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Sample records for mutation frequency due

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Increased Mutation Frequency Due to Inactivation of the DNA Oxidative Repair System▿

    PubMed Central

    Mandsberg, L. F.; Ciofu, O.; Kirkby, N.; Christiansen, L. E.; Poulsen, H. E.; Høiby, N.

    2009-01-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:19332676

  2. Polymorphic Mutation Frequencies of Clinical and Environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 × 10−8. Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change. PMID:20097818

  3. Polymorphic mutation frequencies of clinical and environmental Stenotrophomonas maltophilia populations.

    PubMed

    Turrientes, María Carmen; Baquero, María Rosario; Sánchez, María Blanca; Valdezate, Sylvia; Escudero, Esther; Berg, Gabrielle; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-03-01

    Mutation frequencies were studied in 174 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from clinical and nonclinical environments by detecting spontaneous rifampin-resistant mutants in otherwise-susceptible populations. The distribution of mutation frequencies followed a pattern similar to that found for other bacterial species, with a modal value of 1 x 10(-8). Nevertheless, the proportion of isolates showing mutation frequencies below the modal value (hypomutators) was significantly higher for S. maltophilia than those so far reported in other organisms. Low mutation frequencies were particularly frequent among environmental S. maltophilia strains (58.3%), whereas strong mutators were found only among isolates with a clinical origin. These results indicate that clinical environments might select bacterial populations with high mutation frequencies, likely by second-order selection processes. In several of the strong-mutator isolates, functional-complementation assays with a wild-type allele of the mutS gene demonstrated that the mutator phenotype was due to the impairment of MutS activity. In silico analysis of the amino acid changes present in the MutS proteins of these hypermutator strains in comparison with the normomutator isolates suggests that the cause of the defect in MutS might be a H683P amino acid change.

  4. Selection-Driven Accumulation of Suppressor Mutants in Bacillus subtilis: The Apparent High Mutation Frequency of the Cryptic gudB Gene and the Rapid Clonal Expansion of gudB+ Suppressors Are Due to Growth under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Gunka, Katrin; Stannek, Lorena; Care, Rachel A.; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil bacteria like Bacillus subtilis can cope with many growth conditions by adjusting gene expression and metabolic pathways. Alternatively, bacteria can spontaneously accumulate beneficial mutations or shape their genomes in response to stress. Recently, it has been observed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the catabolically active glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), RocG, mutates the cryptic gudBCR gene at a high frequency. The suppressor mutants express the active GDH GudB, which can fully replace the function of RocG. Interestingly, the cryptic gudBCR allele is stably inherited as long as the bacteria synthesize the functional GDH RocG. Competition experiments revealed that the presence of the cryptic gudBCR allele provides the bacteria with a selective growth advantage when glutamate is scarce. Moreover, the lack of exogenous glutamate is the driving force for the selection of mutants that have inactivated the active gudB gene. In contrast, two functional GDHs are beneficial for the cells when glutamate was available. Thus, the amount of GDH activity strongly affects fitness of the bacteria depending on the availability of exogenous glutamate. At a first glance the high mutation frequency of the cryptic gudBCR allele might be attributed to stress-induced adaptive mutagenesis. However, other loci on the chromosome that could be potentially mutated during growth under the selective pressure that is exerted on a GDH-deficient mutant remained unaffected. Moreover, we show that a GDH-proficient B. subtilis strain has a strong selective growth advantage in a glutamate-dependent manner. Thus, the emergence and rapid clonal expansion of the active gudB allele can be in fact explained by spontaneous mutation and growth under selection without an increase of the mutation rate. Moreover, this study shows that the selective pressure that is exerted on a maladapted bacterium strongly affects the apparent mutation frequency of mutational hot spots. PMID:23785476

  5. Inherited thrombocytopenia due to GATA-1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Patrick D; Balamohan, Sanjeev M; Raskind, Wendy H; Kacena, Melissa A

    2011-09-01

    The GATA family of transcription factors, including the founding member, GATA-1, have an important role in gene regulation. GATA-1 is integral to successful hematopoiesis. A wide variety of mutations in GATA-1 affect its function, as well as its interaction with its cofactors (especially Friend of GATA) and the genes upon which GATA-1 acts. Here we review the known mutations, focusing on the specific alterations within the amino acid sequence, the resulting effect on hematopoietic development, and the clinical manifestations that result. Attention is also paid to the relationship between Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, and the phenomenon of a truncated GATA-1, named GATA-1s. The evidence for specific interaction between GATA-1 and chromosome 21, which may explain the correlation between these two mutations, is briefly reviewed.

  6. Normosmic Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Due to TAC3/TACR3 Mutations: Characterization of Neuroendocrine Phenotypes and Novel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Voican, Adela; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fagart, Jérôme; Meduri, Geri; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Chanson, Philippe; Lecomte, Pierre; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Context TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) (OMIM #146110). In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. Results From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%). We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants) found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn) probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001) higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. Conclusion The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations. PMID:22031817

  7. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines’ transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness. PMID:26596348

  8. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. High frequency of RPL22 mutations in microsatellite-unstable colorectal and endometrial tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana M; Tuominen, Iina; van Dijk-Bos, Krista; Sanjabi, Bahram; van der Sluis, Tineke; van der Zee, Ate G; Hollema, Harry; Zazula, Monika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2014-12-01

    Ribosomal Protein L22 (RPL22) encodes a protein that is a component of the 60S subunit of the ribosome. Variants in this gene have recently been linked to cancer development. Mutations in an A8 repeat in exon 2 were found in a recent study in 52% of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors. These tumors are particularly prone to mutations in repeats due to mismatch repair deficiency. We screened this coding repeat in our collection of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors (EC) and colorectal tumors (CRC). We found 50% mutation frequency for EC and 77% mutation frequency for CRC. These results confirm the previous study on the involvement of RPL22 in EC and, more importantly, reports for the first time such high mutation frequency in this gene in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, considering the high mutation frequency found, our data point toward an important role for RPL22 in microsatellite instability carcinogenesis.

  10. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  11. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Buery, Rosario Rivera; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Gunduz, Mehmet; Lefeuvre, Mathieu; Fujii, Masae; Inoue, Masahisa; Setsu, Kojun; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in other melanoma subtypes. The purpose of this study was to determine RAS protein expression and NRAS and BRAF mutation in 18 primary OMM cases using immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. Results showed that RAS is intensely expressed in both in situ and invasive OMMs. However, NRAS mutation was only observed in 2/15 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified cases both of which were silent mutations. On the other hand, BRAF missense mutations were observed only in 1/15 cases with PCR amplification. NRAS and BRAF mutations were independent from previously reported c-kit mutations. The classical V600E BRAF mutation was not found; instead a novel V600L was observed suggesting that the oncogenic event in OMM is different from that in skin melanoma. The low frequency of NRAS and BRAF mutations indicate that these genes are not common, but probable events in OMM pathogenesis, most likely independent of c-kit mutation.

  12. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability.(1) Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy.(2-5) The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology

  13. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Song-Ro; Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System) to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11) were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10−8) suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments. PMID:27341568

  14. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    The site frequency spectrum (SFS) has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the “phylogenetically-conditioned SFS” or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans. PMID:27977673

  15. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy due to a novel mutation in ACAD9.

    PubMed

    Garone, Caterina; Donati, Maria Alice; Sacchini, Michele; Garcia-Diaz, Beatriz; Bruno, Claudio; Calvo, Sarah; Mootha, Vamsi K; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2013-09-01

    Mendelian forms of complex I deficiency are usually associated with fatal infantile encephalomyopathy. Application of "MitoExome" sequencing (deep sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome and the coding exons of >1000 nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial proteome) allowed us to reveal an unusual clinical variant of complex I deficiency due to a novel homozygous mutation in ACAD9. The patient had an infantile-onset but slowly progressive encephalomyopathy and responded favorably to riboflavin therapy. A 13-year-old boy had exercise intolerance, weakness, and mild psychomotor delay. Muscle histochemistry showed mitochondrial proliferation, and biochemical analysis revealed severe complex I deficiency (15% of normal). The level of complex I holoprotein was reduced as determined by use of Western blot both in muscle (54%) and in fibroblasts (57%). The clinical presentation of complex I deficiency due ACAD9 mutations spans from fatal infantile encephalocardiomyopathy to mild encephalomyopathy. Our data support the notion that ACAD9 functions as a complex I assembly protein. ACAD9 is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing flavoprotein, and treatment with riboflavin is advisable.

  16. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  17. Atypical Progeroid Syndrome due to Heterozygous Missense LMNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Agarwal, Anil K.; Simha, Vinaya; Levine, Benjamin; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Crow, Yanick

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and mandibuloacral dysplasia are well-recognized allelic autosomal dominant and recessive progeroid disorders, respectively, due to mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. Heterozygous LMNA mutations have also been reported in a small number of patients with a less well-characterized atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the phenotype of patients presenting with APS. Results: We report 11 patients with APS from nine families, many with novel heterozygous missense LMNA mutations, such as, P4R, E111K, D136H, E159K, and C588R. These and previously reported patients now reveal a spectrum of clinical features including progeroid manifestations such as short stature, beaked nose, premature graying, partial alopecia, high-pitched voice, skin atrophy over the hands and feet, partial and generalized lipodystrophy with metabolic complications, and skeletal anomalies such as mandibular hypoplasia and mild acroosteolysis. Skin fibroblasts from these patients when assessed for lamin A/C expression using epifluorescence microscopy revealed variable nuclear morphological abnormalities similar to those observed in patients with HGPS. However, these nuclear abnormalities in APS patients could not be rescued with 48 h treatment with farnesyl transferase inhibitors, geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors or trichostatin-A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Immunoblots of cell lysates from fibroblasts did not reveal prelamin A accumulation in any of these patients. Conclusions: APS patients have a few overlapping but some distinct clinical features as compared with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. The pathogenesis of clinical manifestations in APS patients seems not to be related to accumulation of mutant farnesylated prelamin A. PMID:19875478

  18. Allele Frequencies at Microsatellite Loci: The Stepwise Mutation Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, A. M.; Slatkin, M.; Freimer, N. B.

    1993-01-01

    We summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. We show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. We show that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. PMID:8454213

  19. Determination and Therapeutic Exploitation of Ebola Virus Spontaneous Mutation Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Alfson, Kendra J.; Worwa, Gabriella; Carrion, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) is an RNA virus that can cause hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Typically, RNA viruses have high spontaneous mutation rates, which permit rapid adaptation to selection pressures and have other important biological consequences. However, it is unknown if filoviruses exhibit high mutation frequencies. Ultradeep sequencing and a recombinant EBOV that carries the gene encoding green fluorescent protein were used to determine the spontaneous mutation frequency of EBOV. The effects of the guanosine analogue ribavirin during EBOV infections were also assessed. Ultradeep sequencing revealed that the mutation frequency for EBOV was high and similar to those of other RNA viruses. Interestingly, significant genetic diversity was not observed in viable viruses, implying that changes were not well tolerated. We hypothesized that this could be exploited therapeutically. In vitro, the presence of ribavirin increased the error rate, and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 27 μM. In a mouse model of ribavirin therapy given pre-EBOV exposure, ribavirin treatment corresponded with a significant delay in time to death and up to 75% survival. In mouse and monkey models of therapy given post-EBOV exposure, ribavirin treatment also delayed the time to death and increased survival. These results demonstrate that EBOV has a spontaneous mutation frequency similar to those of other RNA viruses. These data also suggest a potential for therapeutic use of ribavirin for human EBOV infections. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic disease with high case fatality rates; there are no approved vaccines or therapies. We determined the spontaneous mutation frequency of EBOV, which is relevant to understanding the potential for the virus to adapt. The frequency was similar to those of other RNA viruses. Significant genetic diversity was not observed in viable viruses, implying that

  20. The Frequency of Some Thrombophilic Mutations in Eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Bakan, Ebubekir; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Bakan, Nuri; Sebin, Engin; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene polymorphisms are closely associated with thrombophilia. Regional frequencies of these mutations may show a characteristic state. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Eastern Turkey. In 433 patients sent to the laboratory with the suspicion of thrombophilia, using whole blood samples, an automated Nucleic Acid Test was used for mutation determinations in Verigene System. The kit module was designed to detect the Factor V G1691A / Factor II G20210A / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T single nucleotide polymorphisms. In 433 patients, 8.7% for Factor V G1691A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, 3.9% for Factor II G20210A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, and 43.9% for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype and 3.0% homozygous mutation genotype. Detection of these commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase single nucleotide polymorphisms can help to identify patients in high risk group and to evaluate the interaction of genetic and acquired risk factors. Our findings suggest that commonly seen thrombophilic allele mutation frequency in our region is the same as the data reported in the literature.

  1. The Frequency of Some Thrombophilic Mutations in Eastern Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Bakan, Ebubekir; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Bakan, Nuri; Sebin, Engin; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene polymorphisms are closely associated with thrombophilia. Regional frequencies of these mutations may show a characteristic state. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Eastern Turkey. Materials and Methods: In 433 patients sent to the laboratory with the suspicion of thrombophilia, using whole blood samples, an automated Nucleic Acid Test was used for mutation determinations in Verigene System. The kit module was designed to detect the Factor V G1691A / Factor II G20210A / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T single nucleotide polymorphisms. Results: In 433 patients, 8.7% for Factor V G1691A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, 3.9% for Factor II G20210A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, and 43.9% for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype and 3.0% homozygous mutation genotype. Conclusion: Detection of these commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase single nucleotide polymorphisms can help to identify patients in high risk group and to evaluate the interaction of genetic and acquired risk factors. Our findings suggest that commonly seen thrombophilic allele mutation frequency in our region is the same as the data reported in the literature. PMID:27026755

  2. Identification and frequencies of cystic fibrosis mutations in central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Pepermans, Xavier; Mellado, Soledad; Chialina, Sergio; Wagener, Marta; Gallardo, Liliana; Lande, Hilda; Bordino, Walter; Baran, Daniel; Bours, Vincent; Leal, Teresinha

    2016-01-01

    The Argentinian population is mainly of Caucasian origin, with a small contingent of indigenous descent. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that a panel of mutations designed for European countries is not optimal as a first-line molecular diagnosis for routine use in this country of mixed European origin. Phenotype analyses combined with a European screening panel of 71 mutations followed by Sanger sequencing and large rearrangement study, were used to characterize the identification and distribution of CFTR mutations in the Santa Fe province of Argentina. Clinical review of 121 subjects suspected of CF during childhood led to selection of 83 unrelated patients. Thirty four different mutations, including two new ones, c.2554dupT and p.Leu49Pro, were detected. The total sensitivity was 91% (n = 151/166 alleles). Frequencies of CFTR mutations in Argentinian populations differ from those of their European ancestry. A new first line panel of 21 CFTR mutations with a sensitivity of 84% is proposed for routine use in central Argentina.

  3. Is VHF Fresnel reflectivity due to low frequency buoyancy waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Vincent, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    VHF radar echoes are greatly enhanced near the zenith relative to other directions. This enhancement must be due to reflection from horizontally stratified laminate of refractive index. The refractivity laminate are due to the displacements of low frequency buoyancy (internal gravity) waves acting on the background vertical gradient of refractivity. VANZANDT (1982) has shown that the observed spectra of mesoscale wind fluctuations in the troposphere and lower stratosphere are modeled by a universal spectrum of buoyancy (internal gravity) waves. Since the observed frequency spectrum is red, the buoyancy wave model of the vertical displacement spectrum is strongly enhanced near the zenith. In other terms, the resulting refractivity irregularities are strongly stratified.

  4. Frequency and Complexity of De Novo Structural Mutation in Autism.

    PubMed

    Brandler, William M; Antaki, Danny; Gujral, Madhusudan; Noor, Amina; Rosanio, Gabriel; Chapman, Timothy R; Barrera, Daniel J; Lin, Guan Ning; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Watts, Amanda C; Wong, Lawrence C; Estabillo, Jasper A; Gadomski, Therese E; Hong, Oanh; Fajardo, Karin V Fuentes; Bhandari, Abhishek; Owen, Renius; Baughn, Michael; Yuan, Jeffrey; Solomon, Terry; Moyzis, Alexandra G; Maile, Michelle S; Sanders, Stephan J; Reiner, Gail E; Vaux, Keith K; Strom, Charles M; Zhang, Kang; Muotri, Alysson R; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Leal, Suzanne M; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Corsello, Christina; Sebat, Jonathan

    2016-04-07

    Genetic studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have established that de novo duplications and deletions contribute to risk. However, ascertainment of structural variants (SVs) has been restricted by the coarse resolution of current approaches. By applying a custom pipeline for SV discovery, genotyping, and de novo assembly to genome sequencing of 235 subjects (71 affected individuals, 26 healthy siblings, and their parents), we compiled an atlas of 29,719 SV loci (5,213/genome), comprising 11 different classes. We found a high diversity of de novo mutations, the majority of which were undetectable by previous methods. In addition, we observed complex mutation clusters where combinations of de novo SVs, nucleotide substitutions, and indels occurred as a single event. We estimate a high rate of structural mutation in humans (20%) and propose that genetic risk for ASD is attributable to an elevated frequency of gene-disrupting de novo SVs, but not an elevated rate of genome rearrangement.

  5. Frequency and Complexity of De Novo Structural Mutation in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Brandler, William M.; Antaki, Danny; Gujral, Madhusudan; Noor, Amina; Rosanio, Gabriel; Chapman, Timothy R.; Barrera, Daniel J.; Lin, Guan Ning; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Watts, Amanda C.; Wong, Lawrence C.; Estabillo, Jasper A.; Gadomski, Therese E.; Hong, Oanh; Fajardo, Karin V. Fuentes; Bhandari, Abhishek; Owen, Renius; Baughn, Michael; Yuan, Jeffrey; Solomon, Terry; Moyzis, Alexandra G.; Maile, Michelle S.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Reiner, Gail E.; Vaux, Keith K.; Strom, Charles M.; Zhang, Kang; Muotri, Alysson R.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Leal, Suzanne M.; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Corsello, Christina; Sebat, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have established that de novo duplications and deletions contribute to risk. However, ascertainment of structural variants (SVs) has been restricted by the coarse resolution of current approaches. By applying a custom pipeline for SV discovery, genotyping, and de novo assembly to genome sequencing of 235 subjects (71 affected individuals, 26 healthy siblings, and their parents), we compiled an atlas of 29,719 SV loci (5,213/genome), comprising 11 different classes. We found a high diversity of de novo mutations, the majority of which were undetectable by previous methods. In addition, we observed complex mutation clusters where combinations of de novo SVs, nucleotide substitutions, and indels occurred as a single event. We estimate a high rate of structural mutation in humans (20%) and propose that genetic risk for ASD is attributable to an elevated frequency of gene-disrupting de novo SVs, but not an elevated rate of genome rearrangement. PMID:27018473

  6. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  7. Hemochromatosis due to mutations in transferrin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Roetto, Antonella; Daraio, Filomena; Alberti, Federica; Porporato, Paolo; Calì, Angelita; De Gobbi, Marco; Camaschella, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A rare recessive disorder which leads to iron overload and severe clinical complications similar to those reported in HFE-related hemochromatosis has been delineated and sometimes called hemochromatosis type 3. The gene responsible is Transferrin Receptor 2 (TFR2), which maps to chromosome 7q22. The TFR2 gene presents a significative homology to transferrin receptor (TFRC) gene, encodes for a transmembrane protein with a large extracellular domain, is able to bind transferrin, even if with lower affinity than TFRC. The TFR2 function is still unclear. The transcript does not contain IRE elements and is not modified by the cellular iron status. At variance with TFRC, interactions between TFR2 and HFE do not occur, at least in their soluble forms. TFR2 is spliced in two alternative forms, alfa and beta. The alfa form is strongly expressed in the liver. The beta form, codified from a start site in exon 4 of the alpha, has a low and ubiquitous expression. Using anti-TFR2 monoclonal antibodies we have confirmed expression of the protein in the liver but also in duodenal epithelial cells, and studied the protein functional behaviour in cell lines, in response to iron addition, iron deprivation and olo-transferrin exposure. Our results suggest a regulatory role of TFR2 in iron metabolism. Five TFR2 homozygous mutations have been documented in HFE3 patients: a nonsense mutation (Y250X); a C insertion that causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon (E60X); a missense mutation (M172K); a 12 basepair deletion in exon 16, that causes 4 aminoacid loss (AVAQ 594-597del) in the extracellular domain of TFR2; a missense mutation in exon 17 (Q690P). The mutation analysis supports the hypothesis that all are private mutations. The pathogenetic role of TFR2 in hemochromatosis has been recently further demonstrated through the targeted expression of the Y250X human mutation in mice, which develop sings of iron overload identical to the human disease. Although the rarity of TFR2

  8. PSORS2 is due to mutations in CARD14.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine T; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D O; Pierson, Katherine C; Yang, Chi-Fan; Joyce, Cailin E; Ryan, Caitriona; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A; Liu, Yin; Chen, Yongqing; McBride, Alison A; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Menter, Alan; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A; Bowcock, Anne M

    2012-05-04

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated genetic disorder of the skin and is associated with arthritis in approximately 30% of cases. Previously, we localized PSORS2 (psoriasis susceptibility locus 2) to chromosomal region 17q25.3-qter after a genome-wide linkage scan in a family of European ancestry with multiple cases of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Linkage to PSORS2 was also observed in a Taiwanese family with multiple psoriasis-affected members. In caspase recruitment domain family, member 14 (CARD14), we identified unique gain-of-function mutations that segregated with psoriasis by using genomic capture and DNA sequencing. The mutations c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) (in the family of European descent) and c.349+5G>A (in the Taiwanese family) altered splicing between CARD14 exons 3 and 4. A de novo CARD14 mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala), was detected in a child with sporadic, early-onset, generalized pustular psoriasis. CARD14 activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), and compared with wild-type CARD14, the p.Gly117Ser and p.Glu138Ala substitutions were shown to lead to enhanced NF-kB activation and upregulation of a subset of psoriasis-associated genes in keratinocytes. These genes included chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and interleukin 8 (IL8). CARD14 is localized mainly in the basal and suprabasal layers of healthy skin epidermis, whereas in lesional psoriatic skin, it is reduced in the basal layer and more diffusely upregulated in the suprabasal layers of the epidermis. We propose that, after a triggering event that can include epidermal injury, rare gain-of-function mutations in CARD14 initiate a process that includes inflammatory cell recruitment by keratinocytes. This perpetuates a vicious cycle of epidermal inflammation and regeneration, a cycle which is the hallmark of psoriasis.

  9. Spondyloenchondrodysplasia Due to Mutations in ACP5: A Comprehensive Survey.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Tracy A; Rice, Gillian I; Adib, Navid; Ades, Lesley; Barete, Stephane; Baskar, Kannan; Baudouin, Veronique; Cebeci, Ayse N; Clapuyt, Philippe; Coman, David; De Somer, Lien; Finezilber, Yael; Frydman, Moshe; Guven, Ayla; Heritier, Sébastien; Karall, Daniela; Kulkarni, Muralidhar L; Lebon, Pierre; Levitt, David; Le Merrer, Martine; Linglart, Agnes; Livingston, John H; Navarro, Vincent; Okenfuss, Ericka; Puel, Anne; Revencu, Nicole; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Vivarelli, Marina; Wouters, Carine; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Crow, Yanick J

    2016-04-01

    Spondyloenchondrodysplasia is a rare immuno-osseous dysplasia caused by biallelic mutations in ACP5. We aimed to provide a survey of the skeletal, neurological and immune manifestations of this disease in a cohort of molecularly confirmed cases. We compiled clinical, genetic and serological data from a total of 26 patients from 18 pedigrees, all with biallelic ACP5 mutations. We observed a variability in skeletal, neurological and immune phenotypes, which was sometimes marked even between affected siblings. In total, 22 of 26 patients manifested autoimmune disease, most frequently autoimmune thrombocytopenia and systemic lupus erythematosus. Four patients were considered to demonstrate no clinical autoimmune disease, although two were positive for autoantibodies. In the majority of patients tested we detected upregulated expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), in keeping with the autoimmune phenotype and the likely immune-regulatory function of the deficient protein tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Two mutation positive patients did not demonstrate an upregulation of ISGs, including one patient with significant autoimmune disease controlled by immunosuppressive therapy. Our data expand the known phenotype of SPENCD. We propose that the OMIM differentiation between spondyloenchondrodysplasia and spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation is no longer appropriate, since the molecular evidence that we provide suggests that these phenotypes represent a continuum of the same disorder. In addition, the absence of an interferon signature following immunomodulatory treatments in a patient with significant autoimmune disease may indicate a therapeutic response important for the immune manifestations of spondyloenchondrodysplasia.

  10. High frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Kari J; Catón, Javier; Morgan, Peter R; Ristimäki, Ari; Ruhin, Blandine; Kellokoski, Jari; Elenius, Klaus; Heikinheimo, Kristiina

    2014-04-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic neoplasm. Although ameloblastomas rarely metastasise, recurrences together with radical surgery often result in facial deformity and significant morbidity. Development of non-invasive therapies has been precluded by a lack of understanding of the molecular background of ameloblastoma pathogenesis. When addressing the role of ERBB receptors as potential new targets for ameloblastoma, we discovered significant EGFR over-expression in clinical samples using real-time RT-PCR, but observed variable sensitivity of novel primary ameloblastoma cells to EGFR-targeted drugs in vitro. In the quest for mutations downstream of EGFR that could explain this apparent discrepancy, Sanger sequencing revealed an oncogenic BRAF V600E mutation in the cell line resistant to EGFR inhibition. Further analysis of the clinical samples by Sanger sequencing and BRAF V600E-specific immunohistochemistry demonstrated a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutations (15 of 24 samples, 63%). These data provide novel insight into the poorly understood molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and offer a rationale to test drugs targeting EGFR or mutant BRAF as novel therapies for ameloblastoma. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. High frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kurppa, Kari J; Catón, Javier; Morgan, Peter R; Ristimäki, Ari; Ruhin, Blandine; Kellokoski, Jari; Elenius, Klaus; Heikinheimo, Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic neoplasm. Although ameloblastomas rarely metastasise, recurrences together with radical surgery often result in facial deformity and significant morbidity. Development of non-invasive therapies has been precluded by a lack of understanding of the molecular background of ameloblastoma pathogenesis. When addressing the role of ERBB receptors as potential new targets for ameloblastoma, we discovered significant EGFR over-expression in clinical samples using real-time RT–PCR, but observed variable sensitivity of novel primary ameloblastoma cells to EGFR-targeted drugs in vitro. In the quest for mutations downstream of EGFR that could explain this apparent discrepancy, Sanger sequencing revealed an oncogenic BRAF V600E mutation in the cell line resistant to EGFR inhibition. Further analysis of the clinical samples by Sanger sequencing and BRAF V600E-specific immunohistochemistry demonstrated a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutations (15 of 24 samples, 63%). These data provide novel insight into the poorly understood molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and offer a rationale to test drugs targeting EGFR or mutant BRAF as novel therapies for ameloblastoma. PMID:24374844

  12. Virus mutation frequencies can be greatly underestimated by monoclonal antibody neutralization of virions.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; de la Torre, J C; Steinhauer, D A; Clarke, D; Duarte, E; Domingo, E

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants have been widely used to estimate virus mutation frequencies. We demonstrate that standard virion neutralization inevitably underestimates monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant genome frequencies of vesicular stomatitis virus, due to phenotypic masking-mixing when wild-type (wt) virions are present in thousandsfold greater numbers. We show that incorporation of antibody into the plaque overlay medium (after virus penetration at 37 degrees C) can provide accurate estimates of genome frequencies of neutral monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant viruses in wt clones. By using this method, we have observed two adjacent G----A base transition frequencies in the I3 epitope to be of the order of 10(-4) in a wt glycine codon. This appears to be slightly lower than the frequencies observed at other sites for total (viable and nonviable) virus genomes when using a direct sequence approach. Images PMID:2479770

  13. PSORS2 Is Due to Mutations in CARD14

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Catherine T.; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Pierson, Katherine C.; Yang, Chi-Fan; Joyce, Cailin E.; Ryan, Caitriona; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A.; Liu, Yin; Chen, Yongqing; McBride, Alison A.; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Menter, Alan; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A.; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated genetic disorder of the skin and is associated with arthritis in approximately 30% of cases. Previously, we localized PSORS2 (psoriasis susceptibility locus 2) to chromosomal region 17q25.3-qter after a genome-wide linkage scan in a family of European ancestry with multiple cases of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Linkage to PSORS2 was also observed in a Taiwanese family with multiple psoriasis-affected members. In caspase recruitment domain family, member 14 (CARD14), we identified unique gain-of-function mutations that segregated with psoriasis by using genomic capture and DNA sequencing. The mutations c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) (in the family of European descent) and c.349+5G>A (in the Taiwanese family) altered splicing between CARD14 exons 3 and 4. A de novo CARD14 mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala), was detected in a child with sporadic, early-onset, generalized pustular psoriasis. CARD14 activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), and compared with wild-type CARD14, the p.Gly117Ser and p.Glu138Ala substitutions were shown to lead to enhanced NF-kB activation and upregulation of a subset of psoriasis-associated genes in keratinocytes. These genes included chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and interleukin 8 (IL8). CARD14 is localized mainly in the basal and suprabasal layers of healthy skin epidermis, whereas in lesional psoriatic skin, it is reduced in the basal layer and more diffusely upregulated in the suprabasal layers of the epidermis. We propose that, after a triggering event that can include epidermal injury, rare gain-of-function mutations in CARD14 initiate a process that includes inflammatory cell recruitment by keratinocytes. This perpetuates a vicious cycle of epidermal inflammation and regeneration, a cycle which is the hallmark of psoriasis. PMID:22521418

  14. Increased mitochondrial mutation frequency after an island colonization: positive selection or accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations?

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Emilie A; Tautz, Diethard

    2013-04-23

    Island colonizations are excellent models for studying early processes of evolution. We found in a previous study on mice that had colonized the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Archipelago about 200 years ago that they were derived from a single founder lineage and that this showed an unexpectedly large number of new mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop. To assess whether positive selection has played a role in the emergence of these variants, we have obtained 16 full mitochondrial genome sequences from these mice. For comparison, we have compiled 57 mitochondrial genome sequences from laboratory inbred lines that became established about 100 years ago, also starting from a single founder lineage. We find that the island mice and the laboratory lines show very similar mutation frequencies and patterns. None of the patterns in the Kerguelen mice provides evidence for positive selection. We conclude that nearly neutral evolutionary processes that assume the presence of slightly deleterious variants can fully explain the patterns. This supports the notion of time-dependency of molecular evolution and provides a new calibration point. Based on the observed mutation frequency, we calculate an average evolutionary rate of 0.23 substitutions per site per Myr for the earliest time frame of divergence, which is about six times higher than the long-term rate of 0.037 substitutions per site per Myr.

  15. [Frequency, risk factors and vaginal colonization due to Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    González Pedraza Avilés, Alberto; Sánchez Hernández, Gabriela; Ponce Rosas, Raúl Efrén

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies associate Escherichia coli with symptomatic infections at vaginal level, mainly associated to changes in the normal flora taken place by a series of factors characteristic of the host. To recognize their colonization frequency and these factors, it becomes important due to their association with perinatal complications, besides considering this colonization like the critical step preceding urinary tract infection. To determine the frequency of colonization of Escherichia coli in 519 female patients, the role of the bacterium in the vaginal ecology likes probable cause of clinical manifestations and to recognize the associate's factors of risk with its vaginal colonization. 519 women were studied: 350 symptomatic and 169 asymptomatic. Vaginal swab specimens were inoculated onto the routine mediums. Associations of Escherichia coli with various risk factors were examined by using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals, and statistical significance was assessed by the Chi statistic or Fischer's exact test. Overall Escherichia coli was isolated from 95 (18.3%) of the women. Factors that were significantly associated with vaginal carriage of E. coli were the age extreme groups, the climacteric, and the bad genital habits. The highest frequency of vaginal colonization for Escherichia coli was presented in the population groups where there is hormonal deficiency, mainly of estrogens of the type estradiol. The vaginal colonization for E. coli doesn't associate to sexual behavior. Although E. coli doesn't produce defined symptoms at vaginal level, the relatively low carriage rate indicates that this organism should not be considered as part of the normal indigenous vaginal flora and that it should take into account due to the perinatal complication it is associated.

  16. Clinical, Pathological and Mutational Spectrum of Dystroglycanopathy Due to LARGE Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Meilleur, Katherine G.; Zukosky, Kristen; Medne, Livija; Fequiere, Pierre; Powell-Hamilton, Nina; Winder, Thomas L.; Alsaman, Abdulaziz; El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Hu, Ying; Donkervoort, Sandra; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Eagle, Ralph; Finkel, Richard; Scavina, Mena; Hood, Ian C.; Rorke-Adams, Lucy B.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a subtype of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) of varying severity that can affect the brain and eyes, ranging from Walker-Warburg syndrome with severe brain malformation to milder CMD presentations with affected or normal cognition and later onset. Mutations in dystroglycanopathy genes affect a specific glycoepitope on α-dystroglycan (αDG); of the 14 genes implicated to date, LARGE is the glycosyltransferase that adds the final xylose and glucuronic acid, allowing αDG to bind ligands including laminin 211 and neurexin. Only 11 patients with LARGE mutations have been reported. We report the clinical, neuroimaging and genetic features of 4 additional patients. We confirm that gross deletions and rearrangements are important mutational mechanisms for LARGE. The brain abnormalities overshadowed the initially mild muscle phenotype in all 4 patients. We present the first comprehensive postnatal neuropathology of the brain, spinal cord and eyes of 1 patient with a homozygous LARGE mutation at Cys443; in this patient, polymicrogyria was the predominant cortical malformation; densely festooned polymicrogyria were overlaid by a continuous agyric surface. In view of the severity of these abnormalities, Cys443 may be a functionally important residue in the LARGE protein whereas the mutation p.Glu509Lys of Patient 1 in this study may confer a milder phenotype. Overall, these results expand the clinical and genetic spectrum of dystroglycanopathy. PMID:24709677

  17. Alterations in the frequency of trinucleotide repeat dynamic mutations in offspring conceived through assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying-Ming; Li, Li; Zhou, Li-Ming; Le, Fang; Cai, Li-Yi; Yu, Ping; Zhu, Yu-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Wang, Li-Ya; Li, Le-Jun; Lou, Yi-Yun; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Lou, Hang-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng; Jin, Fan

    2013-09-01

    How does the frequency of trinucleotide repeat dynamic mutations in offspring conceived through assisted reproductive technology (ART) compare with the frequency of these mutations in control offspring conceived from spontaneous pregnancies? There is a slight increase in dynamic mutation instability in offspring conceived through ART compared with the naturally conceived offspring. There is evidence to suggest that ART can increase the risk of birth defects and karyotypic abnormalities. However, the accumulating evidence of an association between ART and de novo genetic aberrations is controversial. A prospective clinical observational study was performed on 246 families recruited from an in vitro fertilisation (IVF) centre at a tertiary-care, university-affiliated teaching hospital from 2008 to 2012. The study included 147 ART families [75 IVF and 72 intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)] in the study group and 99 natural-conception families in the control group. Parental, umbilical cord and infant peripheral blood samples were collected, and the trinucleotide repeats of the ATN1, AR, ATXN1, ATXN3, Huntington, DMPK and FMR-1 genes were investigated between the generations; these genes were chosen due to their ability to undergo dynamic mutation. The frequencies and sizes of the mutational repeats, as well as the intergenerational instability, were measured. In 2466 transmissions identified in the ART offspring, 2.11% (n = 52/2466) of the alleles were unstable upon transmission, while in the control group offspring, the frequency of dynamic mutation was 0.77% (n = 10/1300); this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The unstable transmission alleles were detected in 32 (2.48%) of the 1288 alleles from the IVF offspring and in 20 (1.70%) of the 1178 alleles from the ICSI offspring; both of these frequencies were significantly different from that of naturally conceived offspring (0.77%) (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, there were no

  18. Mutation frequency and specificity with age in liver, bladder and brain of lacI transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, G R; Oda, Y; de Boer, J G; Glickman, B W

    2000-01-01

    Mutation frequency and specificity were determined as a function of age in nuclear DNA from liver, bladder, and brain of Big Blue lacI transgenic mice aged 1.5-25 months. Mutations accumulated with age in liver and accumulated more rapidly in bladder. In the brain a small initial increase in mutation frequency was observed in young animals; however, no further increase was observed in adult mice. To investigate the origin of mutations, the mutational spectra for each tissue and age were determined. DNA sequence analysis of mutant lacI transgenes revealed no significant changes in mutational specificity in any tissue at any age. The spectra of mutations found in aging animals were identical to those in younger animals, suggesting that they originated from a common set of DNA lesions manifested during DNA replication. The data also indicated that there were no significant age-related mutational changes due to oxidative damage, or errors resulting from either changes in the fidelity of DNA polymerase or the efficiency of DNA repair. Hence, no evidence was found to support hypotheses that predict that oxidative damage or accumulation of errors in nuclear DNA contributes significantly to the aging process, at least in these three somatic tissues. PMID:10757770

  19. Low frequency of AXIN2 mutations and high frequency of MUTYH mutations in patients with multiple polyposis.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Sophie; Guillemot, François; Triboulet, Jean-Pierre; Cattan, Stéphane; Mouton, Christine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2006-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis has been linked to germline mutations in the APC tumor suppressor gene. However, a number of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (with either classical or attenuated phenotype) have no APC mutation. Recently, germline mutations in the Wnt pathway component gene AXIN2 have been associated with tooth agenesis-colorectal cancer syndrome. Moreover, biallelic mutations in the base excision repair gene MUTYH have been associated with polyposis and early-onset colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to further assess the contribution of AXIN2 and MUTYH to hereditary colorectal cancer susceptibility. AXIN2 and MUTYH genes were screened for germline mutations by PCR and direct sequencing in 39 unrelated patients with multiple adenomas or colorectal cancer without evidence of APC mutation nor mismatch repair defect. Two novel AXIN2 variants were detected in one patient with multiple adenomas, but no clearly pathogenic mutation. In contrast, nine different MUTYH mutations were detected in eight patients, including four novel mutations. Biallelic MUTYH mutations were only found in patients with multiple adenomatous polyposis (7 out of 22 (32%)). Interestingly, five MUTYH mutation carriers had a family history consistent with dominant inheritance. Moreover, one patient with biallelic MUTYH mutations presented with multiple adenomas and severe tooth agenesis. Therefore, germline mutations are rare in AXIN2 but frequent in MUTYH in patients with multiple adenomas. Our data suggest that genetic testing of MUTYH may be of interest in patients with pedigrees apparently compatible with autosomal recessive as well as dominant inheritance.

  20. [Frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation in different French regions].

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    1998-05-01

    We studied the frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation on 1,836 DNA samples originating from ten French regions. This mutation confers, in the homozygous state, resistance to HIV-1 infection. For the whole territory, the mean percentage presence of the delta 32 mutation is 9.2%. The mutation is statistically more frequent in the north (11.2%) than in the south (6.3%) of the country; this differentiation corresponds probably to a gradient of decreasing frequencies of the delta 32 mutation in Europe.

  1. Effect of Ames dwarfism and caloric restriction on spontaneous DNA mutation frequency in different mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Busuttil, Rita A; Calder, R Brent; Dollé, Martijn E T; Diaz, Vivian; McMahan, C Alex; Bartke, Andrzej; Nelson, James; Reddick, Robert; Vijg, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Genetic instability has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Caloric restriction (CR) and suppression of the somatotroph axis significantly increase life span in the mouse and reduce multiple symptoms of aging, including cancer. To test if in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is reduced by such mechanisms, we crossed long-lived Ames dwarf mice with a C57BL/6J line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from tissues and organs into Escherichia coli to measure mutant frequencies. Four cohorts were studied: (1) ad lib wild-type; (2) CR wild-type; (3) ad lib dwarf; and (4) CR dwarf. While both CR wild-type and ad lib dwarf mice lived significantly longer than the ad lib wild-type mice, under CR conditions dwarf mice did not live any longer than ad lib wild-type mice. While this may be due to an as yet unknown adverse effect of the C57BL/6J background, it did not prevent an effect on spontaneous mutation frequencies at the lacZ locus, which were assessed in liver, kidney and small intestine of 7- and 15-month-old mice of all four cohorts. A lower mutant frequency in the ad lib dwarf background was observed in liver and kidney at 7 and 15 months of age and in small intestine at 15 months of age as compared to the ad lib wild-type. CR also significantly reduced spontaneous mutant frequency in kidney and small intestine, but not in liver. In a separate cohort of lacZ-C57BL/6J mice CR was also found to significantly reduce spontaneous mutant frequency in liver and small intestine, across three age levels. These results indicate that two major pro-longevity interventions in the mouse are associated with a reduced mutation frequency. This could be responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced longevity associated with Ames dwarfism and CR.

  2. Effect of Ames dwarfism and caloric restriction on spontaneous mutation frequency in different mouse tissues

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Busuttil, Rita; Calder, Brent; Dollé, Martijn E. T.; Diaz, Vivian; McMahan, C. Alex; Bartke, Andrzej; Nelson, James; Reddick, Robert; Vijg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Genetic instability has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Caloric restriction (CR) and suppression of the somatotroph axis significantly increase life span in the mouse and reduces multiple symptoms of aging, including cancer. To test if in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is reduced by such mechanisms, we crossed long-lived Ames dwarf mice with a C57BL/6J line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from tissues and organs into E. coli to measure mutant frequencies. Four cohorts were studied: (1) ad lib wild-type; (2) CR wild-type; (3) ad lib dwarf; and (4) CR dwarf. While both CR wild-type and ad lib dwarf mice lived significantly longer than the ad lib wild-type mice, under CR conditions dwarf mice did not live any longer than ad lib wild-type mice. While this may be due to an as yet unknown adverse effect of the C57Bl/6 background, it did not prevent an effect on spontaneous mutation frequencies at the lacZ locus, which were assessed in liver, kidney and small intestine of 7- and 15-month old mice of all four cohorts. A lower mutant frequency in the ad lib dwarf background was observed in liver and kidney at 7 and 15 months of age and in small intestine at 15 months of age as compared to the ad lib wild-type. CR also significantly reduced spontaneous mutant frequency in kidney and small intestine, but not in liver. In a separate cohort of lacZ-C57BL/6J mice CR was also found to significantly reduce spontaneous mutant frequency in liver and small intestine, across three age levels. These results indicate that two major pro-longevity interventions in the mouse are associated with a reduced mutation frequency. This could be responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced longevity associated with Ames dwarfism and CR. PMID:18565572

  3. Contrasting Frequencies and Effects of cis- and trans-Regulatory Mutations Affecting Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Brian P. H.; Duveau, Fabien; Yuan, David C.; Tryban, Stephen; Yang, Bing; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable differences in gene expression are caused by mutations in DNA sequences encoding cis-regulatory elements and trans-regulatory factors. These two classes of regulatory change differ in their relative contributions to expression differences in natural populations because of the combined effects of mutation and natural selection. Here, we investigate how new mutations create the regulatory variation upon which natural selection acts by quantifying the frequencies and effects of hundreds of new cis- and trans-acting mutations altering activity of the TDH3 promoter in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the absence of natural selection. We find that cis-regulatory mutations have larger effects on expression than trans-regulatory mutations and that while trans-regulatory mutations are more common overall, cis- and trans-regulatory changes in expression are equally abundant when only the largest changes in expression are considered. In addition, we find that cis-regulatory mutations are skewed toward decreased expression while trans-regulatory mutations are skewed toward increased expression. We also measure the effects of cis- and trans-regulatory mutations on the variability in gene expression among genetically identical cells, a property of gene expression known as expression noise, finding that trans-regulatory mutations are much more likely to decrease expression noise than cis-regulatory mutations. Because new mutations are the raw material upon which natural selection acts, these differences in the frequencies and effects of cis- and trans-regulatory mutations should be considered in models of regulatory evolution. PMID:26782996

  4. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  5. A neo-Darwinian algorithm: asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication promote evolution.

    PubMed

    Wada, K N; Doi, H; Tanaka, S; Wada, Y; Furusawa, M

    1993-12-15

    Evolution is, in a sense, to resolve optimization problems. Our neo-Darwinian algorithm based on the mechanics of inheritance and natural selection uses double-stranded DNA-type genetic information to resolve the "knap-sack problem." The algorithm with asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication most effectively resolved the problem. Our results strongly suggest that disparity in mutations caused by the asymmetric machinery of DNA replication promotes evolution, in particular of diploid organisms with a high mutation rate, in a small population, and under strong selection pressure.

  6. Two children with "dropped head" syndrome due to lamin A/C mutations.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Jeremy C; Kanter, Ronald J; Carboni, Michael P; Smith, Edward C

    2010-11-01

    LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) is a recently described disorder characterized by infantile-onset myopathy due to mutations in the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. We report the genetic and clinical characteristics of two unrelated L-CMD patients. Patient 1 harbored a novel, L35P mutation and patient 2 a previously reported R249W mutation. The striking phenotype associated with L-CMD is important to recognize, as molecular diagnostic testing can spare patients unnecessary procedures and prompt the physician to monitor for associated cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Lethal Keratitis, Ichthyosis, and Deafness Syndrome Due to the A88V Connexin 26 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Carmen; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Fajardo-Ramirez, Oscar R; Ramírez, Brenda; Hua, Rong; Choate, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a well-characterized disease that has been related to mutations in the GJB6 gene. Clinical features such as erythrokeratoderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, alopecia, and progressive vascularizing keratitis, among others, are well known in this entity. In this report we describe a newborn female patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome with a lethal outcome due to sepsis. The patient harbored the mutation A88V that has been previously reported in lethal cases.

  8. Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to STAR mutations in a Caucasian patient.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Casas, Luis; Bose, Himangshu S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), the most severe form of CAH, is most commonly caused by mutations in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which is required for the movement of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membranes to synthesize pregnenolone. This study was performed to evaluate whether the salt-losing crisis and the adrenal inactivity experienced by a Scandinavian infant is due to a de novo STAR mutation. The study was conducted at the University of North Dakota, the Mercer University School of Medicine and the Memorial University Medical Center to identify the cause of this disease. The patient was admitted to a pediatric endocrinologist at the Sanford Health Center for salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure. Lipoid CAH is an autosomal recessive disease, we identified two de novo heterozygous mutations (STAR c.444C>A (STAR p.N148K) and STAR c.557C>T (STAR p.R193X)) in the STAR gene, causing lipoid CAH. New onset lipoid CAH can occur through de novo mutations and is not restricted to any specific region of the world. This Scandinavian family was of Norwegian descent and had lipoid CAH due to a mutation in S TAR exons 4 and 5. Overexpression of the STAR p.N148K mutant in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells supplemented with an electron transport system showed activity similar to the background level, which was ∼10% of that observed with wild-type (WT) STAR. Protein-folding analysis showed that the finger printing of the STAR p.N148K mutant is also different from the WT protein. Inherited STAR mutations may be more prevalent in some geographical areas but not necessarily restricted to those regions. STAR mutations cause lipoid CAH.This is a pure population from a caucasian family.Mutation ablated STAR activity.The mutation resulted in loosely folded conformation of STAR.

  9. Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to STAR mutations in a Caucasian patient

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Casas, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), the most severe form of CAH, is most commonly caused by mutations in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which is required for the movement of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membranes to synthesize pregnenolone. This study was performed to evaluate whether the salt-losing crisis and the adrenal inactivity experienced by a Scandinavian infant is due to a de novo STAR mutation. The study was conducted at the University of North Dakota, the Mercer University School of Medicine and the Memorial University Medical Center to identify the cause of this disease. The patient was admitted to a pediatric endocrinologist at the Sanford Health Center for salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure. Lipoid CAH is an autosomal recessive disease, we identified two de novo heterozygous mutations (STAR c.444C>A (STAR p.N148K) and STAR c.557C>T (STAR p.R193X)) in the STAR gene, causing lipoid CAH. New onset lipoid CAH can occur through de novo mutations and is not restricted to any specific region of the world. This Scandinavian family was of Norwegian descent and had lipoid CAH due to a mutation in S TAR exons 4 and 5. Overexpression of the STAR p.N148K mutant in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells supplemented with an electron transport system showed activity similar to the background level, which was ∼10% of that observed with wild-type (WT) STAR. Protein-folding analysis showed that the finger printing of the STAR p.N148K mutant is also different from the WT protein. Inherited STAR mutations may be more prevalent in some geographical areas but not necessarily restricted to those regions. Learning points STAR mutations cause lipoid CAH.This is a pure population from a caucasian family.Mutation ablated STAR activity.The mutation resulted in loosely folded conformation of STAR. PMID:27047663

  10. TERT promoter mutations are a major indicator of recurrence and death due to papillary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Martyn; Ren, Yan; O'Neill, Christine; Gill, Anthony; Aniss, Adam; Sywak, Mark; Sidhu, Stan; Delbridge, Leigh; Learoyd, Diana; de Vathaire, Florent; Robinson, Bruce G; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J

    2016-08-01

    TERT promoter mutations have been associated with adverse prognosis in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). We investigated the association between TERT promoter mutations and survival from PTC. Retrospective observational cohort study. Eighty consecutive patients with PTC who underwent surgery between 1990 and 2003. TERT promoter was genotyped in DNA from 80 archival PTCs by Sanger sequencing. Median follow-up was 106 months (range 1-270). Outcomes analysis was stratified according to disease and overall survival status. For each parameter, relative risk (RR) adjusted for age at first surgery and gender was estimated. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression models. PTCs from 11 patients (14%) contained either C228T or C250T TERT promoter mutation. TERT mutations were significantly associated with adverse prognostic features such as older age (P = 0·002), male gender (P = 0·01) and Stage IV disease (P = 0·03). Four patients died from PTC during follow-up: 3 patients with TERT mutations (27%) and one without (1·5%). Disease-related mortality rate with or without TERT mutations was 33·7 vs 1·6 per 1000 patient-years respectively, that is 10 (95% CI = 1·0-104·1, P = 0·05) fold higher, after adjustment for age at first surgery and gender. The combination of TERT promoter mutation and BRAF(V) (600E) significantly increased disease-related death risk (P = 0·002). TERT mutations increased expression of a reporter gene in thyroid cells containing BRAF(V) (600E) . TERT promoter mutations are a major indicator of death due to PTCs. Conversely, absence of TERT mutations portends better survival. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Endocrinology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Impaired prosaposin lysosomal trafficking in frontotemporal lobar degeneration due to progranulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bracko, Oliver; Choi, Ji Whae; Jia, Yan; Nana, Alissa L.; Brady, Owen Adam; Hernandez, Jean C. Cruz; Nishimura, Nozomi; Seeley, William W.; Hu, Fenghua

    2017-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of progranulin (PGRN) due to mutations in the granulin (GRN) gene causes frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and complete loss of PGRN leads to a lysosomal storage disorder, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests that PGRN is essential for proper lysosomal function, but the precise mechanisms involved are not known. Here, we show that PGRN facilitates neuronal uptake and lysosomal delivery of prosaposin (PSAP), the precursor of saposin peptides that are essential for lysosomal glycosphingolipid degradation. We found reduced levels of PSAP in neurons both in mice deficient in PGRN and in human samples from FTLD patients due to GRN mutations. Furthermore, mice with reduced PSAP expression demonstrated FTLD-like pathology and behavioural changes. Thus, our data demonstrate a role of PGRN in PSAP lysosomal trafficking and suggest that impaired lysosomal trafficking of PSAP is an underlying disease mechanism for NCL and FTLD due to GRN mutations. PMID:28541286

  12. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  13. Sporadic Hirschsprung`s disease due to a novel nonsense mutation in the RET protooncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Donis-Keller, H.; Langer, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is characterized by a lack of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the hindgut. This is most likely due to a failure of the progenitor cells (that are destined to become the ganglion cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses) to complete their distal migration in the colon. Recently, mutations in the RET protoocogene have been reported in association with HSCR. We report a novel nonsense mutation resulting in a severely truncated protein. Germline DNA from a panel of 6 HSCR patients was analyzed by SSCP for 20 exons of RET. Eight exons were also directly sequenced. We identified a novel mutation within RET exon 2. The mutation (TAC{sub 36}{yields}TAG{sub 36}), which occurs at nucleotide position 108, involves the replacement of tyrosine with a stop codon and results in a truncated 35 amino acid protein. This mutation is the most 5{prime} nonsense mutation reported thus far. Interestingly, the patient has no prior family history of HSCR and was also diagnosed with multiple developmental anomalies including dysplastic kidney. Recent gene targeting studies with mouse models have shown that RET is essential for normal renal development. However, a parallel phenotype has not been seen in other reported HSCR patients with RET mutations. The observations reported here provide evidence that RET plays a role in human renal development. Ongoing studies will determine the extent of RET involvement in sporadic cases of HSCR.

  14. Permanent neonatal diabetes due to a novel insulin signal peptide mutation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Suhaimi; Mohd Ali, Johari; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Harun, Fatimah

    2013-06-01

    We report a rare case of permanent neonatal diabetes (PND) due to insulin (INS) gene mutation in a 51-month-old girl who presented with hyperglycemia in the neonatal period. Mutational analysis of KCNJ11 and INS was performed and this detected a novel heterozygous c.38T>G (p.Leu13Arg) INS de novo mutation. The non-conservative change substitutes the highly conserved L(13) residue within the hydrophobic core region of the preproinsulin signal peptide. Given the frequent tendency of heterozygous INS mutations to exhibit dominant negative disease pathogenesis, it is likely that the mutant preproinsulin perturbed the non-mutant counterpart progression and processing within the β-cells, and this resulted to a permanent form of congenital diabetes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Redistribution of suprathermal electrons due to fishbone frequency jumps.

    PubMed

    Macor, A; Goniche, M; Artaud, J F; Decker, J; Elbeze, D; Garbet, X; Giruzzi, G; Hoang, G T; Maget, P; Mazon, D; Molina, D; Nguyen, C; Peysson, Y; Sabot, R; Ségui, J L

    2009-04-17

    MHD instabilities driven by fast electrons identified as fishbonelike modes have been detected on Tore Supra during lower hybrid current drive discharges. Direct experimental evidence is reported of a novel feature: the regular redistribution of suprathermal electrons toward external tokamak regions which are correlated to periodic mode frequency jumps. Sharp drops of the electron temperature time trace are factually linked to the cyclical deterioration of the fast electron confinement.

  16. Redistribution of Suprathermal Electrons due to Fishbone Frequency Jumps

    SciTech Connect

    Macor, A.; Goniche, M.; Artaud, J. F.; Decker, J.; Elbeze, D.; Garbet, X.; Giruzzi, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Maget, P.; Mazon, D.; Molina, D.; Nguyen, C.; Peysson, Y.; Sabot, R.; Segui, J. L.

    2009-04-17

    MHD instabilities driven by fast electrons identified as fishbonelike modes have been detected on Tore Supra during lower hybrid current drive discharges. Direct experimental evidence is reported of a novel feature: the regular redistribution of suprathermal electrons toward external tokamak regions which are correlated to periodic mode frequency jumps. Sharp drops of the electron temperature time trace are factually linked to the cyclical deterioration of the fast electron confinement.

  17. Frequency of TERT Promoter Mutations in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Robert; Taubert, Helge; Zinnall, Ulrike; Giedl, Johannes; Gaisa, Nadine T; Burger, Maximilian; Ruemmele, Petra; Hurst, Carolyn D; Knowles, Margaret A; Wullich, Bernd; Hartmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Recently, recurrent mutations within the core promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene generating consensus binding sites for ETS transcription factor family members were described in melanomas and other malignancies (e.g. bladder cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma). These mutations were discussed as early drivers for malignant transformation. In prostate cancer (PrCa) TERT expression has been associated with a poor prognosis and higher risk for disease recurrence. The underlying mechanisms for high TERT expression in PrCa have still not been clarified. To date, data on TERT promoter mutation analysis in PrCa are sparse. Therefore, we performed sequence analysis of the core promoter region of the TERT gene in an unselected cohort of prostate tumors. Sections from 167 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and cryopreserved prostate tumors were microdissected and used for DNA isolation. The mutation hotspot region within the TERT core promoter (-260 to +60) was analyzed by direct Sanger sequencing or SNaPshot analysis. All cases were analyzed successfully. Mutations within the core promoter of the TERT gene were not detected in any of the cases with all tumors exhibiting a wild-type sequence. TERT core promoter mutations reported from several other malignancies were not detected in our unselected cohort of PrCa. These data indicate that alterations within the core promoter of the TERT gene do not play an important role in prostate carcinogenesis.

  18. Unravelling 5-oxoprolinuria (pyroglutamic aciduria) due to bi-allelic OPLAH mutations: 20 new mutations in 14 families.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Patel, Nisha; Walter, Melanie; Jordanova, Albena; Alfadhel, Majid; Barić, Ivo; Çoker, Mahmut; Damli-Huber, Aynur; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; García Segarra, Nuria; Geraghty, Michael T; Jåtun, Bjørn Magne; Kalkan Uçar, Sema; Kriewitz, Merten; Rauchenzauner, Markus; Bilić, Karmen; Tournev, Ivailo; Till, Claudia; Sayson, Bryan; Beumer, Daniel; Ye, Cynthia Xin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Vallance, Hilary; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-09-01

    Primary 5-oxoprolinuria (pyroglutamic aciduria) is caused by a genetic defect in the γ-glutamyl cycle, affecting either glutathione synthetase or 5-oxoprolinase. While several dozens of patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency have been reported, with hemolytic anemia representing the clinical key feature, 5-oxoprolinase deficiency due to OPLAH mutations is less frequent and so far has not attracted much attention. This has prompted us to investigate the clinical phenotype as well as the underlying genotype in patients from 14 families of various ethnic backgrounds who underwent diagnostic mutation analysis following the detection of 5-oxoprolinuria. In all patients with 5-oxoprolinuria studied, bi-allelic mutations in OPLAH were indicated. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for 5-oxoprolinase deficiency is further supported by the identification of a single mutation in all 9/14 parent sample sets investigated (except for the father of one patient whose result suggests homozygosity), and the absence of 5-oxoprolinuria in all tested heterozygotes. It is remarkable, that all 20 mutations identified were novel and private to the respective families. Clinical features were highly variable and in several sib pairs, did not segregate with 5-oxoprolinuria. Although a pathogenic role of 5-oxoprolinase deficiency remains possible, this is not supported by our findings. Additional patient ascertainment and long-term follow-up is needed to establish the benign nature of this inborn error of metabolism. It is important that all symptomatic patients with persistently elevated levels of 5-oxoproline and no obvious explanation are investigated for the genetic etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Due Process Hearings under the IDEA: A Longitudinal Frequency Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Gischlar, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to track the trend in the number of due process hearings that have been adjudicated under the IDEA (i.e., in which the hearing officer issued a written decision) nationally for the past 15 years. The secondary purpose is to rank order the states by the number of adjudicated hearings both on an overall basis…

  20. Due Process Hearings under the IDEA: A Longitudinal Frequency Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Gischlar, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to track the trend in the number of due process hearings that have been adjudicated under the IDEA (i.e., in which the hearing officer issued a written decision) nationally for the past 15 years. The secondary purpose is to rank order the states by the number of adjudicated hearings both on an overall basis…

  1. Frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 chemokine receptor gene mutation in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Karam, W; Jurjus, R; Khoury, N; Khansa, H; Assad, C; Zalloua, P; Jurjus, A

    2004-01-01

    A direct correlation between HIV infection and mutation in the chemokine receptor (CCR5) gene has been established. However, such correlation has never been investigated in Lebanon. We report the frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 mutation in a random sample of 209 healthy, HIV-1 seronegative Lebanese aged 19-68. Overall, 4.8% were heterozygous for the mutation. Homozygosity was absent from our sample. The frequency for the CCR5-delta 32 allele was 2.5%. Distribution of the mutation was unaffected by sex, age, religion or educational level. The frequency in the Lebanese population is consistent with that in the origin of the mutation in northern Europe. This could be attributed to a gene flow into the Middle East from northern Europe.

  2. High Frequency QPOs due to Black Hole Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos; Fukumura, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed computations of photon orbits emitted by flares at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) of accretion disks around rotating black holes. We show that for sufficiently large spin parameter, i.e. a > 0.94 M, flare a sufficient number of photons arrive at an observer after multiple orbits around the black hole, to produce an "photon echo" of constant lag, i.e. independent of the relative phase between the black hole and the observer, of T approximates 14 M. This constant time delay, then, leads to a power spectrum with a QPO at a frequency nu approximates 1/14M, even for a totally random ensemble of such flares. Observation of such a QPO will provide incontrovertible evidence for the high spin of the black hole and a very accurate, independent, measurement of its mass.

  3. High Frequency QPOs due to Black Hole Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos; Fukumura, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed computations of photon orbits emitted by flares at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) of accretion disks around rotating black holes. We show that for sufficiently large spin parameter, i.e. a > 0.94 M, flare a sufficient number of photons arrive at an observer after multiple orbits around the black hole, to produce an "photon echo" of constant lag, i.e. independent of the relative phase between the black hole and the observer, of T approximates 14 M. This constant time delay, then, leads to a power spectrum with a QPO at a frequency nu approximates 1/14M, even for a totally random ensemble of such flares. Observation of such a QPO will provide incontrovertible evidence for the high spin of the black hole and a very accurate, independent, measurement of its mass.

  4. Partial biotinidase deficiency is usually due to the D444H mutation in the biotinidase gene.

    PubMed

    Swango, K L; Demirkol, M; Hüner, G; Pronicka, E; Sykut-Cegielska, J; Schulze, A; Mayatepek, E; Wolf, B

    1998-05-01

    Newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency has identified children with profound biotinidase deficiency (<10% of mean normal serum activity) and those with partial biotinidase deficiency (10%-30% of mean normal serum activity). Children with partial biotinidase deficiency and who are not treated with biotin do not usually exhibit symptoms unless they are stressed (i.e., prolonged infection). We found that 18 of 19 randomly selected individuals with partial deficiency have the transversion missense mutation G1330>C, which substitutes a histidine for aspartic acid444 (D444H) in one allele of the biotinidase gene. We have previously estimated that the D444H mutation results in 48% of normal enzyme activity for that allele and occurs with an estimated frequency of 0.039 in the general population. The D444H mutation in biotinidase deficiency is similar to the Duarte variant in galactosemia. The D444H mutation in one allele in combination with a mutation for profound deficiency in the other allele is the common cause of partial biotinidase deficiency.

  5. Adult-onset autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy due to BIN1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; Malfatti, Edoardo; Dondaine, Nicolas; Koch, Catherine; Vasli, Nasim; Kress, Wolfram; Strittmatter, Matthias; Taratuto, Ana Lia; Gonorazky, Hernan; Laforêt, Pascal; Maisonobe, Thierry; Olivé, Montse; Gonzalez-Mera, Laura; Fardeau, Michel; Carrière, Nathalie; Clavelou, Pierre; Eymard, Bruno; Bitoun, Marc; Rendu, John; Fauré, Julien; Weis, Joachim; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Romero, Norma B; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-12-01

    Centronuclear myopathies are congenital muscle disorders characterized by type I myofibre predominance and an increased number of muscle fibres with nuclear centralization. The severe neonatal X-linked form is due to mutations in MTM1, autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy with neonatal or childhood onset results from mutations in BIN1 (amphiphysin 2), and dominant cases were previously associated to mutations in DNM2 (dynamin 2). Our aim was to determine the genetic basis and physiopathology of patients with mild dominant centronuclear myopathy without mutations in DNM2. We hence established and characterized a homogeneous cohort of nine patients from five families with a progressive adult-onset centronuclear myopathy without facial weakness, including three sporadic cases and two families with dominant disease inheritance. All patients had similar histological and ultrastructural features involving type I fibre predominance and hypotrophy, as well as prominent nuclear centralization and clustering. We identified heterozygous BIN1 mutations in all patients and the molecular diagnosis was complemented by functional analyses. Two mutations in the N-terminal amphipathic helix strongly decreased the membrane-deforming properties of amphiphysin 2 and three stop-loss mutations resulted in a stable protein containing 52 supernumerary amino acids. Immunolabelling experiments revealed abnormal central accumulation of dynamin 2, caveolin-3, and the autophagic marker p62, and general membrane alterations of the triad, the sarcolemma, and the basal lamina as potential pathological mechanisms. In conclusion, we identified BIN1 as the second gene for dominant centronuclear myopathy. Our data provide the evidence that specific BIN1 mutations can cause either recessive or dominant centronuclear myopathy and that both disorders involve different pathomechanisms. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights

  6. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK) is caused by heterozygous KCNC1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Fábio A; Andrade, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a distinct group of seizure disorders characterized by gradual neurological decline with ataxia, myoclonus and recurring seizures. There are several forms of PME, among which the most recently described is MEAK - myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation. This particular subtype is caused by a recurrent de novo heterozygous mutation (c.959G>A, p.Arg320His) in the KCNC1 gene, which maps to chromosome 11 and encodes for the Kv3.1 protein (a subunit of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels). Loss of Kv3 function disrupts the firing properties of fast-spiking neurons, affects neurotransmitter release and induces cell death. Specifically regarding Kv3.1 malfunctioning, the most affected neurons include inhibitory GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar neurons. Impairment of the former cells is believed to contribute to myoclonus and seizures, whereas dysfunction of the latter to ataxia and tremor. Phenotypically, MEAK patients generally have a normal early development. At the age of 6 to 14 years, they present with myoclonus, which tends to progressively worsen with time. Tonic-clonic seizures may or may not be present, and some patients develop mild cognitive impairment following seizure onset. Typical electroencephalographic features comprise generalized epileptiform discharges and, in some cases, photosensitivity. Brain imaging is either normal or shows cerebellar atrophy. The identification of MEAK has both expanded the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of PME and established an emerging role for de novo mutations in PME.

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Sébastien; Lavie, Julie; Banneau, Guillaume; Voirand, Nathalie; Lavandier, Karine; Debouverie, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous group of diseases little known in clinical practice due to its low prevalence, slow progression, and difficult diagnosis. This results in an underestimation of HSP leading to belated diagnosis and management. In depth diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and identification of genomic mutations. We describe the clinical presentation and pathogeny of HSP through a report of a case due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene (SPG31). Patient concerns: A 64-year-old woman presented gait disturbances due to spasticity of the lower limbs progressing since her third decade. Previous investigations failed to find any cause. Interventions: DNA analysis was performed to search for HSP causing mutations. Diagnoses: A novel heterozygote mutation (c.595 + 1G>A) of the REEP1 gene, within the splice site of intron 6, was discovered. This nucleotide change causes exon 6 skipping leading to frame shift and a truncated transcript identified by complementary DNA sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products. Outcomes: REEP1 is a known protein predominantly located in the upper motor neurons. Mutation of REEP1 primary affects the longest axons explaining predominance of pyramidal syndrome on lower limbs. Lessons: Slow progressive pyramidal syndrome of the lower limbs should elicit a diagnosis of HSP. We describe a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene causing HSP. Pathogeny is based on resulting abnormal REEP1 protein which is involved in the development of longest axons constituting the corticospinal tracts. PMID:28099355

  8. Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) due to a recurrent filamin A (FLNA) mutation

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Torrado, Maria; Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Tello, Ana Maria; Arberas, Claudia L; Cardinale, Antonella; Piccolo, Pasquale; Bacino, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) is an X-linked dominant syndrome with distal limb anomalies, pigmentary skin defects, digital fibromas, and generalized bone involvement due to a recurrent mutation in the filamin A (FLNA) gene. We here report the mutation c.5217G>A in FLNA in three families with TODPD and we found possible germline and somatic mosaicism in two out of the three families. The occurrence of somatic and germline mosaicism for TODPD indicates that caution should be taken in counseling recurrence risks for these conditions upon presentation of an isolated case. PMID:25614868

  9. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  10. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James W; Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2015-03-01

    The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c×CBA/Ca F1 hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300μT of 50Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible.

  11. Angelman syndrome due to a novel splicing mutation of the UBE3A gene.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Stefano; Anesi, Laura; Polli, Roberta; Toldo, Irene; Casarin, Alberto; Drigo, Paola; Murgia, Alessandra

    2008-08-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, absence of speech, seizures, abnormal electroencephalography (EEG), and happy disposition. The syndrome results from lack of function of the maternal copy of the UBE3A gene on the imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome critical region; it is caused by large deletions, paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting center defects or UBE3A deletions, and point mutations. We found a novel splice-site mutation of the UBE3A gene in a child with clinical and EEG features of Angelman syndrome. This case further points out the fact that individuals with Angelman syndrome and mutations of the UBE3A gene have a phenotype that tends to be rather mild, however, undistinguishable, both from the clinical and the electrophysiological points of view, from the Angelman syndrome phenotype due to other known molecular mechanisms.

  12. Early onset ectopia lentis due to a FBN1 mutation with non-penetrance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Lai, Yu-Hung; Capasso, Jenina E; Han, Stella; Levin, Alex V

    2015-06-01

    Isolated ectopia lentis is usually autosomal dominant and commonly due to the mutations of FBN1 gene. We report on a family with ectopia lentis. The propositus is a 6-year-old boy with bilateral superior-temporal ectopia lentis. His echocardiogram was normal and he did not meet the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Molecular genetic testing revealed c.1948 C>T (p.Arg650Cys) in FBN1. The mother has visual acuity of 20/20 with -4.50 right eye and -2.50 left eye. She has no evidence of ectopia lentis. DNA analysis revealed that she has the same FBN1 mutation. Seven other maternal family members also have ectopia lentis. In conclusion, we report on a case of early-onset autosomal dominant isolated ectopia lentis caused by FBN1 mutation that has previously been reported only in Marfan syndrome. The child's mother presumably represents a rare case of nonpenetrance.

  13. Paediatric phenotype of Kallmann syndrome due to mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Zenaty, Delphine; Bretones, Patricia; Lambe, Cécile; Guemas, Isabelle; David, Michel; Léger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2006-07-25

    Kallmann syndrome characterised by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and anosmia is genetically heterogeneous with X-linked, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms. The autosomal dominant form due to loss of function mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) accounts for about 10% of cases. We report here three paediatric cases of Kallmann syndrome with unusual phenotype in two unrelated patients with severe ear anomalies (hypoplasia or agenesis of external ear) associated with classical features, such as cleft palate, dental agenesis, syndactylia, micropenis and cryptorchidism. We found de novo mutation in these two patients (Cys178Ser and Arg622Gly, respectively), and one inherited Arg622Gln mutation with intrafamilial variable phenotype. These genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that paediatric phenotypic expression of FGFR1 loss of function mutations is highly variable, the severity of the oro-facial malformations at birth does not predict gonadotropic function at the puberty and that de novo mutations of FGFR1 are relatively frequent.

  14. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P.

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. [Mutation frequencies in HIV-1 subtype-A genome in regions containing efficient RNAi targets].

    PubMed

    Kravatsky, Y V; Chechetkin, V R; Fedoseeva, D M; Gorbacheva, M A; Kretova, O V; Tchurikov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The development of gene-therapy technology using RNAi for AIDS/HIV-1 treatment is a prospective alternative to traditional anti-retroviral therapy. RNAi targets could be selected in HIV-1 transcripts and in CCR5 mRNA. Previously, we experimentally selected a number of efficient siRNAs that target HIV-1 RNAs. The viral genome mutates frequently, and RNAi strength is very sensitive, even for a single mismatches. That is why it is important to study nucleotide sequences of targets in clinical isolates of HIV-1. In the present study, we analyzed mutations in 6 of about 300-bp regions containing RNAi targets from HIV-1 subtype A isolates in Russia. Estimates of the mean frequencies of mutations in the targets were obtained and the frequencies of mutations in the different codon positions were compared. The frequencies of mutations in the vicinity of the targets and directly within the targets were also compared and have been shown to be approximately the same. The frequencies of indels in the chosen regions have been assessed. Their frequencies have proved to be two to three orders of magnitude less compared to that for mutations.

  16. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the liver.

    PubMed

    Quaas, Alexander; Oldopp, Theresa; Tharun, Lars; Klingenfeld, Catina; Krech, Till; Sauter, Guido; Grob, Tobias J

    2014-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the TERT gene is a major cause of the cancer-specific increase in telomerase activity. Recently, frequent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter have been described in several tumor entities such as melanoma, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. By generating a putative consensus binding site for ETS transcription factors within the TERT promoter, these mutations are predicted to increase promoter activity and TERT transcription. In order to improve the understanding of the role of TERT promoter mutation in liver tumorigenesis, the mutational status of the TERT promoter was analyzed in 78 hepatocellular carcinomas, 15 hepatocellular adenomas, and 52 intrahepatic cholangiocarciomas. The promoter region of TERT was screened for the two hotspot mutations using PCR and restriction fragment length analysis, utilizing the introduction of novel restriction sites by the somatic mutations. TERT promoter mutation was found in 37 of 78 hepatocellular carcinomas (47 %) and was restricted to the -124C>T mutation. Frequency of mutations was associated with grade of differentiation ranging from 39 % in well-differentiated tumors to 73 % in high-grade hepatocellular carcinomas. TERT promoter mutations were not found in 15 hepatocellular adenomas and 52 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. These data show that TERT promoter mutation is the most frequent genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma known at this time. The striking predominance of the -124C>T mutation compared with other tumor entities suggest a biological difference of the two hotspot mutations. Analysis of TERT promoter mutation might become a diagnostic tool distinguishing hepatocellular adenoma from well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Disruption of Xpg increases spontaneous mutation frequency, particularly A:T to C:G transversion.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, N; Hayashi, E; Sasanuma, S; Mita, K; Shiomi, T

    2001-12-19

    Cells isolated from Xpg (the mouse counterpart of XPG)-disrupted mice underwent premature senescence and showed early onset of immortalization, suggesting that Xpg might be involved in genetic stability. Recent studies showed that human XPG, in addition to its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER), was involved in the repair of oxidative base damages such as thymine glycol (Tg) and 8-oxo-guanine (8-oxoG), and this may explain the genetic instability observed in Xpg-deficient cells. To clarify this point, we determined spontaneous mutation frequencies and the type of spontaneous base substitution mutations in cells obtained from normal and Xpg-deficient mice using the supF shuttle vector (pNY200) for mutation assay. The spontaneous mutation frequency of the supF gene in pNY200 propagated in the Xpg-deficient cells was about three times higher than that in normal cells, indicating the importance of Xpg in reducing the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The frequency of spontaneous base substitution mutations at A:T sites, particularly that of the A:T to C:G transversion, increased markedly in the Xpg-deficient cells.

  18. Neb: a zebrafish model of nemaline myopathy due to nebulin mutation.

    PubMed

    Telfer, William R; Nelson, Darcee D; Waugh, Trent; Brooks, Susan V; Dowling, James J

    2012-05-01

    Nemaline myopathy is one of the most common and severe non-dystrophic muscle diseases of childhood. Patients typically present in infancy with hypotonia, weakness, delayed motor development, and bulbar and respiratory difficulties. Mutations in six different genes are associated with nemaline myopathy, with nebulin mutations being the most common. No treatments or disease-modifying therapies have been identified for this disease. One of the major barriers to treatment development is the lack of models amenable to rapid and coordinated testing of potential therapeutic strategies. To overcome this barrier, we have characterized the first zebrafish model of nemaline myopathy. This model, termed neb, harbors a recessive mutation in the nebulin gene that results in decreased Nebulin protein levels, a severe motor phenotype and premature lethality. In addition to impaired motor function, neb zebrafish exhibit many of the features associated with human nemaline myopathy. These include impaired force generation, altered thin filament length and the presence of specific histopathological changes, including the formation of nemaline bodies. In summary, neb zebrafish mirror the genetic, clinical and pathological aspects of nemaline myopathy due to NEB mutation, and thus are an excellent model for future therapy development for this devastating disorder.

  19. Low frequency KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer patients and the presence of multiple mutations in oncogenic drivers in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Morehouse, Chris; Zhu, Wei; Korolevich, Susana; Sui, Dan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Lehmann, Kim; Liu, Zheng; Kiefer, Christine; Czapiga, Meggan; Su, Xinying; Brohawn, Philip; Gu, Yi; Higgs, Brandon W; Yao, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity can confound the results of mutation analyses in oncodriver genes using traditional methods thereby challenging the application of targeted cancer therapy strategies for patients Ultradeep sequencing can detect low frequency and expanded clonal mutations in primary tumors to better inform treatment decisions. KRAS coding exons in 61 treatment-naive colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors and KRAS, EGFR, ALK, and MET in lung tumors from three Chinese non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were sequenced using ultradeep sequencing methods. Forty-one percent of CRC patients (25/61) harbored mutations in the KRAS active domain, eight of which (13%) were not detected by Sanger sequencing. Three (of eight) had frequencies less than 10% and one patient harbored more than one mutation. Low frequency KRAS active (G12R) and EGFR kinase domain mutations (G719A) were identified in one NSCLC patient. A second NSCLC patient showed an EML4-ALK fusion with ALK, EGFR, and MET mutations. A third NSCLC patient harbored multiple low frequency mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MET as well as ALK gene copy number increases. Within the same patient, multiple low frequency mutations occurred within a gene. A complex pattern of intrinsic low frequency driver mutations in well-known tumor oncogenes may exist prior to treatment, resulting in resistance to targeted therapies. Ultradeep sequencing can characterize intratumor heterogeneity and identify such mutations to ultimately affect treatment decisions.

  20. A mutation in Caenorhabditis elegans that increases recombination frequency more than threefold.

    PubMed

    Rose, A M; Baillie, D L

    1979-10-18

    In higher organisms the rate of recombination between genetic loci is presumably responsive to selective pressure. Recently, selective pressures and mutational events that influence recombination have been reviewed. Mutational sites and chromosomal rearrangements that enhance or suppress recombination frequency in specific regions are known, but general mechanisms that enhance recombination have not yet been discovered. We describe here the isolation and characterisation of a strain of the hermaphroditic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, that has a recombination frequency at least threefold higher than that found in the wild type. In this strain, rec-1, the number of reciprocal recombination events between linked loci is increased. This is true for all pairs of linked loci studies so far. The high recombination strain behaves as if it carries a classical recessive mutation, although a second mutation exists which can alter the recessive behaviour of rec-1.

  1. Frequency shifts in a rubidium frequency standard due to coupling to another standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaduszliwer, Bernardo; Cook, R. A.; Frueholz, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Highly reliable timing system, such as used on board satellites, may incorporate a hot standby atomic clock besides the active one. RF couplings between them may affect the performance of the active clock. The effect of such couplings between two rubidium atomic clocks was investigated, and it was found that they will add an oscillatory term to the Allan Variance of the active clock, degrading its frequency stability, and that under certain circumstances they may also shift the active clock's operating frequency. These two effects are discussed in detail, and the level of isolation required to render them negligible is established.

  2. Low frequency of PDCD10 mutations in a panel of CCM3 probands: potential for a fourth CCM locus.

    PubMed

    Liquori, Christina L; Berg, Michel J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Ottenbacher, Monica; Sorlie, Marielle; Leedom, Tracey P; Cannella, Milena; Maglione, Vittorio; Ptacek, Louis; Johnson, Eric W; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities of the brain that can result in a variety of neurological disabilities, including stroke and seizures. Linkage analyses using autosomal dominant families manifesting CCMs have identified three different causative loci on chromosomes 7q21.2 (CCM1), 7p13 (CCM2), and 3q25.2-q27 (CCM3). Mutations in the gene Krit1 are responsible for CCM1, mutations in the gene MGC4607 are responsible for CCM2, and mutations in the gene PDCD10 were recently reported to be responsible for CCM3. We report here that sequence analysis of PDCD10 in a panel of 29 probands lacking Krit1 and MGC4607 mutations revealed only three mutations. The frequency of identified mutations in the PDCD10 gene was surprisingly low, especially given that this panel was heavily biased towards non-CCM1, non-CCM2 probands. These data are in stark contrast with the linkage data, which suggests that 40% of inherited cases would be due to mutations in this gene. Interestingly, when examining the haplotypes of previously published CCM3 families, we found a distinct recombination event in one of the largest CCM3 families that excludes the PDCD10 gene. Although there are many potential explanations for this observation, when combined with the apparent under-representation of causative CCM mutations in PDCD10, this recombination event in a CCM3-linked family suggests that there may be an additional CCM gene in the same chromosomal region.

  3. X-linked sideroblastic anaemia due to ALAS₂ mutations in the Netherlands: a disease in disguise.

    PubMed

    Donker, A E; Raymakers, R A; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Coenen, M J H; Janssen, M C; MacKenzie, M A; Brons, P P T; Swinkels, D W

    2014-05-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anaemia (XLSA; OMIM#300751) is the most common inherited form of sideroblastic anaemia and is associated with several mutations in the erythroid specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS₂). This gene encodes for aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS₂), the catalytic enzyme involved in the first en rate-limiting step of haem biosynthesis.1-3 The disorder is characterised by mostly mild hypochromic microcytic anaemia with bone marrow ring sideroblasts. Even untransfused patients with mild or no anaemia are at risk for severe systemic iron overload due to ineffective erythropoiesis. To date, 61 different ALAS₂ mutations have been reported in 120 families with XLSA. Descriptions of molecularly confirmed case series from the Netherlands, however, are lacking. We reviewed age of presentation, clinical and biochemical features, ALAS₋₂ defects and treatment characteristics of 15 Dutch patients from 11 unrelated families diagnosed with XLSA. In one family a novel pathogenic c.1412G>A (p.Cys471Tyr) mutation was found. All other families shared the previously described c.1355G>A (p.Arg452His) mutation. Haplotype analysis in seven probands with the p.Arg452His mutation strongly suggests that six of them were ancestrally related. Nevertheless, their phenotype was very different. Our patients illustrate the phenotypical heterogeneity in the presentation of XLSA patients, the effectiveness of treatment regimens and the various pitfalls associated with the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of the disease. A timely diagnosis avoids unnecessary investigations and allows adequate treatment that can prevent systemic iron load with subsequent severe life-threatening complications. Therefore, we suggest considering XLSA in both male and female patients with unexplained iron overload and÷or (mild) microcytic anaemia, also at older age.

  4. Hypomagnesemia and functional hypoparathyroidism due to novel mutations in the Mg-channel TRPM6

    PubMed Central

    Astor, Marianne C; Løvås, Kristian; Wolff, Anette S B; Nedrebø, Bjørn; Bratland, Eirik; Steen-Johnsen, Jon; Husebye, Eystein S

    2015-01-01

    Primary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neuromuscular symptoms in infancy due to extremely low levels of serum magnesium and moderate to severe hypocalcemia. Homozygous mutations in the magnesium transporter gene transient receptor potential cation channel member 6 (TRPM6) cause the disease. HSH can be misdiagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic, clinical and biochemical features of patients clinically diagnosed with HSH in a Norwegian cohort. Five patients in four families with clinical features of HSH were identified, including one during a national survey of hypoparathyroidism. The clinical history of the patients and their families were reviewed and gene analyses of TRPM6 performed. Four of five patients presented with generalized seizures in infancy and extremely low levels of serum magnesium accompanied by moderate hypocalcemia. Two of the patients had an older sibling who died in infancy. Four novel mutations and one large deletion in TRPM6 were identified. In one patient two linked homozygous mutations were located in exon 22 (p.F978L) and exon 23 (p.G1042V). Two families had an identical mutation in exon 25 (p.E1155X). The fourth patient had a missense mutation in exon 4 (p.H61N) combined with a large deletion in the C-terminal end of the gene. HSH is a potentially lethal condition that can be misdiagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism. The diagnosis is easily made if serum magnesium is measured. When treated appropriately with high doses of oral magnesium supplementation, severe hypomagnesemia is uncommon and the long-term prognosis seems to be good. PMID:26273099

  5. Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD) due to novel mutations in the LIPA gene.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Fresa, Raffaele; Bellocchio, Antonella; Pino, Elisabetta; Guido, Virgilia; Cantafora, Alfredo; Di Rocco, Maja; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2009-06-01

    Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD) is a rare recessive disorder due to mutations in LIPA gene encoding the lysosomal acidic lipase (LAL). CESD patients have liver disease associated with mixed hyperlipidemia and low plasma levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The aim of this study was the molecular characterization of three patients with CESD. LAL activity was measured in blood leukocytes. In two patients (twin sisters) the clinical diagnosis of CESD was made at 9 years of age, following the fortuitous discovery of elevated serum liver enzymes in apparently healthy children. They had mixed hyperlipidemia, hepatosplenomegaly, reduced LAL activity (approximately 5% of control) and heteroalleic mutations in LIPA gene coding sequence: (i) the common c.894 G>A mutation and (ii) a novel nonsense mutation c.652 C>T (p.R218X). The other patient was an 80 year-old female who for several years had been treated with simvastatin because of severe hyperlipidemia associated with low plasma HDL. In this patient the sequence of major candidate genes for monogenic hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia was negative. She was found to be a compound heterozygote for two LIPA gene mutations resulting in 5% LAL activity: (i) c.894 G>A and (ii) a novel complex insertion/deletion leading to a premature termination codon at position 82. These findings suggest that, in view of the variable severity of its phenotypic expression, CESD may sometimes be difficult to diagnose, but it should be considered in patients with severe type IIb hyperlipidemia associated with low HDL, mildly elevated serum liver enzymes and hepatomegaly.

  6. Hypomagnesemia and functional hypoparathyroidism due to novel mutations in the Mg-channel TRPM6.

    PubMed

    Astor, Marianne C; Løvås, Kristian; Wolff, Anette S B; Nedrebø, Bjørn; Bratland, Eirik; Steen-Johnsen, Jon; Husebye, Eystein S

    2015-12-01

    Primary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neuromuscular symptoms in infancy due to extremely low levels of serum magnesium and moderate to severe hypocalcemia. Homozygous mutations in the magnesium transporter gene transient receptor potential cation channel member 6 (TRPM6) cause the disease. HSH can be misdiagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic, clinical and biochemical features of patients clinically diagnosed with HSH in a Norwegian cohort. Five patients in four families with clinical features of HSH were identified, including one during a national survey of hypoparathyroidism. The clinical history of the patients and their families were reviewed and gene analyses of TRPM6 performed. Four of five patients presented with generalized seizures in infancy and extremely low levels of serum magnesium accompanied by moderate hypocalcemia. Two of the patients had an older sibling who died in infancy. Four novel mutations and one large deletion in TRPM6 were identified. In one patient two linked homozygous mutations were located in exon 22 (p.F978L) and exon 23 (p.G1042V). Two families had an identical mutation in exon 25 (p.E1155X). The fourth patient had a missense mutation in exon 4 (p.H61N) combined with a large deletion in the C-terminal end of the gene. HSH is a potentially lethal condition that can be misdiagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism. The diagnosis is easily made if serum magnesium is measured. When treated appropriately with high doses of oral magnesium supplementation, severe hypomagnesemia is uncommon and the long-term prognosis seems to be good.

  7. The Frequency and Clinical Significance of IDH1 Mutations in Chinese Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Meng; Yin, Yue; Yu, Li; Gao, Chunji

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1) occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. Results Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03%) were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, p<0.01). We identified five IDH1 mutations that were novel to AML: (1) c.299 G>A, p.R100Q; (2) c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3) c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4) c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5) c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01), CEBPA (p<0.01), and NRAS (p<0.01), as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01) and WT1(p<0.01). The overall survival (OS) in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.). Conclusion IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study. PMID:24376688

  8. Insulin resistance uncoupled from dyslipidemia due to C-terminal PIK3R1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Tomlinson, Patsy; Payne, Felicity; Gast, Alexandra; Sleigh, Alison; Bottomley, William; Harris, Julie; Daly, Allan; Rocha, Nuno; Rudge, Simon; Clark, Jonathan; Kwok, Albert; Romeo, Stefano; McCann, Emma; Müksch, Barbara; Dattani, Mehul; Zucchini, Stefano; Wakelam, Michael; Foukas, Lazaros C.; Savage, David B.; Murphy, Rinki; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and low plasma adiponectin. Insulin resistance due to insulin receptor (INSR) dysfunction is associated with none of these, but when due to dysfunction of the downstream kinase AKT2 phenocopies obesity-related insulin resistance. We report 5 patients with SHORT syndrome and C-terminal mutations in PIK3R1, encoding the p85α/p55α/p50α subunits of PI3K, which act between INSR and AKT in insulin signaling. Four of 5 patients had extreme insulin resistance without dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis. In 3 of these 4, plasma adiponectin was preserved, as in insulin receptor dysfunction. The fourth patient and her healthy mother had low plasma adiponectin associated with a potentially novel mutation, p.Asp231Ala, in adiponectin itself. Cells studied from one patient with the p.Tyr657X PIK3R1 mutation expressed abundant truncated PIK3R1 products and showed severely reduced insulin-stimulated association of mutant but not WT p85α with IRS1, but normal downstream signaling. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, mutant p85α overexpression attenuated insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and adipocyte differentiation. Thus, PIK3R1 C-terminal mutations impair insulin signaling only in some cellular contexts and produce a subphenotype of insulin resistance resembling INSR dysfunction but unlike AKT2 dysfunction, implicating PI3K in the pathogenesis of key components of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27766312

  9. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine marks regions with reduced mutation frequency in human DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tomkova, Marketa; McClellan, Michael; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas; Schuster-Boeckler, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    CpG dinucleotides are the main mutational hot-spot in most cancers. The characteristic elevated C>T mutation rate in CpG sites has been related to 5-methylcytosine (5mC), an epigenetically modified base which resides in CpGs and plays a role in transcription silencing. In brain nearly a third of 5mCs have recently been found to exist in the form of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), yet the effect of 5hmC on mutational processes is still poorly understood. Here we show that 5hmC is associated with an up to 53% decrease in the frequency of C>T mutations in a CpG context compared to 5mC. Tissue specific 5hmC patterns in brain, kidney and blood correlate with lower regional CpG>T mutation frequency in cancers originating in the respective tissues. Together our data reveal global and opposing effects of the two most common cytosine modifications on the frequency of cancer causing somatic mutations in different cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17082.001 PMID:27183007

  10. Mutations affecting mitotic recombination frequency in haploids and diploids of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Parag, Y; Parag, G

    1975-01-01

    A haploid strain of Asp. nidulans with a chromosome segment in duplicate (one in normal position on chromosome I, one translocated to chromosome II) shows mitotic recombination, mostly by conversion, in adE in a frequency slightly higher than in the equivalent diploid. A method has been devised, using this duplication, for the selection of rec and uvs mutations. Six rec mutations have been found which decrease recombination frequency in the haploid. One mutation selected as UV sensitive showed a hundred fold increase in recombination frequency in the haploid (pop mutation) and probably the same in diploids. The increased frequency is both in gene conversion and in crossing over, and the exchanges appear in clusters of two or more. pop is allelic to uvsB (Jansen, 1970) which had been found to affect mitotic but not meiotic recombination. It is suggested that mutations of this type interfere with the control mechanism which determines that high recombination is confirmed to the meiotic nuclei and avoided in somatic nuclei.

  11. Low frequency of TERT promoter mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs).

    PubMed

    Campanella, Nathália C; Celestino, Ricardo; Pestana, Ana; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; de Oliveira, Antonio Talvane; Brito, Maria José; Gouveia, António; Lopes, José Manuel; Guimarães, Denise Peixoto; Soares, Paula; Reis, Rui M

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, mainly at positions c.-124 and c.-146 bp, are frequent in several human cancers; yet its presence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has not been reported to date. Herein, we searched for the presence and clinicopathological association of TERT promoter mutations in genomic DNA from 130 bona fide GISTs. We found TERT promoter mutations in 3.8% (5/130) of GISTs. The c.-124C>T mutation was the most common event, present in 2.3% (3/130), and the c.-146C>T mutation in 1.5% (2/130) of GISTs. No significant association was observed between TERT promoter mutation and patient's clinicopathological features. The present study establishes the low frequency (4%) of TERT promoter mutations in GISTs. Further studies are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the hypothetical biological and clinical impact of TERT promoter mutation in GIST pathogenesis.

  12. Early-Onset Central Diabetes Insipidus due to Compound Heterozygosity for AVP Mutations.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Karine; Vallette, Sophie; Deladoëy, Johnny; Van Vliet, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Genetic cases of isolated central diabetes insipidus are rare, are mostly due to dominant AVP mutations and have a delayed onset of symptoms. Only 3 consanguineous pedigrees with a recessive form have been published. A boy with a negative family history presented polyuria and failure to thrive in the first months of life and was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal posterior pituitary signal. A molecular genetic analysis of the AVP gene showed that he had inherited a previously reported mutation from his Lebanese father and a novel A>G transition in the splice acceptor site of intron 1 (IVS1-2A>G) from his French-Canadian mother. Replacement therapy resulted in the immediate disappearance of symptoms and in weight gain. The early polyuria in recessive central diabetes insipidus contrasts with the delayed presentation in patients with monoallelic AVP mutations. This diagnosis needs to be considered in infants with very early onset of polyuria-polydipsia and no brain malformation, even if there is no consanguinity and regardless of whether the posterior pituitary is visible or not on imaging. In addition to informing family counseling, making a molecular diagnosis eliminates the need for repeated imaging studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Non-autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism due to a mutation in TSH receptor: report on two brothers.

    PubMed

    Cerbone, Manuela; Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Improda, Nicola; Pignata, Claudio; Santamaria, Francesca; Tonacchera, Massimo; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2013-01-19

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is a condition characterized by a mild persistent thyroid failure. The main cause is represented by autoimmune thyroiditis, but mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in TSH pathway are thought to be responsible for SH, particularly in cases arising in familial settings. Patients with the syndrome of TSH unresponsiveness may have compensated or overt hypothyroidism with a wide spectrum of clinical and morphological alterations depending on the degree of impairment of TSH-receptor (TSH-R) function. We describe the case of two brothers with non autoimmune SH carrying the same heterozygous mutation in the extracellular domain of TSH-R and presenting with different clinical, biochemical and morphological features. The first one had only a slight persistent elevation of TSH, a normal thyroid ultrasound and did never require l- thyroxine (L-T4) replacement treatment. The second one had a neonatal persistent moderate TSH levels increase associated with a thyroid gland hypoplasia and was treated with L-T4 since the first months of life.These two cases support the recent association of TSH-R mutations inheritance as an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and suggest that the decision to start replacement therapy in patients with persistent SH due to TSH resistance should be individualized.

  14. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Camuzeaux, Stephane S.M.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B.; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I.; Livingston, John H.; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F.; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W. Kling; Pitt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin

  15. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Mills, Philippa B; Camuzeaux, Stephane S M; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B; Varadkar, Sophia M; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I; Livingston, John H; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W Kling; Pitt, Matthew; Clayton, Peter T

    2014-05-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin mononucleotide or

  16. Myosin light chain-2 mutation affects flight, wing beat frequency, and indirect flight muscle contraction kinetics in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have used a combination of classical genetic, molecular genetic, histological, biochemical, and biophysical techniques to identify and characterize a null mutation of the myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) locus of Drosophila melanogaster. Mlc2E38 is a null mutation of the MLC-2 gene resulting from a nonsense mutation at the tenth codon position. Mlc2E38 confers dominant flightless behavior that is associated with reduced wing beat frequency. Mlc2E38 heterozygotes exhibit a 50% reduction of MLC-2 mRNA concentration in adult thoracic musculature, which results in a commensurate reduction of MLC-2 protein in the indirect flight muscles. Indirect flight muscle myofibrils from Mlc2E38 heterozygotes are aberrant, exhibiting myofilaments in disarray at the periphery. Calcium-activated Triton X-100-treated single fiber segments exhibit slower contraction kinetics than wild type. Introduction of a transformed copy of the wild type MLC-2 gene rescues the dominant flightless behavior of Mlc2E38 heterozygotes. Wing beat frequency and single fiber contraction kinetics of a representative rescued line are not significantly different from those of wild type. Together, these results indicate that wild type MLC-2 stoichiometry is required for normal indirect flight muscle assembly and function. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reduced wing beat frequency and possibly the flightless behavior conferred by Mlc2E38 is due in part to slower contraction kinetics of sarcomeric regions devoid or partly deficient in MLC-2. PMID:1469046

  17. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  18. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia grown in soil samples from the Bikini Island.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, S; Ishii, C

    1991-02-01

    Somatic pink mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia BNL 02 clone grown for 76 days in two soil samples taken from the Bikini Island (where a hydrogen bomb explosion test had been conducted in 1954) were investigated. A significantly high mutation frequency (2.58 +/- 0.17 pink mutant events per 10(3) hairs or 1.34 +/- 0.09 pink mutant events per 10(4) hair-cell divisions) was observed for the plant grown in one of the two Bikini soil samples, as compared to the control plants (1.70 +/- 0.14 or 0.88 +/- 0.07, respectively) grown in the field soil of Saitama University. The soil sample which caused the significant increase in mutation frequency contained 6,880 +/- 330 mBq/g 137Cs, 62.5 +/- 4.4 mBq/g 60Co, and some other nuclides; a 150 microR/hr exposure rate being measured on the surface of the soil sample. The effective cumulative external exposures measured for the inflorescences of the plant grown in this soil sample averaged at most 60.8 mR, being too small to explain the significant elevation in mutation frequency observed. On the other hand, internal exposure due to uptake of radioactive nuclides was estimated to be 125 mrad (1.25 mGy) as an accumulated effective dose, mainly based on a gamma-spectrometrical analysis. However, it seemed highly likely that this value of internal exposure was a considerable underestimate, and the internal exposure was considered to be more significant than the external exposure.

  19. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  20. Mutation E169K in junctophilin-2 causes atrial fibrillation due to impaired RyR2 stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Niels; Garbino, Alejandro; Dixit, Sayali S.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Li, Na; Wang, Qiongling; Olivotto, Iacopo; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To study the role of junctophilin 2 (JPH2) in atrial fibrillation (AF). Background JPH2 is believed to have an important role in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ handling and modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ channels (RyR2). Whereas defective RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to the pathogenesis of AF, nothing is known about the potential role of JPH2 in atrial arrhythmias. Methods Screening 203 unrelated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients uncovered a novel JPH2 missense mutation (E169K) in 2 patients with juvenile-onset paroxysmal AF (pAF). Pseudo-knockin (PKI) mouse models were generated to determine the molecular defects underlying the development of AF caused by this JPH2 mutation. Results PKI mice expressing E169K mutant JPH2 exhibited a higher incidence of inducible AF compared with wildtype (WT)-PKI mice, while A399S-PKI mice expressing a HCM-linked JPH2 mutation not associated with atrial arrhythmias were not significantly different from WT-PKI. E169K-PKI but not A399A-PKI atrial cardiomyocytes showed an increased incidence of abnormal SR Ca2+ release events. These changes were attributed to reduced binding of E169KJPH2 to RyR2. Atrial JPH2 levels in WT-JPH2 transgenic, nontransgenic, and JPH2 knockdown mice correlated negatively with the incidence of pacing-induced AF. Ca2+ spark frequency in atrial myocytes and the open probability of single RyR2 channels from JPH2 knockdown mice was significantly reduced by a small JPH2-mimicking oligopeptide. Moreover, patients with pAF had reduced atrial JPH2 levels per RyR2 channel compared to sinus rhythm patients, and an increased frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ release events. Conclusions Our data suggest a novel mechanism by which reduced JPH2-mediated stabilization of RyR2 due to loss-of-function mutation or reduced JPH2:RyR2 ratios can promote SR Ca2+ leak and atrial arrhythmias, representing a potential novel therapeutic target for AF. PMID:23973696

  1. High frequencies of biotinidase (BTD) gene mutations in the Hungarian population.

    PubMed

    Milánkovics, Ilona; Németh, Krisztina; Somogyi, Csilla; Schuler, Agnes; Fekete, György

    2010-12-01

    Biotinidase deficiency, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder, is characterized by neurologic and cutaneous symptoms and can be detected by newborn screening. In Hungary the national screening programme was launched in 1989 with two screening centres. Over 1,070,000 neonates from western Hungary were screened for biotinidase deficiency in the Budapest Screening Centre between 1989 and December 2008. In this period, 57 patients with profound or partial biotinidase deficiency from 50 families were identified through routine newborn screening. The incidence of the disorder in western Hungary is 1 in 18,700, which is about three times the worldwide incidence. Twenty-four different mutations were identified in patients including the c.406delC novel mutation in exon 3, which is a frameshift mutation. To better understand the background of the unusually high disease incidence, 100 healthy subjects from the Hungarian population were screened by PCR and RFLP for the frequencies of p.D444H, p.Q456H and p.A171T;p.D444H, the three most common BTD mutations. The frequencies were found to be 5.5, 0.5 and 0%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the frequencies of two of the most common biotinidase variant alleles are higher in the Hungarian population than in other Caucasian populations. This and the presence of a unique Hungarian mutation may explain the high incidence of biotinidase deficiency in Hungary.

  2. A Novel Rat Model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Due to a Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikas, Thomas B; Wildt, Sheryl J; Wineinger, Amy E; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Markianos, Kyriacos; Cooper, Dale M; Fleming, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic iron overload in rats has been reported, but whether it is due to genetic or environmental causes is unknown. In the current study, phenotypic analysis of Hsd:HHCL Wistar rats revealed a low incidence of histologically detected liver iron overload. Here we characterized the pathophysiology of the iron overload and showed that the phenotype is heritable and due to a mutation in a single gene. We identified a single male rat among the 132 screened animals that exhibited predominantly periportal, hepatocellular iron accumulation. This rat expressed low RNA levels of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin and low protein levels of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2), a membrane protein essential for hepcidin expression in humans and mice and mutated in forms of hereditary hemochromatosis. Sequencing of Tfr2 in the iron-overloaded rat revealed a novel Ala679Gly polymorphism in a highly conserved residue. Quantitative trait locus mapping indicated that this polymorphism correlated strongly with serum iron and transferrin saturations in male rats. Expression of the Gly679 variant in tissue culture cell lines revealed decreased steady-state levels of Tfr2. Characterization of iron metabolism in the progeny of polymorphic rats suggested that homozygosity for the Ala679Gly allele leads to a hemochromatosis phenotype. However, we currently cannot exclude the possibility that a polymorphism or mutation in the noncoding region of Tfr2 contributes to the iron-overload phenotype. Hsd:HHCL rats are the first genetic rat model of hereditary hemochromatosis and may prove useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of iron metabolism. PMID:23582421

  3. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  4. Study of a single BRCA2 mutation with high carrier frequency in a small population.

    PubMed Central

    Thorlacius, S; Sigurdsson, S; Bjarnadottir, H; Olafsdottir, G; Jonasson, J G; Tryggvadottir, L; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1997-01-01

    Germ-line changes in the cancer-predisposition gene BRCA2 are found in a small proportion of breast cancers. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been studied mainly in families with high risk of breast cancer in females, and male breast cancer also has been associated with BRCA2 mutations. The importance of germ-line BRCA2 mutations in individuals without a family history of breast cancer is unknown. The same BRCA2 mutation has been found in 16/21 Icelandic breast cancer families, indicating a founder effect. We determined the frequency of this mutation, 999del5, in 1,182 Icelanders, comprising 520 randomly selected individuals from the population and a series of 632 female breast cancer patients (61.4% of patients diagnosed during the study period) and all male breast cancer patients diagnosed during the past 40 years. We detected the 999del5 germ-line mutation in 0.6% of the population, in 7.7% of female breast cancer patients, and in 40% of males with breast cancer. The mutation was strongly associated with onset of female breast cancer at age <50 years, but its penetrance and expression are varied. A number of cancers other than breast cancer were found to be increased in relatives of mutation carriers, including those with prostate and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, germ-line BRCA2 mutation can be present without a strong family history of breast cancer. Comparison of the age at onset for mother/daughter pairs with the 999del5 mutation and breast cancer indicates that age at onset is decreasing in the younger generation. Increase in breast cancer incidence and lower age at onset suggest a possible contributing environmental factor. PMID:9150155

  5. Study of a single BRCA2 mutation with high carrier frequency in a small population.

    PubMed

    Thorlacius, S; Sigurdsson, S; Bjarnadottir, H; Olafsdottir, G; Jonasson, J G; Tryggvadottir, L; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1997-05-01

    Germ-line changes in the cancer-predisposition gene BRCA2 are found in a small proportion of breast cancers. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been studied mainly in families with high risk of breast cancer in females, and male breast cancer also has been associated with BRCA2 mutations. The importance of germ-line BRCA2 mutations in individuals without a family history of breast cancer is unknown. The same BRCA2 mutation has been found in 16/21 Icelandic breast cancer families, indicating a founder effect. We determined the frequency of this mutation, 999del5, in 1,182 Icelanders, comprising 520 randomly selected individuals from the population and a series of 632 female breast cancer patients (61.4% of patients diagnosed during the study period) and all male breast cancer patients diagnosed during the past 40 years. We detected the 999del5 germ-line mutation in 0.6% of the population, in 7.7% of female breast cancer patients, and in 40% of males with breast cancer. The mutation was strongly associated with onset of female breast cancer at age <50 years, but its penetrance and expression are varied. A number of cancers other than breast cancer were found to be increased in relatives of mutation carriers, including those with prostate and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, germ-line BRCA2 mutation can be present without a strong family history of breast cancer. Comparison of the age at onset for mother/daughter pairs with the 999del5 mutation and breast cancer indicates that age at onset is decreasing in the younger generation. Increase in breast cancer incidence and lower age at onset suggest a possible contributing environmental factor.

  6. Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 Mutations and its Treatment with Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2010-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a rare hereditary retinal degeneration caused by mutations in more than a dozen genes. RPE65, one of these mutated genes, is highly expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium where it encodes the retinoid isomerase enzyme essential for the production of chromophore which forms the visual pigment in rod and cone photoreceptors of the retina. Congenital loss of chromophore production due to RPE65-deficiency together with progressive photoreceptor degeneration cause severe and progressive loss of vision. RPE65-associated LCA recently gained recognition outside of specialty ophthalmic circles due to early success achieved by three clinical trials of gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. The trials were built on multitude of basic, pre-clinical and clinical research defining the pathophysiology of the disease in human subjects and animal models, and demonstrating the proof-of-concept of gene (augmentation) therapy. Substantial gains in visual function of clinical trial participants provided evidence for physiologically relevant biological activity resulting from a newly introduced gene. This article reviews the current knowledge on retinal degeneration and visual dysfunction in animal models and human patients with RPE65 disease, and examines the consequences of gene therapy in terms of improvement of vision reported. PMID:20399883

  7. Spontaneous quinolone resistance in Serratia marcescens due to a mutation in gyrA.

    PubMed Central

    Masecar, B L; Robillard, N J

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous quinolone-resistant mutants of MP050, a quinolone-susceptible clinical strain of Serratia marcescens, were isolated on nutrient agar containing 0.5 microgram of ciprofloxacin per ml. One mutant, designated MP051, was selected for further study. Quinolone MICs for MP051 were 4- to 16-fold higher than those for MP050; nonquinolone MICs were unchanged. The DNA gyrase isolated from MP051 was 24-fold less sensitive to inhibition of supercoiling by ciprofloxacin than the DNA gyrase isolated from MP050 was. Inhibition studies on reconstituted combinations of heterologous gyrase subunits showed that the decreased inhibition was dependent on the A subunit of DNA gyrase from MP051. Further evidence that this decreased inhibition was due to a gyrA mutation was provided by analysis of Escherichia coli gyrA gene expression in S. marcescens heterodiploids containing pNJR3-2, a broad-host-range gyrA gene probe. Quinolone susceptibilities of MP051 heterodiploids containing the wild-type E. coli gyrA gene decreased to those of MP050, while quinolone susceptibilities of MP050 containing the same plasmid were unchanged. These results indicate that spontaneous quinolone resistance in MP051 was due to a mutation in gyrA. Images PMID:1649573

  8. Six novel P gene mutations and oculocutaneous albinism type 2 frequency in Japanese albino patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tamio; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Matsunaga, Jun; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Naoko; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Terao, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yasushi

    2003-05-01

    Type 2 oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from mutations in the P gene that codes one of the melanosomal proteins, the function of which remains unknown. In this paper, we report the frequency of OCA2, 8%, among the Japanese albino population, six novel mutations containing four missense substitutions (P198L, P211L, R10W, M398I), and two splice site mutations (IVS15+1 G>A, IVS24-1 G>C). One of them, R10W, was within the putative signal peptide at the N-terminal of the P protein. This is the first report on the frequency of OCA2 in the Japanese albino population.

  9. Life cycle of the mammalian germ cell: implication for spontaneous mutation frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S E

    1999-04-01

    A brief history of the developmental life cycle of the mammalian germ cell, from fertilization to gametogenesis in the mature gonad, is presented. The differences between gametogenesis in the mature gonad of males and females are also described with regard to properties that may affect their susceptibilities to mutation. It is emphasized that any historical control background rate of necessity will include mutations that occur in germinal tissue at all stages of development and differentiation, although it is not always possible to determine at what stage of germline development a spontaneous mutation has occurred. Studies of induced mutations suggest that the impact on the molecular level and the distribution of mutations among the F1 and F2 progeny may be partly determined by the stage and sex of germ cells in which spontaneous mutations occur. In summary, historical control rates should only be considered the sum total of mutations that occur during the entire life of the individual and cannot represent the control values of any individual germ cell stage. Nonetheless, it is certainly important and valid to use historical control data for calculating human risk, because the primary use of the estimation of mutant frequencies is to access the potential impact of agents in increasing the genetic load in the human population.

  10. Identities and frequencies of mutations of the otoferlin gene (OTOF) causing DFNB9 deafness in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Choi, BY; Ahmed, ZM; Riazuddin, S; Bhinder, MA; Shahzad, M; Husnain, T; Riazuddin, S; Griffith, AJ; Friedman, TB

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in OTOF, encoding otoferlin, cause non-syndromic recessive hearing loss. The goal of our study was to define the identities and frequencies of OTOF mutations in a model population. We screened a cohort of 557 large consanguineous Pakistani families segregating recessive, severe-to-profound, prelingual-onset deafness for linkage to DFNB9. There were 13 families segregating deafness consistent with linkage to markers for DFNB9. We analyzed the genomic nucleotide sequence of OTOF and detected probable pathogenic sequence variants among all 13 families. These include the previously reported nonsense mutation p.R708X and 10 novel variants: 3 nonsense mutations (p.R425X, p.W536X, and p.Y1603X), 1 frameshift (c.1103_1104delinsC), 1 single amino acid deletion (p.E766del) and 5 missense substitutions of conserved residues (p.L573R, p.A1090E, p.E1733K, p.R1856Q and p.R1939W). OTOF mutations thus account for deafness in 13 (2.3%) of 557 Pakistani families. This overall prevalence is similar, but the mutation spectrum is different from those for Western populations. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an alternative splice isoform of OTOF expressed in the human cochlea. This isoform must be required for human hearing because it encodes a unique alternative C-terminus affected by some DFNB9 mutations. PMID:19250381

  11. Inherited and environmentally induced differences in mutation frequencies between wild strains of Sordaria fimicola from "Evolution Canyon".

    PubMed

    Lamb, B C; Saleem, M; Scott, W; Thapa, N; Nevo, E

    1998-05-01

    We have studied whether there is natural genetic variation for mutation frequencies, and whether any such variation is environment-related. Mutation frequencies differed significantly between wild strains of the fungus Sordaria fimicola isolated from a harsher or a milder microscale environment in "Evolution Canyon," Israel. Strains from the harsher, drier, south-facing slope had higher frequencies of new spontaneous mutations and of accumulated mutations than strains from the milder, lusher, north-facing slope. Collective total mutation frequencies over many loci for ascospore pigmentation were 2.3, 3.5 and 4.4% for three strains from the south-facing slope, and 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.3% for five strains from the north-facing slope. Some of this between-slope difference was inherited through two generations of selfing, with average spontaneous mutation frequencies of 1.9% for south-facing slope strains and 0.8% for north-facing slope strains. The remainder was caused by different frequencies of mutations arising in the original environments. There was also significant heritable genetic variation in mutation frequencies within slopes. Similar between-slope differences were found for ascospore germination-resistance to acriflavine, with much higher frequencies in strains from the south-facing slope. Such inherited variation provides a basis for natural selection for optimum mutation rates in each environment.

  12. Inherited and environmentally induced differences in mutation frequencies between wild strains of Sordaria fimicola from "Evolution Canyon".

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, B C; Saleem, M; Scott, W; Thapa, N; Nevo, E

    1998-01-01

    We have studied whether there is natural genetic variation for mutation frequencies, and whether any such variation is environment-related. Mutation frequencies differed significantly between wild strains of the fungus Sordaria fimicola isolated from a harsher or a milder microscale environment in "Evolution Canyon," Israel. Strains from the harsher, drier, south-facing slope had higher frequencies of new spontaneous mutations and of accumulated mutations than strains from the milder, lusher, north-facing slope. Collective total mutation frequencies over many loci for ascospore pigmentation were 2.3, 3.5 and 4.4% for three strains from the south-facing slope, and 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.3% for five strains from the north-facing slope. Some of this between-slope difference was inherited through two generations of selfing, with average spontaneous mutation frequencies of 1.9% for south-facing slope strains and 0.8% for north-facing slope strains. The remainder was caused by different frequencies of mutations arising in the original environments. There was also significant heritable genetic variation in mutation frequencies within slopes. Similar between-slope differences were found for ascospore germination-resistance to acriflavine, with much higher frequencies in strains from the south-facing slope. Such inherited variation provides a basis for natural selection for optimum mutation rates in each environment. PMID:9584088

  13. Influence of sex, smoking and age on human hprt mutation frequencies and spectra.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, J; Karnaoukhova, L; Guenette, G C; Glickman, B W

    1999-01-01

    Examination of the literature for hprt mutant frequencies from peripheral T cells yielded data from 1194 human subjects. Relationships between mutant frequency, age, sex, and smoking were examined, and the kinetics were described. Mutant frequency increases rapidly with age until about age 15. Afterward, the rate of increase falls such that after age 53, the hprt mutant frequency is largely stabilized. Sex had no effect on mutant frequency. Cigarette smoking increased mean mutant frequency compared to nonsmokers, but did not alter age vs. mutant frequency relationships. An hprt in vivo mutant database containing 795 human hprt mutants from 342 individuals was prepared. No difference in mutational spectra was observed comparing smokers to nonsmokers, confirming previous reports. Sex affected the frequency of deletions (>1 bp) that are recovered more than twice as frequently in females (P = 0. 008) compared to males. There is no indication of a significant shift in mutational spectra with age for individuals older than 19 yr, with the exception of A:T --> C:G transversions. These events are recovered more frequently in older individuals. PMID:10388825

  14. Infertility due to congenital absence of vas deferens in mainly caused by variable exon 9 skipping of the CFTR gene in heterozygous males for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Nunes, V.

    1994-09-01

    About 65% or the individuals with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) have mutations in at least one of the CFTR alleles. We have studied the phenotypic effects of the CFTR gene intron 8 polyT tract 5T allele in 90 CBAVD subjects and in parents of CF patients. This group was compared with normal individuals, and with fathers and mothers of CF patients. Allele 5T was significantly associated with CBAVD (19.6%) when compared to the general population (5.2%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 33.3%; p<<0.0001). It was represented poorly in fathers of CF patients (1.3%). Mutations were identified in one (60%) or both CFTR alleles (8.9%) of CBAVD patients. Heterozygosity for the 5T allele was strongly associated with heterozygosity for CF mutations ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.9; p<0.0004). The strong correlation between allele 5T and CBAVD, together with the low frequency of this allele in fathers of CF patients, demonstrates that variable {Delta}exon 9 produces infertility in males if associated with a CF mutation on the other chromosome. The 30% of CBAVD cases with only one CFTR mutation and without a 5T-allele may be due to other molecular mechanisms involving CFTR, distinct from {Delta}exon 9. Since there is a relatively high proportion of CBAVD without CF mutations (25%), other gene(s), distinct from CFTR, may have a role in the CBAVD phenotype.

  15. Is the c.3G>C mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene due to a founder effect in Chinese head and neck paraganglioma patients?

    PubMed

    Zha, Yang; Chen, Xing-ming; Lam, Ching-wan; Lee, Soo-chin; Tong, Sui-fan; Gao, Zhi-qiang

    2011-08-01

    Three Chinese patients with head and neck paragangliomas have been reported to carry the c.3G>C mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene. In addition, in our hospital, two further patients were identified who have the same mutation. It is unclear whether the c.3G>C mutation in Chinese patients is a recurrent mutation or if it is due to a founder effect. We conducted haplotype analysis on these patients to answer this question. Individual case-control study. Germ-line mutations were confirmed in the patients and their families examined in this study using direct sequencing. We also constructed and analyzed haplotypes in four Chinese families. Genotype frequencies were compared to the control group. Three of four families shared the same haplotype, which rarely occurred in the control group. The last family shared a very short area on the physical map with the other three families. There is a founder effect in Chinese head and neck paraganglioma patients carrying the SDHD c.3G>C mutation. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Frequencies, Laboratory Features, and Granulocyte Activation in Chinese Patients with CALR-Mutated Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Chang, Jianmei; Li, Jianlan; Tan, Yanhong; Xu, Zhifang; Ren, Fanggang; Zhao, Junxia; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Na; Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Jianxia; Yang, Wanfang; Wang, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the CALR gene have been recently identified as acquired alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In this study, we evaluated mutation frequencies, laboratory features, and granulocyte activation in Chinese patients with MPNs. A combination of qualitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing was used to detect three driver mutations (i.e., CALR, JAK2V617F, and MPL). CALR mutations were identified in 8.4% of cases with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 5.3% of cases with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Moreover, 25% of polycythemia vera, 29.5% of ET, and 48.1% of PMF were negative for all three mutations (JAK2V617F, MPL, and CALR). Compared with those patients with JAK2V617F mutation, CALR-mutated ET patients displayed unique hematological phenotypes, including higher platelet counts, and lower leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels. Significant differences were not found between Chinese PMF patients with mutants CALR and JAK2V617F in terms of laboratory features. Interestingly, patients with CALR mutations showed markedly decreased levels of leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP) expression, whereas those with JAK2V617F mutation presented with elevated levels. Overall, a lower mutant rate of CALR gene and a higher triple-negative rate were identified in the cohort of Chinese patients with MPNs. This result indicates that an undiscovered mutant gene may have a significant role in these patients. Moreover, these pathological features further imply that the disease biology varies considerably between mutants CALR and JAK2V617F. PMID:26375990

  17. The Phenotype of the Musculocontractural Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome due to CHST14 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Janecke, Andreas R.; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G.; Gahl, William A.; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M.; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with biallelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients hadmildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. PMID:26373698

  18. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa Due To ABCA4 Mutations: Clinical, Pathologic, and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Radu, Roxana A.; Enriquez, G. Stephanie; East, Jade S.; Schindler, Emily I.; Travis, Gabriel H.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive loss of retinal photoreceptor cells. In order to gain new insights into the pathogenesis of ARRP, we evaluated the morphological, biochemical, and gene expression changes in eyes from a human donor with ARRP due to mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Methods. Eyes were obtained postmortem from a donor with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The coding sequences of the RDS, RHO, and ABCA4 genes were screened for disease-causing mutations. Morphological changes in different regions of the retina were examined histologically, and levels of lipofuscin-associated bisretinoids were measured. Gene expression was examined in retinal/choroidal tissue using microarray analysis, and all parameters were compared to those in unaffected control donors. Results. Genetic analysis of the donor's DNA identified two mutations in the ABCA4 gene, IVS14+1G > C and Phe1440del1 cT, each on a separate allele. Morphological evaluation revealed complete loss of the outer nuclear layer, remodeling of the inner retina, loss of retinal vasculature, and regional neovascularization. The retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris exhibited regional preservation. Microarray analysis revealed loss of photoreceptor cell-associated transcripts, with preservation of multiple genes expressed specifically in inner retinal neurons. Conclusions. The persistence of transcripts expressed by inner retinal neurons suggests that despite significant plasticity that occurs during retinal degeneration, bipolar cells and ganglion cells remain at least partially differentiated. Findings from this study suggest that some forms of therapy currently under investigation may have benefit even in advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:22395892

  19. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS.

  20. Low frequency of filaggrin null mutations in Croatia and their relation with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sabolić Pipinić, I; Varnai, V M; Turk, R; Breljak, D; Kezić, S; Macan, J

    2013-06-01

    Filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations are considered associated with atopic dermatitis. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of FLG null mutations R501X, 2282del4, R2447X and S3247X in the Croatian population and their role in the occurrence of allergic diseases including atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Study enrolled 440 freshmen with defined allergic diseases by means of both present symptoms in International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire (relevant respiratory and/or skin symptoms) and markers of allergic sensitization (positive skin prick and/or patch test). FLG null mutations were successfully genotyped in 423 students of which 11 (2.6%) were carriers of FLG null mutation: 1/423 (0.2%) was heterozygous for R501X and 10/423 (2.4%) were heterozygous for 2282del4. No carriers of R2447X and S3247X mutations were identified. In wild-type FLG carriers (412 subjects), atopic dermatitis was present in 45 (11%), allergic rhinitis in 70 (17%) and allergic asthma in 29 (7%) students. Twenty-five of 393 (7%) patch-tested wild-type FLG carriers had ACD. Among 11 FLG null mutation carriers, four had one or more allergic diseases, and five had reported skin symptoms without defined allergic sensitization (positive skin prick test and/or patch test). FLG null mutations were not confirmed as a predictor of analysed allergic diseases, but were confirmed as an independent predictor of skin symptoms (OR 17.19, 95% CI 3.41-86.6, P < 0.001). Our results in general indicate a low frequency of FLG null mutations in the studied Croatian population supporting a theory of a latitude-dependent distribution of FGL null mutations in Europe, with a decreasing north-south gradient of R501X and 2282del4 mutation frequency. The relation between FLG null mutations and skin disorders was confirmed.

  1. Frequencies and prognostic impact of RAS mutations in MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Emma M.C.; van Roon, Eddy H.J.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A.P.; Schneider, Pauline; de Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants represents an aggressive malignancy associated with a high incidence (approx. 80%) of translocations involving the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Attempts to mimic Mixed Lineage Leukemia fusion driven leukemogenesis in mice raised the question whether these fusion proteins require secondary hits. RAS mutations are suggested as candidates. Earlier results on the incidence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia are inconclusive. Therefore, we studied frequencies and relation with clinical parameters of RAS mutations in a large cohort of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Using conventional sequencing analysis, we screened neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog gene (NRAS), v-Ki-ras Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) for mutations in a large cohort (n=109) of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and studied the mutations in relation to several clinical parameters, and in relation to Homeobox gene A9 expression and the presence of ALL1 fused gene 4-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (AF4-MLL). Mutations were detected in approximately 14% of all cases, with a higher frequency of approximately 24% in t(4;11)-positive patients (P=0.04). Furthermore, we identified RAS mutations as an independent predictor (P=0.019) for poor outcome in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a hazard ratio of 3.194 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.211–8.429). Also, RAS-mutated infants have higher white blood cell counts at diagnosis (P=0.013), and are more resistant to glucocorticoids in vitro (P<0.05). Finally, we demonstrate that RAS mutations, and not the lack of Homeobox gene A9 expression nor the expression of AF4-MLL are associated with poor outcome in t(4;11)-rearranged infants. We conclude that the presence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia

  2. C282Y and H63D Mutation Frequencies in a Population from Central Spain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, S.; Mesa, M. S.; Bandrés, F.; Arroyo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula. Methods: DNA extracted from blood samples was analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Restriction enzimes were Snab I and Bcl I for C282Y and H63D, respectively. Results were visualized with Ethidium Bromide staining after gel electrophoresis. Results and discussion: C282Y frequency was 0.02 and that of H63D was 0.16. Result for C282Y mutation falls within the range of variation of the Mediterranean populations. H63D frequency agrees with those reported for other European populations. In both cases frequencies obtained are the lowest of compared Spanish data. Conclusions: This study is useful to compare expected versus presented C282Y and H63D frequencies in Spanish populations and to contribute to the knowledge of Spanish variability, rarely analyzed until now for HFE gene mutations. PMID:11673657

  3. C282Y and H63D mutation frequencies in a population from central Spain.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, S; Mesa, M S; Bandrés, F; Arroyo, E

    2001-01-01

    To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula. DNA extracted from blood samples was analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Restriction enzymes were Snab I and Bcl I for C282Y and H63D, respectively. Results were visualized with Ethidium Bromide staining after gel electrophoresis. C282Y frequency was 0.02 and that of H63D was 0.16. Result for C282Y mutation falls within the range of variation of the Mediterranean populations. H63D frequency agrees with those reported for other European populations. In both cases frequencies obtained are the lowest of compared Spanish data. This study is useful to compare expected versus presented C282Y and H63D frequencies in Spanish populations and to contribute to the knowledge of Spanish variability, rarely analyzed until now for HFE gene mutations.

  4. High frequency of PTEN mutations in nevi and melanomas from xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Taro; Wang, Yun; DiGiovanna, John J; Khan, Sikandar G; Raffeld, Mark; Beltaifa, Senda; Hornyak, Thomas J; Darling, Thomas N; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2014-05-01

    We examined nevi and melanomas in 10 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with defective DNA repair. The lesions had a lentiginous appearance with markedly increased numbers of melanocytes. Using laser capture microdissection, we performed DNA sequencing of 18 benign and atypical nevi and 75 melanomas (melanoma in situ and invasive melanomas). The nevi had a similar high frequency of PTEN mutations as melanomas [61% (11/18) versus 53% (39/73)]. Both had a very high proportion of UV-type mutations (occurring at adjacent pyrimidines) [91% (10/11) versus 92% (36/39)]. In contrast to melanomas in the general population, the frequency of BRAF mutations (11%, 7/61), NRAS mutations (21%, 13/62), and KIT mutations (21%, 6/28) in XP melanomas was lower than for PTEN. Phospho-S6 immunostaining indicated activation of the mTOR pathway in the atypical nevi and melanomas. Thus, the clinical and histological appearances and the molecular pathology of these UV-related XP nevi and melanomas were different from nevi and melanomas in the general population.

  5. Autosomal Recessive Dilated Cardiomyopathy due to DOLK Mutations Results from Abnormal Dystroglycan O-Mannosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morava, Eva; Riemersma, Moniek; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H. M.; Absmanner, Birgit; Verrijp, Kiek; van den Akker, Willem M. R.; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Jozwiak, Adam; Zucker, Nili; Lorber, Avraham; Lammens, Martin; Knopf, Carlos; van Bokhoven, Hans; Grünewald, Stephanie; Lehle, Ludwig; Kapusta, Livia; Mandel, Hanna; Wevers, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5–13 years) with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations. PMID:22242004

  6. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is due to hypomorphic mutations of the SUMF1 gene.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Ida; Bouchè, Valentina; Lombardi, Alessia; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Sulfatases catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds from a wide variety of substrates and are implicated in several human inherited diseases. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the simultaneous deficiency of all known sulfatases. MSD is caused by mutations in the Sulfatase Modifying Factor 1 (SUMF1) gene encoding the alpha-formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which is responsible for the post-translational modification of sulfatases. In all MSD patients, residual sulfatase activities are detectable, at variable levels. To correlate the nature of the residual sulfatase activities detected in MSD patients with residual FGE activity, four FGE mutants (i.e. p.S155P, p.R224W, p.R345C, p.R349W) found in homozygosis in MSD patients were analyzed. Using viral-mediated gene delivery, these mutants were over-expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from a recently developed Sumf1 KO mouse line which is completely devoid of all sulfatase activities. The results obtained indicate that mutant SUMF1 cDNAs encode stable SUMF1 proteins which are of the appropriate molecular weight and are properly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of these cDNAs in Sumf1-/- MEFs results in partial rescue of sulfatase activities. These data indicate that MSD is due to hypomorphic SUMF1 mutations and suggest that complete loss of SUMF1 function is likely to be lethal in humans.

  7. Increased frequency of MEFV gene mutations in patients with primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Erten, Sukran; Altunoglu, A; Keskin, H L; Ceylan, G G; Yazıcı, A; Dalgaci, A F; Uyanık, G; Avsar, A F

    2013-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis and an autosomal recessive inheritance mode. Up to 15 % of FMF patients are reported to experience perimenstrual attacks. Primary dysmenorrhea could be an incomplete abdominal attack, or patients with dysmenorrhea may have increased frequency of MEFV gene mutation carriage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of MEFV gene mutations in patients with dysmenorrhea. Eighty-four patients with primary dysmenorrhea attending consecutively to our gynecology department and 73 healthy female controls selected from hospital staff were included in the study, and MEFV gene mutations were analyzed. The prevalence of total allelic variants was significantly increased in dysmenorrhea patients (p = 0.015); analysis of individual variant rates revealed a significant increase in the frequency of MEFV gene mutations in dysmenorrhea patients compared with the control group (p = 0.036). Gynecologists and primary care physicians must be aware of FMF in the differential diagnosis of dysmenorrhea.

  8. High frequency of single-base transitions and extreme frequency of precise multiple-base reversion mutations in poliovirus.

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, J C; Giachetti, C; Semler, B L; Holland, J J

    1992-01-01

    We employed independent clones of a temperature-sensitive mutant of type 1 poliovirus, 3AB-310/4, to quantitate the frequency of specific U----C transitions at nucleotide 5310, within the genomic region encoding polypeptide 3AB, which is involved in the initiation of RNA replication. Only this U----C base substitution restores the wild-type phenotypic ability to form plaques at 39 degrees C; the other two base substitutions at this site are lethal. The observed frequency of this specific transition averaged 2 x 10(-5), and all revertant viruses forming plaques at 39 degrees C contained the expected cytidine at nucleotide 5310. Incredibly, only 3 of 10 revertants exhibited this one specific U----C transition whereas 7 of 10 exhibited this same transition plus four additional base substitutions that precisely reverted temperature-sensitive 3AB-310/4 to wild-type poliovirus sequence (these latter four mutations had been introduced into 3AB-310/4 as silent third base mutations to provide new restriction sites in infectious cDNAs). No other mutations were detected in this polypeptide 3AB domain in either the single-base or the precise 5-base revertants. No intermediates were seen; all revertants exhibited either the single U----C transition at nucleotide 5310 or the same transition plus four precise reversions to the wild-type sequence at sites 8, 11, 43, and 46 bases distant from nucleotide 5310. Similar results were obtained after transfection of cDNA-derived transcripts. We discuss possible mechanisms for our data. These include (but may not be limited to) error-prone polymerase activity, sequential RNA recombination events joining independent mutations, or some unusual RNA editing process. PMID:1313561

  9. Higher frequency but random distribution of EGFR mutation subtypes in familial lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Tseng, Jeng-Sen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Tseng, Chien-Hua; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Yu, Sung-Liang; Su, Kang-Yi; Yu, Chong-Jen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, Ming-Fang; Chiu, Kuo-Liang; Liu, Chien-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jeremy J.W.; Chang, Gee-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in lung cancer therapy, it remains unclear whether EGFR mutation status in familial lung cancers is different from that of sporadic cases. In this multicenter retrospective study, we compared both the EGFR mutation frequency and patterns between familial and sporadic cases. The results explored that family history of lung cancer is an independent predictor for higher EGFR mutation rate in 1713 lung adenocarcinoma patients (Odd ratio 1.68, 95% CI 1.06–2.67, P = 0.028). However, the distribution of EGFR mutation subtypes was similar to that of sporadic cases. Part of our study involved 40 lung cancer families with at least 2 tumor tissues available within each single family (n = 88) and there was no familial aggregation pattern in EGFR mutation subtypes. There were two families harboring the YAP1 R331W germline risk allele and EGFR mutation statuses among YAP1 family members also varied. These phenomena may hint at the direction of future research into lung carcinogenesis and EGFR mutagenesis. PMID:27449093

  10. Fundamental Limit of 1/f Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, K.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    So-called 1/f noise has power spectral density inversely proportional to frequency, and is observed in many physical processes. Single longitudinal-mode semiconductor lasers, used in variety of interferometric sensing applications, as well as coherent communications, exhibit 1/f frequency noise at low frequency (typically below 100kHz). Here we evaluate mechanical thermal noise due to mechanical dissipation in semiconductor laser components and give a plausible explanation for the widely-observed 1/f frequency noise, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Semiconductor-laser's short cavity, small beam radius, and lossy components are expected to emphasize thermal-noise-limited frequency noise. Our simple model largely explains the different 1/f noise levels observed in various semiconductor lasers, and provides a framework where the noise may be reduced with proper design.

  11. The Frequency of HBB Mutations Among β-Thalassemia Patients in Hamadan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Masoumeh; Azizi Jalilian, Farid; Ahmadi, Leila; Amini, Razieh; Esfehani, Hossein; Sosanian, Maryam; Rabbani, Bahareh; Maleki, Majid; Mahdieh, Nejat

    2017-04-10

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) caused by mutations on the HBB gene is the most common single-gene disorder in the world. In this study, the HBB gene mutation was investigated in Hamadan province, Iran. Forty-one patients referred to a referral hospital were admitted to the study. DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood. The HBB gene was sequenced in all recruited patients. Eleven mutations and eight polymorphisms were found in the studied patients. IVS-II-1 (G>A) (HBB: c.315+1 G>A) was the most common mutation, accounting for 25.61% of mutant alleles. Other mutations included codon 8 (-AA) (HBB: c.25-26delAA); IVS-I-110 (G>A) (HBB: c.93-21 G>A); codons 8/9 (+G) (HBB: c.27-28insG); IVS-I-1 (G>A) (HBB: c.92 G>A); codon 44 (-C) (HBB: c.135delC); codons 25/26 (+T) (HBB: c.78-79insT); IVS-I-130 (G>C) (HBB: c.93-1 G>C); -28 (A>C) (HBB: c.-78 A>C); codons 36/37 (-T) (HBB: c.112delT) and IVS-I-6 (T>C) (HBB: c.92+6 T>C). According to our findings, the IVS-II-1 mutation has the highest prevalence in Hamadan Province. It was found that the total frequency of the IVS-II-1, codons 25/26 (+T), codons 8/9 (+G), IVS-I-110 and IVS-I-1 mutations was 82.92%. Therefore, given these findings, it is recommended that these five mutations are screened for as a first step in laboratories without sequencing instruments, and that the rest of the gene is subsequently examined.

  12. The tRNA-Tyr gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: agents of phenotypic variation and position effects on mutation frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Harashima, Sayoko; Hartzog, Phillip E; Sinha, Himanshu; McCusker, John H

    2002-01-01

    Extensive phenotypic diversity or variation exists in clonal populations of microorganisms and is thought to play a role in adaptation to novel environments. This phenotypic variation or instability, which occurs by multiple mechanisms, may be a form of cellular differentiation and a stochastic means for modulating gene expression. This work dissects a case of phenotypic variation in a clinically derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain involving a cox15 ochre mutation, which acts as a reporter. The ochre mutation reverts to sense at a low frequency while tRNA-Tyr ochre suppressors (SUP-o) arise at a very high frequency to produce this phenotypic variation. The SUP-o mutations are highly pleiotropic. In addition, although all SUP-o mutations within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family suppress the ochre mutation reporter, there are considerable phenotypic differences among the different SUP-o mutants. Finally, and of particular interest, there is a strong position effect on mutation frequency within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family, with one locus, SUP6, mutating at a much higher than average frequency and two other loci, SUP2 and SUP8, mutating at much lower than average frequencies. Mechanisms for the position effect on mutation frequency are evaluated. PMID:12196388

  13. Monogenic forms of childhood obesity due to mutations in the leptin gene.

    PubMed

    Funcke, Jan-Bernd; von Schnurbein, Julia; Lennerz, Belinda; Lahr, Georgia; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Congenital leptin deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive monogenic obesity syndrome caused by mutations in the leptin gene. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of the eight distinct mutations found so far in humans.

  14. Heavy smokers have higher bcl-2 mutation frequency and risk for lymphoma than non-smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Cortopassi, G.A.; Bell, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Early detection of cells carrying somatic mutations at oncogenic loci could prove useful for identifying individuals at high risk for cancer and permit intervention prior to the onset of clinically recognizable disease. We have determined the frequency of rare t(14;18)(q32;q21) translocations at the bcl-2 proto-oncogene locus in the peripheral blood of 85 smokers and 35 nonsmokers using a sensitive nested PCR assay. The identical translocation occurs in 85% of follicular lymphoma tumors, and about 50% of all non-Hodgkin`s Lymphoma. Smokers with the highest exposure had a 3.6-fold higher mutation frequency relative to the nonsmokers. Logistic regression analysis showed that of the variables tested (age, race, sex, current smoking, years of smoking, and pack-years), the cumulative smoking measure (pack-years) was the best predictor of t(14;18) frequency (p=0.004). These observations are consistent with two recent epidemiological studies showing 2.3-fold and 3.8-fold increased risk for Non-Hodgkins lymphoma among heavy smokers. The results support the hypothesis that smokers have an increased burden of lymphocytes bearing bcl-2 mutations which raises their individual risk for future lymphoid tumors. We speculate that the increased frequency of oncogenic translocations in smokers may result either from the mutagenic or antigenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  15. Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency in Serbia: Two Novel Mutations and Evidence of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    PubMed

    Andrejević, Slađana; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Košnik, Mitja; Mijanović, Radovan; Bonači-Nikolić, Branka; Rijavec, Matija

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent life-threatening oedemas and/or abdominal pain and caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1. We sought to investigate the spectrum of SERPING1 mutations in Serbia and the possible genotype-phenotype association. C1-INH-HAE was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria in 40 patients from 27 families; four were asymptomatic. Mutational analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Disease-causing mutations in SERPING1 were identified in all patients. In C1-INH-HAE type I, we identified 19 different mutations, including 6 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 2 small deletions, 1 small insertion, 2 splicing defects and 2 large deletions. Two of the mutations (c.300C>T and c.1184_1185insTA) are reported here for the first time. All C1-INH-HAE type II patients from three families harboured the same substitution (c.1396C>T). Based on the type of mutation identified in the SERPING1 gene, patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (nonsense, frameshift, large deletions/insertions, splicing defect, and mutations at Arg444) or group 2 (missense, excluding mutations at Arg444). Significant differences were found in the clinical severity score (P = 0.005), prevalence of laryngeal (P = 0.040) and facial (P = 0.013) oedema, and long-term prophylaxis (P = 0.023) between the groups with different types of mutations. Because our population consisted of related subjects, differences in the severity score between mutation groups were further confirmed using the generalized estimating equation (P = 0.038). Our study identified 20 different disease-causing mutations, including two novel mutations, in all C1-INH-HAE patients, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene. Furthermore, it appears that mutations with a clear effect

  16. Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency in Serbia: Two Novel Mutations and Evidence of Genotype-Phenotype Association

    PubMed Central

    Andrejević, Slađana; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Košnik, Mitja; Mijanović, Radovan; Bonači-Nikolić, Branka; Rijavec, Matija

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent life-threatening oedemas and/or abdominal pain and caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1. We sought to investigate the spectrum of SERPING1 mutations in Serbia and the possible genotype-phenotype association. C1-INH-HAE was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria in 40 patients from 27 families; four were asymptomatic. Mutational analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Disease-causing mutations in SERPING1 were identified in all patients. In C1-INH-HAE type I, we identified 19 different mutations, including 6 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 2 small deletions, 1 small insertion, 2 splicing defects and 2 large deletions. Two of the mutations (c.300C>T and c.1184_1185insTA) are reported here for the first time. All C1-INH-HAE type II patients from three families harboured the same substitution (c.1396C>T). Based on the type of mutation identified in the SERPING1 gene, patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (nonsense, frameshift, large deletions/insertions, splicing defect, and mutations at Arg444) or group 2 (missense, excluding mutations at Arg444). Significant differences were found in the clinical severity score (P = 0.005), prevalence of laryngeal (P = 0.040) and facial (P = 0.013) oedema, and long-term prophylaxis (P = 0.023) between the groups with different types of mutations. Because our population consisted of related subjects, differences in the severity score between mutation groups were further confirmed using the generalized estimating equation (P = 0.038). Our study identified 20 different disease-causing mutations, including two novel mutations, in all C1-INH-HAE patients, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene. Furthermore, it appears that mutations with a clear effect

  17. Recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to compound heterozygous mitofusin 2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Polke, J.M.; Laurá, M.; Pareyson, D.; Taroni, F.; Milani, M.; Bergamin, G.; Gibbons, V.S.; Houlden, H.; Chamley, S.C.; Blake, J.; DeVile, C.; Sandford, R.; Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) are the most common cause of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2). Over 50 mutations have been reported, mainly causing autosomal dominant disease, though families with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations have been described. We present 3 families with early-onset CMT2 associated with compound heterozygous MFN2 mutations. Transcriptional analysis was performed to investigate the effects of the mutations. Methods: Patients were examined clinically and electrophysiologically; parents were also examined where available. Genetic investigations included MFN2 DNA sequencing and dosage analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. MFN2 mRNA transcripts from blood lymphocytes were analyzed in 2 families. Results: Compound heterozygosity for MFN2 mutations was associated with early-onset CMT2 of varying severity between pedigrees. Parents, where examined, were unaffected and were heterozygous for the expected mutations. Four novel mutations were detected (one missense, one nonsense, an intragenic deletion of exons 7 + 8, and a 3–base pair deletion), as well as 2 previously reported missense mutations. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated aberrant splicing of the exonic deletion and indicated nonsense-mediated decay of mutant alleles with premature truncating mutations. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that MFN2 mutations can cause early-onset CMT2 with apparent recessive inheritance. Novel genetic findings include an intragenic MFN2 deletion and nonsense-mediated decay. Carrier parents were asymptomatic, suggesting that MFN2 null alleles can be nonpathogenic unless coinherited with another mutation. PMID:21715711

  18. Severe childhood SMA and axonal CMT due to anticodon binding domain mutations in the GARS gene.

    PubMed

    James, P A; Cader, M Z; Muntoni, F; Childs, A-M; Crow, Y J; Talbot, K

    2006-11-14

    We screened 100 patients with inherited and sporadic lower motor neuron degeneration and identified three novel missense mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene. One mutation was in the anticodon binding domain and associated with onset in early childhood and predominant involvement of the lower limbs, thus extending the phenotype associated with GARS mutations.

  19. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure:Effects of dose rate on mutation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Masako; Nakamura, Issei; Manabe, Yuichiro

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the linear no threshold (LNT) hypothesis deduced from the prominent works done by H. J. Muller for the DNA mutation induced by the artificial radiation and by W. L. Russell and E. M. Kelly for that of mega-mouse experiments, developing a new kinetic reaction theory. While the existing theoretical models primarily rely on the dependence of the total dose D on the mutation frequency, the key ingredient in our theory is the dose rate d(t) that accounts for decrease in the mutation rate during the time course of the cellular reactions. The general form for the mutation frequency with the constant dose rate d is simply expressed as, dFm(t)/dt = A - BFm(t) , with A =a0 +a1(d +deff) and B =b0 +b1(d +deff) . We discuss the solution for a most likely case with B > 0 ; Fm(t) = [A/B -Fm(0) ] (1 -e-Bt) +Fm(0) with the control value Fm(0) . We show that all the data of mega-mouse experiments by Russel with different dose rates fall on the universal scaling function Φ(τ) ≡ [Fm(τ) -Fm(0) ]/[ A / B -Fm(0) ] = 1 - exp(- τ) with scaled time τ = Bt . The concept of such a scaling rule provides us with a strong tool to study different species in a unified manner.

  20. Elevated frequency of glycophorin A mutations in erythrocytes from Chernobyl accident victims

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.; Grant, S.G.; Moore, D. II; Pilinskaya, M.; Vorobtsova, I.; Pleshanov, P.

    1995-02-01

    In 1986, when an explosion accident occurred at the Chernobyl, Ukraine nuclear power plant, a large number of people were exposed to significant amounts of ionizing radiation. During the time between 1986 and 1992, peripheral blood samples were obtained from 102 people who either were on site during the emergency or were brought to Chernobyl shortly thereafter to assist in the cleanup of radioactive contaminants and isolate the damaged reactor from the environment. These blood samples plus samples from 13 unexposed Soviet individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry using the allele-loss somatic mutation assay for glycophorin A. Results of these assays show that the frequency of N/{O} variant red cells increased in proportion to the estimated radiation exposure of each individual. The radiation dose-response function derived from this population closely resembles that determined previously for atomic bomb survivors whose blood samples were obtained and analyzed 40 years after their exposure. This suggests comparable mutation induction per unit dose for these two populations and long-term persistence of the mutational damage. In addition, measurements on multiple blood samples from each of 10 donors taken over a 7-year period showed no significant changes in N/{O} variant cell frequencies, confirming the persistence of radiation-induced somatic mutations in long-lived bone marrow stem cells. 19 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Frequency of mutations in PROP-1 gene in Turkish children with combined pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Nurgün; Vurallı, Doğuş; Taşkıran, Ekim; Gönç, Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Yılmaz, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the prophet of Pit-1 (PROP-1) gene are responsible for most of the cases of combined pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). We performed this study to determine the prevalence of PROP-1 mutations in a group of Turkish children with CPHD. Fifty-three children with the diagnosis of CPHD were included in this study. Clinical data were obtained from medical files, and hormonal evaluation and genetic screening for PROP-1 mutations were performed. A homozygous S109X mutation was found in the second exon in two brothers, and they had growth hormone (GH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies and normal prolactin levels. In the third exon of the PROP-1 gene, a heterozygous A142T polymorphism was found in 14 patients and a homozygous A142T polymorphism was found in 3 patients. In the first exon, a homozygous A9A polymorphism was found in 7 patients and a heterozygous A9A polymorphism was found in 31 patients. We assumed that mutations in the PROP-1 gene in cases with CPHD were expected to be more prevalent in our population due to consanguinity, but it was found that these mutations were far less than expected and that it was rare in non-familial cases.

  2. A case of homocystinuria due to CBS gene mutations revealed by cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Mariana; Not, Adeline; de Baulny, Hélène Ogier; Masnou, Pascal; Vahedi, Katayoun; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Denier, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Homocystinuria caused by cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency is most often diagnosed in childhood and has a variable expressivity. The most frequent abnormalities include intellectual disability, ectopia lentis, myopia, skeletal abnormalities or thromboembolism. To report a case of homocystinuria unraveled by cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). A 17 year old female was admitted in our department of neurology for subacute headache and presented seizures in the emergency room. Cerebral imaging revealed CVT. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia was found and led to the diagnosis of homocystinuria due to composite heterozygous mutations in the CBS gene. Further investigations disclosed lens subluxation in association with myopia, mild scoliosis and osteopenia. The patient was treated by heparin followed by warfarin, vitamin therapy and dietary methionine restriction. Total homocysteine and methionine levels became normal in a few weeks and the patient had a complete recovery. In patients with CVT, plasma total homocysteine measurement as part of the etiologic work up may reveal severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to CBS or remethylation defects that require specific treatment and management including perhaps protein-restricted diet and/or vitamin therapy for life. © 2013.

  3. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Effects on Performance and Work Quality due to Low Frequency Ventilation Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson Waye, K.; Rylander, R.; Benton, S.; Leventhall, H. G.

    1997-08-01

    A pilot study was carried out to assess method evaluating effects of low frequency noise on performance. Of special interest was to study objective and subjective effects over time. Two ventilation noises were used, one of a predominantly mid frequency character and the other of a predominantly low frequency character. Both had an NC value of 35. For the study, 50 students were recruited and 30 selected on the basis of subjective reports of pressure on the eardrum after exposure to a low frequency noise. Of these, 14 randomly selected subjects aged 21 and 34 took part. The subjects performed three computerized cognitive tests in the mid frequency or the low frequency noise condition alternatively. Tests I and II were performed together with a secondary task.Questionnaires were used to evaluate subjective symptoms, effects on mood and estimated interference with the test results due to temperature, light and noise. The results showed that the subjective estimations of noise interference with performance were higher for the low frequency noise (p<0·05). The exposure to low frequency noise resulted in lower social orientation (p<0·05) (more disagreeable, less co-operative, helpful) and a tendency to lower pleasantness (p=0·07) (more bothered, less content) as compared to the mid frequency noise exposure. Data from test III may indicate that the response time during the last part of the test was longer in the low frequency noise exposure. The effects seemed to appear over time. The hypothesis that cognitive demands are less well coped with under the low frequency noise condition, needs to be further studied. The results further indicate that the NC curves do not fully assess the negative effects of low frequency noise on work performance.

  5. Ethnic heterogeneity and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation frequencies in Chicago-area CF families

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.; Lester, L.A.; Mott, C.; Billstrand, C.; Lemke, A.; Ven, K. van der ); Marcus, S.; Kraut, J.; Booth, C. ); Lloyd-Still, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The identification of a common mutation, [Delta]F508, in the CFTR gene allowed, for the first time, the detection of cystic fibrosis (CF) carriers in the general population. Further genetic studies revealed >100 additional disease-causing mutations in this gene, few of which occur on >1% of CF chromosomes in any ethnic group. Prior to establishing counseling guidelines and carrier risk assessments, the authors sought to establish the frequencies of the CFTR mutations that are present in CF families living in the Chicago are, a region notable for its ethnic heterogeneity. Their sample included 283 unrelated CF carriers, with the following ethnic composition: 78% non-Ashkenazi Caucasians, 5% Ashkenazi, 9% African-American, 3% Mexican, 0.3% Native American, and 5% mixed ancestry. When a panel of 10 mutations ([Delta]F508, [Delta]I507, G542X, G551D, R553X, S549N, R1162X, W1282X, N1303K, and 1717-1G[r arrow]A) was used, detection rates ranged from 75% in non-Ashkenazi Caucasians to 40% in African-Americans. These data suggest that the goal of screening for 90%-95% of CF mutations may be unrealistic in this and other, similar US populations. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Frequency and origins of hemoglobin S mutation in African-derived Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    De Mello Auricchio, Maria Teresa Balester; Vicente, João Pedro; Meyer, Diogo; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2007-12-01

    Africans arrived in Brazil as slaves in great numbers, mainly after 1550. Before the abolition of slavery in Brazil in 1888, many communities, called quilombos, were formed by runaway or abandoned African slaves. These communities are presently referred to as remnants of quilombos, and many are still partially genetically isolated. These remnants can be regarded as relicts of the original African genetic contribution to the Brazilian population. In this study we assessed frequencies and probable geographic origins of hemoglobin S (HBB*S) mutations in remnants of quilombo populations in the Ribeira River valley, São Paulo, Brazil, to reconstruct the history of African-derived populations in the region. We screened for HBB*S mutations in 11 quilombo populations (1,058 samples) and found HBB*S carrier frequencies that ranged from 0% to 14%. We analyzed beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes linked to the HBB*S mutation in 86 chromosomes and found the four known African haplotypes: 70 (81.4%) Bantu (Central Africa Republic), 7 (8.1%) Benin, 7 (8.1%) Senegal, and 2 (2.3%) Cameroon haplotypes. One sickle cell homozygote was Bantu/Bantu and two homozygotes had Bantu/Benin combinations. The high frequency of the sickle cell trait and the diversity of HBB*S linked haplotypes indicate that Brazilian remnants of quilombos are interesting repositories of genetic diversity present in the ancestral African populations.

  7. Comparison of Data on Mutation Frequencies of Mice Caused by Radiation with Low Dose Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Bando, Masako

    2013-09-01

    We propose low dose (LD) model, the extension of LDM model which was proposed in the previous paper [Y. Manabe et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81 (2012) 104004] to estimate biological damage caused by irradiation. LD model takes account of cell death effect in addition to the proliferation, apoptosis, repair which were included in LDM model. As a typical example of estimation, we apply LD model to the experiment of mutation frequency on the responses induced by the exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. The most famous and extensive experiments are those summarized by Russell and Kelly [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79 (1982) 539], which are known as ``mega-mouse project''. This provides us with important information of the frequencies of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonia stem-cells. It is found that the numerical results of the mutation frequency of mice are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data: the LD model reproduces the total dose and dose rate dependence of data reasonably. In order to see such dose-rate dependence more explicitly, we introduce the dose-rate effectiveness factor (DREF). This represents a sort of dose rate dependent effect, which are to be competitive with proliferation effect of broken cells induced by irradiation.

  8. Acanthosis nigricans and insulin sensitivity in patients with achondroplasia and hypochodroplasia due to FGFR3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Brain, Caroline; Torpiano, John; Dattani, Mehul T

    2009-10-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN) has been reported in association with severe skeletal dysplasias due to activating mutations in FGFR3, including thanatophoric dysplasia, severe achondroplasia (ACH) with developmental delay and AN (SADDAN syndrome), and Crouzon syndrome with AN. There are isolated reports of patients with ACH and AN. In this series, we report clinical and biochemical data on five male patients, four with ACH and one with hypochondroplasia (HCH), who developed AN without SADDAN. We compared the results of a 1.75 g/kg oral glucose tolerance test performed in patients with ACH/HCH and AN with age-, sex-, and puberty-matched short children. Three of the patients were treated with recombinant human GH (dose range, 45-50 microg/kg/d), one patient had discontinued treatment 6 months before presentation, and one had never been treated. All patients had a fasting plasma glucose of less than 6 mmol/liter, and no patient had a plasma glucose greater than 7.8 mmol/liter at 2 h after ingestion of a glucose load. Although body mass index was higher in patients with skeletal dysplasia (28.9 +/- 7.3 vs. 20 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2); P = 0.01), mean fasting plasma insulin concentration was greater in controls (14.4 +/- 4.8 vs. 6.0 +/- 4.5 mU/liter; P = 0.03), as was homeostasis assessment index for insulin resistance (2.5 +/- 0.9 vs. 1.17 +/- 0.8; P = 0.05). Our findings suggest that the development of AN in patients with ACH/HCH is not due to insulin insensitivity either on its own or secondary to treatment with recombinant human GH. Whether the AN is due to altered melanocyte function in these individuals remains to be established.

  9. Low Frequency Stimulation Decreases Seizure Activity in a Mutation Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Kara Buehrer; Tian, Nan; Durand, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose To investigate brain electrical activity in Q54 mice that display spontaneous seizures because of a gain-of-function mutation of the Scn2a sodium channel gene, and to evaluate the efficacy of low frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) for seizure frequency reduction. Methods EEG, EMG, and hippocampal deep electrodes were implanted into Q54 mice expressing an epileptic phenotype (n = 6). Chronic six channel recordings (wideband, 0.1–300 Hz) were stored 24 hours a day for more than 12 days. Low Frequency stimulation (LFS) (3Hz, square wave, biphasic, 100μs, 400μA) was applied to the ventral hippocampal commisure (VHC) in alternating five minute cycles (on or off) 24 hours a day for a period of four days. Results LFS (3Hz) resulted in a significant reduction in seizure frequency and duration (21% and 35%, p<0.05), when applied to the VHC of epileptic Q54 mice (n = 6). Seizure frequency was not directly affected by stimulation state (“on” versus “off”). Conclusion LFS applied at a frequency of 3Hz significantly reduced seizure frequency and duration in the Q54 model. Furthermore, the reduction of seizure frequency and duration by LFS was not immediate but had a delayed and lasting effect, supporting complex, indirect mechanisms of action. PMID:20659150

  10. Congenital microcephaly and chorioretinopathy due to de novo heterozygous KIF11 mutations: five novel mutations and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Enyedi, Laura; Parsons, Gretchen; Collins, Sarah; Medne, Livija; Adams, Carissa; Ward, Thomas; Davitt, Bradley; Bicknese, Alma; Zackai, Elaine; Toriello, Helga; Dobyns, William B.; Christian, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The microcephaly-lymphedema-chorioretinal dysplasia (MLCRD) syndrome is a distinct microcephaly syndrome. The hallmark features, microcephaly, chorioretinopathy, and lymphedema, are frequently recognized at birth. Another clinical entity, the chorioretinal dysplasia, microcephaly and mental retardation syndrome (CDMMR) is a highly overlapping syndrome characterized by more variable lymphedema. Recently, heterozygous mutations in KIF11, a gene encoding a critical spindle motor protein of the Kinesin family, have been reported in individuals with MLCRD, and in individuals with CDMMR. This finding is suggestive of a single clinically variable spectrum. Here, we report on de novo novel mutations of KIF11 in five individuals with severe microcephaly, marked simplification of the gyral pattern on neuroimaging, bilateral chorioretinopathy and developmental delay. Three patients had congenital lymphedema, and one had congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This report therefore further expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of KIF11-associated microcephaly. PMID:25115524

  11. Spontaneous mutation frequency and molecular mechanisms of Shigella flexneri fluoroquinolone resistance under antibiotic selective stress.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qijing; Pan, Jing-Cao; Shen, Zhangqi; Zhang, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Shigella strains has risen rapidly, presumably in response to ciprofloxacin antibiotic stress. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance phenotype is critical to developing novel and effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, the frequency of ciprofloxacin-induced mutation was measured in antibiotic resistance genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE, marOR, and marA) of Shigella flexneri. The S. flexneri 2a strain 301 was cultured on Luria-Bertani agar plates containing one of seven different ciprofloxacin concentrations (range: 0.03125-2 μg mL(-1)). Resistant colonies were selected for gene-targeted sequencing analysis; the identified point mutations were subsequently confirmed by insertion into antibiotic cassette plasmids and growth under ciprofloxacin stress. The results demonstrated that the seven different ciprofloxacin concentrations produced dose-dependent frequencies of spontaneous mutations: 10(-8) (0.03125 and 0.0625 μg mL(-1)), 10(-9) (0.125 μg mL(-1)), and <10(-9) (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 μg mL(-1)). PCR sequencing of the ten randomly selected resistant colonies (minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.125 μg mL(-1), n = 5 and 0.25 μg mL(-1), n = 5) revealed that all colonies had mutations in the gyrA gene at either codon 83 (Ser83 → Leu) or 87 (Asp87 → Tyr or → Gly), both of which were confirmed at MIC of 0.125 μg mL(-1). None of the spontaneous mutation colonies exhibited gyrB, parC, parE, marOR, or marA mutations. In conclusion, S. flexneri is normomutable under ciprofloxacin antibiotic stress and fluoroquinolone resistance by spontaneous mutation occurs at a low rate. Codon mutations gyrA 83 and/or gyrA 87 cause a 4-fold increase in the ciprofloxacin MIC, and may represent the natural mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  12. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  13. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria due to a mutation in GATA1: the first trans-acting mutation causative for a human porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Spangrude, Gerald J.; Kushner, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder, is due to mutations of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Deficiency of UROS results in excess uroporphyrin I, which causes photosensitization. We evaluated a 3-year-old boy with CEP. A hypochromic, microcytic anemia was present from birth, and platelet counts averaged 70 × 109/L (70 000/μL). Erythrocyte UROS activity was 21% of controls. Red cell morphology and globin chain labeling studies were compatible with β-thalassemia. Hb electrophoresis revealed 36.3% A, 2.4% A2, 59.5% F, and 1.8% of an unidentified peak. No UROS or α- and β-globin mutations were found in the child or the parents. The molecular basis of the phenotype proved to be a mutation of GATA1, an X-linked transcription factor common to globin genes and heme biosynthetic enzymes in erythrocytes. A mutation at codon 216 in the child and on one allele of his mother changed arginine to tryptophan (R216W). This is the first report of a human porphyria due to a mutation in a trans-acting factor and the first association of CEP with thalassemia and thrombocytopenia. The Hb F level of 59.5% suggests a role for GATA-1 in globin switching. A bone marrow allograft corrected both the porphyria and the thalassemia. PMID:17148589

  14. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria due to a mutation in GATA1: the first trans-acting mutation causative for a human porphyria.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John D; Steensma, David P; Pulsipher, Michael A; Spangrude, Gerald J; Kushner, James P

    2007-03-15

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder, is due to mutations of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Deficiency of UROS results in excess uroporphyrin I, which causes photosensitization. We evaluated a 3-year-old boy with CEP. A hypochromic, microcytic anemia was present from birth, and platelet counts averaged 70 x 10(9)/L (70,000/microL). Erythrocyte UROS activity was 21% of controls. Red cell morphology and globin chain labeling studies were compatible with beta-thalassemia. Hb electrophoresis revealed 36.3% A, 2.4% A(2), 59.5% F, and 1.8% of an unidentified peak. No UROS or alpha- and beta-globin mutations were found in the child or the parents. The molecular basis of the phenotype proved to be a mutation of GATA1, an X-linked transcription factor common to globin genes and heme biosynthetic enzymes in erythrocytes. A mutation at codon 216 in the child and on one allele of his mother changed arginine to tryptophan (R216W). This is the first report of a human porphyria due to a mutation in a trans-acting factor and the first association of CEP with thalassemia and thrombocytopenia. The Hb F level of 59.5% suggests a role for GATA-1 in globin switching. A bone marrow allograft corrected both the porphyria and the thalassemia.

  15. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis is due to a CLCN7 mutation.

    PubMed

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Trinh, Anne; Taylor, John; Lise, Stefano; Taylor, Jenny C; Ebeling, Peter R; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation in a family with an unusual presentation of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (OPT), proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness, a combination of features not previously reported. We undertook exome sequencing of one affected and one unaffected family member, followed by targeted analysis of known candidate genes to identify the causative mutation. This identified a missense mutation (c.643G>A; p.Gly215Arg) in the gene encoding the chloride/proton antiporter 7 (gene CLCN7, protein CLC-7), which was confirmed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR, and to be present in the three available patients. CLC-7 mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant OPT type 2, also called Albers-Schonberg disease, which is characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly of the spine, pelvis and skull base, resulting in bone fragility and fractures. Albers-Schonberg disease is not reported to be associated with RTA, but autosomal recessive OPT type 3 (OPTB3) with RTA is associated with carbonic anhydrase type 2 (CA2) mutations. No mutations were detected in CA2 or any other genes known to cause proximal RTA. Neither CLCN7 nor CA2 mutations have previously been reported to be associated with renal stones or epilepsy. Thus, we identified a CLCN7 mutation in a family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, RTA, renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Frequency, spectrum, and functional significance of TP53 mutations in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Voropaeva, E N; Pospelova, T I; Voevoda, M I; Maksimov, V N

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis of oncogene mutations shows that variations in their frequency, spectrum, and hot-spot locations depends on the type of tumor and the ethnic origin of the population studied. The current version of the IARC TP53 Mutation Database lacks information about the frequency and spectrum of TP53 mutations in patients with DLBCL in Russia. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and functional significance of TP53 mutations in patients with DLBCL in Novosibirsk. The TP53 coding sequence and the adjacent intron regions were analyzed by direct sequencing in the tumor material from 74 patients with DLBCL. Mutations of the TP53 coding sequence were found in 18 (24.3%) patients. These data are consistent with the frequency of TP53  mutations observed in other studies. The spectrum of nucleotide substitutions found in DLBCL specimens corresponded to that described in the IARC TP53 Mutation Database. According to bioinformatic data and to reported experiments in vitro, most of the mutations detected result in the production of functionally inactive p53. Our results show that DLBCL progression is accompanied by the functional selection for mutations in TP53 exons 5-8.

  17. Familial acromegaly due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene mutation in a Turkish cohort.

    PubMed

    Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Sayitoglu, Muge; Firtina, Sinem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is associated with 15-20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas and 50-80% of cases with AIP mutation exhibit a somatotropinoma. Herein we report clinical characteristics of a large family where AIP R304X variants have been identified. AIP mutation analysis was performed on a large (n = 52) Turkish family across six generations. Sella MRIs of 30 family members were obtained. Basal pituitary hormone levels were evaluated in 13 family members harboring an AIP mutation. Thirteen of 52 family members (25%) were found to have a heterozygous nonsense germline R304X mutation in the AIP gene. Seven of the 13 mutation carriers (53.8%) had current or previous history of pituitary adenoma. Of these 7 mutation carriers, all but one had somatotropinoma/somatolactotropinoma (85.7% of the pituitary adenomas). Of the 6 acromegaly patients with AIP mutation (F/M: 3/3) the mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 32 ± 10.3 years while the mean age of symptom onset was 24.8 ± 9.9 years. Three of the six (50%) acromegaly cases with AIP mutation within the family presented with a macroadenoma and none presented with gigantism. Biochemical disease control was achieved in 66.6% (4/6) of the mutation carriers with acromegaly after a mean follow-up period of 18.6 ± 17.6 years. Common phenotypic characteristics of familial pituitary adenoma or somatotropinoma due to AIP mutation vary between families or even between individuals within a family.

  18. Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson Syndrome Due to PARN Mutations: Fourteen Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Ashley M.; Ballew, Bari J.; Kentosh, Joshua B.; Turner, Clesson E.; Norton, Scott A.; Giri, Neelam; Alter, Blanche P.; Nellan, Anandani; Gamper, Christopher; Hartman, Kip R.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome is a dyskeratosis congenita-related telomere biology disorder that presents in infancy with intrauterine growth retardation immunodeficiency, and cerebellar hypoplasia in addition to the triad of nail dysplasia, skin pigmentation, and oral leukoplakia. Patients with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome often develop bone marrow failure in early childhood. Germline mutations in DKC1, TERT, TINF2, RTEL1, ACD, and PARN cause about 60% of Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome cases. Case Report We report 14 years of follow-up for a patient with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome who initially presented as an infant with intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, and central nervous system calcifications. He was diagnosed with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome at age six and had a complicated medical history including severe developmental delay, cerebellar hypoplasia, esophageal and urethral stenosis, hip avascular necrosis, immunodeficiency, and bone marrow failure evolving to myelodysplastic syndrome requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation at age 14. He had progressive skin pigmentation changes, oral leukoplakia, and nail dysplasia leading to anonychia. Whole exome sequencing identified novel biallelic variants in PARN. Conclusions This case illustrates that the constellation of IUGR, central nervous system calcifications, and cerebellar hypoplasia, esophageal or urethral stenosis, and cytopenias, in the absence of congenital infection, may be due to Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Early diagnosis of Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome is important to optimize medical management and provide genetic counseling. PMID:26810774

  19. Salbutamol benefits children with congenital myasthenic syndrome due to DOK7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Burke, Georgina; Hiscock, Andrew; Klein, Andrea; Niks, Erik H; Main, Marion; Manzur, Adnan Y; Ng, Joanne; de Vile, Catherine; Muntoni, Francesco; Beeson, David; Robb, Stephanie

    2013-02-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes due to DOK7 mutations cause fatigable limb girdle weakness. Treatment with ephedrine improves muscle strength. Salbutamol, a β(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist with fewer side effects and more readily available, has been effective in adult and anecdotal childhood cases. This study reports the effects of salbutamol on motor function in childhood DOK7 congenital myasthenic syndrome. Nine children (age range 5.9-15.1years) were treated with oral salbutamol, 2-4mg TDS. The effect on timed tests of motor function, pre- and up to 28months post-treatment, was audited retrospectively. All 9 reported functional benefit within 1month, with progressive improvement to a plateau at 12-18months. Within the first month, all 3 non-ambulant children resumed walking with assistance. Although improvements were seen in some timed tests (timed 10m, arm raise time, 6min walk time) this did not fully reflect the observed functional benefits in daily living activities. No major side effects were reported. We conclude that oral salbutamol treatment significantly improves strength in children with DOK7 congenital myasthenic syndrome and is well tolerated. Outcome measures need to be refined further, both to accurately reflect functional abilities in children and to document progress and treatment response.

  20. Frequency and geographic distribution of TERT promoter mutations in primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pezzuto, Francesca; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-01-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mainly develops in subjects chronically infected with hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses through a multistep process characterized by the accumulation of genetic alterations in the human genome. Nucleotide changes in coding regions (i.e. TP53, CTNNB1, ARID1A and ARID2) as well as in non-coding regions (i.e. TERT promoter) are considered cancer drivers for HCC development with variable frequencies in different geographic regions depending on the etiology and environmental factors. Recurrent hot spot mutations in TERT promoter (G > A at-124 bp; G > A at -146 bp), have shown to be common events in many tumor types including HCC and to up regulate the expression of telomerases. We performed a comprehensive review of the literature evaluating the differential distribution of TERT promoter mutations in 1939 primary HCC from four continents. Mutation rates were found higher in Europe (56.6%) and Africa (53.3%) than America (40%) and Asia (42.5%). In addition, HCV-related HCC were more frequently mutated (44.8% in US and 69.7% in Asia) than HBV-related HCC (21.4% in US and 45.5% in Africa). HCC cases associated to factors other than hepatitis viruses are also frequently mutated in TERT promoter (43.6%, 52.6% and 57.7% in USA, Asia and Europe, respectively). These results support a major role for telomere elongation in HCV-related and non-viral related hepatic carcinogenesis and suggest that TERT promoter mutations could represent a candidate biomarker for the early detection of liver cancer in subjects with HCV infection or with metabolic liver diseases.

  1. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  2. Dysregulated mitophagy and mitochondrial organization in optic atrophy due to OPA1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chunyan; Ashley, Neil; Diot, Alan; Morten, Karl; Phadwal, Kanchan; Williams, Andrew; Fearnley, Ian; Rosser, Lyndon; Lowndes, Jo; Fratter, Carl; Ferguson, David J.P.; Vay, Laura; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Moroni, Isabella; Bianchi, Stefania; Lamperti, Costanza; Downes, Susan M.; Sitarz, Kamil S.; Flannery, Padraig J.; Carver, Janet; Dombi, Eszter; East, Daniel; Laura, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M.; Mortiboys, Heather; Prevo, Remko; Campanella, Michelangelo; Daniels, Matthew J.; Zeviani, Massimo; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Simon, Anna Katharina; Votruba, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate mitophagy in 5 patients with severe dominantly inherited optic atrophy (DOA), caused by depletion of OPA1 (a protein that is essential for mitochondrial fusion), compared with healthy controls. Methods: Patients with severe DOA (DOA plus) had peripheral neuropathy, cognitive regression, and epilepsy in addition to loss of vision. We quantified mitophagy in dermal fibroblasts, using 2 high throughput imaging systems, by visualizing colocalization of mitochondrial fragments with engulfing autophagosomes. Results: Fibroblasts from 3 biallelic OPA1(−/−) patients with severe DOA had increased mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)–depleted cells due to decreased levels of OPA1 protein. Similarly, in siRNA-treated control fibroblasts, profound OPA1 knockdown caused mitochondrial fragmentation, loss of mtDNA, impaired mitochondrial function, and mitochondrial mislocalization. Compared to controls, basal mitophagy (abundance of autophagosomes colocalizing with mitochondria) was increased in (1) biallelic patients, (2) monoallelic patients with DOA plus, and (3) OPA1 siRNA–treated control cultures. Mitophagic flux was also increased. Genetic knockdown of the mitophagy protein ATG7 confirmed this by eliminating differences between patient and control fibroblasts. Conclusions: We demonstrated increased mitophagy and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation in primary human cultures associated with DOA plus due to biallelic OPA1 mutations. We previously found that increased mitophagy (mitochondrial recycling) was associated with visual loss in another mitochondrial optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Combined with our LHON findings, this implicates excessive mitochondrial fragmentation, dysregulated mitophagy, and impaired response to energetic stress in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial optic neuropathies, potentially linked with mitochondrial mislocalization and mtDNA depletion. PMID:27974645

  3. Frequency of the transthyretin Val30Met mutation in the northern Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Malin; Jonasson, Jenni; Cederquist, Kristina; Suhr, Ole B

    2014-03-01

    By genotyping a large number of samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study cohort, a carrier frequency could be determined for the Skellefteå and Lycksele populations. A previous study of the amyloidogenic transthyretin mutation TTRV30M in Northern Sweden's endemic area has shown a large variation in carrier frequency and penetrance of the trait within the area. However, the estimations have been based on a small sample size within the different regions in the area and therefore, the wide variation in TTRV30M carrier frequency observed between the Lycksele and Skellefteå populations are uncertain. Based on a total of 3460 samples, the estimated overall carrier frequency in the two regions was 1.82% with a carrier frequency in the Skellefteå and Lycksele population of 1.63% and 2.02%, respectively. Thus, the previously reported extremely high frequency in the Lycksele region compared to that of the Skellefteå region could not be substantiated. However, it does not change the previous finding of a surprisingly higher carrier frequency in the population from endemic area of Northern Sweden compared to that reported from endemic areas in Portugal.

  4. Point mutation frequency in the FMR1 gene as revealed by fragile X syndrome screening.

    PubMed

    Handt, Maximilian; Epplen, Andrea; Hoffjan, Sabine; Mese, Kemal; Epplen, Jörg T; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of intellectual disability, developmental delay and autism spectrum disorders. This syndrome is due to a functional loss of the FMR1 gene product FMRP, and, in most cases, it is caused by CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 promoter. Yet, also other FMR1 mutations may cause a FXS-like phenotype. Since standard molecular testing does not include the analysis of the FMR1 coding region, the prevalence of point mutations causing FXS is not well known. Here, high resolution melting (HRM) was used to screen for FMR1 gene mutations in 508 males with clinical signs of mental retardation and developmental delay, but without CGG and GCC repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene and AFF2 genes, respectively. Sequence variations were identified by HRM analysis and verified by direct DNA sequencing. Two novel missense mutations (p.Gly482Ser in one patient and p.Arg534His in two unrelated patients), one intronic and two 3'-untranslated region (UTR) variations were identified in the FMR1 gene. Missense mutations in the FMR1 gene might account for a considerable proportion of cases in male patients with FXS-related symptoms, such as those linked to mental retardation and developmental delay.

  5. Breast and ovarian cancer predisposition due to de novo BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Golmard, L; Delnatte, C; Laugé, A; Moncoutier, V; Lefol, C; Abidallah, K; Tenreiro, H; Copigny, F; Giraudeau, M; Guy, C; Barbaroux, C; Amorim, G; Briaux, A; Guibert, V; Tarabeux, J; Caputo, S; Collet, A; Gesta, P; Ingster, O; Stern, M-H; Rouleau, E; de Pauw, A; Gauthier-Villars, M; Buecher, B; Bézieau, S; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Houdayer, C

    2016-03-10

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two major genes predisposing to breast and ovarian cancer. Whereas high de novo mutation rates have been demonstrated for several genes, only 11 cases of de novo BRCA1/2 mutations have been reported to date and the BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate remains unknown. The present study was designed to fill this gap based on a series of 12 805 consecutive unrelated patients diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer who met the inclusion criteria for BRCA1/2 gene analysis according to French guidelines. BRCA1/2 mutations were detected in 1527 (12%) patients, and three BRCA1 mutations and one BRCA2 mutation were de novo. The BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate was estimated to be 0.3% (0.1%; 0.7%). Although rare, it may be useful to take the possibility of de novo BRCA1/2 mutation into account in genetic counseling of relatives and to improve the understanding of complex family histories of breast and ovarian cancers.

  6. Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII is due to mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; McGee, Beth; Yamaoka, Jennifer S.; Guglielmone, Hugo; Downes, Katharine A.; Minoldo, Salvador; Jarchum, Gustavo; Peyvandi, Flora; de Bosch, Norma B.; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette; Chatelain, Bernard; Olpinski, Marian; Bockenstedt, Paula; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kaufman, Randal J.; Nichols, William C.; Tuddenham, Edward G. D.; Ginsburg, David

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) or MCFD2 cause combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII (F5F8D). LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a protein complex that functions as a cargo receptor ferrying FV and FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. In this study, we analyzed 10 previously reported and 10 new F5F8D families. Mutations in the LMAN1 or MCFD2 genes accounted for 15 of these families, including 3 alleles resulting in no LMAN1 mRNA accumulation. Combined with our previous reports, we have identified LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations as the causes of F5F8D in 71 of 76 families. Among the 5 families in which no mutations were identified, 3 were due to misdiagnosis, with the remaining 2 likely carrying LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations that were missed by direct sequencing. Our results suggest that mutations in LMAN1 and MCFD2 may account for all cases of F5F8D. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis detected a low level of LMAN1-MCFD2 complex in lymphoblasts derived from patients with missense mutations in LMAN1 (C475R) or MCFD2 (I136T), suggesting that complete loss of the complex may not be required for clinically significant reduction in FV and FVIII. PMID:16304051

  7. Carrier frequency of GJB2 (connexin-26) mutations causing inherited deafness in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Hee; Park, Hong-Joon; Kang, Eun-Joo; Ryu, Jae-Song; Lee, Anna; Yang, Young-Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ryul

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with hereditary hearing loss. Although most studies of GJB2 mutations have dealt with hearing-impaired patients, there are few reports of the frequency of these mutations in the general population. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of GJB2 mutations causing inherited deafness in the general Korean population. Blood samples were obtained from 2,072 newborns with normal hearing. The dried blood samples were subjected to PCR to amplify the entire coding region of the GJB2 gene, which was followed by direct DNA sequencing. A total of 24 different sequence variants were identified in the coding region of GJB2, including eight pathogenic mutations (p.V37I, p.G45E, p.R143 W, c.176_191del16, c.235delC, c.292_298dup7, c.299_300delAT and c.605ins46), four polymorphisms (p.V27I, p.E114G, p.G160S and p.I203T), six unclassified variants (p.G4D, p.S85Y, p.T123 N, p.R127H, p.A171T and p.F191L) and six novel variants (p.W3T, p.I20L, p.K41E, c.147C > T, c.186C > T and c.576A > G). Pathogenic mutations causing inherited deafness were identified in 3% (62/2,072) of the newborns with normal hearing. Of the eight pathogenic mutations found, p.V37I was the most common (1.35%, 28/2,072), followed by c.235delC (1.25%, 26/2,072). These data provide information about carrier frequency for GJB2-based hearing loss and have important implications for genetic diagnostic testing for inherited deafness in the Korean population.

  8. Frequency of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Smokers with Lung Cancer Without Pulmonary Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Ito-Nishii, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Touge, Hirokazu; Kodani, Masahiro; Makino, Haruhiko; Yanai, Masaaki; Tanaka, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Araki, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a smoking-related disease, and is categorized into the emphysema and airway dominant phenotypes. We examined the relationship between emphysematous changes and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The medical records for 250 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were categorized into the emphysema or non-emphysema group. Wild-type EGFR was detected in 136 (54%) and mutant EGFR in 48 (19%). Emphysematous changes were observed in 87 (36%) patients. EGFR mutation was highly frequent in the non-emphysema group (p=0.0014). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that emphysema was an independent risk factor for reduced frequency of EGFR mutation (Odds Ratio=3.47, p=0.005). Our data showed a relationship between emphysematous changes and EGFR mutation status. There might be mutually exclusive genetic risk factors for carcinogenesis and development of emphysematous changes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. A High Frequency of BRCA Mutations in Young Black Women with Breast Cancer from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Tuya; Bonner, Devon; Cragun, Deborah; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Phelan, Catherine; Servais, Lily; Kim, Jongphil; Narod, Steven A.; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Vadaparampil, Susan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Black women are disproportionately affected with triple negative breast cancer and have relatively poor survival. It is not known to what extent differences in clinical presentation of breast cancer in Non-Hispanic White (NHW) women and Black women can be accounted for by the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes. We sought to evaluate the frequency of BRCA pathogenic variants in a population-based sample of young Black women with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS Black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at or before age 50 from 2009 to 2012 were recruited to the study through the Florida Cancer Registry. Participants underwent genetic counseling, completed a study questionnaire and consented to release of their medical records. Saliva specimens were collected for BRCA sequencing and large rearrangement testing through MLPA. RESULTS A DNA sample was evaluated for 396 women of whom 49 (12.4%) had a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Eight recurrent mutations accounted for 49% of all pathogenic variants. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of BRCA mutations among our Florida-based sample of young Black women with breast cancer exceeds that previously reported for NHW women. It is appropriate to recommend BRCA testing in all young Black women with invasive breast cancer. PMID:26287763

  10. A high frequency of BRCA mutations in young black women with breast cancer residing in Florida.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tuya; Bonner, Devon; Cragun, Deborah; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Phelan, Catherine; Servais, Lily; Kim, Jongphil; Narod, Steven A; Akbari, Mohammad R; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    Black women are disproportionately affected with triple-negative breast cancer and have relatively poor survival. To the authors' knowledge, it is not known to what extent differences in the clinical presentation of breast cancer between non-Hispanic white women and black women can be accounted for by the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The authors sought to evaluate the frequency of BRCA pathogenic variants in a population-based sample of young black women with breast cancer. Black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at age ≤50 years from 2009 to 2012 were recruited to the study through the Florida Cancer Registry. Participants underwent genetic counseling, completed a study questionnaire, and consented to release of their medical records. Saliva specimens were collected for BRCA sequencing and large rearrangement testing through multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A DNA sample was evaluated for 396 women, 49 of whom (12.4%) had a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Eight recurrent mutations accounted for 49% of all pathogenic variants. To the authors' knowledge, the prevalence of BRCA mutations among the Florida-based sample of young black women with breast cancer in the current study exceeds that previously reported for non-Hispanic white women. It is appropriate to recommend BRCA testing in all young black women with invasive breast cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Reduction in mutation frequency by very low-dose gamma irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Keiji; Magae, Junji; Kawakami, Yasushi; Koana, Takao

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for stochastic effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to very low-dose radiation at a low dose rate, we irradiated immature male germ cells of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, with several doses of (60)Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 22.4 mGy/h. Thereafter, we performed the sex-linked recessive lethal mutation assay by mating the irradiated males with nonirradiated females. The mutation frequency in the group irradiated with 500 microGy was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01), whereas in the group subjected to 10 Gy irradiation, the mutation frequency was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.03). A J-shaped dose-response relationship was evident. Molecular experiments using DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription PCR indicated that several genes known to be expressed in response to heat or chemical stress and grim, a positive regulator of apoptosis, were up-regulated immediately after irradiation with 500 microGy. The involvement of an apoptosis function in the non-linear dose-response relationship was suggested.

  12. Different mutations are responsible for the elevated sister chromatid exchange frequencies characteristic of Bloom's syndrome and hamster EM9 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Louie, E.; German, J.

    1987-04-01

    Experimental hybridization of cultured cells was employed to determine whether the strikingly elevated rates of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) exhibited by Bloom's syndrome (BS) and hamster cell line EM9 have the same or different bases. Seventeen cell lines were developed from polyethylene glycol-treated mixtures of BS and EM9 cells. Cytogenetic analysis proved the hybrid nature of 12 of the lines; 9 of those 12 exhibited low (normal) numbers of SCEs, signifying complementation. The parental BS and EM9 cells, although resembling each other in exhibiting very high SCE frequencies in BrdUrd-containing medium, differ from one another with respect to their proliferative abilities in such medium, the EM9 cells but not the BS cells being exquisitely hypersensitive to BrdUrd. In the low-SCE hybrid lines, hypersensitivity to growth in BrdUrd-containing medium was restored to normal whereas the hypersensitivity was retained by the high-SCE hybrids. It is concluded, first, that the mutations in BS and EM9 cells are different and, second, that both the elevated SCE frequency and the excessive BrdUrd hypersensitivity of EM9 cells are due to the same mutation.

  13. Frequency of EGFR and KRAS mutations in patients with non small cell lung cancer by racial background: do disparities exist?

    PubMed

    Bauml, Joshua; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhang, Yu; Watt, Christopher D; Vachani, Anil; Aggarwal, Charu; Evans, Tracey; Langer, Corey

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in EGFR and KRAS can impact treatment decisions for patients with NSCLC. The incidence of these mutations varies, and it is unclear whether there is a decreased frequency among African Americans (AfAs). We performed a retrospective chart review of 513 NSCLC patients undergoing EGFR and KRAS mutational analysis at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania between May 2008 and November 2011. Clinical and pathologic data were abstracted from the patients' electronic medical record. Of 497 patients with informative EGFR mutation analyses, the frequency of EGFR mutation was 13.9%. The frequency of EGFR mutations was associated with race (p < 0.001) and was lower in AfA patients compared to Caucasian (C) patients but did not reach statistical significance (4.8% vs. 13.7%, p = 0.06). Mean Charlson Comorbidity Index and number of cigarette pack years were significantly lower in patients with EGFR mutations (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between race and EGFR mutation (p = 0.01), even after adjusting for smoking status (p < 0.001) and gender (p = 0.03). KRAS mutation (study frequency 28.1%) was not associated with race (p = 0.08; p=0.51 for Afa vs. C patients), but was more common among smokers (p < 0.001) and females (p = 0.01). Based on multivariable analysis, even after adjusting for smoking status and gender, we found that race was statistically significantly associated with EGFR mutation, but not KRAS mutational status. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single institution series to date evaluating racial differences in EGFR and KRAS mutational status among patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequency and Clinicopathologic Features of RUNX1 Mutations in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Not Otherwise Specified.

    PubMed

    You, Eunkyoung; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Koh, Kyung-Nam; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin; Park, Young-Mi; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the frequency and clinicopathologic characteristics of RUNX1 mutations, focusing on patients with acute myeloid leukemia not otherwise specified (AML NOS). Diagnostic samples from 219 patients with AML NOS were analyzed for RUNX1 mutations using standard polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Thirty-one RUNX1 mutations were detected in 33 (15.1%) patients. Mutations clustered in the Runt homology (61.3%) and transactivation domains (25.8%). Frameshift mutations were most common (51.6%), followed by missense (41.9%) and nonsense (6.5%) mutations. Patients with RUNX1 mutations had a lower platelet count (P = .013) and shorter relapse-free survival (P = .045) than those without. The presence of RUNX1 and NPM1 or CEBPA mutations was mutually exclusive. A literature review, including our study, showed that patients with RUNX1 mutations were associated with intermediate risk; coexisting mutations such as FLT3-ITD, ASXL1, TET2, and DNMT3A; and a relatively cytogenetic heterogeneity. Our findings strengthen previous data concerning RUNX1 mutations in AML and support the notion that RUNX1 mutational status should be integrated into a diagnostic workup of AML, particularly for AML NOS or an intermediate-risk group.

  15. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis is due to a CLCN7 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E.; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Trinh, Anne; Taylor, John; Lise, Stefano; Taylor, Jenny C.; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation in a family with an unusual presentation of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (OPT), proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness, a combination of features not previously reported. We undertook exome sequencing of one affected and one unaffected family member, followed by targeted analysis of known candidate genes to identify the causative mutation. This identified a missense mutation (c.643G>A; p.Gly215Arg) in the gene encoding the chloride/proton antiporter 7 (gene CLCN7, protein CLC‐7), which was confirmed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)‐PCR, and to be present in the three available patients. CLC‐7 mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant OPT type 2, also called Albers–Schonberg disease, which is characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly of the spine, pelvis and skull base, resulting in bone fragility and fractures. Albers–Schonberg disease is not reported to be associated with RTA, but autosomal recessive OPT type 3 (OPTB3) with RTA is associated with carbonic anhydrase type 2 (CA2) mutations. No mutations were detected in CA2 or any other genes known to cause proximal RTA. Neither CLCN7 nor CA2 mutations have previously been reported to be associated with renal stones or epilepsy. Thus, we identified a CLCN7 mutation in a family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, RTA, renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27540713

  16. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  17. Mutation frequencies of X-linked mental retardation genes in families from the EuroMRX consortium.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Yntema, Helger G; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Oudakker, Astrid R; de Vries, Bert B A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Van Esch, Hilde; Frints, Suzanne G M; Froyen, Guy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Raynaud, Martine; Moizard, Marie-Pierre; Ronce, Nathalie; Bensalem, Anissa; Moraine, Claude; Poirier, Karine; Castelnau, Laetitia; Saillour, Yoann; Bienvenu, Thierry; Beldjord, Chérif; des Portes, Vincent; Chelly, Jamel; Turner, Gillian; Fullston, Tod; Gecz, Jozef; Kuss, Andreas W; Tzschach, Andreas; Jensen, Lars Riff; Lenzner, Steffen; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Hamel, Ben C J

    2007-02-01

    The EuroMRX family cohort consists of about 400 families with non-syndromic and 200 families with syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). After exclusion of Fragile X (Fra X) syndrome, probands from these families were tested for mutations in the coding sequence of 90 known and candidate XLMR genes. In total, 73 causative mutations were identified in 21 genes. For 42% of the families with obligate female carriers, the mental retardation phenotype could be explained by a mutation. There was no difference between families with (lod score >2) or without (lod score <2) significant linkage to the X chromosome. For families with two to five affected brothers (brother pair=BP families) only 17% of the MR could be explained. This is significantly lower (P=0.0067) than in families with obligate carrier females and indicates that the MR in about 40% (17/42) of the BP families is due to a single genetic defect on the X chromosome. The mutation frequency of XLMR genes in BP families is lower than can be expected on basis of the male to female ratio of patients with MR or observed recurrence risks. This might be explained by genetic risk factors on the X chromosome, resulting in a more complex etiology in a substantial portion of XLMR patients. The EuroMRX effort is the first attempt to unravel the molecular basis of cognitive dysfunction by large-scale approaches in a large patient cohort. Our results show that it is now possible to identify 42% of the genetic defects in non-syndromic and syndromic XLMR families with obligate female carriers. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Frequency and spectrum of hemoglobinopathy mutations in a Uruguayan pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Julio Da; Ávila, Amalia; Icasuriaga, Sandra; Gongóra, María; Castillo, Luis; Serrón, Alejandra; Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Sans, Mónica; Sonati, Maria de Fátima

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common recessive diseases worldwide but their prevalence in Uruguay has not been investigated. In this study, 397 unrelated outpatient children from the Pereira Rosell Hospital Center (CHPR), as well as 31 selected patients with microcytic anemia and 28 β-thalassemia carriers were analyzed for hemoglobinopathies by using biochemical and molecular biology methods. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to compare the hematological indices between groups of genotypes. Of the 397 patients in the first group, approximately 1% (0.76% HbS and 0.25% β-thalassemia) had a mutation in the HBB gene and 3.3% had β-thalassemia. These mutations had a heterogeneous distribution that varied according to individual ancestry. HbS was found exclusively in individuals with declared African ancestry and had a carrier frequency of 2.2%. The frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in outpatients of European and African ancestry was 1.2% and 6.5%, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in patients with microcytic anemia was 25.8%, significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in the sample as a whole and in Afro-descendants and Euro-descendants. Significant differences were observed in the hematological parameters between individuals with thalassemia genotypes and those with a normal genotype. These results indicate that hemoglobinopathies are a relevant health problem in Uruguay. PMID:24130436

  19. Variation in the mutation frequency determining quinolone resistance in Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L2 and D.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jan; Solbach, Werner; Gieffers, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Quinolone resistance of chlamydiae is supposed to be extremely rare. To assess the risk for the emergence of chlamydial quinolone resistance, we analysed the occurrence of resistant mutants in a quantitative perspective. Infectious elementary bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L(2) (ATCC VR-902B) and D (ATTC VR-885) clones were purified on density gradients, and mutants resistant to moxifloxacin and rifampicin were selected by a plaque assay. Plaque assays were conducted with 2 x 10(9) inclusion forming units (IFUs) of each serovar for rifampicin and 2.66 x 10(9) IFUs for moxifloxacin. Resistant clones were analysed for mutations in the gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE genes, and respective MICs were determined by titration experiments. Mutation frequencies for rifampicin (MIC >or= 0.2 mg/L) did not differ significantly between serovars L(2) and D (5.7 x 10(-7) versus 6.3 x 10(-7)). In contrast, the occurrence of moxifloxacin-resistant mutants (MIC >or= 0.6 mg/L) was determined to be 2.0-2.2 x 10(-8) for the serovar L(2) isolate and less than 2.66 x 10(-9) for the serovar D isolate. Moxifloxacin resistance of all serovar L(2) clones depended on single-nucleotide point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA, whereas no additional mutations were found in the gyrB, parC or parE genes. C. trachomatis isolates have the potential to present with clinically relevant antibiotic resistance in future. Serovar-specific differences in the occurrence of spontaneous mutations should be taken into account to predict quinolone resistance in different chlamydial diseases.

  20. Exome sequencing identifies a spectrum of mutation frequencies in advanced and lethal prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akash; White, Thomas A.; MacKenzie, Alexandra P.; Clegg, Nigel; Lee, Choli; Dumpit, Ruth F.; Coleman, Ilsa; Ng, Sarah B.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H.; Morrissey, Colm; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Peter S.; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To catalog protein-altering mutations that may drive the development of prostate cancers and their progression to metastatic disease systematically, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 prostate cancers derived from 16 different lethal metastatic tumors and three high-grade primary carcinomas. All tumors were propagated in mice as xenografts, designated the LuCaP series, to model phenotypic variation, such as responses to cancer-directed therapeutics. Although corresponding normal tissue was not available for most tumors, we were able to take advantage of increasingly deep catalogs of human genetic variation to remove most germline variants. On average, each tumor genome contained ∼200 novel nonsynonymous variants, of which the vast majority was specific to individual carcinomas. A subset of genes was recurrently altered across tumors derived from different individuals, including TP53, DLK2, GPC6, and SDF4. Unexpectedly, three prostate cancer genomes exhibited substantially higher mutation frequencies, with 2,000–4,000 novel coding variants per exome. A comparison of castration-resistant and castration-sensitive pairs of tumor lines derived from the same prostate cancer highlights mutations in the Wnt pathway as potentially contributing to the development of castration resistance. Collectively, our results indicate that point mutations arising in coding regions of advanced prostate cancers are common but, with notable exceptions, very few genes are mutated in a substantial fraction of tumors. We also report a previously undescribed subtype of prostate cancers exhibiting “hypermutated” genomes, with potential implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. Our results also suggest that increasingly deep catalogs of human germline variation may challenge the necessity of sequencing matched tumor-normal pairs. PMID:21949389

  1. Angelman syndrome due to a termination codon mutation of the UBE3A gene.

    PubMed

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Machado, Jerry; Fang, Ping; Dupuis, Lucie; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, and severe speech delay. It may be caused by deletion of chromosome region 15q11.2 of the maternally inherited chromosome, mutations in the UBE3A gene, uniparental disomy, or imprinting defects. Most patients with this diagnosis have a severe phenotype, and a few have a mild form of the disease. We report a patient with a novel mutation in the UBE3A gene that consists of a deletion of the termination codon (c.2556-*+6del GTAAAACAAA) and results in an elongated protein E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Our patient has a mild phenotype compared with other patients in general and specifically to patients with UBE3A mutations. He has mild developmental delay, moderate speech delay, and no seizures. Recognition of this genotype-phenotype correlation will allow better genetic counseling to other patients with similar stop codon mutations.

  2. Fabry disease due to D313Y and novel GLA mutations.

    PubMed

    Koulousios, Konstantinos; Stylianou, Konstantinos; Pateinakis, Panagiotis; Zamanakou, Maria; Loules, Gedeon; Manou, Eleni; Kyriklidou, Parthena; Katsinas, Christos; Ouzouni, Alexandra; Kyriazis, John; Speletas, Matthaios; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2017-10-06

    Our aim is to report four novel α-gal A gene (GLA) mutations resulting in Fabry disease (FD) and provide evidence of pathogenicity of the D313Y mutation regarding which contradictory data have been presented in the literature. Twenty-five family members of nine unrelated patients with definite FD diagnosis, 10 clinically suspected cases and 18 members of their families were included in this polycentric cohort study. Genotyping and measurement of lyso-Gb3 was performed in all individuals. The α-Gal A activity was measured in all men as well as plasma and urine Gb3 concentration in selected cases. Optical and electron microscopy was performed in kidney biopsies of selected patients. All the above were evaluated in parallel with the clinical data of the patients. Fourteen new cases of FD were recognised, four of which were carrying already described GLA mutations. Four novel GLA mutations, namely c.835C>T, c.280T>A, c.924A>C and c.511G>A, resulting in a classic FD phenotype were identified. Moreover, FD was definitely diagnosed in five patients carrying the D313Y mutation. Eight D313Y carriers were presenting signs of FD despite not fulfilling the criteria of the disease, two had no FD signs and two others were apparently healthy. Four novel GLA pathogenic mutations are reported and evidence of pathogenicity of the D313Y mutation is provided. It seems that the D313Y mutation is related to a later-onset milder phenotype than the typical phenotype with normal lysoGb3 concentration. Our study underlines the significance of family member genotyping and newborn screening to avoid misdiagnoses and crucial delays in diagnosis and treatment of the disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Identifying functional defects in patients with immune dysregulation due to LRBA and CTLA-4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tie Zheng; Verma, Nisha; Wanders, Jennifer; Kennedy, Alan; Soskic, Blagoje; Janman, Daniel; Halliday, Neil; Rowshanravan, Behzad; Worth, Austen; Qasim, Waseem; Baxendale, Helen; Stauss, Hans; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Neth, Olaf; Olbrich, Peter; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; Burns, Siobhan O; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M

    2017-03-16

    Heterozygous CTLA-4 deficiency has been reported as a monogenic cause of common variable immune deficiency with features of immune dysregulation. Direct mutation in CTLA-4 leads to defective regulatory T-cell (Treg) function associated with impaired ability to control levels of the CTLA-4 ligands, CD80 and CD86. However, additional mutations affecting the CTLA-4 pathway, such as those recently reported for LRBA, indirectly affect CTLA-4 expression, resulting in clinically similar disorders. Robust phenotyping approaches sensitive to defects in the CTLA-4 pathway are therefore required to inform understanding of such immune dysregulation syndromes. Here, we describe assays capable of distinguishing a variety of defects in the CTLA-4 pathway. Assessing total CTLA-4 expression levels was found to be optimal when restricting analysis to the CD45RA(-)Foxp3(+) fraction. CTLA-4 induction following stimulation, and the use of lysosomal-blocking compounds, distinguished CTLA-4 from LRBA mutations. Short-term T-cell stimulation improved the capacity for discriminating the Foxp3(+) Treg compartment, clearly revealing Treg expansions in these disorders. Finally, we developed a functionally orientated assay to measure ligand uptake by CTLA-4, which is sensitive to ligand-binding or -trafficking mutations, that would otherwise be difficult to detect and that is appropriate for testing novel mutations in CTLA-4 pathway genes. These approaches are likely to be of value in interpreting the functional significance of mutations in the CTLA-4 pathway identified by gene-sequencing approaches.

  4. Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Frazer, Neil; Erikson, Li; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations.

  5. Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L; Fletcher, Charles H; Frazer, Neil; Erikson, Li; Storlazzi, Curt D

    2017-05-18

    Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations.

  6. Carrier frequencies of mutations/polymorphisms in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in the Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Omar; Boulouiz, Redouane; Nahili, Halima; Bakhouch, Khadija; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rouba, Hassan; Chafik, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2008-12-01

    Mutations in the Connexin 26 gene (GJB2/Cx26) are responsible for more than half of all cases of prelingual nonsyndromic recessive deafness in Caucasians. The carrier frequency of the 35delG-GJB2 mutation was found to be as high as 2-4% in the Mediterranean populations. Different GJB2 mutations were reported in the Moroccan patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss; however, rare studies were carried out on the carrier frequencies of these mutations in the healthy populations. The aim of this study was to estimate the carrier frequencies of the GJB2 mutations in the Moroccan population. The molecular analysis of the 35delG mutation and other GJB2 sequence variations was performed in 386 healthy unrelated Moroccan individuals with no known hearing loss. Five GJB2 sequence variations at heterozygous state were found: two mutations, 35delG and 109G > A (V37I), and three polymorphisms, 79G > A (V27I), 341G > A (E114G), and 457G > A (V153I). The carrier frequency of the 35delG mutation was the highest with 2.07% [95% confidence interval (0.90-4.04%)], followed by that of the V37I mutation with 1.43% (0.06-5.39). The carrier frequency of V27I, E114G, and V153I changes was estimated to be 0.71% (0.01-4.34). This finding shows that the 35delG carrier frequency found here is similar to the one observed in Mediterranean populations. It provides new information about GJB2 carrier rates facilitating the diagnosis and the genetic counseling in the Moroccan population.

  7. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian populations.

    PubMed

    Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Karimi-Googheri, Masoud; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2015-04-01

    Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (Δ 32) in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 Δ 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 Δ 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  8. The Frequency and Type of K-RAS Mutations in Mexican Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A National Study.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Ramos, Susana G; Alcázar-González, Gregorio; Reyes-Cortés, Luisa M; Torres-Grimaldo, Abdiel A; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Morales-Casas, José; Flores-Sánchez, Patricia; De León-Escobedo, Raúl; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; Moreno-Bringas, Carmen; Sánchez-Guillén, Jorge; Ramos-Salazar, Pedro; González-de León, César; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2017-06-01

    Current metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) therapy uses monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This treatment is only useful in the absence of K-RAS gene mutations; therefore the study of such mutations is part of a personalized treatment. The aim of this work is to determine the frequency and type of the most common K-RAS mutations in Mexican patients with metastatic disease by nucleotide sequencing. We studied 888 patients with mCRC from different regions of Mexico. The presence of mutations in exon 2, codons 12 and 13, of the K-RAS gene was determined by nucleotide sequencing. Patients exhibited K-RAS gene mutations in 35% (310/888) of cases. Mutation frequency of codons 12 and 13 was 71% (221/310) and 29% (89/310), respectively. The most common mutation (45.7%) in codon 12 was c.35G>A (p.G12D), whereas the one in codon 13 was c.38G>A (p.G13D) (78.7%). Given the frequency of K-RAS mutations in Mexicans, making a genetic study before deciding to treat mCRC patients with monoclonal antibodies is indispensable.

  9. Frequency of common cystic fibrosis gene mutations in chronic bronchitis patients.

    PubMed

    Entzian, P; Müller, E; Boysen, A; Artlich, A; Schwinger, E; Schlaak, M

    1995-05-01

    It has been suggested that the delta F508 deletion, the most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, might be linked to chronic bronchial hypersecretion. We investigated whether such an association could be found in chronic bronchitis, since chronic bronchial hypersecretion is an important and specific element of chronic bronchitis. We screened 100 patients hospitalized for chronic bronchitis with six of the most frequently occurring CF gene mutations: delta F508, R553X, G542X, G551D, N1303K, and 621-1G-->T. Only one patient affected by chronic bronchitis and diffuse bronchiectasis was heterozygous for the deletion delta F508; no other mutations were found. This is not significantly different from the expected frequency of CF carriers in northern Europe, which is 1 in 25. Thus, no association between the most commonly occurring cystic fibrosis genes and chronic bronchitis is likely to exist and routine screening of patients without further signs of cystic fibrosis would seem to be of no benefit in northern Europe.

  10. Increased incidence of choroid plexus carcinoma due to the germline TP53 R337H mutation in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Gislaine; Taques, Guilherme R; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Gugelmin, Elizabeth S; Oliveira Figueiredo, Mirna M; Watanabe, Flora; Pontarolo, Roberto; Lalli, Enzo; Torres, Luiz Fernando Bleggi

    2011-03-22

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPC) are rare tumors predominantly found in children. Given the high frequency of the germline R337H mutation in the TP53 gene in southern Brazil, we have evaluated the frequency of the R337H mutation in families with CPC in children. The present series included 29 patients that were admitted to the same institution from 1992 to 2010, including 22 children with CPC (0.08-13.6 years of age at diagnosis) and 7 children with papilloma of the choroid plexus (Pp; 0.5-9.8 years of age). Surgical resection was possible in 28 children. Blood and/or tumor DNA was extracted and analyzed using PCR-RFLP and results were confirmed by sequencing 240 bp of the TP53 exon 10. The patients, all parents, and some relatives submitted samples for blood DNA analysis. In addition, we have also examined the presence of the mutation in DNA from paraffin-embedded tumor samples to evaluate loss of heterozygosity. We found 63.3% (14/22) of the CPC patients positive for the germline R337H mutation; CPC samples were either heterozygous (n = 7), lost only the wild-type (n = 4), or only the R337H copy (n = 2). One CPC sample was not available. All Pp cases (7/7, 100%) were negative for R337H. Cure (>5 years survival free of disease) was observed in 18.1% of the CPC cases with the R337H mutation (2/11), 71.4% of the Pp (5/7), and 25% of CPC cases negative for the R337H mutation (2/8). Family history of cancer (with 2 or more cancer cases) was exclusively identified on the parental side segregating the R337H mutation, and 50% (7/14) of them were compatible with Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. Our results show for the first time that the R337H TP53 mutation is responsible for 63% of the CPC cases in children, suggesting a higher incidence of CPC in southern Brazil.

  11. Cushing's syndrome secondary to adrenocorticotropin-independent macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia due to activating mutations of GNAS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Domenice, Sorahia; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Martin, Regina Matsunaga; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Zerbini, Maria Claudia Nogueira; Lucon, Antonio Marmo; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho

    2003-05-01

    ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an uncommon cause of Cushing's syndrome characterized by bilateral nodular adrenocortical hyperfunction in the presence of suppressed ACTH levels. We investigated whether activating mutations in the ACTH receptor (MC2-R) or G(s alpha) (GNAS1) genes might be involved in AIMAH genesis. Five women with Cushing's syndrome due to AIMAH, confirmed by histological studies, and no signs of McCune-Albright syndrome were selected for molecular analysis of these genes. The single exon of the MC2-R gene and exons 8 and 9 of the GNAS1 gene were amplified by PCR in genomic DNA from adrenal nodules and peripheral blood. Direct sequencing revealed only MC2-R wild-type sequences. GNAS1 PCR products at denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed abnormal migration patterns in adrenal tissues of three patients. Automatic sequencing showed two different activating mutations at codon Arg(201) of GNAS1, a substitution by histidine in two cases and by serine in one case. In conclusion, we found two different gsp mutations in three patients with Cushing's syndrome due to AIMAH, and we speculate whether they belong to the spectrum of McCune-Albright syndrome or whether these are the first reported cases of AIMAH due to gsp mutations.

  12. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C.; Gerard, N.

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Familial hyperproinsulinaemia due to a mutation substituting histidine for arginine at position 65 in proinsulin: identification of the mutation by restriction enzyme mapping.

    PubMed

    Collinet, M; Berthelon, M; Bénit, P; Laborde, K; Desbuquois, B; Munnich, A; Robert, J J

    1998-06-01

    Familial hyperproinsulinaemia is a rare genetic disorder characterized by point mutations in the insulin gene which impair the conversion of proinsulin to insulin. We report here three members of a two-generation Caucasian family in whom this syndrome was identified by unexplained hyperinsulinism associated with normal glucose tolerance and normal insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin immunoreactivity showed a reduced affinity for the insulin receptor and eluted mainly, on Biogel chromatography, at the position of proinsulin. Analysis of the PCR-amplified insulin gene by restriction enzyme mapping revealed a new recognition site for the enzyme Nla III, indicating a Arg65 to His mutation. Sequence analysis of exon 3 confirmed this mutation in one allele of the gene. This study reports a two-generation European-Caucasian family with hyperproinsulinaemia due to a substitution of His for Arg at position 65 in proinsulin, the seventh now identified worldwide and the second from Europe. The mutation generated a new restriction site on the insulin gene suggesting the usefulness of restriction enzyme mapping as a screening procedure.

  14. An Slfn2 mutation causes lymphoid and myeloid immunodeficiency due to loss of immune cell quiescence.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Krebs, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Li, Xiaohong; Croker, Ben A; Siggs, Owen M; Popkin, Daniel; Du, Xin; Lawson, Brian R; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Xia, Yu; Khovananth, Kevin; Moresco, Eva Marie; Satoh, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Here we describe a previously unknown form of inherited immunodeficiency revealed by an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called elektra. Mice homozygous for this mutation showed enhanced susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection and diminished numbers of T cells and inflammatory monocytes that failed to proliferate after infection and died via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in response to diverse proliferative stimuli. They also had a greater proportion of T cells poised to replicate DNA, and their T cells expressed a subset of activation markers, suggestive of a semi-activated state. We positionally ascribe the elektra phenotype to a mutation in the gene encoding Schlafen-2 (Slfn2). Our findings identify a physiological role for Slfn2 in the defense against pathogens through the regulation of quiescence in T cells and monocytes.

  15. Cornelia de Lange syndrome due to mosaic NIPBL mutation: antenatal presentation with sacrococcygeal teratoma.

    PubMed

    Banait, Nishant; Fenton, Alan; Splitt, Miranda

    2015-08-14

    A male infant at 36 weeks gestation was born by section. At 20 weeks of gestation, congenital diaphragmatic hernia and sacrococcygeal teratoma had been seen on ultrasound. At birth, the infant had features suggestive of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). He remained hypoxic despite aggressive ventilatory manoeuvres and was palliated. At postmortem, the lungs were hypoplastic. In CdLS, mutations in NIPBL are found in around 50% of cases. Mutation analysis, including multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification of the NIPBL gene from the DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes was negative, but microarray comparative genomic hybridisation on DNA from skin fibroblast showed a 0.13Mb deletion on chromosome 5p13. The deleted region includes exons 42-47 of the NIPBL gene. It is important to perform NIBPL mutation analysis on DNA from more than one tissue when testing for CdLS. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. High frequency of W1327X mutation in glycogen storage disease type III patients from central Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Wafa; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Messai, Habib; Mili, Amira; Gribaa, Moez; Kefi, Rym; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Boughamoura, Lamia; Chemli, Jelel; Saad, Ali; Kaabachi, Naziha; Sfar, Mohamed Tahar; Ben Dridi, Marie-Françoise; Tebib, Neji; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (AGL). It is characterized by hepatomegaly, progressive myopathy, cardiomyopathy and fasting hypoglycemia. Several mutations in AGL gene have been described in different populations. The W1327X mutation was reported in one Tunisian patient resident in Italy. We looked in this report to determine the frequency of W1327X mutation among Tunisian patients. The W1327X mutation was screening in 26 GSD III patients originated from various geographic locations in Tunisia. The sequence analysis revealed that among nine patients carried the W1327X mutation. Eight of them were from six unrelated families and they were originated from Mahdia (centre of Tunisia) suggesting the existence of a founder effect in this region. Taking into account historical migratory waves, screening for this mutation should be performed in priority for molecular diagnosis confirmation of GSD III in North African populations.

  17. Mitochondrial Cardioencephalomyopathy Due to a Novel SCO2 Mutation in a Brazilian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Oliveira, Guilherme; Filho, Geraldo Brasileiro; Martins, Poliana; Vainzof, Mariz; Hirano, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review all patients with SCO2 mutations and to describe a Brazilian patient with cardioencephalomyopathy carrying compound heterozygous mutations in SCO2, one being the known pathogenic p.E140K mutation and the other a novel 12–base pair (bp) deletion at nucleotides 1519 through 1530 (c.1519_1530del). Design Case report and literature review. Setting University hospital Patient Infant girl presenting with an encephalomyopathy, inspiratory stridor, ventilator failure, progressive hypotonia, and weakness, leading to death. Main Outcome Measures Clinical features, neuro-imaging findings, muscle biopsy with histochemical analysis, and genetic studies. Results This infant girl was the first child of healthy, nonconsanguineous parents. She developed progressive muscular hypotonia and ventilatory failure. At the end of the first month of life, she developed cardiomegaly and signs of cardiac failure. Routine blood tests showed lactic acidosis and mild elevation of the creatine kinase level. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed increased T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signals in the putamen bilaterally. Nerve conduction studies showed severe axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. Muscle biopsy revealed a neurogenic pattern with mitochondrial proliferation and total absence of cytochrome-c oxidase histochemical stain. Sequencing of SCO2 showed that the patient had compound heterozygote SCO2 mutations: the previously described c.1541G A (p.E140K) mutation and a novel 12-bp deletion at nucleotides 1519 through 1530 (c.1519_1530del). The patient died at age 45 days. Conclusions Our findings and the literature review indicate that it is important to consider the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease in newborns with hypotonia and cardiomyopathy. In our case, the accurate diagnosis of SCO2 mutations is particularly important for genetic counseling. PMID:23407777

  18. Frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in a cohort of 1,000 neonates in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Ropero, Paloma; Briceño, Olga; Mateo, Marta; Polo, Marta; Mora, Asunción; González, Fernando Ataulfo; Villegas, Ana

    2006-05-01

    For centuries in Europe, population movements have contributed to ethnic groups, cultures, and consequently, inheritance mixing. There are certain genetic diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis whose distribution is directly related to the population movements. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the C282Y and H63D mutation frequency of the HFE gene in a cohort study of 1,000 neonates in the Community of Madrid (Spain), thus contributing to the HFE gene mutations distribution research in Europe and establishing the origin of the mutations in Spain. The allelic frequency of C282Y mutation was 1.7% (CI 95% 1.1-2.3) and the H63D allele was present in 16.4% of chromosomes (CI 95% 14.8-18). In Spain, the presence of C282Y mutation and its distribution could be due more to Celtic than to Viking legacy, whereas it is assumed that the one in relation to the H63D variant occurred in the Basque Country during the Paleolithic Period.

  19. Frequency of spontaneous mutations that confer antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed

    Binet, Rachel; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2005-07-01

    Mutations in rRNA genes (rrn) that confer resistance to ribosomal inhibitors are typically recessive or weakly codominant and have been mostly reported for clinical strains of pathogens possessing only one or two rrn operons, such as Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium spp. An analysis of the genome sequences of several members of the Chlamydiaceae revealed that these obligate intracellular bacteria harbor only one or two sets of rRNA genes. To study the contribution of rRNA mutations to the emergence of drug resistance in the Chlamydiaceae, we used the sensitivities of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 (two rrn operons) and Chlamydophila psittaci 6BC (one rrn operon) to the aminoglycoside spectinomycin as a model. Confluent cell monolayers were infected in a plaque assay with about 10(8) wild-type infectious particles and then treated with the antibiotic. After a 2-week incubation time, plaques formed by spontaneous spectinomycin-resistant (Spc(r)) mutants appeared with a frequency of 5 x 10(-5) for C. psittaci 6BC. No Spc(r) mutants were isolated for C. trachomatis L2, although the frequencies of rifampin resistance were in the same range for both strains (i.e., 10(-7)). The risk of emergence of Chlamydia strains resistant to tetracyclines and macrolides, the ribosomal drugs currently used to treat chlamydial infections, is discussed.

  20. Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia in an adult male due to a novel mutation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanda; Qing, Qi; Liu, Xuesong; Chen, Sibei; Chen, Ziyi; Niu, Xuefeng; Tan, Yaxia; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by mutation in the gene coding for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), which impairs peripheral B cell maturation and hypogammaglobulinemia. In this report, we present a case of XLA in a 22-year-old adult male. Genetic testing revealed a novel mutation located at the conserved region (c.383T>C). The patient had a history of recurrent respiratory tract infection which eventually progressed to chronic type II respiratory failure. Several pathogenic bacteria were isolated on culture of respiratory secretions obtained on bronchoscopy. The patient improved on treatment with antibiotics. PMID:27867589

  1. Bruton's agammaglobulinemia in an adult male due to a novel mutation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanda; Qing, Qi; Liu, Xuesong; Chen, Sibei; Chen, Ziyi; Niu, Xuefeng; Tan, Yaxia; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yimin; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Ling

    2016-10-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by mutation in the gene coding for Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), which impairs peripheral B cell maturation and hypogammaglobulinemia. In this report, we present a case of XLA in a 22-year-old adult male. Genetic testing revealed a novel mutation located at the conserved region (c.383T>C). The patient had a history of recurrent respiratory tract infection which eventually progressed to chronic type II respiratory failure. Several pathogenic bacteria were isolated on culture of respiratory secretions obtained on bronchoscopy. The patient improved on treatment with antibiotics.

  2. Digenic retinitis pigmentosa due to mutations at the unlinked peripherin/RDS and ROM1 loci

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-06-10

    In spite of recent advances in identifying genes causing monogenic human disease, very little is known about the genes involved in polygenic disease. Three families were identified with mutations in the unlinked photoreceptor-specific genes ROM 1 and peripherin/RDS, in which only double heterozygotes develop retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These findings indicate that the allelic and nonallelic heterogeneity known to be a feature of monogenic RP is complicated further by interactions between unlinked mutations causing digenic RP. Recognition of the inheritance pattern exemplified by these three families might facilitate the identification of other examples of digenic inheritance in human disease.

  3. Atypical presentation of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to CASP10 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Serena Ilaria; Mazza, Cinzia; Moratto, Daniele; Ramenghi, Ugo; Caorsi, Roberta; Gattorno, Marco; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the case of a 8-years-old boy with diagnosis of atypical autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), carrying heterozygous mutation of CASP10 gene (I406L). He presented with multiple non-invasive infections of the skin, that were associated to chronic non-malignant non-infectious lymphadenopathy, failure to thrive, weakness, arthralgia, relapsing oral aftosis, and expansion of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-)/CD8(-) T cells. This observation suggests that cutaneous infections can be observed in ALPS patients carrying CASP10 mutations.

  4. Seizure semiology in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features, due to novel LGI1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Agher, Dahbia; Chabrol, Elodie; Elkouby, Léa; Leguern, Eric; Paterson, Sarah J; Harty, Rosie; Bellows, Susannah T; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in LGI1 are found in 50% of families with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). In ADEAF, family members have predominantly lateral temporal lobe seizures but mesial temporal lobe semiology may also occur. We report here three families with novel LGI1 mutations (p.Ile82Thr, p.Glu225*, c.432-2_436del). Seven affected individuals reported an auditory aura and one a visual aura. A 10-year old boy described a cephalic aura followed by an unpleasant taste and oral automatisms without auditory, visual or psychic features. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutation frequency and genotype/phenotype correlation among phenylketonuria patients from Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, S.L.C.; Martinez, D.; Kuozmine, A.

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). To determine the molecular basis of PKU in the state of Georgia, thirty-five Georgian PKU patients representing sixty independent alleles were examined by a combination of DGGE and direct sequence analysis. At present, this approach has led to the identification of 55/60 or about 92% of all mutant alleles. The relatively high frequencies of mutations common to the British Isles (R408W, I65T and L348V) are compatible with 1990 census data showing that 34% of the general Georgian population claim Irish, English or Scottish ancestors. Three new mutations, E76A (1/60), R241L (2/60), and R400R (2/60), were also detected in this study. Although the nucleotide substitution in codon 400 (AGG{r_arrow}CGG) did not change the amino acid sequence, it was the only base change detected in a scan of all 13 exons of two independent alleles. Since codon 400 is split between exons 11 and 12, this change may exert some effect on splicing, as has previously been seen in the PAH gene for the silent mutation Q304Q and the nonsense mutation Y356X, each of which effect codons immediately adjacent to splicing signals. This hypothesis remains to be tested by expression analysis or studies of ectopic transcripts. The remaining 19 characterized alleles contained one of 15 previously identified mutations. Twenty-five of the thirty non-related patients examined in this study were completely genotyped, and there was a strong correlation between mutant PAH genotype, PAH activity predicted from in vitro expression studies where known, and PKU or HPA phenotype. For mutations not yet studied by expression analysis, this correlation suggests that L213P, R241L, Y277D may drastically reduce residual PAH activity while F39L and E76A may retain significant amounts of PAH activity.

  6. Relationship between low-frequency aircraft noise and annoyance due to rattle and vibration.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl; Silvati, Laura; Sneddon, Matthew

    2002-04-01

    A near-replication of a study of the annoyance of rattle and vibration attributable to aircraft noise [Fidell et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 1408-1415 (1999)] was conducted in the vicinity of Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP). The findings of the current study were similar to those reported earlier with respect to the types of objects cited as sources of rattle in homes, frequencies of notice of rattle, and the prevalence of annoyance due to aircraft noise-induced rattle. A reliably lower prevalence rate of annoyance (but not of complaints) with rattle and vibration was noted among respondents living in homes that had been treated to achieve a 5-dB improvement in A-weighted noise reduction than among respondents living in untreated homes. This difference is not due to any substantive increase in low-frequency noise reduction of acoustically treated homes, but may be associated with installation of nonrattling windows. Common interpretations of the prevalence of a consequential degree of annoyance attributable to low-frequency aircraft noise may be developed from the combined results of the present and prior studies.

  7. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia due to a novel p.Q240H mutation in the Lipoprotein Lipase gene.

    PubMed

    Soto, Angela Ganan; McIntyre, Adam; Agrawal, Sungeeta; Bialo, Shara R; Hegele, Robert A; Boney, Charlotte M

    2015-09-04

    Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Several mutations in the LPL gene have been identified to cause decreased activity of the enzyme. An 11-week-old, exclusively breastfed male presented with coffee-ground emesis, melena, xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and chylomicronemia. Genomic DNA analysis identified lipoprotein lipase deficiency due to compound heterozygosity including a novel p.Q240H mutation in exon 5 of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene. His severe hypertriglyceridemia, including xanthomas, resolved with dietary long-chain fat restriction. We describe a novel mutation of the LPL gene causing severe hypertriglyceridemia and report the response to treatment. A review of the current literature regarding LPL deficiency syndrome reveals a few potential new therapies under investigation.

  8. Levodopa-responsive infantile parkinsonism due to a novel mutation in the tyrosine hydroxylase gene and exacerbation by viral infections.

    PubMed

    Diepold, Katharina; Schütz, Barbara; Rostasy, Kevin; Wilken, Bernd; Hougaard, Pia; Güttler, Flemming; Romstad, Anne; Birk Møller, Lisbeth

    2005-06-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of infantile dystonia due to mutations in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene have been described recently. The main clinical manifestations are Segawa's disease, or infantile hypokinetic rigid Parkinsonism. Here, we report on a patient with hyperrigidity, psychomotor developmental delay, and dystonic posturing of the hands, symptoms that appeared after a viral infection at the age of 14 months. Low homovanillic acid/5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (HVA/5HIAA) ratio in cerebrospinal fluid suggested a TH deficiency. Molecular analysis revealed a novel (H246Y) and a known (D498G) compound heterozygote mutation in the TH gene. The patient showed a remarkable response to treatment with levodopa. The new mutation and the association of viral infections with the onset and worsening of symptoms are discussed.

  9. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular pathogenesis in granulosa cell tumor is not only due to somatic FOXL2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2014-09-06

    Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable late recurrent and malignant behavior. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C > G mutation in adult-type granulosa cell tumor. In this study, we report an 80-year-old woman with a granulosa cell tumor arising from ovary. She presented with a huge pelvic mass with postmenopausal bleeding. No obvious intraperitoneal tumor implants were observed during operation. Final diagnosis was granulosa-theca cell tumor without capsule invasion. No recurrent disease was noted during 3-year post-operation follow-up period. Molecular studies showed a heterozygous FOXL2 402C > G mutation in the tumor by direct gene sequencing. In addition, DNA replication error, on analysis of the lengths of CAG repeats in androgen receptor gene, revealed defective DNA mismatch repair system in the granulosa cell tumor. We propose that the 402C > G mutation in FOXL2 is critical to the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. However, the malignant behavior of this tumor is driven by DNA mismatch repair deficiency. Unequal DNA copy numbers were noted on array comparative genomic hybridization. This implies that there is malignant potential even in the early stage of the granulosa cell tumor. Late malignant recurrence may be a late event of DNA repair function disability, not directly related to pathognomonic FOXL2 mutation.

  11. Dysregulation of Insulin Secretion in Children With Congenital Hyperinsulinism due to Sulfonylurea Receptor Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, A.; Ferry, R.J.; Kelly, A.; Koo-McCoy, S.; Polonsky, K.; Glaser, B.; Permutt, M.A.; Aguilar-Bryan, L.; Stafford, D.; Thornton, P.S.; Baker, L.; Stanley, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the high-affinity sulfonylurea receptor (SUR)-1 cause one of the severe recessively inherited diffuse forms of congenital hyperinsulinism or, when associated with loss of heterozygosity, focal adenomatosis. We hypothesized that SUR1 mutations would render the β-cell insensitive to sulfonylureas and to glucose. Stimulated insulin responses were compared among eight patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism (two mutations), six carrier parents, and ten normal adults. In the patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism, the acute insulin response to intravenous tolbutamide was absent and did not overlap with the responses seen in either adult group. There was positive, albeit significantly blunted, acute insulin response to intravenous dextrose in the patients with diffuse hyperinsulinism. Graded infusions of glucose, to raise and then lower plasma glucose concentrations over 4 h, caused similar rises in blood glucose but lower peak insulin levels in the hyperinsulinemic patients. Loss of acute insulin response to tolbutamide can identify children with diffuse SUR1 defects. The greater response to glucose than to tolbutamide indicates that ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel–independent pathways are involved in glucose-mediated insulin release in patients with diffuse SUR1 defects. The diminished glucose responsiveness suggests that SUR1 mutations and lack of KATP channel activity may contribute to the late development of diabetes in patients with hyperinsulinism independently of subtotal pancreatectomy. PMID:11272143

  12. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  13. CCT2 Mutations Evoke Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to Chaperone Complex Instability

    PubMed Central

    Minegishi, Yuriko; Sheng, XunLun; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Sergeev, Yuri; Iejima, Daisuke; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Furuno, Masaaki; Zhuang, Wenjun; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Hattori, Seisuke; Iwata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a hereditary early-onset retinal dystrophy that is accompanied by severe macular degeneration. In this study, novel compound heterozygous mutations were identified as LCA-causative in chaperonin-containing TCP-1, subunit 2 (CCT2), a gene that encodes the molecular chaperone protein, CCTβ. The zebrafish mutants of CCTβ are known to exhibit the eye phenotype while its mutation and association with human disease have been unknown. The CCT proteins (CCT α-θ) forms ring complex for its chaperon function. The LCA mutants of CCTβ, T400P and R516H, are biochemically instable and the affinity for the adjacent subunit, CCTγ, was affected distinctly in both mutants. The patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), carrying these CCTβ mutants, were less proliferative than the control iPSCs. Decreased proliferation under Cct2 knockdown in 661W cells was significantly rescued by wild-type CCTβ expression. However, the expression of T400P and R516H didn’t exhibit the significant effect. In mouse retina, both CCTβ and CCTγ are expressed in the retinal ganglion cells and connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells. The Cct2 knockdown decreased its major client protein, transducing β1 (Gβ1). Here we report the novel LCA mutations in CCTβ and the impact of chaperon disability by these mutations in cellular biology. PMID:27645772

  14. Fast-Ion Losses due to High-Frequency MHD Perturbations in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Guenter, S.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Mantsinen, M. J.; Martin, P.; Piovesan, P.; Sassenberg, K.

    2008-02-08

    Time-resolved energy and pitch angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with high-frequency magnetohydrodynamic perturbations have been obtained for the first time in a magnetic fusion device and are presented here. A detailed analysis of fast-ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes has revealed the existence of a new core-localized magnetohydrodynamic perturbation, the sierpes mode. The sierpes mode is a non-Alfvenic instability which dominates the losses of fast ions in ion cyclotron resonance heated discharges, and it is named for its footprint in the spectrograms ('sierpes' means 'snake' in Spanish). The sierpes mode has been reconstructed by means of highly resolved multichord soft-x-ray measurements.

  15. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria due to a novel mutation in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene

    PubMed Central

    To-Figueras, J.; Phillips, J.; Gonzalez-López, J.M.; Badenas, C.; Madrigal, I.; González-Romarís, E.M.; Ramos, C.; Aguirre, J.M.; Herrero, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare form of porphyria that results from a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD). The disease is caused by homoallelism or heteroallelism for mutations in the UROD gene. Objective To study a 19 year-old woman from Equatorial Guinea, one of the few cases of HEP of African descent and to characterize a new mutation causing HEP. Methods Excretion of porphyrins and residual UROD activity in erythrocytes were measured and compared to other HEP patients. UROD gene of the proband was sequenced and a new mutation identified. The recombinant UROD protein was purified and assayed for enzymatic activity. The aminoacid change mapped to the UROD protein and the functional consequences were predicted. Results The patient presented a novel G170D missense mutation in homozygosity. Porphyrin excretion showed an atypical pattern in stool with a high pentaporphyrin III to isocoproporphyrin ratio. Erythrocyte UROD activity was 42 % of normal and higher than the activity found in HEP patients with a G281E mutation. The recombinant UROD protein showed a relative activity of 17 % and 60 % of wild-type towards uroporphyrinogen I and III respectively. Molecular modelling showed that glycine 170 is located on the dimer interface of UROD, in a loop containing residues 167-172 that are critical for optimal enzymatic activity and that carboxyl side chain from aspartic acid is predicted to cause negative interactions between the protein and the substrate. Conclusions The results emphasize the complex relationship between the genetic defects and the biochemical phenotype in homozygous porphyria. PMID:21668429

  16. Type B mandibuloacral dysplasia with congenital myopathy due to homozygous ZMPSTE24 missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Yaou, Rabah Ben; Navarro, Claire; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Bertrand, Anne T; Massart, Catherine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Cadiñanos, Juan; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Estournet, Brigitte; Richard, Pascale; Barois, Annie; Lévy, Nicolas; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in ZMPSTE24 gene, encoding a major metalloprotease, leads to defective prelamin A processing and causes type B mandibuloacral dysplasia, as well as the lethal neonatal restrictive dermopathy syndrome. Phenotype severity is correlated with the residual enzyme activity of ZMPSTE24 and accumulation of prelamin A. We had previously demonstrated that a complete loss of function in ZMPSTE24 was lethal in the neonatal period, whereas compound heterozygous mutations including one PTC and one missense mutation were associated with type B mandibuloacral dysplasia. In this study, we report a 30-year longitudinal clinical survey of a patient harboring a novel severe and complex phenotype, combining an early-onset progeroid syndrome and a congenital myopathy with fiber-type disproportion. A unique homozygous missense ZMPSTE24 mutation (c.281T>C, p.Leu94Pro) was identified and predicted to produce two possible ZMPSTE24 conformations, leading to a partial loss of function. Western blot analysis revealed a major reduction of ZMPSTE24, together with the presence of unprocessed prelamin A and decreased levels of lamin A, in the patient's primary skin fibroblasts. These cells exhibited significant reductions in lifespan associated with major abnormalities of the nuclear shape and structure. This is the first report of MAD presenting with confirmed myopathic abnormalities associated with ZMPSTE24 defects, extending the clinical spectrum of ZMPSTE24 gene mutations. Moreover, our results suggest that defective prelamin A processing affects muscle regeneration and development, thus providing new insights into the disease mechanism of prelamin A-defective associated syndromes in general. PMID:21267004

  17. The Phenotypic Spectrum of DYT24 Due to ANO3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Charlesworth, Gavin; Cordivari, Carla; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Batla, Amit; Houlden, Henry; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Genes causing primary dystonia are rare. Recently, pathogenic mutations in the anoctamin 3 gene (ANO3) have been identified to cause autosomal dominant craniocervical dystonia and have been assigned to the dystonia locus dystonia-24 (DYT24). Here, we expand on the phenotypic spectrum of DYT24 and provide demonstrative videos. Moreover, tremor recordings were performed, and back-averaged electroencephalography, sensory evoked potentials, and C-reflex studies were carried out in two individuals who carried two different mutations in ANO3. Ten patients from three families are described. The age at onset ranged from early childhood to the forties. Cervical dystonia was the most common site of onset followed by laryngeal dystonia. The characteristic feature in all affected individuals was the presence of tremor, which contrasts DYT24 from the typical DYT6 phenotype. Tremor was the sole initial manifestation in some individuals with ANO3 mutations, leading to misdiagnosis as essential tremor. Electrophysiology in two patients with two different mutations showed co-contraction of antagonist muscles, confirming dystonia, and a 6-Hz arm tremor at rest, which increased in amplitude during action. In one of the studied patients, clinically superimposed myoclonus was observed. The duration of the myoclonus was in the range of 250 msec at about 3 Hz, which is more consistent with subcortical myoclonus. In summary, ANO3 causes a varied phenotype of young-onset or adult-onset craniocervical dystonia with tremor and/or myoclonic jerks. Patients with familial cervical dystonia who also have myoclonus-dystonia as well as patients with prominent tremor and mild dystonia should be tested for ANO3 mutations. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:24442708

  18. Type B mandibuloacral dysplasia with congenital myopathy due to homozygous ZMPSTE24 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Ben Yaou, Rabah; Navarro, Claire; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Bertrand, Anne T; Massart, Catherine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Cadiñanos, Juan; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Estournet, Brigitte; Richard, Pascale; Barois, Annie; Lévy, Nicolas; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-06-01

    Mutation in ZMPSTE24 gene, encoding a major metalloprotease, leads to defective prelamin A processing and causes type B mandibuloacral dysplasia, as well as the lethal neonatal restrictive dermopathy syndrome. Phenotype severity is correlated with the residual enzyme activity of ZMPSTE24 and accumulation of prelamin A. We had previously demonstrated that a complete loss of function in ZMPSTE24 was lethal in the neonatal period, whereas compound heterozygous mutations including one PTC and one missense mutation were associated with type B mandibuloacral dysplasia. In this study, we report a 30-year longitudinal clinical survey of a patient harboring a novel severe and complex phenotype, combining an early-onset progeroid syndrome and a congenital myopathy with fiber-type disproportion. A unique homozygous missense ZMPSTE24 mutation (c.281T>C, p.Leu94Pro) was identified and predicted to produce two possible ZMPSTE24 conformations, leading to a partial loss of function. Western blot analysis revealed a major reduction of ZMPSTE24, together with the presence of unprocessed prelamin A and decreased levels of lamin A, in the patient's primary skin fibroblasts. These cells exhibited significant reductions in lifespan associated with major abnormalities of the nuclear shape and structure. This is the first report of MAD presenting with confirmed myopathic abnormalities associated with ZMPSTE24 defects, extending the clinical spectrum of ZMPSTE24 gene mutations. Moreover, our results suggest that defective prelamin A processing affects muscle regeneration and development, thus providing new insights into the disease mechanism of prelamin A-defective associated syndromes in general.

  19. Detection of low frequency FGFR3 mutations in the urine of bladder cancer patients using next-generation deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Millholland, John M; Li, Shuqiang; Fernandez, Cecilia A; Shuber, Anthony P

    2012-01-01

    Biological fluid-based noninvasive biomarker assays for monitoring and diagnosing disease are clinically powerful. A major technical hurdle for developing these assays is the requirement of high analytical sensitivity so that biomarkers present at very low levels can be consistently detected. In the case of biological fluid-based cancer diagnostic assays, sensitivities similar to those of tissue-based assays are difficult to achieve with DNA markers due to the high abundance of normal DNA background present in the sample. Here we describe a new urine-based assay that uses ultradeep sequencing technology to detect single mutant molecules of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) DNA that are indicative of bladder cancer. Detection of FGFR3 mutations in urine would provide clinicians with a noninvasive means of diagnosing early-stage bladder cancer. The single-molecule assay detects FGFR3 mutant DNA when present at as low as 0.02% of total urine DNA and results in 91% concordance with the frequency that FGFR3 mutations are detected in bladder cancer tumors, significantly improving diagnostic performance. To our knowledge, this is the first practical application of next-generation sequencing technology for noninvasive cancer diagnostics. PMID:24199178

  20. Frequency and type of inheritable mutations induced by γ rays in rice as revealed by whole genome sequencing*#

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Zheng, Yun-chao; Cui, Hai-rui; Fu, Hao-wei; Shu, Qing-yao; Huang, Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Mutation breeding is based on the induction of genetic variations; hence knowledge of the frequency and type of induced mutations is of paramount importance for the design and implementation of a mutation breeding program. Although γ ray irradiation has been widely used since the 1960s in the breeding of about 200 economically important plant species, molecular elucidation of its genetic effects has so far been achieved largely by analysis of target genes or genomic regions. In the present study, the whole genomes of six γ-irradiated M2 rice plants were sequenced; a total of 144–188 million high-quality (Q>20) reads were generated for each M2 plant, resulting in genome coverage of >45 times for each plant. Single base substitution (SBS) and short insertion/deletion (Indel) mutations were detected at the average frequency of 7.5×10−6–9.8×10−6 in the six M2 rice plants (SBS being about 4 times more frequent than Indels). Structural and copy number variations, though less frequent than SBS and Indel, were also identified and validated. The mutations were scattered in all genomic regions across 12 rice chromosomes without apparent hotspots. The present study is the first genome-wide single-nucleotide resolution study on the feature and frequency of γ irradiation-induced mutations in a seed propagated crop; the findings are of practical importance for mutation breeding of rice and other crop species. PMID:27921396

  1. Frequency and type of inheritable mutations induced by γ rays in rice as revealed by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Zheng, Yun-Chao; Cui, Hai-Rui; Fu, Hao-Wei; Shu, Qing-Yao; Huang, Jian-Zhong

    Mutation breeding is based on the induction of genetic variations; hence knowledge of the frequency and type of induced mutations is of paramount importance for the design and implementation of a mutation breeding program. Although γ ray irradiation has been widely used since the 1960s in the breeding of about 200 economically important plant species, molecular elucidation of its genetic effects has so far been achieved largely by analysis of target genes or genomic regions. In the present study, the whole genomes of six γ-irradiated M2 rice plants were sequenced; a total of 144-188 million high-quality (Q>20) reads were generated for each M2 plant, resulting in genome coverage of >45 times for each plant. Single base substitution (SBS) and short insertion/deletion (Indel) mutations were detected at the average frequency of 7.5×10(-6)-9.8×10(-6) in the six M2 rice plants (SBS being about 4 times more frequent than Indels). Structural and copy number variations, though less frequent than SBS and Indel, were also identified and validated. The mutations were scattered in all genomic regions across 12 rice chromosomes without apparent hotspots. The present study is the first genome-wide single-nucleotide resolution study on the feature and frequency of γ irradiation-induced mutations in a seed propagated crop; the findings are of practical importance for mutation breeding of rice and other crop species.

  2. Emergence and clonal spread of colistin resistance due to multiple mutational mechanisms in carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in London.

    PubMed

    Otter, Jonathan A; Doumith, Michel; Davies, Frances; Mookerjee, Siddharth; Dyakova, Eleonora; Gilchrist, Mark; Brannigan, Eimear T; Bamford, Kathleen; Galletly, Tracey; Donaldson, Hugo; Aanensen, David M; Ellington, Matthew J; Hill, Robert; Turton, Jane F; Hopkins, Katie L; Woodford, Neil; Holmes, Alison

    2017-10-05

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are emerging worldwide, limiting therapeutic options. Mutational and plasmid-mediated mechanisms of colistin resistance have both been reported. The emergence and clonal spread of colistin resistance was analysed in 40 epidemiologically-related NDM-1 carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates identified during an outbreak in a group of London hospitals. Isolates from July 2014 to October 2015 were tested for colistin susceptibility using agar dilution, and characterised by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Colistin resistance was detected in 25/38 (65.8%) cases for which colistin susceptibility was tested. WGS found that three potential mechanisms of colistin resistance had emerged separately, two due to different mutations in mgrB, and one due to a mutation in phoQ, with onward transmission of two distinct colistin-resistant variants, resulting in two sub-clones associated with transmission at separate hospitals. A high rate of colistin resistance (66%) emerged over a 10 month period. WGS demonstrated that mutational colistin resistance emerged three times during the outbreak, with transmission of two colistin-resistant variants.

  3. Brain involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to ganglioside-induced differentiation associated-protein 1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Fouad; Anselm, Irina; Yang, Edward; Ghosh, Partha S

    2017-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) due to ganglioside-induced differentiation associated-protein 1 (GDAP1) gene mutation can be inherited as an autosomal recessive (severe phenotype) or dominant (milder phenotype) disorder. GDAP1 protein, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is involved in the mitochondrial fission. Brain imaging abnormalities have not been reported in this condition. We described an 8-year-old boy who had an early onset autosomal recessive neuropathy. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the GDAP1 gene: c.313_313delA, p.Arg105Glufs*3 - a novel mutation (maternally inherited) and c.358C>T, pR120W - a known pathogenic mutation (paternally inherited). He had abnormal brain MRI findings since infancy localized to the middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar white matter with sparing of the supratentorial brain. We speculate that GDAP1 protein due to its widespread distribution and mitochondrial location is responsible for these imaging abnormalities. This report expands the spectrum of brain imaging abnormalities seen in different types of CMT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. X-Linked Agammagobulinemia in a Large Series of North African Patients: Frequency, Clinical Features and Novel BTK Mutations.

    PubMed

    Aadam, Zahra; Kechout, Nadia; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chan, Koon-Wing; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Zidi, Fethi; Ailal, Fatima; Attal, Nabila; Doudou, Fatouma; Abbadi, Mohamed-Cherif; Kaddache, Chawki; Smati, Leila; Touri, Nabila; Chemli, Jalel; Gargah, Tahar; Brini, Ines; Bakhchane, Amina; Charoute, Hicham; Jeddane, Leila; El Atiqi, Sara; El Hafidi, Naïma; Hida, Mustapha; Saile, Rachid; Alj, Hanane Salih; Boukari, Rachida; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Najib, Jilali; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Lau, Yu-Lung; Mellouli, Fethi; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammagobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene defect. XLA patients have absent or reduced number of peripheral B cells and a profound deficiency in all immunoglobulin isotypes. This multicenter study reports the clinical, immunological and molecular features of Bruton's disease in 40 North African male patients. Fifty male out of 63 (male and female) patients diagnosed with serum agammaglobulinemia and non detectable to less than 2% peripheral B cells were enrolled. The search for BTK gene mutations was performed for all of them by genomic DNA amplification and Sanger sequencing. We identified 33 different mutations in the BTK gene in 40 patients including 12 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 6 splice-site mutations, 5 frameshift, 2 large deletions, one complex mutation and one in-frame deletion. Seventeen of these mutations are novel. This large series shows a lower frequency of XLA among male patients from North Africa with agammaglobulinemia and absent to low B cells compared with other international studies (63.5% vs. 85%). No strong evidence for genotype-phenotype correlation was observed. This study adds to other reports from highly consanguineous North African populations, showing lower frequency of X-linked forms as compared to AR forms of the same primary immunodeficiency. Furthermore, a large number of novel BTK mutations were identified and could further help identify carriers for genetic counseling.

  5. Mutations in Elongation Factor Ef-1α Affect the Frequency of Frameshifting and Amino Acid Misincorporation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sandbaken, M. G.; Culbertson, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A mutational analysis of the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1α indicates that this protein functions to limit the frequency of errors during genetic code translation. We found that both amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors are controlled by EF-1α. In order to examine the function of this protein, the TEF2 gene, which encodes EF-1α in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was mutagenized in vitro with hydroxylamine. Sixteen independent TEF2 alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress frameshift mutations. DNA sequence analysis identified eight different sites in the EF-1α protein that elevate the frequency of mistranslation when mutated. These sites are located in two different regions of the protein. Amino acid substitutions located in or near the GTP-binding and hydrolysis domain of the protein cause suppression of frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may effect mistranslation by altering the binding or hydrolysis of GTP. Amino acid substitutions located adjacent to a putative aminoacyl-tRNA binding region also suppress frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may alter the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA by EF-1α. The identification of frameshift and nonsense suppressor mutations in EF-1α indicates a role for this protein in limiting amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors. We suggest that these types of errors are controlled by a common mechanism or closely related mechanisms. PMID:3066688

  6. Phenotypic and molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Alexander M; Oates, Emily C; Salter, Hannah K; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Sinead M; Schule, Rebecca; Gonzalez, Michael A; Scoto, Mariacristina; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A; Houlden, Henry; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Iyailo; Chamova, Teodora; Litvinenko, Ivan; Zuchner, Stephan; Herrmann, David N; Blake, Julian; Sowden, Janet E; Acsadi, Gyuda; Rodriguez, Michael L; Menezes, Manoj P; Clarke, Nigel F; Auer Grumbach, Michaela; Bullock, Simon L; Muntoni, Francesco; Reilly, Mary M; North, Kathryn N

    2015-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a disorder of lower motor neurons, most commonly caused by recessive mutations in SMN1 on chromosome 5q. Cases without SMN1 mutations are subclassified according to phenotype. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, is characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and wasting, associated with reduced numbers of lumbar motor neurons and is caused by mutations in DYNC1H1, which encodes a microtubule motor protein in the dynein-dynactin complex and one of its cargo adaptors, BICD2. We have now identified 32 patients with BICD2 mutations from nine different families, providing detailed insights into the clinical phenotype and natural history of BICD2 disease. BICD2 spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity predominant most commonly presents with delayed motor milestones and ankle contractures. Additional features at presentation include arthrogryposis and congenital dislocation of the hips. In all affected individuals, weakness and wasting is lower-limb predominant, and typically involves both proximal and distal muscle groups. There is no evidence of sensory nerve involvement. Upper motor neuron signs are a prominent feature in a subset of individuals, including one family with exclusively adult-onset upper motor neuron features, consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. In all cohort members, lower motor neuron features were static or only slowly progressive, and the majority remained ambulant throughout life. Muscle MRI in six individuals showed a common pattern of muscle involvement with fat deposition in most thigh muscles, but sparing of the adductors and semitendinosus. Muscle pathology findings were highly variable and included pseudomyopathic features, neuropathic features, and minimal change. The six causative mutations, including one not previously reported, result in amino acid changes within all three coiled-coil domains of the BICD2 protein, and include a possible 'hot spot' mutation, p.Ser107Leu

  7. Phenotypic and molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2

    PubMed Central

    Rossor, Alexander M.; Oates, Emily C.; Salter, Hannah K.; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Sinead M.; Schule, Rebecca; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Scoto, Mariacristina; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A.; Houlden, Henry; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Iyailo; Chamova, Teodora; Litvinenko, Ivan; Zuchner, Stephan; Herrmann, David N.; Blake, Julian; Sowden, Janet E.; Acsadi, Gyuda; Rodriguez, Michael L.; Menezes, Manoj P.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Auer Grumbach, Michaela; Bullock, Simon L.; Muntoni, Francesco; North, Kathryn N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a disorder of lower motor neurons, most commonly caused by recessive mutations in SMN1 on chromosome 5q. Cases without SMN1 mutations are subclassified according to phenotype. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, is characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and wasting, associated with reduced numbers of lumbar motor neurons and is caused by mutations in DYNC1H1, which encodes a microtubule motor protein in the dynein-dynactin complex and one of its cargo adaptors, BICD2. We have now identified 32 patients with BICD2 mutations from nine different families, providing detailed insights into the clinical phenotype and natural history of BICD2 disease. BICD2 spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity predominant most commonly presents with delayed motor milestones and ankle contractures. Additional features at presentation include arthrogryposis and congenital dislocation of the hips. In all affected individuals, weakness and wasting is lower-limb predominant, and typically involves both proximal and distal muscle groups. There is no evidence of sensory nerve involvement. Upper motor neuron signs are a prominent feature in a subset of individuals, including one family with exclusively adult-onset upper motor neuron features, consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. In all cohort members, lower motor neuron features were static or only slowly progressive, and the majority remained ambulant throughout life. Muscle MRI in six individuals showed a common pattern of muscle involvement with fat deposition in most thigh muscles, but sparing of the adductors and semitendinosus. Muscle pathology findings were highly variable and included pseudomyopathic features, neuropathic features, and minimal change. The six causative mutations, including one not previously reported, result in amino acid changes within all three coiled-coil domains of the BICD2 protein, and include a possible ‘hot spot’ mutation, p.Ser107

  8. Origin of terminal voltage variations due to self-mixing in terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Grier, Andrew; Dean, Paul; Valavanis, Alexander; Keeley, James; Kundu, Iman; Cooper, Jonathan D; Agnew, Gary; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Li, Lianhe H; Harrison, Paul; Linfield, Edmund H; Ikonić, Zoran; Davies, A Giles; Indjin, Dragan

    2016-09-19

    We explain the origin of voltage variations due to self-mixing in a terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) using an extended density matrix (DM) approach. Our DM model allows calculation of both the current-voltage (I-V) and optical power characteristics of the QCL under optical feedback by changing the cavity loss, to which the gain of the active region is clamped. The variation of intra-cavity field strength necessary to achieve gain clamping, and the corresponding change in bias required to maintain a constant current density through the heterostructure is then calculated. Strong enhancement of the self-mixing voltage signal due to non-linearity of the (I-V) characteristics is predicted and confirmed experimentally in an exemplar 2.6 THz bound-to-continuum QCL.

  9. A Slfn2 mutation causes lymphoid and myeloid immunodeficiency due to loss of immune cell quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Krebs, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Li, Xiaohong; Croker, Ben A.; Siggs, Owen M.; Popkin, Daniel; Du, Xin; Lawson, Brian R.; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Xia, Yu; Khovananth, Kevin; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Satoh, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new form of inherited immunodeficiency revealed by an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation called elektra. Homozygotes showed enhanced susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, and diminished numbers of T cells and inflammatory monocytes that failed to proliferate upon infection and died via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in response to diverse proliferative stimuli. Elektra mice exhibited an increased proportion of T cells poised to replicate DNA and their T cells expressed a subset of activation markers, suggestive of a semi-activated state. The elektra phenotype was positionally ascribed to a mutation in the gene encoding Schlafen-2 (Slfn2). Our findings reveal a physiological role for Slfn2 in the defense against pathogens through regulation of quiescence in T cells and monocytes. PMID:20190759

  10. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  11. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  12. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency due to HADHB gene mutation in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaona; Zheng, Feixia; Zhang, Yao; Bao, Xinhua; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Yanling; Xiong, Hui

    2015-12-01

    We report an 8-year-old girl with lower limb weakness since birth in whom mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) deficiency, an autosomal recessive fatty acid oxidation disorder caused by HADHA or HADHB mutations, had not been definitively diagnosed before she was referred to our hospital. Repeated blood acylcarnitine analysis revealed slightly increased long-chain 3-OH-acylcarnitine levels; electromyography (EMG) suggested peripheral nerve injury; muscle biopsy confirmed a neurogenic lesion in muscle fibers, as shown by EMG. Analysis of the HADHB, which encodes long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, one of the enzymes constituting mitochondrial trifunctional protein, identified homozygous missense mutation c.739C > T (p.R247C). Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency is an extremely rare disorder and has not been reported in Chinese people to date. It is likely that neonatal onset, as seen in our patient, has not been reported for the neuromyopathic phenotype of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency.

  13. Anemia and iron overload due to compound heterozygosity for novel ceruloplasmin mutations.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Sandra; De Gobbi, Marco; Roetto, Antonella; Zecchina, Gabriella; Leonardo, Eugenio; Rizzetto, Mario; Lucetti, Claudio; Petrozzi, Lucia; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Camaschella, Clara

    2002-09-15

    Aceruloplasminemia is a recessive disorder characterized by anemia, iron overload, and neurodegeneration, caused by the absence of ceruloplasmin (Cp), a multicopper oxidase important for iron export. Few patients homozygous for loss of function mutations of the Cp gene have been reported. We describe a 62-year-old white woman with heavy liver iron overload, diabetes, anemia, and neurologic symptoms. She was compound heterozygote for 2 novel mutations that result in the absence of hepatocyte Cp: an adenine insertion at nucleotide 2917 causing a truncated protein and a C-G transversion causing a glutamine-->glutamic acid substitution at position 146. Although rare in whites, aceruloplasminemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained anemia associated with iron overload, because these features anticipate progressive neurologic symptoms. We propose that anemia, secondary to the impaired macrophage iron release, plays a major role in hepatic iron overload through increased absorption mediated by the erythroid regulator.

  14. High frequency of alkaptonuria in Slovakia: evidence for the appearance of multiple mutations in HGO involving different mutational hot spots.

    PubMed

    Zatková, A; de Bernabé, D B; Poláková, H; Zvarík, M; Feráková, E; Bosák, V; Ferák, V; Kádasi, L; de Córdoba, S R

    2000-11-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000-250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region.

  15. High Frequency of Alkaptonuria in Slovakia: Evidence for the Appearance of Multiple Mutations in HGO Involving Different Mutational Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    Zatková, Andrea; de Bernabé, Daniel Beltrán Valero; Poláková, Helena; Zvarík, Marek; Feráková, Eva; Bošák, Vladimir; Ferák, Vladimír; Kádasi, L'udovít; de Córdoba , Santiago Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000–250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region. PMID:11017803

  16. Familial cerebral cavernomas due to a KRIT1 mutation presenting with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Andole, Sreeman; Kennedy, Angus

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 25-year-old individual who presented acutely following a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. Brain MRI of the individual demonstrated the classical appearance of multiple cerebral cavernous haemangiomas (cavernomas). There was an autosomal dominant family history. Genetic testing identified a truncating mutation in the KRIT1 gene in the individual and confirmed the diagnosis of familial cerebral cavernomas as the cause of epilepsy in the family. PMID:22699465

  17. Retrospective cohort study of familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis due to CLDN16 mutations.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Przemysław; Zaniew, Marcin; Haisch, Lea; Pulcer, Barbara; Szczepańska, Maria; Moczulska, Anna; Rogowska-Kalisz, Anna; Bieniaś, Beata; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Hyla-Klekot, Lidia; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Konrad, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is a rare autosomal recessive tubular disorder exhibiting a high risk for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is a retrospective multicentre study of 25 paediatric cases with FHHNC in Poland. Median age at diagnosis was 4 years and median follow-up time was 4.8 years. All cases of FHHNC carried recessive mutations in CLDN16. The founder mutation in CLDN16, Leu151Phe, was the most frequent cause of FHHNC in Polish patients, with 13 (52%) cases being homozygous and 5 (20%) carrying Leu151Phe allele in compound heterozygosity. All cases showed nephrocalcinosis, increased urinary fractional excretion of magnesium and hypercalciuria. Other disease features included hypomagnesaemia (76%), hyperparathyroidism (76%), hyperuricaemia (56%) and hypocitraturia (60%). Treatment with thiazides effectively reduced hypercalciuria in most cases. During follow-up, renal function declined in 60% of patients; 12% of patients reached CKD stage 3 or 4 and one patient developed end-stage renal failure. We report one of the largest cohorts of FHHNC cases caused by CLDN16 mutations. A missense variant of CLDN16, Leu151Phe, is the most common mutation responsible for FHHNC in Poland. Additionally, we found that normomagnesaemia does not exclude FHHNC and the calculation of fractional excretion of Mg can be diagnostic in the setting of normomagnesaemia. We also demonstrate the efficacy of a treatment with thiazides in terms of hypercalciuria in the majority of patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Gigantism and acromegaly due to Xq26 microduplications and GPR101 mutation.

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Daly, Adrian F; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Larco, Darwin O; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Szarek, Eva; Leal, Letícia F; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Castermans, Emilie; Villa, Chiara; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Chittiboina, Prashant; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Shah, Nalini; Metzger, Daniel; Lysy, Philippe A; Ferrante, Emanuele; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Lodish, Maya; Horvath, Anelia; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Manning, Allison D; Levy, Isaac; Keil, Margaret F; Sierra, Maria de la Luz; Palmeira, Leonor; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Naves, Luciana A; Jamar, Mauricette; Bours, Vincent; Wu, T John; Choong, Catherine S; Bertherat, Jerome; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter; Farrell, William E; Barlier, Anne; Quezado, Martha; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Wess, Jurgen; Costanzi, Stefano; Liu, Pengfei; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-12-18

    Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients' pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone-producing cells. We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.).

  19. Gigantism and Acromegaly Due to Xq26 Microduplications and GPR101 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Trivellin, G.; Daly, A.F.; Faucz, F.R.; Yuan, B.; Rostomyan, L.; Larco, D.O.; Schernthaner-Reiter, M.H.; Szarek, E.; Leal, L.F.; Caberg, J.-H.; Castermans, E.; Villa, C.; Dimopoulos, A.; Chittiboina, P.; Xekouki, P.; Shah, N.; Metzger, D.; Lysy, P.A.; Ferrante, E.; Strebkova, N.; Mazerkina, N.; Zatelli, M.C.; Lodish, M.; Horvath, A.; de Alexandre, R. Bertollo; Manning, A.D.; Levy, I.; Keil, M.F.; de la Luz Sierra, M.; Palmeira, L.; Coppieters, W.; Georges, M.; Naves, L.A.; Jamar, M.; Bours, V.; Wu, T.J.; Choong, C.S.; Bertherat, J.; Chanson, P.; Kamenický, P.; Farrell, W.E.; Barlier, A.; Quezado, M.; Bjelobaba, I.; Stojilkovic, S.S.; Wess, J.; Costanzi, S.; Liu, P.; Lupski, J.R.; Beckers, A.; Stratakis, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. METHODS We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein–coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients’ pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone–producing cells. CONCLUSIONS We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.) PMID:25470569

  20. Depolarizing bipolar cell dysfunction due to a Trpm1 point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N.; Bojang, Pasano; Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Sturgill-Short, Gwen; Ray, Thomas A.; Furukawa, Takahisa; Koike, Chieko; Goldberg, Andrew F. X.; Shen, Yin; McCall, Maureen A.; Nawy, Scott; Nishina, Patsy M.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in TRPM1 are found in humans with an autosomal recessive form of complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB). The Trpm1−/− mouse has been an important animal model for this condition. Here we report a new mouse mutant, tvrm27, identified in a chemical mutagenesis screen. Genetic mapping of the no b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) phenotype of tvrm27 localized the mutation to a chromosomal region that included Trpm1. Complementation testing with Trpm1−/− mice confirmed a mutation in Trpm1. Sequencing identified a nucleotide change in exon 23, converting a highly conserved alanine within the pore domain to threonine (p.A1068T). Consistent with prior studies of Trpm1−/− mice, no anatomical changes were noted in the Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 retina. The Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 phenotype is distinguished from that of Trpm1−/− by the retention of TRPM1 expression on the dendritic tips of depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs). While ERG b-wave amplitudes of Trpm1+/− heterozygotes are comparable to wild type, those of Trpm1+/tvrm27 mice are reduced by 32%. A similar reduction in the response of Trpm1+/tvrm27 DBCs to LY341495 or capsaicin is evident in whole cell recordings. These data indicate that the p.A1068T mutant TRPM1 acts as a dominant negative with respect to TRPM1 channel function. Furthermore, these data indicate that the number of functional TRPM1 channels at the DBC dendritic tips is a key factor in defining DBC response amplitude. The Trpm1tvrm27/tvrm27 mutant will be useful for elucidating the role of TRPM1 in DBC signal transduction, for determining how Trpm1 mutations impact central visual processing, and for evaluating experimental therapies for cCSNB. PMID:22896717

  1. MRI characteristics and scoring in HDLS due to CSF1R gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sundal, Christina; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Nicholson, Alexandra M; Wider, Christian; Shuster, Elizabeth A; Aasly, Jan; Spina, Salvatore; Ghetti, Bernardino; Roeber, Sigrun; Garbern, James; Borjesson-Hanson, Anne; Tselis, Alex; Swerdlow, Russell H; Miller, Bradley B; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Heckman, Michael G; Uitti, Ryan J; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matt; Andersen, Oluf; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W; Broderick, Daniel; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2012-08-07

    To describe the brain MRI characteristics of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) with known mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R) on chromosome 5. We reviewed 20 brain MRI scans of 15 patients with autopsy- or biopsy-verified HDLS and CSF1R mutations. We assessed sagittal T1-, axial T1-, T2-, proton density-weighted and axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images for distribution of white matter lesions (WMLs), gray matter involvement, and atrophy. We calculated a severity score based on a point system (0-57) for each MRI scan. Of the patients, 93% (14 of 15) demonstrated localized WMLs with deep and subcortical involvement, whereas one patient revealed generalized WMLs. All WMLs were bilateral but asymmetric and predominantly frontal. Fourteen patients had a rapidly progressive clinical course with an initial MRI mean total severity score of 16.7 points (range 10-33.5). Gray matter pathology and brainstem atrophy were absent, and the corticospinal tracts were involved late in the disease course. There was no enhancement, and there was minimal cerebellar pathology. Recognition of the typical MRI patterns of HDLS and the use of an MRI severity score might help during the diagnostic evaluation to characterize the natural history and to monitor potential future treatments. Indicators of rapid disease progression were symptomatic disease onset before 45 years, female sex, WMLs extending beyond the frontal regions, a MRI severity score greater than 15 points, and mutation type of deletion.

  2. Delayed puberty due to a novel mutation in CHD7 causing CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Andrew; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Picker, Jonathan; Maher, Thomas A; Milunsky, Aubrey

    2010-12-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented to a pediatric endocrinology clinic for delayed puberty with no signs of secondary sexual development. Her past medical history was significant for bilateral colobomas, inner-ear anomalies, hearing loss, and anosmia. Genetic testing revealed a novel de novo mutation in the CHD7 gene, one of the causative genes in CHARGE syndrome (coloboma, heart disease, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development and/or central nervous system anomalies, genital anomalies and/or hypogonadism, and ear anomalies and/or deafness). We review the distinction between hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism and discuss the availability of molecular genetic testing for idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. CHD7 mutations have also been found in some patients with Kallmann syndrome, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and anosmia, and we discuss the overlap between this syndrome and CHARGE syndrome. With the increased availability of genetic testing for a variety of disorders, it is important for pediatricians to become familiar with interpreting genetic test results. Finally, we illustrate that Bayes' theorem is a useful statistical tool for interpreting novel missense mutations of unknown significance.

  3. A genetic predisposition for bovine neonatal pancytopenia is not due to mutations in coagulation factor XI.

    PubMed

    Krappmann, K; Weikard, R; Gerst, S; Wolf, C; Kühn, Ch

    2011-11-01

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a newly emerging disease in many European countries that causes haemorrhagic diathesis and mortality in neonatal calves. This study tested the hypothesis that genetic factors might be involved in BNP, since genetic defects resulting in coagulation disorders have been described in many species, including cattle. A familial pattern of occurrence of BNP cases was observed in an experimental population of cattle in Germany and BNP was diagnosed in nine calves on an experimental dairy herd from May 2007 to December 2009. All affected calves were descendents of a single F(1) sire in a specific F(2) resource population generated from Charolais and German Holstein bloodlines. Sequence analysis of the bovine coagulation factor XI (F11) gene as a functional candidate gene for BNP revealed an unusually high number of non-synonymous mutations within the gene compared to a whole genome mutation screen in cattle targetting random sequences. However, none of the mutations in the F11 gene were concordant with BNP status. Although these data and further pedigree analysis excluded a simple mode of inheritance of the BNP phenotype, there was a statistically significant (P=0.0001) accumulation of BNP cases in the specific pedigree examined, suggesting that a genetic component is involved in the development of BNP.

  4. Multiplex epithelium dysfunction due to CLDN10 mutation: the HELIX syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Brideau, Gaelle; Al-Sarraj, Yasser; Maroun, Rachid C; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Leclerc-Mercier, Stéphanie; Olinger, Eric; Baron, Stéphanie; Chaussain, Catherine; Nochy, Dominique; Taha, Rowaida Z; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Joshi, Vandana; Curmi, Patrick A; Kambouris, Marios; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Bodemer, Christine; Devuyst, Olivier; Houillier Md PhD, Pascal; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2017-08-03

    PurposeWe aimed to identify the genetic cause to a clinical syndrome encompassing hypohidrosis, electrolyte imbalance, lacrimal gland dysfunction, ichthyosis, and xerostomia (HELIX syndrome), and to comprehensively delineate the phenotype.MethodsWe performed homozygosity mapping, whole-genome sequencing, gene sequencing, expression studies, functional tests, protein bioinformatics, and histological characterization in two unrelated families with HELIX syndrome.ResultsWe identified biallelic missense mutations (c.386C>T, p.S131L and c.2T>C, p.M1T) in CLDN10B in six patients from two unrelated families. CLDN10B encodes Claudin-10b, an integral tight junction (TJ) membrane-spanning protein expressed in the kidney, skin, and salivary glands. All patients had hypohidrosis, renal loss of NaCl with secondary hyperaldosteronism and hypokalemia, as well as hypolacrymia, ichthyosis, xerostomia, and severe enamel wear. Functional testing revealed that patients had a decreased NaCl absorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and a severely decreased secretion of saliva. Both mutations resulted in reduced or absent Claudin-10 at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells.ConclusionCLDN10 mutations cause a dysfunction in TJs in several tissues and, subsequently, abnormalities in renal ion transport, ectodermal gland homeostasis, and epidermal integrity.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 3 August 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.71.

  5. Diagnostic Criteria for Adult-onset Leukoencephalopathy With Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Due to CSF1R mutation.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Tada, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Onodera, Osamu; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ikeuchi, Takeshi

    2017-09-18

    To establish and validate diagnostic criteria for adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) due to colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) mutation. We developed diagnostic criteria for ALSP based on a recent analysis of the clinical characteristics of ALSP. These criteria provide "probable" and "possible" designations for patients who do not have a genetic diagnosis. To verify its sensitivity and specificity, we retrospectively applied our criteria to 83 ALSP cases who had CSF1R mutations (24 of these were analyzed at our institutions, and the others were identified from the literature), 53 cases who had CSF1R mutation-negative leukoencephalopathies, and 32 cases who had cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) with NOTCH3 mutations. Among the CSF1R mutation-positive cases, 50 cases (60%) were diagnosed as "probable" and 32 (39%) were diagnosed as "possible," leading to a sensitivity of 99% if calculated as a ratio of the combined number of cases who fulfilled "probable" or "possible" to the total number of cases. With regard to specificity, 22 cases (42%) with mutation-negative leukoencephalopathies and 28 (88%) with CADASIL were correctly excluded using these criteria. These diagnostic criteria are very sensitive for diagnosing ALSP with sufficient specificity for differentiating from CADASIL and moderate specificity for other leukoencephalopathies. Our results suggest that these criteria are useful for the clinical diagnosis of ALSP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Culture Volume and Vessel Affect Long-Term Survival, Mutation Frequency, and Oxidative Stress of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Karin E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently studied during exponential- and stationary-phase growth. However, many strains can survive in long-term stationary phase (LTSP), without the addition of nutrients, from days to several years. During LTSP, cells experience a variety of stressors, including reactive oxidative species, nutrient depletion, and metabolic toxin buildup, that lead to physiological responses and changes in genetic stability. In this study, we monitored survival during LTSP, as well as reporters of genetic and physiological change, to determine how the physical environment affects E. coli during long-term batch culture. We demonstrate differences in yield during LTSP in cells incubated in LB medium in test tubes versus Erlenmeyer flasks, as well as growth in different volumes of medium. We determined that these differences are only partially due to differences in oxygen levels by incubating the cells in different volumes of media under anaerobic conditions. Since we hypothesized that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in physiological outputs during the late log and early stationary phases, we monitored alkalization, mutation frequency, oxidative stress response, and glycation. Although initial cell yields are essentially equivalent under each condition tested, physiological responses vary greatly in response to culture environment. Incubation in lower-volume cultures leads to higher oxyR expression but lower mutation frequency and glycation levels, whereas incubation in high-volume cultures has the opposite effect. We show here that even under commonly used experimental conditions that are frequently treated as equivalent, the stresses experienced by cells can differ greatly, suggesting that culture vessel and incubation conditions should be carefully considered in the planning or analysis of experiments. PMID:24375138

  7. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Methods Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. Results For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses

  8. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses.

    PubMed

    Bhonsle, Suyashree P; Arena, Christopher B; Sweeney, Daniel C; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses, and 15.46 ± 1.37 % (x

  9. Benefits and Challenges with Applying Unique Molecular Identifiers in Next Generation Sequencing to Detect Low Frequency Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kou, Ruqin; Lam, Ham; Duan, Hairong; Ye, Li; Jongkam, Narisra; Chen, Weizhi; Zhang, Shifang; Li, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Indexing individual template molecules with a unique identifier (UID) before PCR and deep sequencing is promising for detecting low frequency mutations, as true mutations could be distinguished from PCR errors or sequencing errors based on consensus among reads sharing same index. In an effort to develop a robust assay to detect from urine low-abundant bladder cancer cells carrying well-documented mutations, we have tested the idea first on a set of mock templates, with wild type and known mutants mixed at defined ratios. We have measured the combined error rate for PCR and Illumina sequencing at each nucleotide position of three exons, and demonstrated the power of a UID in distinguishing and correcting errors. In addition, we have demonstrated that PCR sampling bias, rather than PCR errors, challenges the UID-deep sequencing method in faithfully detecting low frequency mutation.

  10. Benefits and Challenges with Applying Unique Molecular Identifiers in Next Generation Sequencing to Detect Low Frequency Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Ruqin; Lam, Ham; Duan, Hairong; Ye, Li; Jongkam, Narisra; Chen, Weizhi; Zhang, Shifang; Li, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Indexing individual template molecules with a unique identifier (UID) before PCR and deep sequencing is promising for detecting low frequency mutations, as true mutations could be distinguished from PCR errors or sequencing errors based on consensus among reads sharing same index. In an effort to develop a robust assay to detect from urine low-abundant bladder cancer cells carrying well-documented mutations, we have tested the idea first on a set of mock templates, with wild type and known mutants mixed at defined ratios. We have measured the combined error rate for PCR and Illumina sequencing at each nucleotide position of three exons, and demonstrated the power of a UID in distinguishing and correcting errors. In addition, we have demonstrated that PCR sampling bias, rather than PCR errors, challenges the UID-deep sequencing method in faithfully detecting low frequency mutation. PMID:26752634

  11. Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts due to recessive mutations in the CTC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Bisserbe, A; Tertian, G; Buffet, C; Turhan, A; Lambotte, O; Nasser, G; Alvin, P; Tardieu, M; Riant, F; Bergametti, F; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Denier, C

    2015-05-01

    Cerebro-retinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) or Coats plus syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder affecting the eyes, brain, bone and gastrointestinal tract. Its primary pathogenesis involves small vessel obliterative microangiopathy. Recently, autosomal recessively inherited mutations in CTC1 have been reported in CRMCC patients. We herein report an adolescent referred to our hospital following new seizures in a context of an undefined multisystem disorder. Cerebral imaging disclosed asymmetrical leukopathy, intracranial calcifications and cysts. In addition, he presented other typical CRMCC features i.e. a history of intrauterine growth retardation, skeletal demineralization and osteopenia, bilateral exudative vitreo-retinopathy reminiscent of Coats disease, recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhages secondary to watermelon stomach and variceal bleeding of the esophagus due to idiopathic portal hypertension and telangiectatic and angiodysplasic changes in the small intestine and colon, and anemia due to recurrent bleeding and bone marrow abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with Coats plus syndrome. CTC1 gene screening confirmed the diagnosis with the identification of heterozygous deleterious mutations. CRMCC due to CTC1 mutations has a broad clinical expressivity. Our case report illustrates the main possible associated phenotypes and their complications, demonstrating the need for a careful etiological search in order to initiate appropriate therapeutic and preventive measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. High frequency of CRB1 mutations as cause of Early-Onset Retinal Dystrophies in the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Corton, Marta; Tatu, Sorina D; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; Vallespín, Elena; Tapias, Ignacio; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Bernal, Sara; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Baiget, Montserrat; Ayuso, Carmen

    2013-02-05

    CRB1 mutations are reported as cause of severe congenital and early-onset retinal dystrophies (EORD) with different phenotypic manifestations, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and cone-rod dystrophies. Comprehensive mutational scanning of the whole gene has been only performed in few cohorts, mainly in LCA patients. Here, we aimed investigating the real prevalence of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish population by extensive screening of CRB1 mutations in a large cohort of LCA and EORP cases. This report integrates data from previous studies on CRB1 defects in our Spanish cohort of LCA and early-onset RP (EORP) with new findings from a comprehensive mutational screening of the whole gene. The molecular tools used include mutation genotyping arrays, whole-genome homozygosity mapping, an optimized high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and Sanger sequencing. A large clinically well-characterized cohort of 404 Spanish cases was studied, 114 of which suffered from LCA and 290 from EORP. This study reveals that 11% of Spanish patients carried mutations in CRB1, ranging from 9% of EORP to 14% of LCA cases. More than three quarters of the mutations identified herein have been first described in this Spanish cohort, 13 of them are unreported new variants and 13 had been previously reported in our previous studies. This work provides a wide spectrum of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish EORD patients and evidences the major role of CRB1 as causal gene in the Spanish EORP patients. It is noteworthy that a high rate of private mutations only described in our cohort has been found so far. To our knowledge, this study represents the most complete mutational screening of CRB1 in a Spanish LCA and EORP cohort, allowing us to establish gene-specific frequencies and to provide a wide spectrum of CRB1 mutations in the Spanish population.

  13. Frequency-rank correlations of rhodopsin mutations with tuned hydropathic roughness based on self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    The behavior of disease-linked mutations of membrane proteins is especially simple in rhodopsin, where they are well-studied, as they are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa, RP (retinal degeneration). Here we show that the frequency of occurrence of single RP mutations is strongly influenced by their transportational survival rates, and that this survival correlates well (82%) with a long-range, non-local hydropathic measure of the roughness of the water interfaces of ex-membrane rhodopsin based on self-organized criticality (SOC). It is speculated that this concept may be generally useful in studying survival rates of many mutated proteins.

  14. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome due to a loss of function mutation in the COL9A3 gene.

    PubMed

    Faletra, Flavio; D'Adamo, Adamo P; Bruno, Irene; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Biskup, Saskia; Esposito, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (STL) is a clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by ophthalmic, articular, orofacial, and auditory manifestations. STL has been described with both autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance. The dominant form is caused by mutations of COL2A1 (STL 1, OMIM 108300), COL11A1 (STL 2, OMIM 604841), and COL11A2 (STL 3, OMIM 184840) genes, while recessive forms have been associated with mutations of COL9A1 (OMIM 120210) and COL9A2 (OMIM 120260) genes. Type IX collagen is a heterotrimeric molecule formed by three genetically distinct chains: α1, α2, and α3 encoded by the COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3 genes. Up to this time, only heterozygous mutations of COL9A3 gene have been reported in human and related to: (1) multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 3, (2) susceptibility to an intervertebral disc disease, and (3) hearing loss. Here, we describe the first autosomal recessive Stickler family due to loss of function mutations (c.1176_1198del, p.Gln393Cysfs*25) of COL9A3 gene. These findings extend further the role of collagen genes family in the disease pathogenesis.

  15. High probability and frequency of EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mengxi; Zhuang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xinli; Huang, Ruofan; Liang, Xiaohua; Zhan, Qiong

    2017-08-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide. Brain metastasis (BMs) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most important cause of death. This study aimed to explore the association of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and BMs in NSCLC. We analyzed 50 NSCLC patients with BMs and 50 match-paired NSCLC patients with no brain metastases (NBMs). The EGFR mutation status of primary lesions was detected using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction. The BMs patients had a higher frequency of EGFR mutations than the NBMs patients (52.0 vs. 22.0% respectively, P < 0.001), in both adenocarcinoma (60.5 vs. 30.6%, P = 0.003) and squamous carcinoma (37.5 vs. 0%, P = 0.04). The incidence of BMs in patients with EGFR mutations was higher than in patients with wild-type EGFR (70.3 vs. 38.1%, P = 002). NSCLC patients with BMs had a higher incidence of EGFR mutations and those with mutant EGFR had a higher frequency of BMs. EGFR mutations may promote brain metastasis growth of NSCLC.

  16. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Laura N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate. PMID:25392761

  17. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Amos, William; Filipe, Laura N S

    2014-01-01

    Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate.

  18. Familial Wolfram syndrome due to compound heterozygosity for two novel WFS1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Gabriela; Pérez-Cano, Hector J.; Camargo, Mayra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To describe the first instance of genotyping in a Latin American family with Wolfram syndrome (WS). Methods Four affected siblings and their healthy parents were studied. Ophthalmologic examination included best corrected visual acuity determination, funduscopy, fluorescein retinal angiography, and Goldmann kinetic perimetry. Molecular methods included linkage analysis using microsatellites markers located on the markers located on the Wofram syndrome 1 (WFS1) region at 4p16.1, PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing analysis of the complete coding region and exon/intron junctions of WFS1. In addition, allele-specific cloning and sequencing techniques were used to characterize a heterozygous frameshift mutation. Results The four affected siblings presented with a homogeneous clinical picture characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus, severe optic atrophy, and progressive hearing loss. Linkage analysis indicated that all four sibs were heterozygous for markers linked to the WFS1 region and that each inherited the same allele from the mother and the same from the father, suggesting compound heterozygosity. Direct WFS1 analysis disclosed a paternally inherited novel missense R177P mutation whereas allele-specific cloning and sequencing revealed a novel WFS1 16 bp deletion that was inherited from the mother. Conclusions Our report of two novel WFS1 mutations expands the molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome. This is the first documented case of the molecular basis of the disease in a Latin American family. Analysis of more patients from this population will establish if compound heterozygosity is commonly found in affected individuals from this ethnic group. PMID:18660851

  19. Time trends in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutation frequency in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Parczewski, Milosz; Witak-Jedra, Magdalena; Maciejewska, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Skwara, Pawel; Garlicki, Aleksander; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Rogalska, Magdalena; Jankowska, Maria; Lemanska, Malgorzata; Hlebowicz, Maria; Baralkiewicz, Grazyna; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Mazurek, Renata; Lojewski, Wladyslaw; Grabczewska, Edyta; Olczak, Anita; Jablonowska, Elzbieta; Rymer, Weronika; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Szetela, Bartosz; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Knysz, Brygida; Urbanska, Anna; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Poland, the HIV epidemic has shifted recently from being predominantly related to injection drug use (IDU) to being driven by transmissions among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM). The number of new HIV cases has increased in the recent years, while no current data on the transmitted drug resistance associated mutations (tDRM) frequency trend over time are available from 2010. In this study, we analyze the temporal trends in the spread of tDRM from 2008 to 2013. Materials and Methods Partial pol sequences from 833 antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals of European descent (Polish origin) linked to care in 9 of 17 Polish HIV treatment centres were analyzed. Drug resistance interpretation was performed according to WHO surveillance recommendations, subtyping with REGA genotyping 2.0 tool. Time trends were examined for the frequency of t-DRM across subtypes and transmission groups using logistic regression (R statistical platform, v. 3.1.0). Results Frequency of tDRM proved stable over time, with mutation frequency change from 11.3% in 2008 to 8.3% in 2013 [OR: 0.91 (95% CI 0.80–1,05), p=0.202] (Figure 1a). Also, no significant differences over time were noted for the subtype B (decrease from 8.4% 2008 to 6.2% in 2013 [OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.79–1.11), p=0.45] and across non-B variants [change from 22.6% 2008 to 23.1% in 2013, OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.75–1.19), p=0.62]. When patient groups were stratified according to transmission route, in MSM there was a trend for a NNRTI t-DRM decrease (from 6.8% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.02), p=0.0655, slope −0.74%/year) (Figure 1b), related to the subtype B infected MSM (decrease from 7% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.03), p=0.0662, slope −0.75%/year). Overall tDRM frequency decrease was also noted for the heterosexually infected patients [from 17.6% 2008 to 10.3% in 2013, OR: 0.83 (95% CI 0.67–1.02, p=0.077, slope −2.041%/year)] but did not associate with drug class (Figure

  20. DMD and BMD in the same family due to two distinct mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, L.; Mora, M.; Di Blasi, C.; Brugnoni, R.

    1995-12-04

    We report on a family with a boy affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and an asymptomatic cousin with a Becker-type dystrophin abnormality, diagnosed by chance. Dystrophin gene analysis showed that these conditions were caused by two distinct deletions with breakpoints in different exons. In Xp21 families, DNA analysis and dystrophin testing of asymptomatic males with high CK plasma levels might detect different dystrophin mutations in separate haplotypes as in our family, although we stress there should be clear clinical or familial indications for such testing. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Two patients with 'Dropped head syndrome' due to mutations in LMNA or SEPN1 genes.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, A; Haliloglu, G; Richard, P; Talim, B; Maugenre, S; Ferreiro, A; Guicheney, P; Menditto, I; Benedetti, S; Bertini, E; Bonne, G; Topaloglu, H

    2005-08-01

    Dropped head syndrome is characterized by severe weakness of neck extensor muscles with sparing of the flexors. It is a prominent sign in several neuromuscular conditions, but it may also be an isolated feature with uncertain aetiology. We report two children in whom prominent weakness of neck extensor muscles is associated with mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) and selenoprotein N1 (SEPN1) genes, respectively. This report expands the underlying causes of the dropped head syndrome which may be the presenting feature of a congenital muscular dystrophy.

  2. Measuring frequency changes due to microwave power variations as a function of C-field setting in a rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarosy, E. B.; Johnson, Walter A.; Karuza, Sarunas K.; Voit, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown in previous studies that in some cesium frequency standards there exist certain C-field settings that minimize frequency changes that are due to variations in the microwave power. In order to determine whether similar results could be obtained with rubidium (Rb) frequency standards (clocks), we performed a similar study, using a completely automated measurement system, on a commercial Rb standard. From our measurements we found that changing the microwave power to the filter cell resulted in significant changes in frequency, and that the magnitude of these frequency changes at low C-field levels went to zero and decreased as the C-field was increased.

  3. Water-waves frequency upshift of the spectral mean due to wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeltink, Debbie; Chabchoub, Amin; Brunetti, Maura; Kasparian, Jerome; Kimmoun, Olivier; Branger, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The effect of wind forcing on monochromatic modulated water waves was investigated both numerically and experimentally in the context of the Modified Non-Linear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation framework. While wind is usually associated with a frequency downshift of the dominant spectral peak, we show that it may induce an upshift of the spectral mean due to an asymmetric amplification of the spectrum. Here the weighted average spectral mean is equal to the ratio of the momentum of the envelope to its norm and it detects any asymmetries in the spectrum (Segur et al. 2005). Wind can however indirectly induce frequency downshifts, by promoting dissipative effects like wave breaking. We highlight that the definition of the up- and downshift in terms of peak frequency or average frequency is critical for a relevant discussion. In our model, the wind input consists of a leading order forcing term that amplifies all frequencies equally and induces a broadening of the spectrum, and a higher order asymmetric term (Brunetti et al. 2014; Brunetti & Kasparian 2014) that amplifies higher frequencies more than lower ones and induces a permanent upshift of the spectral mean. The effect of MNLS + wind is exactly opposite to MNLS + viscosity, where the lower order viscosity terms damp the whole spectrum, while the higher order viscosity terms damp higher frequencies more than lower ones and thus causes a permanent downshift, as evidenced by Carter & Govan (2016). We corroborated the model with wave tank experiments conducted in the IRPHE/Pytheas large wind-wave facility located in Marseille, France. Wave data analysis show the temporary downshift in the spectral peak sense caused by the wind, and the temporary upshift in the spectral mean sense characteristic of the MNLS. As the tank-length was limited, we used long-range simulations to obtain upshift in the spectral mean sense caused by the wind. The limit of the model is reached when breaking events occur. We acknowledge financial

  4. Precision therapy for a new disorder of AMPA receptor recycling due to mutations in ATAD1

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Umanah, George K.E.; Sondheimer, Neal; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Wilkens, Alisha B.; Conlin, Laura K.; Santani, Avni B.; Nesbitt, Addie; Juulsola, Jane; Ma, Erica; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: ATAD1 encodes Thorase, a mediator of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptor recycling; in this work, we characterized the phenotype resulting from ATAD1 mutations and developed a targeted therapy in both mice and humans. Methods: Using exome sequencing, we identified a novel ATAD1 mutation (p.E276X) as the etiology of a devastating neurologic disorder characterized by hypertonia, seizures, and death in a consanguineous family. We postulated that pathogenesis was a result of excessive AMPA receptor activity and designed a targeted therapeutic approach using perampanel, an AMPA-receptor antagonist. Results: Perampanel therapy in ATAD1 knockout mice reversed behavioral defects, normalized brain MRI abnormalities, prevented seizures, and prolonged survival. The ATAD1 patients treated with perampanel showed improvement in hypertonicity and resolution of seizures. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that identification of novel monogenic neurologic disorders and observation of response to targeted therapeutics can provide important insights into human nervous system functioning. PMID:28180185

  5. Human nonsyndromic hereditary deafness DFNA17 is due to a mutation in nonmuscle myosin MYH9.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, A K; Goldstein, J A; Kelley, M J; Luxford, W; Castelein, C M; Mhatre, A N

    2000-11-01

    The authors had previously mapped a new locus-DFNA17, for nonsyndromic hereditary hearing impairment-to chromosome 22q12.2-q13. 3. DFNA17 spans a 17- to 23-cM region, and MYH9, a nonmuscle-myosin heavy-chain gene, is located within the linked region. Because of the importance of myosins in hearing, MYH9 was tested as a candidate gene for DFNA17. Expression of MYH9 in the rat cochlea was confirmed using reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunohistochemistry. MYH9 was immunolocalized in the organ of Corti, the subcentral region of the spiral ligament, and the Reissner membrane. Sequence analysis of MYH9 in a family with DFNA17 identified, at nucleotide 2114, a G-->A transposition that cosegregated with the inherited autosomal dominant hearing impairment. This missense mutation changes codon 705 from an invariant arginine (R) to histidine (H), R705H, within a highly conserved SH1 linker region. Previous studies have shown that modification of amino acid residues within the SH1 helix causes dysfunction of the ATPase activity of the motor domain in myosin II. Both the precise role of MYH9 in the cochlea and the mechanism by which the R705H mutation leads to the DFNA17 phenotype (progressive hearing impairment and cochleosaccular degeneration) remain to be elucidated.

  6. Myopathic mtDNA Depletion Syndrome Due to Mutation in TK2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, Elena; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Rivera, Henry; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Coca-Robinot, David; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease gene(s) in a Spanish girl with failure to thrive, muscle weakness, mild facial weakness, elevated creatine kinase, deficiency of mitochondrial complex III and depletion of mtDNA. With whole-exome sequencing data, it was possible to get the whole mtDNA sequencing and discard any pathogenic variant in this genome. The analysis of whole exome uncovered a homozygous pathogenic mutation in thymidine kinase 2 gene ( TK2; NM_004614.4:c.323 C>T, p.T108M). TK2 mutations have been identified mainly in patients with the myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes. This patient presents an atypical TK2-related myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes, because despite having a very low content of mtDNA (<20%), she presents a slower and less severe evolution of the disease. In conclusion, our data confirm the role of TK2 gene in mtDNA depletion syndromes and expanded the phenotypic spectrum.

  7. Broad CTL response is required to clear latent HIV-1 due to dominance of escape mutations

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Pertea, Mihaela; Rongvaux, Anthony; Wang, Leyao; Durand, Christine M.; Ghiaur, Gabriel; Lai, Jun; McHugh, Holly L.; Hao, Haiping; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Gurer, Cagan; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Strowig, Till; Kumar, Priti; Siliciano, Janet D.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Shan, Liang; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-1 persists in a stable latent reservoir1, 2, primarily in resting memory CD4+ T cells3, 4. This reservoir presents a major barrier to the cure of HIV-1 infection. To purge the reservoir, pharmacological reactivation of latent HIV-1 has been proposed5 and tested both in vitro and in vivo6–8. A key remaining question is whether virus-specific immune mechanisms including cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) can clear infected cells in ART-treated patients after latency is reversed. Here we show that there is a striking all or none pattern for CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag epitopes. Unless ART is started early, the vast majority (>98%) of latent viruses carry CTL escape mutations that render infected cells insensitive to CTLs directed at common epitopes. To solve this problem, we identified CTLs that could recognize epitopes from latent HIV-1 that were unmutated in every chronically infected patient tested. Upon stimulation, these CTLs eliminated target cells infected with autologous virus derived from the latent reservoir, both in vitro and in patient-derived humanized mice. The predominance of CTL-resistant viruses in the latent reservoir poses a major challenge to viral eradication. Our results demonstrate that chronically infected patients retain a broad spectrum viral-specific CTL response and that appropriate boosting of this response may be required for the elimination of the latent reservoir. PMID:25561180

  8. Critical Diamond-Blackfan anemia due to ribosomal protein S19 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Shuichi; Mitsuo, Miho; Noguchi, Maiko; Nakagawa, Shin-Ichiro; Ueda, Koichiro; Inada, Hiroko; Ohga, Shouichi; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by pure erythrocyte aplasia, and approximately 70% of patients carry mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RP). Here, we report the case of a male infant with DBA who presented with anemic crisis (hemoglobin [Hb] concentration 1.5 g/dL) at 58 days after birth. On admission, the infant was pale and had tachypnea, but recovered with intensive care, including red blood cell transfusions, and prednisolone. Based on the clinical diagnosis of DBA, the father of the infant had cyclosporine-A-dependent anemia. On analysis of RP genes when the infant was 6 months old, both the infant and the father, but not the mother, were found to harbor a mutation of RPS19 (c.167G > C, p. R56P). Therefore, genetic background search and early neonatal health check-ups are recommended for families with a history of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Characterizing familial corticobasal syndrome due to Alzheimer's disease pathology and PSEN1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Benjamin; Khan, Aun; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Bilbao, Juan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghani, Mahdi; Freedman, Morris; Stuss, Donald T; Chow, Tiffany; Black, Sandra E; Masellis, Mario

    2017-05-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) resulting from genetic Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been described only once. Whether familial CBS-AD is a distinct clinical entity with its own imaging signature remains unknown. Four individuals with CBS from two families underwent detailed assessment. For two individuals, regional atrophy and hypoperfusion were compared to autopsy-confirmed typical late-onset AD and corticobasal degeneration, as well as genetically proven PSEN1 cases with an amnestic presentation. One family harbored a novel mutation in PSEN1:p.Phe283Leu. MRI demonstrated severe parietal, perirolandic, and temporal atrophy, with relative sparing of frontal and ipsilateral hippocampal regions. Autopsy confirmed pure AD pathology. The other family harbored a known PSEN1 mutation:p.Gly378Val. This report confirms familial CBS-AD as a distinct clinical entity, with a parietal-perirolandic-temporal atrophy signature. It illustrates the clinical heterogeneity that can occur despite a shared genetic cause and underscores the need for biomarkers such as amyloid imaging during life. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The clinical features of retinal disease due to a dominant mutation in RPE65

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Sarah; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Holder, Graham E.; Moore, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a detailed phenotypic and molecular study of two families with autosomal dominant RPE65-related retinal dystrophy. Methods Five patients from two families were ascertained from the retinal clinics of a tertiary referral center. Phenotyping included retinal imaging and electrophysiological testing. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing of exon 13 of RPE65 and its intron–exon boundaries was performed on all reported patients and segregation confirmed in available relatives. The main outcome measures were the results of an ophthalmic examination and investigation and molecular genetic analysis. Results Four affected patients from two families presented with nyctalopia and central visual disturbance in adulthood progressing to severe visual loss by the fifth to eighth decades. The patients had extensive chorioretinal atrophy with a relatively preserved anterior retina. In the second family, one patient had bilateral, vitelliform-like foveal lesions consistent with adult onset vitelliform macular dystrophy and no peripheral retinal changes. These unrelated families were both heterozygous for c.1430A>G (p.Asp477Gly). One unaffected family member also tested positive for this mutation but had good vision at age 80 years. Conclusions Autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy resembling choroideremia can arise from a heterozygous mutation in RPE65. It may manifest with mild disease or be non-penetrant. Awareness of these unusual presentations can facilitate targeted molecular investigation. PMID:27307694

  11. Complexity of the Class B Phenotype in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Rhodopsin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; McGuigan, David B.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Gruzensky, Michaela L.; Sheplock, Rebecca; Palma, Judy; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previously, patients with RHO mutations and a class A phenotype were found to have severe early-onset loss of rod function, whereas patients with a class B phenotype retained rod function at least in certain retinal regions. Here class B patients were studied at different disease stages to understand the topographic details of the phenotype in preparation for therapies of this regionalized retinopathy. Methods A cohort of patients with RHO mutations and class B phenotype (n = 28; ages 10–80 years) were studied with rod and cone perimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results At least three components of the phenotype were identified in these cross-sectional studies. Patients could have hemifield dysfunction, pericentral loss of function, or a diffuse rod sensitivity loss across the visual field. Combinations of these different patterns were also found. Colocalized photoreceptor layer thicknesses were in agreement with the psychophysical results. Conclusions These disorders with regional retinal variation of severity require pre-evaluations before enrollment into clinical trials to seek answers to questions about where in the retina would be appropriate to deliver focal treatments, and, for retina-wide treatment strategies, where in the retina should be monitored for therapeutic efficacy (or safety). PMID:27654411

  12. The allele-frequency spectrum in a decoupled Moran model with mutation, drift, and directional selection, assuming small mutation rates

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Claus; Clemente, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a decoupled Moran model with haploid population size N, a biallelic locus under mutation and drift with scaled forward and backward mutation rates θ1=μ1N and θ0=μ0N, and directional selection with scaled strength γ=sN. With small scaled mutation rates θ0 and θ1, which is appropriate for single nucleotide polymorphism data in highly recombining regions, we derive a simple approximate equilibrium distribution for polymorphic alleles with a constant of proportionality. We also put forth an even simpler model, where all mutations originate from monomorphic states. Using this model we derive the sojourn times, conditional on the ancestral and fixed allele, and under equilibrium the distributions of fixed and polymorphic alleles and fixation rates. Furthermore, we also derive the distribution of small samples in the diffusion limit and provide convenient recurrence relations for calculating this distribution. This enables us to give formulas analogous to the Ewens–Watterson estimator of θ for biased mutation rates and selection. We apply this theory to a polymorphism dataset of fourfold degenerate sites in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:22269092

  13. Effect of Ku80 Deficiency on Mutation Frequencies and Spectra at a LacZ Reporter Locus in Mouse Tissues and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Busuttil, Rita A.; Muñoz, Denise P.; Garcia, Ana Maria; Rodier, Francis; Kim, Woo Ho; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and γH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80−/− as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements. PMID:18941635

  14. Genetic enhancement of cognition in a kindred with cone–rod dystrophy due to RIMS1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thompson, Pamela J; Need, Anna; Harris, Sarah E; Weale, Michael E; Wilkie, Susan E; Michaelides, Michel; Free, Samantha L; Walley, Nicole; Gumbs, Curtis; Gerrelli, Dianne; Ruddle, Piers; Whalley, Lawrence J; Starr, John M; Hunt, David M; Goldstein, David B; Deary, Ian J; Moore, Anthony T

    2007-01-01

    Background The genetic basis of variation in human cognitive abilities is poorly understood. RIMS1 encodes a synapse active‐zone protein with important roles in the maintenance of normal synaptic function: mice lacking this protein have greatly reduced learning ability and memory function. Objective An established paradigm examining the structural and functional effects of mutations in genes expressed in the eye and the brain was used to study a kindred with an inherited retinal dystrophy due to RIMS1 mutation. Materials and methods Neuropsychological tests and high‐resolution MRI brain scanning were undertaken in the kindred. In a population cohort, neuropsychological scores were associated with common variation in RIMS1. Additionally, RIMS1 was sequenced in top‐scoring individuals. Evolution of RIMS1 was assessed, and its expression in developing human brain was studied. Results Affected individuals showed significantly enhanced cognitive abilities across a range of domains. Analysis suggests that factors other than RIMS1 mutation were unlikely to explain enhanced cognition. No association with common variation and verbal IQ was found in the population cohort, and no other mutations in RIMS1 were detected in the highest scoring individuals from this cohort. RIMS1 protein is expressed in developing human brain, but RIMS1 does not seem to have been subjected to accelerated evolution in man. Conclusions A possible role for RIMS1 in the enhancement of cognitive function at least in this kindred is suggested. Although further work is clearly required to explore these findings before a role for RIMS1 in human cognition can be formally accepted, the findings suggest that genetic mutation may enhance human cognition in some cases. PMID:17237123

  15. Ophthalmic manifestations in a Chinese family with familial amyloid polyneuropathy due to a TTR Gly83Arg mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Zhang, B; Jin, X; Wang, W; Lee, J; Li, J; Yuan, H; Cheng, X

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristic ophthalmic phenotypes of a large Chinese family with familial amyloid polyneuropathy due to a missense mutation in transthyretin (TTR) (c.307 C>G). Twenty-seven individuals (12 affected, 15 unaffected) from a five-generation Chinese family underwent general medical examination and comprehensive ophthalmic examination, including best correct visual acuity, intraocular pressure measurements, Schirmer test, slitlamp examination, fundoscopy, and ocular ultrasonography. Histological examination of vitreous biopsies using Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry was performed. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram were used to evaluate cardiac amyloidosis. Electromyography was used to evaluate nerve function. All four exons of TTR were amplified by PCR, sequenced using a Bigdye terminator v3.1 cycle sequencing kit and analyzed on an ABI 3700XL Genetic Analyzer. All 12 affected individuals in the family had ocular manifestations, including severe vitreous opacities, secondary glaucoma, xerophthalmia, dyscoria, and attenuated retinal arteries. Congo red staining demonstrated amyloid deposits in the vitreous, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the deposition of TTR proteins in the vitreous. Twelve individuals had polyneuropathy, and electromyography detected functional damage in peripheral nerves. One individual was diagnosed with cardiac amyloidosis by CMR. Direct sequencing revealed the heterozygous missense mutation in TTR (c.307 C>G p.Gly83Arg) in all 12 affected individuals. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype and was absent in 100 normal controls. Vitreous opacity is very common in patients with the TTR Gly83Arg mutation; other clinical characteristics associated with the mutation include polyneuropathy and cardiac amyloidosis.

  16. Strong Meissner screening change in superconducting radio frequency cavities due to mild baking

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A.; Barkov, F.; Suter, A.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.

    2014-02-17

    We investigate “hot” regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-μSR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth λ{sub L}=23±2 nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120 ∘C baked cavity shows a much larger λ>100 nm and a depth dependent mean free path, likely due to gradient in vacancy concentration. We suggest that these vacancies can efficiently trap hydrogen and hence prevent the formation of hydrides responsible for rf losses in hot regions.

  17. Different Frequencies of Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 Subtypes Circulating in China: A Comprehensive Study

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Hongshuai; Gui, Tao; Jia, Lei; Guo, Wei; Han, Jingwan; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Hanping; Li, Jingyun; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05). Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05). All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China. PMID:24663120

  18. Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with COPD due to Biomass Smoke and Tobacco Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali; Sezgi, Cengizhan; Akil, Mehmet Ata

    2012-01-01

    Objectives; Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common and well established complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its presence is associated with decreased survival. This study was designed to investigate the PH frequency and its relations in hospitalized tobacco and biomass related COPD patients. Methods and Results; The study was a retrospective review of inpatients with COPD defined as a history of tobacco or biomass smoking, Pulmonary function tests (PFT) within stable status, an echocardiogram within stable status. PH was defined as systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) >35 mmHg. Of the 694 individuals, 600 had suitable aspects for inclusion of study. All Females were biomass exposer and males were tobacco smoker. The Prevalence of PH was found more frequent in females than males. It was more prominent in moderate level COPD cases (56,2% and 37,5%, P<0,002). Both groups had airflow limitation, hypercapnia and hypoxemia, but no differences were found in terms of PaCO2 and PaO2. However, FEV1 % was lower in males than females (p<0,005). On the other hand, FVC % was lower in the females compared with the males (p < 0.02). When analyzing the influence of PFT and demographic parameters on PH in separate COPD level groups, the results a bit varied among the groups. Conclusion; Our study demonstrated that PH frequency is higher in female COPD cases due to biomass smoke than in male COPD cases due to tobacco smoke. The influence of FVC % on the risk of a person having PH increased with increasing COPD level. PMID:22859900

  19. Frequency of pulmonary hypertension in patients with COPD due to biomass smoke and tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali; Sezgi, Cengizhan; Akil, Mehmet Ata

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common and well established complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its presence is associated with decreased survival. This study was designed to investigate the PH frequency and its relations in hospitalized tobacco and biomass related COPD patients. The study was a retrospective review of inpatients with COPD defined as a history of tobacco or biomass smoking, Pulmonary function tests (PFT) within stable status, an echocardiogram within stable status. PH was defined as systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) >35 mmHg. Of the 694 individuals, 600 had suitable aspects for inclusion of study. All Females were biomass exposer and males were tobacco smoker. The Prevalence of PH was found more frequent in females than males. It was more prominent in moderate level COPD cases (56,2% and 37,5%, P<0,002). Both groups had airflow limitation, hypercapnia and hypoxemia, but no differences were found in terms of PaCO(2) and PaO2. However, FEV1 % was lower in males than females (p<0,005). On the other hand, FVC % was lower in the females compared with the males (p < 0.02). When analyzing the influence of PFT and demographic parameters on PH in separate COPD level groups, the results a bit varied among the groups. Our study demonstrated that PH frequency is higher in female COPD cases due to biomass smoke than in male COPD cases due to tobacco smoke. The influence of FVC % on the risk of a person having PH increased with increasing COPD level.

  20. The frequency and origin of the sickle cell mutation in the district of Coruche/Portugal.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, C; Rueff, J; Falcao, A B; Portugal, S; Weatherall, D J; Kulozik, A E

    1989-06-01

    The frequency of the beta S mutation in the district of Coruche/Portugal is estimated to be about 4% from analysis of a group of 181 school children and their teachers in an area in which malaria has been endemic until recently. Several white Portuguese patients with sickle cell disease (six homozygous SS and one S beta degree thalassaemia) were found in a group of 309 further patients who were known and followed up by local medical practitioners. These patients had clinical and haematological features similar to patients of African origin, although their growth and sexual development appeared to be normal. The analysis of an array of polymorphic restriction sites within the beta S globin gene cluster (beta S haplotype) showed patterns that are known to occur in Africa. The frequencies of the three main African beta S haplotypes termed Senegal, Bantu, and Benin reflect the extent of Portuguese naval explorations. It is concluded that the sickle cell gene in Portugal has probably been imported from Africa and has been amplified in comparison with other genes characteristic for African races because of the selective advantage of AS heterozygotes in an area endemic for malaria.

  1. Neonatal diabetes mellitus due to a novel ABCC8 gene mutation mimicking an organic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Akanksha N; Muranjan, Mamta N; Karande, Sunil; Shah, Nalini S

    2014-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus and organic acidemias, may present with similar features like hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and failure to thrive. A four-mo-old girl presented with diabetic ketoacidosis following a febrile respiratory illness during which high anion gap metabolic acidosis and hyperglycemia were detected. She also had hyperammonemia, which led to diagnostic uncertainty. Euglycemia was achieved with insulin injections. Genotyping revealed a homozygous novel mutation of the ABCC8 gene coding for the SUR1 subunit of the pancreatic beta cell potassium channel. Subsequently, the child was successfully transitioned to oral glibenclamide therapy. Developmental delay was noted on follow-up which raised the possibility of intermediate DEND syndrome. A possible cause for hyperammonemia in neonatal diabetes mellitus has been postulated in the discussion.

  2. A new overgrowth syndrome is due to mutations in RNF125.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Jair; Mansilla, Alicia; Valencia, María; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Romanelli, Valeria; Arias, Pedro; Castrejón, Nerea; Poletta, Fernando; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Gordo, Gema; Mansilla, Elena; García-Santiago, Fé; González-Casado, Isabel; Vallespín, Elena; Palomares, María; Mori, María A; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Fernández, Luis; Mena, Rocío; Benito-Sanz, Sara; del Pozo, Ángela; Silla, Juan Carlos; Ibañez, Kristina; López-Granados, Eduardo; Martín-Trujillo, Alex; Montaner, David; Heath, Karen E; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Dopazo, Joaquín; Nevado, Julián; Monk, David; Ruiz-Pérez, Víctor L; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Overgrowth syndromes (OGS) are a group of disorders in which all parameters of growth and physical development are above the mean for age and sex. We evaluated a series of 270 families from the Spanish Overgrowth Syndrome Registry with no known OGS. We identified one de novo deletion and three missense mutations in RNF125 in six patients from four families with overgrowth, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, mild hydrocephaly, hypoglycemia, and inflammatory diseases resembling Sjögren syndrome. RNF125 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and is a novel gene of OGS. Our studies of the RNF125 pathway point to upregulation of RIG-I-IPS1-MDA5 and/or disruption of the PI3K-AKT and interferon signaling pathways as the putative final effectors. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schmidt, Paul J.; Campagna, Dean R.; Rahimov, Fedik; Schilke, Brenda A.; Cuijpers, Marloes; Rieneck, Klaus; Lausen, Birgitte; Linenberger, Michael L.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Guo, Chaoshe; Hofmann, Inga; Newburger, Peter E.; Matthews, Dana; Shimamura, Akiko; Snijders, Pieter J. L. M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Niemeyer, Charlotte M.; Watson, Henry G.; Dziegiel, Morten H.; Heeney, Matthew M.; May, Alison; Bottomley, Sylvia S.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Markianos, Kyriacos; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q deletion syndrome 5q33 critical deletion interval and involved in mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, result in CSA inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In a fraction of patients with just 1 severe loss-of-function allele, expression of the clinical phenotype is associated with a common coding single nucleotide polymorphism in trans that correlates with reduced messenger RNA expression and results in a pseudodominant pattern of inheritance. PMID:26491070

  4. Deletions and Point Mutations of LRRC50 Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Due to Dynein Arm Defects

    PubMed Central

    Loges, Niki Tomas; Olbrich, Heike; Becker-Heck, Anita; Häffner, Karsten; Heer, Angelina; Reinhard, Christina; Schmidts, Miriam; Kispert, Andreas; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Knowles, Michael R.; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Seithe, Horst; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Richard; Omran, Heymut

    2009-01-01

    Genetic defects affecting motility of cilia and flagella cause chronic destructive airway disease, randomization of left-right body asymmetry, and, frequently, male infertility in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The most frequent defects involve outer and inner dynein arms (ODAs and IDAs) that are large multiprotein complexes responsible for cilia-beat generation and regulation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that large genomic deletions, as well as point mutations involving LRRC50, are responsible for a distinct PCD variant that is characterized by a combined defect involving assembly of the ODAs and IDAs. Functional analyses showed that LRRC50 deficiency disrupts assembly of distally and proximally DNAH5- and DNAI2-containing ODA complexes, as well as DNALI1-containing IDA complexes, resulting in immotile cilia. On the basis of these findings, we assume that LRRC50 plays a role in assembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes. PMID:19944400

  5. Arthrogryposis as neonatal presentation of Loeys-Dietz syndrome due to a novel TGFBR2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Irene; Fernández-Alvarez, Paula; Munell, Francina; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Giralt, Gemma; Vendrell, Teresa; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2017-06-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized mainly by cardiovascular, craniofacial and skeletal features. We report on a patient with LDS, whose prenatal examination was compatible with the diagnosis of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Neonatal assessment showed craniofacial and cardiovascular findings suggestive of LDS whose diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of a novel mutation (HGVN: NM_003242.5 (TGFBR2): c.1381T > C (p.(Cys461Arg))) in the TGFBR2 gene. Few prenatal and neonatal cases of LDS have been reported in the literature. We reviewed all cases reported to date with perinatal onset to delineate the clinical manifestations that allow us to prompt diagnosis of this syndrome at an early stage to prevent fatal cardiovascular complications. Furthermore we discuss the multidisciplinary follow up required in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schmidt, Paul J; Campagna, Dean R; Rahimov, Fedik; Schilke, Brenda A; Cuijpers, Marloes; Rieneck, Klaus; Lausen, Birgitte; Linenberger, Michael L; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Guo, Chaoshe; Hofmann, Inga; Newburger, Peter E; Matthews, Dana; Shimamura, Akiko; Snijders, Pieter J L M; Towne, Meghan C; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Watson, Henry G; Dziegiel, Morten H; Heeney, Matthew M; May, Alison; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Swinkels, Dorine W; Markianos, Kyriacos; Craig, Elizabeth A; Fleming, Mark D

    2015-12-17

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q deletion syndrome 5q33 critical deletion interval and involved in mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, result in CSA inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In a fraction of patients with just 1 severe loss-of-function allele, expression of the clinical phenotype is associated with a common coding single nucleotide polymorphism in trans that correlates with reduced messenger RNA expression and results in a pseudodominant pattern of inheritance. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Familial CD8 deficiency due to a mutation in the CD8α gene

    PubMed Central

    de la Calle-Martin, Oscar; Hernandez, Manuel; Ordi, Jose; Casamitjana, Natalia; Arostegui, Juan I.; Caragol, Isabel; Ferrando, Monserrat; Labrador, Moises; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose L.; Espanol, Teresa

    2001-01-01

    CD8 glycoproteins play an important role in both the maturation and function of MHC class I-restricted T lymphocytes. A 25-year-old man, from a consanguineous family, with recurrent bacterial infections and total absence of CD8+ cells, was studied. Ab deficiencies and ZAP-70 and TAP defects were ruled out. A missense mutation (gly90→ser) in both alleles of the immunoglobulin domain of the CD8α gene was shown to correlate with the absence of CD8 expression found in the patient and two sisters. Conversely, high percentages of CD4–CD8–TCRαβ+ T cells were found in the three siblings. A novel autosomal recessive immunologic defect characterized by absence of CD8+ cells is described. These findings may help to further understanding of the role of CD8 molecules in human immune response. PMID:11435463

  8. The cellular and molecular pathology of the motor system in hereditary spastic paraparesis due to mutation of the spastin gene.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Stephen B; McDermott, Christopher J; Grierson, Andrew J; Wood, Jonathan D; Gelsthorpe, Catherine; Ince, Paul G; Shaw, Pamela J

    2003-11-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, the most common cause of which is mutation of the spastin gene. Recent evidence suggests a role for spastin in microtubule dynamics, but the distribution of the protein within the CNS is unknown. The core neuropathology of HSP is distal degeneration of the lateral corticospinal tract and of fasciculus gracilis, but there are few neuropathological studies of cases with a defined mutation. We aimed to determine the distribution of spastin expression in the human CNS and to investigate the cellular pathology of the motor system in HSP due to mutation of the spastin gene. Using an antibody to spastin, we have carried out immunohistochemistry on postmortem brain. We have demonstrated that spastin is a neuronal protein. It is widely expressed in the CNS so that the selectivity of the degeneration in HSP is not due to the normal cellular distribution of the protein. We have identified mutation of the spastin gene in 3 autopsy cases of HSP. Distal degeneration of long tracts in the spinal cord, consistent with a dying back axonopathy, was accompanied by a microglial reaction. The presence of novel hyaline inclusions in anterior horn cells and an alteration in immunostaining for cytoskeletal proteins and mitochondria indicates that long tract degeneration is accompanied by cytopathology in the motor system and may support a role for derangement of cytoskeletal function. All 3 cases also demonstrated evidence of tau pathology outside the motor system, suggesting that the neuropathology is not confined to the motor system in spastin-related HSP.

  9. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic selection makes it possible to reduce pedigree-based inbreeding over best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) by increasing emphasis on own rather than family information. However, pedigree inbreeding might not accurately reflect loss of genetic variation and the true level of inbreeding due to changes in allele frequencies and hitch-hiking. This study aimed at understanding the impact of using long-term genomic selection on changes in allele frequencies, genetic variation and level of inbreeding. Methods Selection was performed in simulated scenarios with a population of 400 animals for 25 consecutive generations. Six genetic models were considered with different heritabilities and numbers of QTL (quantitative trait loci) affecting the trait. Four selection criteria were used, including selection on own phenotype and on estimated breeding values (EBV) derived using phenotype-BLUP, genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results For each selection criterion, hitch-hiking in the vicinity of the QTL appeared more extensive when accuracy of selection was higher and the number of QTL was lower. When inbreeding was measured by pedigree information, selection on genomic BLUP EBV resulted in lower levels of inbreeding than selection on phenotype BLUP EBV, but this did not always apply when inbreeding was measured by runs of homozygosity. Compared to genomic BLUP, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso led to less genetic drift, reduced loss of favourable alleles and more effectively controlled the rate of both pedigree and genomic inbreeding in all simulated scenarios. In addition, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso showed a higher selection differential for mendelian sampling terms than selection on

  10. Effects of male germ-cell stage on the frequency, nature, and spectrum of induced specific-locus mutations in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B

    2004-09-01

    By means of the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) with visible markers, which is capable of detecting intragenic mutations as well as larger lesions, about 20 mutagens have been studied comparatively across arrays of male germ-cell stages. In addition, a very large historical control, accumulated over decades, provides data on spontaneous mutations in males. Each mutagen has a characteristic germ-cell-stage sensitivity pattern. Although most chemicals yield their maximum numbers of mutations following exposure of spermatozoa and late spermatids, mutagens have now been identified that peak in each of the major stages of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis, including those in which effects on recombination can also be induced. Stem-cell spermatogonia have yielded positive results with only five of 15 mutagenic chemicals. In postspermatogonial stages, all chemicals, as well as radiations, induce primarily large lesions (LL). By contrast, in spermatogonia (either stem-cell or differentiating) all chemicals except one (bleomycin) produce very few such lesions. The spectrum of relative mutation frequencies at the seven loci of the SLT is characteristic for treated germ-cell stage and mutagen. Treatments that induce primarily LL are characterized by a great preponderance of s (Ednrb)-locus mutations (possibly due to a paucity of haplo-insufficient genes in the surrounding region); and those that induce very few, if any, LL by a great preponderance of p-locus mutations. Spontaneous locus-spectra differ from both types of treatment-induced spectra; moreover, there are two distinct types of spontaneous spectra, depending on whether mutations occurred in mitotic cells or during the perigametic interval.

  11. Frequency and spectrum of mutations at codons 12 and 13 of the C-K-ras gene in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, G.; Cronauer-Mitra, S.; Peinado, M.A.; Perucho, M. )

    1991-06-01

    The frequency of point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of the c-K-ras gene has been determined in a panel of more than 400 human tumors. Mutant c-K-ras genes were detected in about 75% of adenocarcinomas of the pancreas; 40% of adenomas and carcinomas of the colon and rectum; 30% of carcinomas of the bile duct; 25% of carcinomas of the lung, and in lower frequency in other carcinomas, including liver, stomach, and kidney. No mutations were found in carcinomas of the breast, prostate, esophagus, and gall bladder, among others. Comparative analysis of the spectrum of mutations show that while G to A transitions were the most frequent mutations in pancreatic and colo-rectal tumors, G to T transversions were more prevalent in lung carcinomas. The aspartic acid mutation at codon 13 (GGC {r arrow} GAC) was relatively frequent in colo-rectal tumors but rare in pancreatic and lung carcinomas. The differences in the mutation spectrum of the c-K-ras gene in cancers of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts are suggestive of differential exposure to genotoxic agents.

  12. [Frequency of Helicobacter pylori nitroreductase RdxA mutations for metronidazole activation in a population in the Cauca Department, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Claudia Patricia; Quiroga, Andrés Javier; Sierra, Carlos H; Trespalacios, Alba Alicia

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to metronidazole is a key factor associated with Helicobacter pylori treatment failure. Even though resistance is mostly associated with RdxA nitroreductase mutations, studies of this H. pylori protein in Popayán (Colombia) are still incipient. To evaluate the frequency of mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase in a population of patients with H. pylori-positive gastrointestinal disease. We amplified the DNA of 170 gastric biopsies by PCR to detect mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase. An analysis of DNA sequences translated into amino acid sequences was done and then compared to the reference strain 26695. The frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in this study population was 78%. Its most frequent distribution was found in positions D59N (153 samples), R131K (101 samples), R90K (97 samples), A118T (42 samples), I160F (32 samples) and H97T (26 samples), and meaningful stop codons Q50*, D59*; E75*, C159* and I160* in five, one, three, ten and six samples, respectively. The most common virulence genotype was vacAs1/m1 cagA negative (48.6 %). The high frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in H. pylori isolates in Popayán (Colombia) indicates that empirical therapy with metronidazole may not be a valid option for the eradication of H. pylori in patients of the studied population.

  13. Cystic fibrosis in the Basque country: high frequency of mutation delta F508 in patients of Basque origin.

    PubMed

    Casals, T; Vázquez, C; Lázaro, C; Girbau, E; Giménez, F J; Estivill, X

    1992-02-01

    The Basque population is one of the oldest populations of Europe. It has been suggested that the Basques arose from a population established in western Europe during the late Paleolithic Age. The Basque language (Euskera) is a supposedly pre-Indo-European language that originates from the first settlers of Europe. The variable distribution of the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation (delta F508 deletion) in Europe, with higher frequencies of the mutation in northern Europe and lower frequencies in southern Europe, has suggested that the delta F508 mutation was spread by early farmers migrating from the Middle East during the Neolithic period. We have studied 45 CF families from the Basque Country, where the incidence of CF is approximately 1/4,500. The birthplaces of the parents and grandparents have been traced and are distributed according to their origin as Basque or Mixed Basque. The frequency of the delta F508 mutation in the chromosomes of Basque origin is 87%, compared with 58% in those of Mixed Basque origin. The analysis of haplotypes, both with markers closely linked to the CF gene and with intragenic markers, suggests that the delta F508 mutation was not spread by the Indo-European invasions but was already present in Europe more than 10,000 years ago, during the Paleolithic period.

  14. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  15. Biotinidase deficiency due to a de novo mutation or gonadal mosaicism in a first child.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Rodolfo; Caciotti, Anna; Funghini, Silvia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Cayton, Erica; Mooney, Sean D; Guerrini, Renzo; Morrone, Amelia

    2015-05-20

    Biotinidase deficiency (BD), which is caused by BTD genetic lesions, if untreated, can result in neurological and cutaneous manifestations. Biotin supplementation can improve or prevent symptoms. We herewith present a family, which we studied at biochemical and molecular level, after identifying the proband through a newborn screening programme. BTD gene molecular analysis showed the proband to be compound heterozygous for the c.1330G>C p.(Asp444His) mild known variant, and for the c.1475 C>T p.(Thr492Ile) new variant. Bioinformatic analysis allowed us to confirm the pathogenic role of the newly identified variant. The proband's father, who exhibited low biotinidase (BTD) enzyme activity, was homozygous for the mild variant, whereas the proband's mother, who exhibited borderline BTD values, the BTD mutation carrier status could not be detected. This is the first description of a patient with BD harbouring a variant whose origin is either de novo or the consequence of gonadal mosaicism. BTD molecular analysis and bioinformatic tools for the evaluation of pathogenicity of newly identified variants are necessary for diagnostic purposes (i.e., clarifying borderline enzyme assays and the carrier status of parents), and for genetic counselling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Disease mechanisms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa due to RP2 and RPGR mutations.

    PubMed

    Lyraki, Rodanthi; Megaw, Roly; Hurd, Toby

    2016-10-15

    Photoreceptor degeneration is the prominent characteristic of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies resulting in blindness. Although abnormalities in many pathways can cause photoreceptor degeneration, one of the most important causes is defective protein transport through the connecting cilium, the structure that connects the biosynthetic inner segment with the photosensitive outer segment of the photoreceptors. The majority of patients with X-linked RP have mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) or RP2 genes, the protein products of which are both components of the connecting cilium and associated with distinct mechanisms of protein delivery to the outer segment. RP2 and RPGR proteins are associated with severe diseases ranging from classic RP to atypical forms. In this short review, we will summarise current knowledge generated by experimental studies and knockout animal models, compare and discuss the prominent hypotheses about the two proteins' functions in retinal cell biology. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. A family of distal arthrogryposis type 5 due to a novel PIEZO2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Mariko; Fujita, Atsushi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Komaki, Hirofumi; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Takeshita, Eri; Kojima, Emiko; Koichihara, Reiko; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Yamazaki, Hiroko; Kusaka, Kei; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders with multiple congenital contractures predominant in the distal extremities. A total of 10 subtypes are proposed based on the pattern of contractures and association with extraarticular symptoms. DA5 is defined as a subtype with ptosis/oculomotor limitation. However, affected individuals have a variety of non-ocular features as well. We report on a two-generation family, including four affected individuals who all had congenital contractures of the distal joints, ptosis, restricted ocular movements, distinct facial appearance with deep-set eyes, and shortening of the 1st and 5th toes. The proband and her affected mother had restrictive lung disease, a recently recognized syndromic component of DA5, while younger patients did not. The proband had metacarpal and metatarsal synostosis, and the mother showed excavation of the optic disk. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.4456G>C (p.A1486P) of PIEZO2. PIEZO2 encodes a mechanosensitive ion channel, malfunction of which provides pleiotropic effects on joints, ocular muscles, lung function, and bone development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neuropathies of Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome due to mutations in leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) gene

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Alexandra E.; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2016-01-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome (STWS; OMIM #610559) is a rare disease that results in dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary processes such as breathing rate and body temperature. In infants, this can result in respiratory distress, feeding and swallowing difficulties, and hyperthermic episodes. Individuals may sweat excessively when body temperature is not elevated. Additionally, individuals have reduced ability to feel pain and may lose reflexes such as the corneal reflex that normally causes one to blink, and the patellar reflex resulting in the knee-jerk. STWS usually results in infant mortality, yet some STWS patients survive into early adulthood. STWS is caused by a mutation in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) gene, which is inherited in an autosomal-recessive pattern. Most LIFR mutations resulting in STWS cause instability of the mRNA due to frameshift mutations leading to premature stop codons, which prevent the formation of LIFR protein. STWS is managed on a symptomatic basis as no treatment is currently available. PMID:28058407

  19. Neuropathies of Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome due to mutations in leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) gene.

    PubMed

    Oxford, Alexandra E; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2016-01-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome (STWS; OMIM #610559) is a rare disease that results in dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary processes such as breathing rate and body temperature. In infants, this can result in respiratory distress, feeding and swallowing difficulties, and hyperthermic episodes. Individuals may sweat excessively when body temperature is not elevated. Additionally, individuals have reduced ability to feel pain and may lose reflexes such as the corneal reflex that normally causes one to blink, and the patellar reflex resulting in the knee-jerk. STWS usually results in infant mortality, yet some STWS patients survive into early adulthood. STWS is caused by a mutation in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) gene, which is inherited in an autosomal-recessive pattern. Most LIFR mutations resulting in STWS cause instability of the mRNA due to frameshift mutations leading to premature stop codons, which prevent the formation of LIFR protein. STWS is managed on a symptomatic basis as no treatment is currently available.

  20. Marked increase in biofilm-derived rough pneumococcal variants and rifampin-resistant strains not due to hex gene mutations.

    PubMed

    McEllistrem, M Catherine; Scott, Jennifer R; Zuniga-Castillo, Jacobo; Khan, Saleem A

    2009-06-01

    Otitis, pneumonia, and meningitis are tissue-based pneumococcal infections that can be associated with biofilms. The emergence of phenotypic rough variants, also known as acapsular small-colony variants, is essential for pneumococcal biofilm formation. These rough variants can increase nearly 100-fold in biofilms over time and can arise through single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, or tandem duplications in the first gene of the capsular operon, cps3D. We detected a 100-fold increase in rifampin-resistant (Rif(r)) mutants in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures using a nonvaccine serotype 3 strain, which is causing an increasing number of cases of otitis in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Since both rough variants and Rif(r) strains can arise through SNPs, they could emerge due to alteration of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. The Hex system, a pneumococcal MMR system, repairs mismatches during replication and transformation. In this study, no mutations were detected in the hexAB gene sequences among several rough variants with unique mutations in the cps3D gene. Within a hexA null mutant grown in broth, we detected only a 17.5-fold increase in rough variants compared to the wild-type parental strain. Taken together, these data suggest that mutations in the hex genes and modulation of hexA activity are unlikely to account for the generation of biofilm-derived rough variants.

  1. Episodic weakness and Charcot-marie-tooth disease due to a mitochondrial MT-ATP6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Francis B; Tawil, Rabi; Herrmann, David N

    2017-06-01

    Episodic muscle weakness is the hallmark of a heterogeneous group of disorders known as periodic paralysis. A majority are due to single nucleotide mutations causing membrane depolarization. We report 2 family members with chronic, slowly progressive, distal axonal neuropathy, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2) and episodic weakness resembling periodic paralysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a mitochondrial MT-ATP6 mutation m.9185T>C (p.Leu220Pro) in both patients, consistent with a previous report of an association with this phenotype. The episodic weakness has been responsive to acetazolamide therapy for a few decades. By contrast, the underlying axonal neuropathy is quite progressive despite treatment with acetazolamide. Mitochondrial DNA mutations should be considered in patients with a history of episodic weakness and axonal inherited neuropathy (CMT2). The episodic weakness is responsive to acetazolamide therapy, and electrophysiological testing for periodic paralysis with a long exercise protocol is negative in these cases. Muscle Nerve 55: 922-927, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mutations in KIT occur at low frequency in melanomas arising from anatomical sites associated with chronic and intermittent sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Handolias, Despina; Salemi, Renato; Murray, William; Tan, Angela; Liu, Wendy; Viros, Amaya; Dobrovic, Alexander; Kelly, John; McArthur, Grant A

    2010-04-01

    In melanoma, mutations in KIT are most frequent in acral and mucosal subtypes and rarely reported in cutaneous melanomas particularly those associated with intermittent UV exposure. Conversely melanomas arising within chronic sun damaged skin are considered to harbour KIT mutations at higher rates. To characterize the frequency of KIT mutations in a representative melanoma population, 261 patients from two Australian melanoma centres were prospectively screened for mutations in exons 11, 13 and 17 of the KIT gene. A total of 257 patients had cutaneous melanoma arising from non-acral sites and four were acral melanomas. No mucosal or ocular melanomas were analysed. KIT mutations were identified in five tumours (2% of the entire cohort) including two acral melanomas. Two of the three non-acral melanomas with KIT mutations were associated with markers of chronic sun damage as assessed by the degree of skin elastosis. In the remaining cohort, 43% had chronically sun damaged skin. This report confirms that within an Australian population, KIT mutations are infrequent in cutaneous melanomas associated with both intermittent and chronic sun exposed skin.

  3. ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF CINNEMALDEHYDE DUE TO INHIBITION OF MUTATIONS AT GC SITES BUT NOT AT SITES IN SALMONELLA TA104

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanillin and cinnemaldehyde are dietary antimutagens that reduce the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella strain TA104 (hisG428, rfa, duvrB, pKM101) by 50%. To date, no study has ever demonstrated whether the antimutagenic effect of an agent is due to a reduction in all cla...

  4. Neonatal pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency due to a R302H mutation in the PDHA1 gene: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Soares-Fernandes, João P; Teixeira-Gomes, Roseli; Cruz, Romeu; Ribeiro, Manuel; Magalhães, Zita; Rocha, Jaime F; Leijser, Lara M

    2008-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is one of the most common causes of congenital lactic acidosis. Correlations between the genetic defect and neuroimaging findings are lacking. We present conventional and diffusion-weighted MRI findings in a 7-day-old male neonate with PDH deficiency due to a mosaicism for the R302H mutation in the PDHA1 gene. Corpus callosum dysgenesis, widespread increased diffusion in the white matter, and bilateral subependymal cysts were the main features. Although confirmation of PDH deficiency depends on specialized biochemical analyses, neonatal MRI plays a role in evaluating the pattern and extent of brain damage, and potentially in early diagnosis and clinical decision making.

  5. Frequency of Germline Mutations in 25 Cancer Susceptibility Genes in a Sequential Series of Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nancy U.; Kidd, John; Allen, Brian A.; Singh, Nanda; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Winer, Eric P.; Garber, Judy E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/2 is standard for select patients with breast cancer to guide clinical management. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows testing for mutations in additional breast cancer predisposition genes. The frequency of germline mutations detected by using NGS has been reported in patients with breast cancer who were referred for BRCA1/2 testing or with triple-negative breast cancer. We assessed the frequency and predictors of mutations in 25 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1/2, in a sequential series of patients with breast cancer at an academic institution to examine the utility of genetic testing in this population. Methods Patients with stages I to III breast cancer who were seen at a single cancer center between 2010 and 2012, and who agreed to participate in research DNA banking, were included (N = 488). Personal and family cancer histories were collected and germline DNA was sequenced with NGS to identify mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 10.7% of women, including 6.1% in BRCA1/2 (5.1% in non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients) and 4.6% in other breast/ovarian cancer predisposition genes including CHEK2 (n = 10), ATM (n = 4), BRIP1 (n = 4), and one each in PALB2, PTEN, NBN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MSH6, and PMS2. Whereas young age (P < .01), Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry (P < .01), triple-negative breast cancer (P = .01), and family history of breast/ovarian cancer (P = .01) predicted for BRCA1/2 mutations, no factors predicted for mutations in other breast cancer predisposition genes. Conclusion Among sequential patients with breast cancer, 10.7% were found to have a germline mutation in a gene that predisposes women to breast or ovarian cancer, using a panel of 25 predisposition genes. Factors that predict for BRCA1/2 mutations do not predict for mutations in other breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes when these genes are analyzed as a single group. Additional cohorts will be helpful to define

  6. Uncertainty of Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves due to varied climate baseline periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Sherien; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; Han, Dawei

    2017-04-01

    Storm water management systems depend on Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves as a standard design tool. However, due to climate change, the extreme precipitation quantiles represented by IDF curves will be subject to alteration over time. Currently, a common approach is to adopt a single benchmark period for bias correction, which is inadequate in deriving reliable future IDF curves. This study assesses the expected changes between the IDF curves of the current climate and those of a projected future climate and the uncertainties associated with such curves. To provide future IDF curves, daily precipitation data simulated by a 1-km regional climate model were temporally bias corrected by using eight reference periods with a fixed length of 30 years and a moving window of 5 years between the cases for the period 1950-2014. Then the bias-corrected data were further disaggregated into ensemble of 5-min series by using an algorithm which combines the Nonparametric Prediction (NPRED) model and the method of fragments (MoF) framework. The algorithm uses the radar data to resample the disaggregated future rainfall fragments conditioned to the daily rainfall and temperature data. The disaggregated data were then aggregated into different durations based on concentration time. The results suggest that uncertainty in the percentage of change in the projected rainfall compared to the rainfall in the current climate varies significantly depending on which of the eight reference periods are used for the bias correction. Both the maximum projection of rainfall intensity and the maximum change in future projections are affected by using different reference periods for different frequencies and durations. Such an important issue has been largely ignored by the engineering community and this study has shown the importance of including the uncertainty of benchmarking periods in bias-correcting future climate projections.

  7. Colon cancer metastasis in mouse liver is not affected by hypercoagulability due to Factor V Leiden mutation

    PubMed Central

    Klerk, CPW; Smorenburg, SM; Spek, CA; Van Noorden, CJF

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown life-prolonging effects of antithrombotics in cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown due to the multitude of their effects. We investigated in a mouse model whether one of the targets of antithrombotic therapy, fibrin deposition, stimulates tumour development. Fibrin may provide either protection of cancer cells in the circulation against mechanical stress and the immune system, or form a matrix for tumours and/or angiogenesis in tumours to develop. Mice homozygous for Factor V Leiden (FVL), a mutation in one of the coagulation factors that facilitates fibrin formation, were used to investigate whether hypercoagulability affects tumour development in an experimental metastasis model. Liver metastases of colon cancer were induced in mice with the FVL mutation and wild-type littermates. At day 21, number and size of tumours at the liver surface, fibrin/fibrinogen distribution, vessel density and the presence of newly formed vessels in tumours were analysed. Number and size of tumours did not differ between mice with and without the FVL mutation. Fibrin/fibrinogen was found in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and cancer cells, in blood vessels in liver and tumour tissue and diffusely distributed outside vessels in tumours, indicating leaky vessels. Vessel density and angiogenesis varied widely between tumours, but a pre-dominance for vessel-rich or vessel-poor tumours or vessel formation could not be found in either genotype. In conclusion, the FVL mutation has no effect on the development of secondary tumours of colon cancer in livers of mice. Fibrin deposition and thus inhibition of fibrin formation by anticoagulants do not seem to affect tumour development in this model. PMID:17635646

  8. 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis due to a Homozygous Mutation in Desert Hedgehog (DHH) Identified by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Hartmut; Birnbaum, Wiebke; Marshall, Louise; Schröder, Tatjana; Reiz, Benedikt; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Bäumer, Tobias; Capetian, Philipp; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background: 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of congenital conditions. Mutations in a variety of genes can affect gonadal development or androgen biosynthesis/action and thereby influence the development of the internal and external genital organs. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify the genetic cause in two 46,XY sisters of a consanguineous family with DSD and gonadal tumor formation. Methods: We used a next-generation sequencing approach by exome sequencing. Electrophysiological and high-resolution ultrasound examination of peripheral nerves as well as histopathological examination of the gonads were performed. Results: We identified a novel homozygous R124Q mutation in the desert hedgehog gene (DHH), which alters a conserved residue among the three mammalian Hedgehog ligands sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, and desert hedgehog. No other relevant mutations in DSD-related genes were encountered. The gonads of one patient showed partial gonadal dysgenesis with loss of Leydig cells in tubular areas with seminoma in situ and a hyperplasia of Leydig cell-like cells expressing CYP17A1 in more dysgenetic parts of the gonad. In addition, both patients suffer from a polyneuropathy. High-resolution ultrasound revealed a structural change of peripheral nerve structure that fits well to a minifascicle formation of peripheral nerves. Conclusion: Mutations in DHH play a role in 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis and are associated with seminoma formation and a neuropathy with minifascicle formation. Gonadal dysgenesis in these cases may be due to impairment of Sertoli cell-Leydig cell interaction during gonadal development. PMID:25927242

  9. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F.; Haskins, Mark E.; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with ∼35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461–GQ850464. PMID:19934113

  10. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Haskins, Mark E; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-02-15

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with approximately 35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461-GQ850464.

  11. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia of adult onset due to STUB1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Simonis, Nicolas; Rai, Myriam; van Heurck, Roxane; Abramowicz, Marc; D'Hooghe, Marc; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Autosomal recessive ataxias affect about 1 person in 20,000. Friedreich ataxia accounts for one-third of the cases in Caucasians; the others are due to a growing list of very rare molecular defects, including mild forms of metabolic diseases. In nearly 50%, the genetic cause remains undetermined.

  12. Dominant Mutations (lex) in Escherichia coli K-12 Which Affect Radiation Sensitivity and Frequency of Ultraviolet Light-Induced Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David W.; Low, K. Brooks; Edmiston, Susan J.

    1972-01-01

    Three mutations, denoted lex-1, -2 and -3, which increase the sensitivity of Escherichia coli K-12 to ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation, have been found by three-factor transduction crosses to be closely linked to uvrA on the E. coli K-12 linkage map. Strains bearing these mutations do not appear to be defective in genetic recombination although in some conjugational crosses they may fail to produce a normal yield of genetic recombinants depending upon the time of mating and the marker selected. The mutagenic activity of UV is decreased in the mutant strains. After irradiation with UV, cultures of the strains degrade their deoxyribonucleic acid at a high rate, similar to recA− mutant strains. Stable lex+/lec− heterozygotes are found to have the mutant radiation-sensitive phenotype of haploid lex− strains. PMID:4343824

  13. Audibility, speech perception and processing of temporal cues in ribbon synaptic disorders due to OTOF mutations.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Rosamaria; del Castillo, Ignacio; Cama, Elona; Scimemi, Pietro; Starr, Arnold

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the OTOF gene encoding otoferlin result in a disrupted function of the ribbon synapses with impairment of the multivesicular glutamate release. Most affected subjects present with congenital hearing loss and abnormal auditory brainstem potentials associated with preserved cochlear hair cell activities (otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics [CMs]). Transtympanic electrocochleography (ECochG) has recently been proposed for defining the details of potentials arising in both the cochlea and auditory nerve in this disorder, and with a view to shedding light on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying auditory dysfunction. We review the audiological and electrophysiological findings in children with congenital profound deafness carrying two mutant alleles of the OTOF gene. We show that cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitude and summating potential (SP) amplitude and latency are normal, consistently with a preserved outer and inner hair cell function. In the majority of OTOF children, the SP component is followed by a markedly prolonged low-amplitude negative potential replacing the compound action potential (CAP) recorded in normally-hearing children. This potential is identified at intensities as low as 90 dB below the behavioral threshold. In some ears, a synchronized CAP is superimposed on the prolonged responses at high intensity. Stimulation at high rates reduces the amplitude and duration of the prolonged potentials, consistently with their neural generation. In some children, however, the ECochG response only consists of the SP, with no prolonged potential. Cochlear implants restore hearing sensitivity, speech perception and neural CAP by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve fibers. These findings indicate that an impaired multivesicular glutamate release in OTOF-related disorders leads to abnormal auditory nerve fiber activation and a consequent impairment of spike generation. The magnitude of these effects seems to vary, ranging from

  14. Retinal Disease Course in Usher Syndrome 1B Due to MYO7A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Gibbs, Dan; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Olivares, Melani B.; Russell, Robert C.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Kenna, Margaret A.; Kimberling, William J.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Williams, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the disease course in Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B) caused by myosin 7A (MYO7A) gene mutations. Methods. USH1B patients (n = 33, ages 2–61) representing 25 different families were studied by ocular examination, kinetic and chromatic static perimetry, dark adaptometry, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Consequences of the mutant alleles were predicted. Results. All MYO7A patients had severely abnormal ERGs, but kinetic fields revealed regional patterns of visual loss that suggested a disease sequence. Rod-mediated vision could be lost to different degrees in the first decades of life. Cone vision followed a more predictable and slower decline. Central vision ranged from normal to reduced in the first four decades of life and thereafter was severely abnormal. Dark adaptation kinetics was normal. Photoreceptor layer thickness in a wide region of central retina could differ dramatically between patients of comparable ages; and there were examples of severe losses in childhood as well as relative preservation in patients in the third decade of life. Comparisons were made between the mutant alleles in mild versus more severe phenotypes. Conclusions. A disease sequence in USH1B leads from generally full but impaired visual fields to residual small central islands. At most disease stages, there was preserved temporal peripheral field, a potential target for early phase clinical trials of gene therapy. From data comparing patients' rod disease in this cohort, the authors speculate that null MYO7A alleles could be associated with milder dysfunction and fewer photoreceptor structural losses at ages when other genotypes show more severe phenotypes. PMID:21873662

  15. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset.

  16. Population Structure, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Mutation Frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María-Isabel; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez-G.; Fenoll, Asunción; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Máiz, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from sputum samples from 26 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients attending our CF unit (1995 to 2003) were studied. Mean yearly incidence of isolation was 5.5%, and all were strains recovered from young patients (≤12 years). The isolation was linked to clinical exacerbation in 35% of the cases, but only 27% of these were not accompanied by other CF pathogens. Fifty percent of the patients presented with two to four isolates over the studied period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-SmaI digestion revealed a high heterogeneity (32 pulsotypes among 48 isolates) and the persistence over a 6-month period of a single clone (clone A) in two patients. This clone, presenting a varied multiresistance phenotype, was identified as the Spain23F-1 clone and was also recognized in six other patients, including two out of nine patients from the CF unit of Sant Joan de Dèu Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. In our isolates, 16 different serotypes were recognized, the most frequent being 23F (33.3%), 19F (18.8%), 6A (6.2%), and 6B (6.2%). High overall resistance rates were observed: to penicillin, 73%; to cefotaxime, 33%; to erythromycin, 42%; to tetracycline, 58%; to chloramphenicol, 48%; and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 67%. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was not detected. Multiresistance was a common feature (60%). The percentage of S. pneumoniae strains with increased frequencies of mutation to rifampin resistance (≥7.5 × 10−8) was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in CF (60%) than among non-CF (37%) isolates in the same institution (M. I. Morosini et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 47:1464-1467, 2003). Even though a clear association with acute exacerbations could not be observed, long-term clonal persistence and variability, high frequency of antibiotic resistance, and hypermutability indicate the plasticity for adaptation of S. pneumoniae to the CF lung environment. PMID:15872243

  17. Population structure, antimicrobial resistance, and mutation frequencies of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María-Isabel; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez-G; Fenoll, Asunción; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Máiz, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    Forty-eight Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from sputum samples from 26 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients attending our CF unit (1995 to 2003) were studied. Mean yearly incidence of isolation was 5.5%, and all were strains recovered from young patients (< or = 12 years). The isolation was linked to clinical exacerbation in 35% of the cases, but only 27% of these were not accompanied by other CF pathogens. Fifty percent of the patients presented with two to four isolates over the studied period. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-SmaI digestion revealed a high heterogeneity (32 pulsotypes among 48 isolates) and the persistence over a 6-month period of a single clone (clone A) in two patients. This clone, presenting a varied multiresistance phenotype, was identified as the Spain23F-1 clone and was also recognized in six other patients, including two out of nine patients from the CF unit of Sant Joan de Deu Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. In our isolates, 16 different serotypes were recognized, the most frequent being 23F (33.3%), 19F (18.8%), 6A (6.2%), and 6B (6.2%). High overall resistance rates were observed: to penicillin, 73%; to cefotaxime, 33%; to erythromycin, 42%; to tetracycline, 58%; to chloramphenicol, 48%; and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 67%. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was not detected. Multiresistance was a common feature (60%). The percentage of S. pneumoniae strains with increased frequencies of mutation to rifampin resistance (> or = 7.5 x 10(-8)) was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in CF (60%) than among non-CF (37%) isolates in the same institution (M. I. Morosini et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 47:1464-1467, 2003). Even though a clear association with acute exacerbations could not be observed, long-term clonal persistence and variability, high frequency of antibiotic resistance, and hypermutability indicate the plasticity for adaptation of S. pneumoniae to the CF lung environment.

  18. Patients with multiple morphological abnormalities of the sperm flagella due to DNAH1 mutations have a good prognosis following intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Wambergue, Clémentine; Zouari, Raoudha; Fourati Ben Mustapha, Selima; Martinez, Guillaume; Devillard, Françoise; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Satre, Véronique; Brouillet, Sophie; Halouani, Lazhar; Marrakchi, Ouafi; Makni, Mounir; Latrous, Habib; Kharouf, Mahmoud; Amblard, Florence; Arnoult, Christophe; Ray, Pierre F; Coutton, Charles

    2016-06-01

    in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed on sperm cells from 3 DNAH1-mutated patients and from 29 fertile control subjects. Sperm chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation were evaluated using aniline blue staining and TUNEL assays, respectively, on sperm cells from 3 DNAH1-mutated men and 6 fertile controls. There was a significantly increased proportion of disomy XY and 18 in sperm from DNAH1 mutated patients compared with fertile controls (1.52 versus 0.28%, P = 0.0001 and 0.64 versus 0.09%, P = 0.0001). However, there were no statistically significant differences among sperm from the two groups in their frequencies of either 13, 21, XX or YY disomy or diploidy. Measures of DNA compaction and fragmentation demonstrated a good nuclear sperm quality among DNAH1 mutated men. The overall fertilization, pregnancy and delivery rates of couples including DNAH1 mutated men were of 70.8, 50.0 and 37.5%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in any of these parameters compared with the two control groups (P > 0.05). A limitation of this study is the small number of DNAH1-mutated patients available and the low number of genes identified in MMAF. Further genetic studies are warranted to identify other MMAF-inducing genes to better characterize the genetic etiology of the MMAF phenotype and to improve the management of patients diagnosed with flagellar defects. MMAF patients with DNAH1 mutations have low aneuploidy rates and good nuclear sperm quality, explaining the high pregnancy rate obtained with these patients. Good ICSI results were obtained for both MMAF groups (DNAH1 mutated and nonmutated), suggesting that patients presenting with asthenozoospermia due to flagellar defects have a good ICSI prognosis irrespective of their genotype. The majority of MMAF cases currently remain idiopathic with no genetic cause yet identified. In depth genetic analysis of these patients using next generation sequencing should reveal new causal

  19. Glycophorin A somatic cell mutation frequencies in Finnish reinforced plastics workers exposed to styrene.

    PubMed

    Bigbee, W L; Grant, S G; Langlois, R G; Jensen, R H; Anttila, A; Pfäffli, P; Pekari, K; Norppa, H

    1996-10-01

    We have used the glycophorin A (GPA) in vivo somatic cell mutation assay to assess the genotoxic potential of styrene exposure in 47 reinforced plastics workers occupationally exposed to styrene and 47 unexposed controls matched for age, gender, and active smoking status. GPA variant erythrocyte frequencies (Vf), reflecting GPA allele loss (phi/N) and allele loss and duplication (N/N) somatic mutations arising in vivo in the erythroid progenitor cells of individuals of GPA M/N heterozygous genotype, were flow cytometrically determined in peripheral blood samples from these subjects. Measurements of styrene exposure of the workers at the time of blood sampling showed a mean 8-h time-weighted average (TWA8-h) styrene concentration of 155 mg/m3 (37 ppm) in the breathing zone. Mean urinary concentrations of the styrene metabolites mandelic acid (MA) and mandelic acid plus phenyl glyoxylic acid (MA+PGA) were 4.4 mmol/liter (after workshift) and 2.1 mmol/liter (next morning), respectively. Multivariate analysis of covariance on log-transformed GPA Vf data with models allowing adjustment for age, gender, smoking status, and styrene exposure showed that N/N Vf were nearly significantly increased among all of the exposed workers (adjusted geometric mean, 6.3 per million versus 5.0 in the controls; P = 0.058) and were statistically significantly elevated (adjusted geometric mean, 6.8 versus 5.0 in the controls; P = 0.036) among workers classified into a high-exposure group according to personal TWA8-h concentration of styrene in the breathing zone of > or = 85 mg/m3 (20 ppm; Finnish threshold limit value). Women in this high exposure group showed especially elevated N/N Vf (adjusted geometric mean 8.5 versus 5.3 in control women; P = 0.020); this elevation was also significant if urinary MA+PGA of > or = 1.2 mmol/liter was used as the basis of classification (adjusted geometric mean, 8.3; P = 0.030). The occupational exposure could not be shown to influence phi/N Vf

  20. Low-frequency electrotherapy for female patients with detrusor underactivity due to neuromuscular deficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan-Feng; Zhang, Shen; Wang, Cun-Zhou; Li, Jun; Qu, Chuang-Yu; Cui, Xin-Gang; Zhao, Sheng-Jia

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of low-frequency electrotherapy (LFE) for female patients with early-stage detrusor underactivity (DUA) due to neuromuscular deficiency. A total of 102 female patients were divided randomly into four groups: LFE-NC (normal compliance), LFE-LC (low compliance), CON (control)-NC and CON-LC. Patients in the LFE-NC and LFE-LC groups received LFE, and those in the CON-NC and CON-LC groups received conservative treatment. Urodynamic evaluation was performed before and after treatment. After treatment, 82 % of the LFE-NC regained detrusor contractility, whereas only 2 (8 %) of the CON-NC had normal detrusor contraction. None of LFE-LC or CON-LC regained detrusor contractility (p < 0.01). The per cent of LFE-NC who relied on catheterization for bladder emptying decreased by 43 % (p < 0.01). Those in the LFE-LC, CON-NC and CON-LC groups decreased by only 4, 12 or 0 % (p > 0.05). LFE was more effective for DUA patients with normal compliance; these patients benefited from LFE, but DUA patients with low compliance did not.

  1. An epidemiological investigation of a Forkhead box protein E3 founder mutation underlying the high frequency of sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a Mexican village

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos; Ali, Manir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular epidemiological basis for the unusually high incidence of sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a village in the Tlaxcala province of central Mexico. Methods A population census was performed in a village to identify all sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia cases. Molecular analysis of the previously identified Forkhead box protein E3 (FOXE3) mutation, c.292T>C (p.Y98H), was performed with PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing. In addition, DNA from 405 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the causal mutation. To identify the number of generations since the mutation arose in the village, 17 polymorphic markers distributed in a region of 6 Mb around the mutated locus were genotyped in the affected individuals, followed by DMLE software analysis to calculate mutation age. Results A total of 22 patients with sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 2.52 cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 397). The FOXE3 homozygous mutation was identified in all 17 affected subjects who consented to molecular analysis. Haplotype analysis indicated that the mutation arose 5.0–6.5 generations ago (approximately 106–138 years). Among the 405 unaffected villagers who were genotyped, ten heterozygote carriers were identified, yielding a population carrier frequency of approximately 1 in 40 and a predicted incidence of affected of 1 in 6,400 based on random marriages between two carriers in the village. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a cluster of patients with sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a small Mexican village is due to a FOXE3 p.Y98H founder mutation that arose in the village just over a century ago at a time when a population migrated from a nearby village because of land disputes. The actual disease incidence is higher than the calculated predicted value and suggests non-random marriages

  2. Frequency dependence and intensity fluctuations due to shallow water internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F; Pereselkov, Serguey

    2007-08-01

    A theory and experimental results for sound propagation through an anisotropic shallow water environment are presented to examine the frequency dependence of the scintillation index in the presence of internal waves. The theory of horizontal rays and vertical modes is used to establish the azimutal and frequency behavior of the sound intensity fluctuations, specifically for shallow water broadband acoustic signals propagating through internal waves. This theory is then used to examine the frequency dependent, anisotropic acoustic field measured during the SWARM'95 experiment. The frequency dependent modal scintillation index is described for the frequency range of 30-200 Hz on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  3. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    SciTech Connect

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Maple Syrup Urine Disease: Identification and Carrier-Frequency Determination of a Novel Founder Mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish Population

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Kornreich, Ruth; Sansaricq, Claude; Snyderman, Selma E.; Diaz, George A.

    2001-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism. We noted that a large proportion (10 of 34) of families with MSUD that were followed in our clinic were of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) descent, leading us to search for a common mutation within this group. On the basis of genotyping data suggestive of a conserved haplotype at tightly linked markers on chromosome 6q14, the BCKDHB gene encoding the E1β subunit was sequenced. Three novel mutations were identified in seven unrelated AJ patients with MSUD. The locations of the affected residues in the crystal structure of the E1β subunit suggested possible mechanisms for the deleterious effects of these mutations. Large-scale population screening of AJ individuals for R183P, the mutation present in six of seven patients, revealed that the carrier frequency of the mutant allele was ∼1/113; the patient not carrying R183P had a previously described homozygous mutation in the gene encoding the E2 subunit. These findings suggested that a limited number of mutations might underlie MSUD in the AJ population, potentially facilitating prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection of MSUD in this group. PMID:11509994

  5. High frequency strand slippage mutations in CTCF in MSI-positive endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Zighelboim, Israel; Mutch, David G; Knapp, Amy; Ding, Li; Xie, Mingchao; Cohn, David E; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with defective mismatch repair acquire large numbers of strand slippage mutations including frameshifts in coding sequence repeats. We identified a mutational hotspot, p.T204fs, in the insulator-binding protein (CTCF) in MSI-positive endometrial cancers. Although CTCF was described as a significantly mutated gene by the endometrial cancer TCGA, the A₇ track variants leading to T204 frameshifts were not reported. Reanalysis of TCGA data using Pindel revealed frequent T204fs mutations, confirming CTCF is an MSI target gene and revealed the same frameshifts in tumors with intact mismatch repair. We show that T204fs transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay and as such, T204fs mutations are unlikely to act as dominant negatives. The spectrum and pattern of mutations observed is consistent with CTCF acting as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor.

  6. Frequencies of the Common MEFV Gene Mutations in Adiyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, DT; Atak, PG; Çelik, Ç

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by fever and serosal inflammation. The reasons for the disorder are mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene; the most common of which are M694V, M680I, M694I and V726A. In this study, we aimed to screen these common mutations of the MEFV gene and then determine the prevalence of FMF according to these mutations in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. Seven hundred and sixty-seven healthy individuals from the region of Adıyaman participated in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system (PCR-ARMS) methods were used to determine the common mutations of the MEFV gene. Twenty-six (3.9%) individuals had only one mutation in the MEFV gene, 25 individuals were heterozygous and one person was homozygous for the V726A mutation (0.15%). In the present study, the V726A mutation (50.0%) was the most frequent, followed by M694V (38.5%), M680I (7.7%) and M694I (3.8%). It was seen that the carrier rate was very low and the prevalence of FMF was 0.15%, according to the common mutations of the MEFV gene in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. PMID:25937800

  7. [Monogenic form of diabetes mellitus due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1) - the first case in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György; Balogh, István; Gaál, Zsolt

    2016-03-20

    The classification of diabetes mellitus in adolescents and young adults is often difficult. The diagnosis of the monogenic form of diabetes may have substantial influence on quality of life, prognosis and the choice of the appropriate treatment of affected patients. Among MODY (maturity-onset of diabetes in the young) MODY-1 is rarely detected, only 13 families were described in 2000, and 103 different mutations in 173 families were known in 2013 worldwide. The authors present the first Hungarian case of a monogenic form of diabetes due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1). The diabetes of the index patient No. 1 (42-year-old woman with insulin treated diabetes) was diagnosed as gestational diabetes at age of 20 when she was treated with diet only. Later, insulin treatment has been initiated when marked hyperglycaemia was detected during an episode of acute pneumonia at age of 26. The diabetes of the index patient No. 2 (20-year-old daughter of the index patient No. 1, treated also with insulin) was diagnosed as type 2 diabetes at age of 13 and the patient was treated with diet only. Later the classification was modified to type 1 and insulin therapy was initiated at age of 14. The manifestation of diabetes, the familial occurrence and the low dose insulin requirement were suggestive for monogenic diabetes. Using molecular genetic method a mutation (c.869G>A, p.R290H) of HNF4α gene was found and MODY-1 was diagnosed in both cases. Insulin therapy was switched to treatment with low dose sulfanylurea and an excellent glycaemic control was achieved and sustained at follow-up of 1-year. No further positive cases were found during screening of other family members.

  8. Increased muscle coenzyme Q10 in riboflavin responsive MADD with ETFDH gene mutations due to secondary mitochondrial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Li, Duoling; Shan, Jingli; Liu, Shuping; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Lin, Pengfei; Zheng, Jinfan; Li, Danian; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-06-01

    Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) has a wide range of phenotypic variation ranging from a neonatal lethal form to a mild late-onset form. Our previous data showed that in a group of Chinese patients, a mild type of MADD characterized by myopathy with clinically no other systemic involvement was caused by mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene, which encodes electron transfer flavoprotein: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a downstream electron receptor of ETF:QO was first reported deficient in muscle of MADD patients with ETFDH gene mutations. Nevertheless, this result was not confirmed in a recently published study. Therefore to elucidate muscle CoQ10 level in a large group of MADD patients may provide further insight into the pathomechanism and therapeutic strategies. In this study, we found that 34 riboflavin responsive patients with ETFDH gene mutations had an elevated CoQ10 pool in muscle by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, when CoQ10 levels were normalized to citrate synthase, a marker of mitochondrial mass, there was no significant difference between patients and normal controls. Meanwhile, the increased mitochondrial DNA copy number in muscle also supported that the elevated CoQ10 pool was mainly due to mitochondrial mass proliferation. The expression of CoQ10 biosynthesis genes showed no significant changes whereas genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as PPARα, were marked up regulated. Our results suggested that CoQ10 seems not to be a primary factor in riboflavin responsive MADD and the apparent increase in CoQ10 may be secondary to mitochondrial proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency dependence in seismoacoustic imaging of shallow free gas due to gas bubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Keil, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Shallow free gas is investigated in seismoacoustic data in 10 frequency bands covering a frequency range between 0.2 and 43 kHz. At the edge of a gassy patch in the Bornholm Basin (Baltic Sea), compressional wave attenuation caused by free gas is estimated from reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy sediment layer. Imaging of shallow free gas is considerably influenced by gas bubble resonance, because in the resonance frequency range attenuation is significantly increased. At the resonance frequency of the largest bubbles between 3 and 5 kHz, high scattering causes complete acoustic blanking beneath the top of the gassy sediment layer. In the wider resonance frequency range between 3 and 15 kHz, the effect of smaller bubbles becomes dominant and the attenuation slightly decreases. This allows acoustic waves to be transmitted and reflections can be observed beneath the gassy sediment layer for higher frequencies. Above resonance beginning at ˜19 kHz, attenuation is low and the presence of free gas can be inferred from the decreased reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy layer. Below the resonance frequency range (<1 kHz), attenuation is generally very low and not dependent on frequency. Using the geoacoustic model of Anderson and Hampton, the observed frequency boundaries suggest gas bubble sizes between 1 and 4-6 mm, and gas volume fractions up to 0.02% in a ˜2 m thick sediment layer, whose upper boundary is the gas front. With the multifrequency acoustic approach and the Anderson and Hampton model, quantification of free gas in shallow marine environments is possible if the measurement frequency range allows the identification of the resonance frequency peak. The method presented is limited to places with only moderate attenuation, where the amplitudes of a reflection can be analyzed beneath the gassy sediment layer.

  10. Estimation of Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate mechanical thermal noise in semiconductor lasers, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Our simple model determines an underlying fundamental limit for the frequency noise of free-running semiconductor laser, and provides a framework: where the noise may be potentially reduced with improved design.

  11. Estimation of Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate mechanical thermal noise in semiconductor lasers, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Our simple model determines an underlying fundamental limit for the frequency noise of free-running semiconductor laser, and provides a framework: where the noise may be potentially reduced with improved design.

  12. The frequency and mutation rate of balanced autosomal rearrangements in man estimated from prenatal genetic studies for advanced maternal age.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, D L; Weiss, L; Roberson, J R; Babu, V R

    1983-01-01

    The frequencies of balanced chromosome rearrangements were estimated from three series of advanced maternal-age prenatal genetic studies, and were compared to the frequencies that had been estimated from consecutive newborn surveys. In the maternal-age prenatal studies, the frequencies were: Robertsonian translocations, 0.11%; reciprocal translocations, 0.17%; and inversions, 0.12%. The total frequency of balanced rearrangements in the prenatal genetic studies performed with banding (0.40%, or 1 in 250) was twice that in the consecutive newborn surveys performed without banding (0.19%, or 1 in 526). The difference was limited to inversions and reciprocal translocations; the frequency of Robertsonian translocations was similar in the prenatal series and the newborn surveys. Both familial and de novo rearrangements were more common than anticipated. The de novo cases provided a mutation rate estimate of 4.3 per 10,000 gametes per generation (compared with 1.78 to 2.2 per 10,000 gametes in other surveys). These higher estimates may more reliably approximate the true mutation rate and frequencies of balanced rearrangements in the newborn population than do the newborn surveys. PMID:6837576

  13. Analysis of different versions of the IARC p53 database with respect to G-->T transversion mutation frequencies and mutation hotspots in lung cancer of smokers and non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Paschke, T

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of the IARC p53 database revealed a large number of discrepancies in the classification of smoking status for identical lung cancer entries in different versions of the database. In addition, no statistically significant differences in G-->T transversion mutation frequencies or in mutational hotspots at codons 157, 248 and 273 were found in the R3 version of the database between p53 sequences from smoking and non-smoking lung cancer patients. The possible influence of confounding factors on p53 mutation spectra was demonstrated as illustrated by the impact of ethnicity on G-->T transversion mutation frequencies.

  14. Vesicourethral reflux-induced renal failure in a patient with ICF syndrome due to a novel DNMT3B mutation.

    PubMed

    Kutluğ, Seyhan; Ogur, Gönül; Yilmaz, Aysegül; Thijssen, Peter E; Abur, Ummet; Yildiran, Alisan

    2016-12-01

    ICF syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by hypo- or agammaglobulinemia, centromeric instability mainly on chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 and facial anomalies. ICF syndrome presents with frequent respiratory tract infections in infancy. A 20-month-old female patient was referred to our clinic due to frequent lower respiratory tract infections. ICF syndrome was considered because of comorbidity of hypogammaglobulinemia, facial anomalies, and neuromotor growth retardation. Metaphase chromosome analysis revealed centromeric instability on chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 and through Sanger a previously unreported homozygous missense mutation (c.1805T>C; [p.V602A]) was identified in the DNMT3B, confirming ICF1. The patient was found to have a breakdown in renal function 1 year later; the urinary system was examined and bilateral vesicoureteral reflux was found, warranting the need for dialysis in time. This report expands the mutation spectrum of ICF1 and is the first to describe bilateral vesicoureteral reflux accompanying ICF syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The frequency of pre-core gene mutations in chronic hepatitis B infection: a study of Malaysian subjects.

    PubMed

    Yap, S F; Wong, P W; Chen, Y C; Rosmawati, M

    2002-03-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to determine the frequency of the pre-core stop codon mutant virus in a group of chronic hepatitis B carriers: 81 cases were considered [33 hepatits B e antigen (HBe) positive and 48 HBe negative]. All of the HBe positive cases had detectable viral DNA by hybridization analysis; in the case of the HBe negative cases, one third had detectable viral DNA by hybridization analysis and two thirds had HBV DNA detectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Pre-core stop codon mutant detection was carried out on all specimens using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization following PCR amplification of the target sequence. The pre-core mutant was detected in 13/33 (39.4%) of HBe positive cases and in 32/48 (66.7%) of HBe negative cases. Sequence analysis was carried out on 8 of the 16 HBe negative specimens that did not carry the pre-core mutant virus to determine the molecular basis for the HBe minus phenotype in these cases: the 1762/1764 TA paired mutation in the second AT rich region of the core promoter was detected in five cases; a start codon mutation was detected in one case. The predominant mutation resulting in the HBe minus phenotype in our isolates was the 1896A pre-core ("pre-core stop codon") mutation; other mutations responsible for the phenotype included the core promoter paired mutation and pre-core start codon mutation. In view of the high frequency of the pre-core mutant virus, sequence analysis was performed to determine the virus genotype on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of codon 15. The sequences of 21 wild type virus (14 HBe positive and 7 HBe negative cases) were examined: 15 were found to be codon 15 CCT variants (71.4%); the frequency in the HBe positive group was 12/14 (85.7%), while that in the HBe negative group was 3/7 (42.9%). The high frequency of the codon 15 CCT variant in association with the frequent occurrence of the pre-core mutant in our isolates concurs with the results

  16. Frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations and 5T allele in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Marchand, E; Verellen-Dumoulin, C; Mairesse, M; Delaunois, L; Brancaleone, P; Rahier, J F; Vandenplas, O

    2001-03-01

    To assess the frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Case-control study. All subjects in the study were screened for the presence of 13 mutations in the CFTR gene (R117H, 621 + 1G(-)>T, R334 W, Delta F508, Delta I507, 1717-1G(-)>A, G542X, R553X, G551D, R1162X, 3849 + 10kbC(-)>T, W1282X, and N1303K). Moreover, they were also screened for the presence of the 5T variant in intron 8. University hospital and community-based hospital. Twenty-one white patients with ABPA participated in the study. The presence of CFTR mutations was also investigated in 43 white subjects with allergic asthma who did not show sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus and in 142 subjects seeking genetic counseling for diseases other than cystic fibrosis (CF). Six patients with ABPA were found to be heterozygous for one CFTR mutation, including Delta F508 (n = 2), G542X (n = 1), R1162X (n = 1), 1717-1G(-)>A (n = 1), and R117H (n = 1). The 5T allele was not detected in ABPA patients. None of the ABPA patients showed sweat chloride concentrations > 60 mEq/L. The frequency of CFTR mutation carriers was significantly higher in ABPA patients (6 of 21 patients; 28.5%) than in control asthmatic subjects (2 of 43 subjects; 4.6%; p = 0.01) and in subjects seeking genetic counseling (6 of 142 subjects; p < 0.001). These findings indicate that in patients without a clinical diagnosis of CF, CFTR gene mutations could be involved in the development of ABPA, in association with other genetic or environmental factors.

  17. Increased mutant frequency and altered mutation spectrum of the lacI transgene in Wilson disease rats with hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sone, H; Li, Y J; Ishizuka, M; Aoki, Y; Nagao, M

    2000-09-15

    The mutant strain Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, which accumulates copper in the liver because of a mutation in the Atp7b gene, encoding a copper-ATPase, is a model of Wilson disease. It spontaneously develops hepatitis, and subsequently hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiofibrosis. Excess intracellular copper has been thought to induce DNA damage through reactive oxygen species produced by Cu (II)/Cu (I) redox cycling, and also by direct interaction with DNA. We have developed lacI transgenic Wilson disease (WND-B) rats by mating LEC with Big Blue F344 rats carrying a lambda shuttle vector harboring the lacI gene. lacI mutations of the livers of C-B heterozygous (Atp7b w/m, lacI) and WND-B homozygous (Atp7b m/m, lacI) rats at 6, 24, and 40 weeks of ages were analyzed. Mutant frequencies in the WND-B rats were 2.0 +/- 0.7 x 10(-5), 5.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(-5), and 5.3 +/- 1.0 x 10(-5), respectively, significantly higher than those of C-B rats. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the frequency of deletion mutations of more than two nucleotides were much higher, 15% in WND-B rats, but only 2% in C-B rats. In addition, the average size of deletion was larger in the former. Loss of oligonucleotide-repeat units was specific and relatively frequent in WND-B rats. This type of mutation might be implicated in the induction of DNA strand scissions by reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that the increase in mutant frequencies and/or the specific type of mutation according to copper accumulation play a crucial role in hepatocarcinogenesis in LEC rats.

  18. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    PubMed

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  19. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S. M.; Antia, H. M.

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the ``surface term.'' The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3D flows, can be reduced to an effective ``quiet-Sun'' wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  20. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M.

    2015-06-20

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  1. Low-frequency NNRTI-resistant HIV-1 variants and relationship to mutational load in antiretroviral-naïve subjects.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaili; Lataillade, Max; Kyriakides, Tassos C; Chiarella, Jennifer; St John, Elizabeth P; Webb, Suzin; Moreno, Elizabeth A; Simen, Birgitte B; Kozal, Michael J

    2014-09-16

    Low-frequency HIV variants possessing resistance mutations against non‑nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), especially at HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid (aa) positions K103 and Y181, have been shown to adversely affect treatment response. Therapeutic failure correlates with both the mutant viral variant frequency and the mutational load. We determined the prevalence of NNRTI resistance mutations at several RT aa positions in viruses from 204 antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve HIV-infected individuals using deep sequencing, and examined the relationship between mutant variant frequency and mutational load for those variants. Deep sequencing to ≥0.4% levels found variants with major NNRTI-resistance mutations having a Stanford-HIVdb algorithm value ≥30 for efavirenz and/or nevirapine in 52/204 (25.5%) ARV-naïve HIV-infected persons. Eighteen different major NNRTI mutations were identified at 11 different positions, with the majority of variants being at frequency >1%. The frequency of these variants correlated strongly with the mutational load, but this correlation weakened at low frequencies. Deep sequencing detected additional major NNRTI-resistant viral variants in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Our study suggests the significance of screening for mutations at all RT aa positions (in addition to K103 and Y181) to estimate the true burden of pre-treatment NNRTI-resistance. An important finding was that variants at low frequency had a wide range of mutational loads (>100-fold) suggesting that frequency alone may underestimate the impact of specific NNRTI-resistant variants. We recommend further evaluation of all low-frequency NNRTI-drug resistant variants with special attention given to the impact of mutational loads of these variants on treatment outcomes.

  2. Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

  3. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation: Analysis of 20 cases and K(+) channel properties.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J; Muona, Mikko; Mandelstam, Simone A; Canafoglia, Laura; Boguszewska-Chachulska, Anna M; Korczyn, Amos D; Bisulli, Francesca; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Ragona, Francesca; Michelucci, Roberto; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Straussberg, Rachel; Panzica, Ferruccio; Massano, João; Friedman, Daniel; Crespel, Arielle; Engelsen, Bernt A; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; Spodar, Krystyna; Lasek-Bal, Anetta; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Pasini, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Licchetta, Laura; Gardella, Elena; Lindenau, Matthias; Wulf, Annette; Møller, Rikke S; Benninger, Felix; Afawi, Zaid; Rubboli, Guido; Reid, Christopher A; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Petrou, Steven; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2017-05-01

    To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging data for 20 patients with MEAK due to recurrent KCNC1 p.R320H mutation. In vitro electrophysiological studies were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp to explore biophysical properties of wild-type and mutant KV 3.1 channels. Symptoms began at between 3 and 15 years of age (median = 9.5), with progressively severe myoclonus and rare tonic-clonic seizures. Ataxia was present early, but quickly became overshadowed by myoclonus; 10 patients were wheelchair-bound by their late teenage years. Mild cognitive decline occurred in half. Early death was not observed. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed generalized spike and polyspike wave discharges, with documented photosensitivity in most. Polygraphic EEG-electromyographic studies demonstrated a cortical origin for myoclonus and striking coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical cerebellar atrophy, which appeared progressive, and a prominent corpus callosum. Unexpectedly, transient clinical improvement with fever was noted in 6 patients. To explore this, we performed high-temperature in vitro recordings. At elevated temperatures, there was a robust leftward shift in activation of wild-type KV 3.1, increasing channel availability. MEAK has a relatively homogeneous presentation, resembling Unverricht-Lundborg disease, despite the genetic and biological basis being quite different. A remarkable improvement with fever may be explained by the temperature-dependent leftward shift in activation of wild-type KV 3.1 subunit-containing channels, which would counter the loss of function observed for mutant channels, highlighting KCNC1 as a potential target for precision therapeutics. Ann Neurol 2017

  4. OutLyzer: software for extracting low-allele-frequency tumor mutations from sequencing background noise in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Etienne; Goardon, Nicolas; Brault, Baptiste; Rousselin, Antoine; Paimparay, Germain; Legros, Angelina; Fouillet, Robin; Bruet, Olivia; Tranchant, Aurore; Domin, Florian; San, Chankannira; Quesnelle, Céline; Frebourg, Thierry; Ricou, Agathe; Krieger, Sophie; Vaur, Dominique; Castera, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Highlighting tumoral mutations is a key step in oncology for personalizing care. Considering the genetic heterogeneity in a tumor, software used for detecting mutations should clearly distinguish real tumor events of interest that could be predictive markers for personalized medicine from false positives. OutLyzer is a new variant-caller designed for the specific and sensitive detection of mutations for research and diagnostic purposes. It is based on statistic and local evaluation of sequencing background noise to highlight potential true positive variants. 130 previously genotyped patients were sequenced after enrichment by capturing the exons of 22 genes. Sequencing data were analyzed by HaplotypeCaller, LofreqStar, Varscan2 and OutLyzer. OutLyzer had the best sensitivity and specificity with a fixed limit of detection for all tools of 1% for SNVs and 2% for Indels. OutLyzer is a useful tool for detecting mutations of interest in tumors including low allele-frequency mutations, and could be adopted in standard practice for delivering targeted therapies in cancer treatment. PMID:27825131

  5. High frequency of germline TP53 mutations in a prospective adult-onset sarcoma cohort.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gillian; Ballinger, Mandy L; Wong, Stephen; Hewitt, Chelsee; James, Paul; Young, Mary-Anne; Cipponi, Arcadi; Pang, Tiffany; Goode, David L; Dobrovic, Alex; Thomas, David M

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are a key feature of Li-Fraumeni and related syndromes (LFS/LFL), associated with germline TP53 mutations. Current penetrance estimates for TP53 mutations are subject to significant ascertainment bias. The International Sarcoma Kindred Study is a clinic-based, prospective cohort of adult-onset sarcoma cases, without regard to family history. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in TP53 using high-resolution melting analysis and Sanger sequencing, and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification and targeted massively parallel sequencing for copy number changes. Pathogenic TP53 mutations were detected in blood DNA of 20/559 sarcoma probands (3.6%); 17 were germline and 3 appeared to be somatically acquired. Of the germline carriers, one appeared to be mosaic, detectable in the tumor and blood, but not epithelial tissues. Germline mutation carriers were more likely to have multiple cancers (47% vs 15% for non-carriers, P = 3.0×10(-3)), and earlier cancer onset (33 vs 48 years, P = 1.19×10(-3)). The median survival of mutation carriers following first cancer diagnosis was not significantly different from non-carriers. Only 10/17 (59%) pedigrees met classical or Chompret criteria for LFS. In summary, germline TP53 mutations are not rare in adult patients with sarcoma, with implications for screening, surveillance, treatment and genetic counselling of carriers and family members.

  6. High Frequency of Germline TP53 Mutations in a Prospective Adult-Onset Sarcoma Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen; Hewitt, Chelsee; James, Paul; Young, Mary-Anne; Cipponi, Arcadi; Pang, Tiffany; Goode, David L.; Dobrovic, Alex; Thomas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are a key feature of Li-Fraumeni and related syndromes (LFS/LFL), associated with germline TP53 mutations. Current penetrance estimates for TP53 mutations are subject to significant ascertainment bias. The International Sarcoma Kindred Study is a clinic-based, prospective cohort of adult-onset sarcoma cases, without regard to family history. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in TP53 using high-resolution melting analysis and Sanger sequencing, and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification and targeted massively parallel sequencing for copy number changes. Pathogenic TP53 mutations were detected in blood DNA of 20/559 sarcoma probands (3.6%); 17 were germline and 3 appeared to be somatically acquired. Of the germline carriers, one appeared to be mosaic, detectable in the tumor and blood, but not epithelial tissues. Germline mutation carriers were more likely to have multiple cancers (47% vs 15% for non-carriers, P = 3.0×10−3), and earlier cancer onset (33 vs 48 years, P = 1.19×10−3). The median survival of mutation carriers following first cancer diagnosis was not significantly different from non-carriers. Only 10/17 (59%) pedigrees met classical or Chompret criteria for LFS. In summary, germline TP53 mutations are not rare in adult patients with sarcoma, with implications for screening, surveillance, treatment and genetic counselling of carriers and family members. PMID:23894400

  7. The frequency of the C854 mutation in the aspartoacylase gene in Ashkenazi Jews in Israel

    SciTech Connect

    Elpeleg, O.N.; Shaag, A.; Anikster, Y.; Branski, D.; Barash, V. )

    1994-08-01

    Canavan disease (CD) is an infantile neurodegenerative disease that is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and has mainly been reported in Ashkenazi Jewish families. The primary enzymatic defect is aspartoacyclase deficiency, and an A-to-C transition at nucleotide 854 of the cDNA has recently been reported. The authors screened 18 patients with CD and 879 healthy individuals, all Israeli Ashkenazi Jews, for the mutation. All 18 patients were homozygotes for the mutation, and 15 heterozygotes were found among the healthy individuals. The results disclose a carrier rate of 1:59 and suggest that a screening for the mutation is warranted among Ashkenazi Jewish couples. 9 refs.

  8. Conservation threats due to human-caused increases in fire frequency in Mediterranean-climate ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Syphard, Alexandra D; Radeloff, Volker C; Hawbaker, Todd J; Stewart, Susan I

    2009-06-01

    Periodic wildfire is an important natural process in Mediterranean-climate ecosystems, but increasing fire recurrence threatens the fragile ecology of these regions. Because most fires are human-caused, we investigated how human population patterns affect fire frequency. Prior research in California suggests the relationship between population density and fire frequency is not linear. There are few human ignitions in areas with low population density, so fire frequency is low. As population density increases, human ignitions and fire frequency also increase, but beyond a density threshold, the relationship becomes negative as fuels become sparser and fire suppression resources are concentrated. We tested whether this hypothesis also applies to the other Mediterranean-climate ecosystems of the world. We used global satellite databases of population, fire activity, and land cover to evaluate the spatial relationship between humans and fire in the world's five Mediterranean-climate ecosystems. Both the mean and median population densities were consistently and substantially higher in areas with than without fire, but fire again peaked at intermediate population densities, which suggests that the spatial relationship is complex and nonlinear. Some land-cover types burned more frequently than expected, but no systematic differences were observed across the five regions. The consistent association between higher population densities and fire suggests that regardless of differences between land-cover types, natural fire regimes, or overall population, the presence of people in Mediterranean-climate regions strongly affects the frequency of fires; thus, population growth in areas now sparsely settled presents a conservation concern. Considering the sensitivity of plant species to repeated burning and the global conservation significance of Mediterranean-climate ecosystems, conservation planning needs to consider the human influence on fire frequency. Fine-scale spatial

  9. Evaluations of effects due to low-frequency noise in a low demanding work situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Persson Waye, K.; Kjellberg, A.

    2004-11-01

    Noise sources with a dominating content of low frequencies (20-200 Hz) are found in many occupational environments. This study aimed to evaluate effects of moderate levels of low-frequency noise on attention, tiredness and motivation in a low demanding work situation. Two ventilation noises at the same A-weighted sound pressure level of 45 dB were used: one of a low-frequency character and one of a flat frequency character (reference noise). Thirty-eight female subjects worked with six performance tasks for 4 h in the noises in a between-subject design. Most of the tasks were monotonous and routine in character. Subjective reports were collected using questionnaires and cortisol levels were measured in saliva. The major finding in this study was that low-frequency noise negatively influenced performance on two tasks sensitive to reduced attention and on a proof-reading task. Performances of tasks aimed at evaluating motivation were not significantly affected. The difference in work performance was not reflected by the subjective reports. No effect of noise was found on subjective stress or cortisol levels.

  10. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture.

    PubMed

    Kram, Karin E; Finkel, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  11. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Karin E.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  12. [Damage to implants due to high-frequency electrocautery : analysis of four fractured hip endoprostheses shafts].

    PubMed

    Konrads, C; Wente, M N; Plitz, W; Rudert, M; Hoberg, M

    2014-12-01

    In revision surgery of joints, high-frequency electrocauterization instruments are used for homeostasis and dissection of soft tissue. If there is contact of these instruments with the metal implants, flashover can occur. This can lead to thermal microstructural changes in the material and as a consequence may reduce the fatigue strength of the implant. Four cases of hip revision surgeries were analysed. In all cases flashovers occurred and secondarily, the titanium hip endoprosthesis stem broke in the neck section of the prosthesis. The conducted investigations showed that contact between the high-frequency instrument and the anterolateral aspect of the endoprosthesis neck had occurred. Electrothermal implant damage was found in the broken area. If in hip revision surgery the stem is not to be replaced, contact between high-frequency instruments and the metal implant should be avoided.

  13. High-frequency waves in the corona due to null points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; de Vicente, A.

    2017-06-01

    This work aims to understand the behavior of non-linear waves in the vicinity of a coronal null point. In previous works we have shown that high-frequency waves are generated in such a magnetic configuration. This paper studies those waves in detail in order to provide a plausible explanation of their generation. We demonstrate that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point and produce a train of secondary shocks that escape along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 mHz. We speculate that this frequency may be sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona and therefore can be used to probe the structure of this solar layer. Movies attached to Figs 2 and 4 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. A second mutation associated with apparent [beta]-hexosaminidase A pseudodeficiency: Identification and frequency estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z.; Chabot, T.; Triggs-Raine, B.L. ); Natowicz, M.R.; Prence, E.M. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, S.T.; Brown, D. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA )

    1993-12-01

    Deficient activity of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene, typically causes Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy individuals lacking Hex A activity against synthetic substrates (i.e., individuals who are pseudodeficient) have been described. Recently, an apparently benign C[sub 739]-to-T (Arg247Trp) mutation was found among individuals with Hex A levels indistinguishable from those of carriers of Tay-Sachs disease. This allele, when in compound heterozygosity with a second [open quotes]disease-causing[close quotes] allele, results in Hex A pseudodeficiency. The authors examined the HEXA gene of a healthy 42-year-old who was Hex A deficient but did not have the C[sub 739]-to-T mutation. The HEXA exons were PCR amplified, and the products were analyzed for mutations by using restriction-enzyme digestion or single-strand gel electrophoresis. A G[sub 805]-to-A (Gly269Ser) mutation associated with adult-onset G[sub m2] gangliosidosis was found on one chromosome. A new mutation, C[sub 745]-to-T (Arg 249Trp), was identified on the second chromosome. This mutation was detected in an additional 4/63 (6%) non-Jewish and 0/218 Ashkenazi Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Although the Arg249Trp change may result in a late-onset form of G[sub M2] gangliosidosis, any phenotype must be very mild. This new mutation and the benign C[sub 739]-to-T mutation together account for [approximately]38% of non-Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Because carriers of the C[sub 739]-to-T and C[sub 745]-to-T mutations cannot be differentiated from carriers of disease-causing alleles by using the classical biochemical screening approaches, DNA-based analyses for these mutations should be offered for non-Jewish enzyme-defined heterozygotes, before definitive counseling is provided. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in 969 central nervous system neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Behling, Felix; Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Skardelly, Marco; Nieser, Maike; Christians, Arne; Stockhammer, Florian; Rohde, Veit; Tatagiba, Marcos; Hartmann, Christian; Stadelmann, Christine; Schittenhelm, Jens

    2016-06-27

    Treatment options for oncological diseases have been enhanced by the advent of targeted therapies. The point mutation of the BRAF gene at codon 600 (BRAF V600E) is found in several tumor entities and can be approached with selective inhibitory antibodies. The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib has demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with BRAF V600E-mutant melanoma brain metastases and in other cancer diseases. Therefore the BRAF V600E mutation is a highly interesting oncological target in brain tumors. This study assesses the BRAF V600E mutation status in 969 intracranial neoplasms using a tissue microarray method and immunohistochemical staining with the mutation-specific VE-1 antibody, followed by sequencing of positively stained cases. Out of 784 primary brain tumors seven cases with a BRAF V600E mutation were detected (7/784, 1 %). Six of these cases were neuroepithelial tumors (6/667, 1 %) encompassing 2 astrocytomas WHO grade II (2/42, 5 %), 1 gliosarcoma WHO grade IV (1/75, 1 %) and 3 glioblastomas WHO grade IV (3/312, 1 %). Interestingly, all three mutant glioblastomas showed epithelioid histopathological features. Patients with V600E mutated astrocytic tumors were significantly younger (mean age 15.3 years) than wildtype cases (58.2 years). Among three rhabdoid meningiomas, one case was mutated (1/3) while all other grade I-III meningiomas (1/116, 1 %) and all fifty vestibular schwannomas analyzed were of wildtype status. The vast majority of the BRAF V600E mutations were found in cerebral metastases of malignant melanomas and carcinomas (29/135, 22 %), with false-positive staining found in four breast cancer cases and two non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) samples. Our data suggest routine screening for BRAF V600E mutations for glioblastomas WHO grade IV below the age of 30, especially in glioblastomas with epithelioid features and in all rhabdoid meningiomas WHO grade III. For colorectal carcinoma, thyroid cancer, malignant melanoma and

  16. Fulminant neurological deterioration in a neonate with Leigh syndrome due to a maternally transmitted missense mutation in the mitochondrial ND3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Leshinsky-Silver, E.; E-mail: leshinsky@wolfson.health.gov.il; Lev, D.; Tzofi-Berman, Z.; Cohen, S.; Saada, A.; Yanoov-Sharav, M.; Gilad, E.; Lerman-Sagie, T.

    2005-08-26

    Leigh syndrome can result from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA defects. Mutations in complex V genes of the respiratory chain were considered until recently as the most frequent cause for mitochondrial inherited Leigh syndrome, while gene defects in complex I were related to recessive Leigh syndrome. Recently few reports of mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded complex I subunit genes causing Leigh syndrome have been reported. We describe a 1-month-old baby who acutely deteriorated, with abrupt onset of brainstem dysfunction, due to basal ganglia lesions extending to the brainstem. A muscle biopsy demonstrated complex I deficiency. Subsequent analysis of the mitochondrial genome revealed a homoplastic T10191C mutation in the ND3 gene (in blood and muscle), resulting in a substitution of serine to proline. Hair root analysis revealed a 50% mutant load, reflecting heteroplasmy in early embryonic stages. The mutation was also detected in his mother (5%). Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of the 20 kDa subunit (likely ND6) and of the 30 kDa subunit (NDUFA9), which is probably due to instability attributed to the inability to form subcomplexes with ND3. This is the first description of infantile Leigh syndrome due to a maternally transmitted T10191C substitution in ND3 and not due to a de novo mutation. This mutation is age and tissue dependent and therefore may not be amenable to prenatal testing.

  17. Double Langmuir frequency radiation due to transformation processes in turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. N.; Panchenko, V. G.; Beloshenko, N. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the transformation process of longitudinal Langmuir wave into the transverse electromagnetic wave in turbulent plasma subjected to an upper hybrid pump. The case, when upper hybrid pump wave decays into daughter and ion - sound waves is considered. The transformation of the Langmuir wave into electromagnetic one is considered as the possible mechanism of energy radiation from the plasma. It is shown that the frequency of such radiation is chosen to be near double electron Langmuir frequency 2ωpe . These results give us the possibility to explain the nature of radiation from the laboratory and cosmic plasmas (particularly, from the solar crown).

  18. Conservation of CFTR codon frequency through primates suggests synonymous mutations could have a functional effect.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Iriarte, Andrés; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Marín, Mónica

    2015-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system, with a prevalence of about 1:3000 people. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR gene, which lead to a defective function of the chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Up-to-date, more than 1900 mutations have been reported in CFTR. However for an important proportion of them, their functional effects and the relation to disease are still not understood. Many of these mutations are silent (or synonymous), namely they do not alter the encoded amino acid. These synonymous mutations have been considered as neutral to protein function. However, more recent evidence in bacterial and human proteins has put this concept under revision. With the aim of understanding possible functional effects of synonymous mutations in CFTR, we analyzed human and primates CFTR codon usage and divergence patterns. We report the presence of regions enriched in rare and frequent codons. This spatial pattern of codon preferences is conserved in primates, but this cannot be explained by sequence conservation alone. In sum, the results presented herein suggest a functional implication of these regions of the gene that may be maintained by purifying selection acting to preserve a particular codon usage pattern along the sequence. Overall these results support the idea that several synonymous mutations in CFTR may have functional importance, and could be involved in the disease.

  19. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza A Viruses in the World (1902–2013): Frequency and Distribution of M2 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guoying; Peng, Chao; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Han, Le; Wu, Bin; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) have been used to prevent and treat influenza A virus infections for many years; however, resistance to these drugs has been widely reported in the world. To investigate the frequency and distribution of M2 gene mutations in adamantane-resistant influenza variants circulated in the world between 1902 and 2013, 31251 available M2 protein sequences from different HA-subtype influenza A viruses (H1–H17) were analyzed and adamantane resistance-associated mutations were compared (L26F, V27A, A30T, A30V, S31N, G34E, and L38F). We find that 45.2% (n = 14132) of influenza A (H1–H17) viruses circulating globally were resistant to adamantanes, and the vast majority of resistant viruses (95%) bear S31N mutations. Whereas, only about 1% have V27A mutations and other mutations (L26F, A30T, G34E, and L38F) were extremely rare (their prevalence appeared to be < 0.2%). Our results confirm that H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, and H17 subtype influenza A viruses exhibit high-level resistance to adamantanes. In contrast, the appearance of adamantane-resistant mutants in H2, H4, H6, H10, and H11 subtypes was rare. However, no adamantane resistance viruses were identified among other HA subtypes (H8, H12–H16). Our findings indicate that the frequency and distribution of adamantane-resistant influenza variants varied among different HA subtypes, host species, years of isolation, and geographical areas. This comprehensive study raises concerns about the increasing prevalence of adamantane-resistant influenza A viruses and highlights the importance of monitoring the emergence and worldwide spread of adamantane-resistant variants. PMID:25768797

  20. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Bakker, E; Kneppers, A L; Takata, R I; Rapaport, D; den Dunnen, J T; Zatz, M; van Ommen, G J

    1992-01-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly we observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved "germ line" mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases we are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases of DMD. In a large two-center study of 473 patients from Brazil and the Netherlands, we detected a significant difference in the deletion distribution of isolated (proximal:distal ratio 1:3) and familial cases (ratio 1:1). We conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, our findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a "proximal" new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a "distal" new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. PMID:1415256

  1. Somatic mutational analysis of FAK in breast cancer: A novel gain-of-function mutation due to deletion of exon 33

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xu-Qian; Liu, Xiang-Fan; Yao, Ling; Chen, Chang-Qiang; Gu, Zhi-Dong; Ni, Pei-Hua; Zheng, Xin-Min; Fan, Qi-Shi

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A novel FAK splicing mutation identified in breast tumor. •FAK-Del33 mutation promotes cell migration and invasion. •FAK-Del33 mutation regulates FAK/Src signal pathway. -- Abstract: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. We identified a novel splicing mutant, FAK-Del33 (exon 33 deletion, KF437463), in both breast and thyroid cancers through colony sequencing. Considering the low proportion of mutant transcripts in samples, this mutation was detected by TaqMan-MGB probes based qPCR. In total, three in 21 paired breast tissues were identified with the FAK-Del33 mutation, and no mutations were found in the corresponding normal tissues. When introduced into a breast cell line through lentivirus infection, FAK-Del33 regulated cell motility and migration based on a wound healing assay. We demonstrated that the expression of Tyr397 (main auto-phosphorylation of FAK) was strongly increased in FAK-Del33 overexpressed breast tumor cells compared to wild-type following FAK/Src RTK signaling activation. These results suggest a novel and unique role of the FAK-Del33 mutation in FAK/Src signaling in breast cancer with significant implications for metastatic potential.

  2. A Reduction in Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Due to a Mutation in NCF4 Promotes Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Winter, Susann; Hultqvist Hopkins, Malin; Laulund, Frida; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-12-20

    The mechanisms linking deficits in the phagocytic NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex to autoimmunity are so far incompletely understood. Deficiency in neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 (NCF1) inactivates the NOX2 complex, leading to a dramatic reduction of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhanced susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The contribution of intracellular NOX2 activity to autoimmune regulation is, however, unknown. Another component of the NOX2 complex, NCF4, directs the NOX2 complex to phagosomal membranes via binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and has been proposed to regulate intracellular ROS levels. To address the impact of NCF4 and selective changes in intracellular ROS production on autoimmune inflammation, we studied collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and mannan-induced psoriatic arthritis-like disease (MIP) in mice lacking NCF4 and mice with a mutation in the PtdIns3P-binding site of NCF4. Targeted deletion of Ncf4 (Ncf4(-/-)) led to severe defects in overall ROS production due to concomitant reduction of NCF2 and NCF1. These mice displayed delayed neutrophil apoptosis and enhanced innate immune responses, and they developed aggravated CIA and MIP. Disruption of the PtdIns3P-binding site by targeted mutation (Ncf4*(/)*) resulted in selective defects in intracellular NOX2 activity, which entailed milder effects on innate immunity and MIP but clearly promoted susceptibility to CIA. Innovation and Conclusion: This is, to our knowledge, the first study addressing the development of autoimmunity in an organism with selectively compromised NOX2-dependent intracellular ROS levels. Our data reveal a specific role for NCF4-mediated intracellular ROS production in regulating autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 983-996.

  3. Beneficial effect of pyruvate therapy on Leigh syndrome due to a novel mutation in PDH E1α gene.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yasutoshi; Povalko, Nataliya; Katayama, Koujyu; Kakimoto, Noriko; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Naito, Etsuo; Tanaka, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a progressive untreatable degenerating mitochondrial disorder caused by either mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations. A patient was a second child of unconsanguineous parents. On the third day of birth, he was transferred to neonatal intensive care units because of severe lactic acidosis. Since he was showing continuous lactic acidosis, the oral supplementation of dichloroacetate (DCA) was introduced on 31st day of birth at initial dose of 50 mg/kg, followed by maintenance dose of 25 mg/kg/every 12 h. The patient was diagnosed with LS due to a point mutation of an A-C at nucleotide 599 in exon 6 in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α gene, resulting in the substitution of aspartate for threonine at position 200 (N200T). Although the concentrations of lactate and pyruvate in blood were slightly decreased, his clinical conditions were deteriorating progressively. In order to overcome the mitochondrial or cytosolic energy crisis indicated by lactic acidosis as well as clinical symptoms, we terminated the DCA and administered 0.5 g/kg/day TID of sodium pyruvate orally. We analyzed the therapeutic effects of DCA or sodium pyruvate in the patient, and found that pyruvate therapy significantly decreased lactate, pyruvate and alanine levels, showed no adverse effects such as severe neuropathy seen in DCA, and had better clinical response on development and epilepsy. Though the efficacy of pyruvate on LS will be evaluated by randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study design in future, pyruvate therapy is a possible candidate for therapeutic choice for currently incurable mitochondrial disorders such as LS.

  4. Characterization of a canine model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa due to a PDE6A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tuntivanich, Nalinee; Pittler, Steven J.; Fischer, Andy J.; Omar, Ghezal; Kiupel, Matti; Weber, Arthur; Yao, Suxia; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Khan, Naheed Wali; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To characterize a canine model of autosomal recessive RP due to a PDE6A gene mutation. Methods Affected and breed- and age-matched control puppies were studied by electroretinography (ERG), light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and by assay for retinal PDE6 levels and enzymatic activity. Results The mutant puppies failed to develop normal rod-mediated ERG responses and had reduced light-adapted a-wave amplitudes from an early age. The residual ERG waveforms originated primarily from cone-driven responses. Development of photoreceptor outer segments was halted and rod cells were lost by apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a marked reduction in rod-opsin immunostaining outer segments and relative preservation of cones early in the disease process. With exception of rod bipolar cells that appeared to be reduced in number relatively early in the disease process other inner retinal cells were preserved in the early stages of the disease although there was marked and early activation of Müller glia. Western blotting showed that the PDE6A mutation not only resulted in a lack of PDE6A protein but the affected retinas also lacked the other PDE6 subunits, suggesting expression of PDE6A is required for normal expression of PDE6B and PDE6G. Affected retinas lacked PDE6 enzymatic activity. Conclusions This represents the first characterization of a PDE6A model of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and the PDE6A mutant dog shows promise as a large animal model for investigation of therapies to rescue mutant rod photoreceptors and to preserve cone photoreceptors in the face a rapid loss of rod cells. PMID:18775863

  5. A laser-cooled cesium fountain frequency standard and a measurement of the frequency shift due to ultra-cold collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibble, Kurt; Kasapi, Steven; Chu, Steven

    1993-01-01

    A frequency standard based on an atomic fountain of cesium atoms may have an accuracy of 10(exp -16) due to longer interaction times and smaller anticipated systematic errors. All of the known systematic effects that now limit the accuracy of the Cs frequency standard increase either linearly or as some higher power of the atom's velocity. The one systematic frequency shift which is dramatically different is the frequency shift due to the collisions between the laser cooled atoms. At a temperature of a few micro-K, the de Broglie wavelength (lambda(sub deB) = h/p, where h is Planck's constant and p is the momentum of the atom) is much larger than the scale of the interatomic potential. Under these conditions the collision cross sections can be as large as (lambda(sub deB)(sup 2))/Pi and the frequency shift due to these collisions was recently calculated. In our Cs atomic fountain, we laser cooled and trapped 10(exp 10) Cs atoms in 0.4 s. By shifting the frequencies of the laser beams, the atoms were launched upwards at 2.5 m/s and a fraction of the atoms were optically pumped into the F=3 ground state. The unwanted atoms in the F=4 ground state were removed from the fountain with radiation pressure from a laser beam tuned to excite only those atoms. The Cs atoms in the F=3 state traveled ballistically upwards, were excited by the microwave cavity, and then returned back through the same cavity in the atomic fountain configuration. By varying the cold atom density, a density dependent shift of -12.9 +/- 0.7 mHz or -1.4 x 10-12 for an average fountain density of (2.7 +/- 1.5) 10(exp 9) atoms/cm(sup 3) was measured.

  6. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-08

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction.

  7. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion of brain tissue due to electrically long neurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monai, Hiromu; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Aonishi, Toru

    2012-12-01

    The dielectric properties of brain tissue are important for understanding how neural activity is related to local field potentials and electroencephalograms. It is known that the permittivity of brain tissue exhibits strong frequency dependence (dispersion) and that the permittivity is very large in the low-frequency region. However, little is known with regard to the cause of the large permittivity in the low-frequency region. Here, we postulate that the dielectric properties of brain tissue can be partially accounted for by assuming that neurites are of sufficient length to be “electrically long.” To test this idea, we consider a model in which a neurite is treated as a long, narrow body, and it is subjected to a stimulus created by electrodes situated in the region external to it. With regard to this electric stimulus, the neurite can be treated as a passive cable. Assuming adequate symmetry so that the tissue packed with multiple cables is equivalent to an isolated system consisting of a single cable and a surrounding extracellular resistive medium, we analytically calculate the extracellular potential of the tissue in response to such an externally created alternating-current electric field using a Green's function that we obtained previously. Our results show that brain tissue modeled by such a cable existing within a purely resistive extracellular medium exhibits a large effective permittivity in the low-frequency region. Moreover, we obtain results suggesting that an extremely large low-frequency permittivity can coexist with weak low-pass filter characteristics in brain tissue.

  8. Frequency of 5382insC mutation of BRCA1 gene among breast cancer patients: an experience from Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Bhattacharyya, Deboshree; Bose, Chinmoy Kr; Choudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the number one cancer in females pushing the cervical cancer to the second position. The mutations in two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are frequently associated with familial breast cancer. The main objective of the study was to determine the frequency of the mutation 5382insC in BRCA1 of eastern Indian breast cancer patients and also study the hormonal receptor status and histopathology of the patients. Altogether 92 patients affected with breast cancer were included in this study. ARMS-PCR based amplification was used to detect the presence of mutation. The mutations were considered only after pedigree analysis. Out of 92 patients (age range: 20-77 years) with family history (57 individuals) and without family history (35 individuals) were screened. Fifty controls have been systematically investigated. Seven patients and two family members were found to be carriers of 5382insC mutation in BRCA1 gene. We have found 42.64 % ER(-)/PR(-) cancer and 20.58 % triple negative cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common histology among the investigated individuals. The presented data confirm a noticeable contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in BC development in Eastern India, which may justify an extended BRCA1 5382insC testing within this patient population. We found HER-2/neu negativity and BRCA1 positivity associated with familial breast cancer. From the hospital's patient history, it was revealed that the age of menarche plays an important role in development of breast cancer.

  9. An infant with cartilage-hair hypoplasia due to a novel homozygous mutation in the promoter region of the RMRP gene associated with chondrodysplasia and severe immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Vatanavicharn, N; Visitsunthorn, N; Pho-iam, T; Jirapongsananuruk, O; Pacharn, P; Chokephaibulkit, K; Limwongse, C; Wasant, P

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, sparse hair, and immune deficiency. It is caused by mutations in the RMRP gene, which encodes the RNA component of the mitochondrial RNA-processing ribonuclease (RNase MRP). Several mutations have been identified in its promoter region or transcribed sequence. However, homozygous mutations in the promoter region have been only reported in a patient with primary immunodeficiency without other features of CHH. We report on a Thai girl who first presented with chronic diarrhea, recurrent pneumonia, and severe failure to thrive, without apparently disproportionate dwarfism. The diagnosis of CHH was made after the severe wasting was corrected, and disproportionate growth became noticeable. The patient had the typical features of CHH, including sparse hair and metaphyseal abnormalities. The immunologic profiles were consistent with combined immune deficiency. Mutation analysis identified a novel homozygous mutation, g.-19_-25 dupACTACTC, in the promoter region of the RMRP gene. Identification of the mutation enabled us to provide a prenatal diagnosis in the subsequent pregnancy. This patient is the first CHH case with the characteristic features due to the homozygous mutation in the promoter region of the RMRP gene. The finding of severe immunodeficiency supports that promoter mutations markedly disrupt mRNA cleavage function, which causes cell-cycle impairment.

  10. The Number of Overlapping AID Hotspots in Germline IGHV Genes Is Inversely Correlated with Mutation Frequency in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chaohui; Chu, Charles C.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Bagnara, Davide; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of mutations by Activation-Induced Deaminase (AID) is a key step in generating antibody diversity at the Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci but is also implicated in B-cell malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). AID has previously been shown to preferentially deaminate WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) hotspots. WGCW sites, which contain an overlapping WRC hotspot on both DNA strands, mutate at much higher frequency than single hotspots. Human Ig heavy chain (IGHV) genes differ in terms of WGCW numbers, ranging from 4 for IGHV3-48*03 to as many as 12 in IGHV1-69*01. An absence of V-region mutations in CLL patients (“IGHV unmutated”, or U-CLL) is associated with a poorer prognosis compared to “IGHV mutated” (M-CLL) patients. The reasons for this difference are still unclear, but it has been noted that particular IGHV genes associate with U-CLL vs M-CLL. For example, patients with IGHV1-69 clones tend to be U-CLL with a poor prognosis, whereas patients with IGHV3-30 tend to be M-CLL and have a better prognosis. Another distinctive feature of CLL is that ~30% of (mostly poor prognosis) patients can be classified into “stereotyped” subsets, each defined by HCDR3 similarity, suggesting selection, possibly for a self-antigen. We analyzed >1000 IGHV genes from CLL patients and found a highly significant statistical relationship between the number of WGCW hotspots in the germline V-region and the observed mutation frequency in patients. However, paradoxically, this correlation was inverse, with V-regions with more WGCW hotspots being less likely to be mutated, i.e., more likely to be U-CLL. The number of WGCW hotspots in particular, are more strongly correlated with mutation frequency than either non-overlapping (WRC) hotspots or more general models of mutability derived from somatic hypermutation data. Furthermore, this correlation is not observed in sequences from the B cell repertoires of normal individuals and those with autoimmune diseases. PMID

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta due to mutations in non-collagenous genes: lessons in the biology of bone formation.

    PubMed

    Marini, Joan C; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta or 'brittle bone disease' has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for osteogenesis imperfecta as a collagen-related disorder, where most cases are due to autosomal dominant type I collagen defects, while rare, mostly recessive, forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development, and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of osteogenesis imperfecta. Bone-restricted interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM)-like protein (BRIL) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) defects cause types V and VI osteogenesis imperfecta via defective bone mineralization, while defects in cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1), and cyclophilin B (CYPB) cause types VII-IX osteogenesis imperfecta via defective collagen post-translational modification. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and FK506-binding protein-65 (FKBP65) defects cause types X and XI osteogenesis imperfecta via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding, and chaperoning, while defects in SP7 transcription factor, wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 1 (WNT1), trimeric intracellular cation channel type b (TRIC-B), and old astrocyte specifically induced substance (OASIS) disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) causes type XII osteogenesis imperfecta due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of osteogenesis imperfecta types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and has prodded investigations into common pathways in osteogenesis imperfecta. Such

  12. High Frequency of GBA Gene Mutations in Dementia With Lewy Bodies Among Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Shiner, Tamara; Mirelman, Anat; Gana Weisz, Mali; Bar-Shira, Anat; Ash, Elissa; Cialic, Ron; Nevler, Naomi; Gurevich, Tanya; Bregman, Noa; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Giladi, Nir

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are a risk factor for the development of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). These mutations are common among Ashkenazi Jews (AJ) and appear to have an effect on the natural history of the disease. To evaluate the clinical and genetic characteristics of an AJ cohort of patients diagnosed with DLB, assess the association of phenotype of DLB with GBA mutations, and explore the effects of these mutations on the clinical course of the disease. Thirty-five consecutively recruited AJ patients with newly diagnosed clinically probable or possible DLB underwent genotyping for the 7 known AJ GBA mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation. Two patients with the LRRK2 G2019S mutation were excluded from the final analysis. Data were collected from July 1, 2013, to July 31, 2015. Assessment of clinical markers included the following standardized scales: Autonomic Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease (SCOPA-AUT), REM (Rapid Eye Movement) Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Motor symptoms were assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor part III. A subset of 15 patients also underwent assessment with the Color Trail Making Test, FAS verbal fluency, Digit Span, Hooper Visual Organization Test, and Stroop test. Among the 35 patients with DLB (23 men [66%] and 12 women [34%]; mean [SD], 69.6 [8.2] years), 11 (31%) were carriers of mutations in the GBA gene. Among the 33 patients undergoing further analysis, the GBA mutation carriers were younger at symptom onset (mean [SD] age, 65.7 [11.7] vs 72.1 [5.1] years; P = .03), had more frequent visual hallucinations that did not achieve significance (9 of 11 [82%] compared with 12 of 22 [55%]; P = .052), and had higher scores on the RBD questionnaire (mean [SD], 7.8 [2.2] vs 5.1 [3.3]; P = .03). After adjusting for age and duration of symptoms, testing revealed that GBA mutation carriers

  13. Increased frequency of headache and change in visual aura due to occipital cysticercus granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is a common clinical disorder, quite disabling and affecting the quality of life in majority of patients. The visual aura is the commonest among all types of aura. Various types of migraine aura described in the literature are photopsia, fortification spectra, scotoma, visual distortion, haemianopia and metamorphsia. The epileptic visual aura differs from aura associated with migraine in certain features: short lasting for 2-3 minutes, occurring in clusters, multicoloured and circular in shape. The ictal manifestations of occipital lobe lesions can mimic episodes of migraine with visual aura according to some reports. In this case report, we intended to highlight aggravation and increased frequency of headache attacks and changed pattern of aura induced by occipital lobe cysticercus granuloma in a patient diagnosed of migraine with aura. The importance of neuroimaging of brain in state of unexpected increased frequency of headache episodes has been emphasised. PMID:22962401

  14. Chirality-mediated bistability and strong frequency downshifting of the gyrotropic resonance of a magnetic vortex due to dynamic destiffening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushruth, Manu; Fried, Jasper P.; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Xavier, Stephane; Deranlot, Cyrile; Cros, Vincent; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate an enhanced, bidirectional, in-plane magnetic field tuning of the gyrotropic resonance frequency of a magnetic vortex within a ferromagnetic disk by introducing a flat edge. When the core is in its vicinity, the flat edge locally reduces the core's directional dynamic stiffness for movement parallel to the edge. This strongly reduces the net dynamic core stiffness, leading to the gyrotropic frequency being significantly less than when the core is centered (or located near the round edge). This leads to the measurable range of gyrotropic frequencies being more than doubled and also results in a clear chirality-mediated bistability of the gyrotropic resonance frequency due to what is effectively a chirality dependence of the core's confining potential.

  15. Mitigating Oscillator Pulling Due To Magnetic Coupling in Monolithic Mixed-Signal Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Sobering, Ian David

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of frequency pulling in a varactor-tuned LC VCO under coupling from an on-chip PA is presented. The large-signal behavior of the VCO's inversion-mode MOS varactors is outlined, and the susceptibility of the VCO to frequency pulling from PA aggressor signals with various modulation schemes is discussed. We show that if the aggressor signal is aperiodic, band-limited, or amplitude-modulated, the varactor-tuned LC VCO will experience frequency pulling due to time-modulation of the varactor capacitance. However, if the aggressor signal has constant-envelope phase modulation, VCO pulling can be eliminated, even in the presence of coupling, through careful choice of VCO frequency and divider ratio. Additional mitigation strategies, including new inductor topologies and system-level architectural choices, are also examined.

  16. The 35delG mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) associated with congenital deafness: European carrier frequencies and evidence for its origin in ancient Greece.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Diéterlen, Florent

    2005-01-01

    The 35delG mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) at the DFNB1 locus represents the most common mutation in Caucasian patients with genetic sensorineural deafness. This new meta-analysis concerns published carrier frequencies of the 35delG mutation in 27 populations for 6,628 unrelated individuals in Europe and in the Middle East; the mean carrier frequency of the mutation is 1.9%. Compared on a regional basis, the most elevated carrier frequency value is of 1 individual carrier in 31 in southern Europe. It is probable that the 35delG mutation originated in ancient Greece and was subsequently propagated in other Mediterranean countries (especially in Italy) during recent historical times.

  17. Thermal Injury in Human Subjects Due to 94-GHz Radio Frequency Radiation Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-24

    porcine exposure database. Due to the inherent difficulties in acquiring human subjects and exposing them to up to potential damaging levels of...thermal response to MMW exposures from the porcine database. Due to the limits on recruiting human subjects and exposing them to damaging levels of...exposures to these waves. This experiment is designed to assess if previous studies of MMW skin damage in pigs (Parker et al., 2015b) is indicative

  18. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction. PMID:26903642

  20. Auto-correlation function and frequency spectrum due to a super-position of uncorrelated exponential pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O. E.; Theodorsen, A.

    2017-03-01

    The auto-correlation function and the frequency power spectral density due to a super-position of uncorrelated exponential pulses are considered. These are shown to be independent of the degree of pulse overlap and thereby the intermittency of the stochastic process. For constant pulse duration and a one-sided exponential pulse shape, the power spectral density has a Lorentzian shape which is flat for low frequencies and a power law at high frequencies. The algebraic tail is demonstrated to result from the discontinuity in the pulse function. For a strongly asymmetric two-sided exponential pulse shape, the frequency spectrum is a broken power law with two scaling regions. In the case of a symmetric pulse shape, the power spectral density is the square of a Lorentzian function. The steep algebraic tail at high frequencies in these cases is demonstrated to follow from the discontinuity in the derivative of the pulse function. A random distribution of pulse durations is shown to result in apparently longer correlation times but has no influence on the asymptotic power law tail of the frequency spectrum. The effect of additional random noise is also discussed, leading to a flat spectrum for high frequencies. The probability density function for the fluctuations is shown to be independent of the distribution of pulse durations. The predictions of this model describe the variety of auto-correlation functions and power spectral densities reported from experimental measurements in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas.

  1. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Mexican Population Isolate with High Prevalence of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Due to a Novel Calpain-3 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos A.; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Roque-Ramirez, Bladimir; Zenteno, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2) is a group of autosomally recessive inherited disorders defined by weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In the past, several population isolates with high incidence of LGMD2 arising from founder mutation effects have been identified. The aim of this work is to describe the results of clinical, epidemiologic, and molecular studies performed in a Mexican village segregating numerous cases of LGMD2. A population census was conducted in the village to identify all LGMD affected patients. Molecular analysis included genome wide homozygosity mapping using a 250K SNP Affymetrix microarray followed by PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing of the candidate gene. In addition, DNA from 401 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the LGMD2 causal mutation. A total of 32 LGMD2 patients were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 4.3 (CI: 2.9–5.9) cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 232). Genome wide homozygosity mapping revealed that affected individuals shared a 6.6 Mb region of homozygosity at chromosome 15q15. The identified homozygous interval contained CAPN3, the gene responsible for LGMD2 type A (LGMD2A). Direct sequencing of this gene revealed homozygosity for a novel c.348C>A mutation (p.Ala116Asp) in DNA from all 20 affected subjects available for genetic screening, except one which was heterozygous for the mutation. In such patient, a heterozygous c.2362AG>TCATCT deletion/insertion was recognized as the second CAPN3 mutation. Western blot and autocatalytic activity analyses in protein lysates from skeletal muscle biopsy obtained from a p.Ala116Asp homozygous patient suggested that this particular mutation increased the autocatalytic activity of CAPN3. Thirty eigth heterozygotes of the p.Ala116Asp mutation were identified among 401 genotyped unaffected villagers, yielding a population carrier frequency of 1 in 11

  2. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Mexican Population Isolate with High Prevalence of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Due to a Novel Calpain-3 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos A; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Roque-Ramirez, Bladimir; Zenteno, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2) is a group of autosomally recessive inherited disorders defined by weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In the past, several population isolates with high incidence of LGMD2 arising from founder mutation effects have been identified. The aim of this work is to describe the results of clinical, epidemiologic, and molecular studies performed in a Mexican village segregating numerous cases of LGMD2. A population census was conducted in the village to identify all LGMD affected patients. Molecular analysis included genome wide homozygosity mapping using a 250K SNP Affymetrix microarray followed by PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing of the candidate gene. In addition, DNA from 401 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the LGMD2 causal mutation. A total of 32 LGMD2 patients were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 4.3 (CI: 2.9-5.9) cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 232). Genome wide homozygosity mapping revealed that affected individuals shared a 6.6 Mb region of homozygosity at chromosome 15q15. The identified homozygous interval contained CAPN3, the gene responsible for LGMD2 type A (LGMD2A). Direct sequencing of this gene revealed homozygosity for a novel c.348C>A mutation (p.Ala116Asp) in DNA from all 20 affected subjects available for genetic screening, except one which was heterozygous for the mutation. In such patient, a heterozygous c.2362AG>TCATCT deletion/insertion was recognized as the second CAPN3 mutation. Western blot and autocatalytic activity analyses in protein lysates from skeletal muscle biopsy obtained from a p.Ala116Asp homozygous patient suggested that this particular mutation increased the autocatalytic activity of CAPN3. Thirty eigth heterozygotes of the p.Ala116Asp mutation were identified among 401 genotyped unaffected villagers, yielding a population carrier frequency of 1 in 11

  3. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  4. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O S; Shaw, Kenna R; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M; Kipp, Benjamin R; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S; McWilliams, Robert R; Wolff, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation.

  5. Galactosemia in the Turkish population with a high frequency of Q188R mutation and distribution of Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 variations.

    PubMed

    Özgül, Rıza Köksal; Güzel-Ozantürk, Ayşegül; Dündar, Halil; Yücel-Yılmaz, Didem; Coşkun, Turgay; Sivri, Serap; Aydoǧdu, Sultan; Tokatlı, Ayşegül; Dursun, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Classical galactosemia is an inherited recessive disorder of galactose metabolism caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT), which is caused by mutations in the GALT gene. In this study, 56 Turkish patients diagnosed with galactosemia were screened for GALT gene mutations using Affymetrix resequencing microarrays. Eleven types of mutations were detected in these patients, including two novel mutations (R258G and G310fsX49) and nine recurrent mutations. We detected six patients who were homozygous for the E340* mutation and for N314D, L218L silent substitutions (Duarte-1 variant) in this study. The haplotype E340*, N314D and L218L has been reported only in Turkish patients, which suggests that the E340* mutation is specific for our population and might be spread by a Turk ancestor. In patients, the Duarte-1 allele was found with a frequency of 10.71%, whereas the Duarte-2 allele was not detected. Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 alleles were found to be present at a frequency of 2.3% and 1.4%, respectively, in the screening of 105 healthy individuals. Considering all detected mutations, it is a very important finding that exons 6 and 10 of the GALT gene account for 79% of all mutant alleles in the Turkish population. The most common mutation is Q188R, with a frequency of 55.35%.

  6. [Frequency of the most common mutations of the CFTR gene in peruvian patients with cystic fibrosis using the ARMS-PCR technique].

    PubMed

    Aquino, Ruth; Protzel, Ana; Rivera, Juan; Abarca, Hugo; Dueñas, Milagros; Nestarez, Cecilia; Purizaga, Nestor; Diringer, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene reported in Latin Americausing amplification-refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in two referral hospitals in Peru during the year 2014. The frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene was assessed in patients of the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins and the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, both located in Lima, Peru. Blood samples were collected from 36 patients with CF, and the ARMS-PCR technique was used to determine the presence of these mutations. The study group included 73.5% of patients with a known diagnosis of CF in the country when the study was carried out. ARMS-PCR allowed three of the mutations to be identified in a combined 30.6% of the alleles from patients with CF, and 64.9% of the mutated alleles were not identified. The mutations found were p.Phe508del (22,2%), p.Gly542* (6,9%), and p.Arg1162* (1,4%). There is significant variability in both the frequency and type of mutations present in our study population and in what has been reported in other Latin American countries. It is necessary to perform studies that use complete sequencing technology for the CFTR gene to identify other mutations present in our population.

  7. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  8. Subfraction analysis of circulating lipoproteins in a patient with Tangier disease due to a novel ABCA1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Murano, Takeyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Suzuki, Masayo; Noike, Hirofumi; Takanami, Tarou; Yoshida, Tomoe; Suzuki, Mitsuya; Hashimoto, Ryuya; Maeno, Takatoshi; Terai, Kensuke; Tokuyama, Wataru; Hiruta, Nobuyuki; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Bujo, Hideaki

    2016-01-15

    Tangier disease, characterized by low or absent high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is a rare hereditary lipid storage disorder associated with frequent, but not obligatory, severe premature atherosclerosis due to disturbed reverse cholesterol transport from tissues. The reasons for the heterogeneity in atherogenicity in certain dyslipidemias have not been fully elucidated. Here, using high-performance liquid chromatography with a gel filtration column (HPLC-GFC), we have studied the lipoprotein profile of a 17-year old male patient with Tangier disease who to date has not developed manifest coronary atherosclerosis. The patient was shown to be homozygous for a novel mutation (Leu1097Pro) in the central cytoplasmic region of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Serum total and HDL-cholesterol levels were 59mg/dl and 2mg/dl, respectively. Lipoprotein electrophoretic analyses on agarose and polyacrylamide gels showed the presence of massively abnormal lipoproteins. Further analysis by HPLC-GFC identified significant amounts of lipoproteins in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions. The lipoprotein particles found in the peak subfraction were smaller than normal LDL, were rich in triglycerides, but poor in cholesterol and phospholipids. These findings in an adolescent Tangier patient suggest that patients in whom these triglyceride-rich, cholesterol- and phospholipid-poor LDL-type particles accumulate over time, would experience an increased propensity for developing atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  10. The near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) mutation disrupts hair formation but is not due to a mutation in the Hairless coding region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert E; Carpenter, Donald A; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Michaud, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-07-01

    Near-naked hairless (Hr(N)) is a semi-dominant, spontaneous mutation that was suggested by allelism testing to be allelic with mouse Hairless (Hr). Hr(N) mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, rather than as an inability to regrow hair after the first catagen and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to emerge consistently from the hair follicle, whereas Hr(N)/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in Hr(N)/Hr(N) mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr-coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'-untranslated region, and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore, Hr(N) does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  11. The Near Naked Hairless (HrN) Mutation Disrupts Hair Formation but is not Due to a Mutation in the Hairless Coding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yutao; Das, Suchita; Olszewski, Robert Edward; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Carpenter, D A; Sundberg, John P; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiaochen; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Michaud III, Edward J; Voy, Brynn H

    2007-01-01

    Near naked hairless (HrN) is a semi-dominant mutation that arose spontaneously and was suggested by allelism testing to be an allele of mouse Hairless (Hr). HrN mice differ from other Hr mutants in that hair loss appears as the postnatal coat begins to emerge, as opposed to failure to initiate the first postnatal hair cycle, and that the mutation displays semi-dominant inheritance. We sequenced the Hr cDNA in HrN/HrN mice and characterized the pathological and molecular phenotypes to identify the basis for hair loss in this model. HrN/HrN mice exhibit dystrophic hairs that are unable to consistently emerge from the hair follicle, while HrN/+ mice display a sparse coat of hair and a milder degree of follicular dystrophy than their homozygous littermates. DNA microarray analysis of cutaneous gene expression demonstrates that numerous genes are downregulated in HrN/HrN mice, primarily genes important for hair structure. By contrast, Hr expression is significantly increased. Sequencing the Hr coding region, intron-exon boundaries, 5'- and 3'- UTR and immediate upstream region did not reveal the underlying mutation. Therefore HrN does not appear to be an allele of Hr but may result from a mutation in a closely linked gene or from a regulatory mutation in Hr.

  12. Subchronic perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) exposure induces elevated mutant frequency in an in vivo λ transgenic medaka mutation assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanhong; Hu, Wei; Huang, Changjiang; Hua, Shushan; Wei, Qihao; Bai, Chenglian; Chen, Jiangfei; Norris, Michelle B.; Winn, Richard; Yang, Dongren; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2016-12-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) has been widely detected in the environment, wildlife and humans, but few studies have ever examined its mutagenic effect in vivo. In the present study, we use a transgenic fish model, the λ transgenic medaka, to evaluate the potential mutagenicity of PFOS in vivo following a subchronic exposure of 30 days. The mutant frequency of cII target gene was 3.46 × 10‑5 in liver tissue from control fish, which increased by 1.4-fold to 4.86 × 10‑5 in fish exposed to 6.7 μg/L PFOS, 1.55-fold to 5.36 × 10‑5 in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS, and 2.02-fold to 6.99 × 10‑5 in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. This dose-dependent increase of mutant frequency was also accompanied with mutational spectrum changes associated with PFOS exposure. In particular, PFOS-induced mutation was characterized by +1 frameshift mutations, which increased from 0% in control fish to 13.2% in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS and 14.6% in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. Our findings provide the first evidence of PFOS’s mutagenicity in an aquatic model system. Given the fact that most conventional mutagenic assays were negative for PFOS, we propose that PFOS-induced mutation in liver tissue of λ transgenic medaka may be mediated through compromised liver function.

  13. Subchronic perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) exposure induces elevated mutant frequency in an in vivo λ transgenic medaka mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanhong; Hu, Wei; Huang, Changjiang; Hua, Shushan; Wei, Qihao; Bai, Chenglian; Chen, Jiangfei; Norris, Michelle B; Winn, Richard; Yang, Dongren; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2016-12-08

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) has been widely detected in the environment, wildlife and humans, but few studies have ever examined its mutagenic effect in vivo. In the present study, we use a transgenic fish model, the λ transgenic medaka, to evaluate the potential mutagenicity of PFOS in vivo following a subchronic exposure of 30 days. The mutant frequency of cII target gene was 3.46 × 10(-5) in liver tissue from control fish, which increased by 1.4-fold to 4.86 × 10(-5) in fish exposed to 6.7 μg/L PFOS, 1.55-fold to 5.36 × 10(-5) in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS, and 2.02-fold to 6.99 × 10(-5) in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. This dose-dependent increase of mutant frequency was also accompanied with mutational spectrum changes associated with PFOS exposure. In particular, PFOS-induced mutation was characterized by +1 frameshift mutations, which increased from 0% in control fish to 13.2% in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS and 14.6% in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. Our findings provide the first evidence of PFOS's mutagenicity in an aquatic model system. Given the fact that most conventional mutagenic assays were negative for PFOS, we propose that PFOS-induced mutation in liver tissue of λ transgenic medaka may be mediated through compromised liver function.

  14. Subchronic perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) exposure induces elevated mutant frequency in an in vivo λ transgenic medaka mutation assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanhong; Hu, Wei; Huang, Changjiang; Hua, Shushan; Wei, Qihao; Bai, Chenglian; Chen, Jiangfei; Norris, Michelle B.; Winn, Richard; Yang, Dongren; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) has been widely detected in the environment, wildlife and humans, but few studies have ever examined its mutagenic effect in vivo. In the present study, we use a transgenic fish model, the λ transgenic medaka, to evaluate the potential mutagenicity of PFOS in vivo following a subchronic exposure of 30 days. The mutant frequency of cII target gene was 3.46 × 10−5 in liver tissue from control fish, which increased by 1.4-fold to 4.86 × 10−5 in fish exposed to 6.7 μg/L PFOS, 1.55-fold to 5.36 × 10−5 in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS, and 2.02-fold to 6.99 × 10−5 in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. This dose-dependent increase of mutant frequency was also accompanied with mutational spectrum changes associated with PFOS exposure. In particular, PFOS-induced mutation was characterized by +1 frameshift mutations, which increased from 0% in control fish to 13.2% in fish exposed to 27.6 μg/L PFOS and 14.6% in fish exposed to 87.6 μg/L PFOS. Our findings provide the first evidence of PFOS’s mutagenicity in an aquatic model system. Given the fact that most conventional mutagenic assays were negative for PFOS, we propose that PFOS-induced mutation in liver tissue of λ transgenic medaka may be mediated through compromised liver function. PMID:27929129

  15. Prediction of natural frequency variability due to uncertainty in material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. W.

    1994-01-01

    Composite materials are widely used in various types of modern engineering structures. Traditional studies on composite structures have been based on the assumption that the material properties of the composites are characterized by a priori known elastic moduli, and no uncertainties of these moduli have been considered. However, the composite materials are invariably subject to a certain amount of scatter in their measured elastic moduli. To a large extent, the properties of composite materials are dependent on the fabrication process. But even the composite materials manufactured by the same process demonstrate differences in their elastic properties. This paper proposes a new, non-probabilistic method to predict the variability in the natural frequencies of the composite cylindrical shell, resulting from the unavoidable scatter in elastic moduli. The available measurements of elastic moduli are fitted by the four-dimensional uncertainty ellipsoid. The upper and lower bounds of the natural frequency are derived. With these bounds, designers will have a better understanding of the real dynamic behavior of the structure.

  16. Osteogenesis Imperfecta due to Mutations in Non-Collagenous Genes-Lessons in the Biology of Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Joan C.; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or “brittle bone disease”, has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for OI as a collagen-related disorder, where autosomal dominant type I collagen defects cause most cases, while rare, mostly recessive forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of OI. Recent Findings BRIL and PEDF defects cause types V and VI OI via defective bone mineralization, while defects in CRTAP, P3H1 and CyPB cause types VII-IX via defective collagen post-translational modification. Hsp47 and FKBP65 defects cause types X and XI OI via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding and chaperoning, while defects in SP7, WNT1, TRIC-B and OASIS disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase BMP1 causes type XII OI due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Summary Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of OI types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and should prod investigations into common pathways in OI. Such investigations could yield critical information on cellular and bone tissue mechanisms and translate to new mechanistic insight into clinical therapies for patients. PMID:25007323

  17. High Frequency, Spontaneous motA Mutations in Campylobacter jejuni Strain 81-176

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Krystle L.; Poly, Frédéric; Sahl, Jason W.; Rasko, David A.; Guerry, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important cause of bacterial diarrhea worldwide. The pathogenesis of C. jejuni is poorly understood and complicated by phase variation of multiple surface structures including lipooligosaccharide, capsule, and flagellum. When C. jejuni strain 81-176 was plated on blood agar for single colonies, the presence of translucent, non-motile colonial variants was noted among the majority of opaque, motile colonies. High-throughput genomic sequencing of two flagellated translucent and two opaque variants as well as the parent strain revealed multiple genetic changes compared to the published genome. However, the only mutated open reading frame common between the two translucent variants and absent from the opaque variants and the parent was motA, encoding a flagellar motor protein. A total of 18 spontaneous motA mutations were found that mapped to four distinct sites in the gene, with only one class of mutation present in a phase variable region. This study exemplifies the mutative/adaptive properties of C. jejuni and demonstrates additional variability in C. jejuni beyond phase variation. PMID:24558375

  18. [Frequency of hospitalization due to low back pain syndrome in Poland and European countries].

    PubMed

    Michalik, Rafał; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Kotyla, Przemysław; Owczarek, Aleksander J

    2015-01-01

    Back pain is one of the most frequently diagnosed diseases of the osteoarticular system. It has been estimated that 50-80% of the population has experienced at least one episode of back pain. The aim of the study was to present the epidemiology data on back pain in Poland based on secondary epidemiological data collected in national and international databases. The study was based on the data provided by the National Institute of Health under the framework of the National Hospital Morbidity Research, and the data collected in the Eurostat database. Currently, the highest prevalence rates of hospital admission due to back pain are found in the oldest women (over 65 years) and slightly younger men (between 55 and 64 years of age). In the group of people older than 45 years the incidence of pain episodes increases to about threefold compared to younger people. Moreover, it is noted that the higher number of hospitalizations due to low back pain syndrome concerns rural residents. The analysis of the Eurostat data indicates a large variation in rates of hospitalization due to lower back pain and a slightly different course of disease in other countries. In Poland, for both women and men, there has been a steady increase in the number of patients hospitalized due to lower back pain. The hospitalization rate due to back pain in Poland is one of the lowest in Europe, but the observed increase in the number of hospitalized patients in recent years has created a significant economic burden in the healthcare system. It is worth noting that an average length of hospitalization of patients with lower back pain is slightly longer in Poland (on average 4 days longer) than in Western European countries.

  19. Frequency-dependence of the Love Numbers due to the Earth's Quasi-Rheology, Mantle Anelasticity and Ocean Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Shen, W.; Huang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Love numbers are defined as dimensionless coefficients to characterize the deformations caused by an applied volume potential. For the complex Earth system, Love numbers are not constants but vary with frequency due to the following three factors: 1. the resonance behavior of the wobble motions near its eigen-frequencies, such as the well-known free core nutation resonance in the diurnal tides; 2. the mantle anelasticity of which the role becomes more significant as the frequency gets lower; and 3. the quasi-fluid rheology describing the Earth's fluid-like deformations at geological time scales. In this study, we present a power law for mantle anelasticity constrained by Chandler wobble parameters (the period TC and the quality factor QC) and an empirical quasi-fluid rheology model with a linear dependence on frequency for a period as long as 18.6 years. The models of mantle anelasticity and quasi-fluid rheology can provide good estimates of oceanless Love numbers at arbitrary frequencies with periods ranging from ~1 day to ~18.6 years, when comparing to the observed values for some frequencies. To account for the effects of dynamic oceans on the Love numbers, the diurnal ocean tides from the IERS Conventions (2010), the long-period ocean model of Dickman & Gross (2010) and the equilibrium ocean pole tide model of Desai (2002) are adopted to calculate the oceanic corrections to the Love numbers. We find due to the mantle anelasticity, the equilibrium ocean pole tides will cause imaginary parts to the Love numbers and have notable influence on the geophysical estimate of the QC value, which was disregarded before. In addition, we show that the Chandler wobble parameters derived from our Love number model are consistent with the observations. Thus, we conclude that our model of frequency-dependent Love numbers should be reliable. This study is supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation China (Grant Numbers 41174011, 41128003, 41021061 and 40974015).

  20. Screening the Expression of ABCB6 in Erythrocytes Reveals an Unexpectedly High Frequency of Lan Mutations in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Katalin; Varady, Gyorgy; Gera, Melinda; Antalffy, Geza; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Tordai, Attila; Studzian, Maciej; Strapagiel, Dominik; Pulaski, Lukasz; Tani, Yoshihiko; Sarkadi, Balazs; Szakacs, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Lan is a high-incidence blood group antigen expressed in more than 99.9% of the population. Identification of the human ABC transporter ABCB6 as the molecular basis of Lan has opened the way for studies assessing the relation of ABCB6 function and expression to health and disease. To date, 34 ABCB6 sequence variants have been described in association with reduced ABCB6 expression based on the genotyping of stored blood showing weak or no reactivity with anti-Lan antibodies. In the present study we examined the red blood cell (RBC) surface expression of ABCB6 by quantitative flow cytometry in a cohort of 47 healthy individuals. Sequencing of the entire coding region of the ABCB6 gene in low RBC ABCB6 expressors identified a new allele (IVS9+1G>A, affecting a putative splice site at the boundary of exon 9) and two nonsynonymous SNPs listed in the SNP database (R192Q (rs150221689) and G588 S (rs145526996)). The R192Q mutation showed co-segregation with reduced RBC ABCB6 expression in a family, and we found the G588 S mutation in a compound heterozygous individual with undetectable ABCB6 expression, suggesting that both mutations result in weak or no expression of ABCB6 on RBCs. Analysis of the intracellular expression pattern in HeLa cells by confocal microscopy indicated that these mutations do not compromise overall expression or the endolysosomal localization of ABCB6. Genotyping of two large cohorts, containing 235 and 1039 unrelated volunteers, confirmed the high allele frequency of Lan-mutations. Our results suggest that genetic variants linked to lower or absent cell surface expression of ABCB6/Langereis may be more common than previously thought. PMID:25360778

  1. Screening the expression of ABCB6 in erythrocytes reveals an unexpectedly high frequency of Lan mutations in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Koszarska, Magdalena; Kucsma, Nora; Kiss, Katalin; Varady, Gyorgy; Gera, Melinda; Antalffy, Geza; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Tordai, Attila; Studzian, Maciej; Strapagiel, Dominik; Pulaski, Lukasz; Tani, Yoshihiko; Sarkadi, Balazs; Szakacs, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    Lan is a high-incidence blood group antigen expressed in more than 99.9% of the population. Identification of the human ABC transporter ABCB6 as the molecular basis of Lan has opened the way for studies assessing the relation of ABCB6 function and expression to health and disease. To date, 34 ABCB6 sequence variants have been described in association with reduced ABCB6 expression based on the genotyping of stored blood showing weak or no reactivity with anti-Lan antibodies. In the present study we examined the red blood cell (RBC) surface expression of ABCB6 by quantitative flow cytometry in a cohort of 47 healthy individuals. Sequencing of the entire coding region of the ABCB6 gene in low RBC ABCB6 expressors identified a new allele (IVS9+1G>A, affecting a putative splice site at the boundary of exon 9) and two nonsynonymous SNPs listed in the SNP database (R192Q (rs150221689) and G588 S (rs145526996)). The R192Q mutation showed co-segregation with reduced RBC ABCB6 expression in a family, and we found the G588 S mutation in a compound heterozygous individual with undetectable ABCB6 expression, suggesting that both mutations result in weak or no expression of ABCB6 on RBCs. Analysis of the intracellular expression pattern in HeLa cells by confocal microscopy indicated that these mutations do not compromise overall expression or the endolysosomal localization of ABCB6. Genotyping of two large cohorts, containing 235 and 1039 unrelated volunteers, confirmed the high allele frequency of Lan-mutations. Our results suggest that genetic variants linked to lower or absent cell surface expression of ABCB6/Langereis may be more common than previously thought.

  2. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schüle, Rebecca; Schulze, Martin; Gburek-Augustat, Janina; Schweizer, Roland; Schirmacher, Anja; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Gonzalez, Michael; Young, Peter; Züchner, Stephan; Schöls, Ludger; Bauer, Peter

    2014-04-17

    Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of "spastic ataxias". However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40 years, and neither hypogonadism nor prominent cognitive

  3. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samieh; Yavarian, Majid; Azinfar, Azadeh; Rajaei, Minoo; Azizi Kootenaee, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet. Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered. Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198) as cases and healthy (N=201) as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases. In total, 17(8.6%) of cases and 2(1%) of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01). There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02), very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46), intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR) (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ),and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 ) among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation. The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women.

  4. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Samieh; Yavarian, Majid; Azinfar, Azadeh; Rajaei, Minoo; Azizi Kootenaee, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet. Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered. Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198) as cases and healthy (N=201) as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases. Results: In total, 17(8.6%) of cases and 2(1%) of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01). There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02), very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46), intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR) (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ),and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 ) among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation. Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women. PMID:25242976

  5. Parkinson's disease due to the R1441G mutation in Dardarin: a founder effect in the Basques.

    PubMed

    Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Martí-Massó, José-Félix; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Martínez-Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Sáenz, Amets; Singleton, Andrew B; López de Munain, Adolfo; Pérez-Tur, Jordi

    2006-11-01

    The recent discovery of mutations in Dardarin (LRRK2) have been related to the appearance of Parkinson's disease in several families. Notably, one single mutation in this gene (R1441G) not only appeared in familial, but also in apparently sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) patients of Basque descent. A clinical population was ascertained, and subjects were classified into Basque and non-Basque descent according to their known ancestry. The R1441G mutation was assayed using an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, and several single nucleotide polymorphisms surrounding this mutation were analyzed by direct sequencing. In addition to 22 members of the original Basque families where R1441G was identified, we observed 17 carriers of the mutation who were apparently related through a common ancestor. From a clinical perspective, the disease observed in mutation carriers is indistinguishable from that in noncarriers. The R1441G mutation causes a form of Parkinson's disease that is equivalent to that observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. This mutation appears in 16.4% and 4.0% of familial and sporadic PD in this Basque population, respectively.

  6. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  7. Optic atrophy and a Leigh-like syndrome due to mutations in the c12orf65 gene: report of a novel mutation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Gena; Calderwood, Laurel; Cox, Gerald F; Robson, Caroline D; Teot, Lisa A; Mullon, Jennifer; Anselm, Irina

    2014-03-01

    Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency type 7 (COXPD7) is a rare disorder of mitochondrial metabolism that results in optic atrophy and Leigh syndrome-like disease. We describe 2 siblings with compound heterozygous mutations in the recently identified C12orf65 gene who presented with optic atrophy and mild developmental delays and subsequently developed bilateral, symmetric lesions in the brainstem reminiscent of Leigh syndrome. Repeat neuroimaging demonstrated reversibility of the findings in 1 sibling and persistent metabolic stroke in the other. This article highlights the phenotypic manifestations from a novel mutation in the C12orf65 gene and reviews the clinical presentation of the 5 other individuals reported to date who carry mutations in this gene.

  8. Inherited pain: sodium channel Nav1.7 A1632T mutation causes erythromelalgia due to a shift of fast inactivation.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O; Kist, Andreas M; Lampe, Anne K; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-24

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited "paroxysmal extreme pain disorder" (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079-11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T. Therefore

  9. Sinusoidal Siemens star spatial frequency response measurement errors due to misidentified target centers

    DOE PAGES

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-07-23

    Numerous methods are available to measure the spatial frequency response (SFR) of an optical system. A recent change to the ISO 12233 photography resolution standard includes a sinusoidal Siemens star test target. We take the sinusoidal Siemens star proposed by the ISO 12233 standard, measure system SFR, and perform an analysis of errors induced by incorrectly identifying the center of a test target. We show a closed-form solution for the radial profile intensity measurement given an incorrectly determined center and describe how this error reduces the measured SFR of the system. As a result, using the closed-form solution, we proposemore » a two-step process by which test target centers are corrected and the measured SFR is restored to the nominal, correctly centered values.« less

  10. Sinusoidal Siemens star spatial frequency response measurement errors due to misidentified target centers

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-07-23

    Numerous methods are available to measure the spatial frequency response (SFR) of an optical system. A recent change to the ISO 12233 photography resolution standard includes a sinusoidal Siemens star test target. We take the sinusoidal Siemens star proposed by the ISO 12233 standard, measure system SFR, and perform an analysis of errors induced by incorrectly identifying the center of a test target. We show a closed-form solution for the radial profile intensity measurement given an incorrectly determined center and describe how this error reduces the measured SFR of the system. As a result, using the closed-form solution, we propose a two-step process by which test target centers are corrected and the measured SFR is restored to the nominal, correctly centered values.

  11. Sinusoidal Siemens star spatial frequency response measurement errors due to misidentified target centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Gabriel C.; Griffin, John C.

    2015-07-01

    Numerous methods are available to measure the spatial frequency response (SFR) of an optical system. A recent change to the ISO 12233 photography resolution standard includes a sinusoidal Siemens star test target. We take the sinusoidal Siemens star proposed by the ISO 12233 standard, measure system SFR, and perform an analysis of errors induced by incorrectly identifying the center of a test target. We show a closed-form solution for the radial profile intensity measurement given an incorrectly determined center and describe how this error reduces the measured SFR of the system. Using the closed-form solution, we propose a two-step process by which test target centers are corrected and the measured SFR is restored to the nominal, correctly centered values.

  12. Potential damage to DC superconducting magnets due to the high frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis that a dc superconducting magnet coil does not behave strictly as an inductor, but as a complicated electrodynamic device capable of supporting electromagnetic waves. Travel times of nanosecond pulses and evidence of sinusoidal standing waves were observed on a prototype four-layer solenoidal coil at room temperature. Ringing observed during switching transients appears as a sequence of multiple reflected square pulses whose durations are related to the layer lengths. With sinusoidal excitation of the coil, the voltage amplitude between a pair of points on the coil exhibits maxima at those frequencies such that the distance between these points is an odd multiple of half wavelength in free space. Evidence indicates that any disturbance, such as that resulting from switching or sudden fault, initiates multiple reflections between layers, thus raising the possibility for sufficiently high voltages to cause breakdown.

  13. Amplification of radiation near cyclotron frequency due to electron population inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wu, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Amplification of electromagnetic waves via the cyclotron maser mechanism by a population of weakly relativistic electrons is studied. The effect of a tenuous population of low energy background plasma is included. It is found that both the ordinary and extraordinary modes can be excited by the weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone distribution. The growth rate for the extraordinary mode is much higher than that for the ordinary mode. Velocity spread in the energetic electron distribution function may reduce the growth rate by a factor of approximately 10 from that in the monoenergetic case. The maximum growth rate for the fast extraordinary mode (X mode) occurs near the upper hybrid cutoff frequency. Numerical results are obtained and discussed.

  14. Mutations in the liver glycogen synthase gene in children with hypoglycemia due to glycogen storage disease type 0.

    PubMed Central

    Orho, M; Bosshard, N U; Buist, N R; Gitzelmann, R; Aynsley-Green, A; Blümel, P; Gannon, M C; Nuttall, F Q; Groop, L C

    1998-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 0 (GSD-0) is a rare form of fasting hypoglycemia presenting in infancy or early childhood and accompanied by high blood ketones and low alanine and lactate concentrations. Although feeding relieves symptoms, it often results in postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia. The glycogen synthase (GS) activity has been low or immeasurable in liver biopsies, whereas the liver glycogen content has been only moderately decreased. To investigate whether mutations in the liver GS gene (GYS2) on chromosome 12p12.2 were involved in GSD-0, we determined the exon-intron structure of the GYS2 gene and examined nine affected children from five families for linkage of GSD-0 to the GYS2 gene. Mutation screening of the 16 GYS2 exons was done by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing. Liver GS deficiency was diagnosed from liver biopsies (GS activity and glycogen content). GS activity in the liver of the affected children was extremely low or nil, resulting in subnormal glycogen content. After suggestive linkage to the GYS2 gene had been established (LOD score = 2.9; P < 0.01), mutation screening revealed several different mutations in these families, including a premature stop codon in exon 5 (Arg246X), a 5'-donor splice site mutation in intron 6 (G+1T--> CT), and missense mutations Asn39Ser, Ala339Pro, His446Asp, Pro479Gln, Ser483Pro, and Met491Arg. Seven of the affected children carried mutations on both alleles. The mutations could not be found in 200 healthy persons. Expression of the mutated enzymes in COS7 cells indicated severely impaired GS activity. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that GSD-0 is caused by different mutations in the GYS2 gene. PMID:9691087

  15. Thermoacoustic Contrast of Prostate Cancer due to Heating by Very High Frequency Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo thermoacoustic computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. PMID:25554968

  16. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, S K; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2015-01-21

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  17. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hull, D.; Thomas, M.; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K.; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  18. Increased frequency of extreme Indian Ocean Dipole events due to greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenju; Santoso, Agus; Wang, Guojian; Weller, Evan; Wu, Lixin; Ashok, Karumuri; Masumoto, Yukio; Yamagata, Toshio

    2014-06-12

    The Indian Ocean dipole is a prominent mode of coupled ocean-atmosphere variability, affecting the lives of millions of people in Indian Ocean rim countries. In its positive phase, sea surface temperatures are lower than normal off the Sumatra-Java coast, but higher in the western tropical Indian Ocean. During the extreme positive-IOD (pIOD) events of 1961, 1994 and 1997, the eastern cooling strengthened and extended westward along the equatorial Indian Ocean through strong reversal of both the mean westerly winds and the associated eastward-flowing upper ocean currents. This created anomalously dry conditions from the eastern to the central Indian Ocean along the Equator and atmospheric convergence farther west, leading to catastrophic floods in eastern tropical African countries but devastating droughts in eastern Indian Ocean rim countries. Despite these serious consequences, the response of pIOD events to greenhouse warming is unknown. Here, using an ensemble of climate models forced by a scenario of high greenhouse gas emissions (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), we project that the frequency of extreme pIOD events will increase by almost a factor of three, from one event every 17.3 years over the twentieth century to one event every 6.3 years over the twenty-first century. We find that a mean state change--with weakening of both equatorial westerly winds and eastward oceanic currents in association with a faster warming in the western than the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean--facilitates more frequent occurrences of wind and oceanic current reversal. This leads to more frequent extreme pIOD events, suggesting an increasing frequency of extreme climate and weather events in regions affected by the pIOD.

  19. Deletion of p66Shc in mice increases the frequency of size-change mutations in the lacZ transgene.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Elena; Ruggiero, Antonella; Busuttil, Rita; Migliaccio, Enrica; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Vijg, Jan; Giorgio, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Upon oxidative challenge the genome accumulates adducts and breaks that activate the DNA damage response to repair, arrest, or eliminate the damaged cell. Thus, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by endogenous oxygen metabolism are thought to affect mutation frequency. However, few studies determined the mutation frequency when oxidative stress is reduced. To test whether in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is altered in mice with reduced oxidative stress and cell death rate, we crossed p66Shc knockout (p66KO) mice, characterized by reduced intracellular concentration of ROS and by impaired apoptosis, with a transgenic line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from organs into Escherichia coli to measure mutation rate. Liver and small intestine from 2- to 24-month-old, lacZ (p66Shc+/+) and lacZp66KO mice, were investigated revealing no difference in overall mutation frequency but a significant increase in the frequency of size-change mutations in the intestine of lacZp66KO mice. This difference was further increased upon irradiation of mice with X-ray. In addition, we found that knocking down cyclophilin D, a gene that facilitates mitochondrial apoptosis acting downstream of p66Shc, increased the size-change mutation frequency in small intestine. Size-change mutations also accumulated in death-resistant embryonic fibroblasts from lacZp66KO mice treated with H2 O2 . These results indicate that p66Shc plays a role in the accumulation of DNA rearrangements and suggest that p66Shc functions to clear damaged cells rather than affect DNA metabolism.

  20. Beta-thalassemia mutations in Rome. A high frequency of the IVSII-745 allele in subjects of latium origin.

    PubMed

    Massa, A; Cianciulli, P; Cianetti, L; Iazzone, R; Cenci, A; Sorrentino, F; Franco, G; Pecci, G; Papa, G; Peschle, C

    1994-01-01

    We studied the molecular bases of beta-thalassemia in Rome, a city centrally located in Latium, which is a region with a low incidence of beta-carriers. People also come to Rome from other regions for specific or prenatal diagnostic assessment. Only 11 patients (20%) out of 62 characterized beta-thalassemia subjects were of Latium family origin. They presented five mutations with an uncommonly high frequency of the IVSII-745 allele, that was found in homozygosis in 4 unrelated patients from a southeastern area in the province of Frosinone. These data may indicate a founder effect.

  1. Increased frequency of DNA deletions in pink-eyed unstable mice carrying a mutation in the Werner syndrome gene homologue.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the premature onset of a number of age-related diseases, including cancers. Accumulating evidence indicates that the WS gene product is involved in resolving aberrant DNA structures that may arise during the process of DNA replication and/or transcription. To estimate the frequency of DNA deletions directly in the skin of mouse embryos, mice with a deletion of part of the murine WRN helicase domain were created. These mutant mice were then crossed to the pink-eyed unstable animals, which have a 70 kb internal duplication at the pink-eyed dilution (p) gene. This report indicates that the frequency of deletion of the duplicated sequence at the p locus is elevated in mice with a mutation in the WRN allele when compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the inhibitor of topoisomerase I camptothecin also increases the frequency of deletion at the p locus. This frequency is even more elevated in WRN mutant mice treated with camptothecin. In contrast, while the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity by 3-aminobenzamide increases the frequency of DNA deletion, mutant WRN mice are not significantly more sensitive to the inhibition of PARP activity than wild-type animals.

  2. Frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations, and MGMT methylation in primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Perry, Anamarija M; Bierman, Philip; Loberiza, Fausto; Nasr, Michel R; Szwajcer, David; Del Bigio, Marc R; Smith, Lynette M; Zhang, Weiwei; Greiner, Timothy C

    2017-08-30

    Primary CNS diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PCNS-DLBCL) and systemic DLBCL harbor mutations in MYD88 and CD79B. DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is methylated in some DLBCL. Our goal was to investigate the frequencies of these events, which have not been previously reported within the same series of patients with PCNS-DLBCL. Fifty-four cases of PCNS-DLBCL from two institutions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing for MYD88 and CD79B, and pyrosequencing for MGMT. MYD88 mutations were identified in 68.8% (35 of 51 cases), with L265P being the most frequent mutation. Mutations other than L265P were identified in 21.6% of cases, of which eight novel MYD88 mutations were identified. Of mutated cases, 17.6% had homozygous/hemizygous MYD88 mutations, which has not been previously reported in PCNS-DLBCL. CD79B mutations were found in six of 19 cases (31.6%), all in the Y196 mutation hotspot. MGMT methylation was observed in 37% (20 of 54 cases). There was no significant difference in median overall survival (OS) between the wild type and mutated MYD88 cases, or between methylated and unmethylated MGMT cases. However, a significant difference (P = 0.028) was noted in median OS between the wild type and mutated CD79B cases. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  3. Hallopeau-Siemens dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa due to homozygous 5818delC mutation in the COL7A gene.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Shigeki; Tsukamura, Atsushi; Yanagi, Takahide; Nakahara, Sayuri; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Nakano, Hajime; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited mechanobullous skin disease. The dystrophic EB (DEB), one subtype of EB, is inherited in an autosomal dominant DEB or in an autosomal recessive (RDEB). DEB is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Over 300 pathogenic mutations have been detected within COL7A in DEB. Patients with the Hallopeau-Siemens type (HS-RDEB), most severe form of DEB, frequently have premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. PTC mutations on both alleles result in depleted mRNA and α1 helix, and failure to form the triple helix structure characteristic of type VII collagen. As patients with HS-RDEB usually have a pair of heterozygous PTC mutations, there have been rarely reported homozygous ones in HS-RDEB. We report the first case of HS-RDEB homozygous PTC mutations of 5818delC in both COL7A1 alleles. This case report suggests the positional effect of PTC mutations and vigilance against early infantile death in EB including HS-RDEB.

  4. Large proportion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases in Sardinia are due to a single founder mutation of the TARDBP gene

    PubMed Central

    Chiò, Adriano; Borghero, Giuseppe; Pugliatti, Maura; Ticca, Anna; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Mutani, Roberto; Brunetti, Maura; Ossola, Irene; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Floris, Gianluca; Cannas, Antonino; Parish, Leslie D.; Cossu, Paola; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Johnson, Janel O.; Nalls, Michael A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Restagno, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform an extensive screening for mutations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)–related genes in a consecutive cohort of Sardinian patients, a genetic isolate phylogenically distinct from other European populations. Design Population-based, prospective cohort study. Patients A total of 135 Sardinian patients with ALS and 156 healthy control subjects of Sardinian origin who were age- and sex-matched to patients. Intervention Patients underwent mutational analysis for SOD1, FUS, and TARDBP. Results Mutational screening of the entire cohort found that 39 patients (28.7%) carried the c.1144G A (p.A382T) missense mutation of the TARDBP gene. Of these, 15 had familial ALS (belonging to 10 distinct pedigrees) and 24 had apparently sporadic ALS. None of the 156 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls carried the pathogenic variant. Genotype data obtained for 5 ALS cases carrying the p.A382T mutation found that they shared a 94–single-nucleotide polymorphism risk haplotype that spanned 663 Kb across the TARDBP locus on chromosome 1p36.22. Three patients with ALS who carry the p.A382T mutation developed extrapyramidal symptoms several years after their initial presentation with motor weakness. Conclusions The TARDBP p.A382T missense mutation accounts for approximately one-third of all ALS cases in this island population. These patients share a large risk haplotype across the TARDBP locus, indicating that they have a common ancestor. PMID:21220647

  5. Evidence that in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, which lack DNA polymerase eta, DNA polymerase iota causes the very high frequency and unique spectrum of UV-induced mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Woodgate, Roger; McManus, Terrence P; Mead, Samantha; McCormick, J Justin; Maher, Veronica M

    2007-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients have normal DNA excision repair, yet are predisposed to develop sunlight-induced cancer. They exhibit a 25-fold higher than normal frequency of UV-induced mutations and very unusual kinds (spectrum), mainly transversions. The primary defect in XPV cells is the lack of functional DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase that readily inserts adenine nucleotides opposite photoproducts involving thymine. The high frequency and striking difference in kinds of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells strongly suggest that, in the absence of Pol eta, an abnormally error-prone polymerase substitutes. In vitro replication studies of Pol iota show that it replicates past 5'T-T3' and 5'T-U3' cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, incorporating G or T nucleotides opposite the 3' nucleotide. To test the hypothesis that Pol iota causes the high frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells, we identified an unlimited lifespan XPV cell line expressing two forms of Pol iota, whose frequency of UV-induced mutations is twice that of XPV cells expressing one form. We eliminated expression of one form and compared the parental cells and derivatives for the frequency and kinds of UV-induced mutations. All exhibited similar sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of UV((254 nm)), and the kinds of mutations induced were identical, but the frequency of mutations induced in the derivatives was reduced to frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations, and ultimately their malignant transformation.

  6. Spectrum and frequency of GJB2, GJB6 and SLC26A4 gene mutations among nonsyndromic hearing loss patients in eastern part of India.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Bidisha; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Paul, Silpita; Bankura, Biswabandhu; Pattanayak, Arup Kumar; Biswas, Subhradev; Maity, Biswanath; Das, Madhusudan

    2015-12-01

    Genetically caused nonsyndromic hearing loss is highly heterogeneous. Inspite of this large heterogeneity, mutations in the genes GJB2, GJB6 and SLC26A4 are major contributors. The mutation spectrum of these genes varies among different ethnic groups. Only a handful of studies focused on the altered genetic signature of these genes in different demographic regions of India but never focused on the eastern part of the country. Our study for the first time aimed to characterize the mutation profile of these genes in hearing loss patients of West Bengal state, India. Mutations in GJB2, GJB6 and SLC26A4 genes were screened by bidirectional sequencing from 215 congenital nonsyndromic hearing loss patients. Radiological diagnosis was performed in patients with SLC26A4 mutations by temporal bone CT scan. The study revealed that 4.65% and 6.97% patients had monoallelic and biallelic GJB2 mutations respectively. Six mutations were identified, p.W24X being the most frequent one accounting for 71.05% of the mutated alleles. Mutations in GJB6 including the previously identified deletion mutation (GJB6-D13S1830) were not identified in our study. Further, no patients harbored biallelic mutations in the SLC26A4 gene or the common inner ear malformation Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA). The mutation profile of GJB2 in our study is distinct from other parts of India, suggesting that the mutation spectrum of this gene varies with ethnicity and geographical origin. The absence of GJB6 mutations and low frequency of SLC26A4 mutations suggest that additional genetic factors may also contribute to this disease.

  7. Development of primary early-onset colorectal cancers due to biallelic mutations of the FANCD1/BRCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Degrolard-Courcet, Emilie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Padeano, Marie-Martine; Guiu, Séverine; Bronner, Myriam; Chery, Carole; Coron, Fanny; Lepage, Côme; Chapusot, Caroline; Loustalot, Catherine; Jouve, Jean-Louis; Hatem, Cyril; Ferrant, Emmanuelle; Martin, Laurent; Coutant, Charles; Baurand, Amandine; Couillault, Gérard; Delignette, Alexandra; El Chehadeh, Salima; Lizard, Sarab; Arnould, Laurent; Fumoleau, Pierre; Callier, Patrick; Mugneret, Francine; Philippe, Christophe; Frebourg, Thierry; Jonveaux, Philippe; Faivre, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and predisposition to malignancy. In a minority of cases, FA results from biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations that are associated with early-onset leukaemia and solid tumours. Here, we describe the clinical and molecular features of a remarkable family presenting with multiple primary colorectal cancers (CRCs) without detectable mutations in genes involved in the Mendelian predisposition to CRCs. We unexpectedly identified, despite the absence of clinical cardinal features of FA, a biallelic mutation of the FANCD1/BRCA2 corresponding to a frameshift alteration (c.1845_1846delCT, p.Asn615Lysfs*6) and a missense mutation (c.7802A>G, p.Tyr2601Cys). The diagnosis of FA was confirmed by the chromosomal analysis of lymphocytes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that the c.7802A>G BRCA2 variation was in fact a splicing mutation that creates an aberrant splicing donor site and results partly into an aberrant transcript encoding a truncated protein (p.Tyr2601Trpfs*46). The atypical FA phenotype observed within this family was probably explained by the residual amount of BRCA2 with the point mutation c.7802A>G in the patients harbouring the biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations. Although this report is based in a single family, it suggests that CRCs may be part of the tumour spectrum associated with FANCD1/BRCA2 biallelic mutations and that the presence of such mutations should be considered in families with CRCs, even in the absence of cardinal features of FA.

  8. Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT4A) due to GDAP1 mutation: report of a Colombian family.

    PubMed

    Martin, Angela M; Maradei, Silvia J; Velasco, Harvy M

    2015-12-30

    Mutations of GDAP1 gene cause autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and more than 40 different mutations have been reported. The recessive Q163X mutation has been described in patients of Spanish ancestry, and a founder mutation in South American patients, originating in Spain has been demonstrated. We describe physical and histological features, and the molecular impact of mutation Q163X in a Colombian family. We report two female patients, daughters of consanguineous parents, with onset of symptoms within the first two years of life, developing severe functional impairment, without evidence of dysmorphic features, hoarseness or diaphragmatic paralysis. Electrophysiology tests showed a sensory and motor neuropathy with axonal pattern. Sequencing of GDAP1 gene was requested and the study identified a homozygous point mutation (c.487 C>T) in exon 4, resulting in a premature stop codon (p.Q163X). This result confirms the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4A. The patients were referred to Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation service, in order to be evaluated for ambulation assistance. They have been followed by Pulmonology service, for pulmonary function assessment and diaphragmatic paralysis evaluation. Genetic counseling was offered. The study of the genealogy of the patient, phenotypic features, and electrophysiological findings must be included as valuable tools in the clinical approach of the patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, in order to define a causative mutation. In patients of South American origin, the presence of GDAP1 gene mutations should be considered, especially the Q163X mutation, as the cause of CMT4A disease.

  9. The Frequency and Significance of Silent Myocardial Ischemia Due to Hyoscine Butylbromide Use in Peripheral Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Richard; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Banning, Adrian; Boardman, Philip

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: Hyoscine-N-butylbromide (HB) is an anticholinergic drug used in digital subtraction angiography of the aortoiliac region because it decreases bowel gas movement artifact. HB also causes an increase in heart rate. We investigated whether this could cause silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) in susceptible patients during peripheral angiography. Methods: Thirty-six patients undergoing peripheral angiography were randomized into two groups, with 17 patients receiving 20 mg HB intraarterially during the angiogram and 19 patients receiving no drug. All patients were fitted with a Holter monitor that recorded the electrocardiogram before, during, and after the angiogram. Heart rate trends and ST segments were then analyzed. Results: Patients given HB had a statistically significant rise in heart rate compared with the control group. Although the difference was not statistically significant, two (12%) patients receiving HB had procedural ST depression compared with none in the control group. Pre- and postprocedural episodes of ST depression were common, occurring in 41% of patients receiving HB and 37% of patients receiving no drug, and were associated with an increase in heart rate. Conclusion: The infrequent episodes of procedural SMI, potentially caused by the positive chronotropic effects of HB, are probably insignificant when compared with the high frequency of SMI episodes occurring outside the procedure.

  10. Low-Frequency Underwater Sound Speed Variations Due to Oceanic Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming-Yang; Cartmill, John

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a measurement system called the Acoustical Resonator, which can determine in-situ size spectra of bubbles with radii ranging from about 30 to 1200 microns. This acoustical bubble system had been calibrated against two other optical bubble sensors in laboratory-controlled situations and subsequently deployed in blue-water field experiments in the past three years. Using the well-known Wood's formula for bubbly flows, the bubble spectra measured by the above system can be used for deriving the corresponding low-frequency sound speed. It was found that the sound speed deficits from such combined measured-and-computed methods have reached more than 100 m/sec in the upper 1 to 2 m depth with the prevailing wind from 10 to 15 m/sec. In this paper, we shall present some of the results from a deep-water field experiment conducted in the Gulf of Alaska during Critical Sea Test (CST) 7.

  11. Transient temperature rise in a mouse due to low-frequency regional hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2006-04-01

    A refined nonlinear heat transfer model of a mouse has been developed to simulate the transient temperature rise in a neoplastic tumour and neighbouring tissue during regional hyperthermia using a 150 kHz inductive coil. In this study, we incorporate various bio-energetic enhancements to the heat transfer equation and numerical validations based on experimental findings for the mouse, in terms of nonlinear metabolic heat production, homeothermy, blood perfusion parameters, thermoregulation, psychological and physiological effects. The discretized bio-heat transfer equation has been validated with the commercial software FEMLAB on a canonical multi