient China. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and spectrum of gap junction‑β2 (GJB2), solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger) member 4 (SLC26A4) and GJB3 mutations in patients with autosomal recessive non‑syndromic hearing loss (ARNHL) in this area. A total of 176 unrelated pediatric patients with ARNHL were enrolled in the study. A genomic DNA sample was extracted from the peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction was employed, and the products were sequenced to screen for mutations in GJB2. In addition, a SNaPshot sequencing method was utilized to detect four hotspot mutations in SLC26A4 (IVS7‑2A>G and c.2168A>G) and GJB3 (c.538C>T and c.547G>A). All patients were subjected to a temporal bone computed tomography scan to identify enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA). In total, 14 different mutations, including two new mutations (p.W44L and p.D66N) of GJB2, were detected. The most common pathogenic mutation of GJB2 was c.235delC (15.1%), followed by c.176_191del16 (1.7%), c.299_300delAT (1.7%), c.508_511dup (0.85%) and c.35delG (0.28%) of the total alleles. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 demonstrated that 13.6% (24/176) of patients carried at least one mutant allele. The patients with EVA (84.2%) had SLC26A4 mutations, and 31% had homozygous mutations. Only one patient carried a heterozygous mutation of GJB3 (c.538C>T). Compared with the other regions of China, in the present population cohort, the prevalence and spectrum of mutations in GJB2 was unique, and in patients with EVA the frequency of a homozygous mutation in SLC26A4 was significantly lower. These findings may be of benefit in genetic counseling and risk assessment for families from this area of

  18. Mutations in SPAG1 Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Associated with Defective Outer and Inner Dynein Arms

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michael R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Loges, Niki T.; Hurd, Toby; Leigh, Margaret W.; Huang, Lu; Wolf, Whitney E.; Carson, Johnny L.; Hazucha, Milan J.; Yin, Weining; Davis, Stephanie D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Sagel, Scott D.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Jahnke, Charlotte; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Hjeij, Rim; Gee, Heon Yung; Otto, Edgar A.; Halbritter, Jan; Chaki, Moumita; Diaz, Katrina A.; Braun, Daniela A.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Schueler, Markus; Baktai, György; Griese, Matthias; Turner, Emily H.; Lewis, Alexandra P.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Shendure, Jay; Omran, Heymut; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal-recessive disorder, characterized by oto-sino-pulmonary disease and situs abnormalities. PCD-causing mutations have been identified in 20 genes, but collectively they account for only ∼65% of all PCDs. To identify mutations in additional genes that cause PCD, we performed exome sequencing on three unrelated probands with ciliary outer and inner dynein arm (ODA+IDA) defects. Mutations in SPAG1 were identified in one family with three affected siblings. Further screening of SPAG1 in 98 unrelated affected individuals (62 with ODA+IDA defects, 35 with ODA defects, 1 without available ciliary ultrastructure) revealed biallelic loss-of-function mutations in 11 additional individuals (including one sib-pair). All 14 affected individuals with SPAG1 mutations had a characteristic PCD phenotype, including 8 with situs abnormalities. Additionally, all individuals with mutations who had defined ciliary ultrastructure had ODA+IDA defects. SPAG1 was present in human airway epithelial cell lysates but was not present in isolated axonemes, and immunofluorescence staining showed an absence of ODA and IDA proteins in cilia from an affected individual, thus indicating that SPAG1 probably plays a role in the cytoplasmic assembly and/or trafficking of the axonemal dynein arms. Zebrafish morpholino studies of spag1 produced cilia-related phenotypes previously reported for PCD-causing mutations in genes encoding cytoplasmic proteins. Together, these results demonstrate that mutations in SPAG1 cause PCD with ciliary ODA+IDA defects and that exome sequencing is useful to identify genetic causes of heterogeneous recessive disorders. PMID:24055112

  19. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination.

  20. Mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase cause nephrosis with ichthyosis and adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lovric, Svjetlana; Goncalves, Sara; Gee, Heon Yung; Oskouian, Babak; Srinivas, Honnappa; Choi, Won-Il; Shril, Shirlee; Ashraf, Shazia; Tan, Weizhen; Rao, Jia; Airik, Merlin; Schapiro, David; Braun, Daniela A; Sadowski, Carolin E; Widmeier, Eugen; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Girik, Vladimir; Capitani, Guido; Suh, Jung H; Lachaussée, Noëlle; Arrondel, Christelle; Patat, Julie; Gribouval, Olivier; Furlano, Monica; Boyer, Olivia; Schmitt, Alain; Vuiblet, Vincent; Hashmi, Seema; Wilcken, Rainer; Bernier, Francois P; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan E; Midgley, Julian P; Wright, Nicola; Majewski, Jacek; Zenker, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Kuss, Navina; Greil, Johann; Giese, Thomas; Schwarz, Klaus; Catheline, Vilain; Schanze, Denny; Franke, Ingolf; Sznajer, Yves; Truant, Anne S; Adams, Brigitte; Désir, Julie; Biemann, Ronald; Pei, York; Ars, Elisabet; Lloberas, Nuria; Madrid, Alvaro; Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Connolly, Anne M; Willing, Marcia C; Cooper, Megan A; Lifton, Richard P; Simons, Matias; Riezman, Howard; Antignac, Corinne; Saba, Julie D; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-03-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease cases. A mutation in 1 of over 40 monogenic genes can be detected in approximately 30% of individuals with SRNS whose symptoms manifest before 25 years of age. However, in many patients, the genetic etiology remains unknown. Here, we have performed whole exome sequencing to identify recessive causes of SRNS. In 7 families with SRNS and facultative ichthyosis, adrenal insufficiency, immunodeficiency, and neurological defects, we identified 9 different recessive mutations in SGPL1, which encodes sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase. All mutations resulted in reduced or absent SGPL1 protein and/or enzyme activity. Overexpression of cDNA representing SGPL1 mutations resulted in subcellular mislocalization of SGPL1. Furthermore, expression of WT human SGPL1 rescued growth of SGPL1-deficient dpl1Δ yeast strains, whereas expression of disease-associated variants did not. Immunofluorescence revealed SGPL1 expression in mouse podocytes and mesangial cells. Knockdown of Sgpl1 in rat mesangial cells inhibited cell migration, which was partially rescued by VPC23109, an S1P receptor antagonist. In Drosophila, Sply mutants, which lack SGPL1, displayed a phenotype reminiscent of nephrotic syndrome in nephrocytes. WT Sply, but not the disease-associated variants, rescued this phenotype. Together, these results indicate that SGPL1 mutations cause a syndromic form of SRNS.

  1. Nemaline myopathy caused byTNNT1 mutations in a Dutch pedigree.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, W Ludo; Leijenaar, Jolien F; Spliet, Wim G M; Lavrijsen, Selma W; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Braun, Kees P J; Mulder, Marcel; Timmers-Raaijmakers, Brigitte; Ratsma, Kimberly; Dooijes, Dennis; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by early onset muscular weakness and sarcoplasmatic or intranuclear inclusions of rod-shaped Z-disk material in muscle fibers. Thus far, mutations in seven genes have been identified as cause of NM. Only one singleTNNT1 nonsense mutation has been previously described that causes autosomal recessive NM in the old order Amish with a very specific clinical phenotype including rapidly progressive contractures. Here, we report a patient who is compound heterozygous for a c.309+1G>A mutation and an exon 14 deletion in theTNNT1 gene. This report confirms the specific clinical phenotype ofTNNT1 NM and documents two newTNNT1 mutations outside the old order Amish.

  2. Nemaline myopathy caused byTNNT1 mutations in a Dutch pedigree

    PubMed Central

    van der Pol, W Ludo; Leijenaar, Jolien F; Spliet, Wim G M; Lavrijsen, Selma W; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Braun, Kees P J; Mulder, Marcel; Timmers-Raaijmakers, Brigitte; Ratsma, Kimberly; Dooijes, Dennis; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by early onset muscular weakness and sarcoplasmatic or intranuclear inclusions of rod-shaped Z-disk material in muscle fibers. Thus far, mutations in seven genes have been identified as cause of NM. Only one singleTNNT1 nonsense mutation has been previously described that causes autosomal recessive NM in the old order Amish with a very specific clinical phenotype including rapidly progressive contractures. Here, we report a patient who is compound heterozygous for a c.309+1G>A mutation and an exon 14 deletion in theTNNT1 gene. This report confirms the specific clinical phenotype ofTNNT1 NM and documents two newTNNT1 mutations outside the old order Amish. PMID:24689076

  3. Real-time PCR detection of the recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa-associated c.2470insG mutation in unrelated Mexican families.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Treviño, María G; León-Cachón, Rafael B R; González-Salazar, Francisco; Aguirre-Garza, Marcelino; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Meester, Irene; Salas-Alanis, Julio C

    2014-10-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (R-DEB) is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. The most common mutation reported in Mexican families is the c.2470insG mutation, normally detected by DNA sequencing. We report a faster and more economical high-throughput genotyping method to detect the c.2470insG mutation using specific TaqMan probes in a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that facilitates genotype analysis with allelic discrimination plots. Our new method correctly genotyped 45 samples that had previously been sequenced as 41 wild-type homozygous (-/-), 1 heterozygous (-/G) and three mutant homozygous (G/G) (100% specificity). This new method allows high-throughput screening and furthermore is economical ($3 US/sample), fast (2 h), and sensitive as it requires only 20 ng input DNA. We used the new test to genotype 89 individuals from 32 unrelated Mexican families with R-DEB. The observed genotypic frequencies were 93.3% for the homozygous wild-type and 6.7% for the heterozygous genotype. The homozygous mutant genotype was not found. In conclusion, the allelic discrimination assay by RT-PCR is a sensitive, specific and effective high-throughput test for detecting the c.2470insG mutation. Copyright © 2014 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in HOXC13 Leads to Autosomal Recessive Pure Hair and Nail Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Orseth, Meredith Lee; Smith, J Michael; Brehm, Mary Abigail; Agim, Nnenna Gebechi; Glass, Donald Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare disorder that presents with hypotrichosis and nail dystrophy while sparing other ectodermal structures such as teeth and sweat glands. We describe a homozygous novel missense mutation in the HOXC13 gene that resulted in autosomal recessive PHNED in a Hispanic child. The mutation c.812A>G (p.Gln271Arg) is located within the DNA-binding domain of the HOXC13 gene, cosegregates within the family, and is predicted to be maximally damaging. This is the first reported case of a missense HOXC13 mutation resulting in PHNED and the first reported case of PHNED identified in a North American family. Our findings illustrate the critical role of HOXC13 in human hair and nail development.

  5. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  6. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  7. Deletion at the GCNT2 Locus Causes Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Muhammad; Daud, Muhammad; Kabir, Firoz; Rauf, Bushra; Fatima, Fareeha; Iqbal, Hira; Khan, Arif O.; Al Obaisi, Saif; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Nasir, Idrees A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Eghrari, Allen O.; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to identify the molecular basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a large consanguineous pedigree. Methods All participating individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination. Each patient’s medical history, particularly of cataracts and other ocular abnormalities, was compiled from available medical records and interviews with family elders. Blood samples were donated by all participating family members and used to extract genomic DNA. Genetic analysis was performed to rule out linkage to known arCC loci and genes. Whole-exome sequencing libraries were prepared and paired-end sequenced. A large deletion was found that segregated with arCC in the family, and chromosome walking was conducted to estimate the proximal and distal boundaries of the deletion mutation. Results Exclusion and linkage analysis suggested linkage to a region of chromosome 6p24 harboring GCNT2 (glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 2) with a two-point logarithm of odds score of 5.78. PCR amplifications of the coding exons of GCNT2 failed in individuals with arCC, and whole-exome data analysis revealed a large deletion on chromosome 6p in the region harboring GCNT2. Chromosomal walking using multiple primer pairs delineated the extent of the deletion to approximately 190 kb. Interestingly, a failure to amplify a junctional fragment of the deletion break strongly suggests an insertion in addition to the large deletion. Conclusion Here, we report a novel insertion/deletion mutation at the GCNT2 locus that is responsible for congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family. PMID:27936067

  8. Disruption of the methyltransferase-like 23 gene METTL23 causes mild autosomal recessive intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bernkopf, Marie; Webersinke, Gerald; Tongsook, Chanakan; Koyani, Chintan N.; Rafiq, Muhammad A.; Ayaz, Muhammad; Müller, Doris; Enzinger, Christian; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Schmidt, Kurt; Gruber, Karl; Speicher, Michael R.; Malle, Ernst; Macheroux, Peter; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Windpassinger, Christian; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a gene for mild nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) in two unrelated families, one from Austria, the other from Pakistan. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis enabled us to define a region of homozygosity by descent on chromosome 17q25. Whole-exome sequencing and analysis of this region in an affected individual from the Austrian family identified a 5 bp frameshifting deletion in the METTL23 gene. By means of Sanger sequencing of METTL23, a nonsense mutation was detected in a consanguineous ID family from Pakistan for which homozygosity-by-descent mapping had identified a region on 17q25. Both changes lead to truncation of the putative METTL23 protein, which disrupts the predicted catalytic domain and alters the cellular localization. 3D-modelling of the protein indicates that METTL23 is strongly predicted to function as an S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. Expression analysis of METTL23 indicated a strong association with heat shock proteins, which suggests that these may act as a putative substrate for methylation by METTL23. A number of methyltransferases have been described recently in association with ID. Disruption of METTL23 presented here supports the importance of methylation processes for intact neuronal function and brain development. PMID:24626631

  9. A homozygous missense variant in type I keratin KRT25 causes autosomal recessive woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Raza, Syed Irfan; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Irfanullah; Shahi, Shamim; Acharya, Anushree; Dai, Hang; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-10-01

    Woolly hair (WH) is a hair abnormality that is primarily characterised by tightly curled hair with abnormal growth. In two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive (AR) WH, homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a locus within 17q21.1-q22, which contains the type I keratin gene cluster. A DNA sample from an affected individual from each family underwent exome sequencing. A homozygous missense variant c.950T>C (p.(Leu317Pro)) within KRT25 segregated with ARWH in both families, and has a combined maximum two-point LOD score of 7.9 at ϴ=0. The KRT25 variant is predicted to result in disruption of the second α-helical rod domain and the entire protein structure, thus possibly interfering with heterodimerisation of K25 with type II keratins within the inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle and the medulla of the hair shaft. Our findings implicate a novel gene involved in human hair abnormality, and are consistent with the curled, fragile hair found in mice with Krt25 mutations, and further support the role of IRS-specific type I keratins in hair follicle development and maintenance of hair texture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. A homozygous missense variant in type I keratin KRT25 causes autosomal recessive woolly hair

    PubMed Central

    Ansar, Muhammad; Raza, Syed Irfan; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Irfanullah; Shahi, Shamim; Acharya, Anushree; Dai, Hang; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Woolly hair (WH) is a hair abnormality that is primarily characterised by tightly curled hair with abnormal growth. Methods In two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive (AR) WH, homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a locus within 17q21.1–q22, which contains the type I keratin gene cluster. A DNA sample from an affected individual from each family underwent exome sequencing. Results A homozygous missense variant c.950T>C (p.(Leu317Pro)) within KRT25 segregated with ARWH in both families, and has a combined maximum two-point LOD score of 7.9 at ϴ=0. The KRT25 variant is predicted to result in disruption of the second α-helical rod domain and the entire protein structure, thus possibly interfering with heterodimerisation of K25 with type II keratins within the inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle and the medulla of the hair shaft. Conclusions Our findings implicate a novel gene involved in human hair abnormality, and are consistent with the curled, fragile hair found in mice with Krt25 mutations, and further support the role of IRS-specific type I keratins in hair follicle development and maintenance of hair texture. PMID:26160856

  11. Whole-Genome Analysis Reveals that Mutations in Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase-like 1 Cause Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Below, Jennifer E.; Earl, Dawn L.; Shively, Kathryn M.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Stephan, Mark J.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Hertecant, Jozef L.; Chitayat, David; Unger, Sheila; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia is a rare, autosomal-recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, characteristic facial features, and in some cases severe renal phosphate wasting. We used linkage analysis and whole-genome sequencing of a consanguineous trio to discover that mutations in inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1) cause opsismodysplasia with or without renal phosphate wasting. Evaluation of 12 families with opsismodysplasia revealed that INPPL1 mutations explain ∼60% of cases overall, including both of the families in our cohort with more than one affected child and 50% of the simplex cases. PMID:23273567

  12. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  13. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Stover, E H; Borthwick, K J; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D M; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A B S; Morton, C C; Axon, P R; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E A; Baguley, D M; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M-J; Guala, A; Hulton, S A; Kroes, H; Li Volti, G; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez Soriano, J; Sanjad, S A; Tasic, V; Taylor, C M; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A N; Karet, F E

    2002-11-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal alpha-intercalated cell's apical H(+)-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time.

  14. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Stover, E; Borthwick, K; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A; Morton, C; Axon, P; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E; Baguley, D; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M; Guala, A; Hulton, S; Kroes, H; Li, V; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez, S; Sanjad, S; Tasic, V; Taylor, C; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A; Karet, F

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal α-intercalated cell's apical H+-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time. PMID:12414817

  15. An update of the mutation spectrum of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) in autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Wirth, B

    2000-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, causing progressive weakness of the limbs and trunk, followed by muscle atrophy. SMA is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive diseases, with a carrier frequency of 1 in 50 and the most common genetic cause of childhood mortality. The phenotype is extremely variable, and patients have been classified in type I-III SMA based on age at onset and clinical course. All three types of SMA are caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1). There are two almost identical copies, SMN1 and SMN2, present on chromosome 5q13. Only homozygous absence of SMN1 is responsible for SMA, while homozygous absence of SMN2, found in about 5% of controls, has no clinical phenotype. Ninety-six percent of SMA patients display mutations in SMN1, while 4% are unlinked to 5q13. Of the 5q13-linked SMA patients, 96.4% show homozygous absence of SMN1 exons 7 and 8 or exon 7 only, whereas 3. 6% present a compound heterozygosity with a subtle mutation on one chromosome and a deletion/gene conversion on the other chromosome. Among the 23 different subtle mutations described so far, the Y272C missense mutation is the most frequent one, at 20%. Given this uniform mutation spectrum, direct molecular genetic testing is an easy and rapid analysis for most of the SMA patients. Direct testing of heterozygotes, while not trivial, is compromised by the presence of two SMN1 copies per chromosome in about 4% of individuals. The number of SMN2 copies modulates the SMA phenotype. Nevertheless, it should not be used for prediction of severity of the SMA. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Missense Mutations in a Retinal Pigment Epithelium Protein, Bestrophin-1, Cause Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Millar, Ian D.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Burgess-Mullan, Rosemary; Shweikh, Yusrah; Parry, Neil; O'Sullivan, James; Maher, Geoffrey J.; McKibbin, Martin; Downes, Susan M.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Brown, Peter D.; Black, Graeme C.M.; Manson, Forbes D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bestrophin-1 is preferentially expressed at the basolateral membrane of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) of the retina. Mutations in the BEST1 gene cause the retinal dystrophies vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal-dominant vitreochoroidopathy, and autosomal-recessive bestrophinopathy. Here, we describe four missense mutations in bestrophin-1, three that we believe are previously unreported, in patients diagnosed with autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The physiological function of bestrophin-1 remains poorly understood although its heterologous expression induces a Cl−-specific current. We tested the effect of RP-causing variants on Cl− channel activity and cellular localization of bestrophin-1. Two (p.L140V and p.I205T) produced significantly decreased chloride-selective whole-cell currents in comparison to those of wild-type protein. In a model system of a polarized epithelium, two of three mutations (p.L140V and p.D228N) caused mislocalization of bestrophin-1 from the basolateral membrane to the cytoplasm. Mutations in bestrophin-1 are increasingly recognized as an important cause of inherited retinal dystrophy. PMID:19853238

  17. Uner Tan syndrome caused by a homozygous TUBB2B mutation affecting microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Nguyen, Thai; Srivatsan, Anjana; Leca, Ines; Tian, Guoling; Fritz, Tanja; Hansen, Andi H; Musaev, Damir; McEvoy-Venneri, Jennifer; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Tan, Uner; Kolodner, Richard D; Cowan, Nicholas J; Keays, David A; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-12-23

    The integrity and dynamic properties of the microtubule cytoskeleton are indispensable for the development of the mammalian brain. Consequently, mutations in the genes that encode the structural component (the α/β-tubulin heterodimer) can give rise to severe, sporadic neurodevelopmental disorders. These are commonly referred to as the tubulinopathies. Here we report the addition of recessive quadrupedalism, also known as Uner Tan syndrome (UTS), to the growing list of diseases caused by tubulin variants. Analysis of a consanguineous UTS family identified a biallelic TUBB2B mutation, resulting in a p.R390Q amino acid substitution. In addition to the identifying quadrupedal locomotion, all three patients showed severe cerebellar hypoplasia. None, however, displayed the basal ganglia malformations typically associated with TUBB2B mutations. Functional analysis of the R390Q substitution revealed that it did not affect the ability of β-tubulin to fold or become assembled into the α/β-heterodimer, nor did it influence the incorporation of mutant-containing heterodimers into microtubule polymers. The 390Q mutation in S. cerevisiae TUB2 did not affect growth under basal conditions, but did result in increased sensitivity to microtubule-depolymerizing drugs, indicative of a mild impact of this mutation on microtubule function. The TUBB2B mutation described here represents an unusual recessive mode of inheritance for missense-mediated tubulinopathies and reinforces the sensitivity of the developing cerebellum to microtubule defects.

  18. Defective pro alpha 2(I) collagen synthesis in a recessive mutation in mice: a model of human osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, S D; Sweet, H O; McBride, D J; Davisson, M T; Marks, S C; Shuldiner, A R; Wenstrup, R J; Rowe, D W; Shapiro, J R

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue associated with fractures, osteopenia, and short stature. OI results from mutations affecting the pro alpha 1 or pro alpha 2 gene of type I collagen. We describe a strain of mice with a nonlethal recessively inherited mutation (oim) that results in phenotypic and biochemical features that simulate moderate to severe human OI. The phenotype of homozygous oim mice includes skeletal fractures, limb deformities, generalized osteopenia, and small body size. Their femurs are smaller and demonstrate marked cortical thinning and fewer medullary trabeculae than those of wild-type mice. Breeding studies show the mutation is inherited in most crosses as a single recessive gene on chromosome 6, near the murine Cola-2 gene. Biochemical analysis of skin and bone, as well as isolated dermal fibroblast cultures, demonstrate that alpha 1(I) homotrimeric collagen accumulates in these tissues and is secreted by fibroblasts. Short labeling studies in fibroblasts demonstrate an absence of pro alpha 2(I) collagen chains. Nucleotide sequencing of the cDNA encoding the COOH-propeptide reveals a G deletion at pro alpha 2(I) nucleotide 3983; this results in an alteration of the sequence of the last 48 amino acids. The oim mouse will facilitate the study of type I collagen-related skeletal disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8446583

  19. Congenital isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency: an underestimated cause of neonatal death, explained by TPIT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Brue, Thierry; Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Gueydan, Magali; Barlier, Anne; David, Michel; Nicolino, Marc; Malpuech, Georges; Déchelotte, Pierre; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; de Zegher, Francis; Beckers, Dominique; Kyllo, Jennifer; Donohoue, Patricia; Fassnacht, Martin; Hahner, Stefanie; Allolio, Bruno; Noordam, C; Dunkel, Leo; Hero, Matti; Pigeon, B; Weill, Jacques; Yigit, Sevket; Brauner, Raja; Heinrich, Juan Jorge; Cummings, Elizabeth; Riddell, Christie; Enjalbert, Alain; Drouin, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    Tpit is a T box transcription factor important for terminal differentiation of pituitary proopiomelanocortin-expressing cells. We demonstrated that human and mouse mutations of the TPIT gene cause a neonatal-onset form of congenital isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). In the absence of glucocorticoid replacement, IAD can lead to neonatal death by acute adrenal insufficiency. This clinical entity was not previously well characterized because of the small number of published cases. Since identification of the first TPIT mutations, we have enlarged our series of neonatal IAD patients to 27 patients from 21 unrelated families. We found TPIT mutations in 17 of 27 patients. We identified 10 different TPIT mutations, with one mutation found in five unrelated families. All patients appeared to be homozygous or compound heterozygous for TPIT mutations, and their unaffected parents are heterozygous carriers, confirming a recessive mode of transmission. We compared the clinical and biological phenotype of the 17 IAD patients carrying a TPIT mutation with the 10 IAD patients with normal TPIT-coding sequences. This series of neonatal IAD patients revealed a highly homogeneous clinical presentation, suggesting that this disease may be an underestimated cause of neonatal death. Identification of TPIT gene mutations as the principal molecular cause of neonatal IAD permits prenatal diagnosis for families at risk for the purpose of early glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

  20. The Study of SLC26A4 Gene Causing Autosomal Recessive Hearing Loss by Linkage Analysis in a Cohort of Iranian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Reiisi, Somayeh; Sanati, Mohammad Hosein; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Ahmadian, Shahla; Reiisi, Salimeh; Parchami, Shahrbanoo; Porjafari, Hamid; Shahi, Heshmat; Shavarzi, Afsaneh; Hashemzade Chaleshtori, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural non-syndromic hearing loss is the most common disorder which affects 1 in 500 newborns. Hearing loss is an extremely heterogeneous defect with more than 100 loci identified to date. According to the studies, mutations in GJB2 are estimated to be involved in 50- 80% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss cases, but contribution of other loci in this disorder is yet ambiguous. With regard to studies, DFNB4 locus (SLC26A4) can be classified as the second cause of hearing loss. So, this study aimed to determine the contribution of this locus in hearing loss as well as the frequency of SLC26A4 gene mutations in a population in the west of Iran. In this descriptive laboratory study, we included 30 families from the west of Iran with no mutation in GJB2 gene. Linkage analysis was performed by DFNB4 (SLC26A4) molecular markers (STR). The families with hearing loss linked to this locus were further analyzed for mutation detection. SLC26A4 gene exons were amplified and analyzed using direct DNA sequencing. In studied families, 2 families displayed linkage to DFNB4 locus. Identified mutations include mutation in exon 5 (c.416 G>T) and in splicing site of exon 7 (IVS-2 A>G or c.919-2 A>G). PMID:25317404

  1. Non-Recessive Bt Toxin Resistance Conferred by an Intracellular Cadherin Mutation in Field-Selected Populations of Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins. PMID:23285292

  2. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  3. Summary of mutations underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) in Arabs with four novel mutations in ARCI-related genes from the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Fatma; Mohamed, Madiha; Nair, Pratibha; Saif, Fatima; Mustafa, Ethar M; Bizzari, Sami; Al-Ali, Mahmoud T; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2017-05-01

    Clinical and molecular heterogeneity is a prominent characteristic of congenital ichthyoses, with the involvement of numerous causative loci. Mutations in these loci feature in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) quite variably, with certain genes/mutations being more frequently uncovered in particular populations. In this study, we used whole exome sequencing as well as direct Sanger sequencing to uncover four novel mutations in ARCI-related genes, which were found in families from the United Arab Emirates. In silico tools such as CADD and SIFT Indel were used to predict the functional consequences of these mutations. The here-presented mutations occurred in three genes (ALOX12B, TGM1, ABCA12), and these are a mixture of missense and indel variants with damaging functional consequences on their encoded proteins. This study presents an overview of the mutations that were found in ARCI-related genes in Arabs and discusses molecular and clinical details pertaining to the above-mentioned Emirati cases and their novel mutations with special emphasis on the resulting protein changes. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Chemical mutagenesis testing in Drosophila. I. Comparison of positive and negative control data for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations in three laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, R.C.; Mason, J.M.; Valencia, R.; Zimmering, S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the validation phase of the Drosophila melanogaster segment of the National Toxicology Program, a comparison has been made of positive and negative controls for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations from three laboratories. This comparison involves approximately 700,000 spontaneous recessive lethal mutation tests, 70,000 spontaneous translocation tests, and screens for genetic damage induced by N-nitrosodimethylamine and ..beta..-propiolactone. Spontaneous frequencies for lethal mutations and translocations were homogeneous in the laboratories regardless of solvent or broods sampled. Inhomogeneity was observed in induced frequencies among laboratories, but the variation was no greater than that found within a laboratory.

  5. Mutations in BOREALIN cause thyroid dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Carré, Aurore; Stoupa, Athanasia; Kariyawasam, Dulanjalee; Gueriouz, Manelle; Ramond, Cyrille; Monus, Taylor; Léger, Juliane; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Sebag, Frédéric; Glaser, Nicolas; Zenaty, Delphine; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Hubert, Laurence; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Munnich, Arnold; Besmond, Claude; Taylor, William; Polak, Michel

    2016-12-26

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder and is primarily caused by developmental abnormalities otherwise known as thyroid dysgenesis (TD). We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family with TD and subsequently sequenced a cohort of 134 probands with TD to identify genetic factors predisposing to the disease. We identified the novel missense mutations p.S148F, p.R114Q and p.L177W in the BOREALIN gene in TD-affected families. Borealin is a major component of the Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) with well-known functions in mitosis. Further analysis of the missense mutations showed no apparent effects on mitosis. In contrast, expression of the mutants in human thyrocytes resulted in defects in adhesion and migration with corresponding changes in gene expression suggesting others functions for this mitotic protein. These results were well correlated with the same gene expression pattern analysed in the thyroid tissue of the patient with BOREALIN-p.R114W. These studies open new avenues in the genetics of TD in humans.

  6. New mutation in periaxin gene causing Charcot Marie Tooth disease in a Puerto Rican young male.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Elizabeth; Ramos, Edwardo

    2013-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in more than 30 different genes. One of the genes encodes for periaxin (PRX) protein, which is required for the maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Individuals with PRX gene mutations have been described to present early-onset, autosomal recessive, demyelinating CMT disease or CMT4F subtype. Only 23 mutations involving the PRX gene have been reported in patients throughout the world. We describe a case of a Puerto Rican adolescent with history, neurologic examination, electromyographic data, and laboratory tests consistent with CMT4F. Genetic analysis of this individual showed a heterozygous transversion resulting in amino acid change from arginine to glycine in the PRX gene, suggesting CMT4F. We report this novel PRX mutation to expand the clinical spectrum of CMT disease.

  7. A novel fibrinogen B beta chain frameshift mutation causes congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Zhaoyue; Yu, Ziqiang; Cao, Lijuan; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Changgeng

    2013-07-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by various mutations within the fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG. Ins/del mutations in FGB are extremely rare. We report a patient with afibrinogenaemia who suffered from umbilical cord bleeding and repeated bleeding episodes. His plasma fibrinogen levels could not be detected using the Clauss method and immunological methods. Molecular analyses revealed homozygosity in a novel four bases insertion in codon 40 of FGB exon 2 (g. 2833_2834 ins GTTT), which resulted in a truncated 50-residue polypeptide that contained 11 exceptional abnormal residues. In the transient expression experiments, mutant fibrinogen could be detected at higher level than wild-type fibrinogen in COS-7 cell lysates but not in culture media. These results suggest that the homozygous mutation in FGB could be responsible for congenital afibrinogenaemia in this patient. This frameshift mutation could impair fibrinogen assembly and secretion without influencing the protein synthesis.

  8. Identification and functional characterization of a novel transglutaminase 1 gene mutation associated with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, San-Quan; Li, Chang-Xing; Gao, Xin-Qian; Qiu, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Quan; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Xin; Tian, Xin; Tang, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Tian; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xi-Bao

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases. Mutations in transglutaminase (TGase) 1 gene (TGM1, OMIM 190195) have been implicated in ARCI. However, little is known about TGM1 mutations in the Chinese population, and no functional studies have investigated the biological effect of mutant TGM1 on human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells. To identify the pathogenic mutations of TGM1 gene in two Chinese siblings with ARCI and gain insight into functional consequences of these mutations. Fifteen exons and flanking splice sites of TGM1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then underwent bidirectional Sanger sequencing. The HaCaT cells were transfected with lentiviral vectors, which overexpressed either wild-type or mutant TGM1 cDNAs with deleted homeodomain. Cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were detected. The expression of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, CDK4, TGM1, K10, involucrin, and filaggrin proteins were investigated by Western blot analysis. We found two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c.515C>T, R143C in exon 3 and c.759C>T, S212F in exon 4) in both siblings. HaCaT cells transfected with mutant TGM1 cDNAs displayed a lower growth rate and delayed S phase while overexpression of wild-type TGM1 cDNAs led to accelerated growth. HaCaT cells transfected with mutant TGM1 cDNAs displayed lower expression of differentiation markers such as involucrin and filaggrin. Our findings suggest that the compound heterozygous missense (c.515C>T, R143C) mutations in exon 3 and missense (c.759C>T, S212F) mutations in exon 4 result in the phenotype of ARCI. TGM1 mutations can suppress keratinocyte growth and cornified cell envelope formation. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. A Clinical and Molecular Genetic Study of 50 Families with Autosomal Recessive Parkinsonism Revealed Known and Novel Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Chaouni, Rita; Tafakhori, Abbas; Azcona, Luis J; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Omrani, Mir Davood; Jamshidi, Javad; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Ahmadi, Mona; Habibi, Seyed Amir Hassan; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Fazeli, Atena; Motallebi, Marzieh; Petramfar, Peyman; Askarpour, Saeed; Askarpour, Shiva; Shahmohammadibeni, Hossein Ali; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Eftekhari, Hajar; Shafiei Zarneh, Amir Ehtesham; Mohammadihosseinabad, Saeed; Khorrami, Mehdi; Najmi, Safa; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Shokraeian, Parasto; Ehsanbakhsh, Hossein; Rezaeidian, Jalal; Ebrahimi Rad, Reza; Madadi, Faranak; Andarva, Monavvar; Alehabib, Elham; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Mortazavi, Seyed Erfan; Azimzadeh, Zahra; Bayat, Mahdis; Besharati, Amir Mohammad; Harati-Ghavi, Mohammad Ali; Omidvari, Samareh; Dehghani-Tafti, Zahra; Mohammadi, Faraz; Mohammad Hossein Pour, Banafsheh; Noorollahi Moghaddam, Hamid; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Habibi, Arman; Taherian-Esfahani, Zahra; Darvish, Hossein; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2017-05-13

    In this study, the role of known Parkinson's disease (PD) genes was examined in families with autosomal recessive (AR) parkinsonism to assist with the differential diagnosis of PD. Some families without mutations in known genes were also subject to whole genome sequencing with the objective to identify novel parkinsonism-related genes. Families were selected from 4000 clinical files of patients with PD or parkinsonism. AR inheritance pattern, consanguinity, and a minimum of two affected individuals per family were used as inclusion criteria. For disease gene/mutation identification, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, quantitative PCR, linkage, and Sanger and whole genome sequencing assays were carried out. A total of 116 patients (50 families) were examined. Fifty-four patients (46.55%; 22 families) were found to carry pathogenic mutations in known genes while a novel gene, not previously associated with parkinsonism, was found mutated in a single family (2 patients). Pathogenic mutations, including missense, nonsense, frameshift, and exon rearrangements, were found in Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, SYNJ1, and VAC14 genes. In conclusion, variable phenotypic expressivity was seen across all families.

  10. Mutations in TRIOBP, Which Encodes a Putative Cytoskeletal-Organizing Protein, Are Associated with Nonsyndromic Recessive Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, Saima; Khan, Shaheen N.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Ghosh, Manju; Caution, Kyle; Nazli, Sabiha; Kabra, Madhulika; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Chen, Kevin; Naz, Sadaf; Antonellis, Anthony; Pavan, William J.; Green, Eric D.; Wilcox, Edward R.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Morell, Robert J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    In seven families, six different mutant alleles of TRIOBP on chromosome 22q13 cosegregate with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness. These alleles include four nonsense (Q297X, R788X, R1068X, and R1117X) and two frameshift (D1069fsX1082 and R1078fsX1083) mutations, all located in exon 6 of TRIOBP. There are several alternative splice isoforms of this gene, the longest of which, TRIOBP-6, comprises 23 exons. The linkage interval for the deafness segregating in these families includes DFNB28. Genetic heterogeneity at this locus is suggested by three additional families that show significant evidence of linkage of deafness to markers on chromosome 22q13 but that apparently have no mutations in the TRIOBP gene. PMID:16385457

  11. PRIMA1 mutation: a new cause of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Tankard, Rick; Gazina, Elena V; Damiano, John A; Lawrence, Kate M; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Regan, Brigid M; Shearer, Aiden Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Tinuper, Paolo; Lichetta, Laura; Baldassari, Sara; Bisulli, Francesca; Pippucci, Tommaso; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) can be sporadic or autosomal dominant; some families have nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mutations. We report a novel autosomal recessive phenotype in a single family and identify the causative gene. Methods Whole exome sequencing data was used to map the family, thereby narrowing exome search space, and then to identify the mutation. Results Linkage analysis using exome sequence data from two affected and two unaffected subjects showed homozygous linkage peaks on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, and 14 with maximum LOD scores between 1.5 and 1.93. Exome variant filtering under these peaks revealed that the affected siblings were homozygous for a novel splice site mutation (c.93+2T>C) in the PRIMA1 gene on chromosome 14. No additional PRIMA1 mutations were found in 300 other NFLE cases. The c.93+2T>C mutation was shown to lead to skipping of the first coding exon of the PRIMA1 mRNA using a minigene system. Interpretation PRIMA1 is a transmembrane protein that anchors acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetycholine, to membrane rafts of neurons. PRiMA knockout mice have reduction of AChE and accumulation of acetylcholine at the synapse; our minigene analysis suggests that the c.93+2T>C mutation leads to knockout of PRIMA1. Mutations with gain of function effects in acetylcholine receptor subunits cause autosomal dominant NFLE. Thus, enhanced cholinergic responses are the likely cause of the severe NFLE and intellectual disability segregating in this family, representing the first recessive case to be reported and the first PRIMA1 mutation implicated in disease. PMID:26339676

  12. ADCK3, an Ancestral Kinase, Is Mutated in a Form of Recessive Ataxia Associated with Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Tazir, Meriem; López, Luis Carlos; Quinzii, Catarina M.; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Busso, Cleverson; Makri, Samira; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Benhassine, Traki; Anheim, Mathieu; Lynch, David R.; Thibault, Christelle; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Tranchant, Christine; Poch, Olivier; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Barros, Mario H.; Hirano, Michio; Koenig, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Muscle coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone) deficiency has been identified in more than 20 patients with presumed autosomal-recessive ataxia. However, mutations in genes required for CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway have been identified only in patients with infantile-onset multisystemic diseases or isolated nephropathy. Our SNP-based genome-wide scan in a large consanguineous family revealed a locus for autosomal-recessive ataxia at chromosome 1q41. The causative mutation is a homozygous splice-site mutation in the aarF-domain-containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3). Five additional mutations in ADCK3 were found in three patients with sporadic ataxia, including one known to have CoQ10 deficiency in muscle. All of the patients have childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia with slow progression, and three of six have mildly elevated lactate levels. ADCK3 is a mitochondrial protein homologous to the yeast COQ8 and the bacterial UbiB proteins, which are required for CoQ biosynthesis. Three out of four patients tested showed a low endogenous pool of CoQ10 in their fibroblasts or lymphoblasts, and two out of three patients showed impaired ubiquinone synthesis, strongly suggesting that ADCK3 is also involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis. The deleterious nature of the three identified missense changes was confirmed by the introduction of them at the corresponding positions of the yeast COQ8 gene. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis shows that ADCK3 belongs to the family of atypical kinases, which includes phosphoinositide and choline kinases, suggesting that ADCK3 plays an indirect regulatory role in ubiquinone biosynthesis possibly as part of a feedback loop that regulates ATP production. PMID:18319074

  13. Mutations in SLC45A2 Cause Plumage Color Variation in Chicken and Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Ulrika; Hellström, Anders R.; Tixier-Boichard, Michele; Minvielle, Francis; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Ito, Shin'ichi; Jensen, Per; Rattink, Annemieke; Vereijken, Addie; Andersson, Leif

    2007-01-01

    S*S (Silver), S*N (wild type/gold), and S*AL (sex-linked imperfect albinism) form a series of alleles at the S (Silver) locus on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome Z. Similarly, sex-linked imperfect albinism (AL*A) is the bottom recessive allele at the orthologous AL locus in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The solute carrier family 45, member 2, protein (SLC45A2), previously denoted membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP), has an important role in vesicle sorting in the melanocytes. Here we report five SLC45A2 mutations. The 106delT mutation in the chicken S*AL allele results in a frameshift and a premature stop codon and the corresponding mRNA appears to be degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. A splice-site mutation in the Japanese quail AL*A allele causes in-frame skipping of exon 4. Two independent missense mutations (Tyr277Cys and Leu347Met) were associated with the Silver allele in chicken. The functional significance of the former mutation, associated only with Silver in White Leghorn, is unclear. Ala72Asp was associated with the cinnamon allele (AL*C) in the Japanese quail. The most interesting feature concerning the SLC45A2 variants documented in this study is the specific inhibition of expression of red pheomelanin in Silver chickens. This phenotypic effect cannot be explained on the basis of the current, incomplete, understanding of SLC45A2 function. It is an enigma why recessive null mutations at this locus cause an almost complete absence of both eumelanin and pheomelanin whereas some missense mutations are dominant and cause a specific inhibition of pheomelanin production. PMID:17151254

  14. Catalytic deficiency of human aldolase B in hereditary fructose intolerance caused by a common missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Cross, N C; Tolan, D R; Cox, T M

    1988-06-17

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a human autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of aldolase B that results in an inability to metabolize fructose and related sugars. We report here the first identification of a molecular lesion in the aldolase B gene of an affected individual whose defective protein has previously been characterized. The mutation is a G----C transversion in exon 5 that creates a new recognition site for the restriction enzyme Ahall and results in an amino acid substitution (Ala----Pro) at position 149 of the protein within a region critical for substrate binding. Utilizing this novel restriction site and the polymerase chain reaction, the patient was shown to be homozygous for the mutation. Three other HFI patients from pedigrees unrelated to this individual were found to have the same mutation: two were homozygous and one was heterozygous. We suggest that this genetic lesion is a prevailing cause of hereditary fructose intolerance.

  15. Screening for gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in Malays with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss, using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aishah, Z Siti; Khairi, M D Mohd; Normastura, A R; Zafarina, Z; Zilfalil, B A

    2008-12-01

    To determine the frequency and type of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss. A total of 33 Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss were screened for mutations in the Cx26 coding region. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from buccal swab samples and subjected to polymerase chain reaction. Slow-reannealing was performed, followed by screening using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. Eight of the samples (24.2 per cent) showed heterozygous peaks, and further sequencing of these samples revealed four patients (50.0 per cent) with the W24X mutation, two (25.0 per cent) with the V37I mutation and another two (25.0 per cent) with the G4D mutation. Analysis of buccal swab samples by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is noninvasive and suitable for rapid and reliable screening of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss. Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss have different kinds of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations which are rarely found in other populations.

  16. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:26064258

  17. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  18. Diverse mutational mechanisms cause pathogenic subtelomeric rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yue; Hermetz, Karen E.; Jackson, Jodi M.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Dodd, Anne; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Ballif, Blake C.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Cody, Jannine D.; Ledbetter, David H.; Martin, Christa L.; Rudd, M. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements are a significant cause of intellectual disability and birth defects. Subtelomeric rearrangements, including deletions, duplications and translocations of chromosome ends, were first discovered over 40 years ago and are now recognized as being responsible for several genetic syndromes. Unlike the deletions and duplications that cause some genomic disorders, subtelomeric rearrangements do not typically have recurrent breakpoints and involve many different chromosome ends. To capture the molecular mechanisms responsible for this heterogeneous class of chromosome abnormality, we coupled high-resolution array CGH with breakpoint junction sequencing of a diverse collection of subtelomeric rearrangements. We analyzed 102 breakpoints corresponding to 78 rearrangements involving 28 chromosome ends. Sequencing 21 breakpoint junctions revealed signatures of non-homologous end-joining, non-allelic homologous recombination between interspersed repeats and DNA replication processes. Thus, subtelomeric rearrangements arise from diverse mutational mechanisms. In addition, we find hotspots of subtelomeric breakage at the end of chromosomes 9q and 22q; these sites may correspond to genomic regions that are particularly susceptible to double-strand breaks. Finally, fine-mapping the smallest subtelomeric rearrangements has narrowed the critical regions for some chromosomal disorders. PMID:21729882

  19. A compound heterozygous mutation in the FMO3 gene: the first pediatric case causes fish odor syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Trimethylaminuria (TMAuria), known as “fish odor syndrome,” is a congenital metabolic disorder characterized by an odor resembling that of rotting fish. This odor is caused by the secretion of trimethylamine (TMA) in the breath, sweat, and body secretions and the excretion of TMA along with urine. TMAuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). Most TMAuria cases are caused by missense mutations, but nonsense mutations have also been reported in these cases. Here, we describe the identification of a novel FMO3 gene mutation in a patient with TMAuria and her family. A 3-year-old girl presented with a strong corporal odor after ingesting fish. Genomic DNA sequence analysis revealed that she had compound heterozygous FMO3 mutations; One mutation was the missense mutation p.Val158Ile in exon 3, and the other was a novel nonsense mutation, p.Ser364X, in exon 7 of the FMO3 gene. Familial genetic analyses showed that the p.Val158Ile mutation was derived from the same allele in the father, and the p.Ser364X mutation was derived from the mother. This is the first description of the p.Ser364X mutation, and the first report of a Korean patient with TMAuria caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations. PMID:28392825

  20. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with one dominant and one recessive mutation of the COL7A1 gene in a child with deafness.

    PubMed

    Weinel, Sarah; Lucky, Anne W; Uitto, Jouni; Pfendner, Ellen G; Choo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be inherited in autosomal dominant and recessive forms, the former usually expressed as a milder phenotype, although mild forms of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can occur. We present a patient who was found to be a compound heterozygote, inheriting a dominant mutation from his father and a recessive mutation from his mother, resulting in a clinically severe case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Mutations in the gene for collagen VII (COL7A1) have been documented in both types of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Our patient has also been diagnosed with bilateral auditory neuropathy, a disorder coincidentally also mapped to a nearby gene on chromosome 3p21 (the transmembrane inner ear expressed gene, TMIE).

  1. Biallelic SZT2 Mutations Cause Infantile Encephalopathy with Epilepsy and Dysmorphic Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Hershkovitz, Tova; Heyman, Eli; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Kakar, Naseebullah; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Kornreich, Liora; Thiele, Holger; Bode, Harald; Lagovsky, Irina; Dahary, Dvir; Haviv, Ami; Hubshman, Monika Weisz; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Nürnberg, Peter; Gothelf, Doron; Kubisch, Christian; Shohat, Mordechai; Macaya, Alfons; Borck, Guntram

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are genetically heterogeneous severe disorders in which epileptic activity contributes to neurological deterioration. We studied two unrelated children presenting with a distinctive early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by refractory epilepsy and absent developmental milestones, as well as thick and short corpus callosum and persistent cavum septum pellucidum on brain MRI. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic mutations in seizure threshold 2 (SZT2) in both affected children. The causative mutations include a homozygous nonsense mutation and a nonsense mutation together with an exonic splice-site mutation in a compound-heterozygous state. The latter mutation leads to exon skipping and premature termination of translation, as shown by RT-PCR in blood RNA of the affected boy. Thus, all three mutations are predicted to result in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and/or premature protein truncation and thereby loss of SZT2 function. Although the molecular role of the peroxisomal protein SZT2 in neuronal excitability and brain development remains to be defined, Szt2 has been shown to influence seizure threshold and epileptogenesis in mice, consistent with our findings in humans. We conclude that mutations in SZT2 cause a severe type of autosomal-recessive infantile encephalopathy with intractable seizures and distinct neuroradiological anomalies. PMID:23932106

  2. A nonsense mutation in the COL7A1 gene causes epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald cattle.

    PubMed

    Pausch, Hubert; Ammermüller, Simon; Wurmser, Christine; Hamann, Henning; Tetens, Jens; Drögemüller, Cord; Fries, Ruedi

    2016-12-01

    The widespread use of individual sires for artificial insemination promotes the propagation of recessive conditions. Inadvertent matings between unnoticed carriers of deleterious alleles may result in the manifestation of fatal phenotypes in their progeny. Breeding consultants and farmers reported on Vorderwald calves with a congenital skin disease. The clinical findings in affected calves were compatible with epidermolysis bullosa. Pedigree analysis indicated autosomal recessive inheritance of epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald cattle. We genotyped two diseased and 41 healthy animals at 41,436 single nucleotide polymorphisms and performed whole-genome haplotype-based association testing, which allowed us to map the locus responsible for the skin disease to the distal end of bovine chromosome 22 (P = 8.0 × 10(-14)). The analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data of one diseased calf, three obligate mutation carriers and 1682 healthy animals from various bovine breeds revealed a nonsense mutation (rs876174537, p.Arg1588X) in the COL7A1 gene that segregates with the disease. The same mutation was previously detected in three calves with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa from the Rotes Höhenvieh cattle breed. We show that diseased animals from Vorderwald and Rotes Höhenvieh cattle are identical by descent for an 8.72 Mb haplotype encompassing rs876174537 indicating they inherited the deleterious allele from a recent common ancestor. Autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald and Rotes Höhenvieh cattle is caused by a nonsense mutation in the COL7A1 gene. Our findings demonstrate that deleterious alleles may segregate across cattle populations without apparent admixture. The identification of the causal mutation now enables the reliable detection of carrier animals. Genome-based mating strategies can avoid inadvertent matings of carrier animals thereby preventing the birth of homozygous calves that suffer from a painful skin disease.

  3. Homozygous truncating PTPRF mutation causes athelia.

    PubMed

    Borck, Guntram; de Vries, Liat; Wu, Hsin-Jung; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Lagovsky, Irina; Ishida, Luis Henrique; Thierry, Patrick; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Nürnberg, Peter; Foley, John; Kubisch, Christian; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2014-08-01

    Athelia is a very rare entity that is defined by the absence of the nipple-areola complex. It can affect either sex and is mostly part of syndromes including other congenital or ectodermal anomalies, such as limb-mammary syndrome, scalp-ear-nipple syndrome, or ectodermal dysplasias. Here, we report on three children from two branches of an extended consanguineous Israeli Arab family, a girl and two boys, who presented with a spectrum of nipple anomalies ranging from unilateral hypothelia to bilateral athelia but no other consistently associated anomalies except a characteristic eyebrow shape. Using homozygosity mapping after single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array genotyping and candidate gene sequencing we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in PTPRF as the likely cause of nipple anomalies in this family. PTPRF encodes a receptor-type protein phosphatase that localizes to adherens junctions and may be involved in the regulation of epithelial cell-cell contacts, peptide growth factor signaling, and the canonical Wnt pathway. Together with previous reports on female mutant Ptprf mice, which have a lactation defect, and disrupt